WorldWideScience

Sample records for allometry

  1. Are allometry and macroevolution related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bruce J.; West, Damien

    2011-05-01

    The allometric relationship between the basal metabolic rate B and total body mass M is B = aM, where the allometry coefficient a and the allometry exponent b have been fit to various data sets for over 150 years. The best fit of the allometry exponent to 391 mammalian species is given by Heusner [7] to be midway between the leading theoretical values of 2/3 and 3/4. Most theoretical investigations have focused on determining the proper value of b entailed by an appropriate biological model and with some notable exceptions ignored the allometry coefficient a altogether. Herein, we shift the focus and use the above data to settle on an empirical value of b that gives rise to an allometry coefficient with random variability described by a Pareto distribution. This new perspective suggests an interesting biological interpretation of the statistical fluctuations of the allometry coefficient. The time distribution of the intermittent fluctuations in a are determined to be of the same statistical form as those of speciation found in the punctuated equilibrium theory of macroevolution (Eldredge and Gould [3], Sneppen et al. [5] and Rikvold and Zia [17]).

  2. Entropic origin of allometry relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bruce J.; West, Damien

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical allometry relation (AR) between the size of a network Y and a property of the network X is of the form X = aYb and has been known for nearly two centuries. The allometry coefficient a and allometry exponent b have been fit by various data sets over that time. The ubiquity of ARs in biology, sociology, ecology and indeed in virtually all the other science disciplines entreats science to find the origin of ARs. Data analysis indicates that the empirical AR is obtained with the replacements X → and Y → and the brackets denote an average over an ensemble of realizations of the network. It has been shown that the empirical AR cannot usually be derived from the theoretical one by simple averaging due to the fractal statistics of the fluctuations. Consequently we hypothesize that a possible origin of AR is the Principle of Minimum Entropy Generation (PMEG). We establish in support of this hypothesis that if the fluctuations in the allometry variables have fractal statistics then the PMEG entails the AR between a complex host network and a subnetwork strongly coupled to it.

  3. BOREAS TE-6 Allometry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Gower, Stith T.; Vogel, Jason G.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-6 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the plant biomass, allometry, biometry, sapwood, leaf area index, net primary production, soil temperature, leaf water potential, soil CO2 flux, and multivegetation imagery of boreal vegetation. This data set includes tree measurements conducted on the above-ground biomass of trees in the BOREAS NSA and SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1995 and the derived allometric relationships/equations. The data are stored in ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  4. The allometry of prey preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Kalinkat

    Full Text Available The distribution of weak and strong non-linear feeding interactions (i.e., functional responses across the links of complex food webs is critically important for their stability. While empirical advances have unravelled constraints on single-prey functional responses, their validity in the context of complex food webs where most predators have multiple prey remain uncertain. In this study, we present conceptual evidence for the invalidity of strictly density-dependent consumption as the null model in multi-prey experiments. Instead, we employ two-prey functional responses parameterised with allometric scaling relationships of the functional response parameters that were derived from a previous single-prey functional response study as novel null models. Our experiments included predators of different sizes from two taxonomical groups (wolf spiders and ground beetles simultaneously preying on one small and one large prey species. We define compliance with the null model predictions (based on two independent single-prey functional responses as passive preferences or passive switching, and deviations from the null model as active preferences or active switching. Our results indicate active and passive preferences for the larger prey by predators that are at least twice the size of the larger prey. Moreover, our approach revealed that active preferences increased significantly with the predator-prey body-mass ratio. Together with prior allometric scaling relationships of functional response parameters, this preference allometry may allow estimating the distribution of functional response parameters across the myriads of interactions in natural ecosystems.

  5. Allometry in damselfly ornamental and genital traits: solving some pitfalls of allometry and sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Aguilar, A; López-Valenzuela, A; Brunel, O

    2010-12-01

    Static allometry of sexually selected traits has been the subject of intense research recently. However, some pitfalls for this kind of research are: (a) the functions of sexual traits are largely unknown; (b) more than one body size indicator must be measured; and, (c) allometry must be examined under different environmental circumstances to see whether allometric values change. Using Hetaerina americana damselflies, we investigated the type of allometry exhibited by a wing red spot and aedeagal width. These traits are positively selected during pre-copulatory male-male contests and post-copulatory female stimulation, respectively. As body size indicators, we used wing length and head width. It has been documented that expression of both sexual traits varies throughout the year. Thus, allometry was examined in different times of the year. We also investigated the allometry of aedeagal width and vaginal width at the zone where female stimulation takes place. We found no clear pattern of any allometric relationship for male and female traits and for both body size indicators at all times sampled. Our results contrast with patterns of negative allometry exhibited by genital traits in other animals. PMID:20938802

  6. Natural Selection and Developmental Constraints in the Evolution of Allometries

    OpenAIRE

    Frankino, W. Anthony; Zwaan, Bas J.; Stern, David L.; Brakefield, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    In animals, scaling relationships between appendages and body size exhibit high interspecific variation but low intraspecific variation. This pattern could result from natural selection for specific allometries or from developmental constraints on patterns of differential growth. We performed artificial selection on the allometry between forewing area and body size in a butterfly to test for developmental constraints, and then used the resultant increased range of phenotypic variation to quan...

  7. Three-dimensional geometric analysis of felid limb bone allometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Doube

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies of bone allometry typically use simple measurements taken in a small number of locations per bone; often the midshaft diameter or joint surface area is compared to body mass or bone length. However, bones must fulfil multiple roles simultaneously with minimum cost to the animal while meeting the structural requirements imposed by behaviour and locomotion, and not exceeding its capacity for adaptation and repair. We use entire bone volumes from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of Felidae (cats to investigate regional complexities in bone allometry. METHOD/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Computed tomographic (CT images (16435 slices in 116 stacks were made of 9 limb bones from each of 13 individuals of 9 feline species ranging in size from domestic cat (Felis catus to tiger (Panthera tigris. Eleven geometric parameters were calculated for every CT slice and scaling exponents calculated at 5% increments along the entire length of each bone. Three-dimensional moments of inertia were calculated for each bone volume, and spherical radii were measured in the glenoid cavity, humeral head and femoral head. Allometry of the midshaft, moments of inertia and joint radii were determined. Allometry was highly variable and related to local bone function, with joint surfaces and muscle attachment sites generally showing stronger positive allometry than the midshaft. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Examining whole bones revealed that bone allometry is strongly affected by regional variations in bone function, presumably through mechanical effects on bone modelling. Bone's phenotypic plasticity may be an advantage during rapid evolutionary divergence by allowing exploitation of the full size range that a morphotype can occupy. Felids show bone allometry rather than postural change across their size range, unlike similar-sized animals.

  8. Ecological allometries and niche use dynamics across Komodo dragon ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwandana, Deni; Ariefiandy, Achmad; Imansyah, M. Jeri; Seno, Aganto; Ciofi, Claudio; Letnic, Mike; Jessop, Tim S.

    2016-04-01

    Ontogenetic allometries in ecological habits and niche use are key responses by which individuals maximize lifetime fitness. Moreover, such allometries have significant implications for how individuals influence population and community dynamics. Here, we examined how body size variation in Komodo dragons ( Varanus komodoensis) influenced ecological allometries in their: (1) prey size preference, (2) daily movement rates, (3) home range area, and (4) subsequent niche use across ontogeny. With increased body mass, Komodo dragons increased prey size with a dramatic switch from small (≤10 kg) to large prey (≥50 kg) in lizards heavier than 20 kg. Rates of foraging movement were described by a non-linear concave down response with lizard increasing hourly movement rates up until ˜20 kg body mass before decreasing daily movement suggesting reduced foraging effort in larger lizards. In contrast, home range area exhibited a sigmoid response with increased body mass. Intrapopulation ecological niche use and overlap were also strongly structured by body size. Thus, ontogenetic allometries suggest Komodo dragon's transition from a highly active foraging mode exploiting small prey through to a less active sit and wait feeding strategy focused on killing large ungulates. Further, our results suggest that as body size increases across ontogeny, the Komodo dragon exhibited marked ontogenetic niche shifts that enabled it to function as an entire vertebrate predator guild by exploiting prey across multiple trophic levels.

  9. Height-diameter allometry of tropical forest trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldpausch, T.R.; Banin, L.; Phillips, O.L.; Baker, T.R.; Lewis, S.L.; Quesada, C.A.; Affum-Baffoe, K.; Arets, E.J.M.M.; Berry, N.J.; Bird, M.; Brondizio, E.S.; Camargo, de P.; Chave, J.; Djagbletey, G.; Domingues, T.F.; Drescher, M.; Fearnside, P.M.; Franca, M.B.; Fyllas, N.M.; Lopez-Gonzalez, G.; Hladik, A.; Higuchi, N.; Hunter, M.O.; Iida, Y.; Salim, K.A.; Kassim, A.R.; Keller, M.; Kemp, J.; King, D.A.; Lovett, J.C.; Marimon, B.S.; Marimon-Junior, B.H.; Lenza, E.; Marshall, A.R.; Metcalfe, D.J.; Mitchard, E.T.A.; Moran, E.F.; Nelson, B.W.; Nilus, R.; Nogueira, E.M.; Palace, M.; Patino, S.; Peh, K.S.H.; Raventos, M.T.; Reitsma, J.M.; Saiz, G.; Schrodt, F.; Sonké, B.; Taedoumg, H.E.; Tan, S.; White, L.; Wöll, H.; Lloyd, J.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical tree height-diameter (H:D) relationships may vary by forest type and region making large-scale estimates of above-ground biomass subject to bias if they ignore these differences in stem allometry. We have therefore developed a new global tropical forest database consisting of 39 955 concurr

  10. Height-diameter allometry of tropical forest trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldpausch, T.R.; Banin, L.; Phillips, O.L.; Baker, T.R.; Lewis, S.L.; Quesada, C.A.; Affum-Baffoe, K.; Arets, E.J.M.M.; Berry, N.J.; Bird, M.; Brondizio, E.S.; Camargo, de P.; Chave, J.; Djagbletey, G.; Domingues, T.F.; Drescher, M.; Fearnside, P.M.; Franca, M.B.; Fyllas, N.M.; Lopez-Gonzalez, G.; Hladik, A.; Higuchi, N.; Hunter, M.O.; Iida, Y.; Salim, K.A.; Kassim, A.R.; Keller, M.; Kemp, J.; King, D.A.; Lovett, J.C.; Marimon, B.S.; Marimon-Junior, B.H.; Lenza, E.; Marshall, A.R.; Metcalfe, D.J.; Mitchard, E.T.A.; Moran, E.F.; Nelson, B.W.; Nilus, R.; Nogueira, E.M.; Palace, M.; Patino, S.; Peh, K.S.H.; Raventos, M.T.; Reitsma, J.M.; Saiz, G.; Schrodt, F.; Sonké, B.; Taedoumg, H.E.; Tan, S.; White, L.; Wöll, H.; Lloyd, J.

    2010-01-01

    Tropical tree height-diameter (H:D) relationships may vary by forest type and region making large-scale estimates of above-ground biomass subject to bias if they ignore these differences in stem allometry. We have therefore developed a new global tropical forest database consisting of 39 955 concurr

  11. Relating urban scaling, fundamental allometry, and density scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Rybski, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the connection between urban scaling, fundamental allometry (between city population and city area), and per capita vs.\\ population density scaling. From simple analytical derivations we obtain the relation between the 3 involved exponents. We discuss particular cases and ranges of the exponents which we illustrate in a "phase diagram". As we show, the results are consistent with previous work.

  12. Aruscular mycorhizal fungi alter plant allometry and biomass - density relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Lu; Weiner, Jacob;

    2011-01-01

    fungi (AMF) can promote plant growth and affect plant form. Here experiments were carried out to test whether AMF affect plant allometry and the self-thinning trajectory. Methods Two experiments were conducted on Medicago sativa L., a leguminous species known to be highly dependent on mycorrhiza. Two...

  13. Competition and allometry in annual halophytes plants: an experience from Crimea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Zhaldak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Competitive interactions were established in populations of Salicornia perennans, Suaeda acuminata, Halimione pedunculata, Petrosimonia oppositifolia. The competition changed allometry of plants.

  14. Allometry of Sexual Size Dimorphism in Domestic Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Frynta, Daniel; Baudyšová, Jana; Hradcová, Petra; Faltusová, Kateřina; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2012-01-01

    Background The tendency for male-larger sexual size dimorphism (SSD) to scale with body size – a pattern termed Rensch's rule – has been empirically supported in many animal lineages. Nevertheless, its theoretical elucidation is a subject of debate. Here, we exploited the extreme morphological variability of domestic dog (Canis familiaris) to gain insights into evolutionary causes of this rule. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied SSD and its allometry among 74 breeds ranging in height f...

  15. Evolution of brain-body allometry in Lake Tanganyika cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Kotrschal, Alexander; Hayward, Alexander; Buechel, Severine Denise; Zidar, Josefina; Løvlie, Hanne; Kolm, Niclas

    2016-07-01

    Brain size is strongly associated with body size in all vertebrates. This relationship has been hypothesized to be an important constraint on adaptive brain size evolution. The essential assumption behind this idea is that static (i.e., within species) brain-body allometry has low ability to evolve. However, recent studies have reported mixed support for this view. Here, we examine brain-body static allometry in Lake Tanganyika cichlids using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We found considerable variation in the static allometric intercept, which explained the majority of variation in absolute and relative brain size. In contrast, the slope of the brain-body static allometry had relatively low variation, which explained less variation in absolute and relative brain size compared to the intercept and body size. Further examination of the tempo and mode of evolution of static allometric parameters confirmed these observations. Moreover, the estimated evolutionary parameters indicate that the limited observed variation in the static allometric slope could be a result of strong stabilizing selection. Overall, our findings suggest that the brain-body static allometric slope may represent an evolutionary constraint in Lake Tanganyika cichlids. PMID:27241216

  16. The allometry of number of feathers in birds changes seasonally

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anders Pape Møller

    2015-01-01

    Background:Feathers are a defining feature of birds with multiple functions such as flight, insulation, protection against predation and signaling. Feathers are lost during the annual molt while the rate of such loss at other times of the year and its fitness consequences remain poorly known. Methods:I used information on the number and the mass of feathers for 160 individuals belonging to 85 species of birds in general linear mixed models to analyze allometry of feathers and to investigate possible factors explaining variation in the number of feathers. A phylogenetic effect was assessed by quantifying the random effect of genus. Results:The total mass of feathers increased isometrically with body mass, while the total number of feathers and the mean mass of feathers showed negative allometry. Negative allometry implied that small-sized species had relatively many small feathers. There was a negative association between the number of feathers and migration distance. The total number of feathers initially increased during fall and winter, consistent with individuals growing more feathers later during the year or with individuals with fewer feathers selectively disappearing from the population. In contrast, the number of feathers decreased from winter through spring and summer. Conclusions:These findings suggest that thermoregulation has affected the evolution of the number and the size of feathers, there is selection against feather loss, and that the number of feathers varies across seasons.

  17. The allometry of number of feathers in birds changes seasonally

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anders; Pape; Mller

    2015-01-01

    Background: Feathers are a defining feature of birds with multiple functions such as flight, insulation, protection against predation and signaling. Feathers are lost during the annual molt while the rate of such loss at other times of the year and its fitness consequences remain poorly known.Methods: I used information on the number and the mass of feathers for 160 individuals belonging to 85 species of birds in general linear mixed models to analyze allometry of feathers and to investigate possible factors explaining variation in the number of feathers. A phylogenetic effect was assessed by quantifying the random effect of genus.Results: The total mass of feathers increased isometrically with body mass, while the total number of feathers and the mean mass of feathers showed negative allometry. Negative allometry implied that small-sized species had relatively many small feathers. There was a negative association between the number of feathers and migration distance. The total number of feathers initially increased during fall and winter, consistent with individuals growing more feathers later during the year or with individuals with fewer feathers selectively disappearing from the population. In contrast, the number of feathers decreased from winter through spring and summer.Conclusions: These findings suggest that thermoregulation has affected the evolution of the number and the size of feathers, there is selection against feather loss, and that the number of feathers varies across seasons.

  18. Primate facial allometry and interpretations of australopithecine variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corruccini, R S; Ciochon, R L

    1979-09-01

    Pilbeam and Gould have discussed African Plio-Pleistocene hominid evolution in the context of allometry (size-dependent morphological change). These authors demonstrate that some general aspects of australopithecine morphology (tooth, brain and body size) support the hypothesis that certain early African hominids were merely scaled variations of each other at different sizes. They also speculate that the methods applied to these very broad anatomical categories can be extended to more specific and detailed traits, especially in the face and cranium. Such traits underlie most taxonomic and phylogenetic discussions of the early African Hominidae, so it is useful to follow Pilbeam and Gould's lead, as we do here, and investigate the structural differences in the australopithecine face and cranimum in a quantificiable fashion. PMID:121762

  19. Temperature-mediated transitions between isometry and allometry in a colonial, modular invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Peter J

    2006-09-22

    The evolutionary success of animal design is strongly affected by scaling and virtually all metazoans are constrained by allometry. One body plan that appears to relax these constraints is a colonial modular (CM) design, in which modular iteration is hypothesized to support isometry and indeterminate colony size. In this study, growth rates of juvenile scleractinians (less than 40mm diameter) with a CM design were used to test this assertion using colony diameters recorded annually for a decade and scaling exponents (b) for growth calculated from double logarithmic plots of final versus initial diameters. For all juvenile corals, b differed significantly among years, with isometry (b=1) in 4 years, but positive allometry (b>1) in 5 years. The study years were characterized by differences in seawater temperature that were associated significantly with b for growth, with isometry in warm years but positive allometry in cool years. These results illustrate variable growth scaling in a CM taxon and suggest that the switch between scaling modes is mediated by temperature. For the corals studied, growth was not constrained by size, but this outcome was achieved through both isometry and positive allometry. Under cooler conditions, positive allometry may be beneficial as it represents a growth advantage that increases with size. PMID:16928628

  20. Male mate choice scales female ornament allometry in a cichlid fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kullmann Harald

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies addressing the adaptive significance of female ornamentation have gained ground recently. However, the expression of female ornaments in relation to body size, known as trait allometry, still remains unexplored. Here, we investigated the allometry of a conspicuous female ornament in Pelvicachromis taeniatus, a biparental cichlid that shows mutual mate choice and ornamentation. Females feature an eye-catching pelvic fin greatly differing from that of males. Results We show that allometry of the female pelvic fin is scaled more positively in comparison to other fins. The pelvic fin exhibits isometry, whereas the other fins (except the caudal fin show negative allometry. The size of the pelvic fin might be exaggerated by male choice because males prefer female stimuli that show a larger extension of the trait. Female pelvic fin size is correlated with individual condition, suggesting that males can assess direct and indirect benefits. Conclusions The absence of positive ornament allometry might be a result of sexual selection constricted by natural selection: fins are related to locomotion and thus may be subject to viability selection. Our study provides evidence that male mate choice might scale the expression of a female sexual ornament, and therefore has implications for the understanding of the relationship of female sexual traits with body size in species with conventional sex-roles.

  1. Height-diameter allometry of tropical forest trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Feldpausch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tropical tree height-diameter (H:D relationships may vary by forest type and region making large-scale estimates of above-ground biomass subject to bias if they ignore these differences in stem allometry. We have therefore developed a new global tropical forest database consisting of 39 955 concurrent H and D measurements encompassing 283 sites in 22 tropical countries. Utilising this database, our objectives were:

    1. to determine if H:D relationships differ by geographic region and forest type (wet to dry forests, including zones of tension where forest and savanna overlap.

    2. to ascertain if the H:D relationship is modulated by climate and/or forest structural characteristics (e.g. stand-level basal area, A.

    3. to develop H:D allometric equations and evaluate biases to reduce error in future local-to-global estimates of tropical forest biomass.

    Annual precipitation coefficient of variation (PV, dry season length (SD, and mean annual air temperature (TA emerged as key drivers of variation in H:D relationships at the pantropical and region scales. Vegetation structure also played a role with trees in forests of a high A being, on average, taller at any given D. After the effects of environment and forest structure are taken into account, two main regional groups can be identified. Forests in Asia, Africa and the Guyana Shield all have, on average, similar H:D relationships, but with trees in the forests of much of the Amazon Basin and tropical Australia typically being shorter at any given D than their counterparts elsewhere. The region-environment-structure model with the lowest Akaike's information criterion and lowest deviation estimated stand-level H across all plots to within amedian −2.7 to 0.9% of the true value. Some of the plot-to-plot variability in

  2. Height-diameter allometry of tropical forest trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Feldpausch

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical tree height-diameter (H:D relationships may vary by forest type and region making large-scale estimates of above-ground biomass subject to bias if they ignore these differences in stem allometry. We have therefore developed a new global tropical forest database consisting of 39 955 concurrent H and D measurements encompassing 283 sites in 22 tropical countries. Utilising this database, our objectives were:

      1. to determine if H:D relationships differ by geographic region and forest type (wet to dry forests, including zones of tension where forest and savanna overlap.

      2. to ascertain if the H:D relationship is modulated by climate and/or forest structural characteristics (e.g. stand-level basal area, A.

      3. to develop H:D allometric equations and evaluate biases to reduce error in future local-to-global estimates of tropical forest biomass.

    Annual precipitation coefficient of variation (PV, dry season length (SD, and mean annual air temperature (TA emerged as key drivers of variation in H:D relationships at the pantropical and region scales. Vegetation structure also played a role with trees in forests of a high A being, on average, taller at any given D. After the effects of environment and forest structure are taken into account, two main regional groups can be identified. Forests in Asia, Africa and the Guyana Shield all have, on average, similar H:D relationships, but with trees in the forests of much of the Amazon Basin and tropical Australia typically being shorter at any given D than their counterparts elsewhere.

    The region-environment-structure model with the lowest Akaike's information criterion and lowest deviation estimated stand-level H across all plots to within a median –2.7 to 0.9% of the true value. Some of the plot

  3. BAAD: a Biomass And Allometry Database for woody plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falster, Daniel; Duursma, Remko; Ishihara, Masae; Barneche, Diego; Fitzjohn, Richard; Varhammar, Angelica; Aiba, Masahiro; Ando, M.; Anten, Niels; Aspinwall, Michael J.; Baltzer, Jennifer; Baraloto, Christopher; Battaglia, Michael; Battles, John; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; van Breugel, Michiel; Camac, James; Claveau, Yves; Coll Mir, Llus; Dannoura, Dannoura; Delagrange, Sylvain; Domec, Jean-Cristophe; Fatemi, Farrah; Feng, Wang; Gargaglione, Veronica; Goto, Yoshiaki; Hagihara, Akio; Hall, Jefferson S.; Hamilton, Steve; Harja, Degi; Hiura, Tsutom; Holdaway, Robert; Hutley, L. B.; Ichie, Tomoaki; Jokela, Eric; Kantola, Anu; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Kenzo, Tanaka; King, David A.; Kloeppel, Brian; Kohyama, Takashi; Komiyama, Akira; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Lusk, Christopher; Maguire, Doug; le Maire, Guerric; Makela, Annikki; Markesteijn, Lars; Marshall, John; McCulloh, Kate; Miyata, Itsuo; Mokany, Karen; Mori, Shigeta; Myster, Randall; Nagano, Masahiro; Naidu, Shawna; Nouvellon, Yann; O' Grady, Anthony; O' Hara, Kevin; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Osada, Noriyuki; Osunkoya, Olusegun O.; Luis Peri, Pablo; Petritan, Mary; Poorter, Lourens; Portsmuth, Angelika; Potvin, Catherine; Ransijn, Johannes; Reid, Douglas; Ribeiro, Sabina C.; Roberts, Scott; Rodriguez, Rolando; Saldana-Acosta, Angela; Santa-Regina, Ignacio; Sasa, Kaichiro; Gailia Selaya, Nadezhda; Sillett, Stephen; Sterck, Frank; Takagi, Kentaro; Tange, Takeshi; Tanouchi, Hiroyuki; Tissue, David; Umehara, Tohru; Utsugi, Hajime; Vadeboncoeur, Matthew; Valladares, Fernando; Vanninen, Petteri; Wang, Jian; Wenk, Elizabeth; Williams, Dick; Ximenes, Fabiano de Aquino; Yamaba, Atsushi; Yamada, Toshihiro; Yamakura, Takuo; Yanai, Ruth; York, Robert

    2015-05-07

    Quantifying the amount of mass or energy invested in plant tissues is of fundamental interest across a range of disciplines, including ecology, forestry, ecosystem science, and climate change science (Niklas, 1994; Chave et al. 2005; Falster et al. 2011). The allocation of net primary production into different plant components is an important process affecting the lifetime of carbon in ecosystems, and resource use and productivity by plants (Cannell & Dewar, 1994; Litton et al. 2007; Poorter et al. 2012). While many studies in have destructively harvested woody plants in the name of science, most of these data have only been made available in the form of summary tables or figures included in publications. Until now, the raw data has resided piecemeal on the hard drives of individual scientists spread around the world. Several studies have gathered together the fitted (allometric) equations for separate datasets (Ter-Mikaelian & Korzukhin, 1997; Jenkins et al. 2003; Zianis et al. 2005; Henry et al. 2013), but none have previously attempted to organize and share the raw individual plant data underpinning these equations on a large scale. Gathered together, such data would represent an important resource for the community, meeting a widely recognised need for rich, open data resources to solve ecological problems (Costello et al. 2013; Fady et al. 2014; Harfoot & Roberts, 2014; Costello et al. 2013). We (D.S. Falster and R.A. Duursma, with the help of D.R. Barneche, R.G. FitzJohn and A. Vårhammar) set out to create such a resource, by asking authors directly whether they would be willing to make their raw data files freely available. The response was overwhelming: nearly everyone we contacted was interested to contribute their raw data. Moreover, we were invited to incorporate another compilation led by M. Ishihara and focussing on Japanese literature. As a result, we present BAAD: a Biomass And Allometry Database for woody plants, comprising data collected in 174

  4. Allometry of the duration of flight feather molt in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sievert Rohwer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We used allometric scaling to explain why the regular replacement of the primary flight feathers requires disproportionately more time for large birds. Primary growth rate scales to mass (M as M(0.171, whereas the summed length of the primaries scales almost twice as fast (M(0.316. The ratio of length (mm to rate (mm/day, which would be the time needed to replace all the primaries one by one, increases as the 0.14 power of mass (M(0.316/M(0.171 = M(0.145, illustrating why the time required to replace the primaries is so important to life history evolution in large birds. Smaller birds generally replace all their flight feathers annually, but larger birds that fly while renewing their primaries often extend the primary molt over two or more years. Most flying birds exhibit one of three fundamentally different modes of primary replacement, and the size distributions of birds associated with these replacement modes suggest that birds that replace their primaries in a single wave of molt cannot approach the size of the largest flying birds without first transitioning to a more complex mode of primary replacement. Finally, we propose two models that could account for the 1/6 power allometry between feather growth rate and body mass, both based on a length-to-surface relationship that transforms the linear, cylindrical growing region responsible for producing feather tissue into an essentially two-dimensional structure. These allometric relationships offer a general explanation for flight feather replacement requiring disproportionately more time for large birds.

  5. Evaluating the Importance of Local Environment on Tree Structural Allometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncanson, L.; Cook, B. D.; Rourke, O.; Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.

    2013-12-01

    Allometric relationships relating various forest structural properties such as DBH, tree height and aboveground biomass have been developed through detailed field data collection both in the United States, and globally. However, there has been limited attention to explaining observed variability in these relationships. Often, a single relationship is developed for a single species, and is applied irrespective of environment. In this research, we attempt to explain allometry as a function of environment by focusing on the relationship between DBH, crown radius and tree height. Two primary datasets are used to conduct this research. First, the Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) dataset, including tree DBH and height information for the United States, are used to investigate variability in the relationship between DBH and tree height. Second, high-resolution airborne lidar datasets were collected from areas across the US, Canada and Costa Rica and are applied to investigate variability in the relationship between crown radius and height. The lidar datasets are run through a generalized canopy delineation algorithm to produce multilayered estimates of individual tree location, height, and crown radius. Power law functions are fit to the relationships between DBH and tree height, and crown radius and tree height. The mean and standard deviation of the power law exponents are compared to environmental attributes including precipitation, temperature, topography, and age since disturbance. This research demonstrates that although universal tendencies are observed in average power law exponents, considerable local variability exists that can be partially attributed to local environment. Therefore local environment, as well as tree species, should be accounted for in the development and application of allometric equations for forest studies.

  6. Ontogenetic allometry, heterochrony, and interspecific differences in the skull of African apes, using tridimensional Procrustes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Christine; Penin, Xavier

    2004-06-01

    Ontogenetic studies of African ape skulls lead to an analysis of morphological differences in terms of allometry, heterochrony, and sexual dimorphism. The use of geometric morphometrics allows us 1) to define size and shape variations as independent factors (an essential but seldom respected condition for heterochrony), and 2) to calculate in percentage of shape changes and to graphically represent the parts of shape variation which are related to various biological phenomena: common allometry, intraspecific allometry, and allometric and nonallometric shape discrimination. Three tridimensional Procrustes analyses and the calculation of multivariate allometries, discriminant functions, and statistical tests are used to compare the skulls of 50 Pan troglodytes, and 50 Gorilla gorilla of different dental stages. The results both complement and modify classical results obtained from similar material but with different methods. Size and Scaling in Primate Morphology, New York: Plenum, p. 175-205). As previously described by Shea, the common growth allometric pattern is very important (64% of total shape variation). It corresponds to a larger increase of facial volume than of neurocranial volume, a more obliquely oriented foramen magnum, and a noticeable reshaping of the nuchal region (higher inion). However, the heterochronic interpretation based on common allometry is rather different from Shea. Gorillas differ from chimpanzees not only with a larger magnitude of allometric change (rate peramorphosis), as is classically said, but also grow more in size than in shape (size acceleration). In other words, for a similar stage of growth, gorillas have the size and shape corresponding to older chimpanzees, and for a similar shape, gorillas have a larger size than chimpanzees. In contrast, sexual dimorphism actually corresponds to allometric changes only, as classically demonstrated (time hypermorphosis). Sexual dimorphism is here significant in adult gorillas alone, and

  7. Empirical analysis on the connection between power-law distributions and allometries for urban indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Luiz G A; Lenzi, Ervin K; Mendes, Renio S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the existing connection between power-law distributions and allometries. As it was first reported in [PLoS ONE 7, e40393 (2012)] for the relationship between homicides and population, when these urban indicators present asymptotic power-law distributions, they can also display specific allometries among themselves. Here, we present an extensive characterization of this connection when considering all possible pairs of relationships from twelve urban indicators of Brazilian cities (such as child labour, illiteracy, income, sanitation and unemployment). Our analysis reveal that all our urban indicators are asymptotically distributed as power laws and that the proposed connection also holds for our data when the allometric relationship displays enough correlations. We have also found that not all allometric relationships are independent and that they can be understood as a consequence of the allometric relationship between the urban indicator and the population size. We further show that the residua...

  8. Does allometry account for shape variability in Ephedrus persicae Froggatt (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) parasitic wasps?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žikić, V.; Tomanović, Ž.; Kavallieratos, N. G.; Starý, Petr; Ivanović, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2010), s. 373-380. ISSN 1439-6092 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5007102 Grant ostatní: The Ministry of Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia(SR) 143006B Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : allometry * morphometric variability * geometric morphometrics Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.581, year: 2010

  9. Unusual allometry for sexual size dimorphism in a cichlid where males are extremely larger than females

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kazutaka Ota; Masanori Kohda; Tetsu Sato

    2010-06-01

    When males are the larger sex, a positive allometric relationship between male and female sizes is often found across populations of a single species (i.e. Rensch’s rule). This pattern is typically explained by a sexual selection pressure on males. Here, we report that the allometric relationship was negative across populations of a shell-brooding cichlid fish Lamprologus callipterus, although males are extremely larger than females. Male L. callipterus collect and defend empty snail shells in each of which a female breeds. We found that, across six populations, male and female sizes are positively correlated with not only sexual and fecundity selection indices, but also with shell sizes. Given their different reproductive behaviours, these correlations mean that males are required to be more powerful, and thus larger, to transport larger shells, while female bodies are reduced to the shell size to enable them to enter the shells. Among the three size selections (sexual selection, fecundity selection and shell size), shell size explained the allometry, suggesting that females are more strongly subject to size selection associated with shell size availability than males. However, the allometry was violated when considering an additional population where size-selection regimes of males differed from that of other populations. Therefore, sexual size allometry will be violated by body size divergence induced by multiple selection regimes.

  10. Empirical analysis on the connection between power-law distributions and allometries for urban indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. G. A.; Ribeiro, H. V.; Lenzi, E. K.; Mendes, R. S.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the existing connection between power-law distributions and allometries. As it was first reported in Gomez-Lievano et al. (2012) for the relationship between homicides and population, when these urban indicators present asymptotic power-law distributions, they can also display specific allometries among themselves. Here, we present an extensive characterization of this connection when considering all possible pairs of relationships from twelve urban indicators of Brazilian cities (such as child labor, illiteracy, income, sanitation and unemployment). Our analysis reveals that all our urban indicators are asymptotically distributed as power laws and that the proposed connection also holds for our data when the allometric relationship displays enough correlations. We have also found that not all allometric relationships are independent and that they can be understood as a consequence of the allometric relationship between the urban indicator and the population size. We further show that the residuals fluctuations surrounding the allometries are characterized by an almost constant variance and log-normal distributions.

  11. Caudal fin allometry in the white shark Carcharodon carcharias: implications for locomotory performance and ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingham-Soliar, Theagarten

    2005-05-01

    Allometric scaling analysis was employed to investigate the consequences of size evolution on hydrodynamic performance and ecology in the white shark Carcharodon carcharias. Discriminant analysis using the power equation y=axb was negative for caudal fin span (S) versus fork length (FL) in C. carcharias. In contrast in two delphinid species, Delphinus capensis and Tursiops aduncus, the span of the flukes versus fork length rises in positive allometric fashion, and strong positive allometry of S versus √A (area) was also recorded. The latter reflects a high lift/drag ratio. S versus √A in C. carcharias displays negative allometry and consequently a lower lift/drag ratio. A lower aspect ratio (AR) caudal fin in C. carcharias compared to that of the delphinids (mean 3.33 and 4.1, respectively) and other thunniform swimmers provides the potential for better maneuverability and acceleration. The liver in sharks is frequently associated with a buoyancy function and was found to be positively allometric in C. carcharias. The overall findings suggest that the negatively allometric caudal fin morphometrics in C. carcharias are unlikely to have deleterious evolutionary fitness consequences for predation. On the contrary, when considered in the context of positive liver allometry in C. carcharias it is hereby suggested that buoyancy may play a dominant role in larger white sharks in permitting slow swimming while minimizing energy demands needed to prevent sinking. In contrast hydrodynamic lift is considered more important in smaller white sharks. Larger caudal fin spans and higher lift/drag ratio in smaller C. carcharias indicate greater potential for prolonged, intermediate swimming speeds and for feeding predominantly on fast-moving fish, in contrast to slow-swimming search patterns of larger individuals for predominantly large mammalian prey. Such data may provide some answers to the lifestyle and widespread habitat capabilities of this still largely mysterious animal.

  12. Effect of the relative time of emergence on the growth allometry of Galium aparine in competition with Triticum aestivum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klem, Karel; Rajsnerová, Petra; Novotná, Kateřina; Urban, Otmar; Marek, Michal V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2014), s. 262-270. ISSN 1444-6162 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI111A133; GA TA ČR TA02010780 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : cleaver * competition * growth allometry * relative time of emergence * wheat Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 0.537, year: 2014

  13. Extreme positive allometry of animal adhesive pads and the size limits of adhesion-based climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, David; Clemente, Christofer J; Dittrich, Alex; Kuo, Chi-Yun; Crosby, Alfred J; Irschick, Duncan J; Federle, Walter

    2016-02-01

    Organismal functions are size-dependent whenever body surfaces supply body volumes. Larger organisms can develop strongly folded internal surfaces for enhanced diffusion, but in many cases areas cannot be folded so that their enlargement is constrained by anatomy, presenting a problem for larger animals. Here, we study the allometry of adhesive pad area in 225 climbing animal species, covering more than seven orders of magnitude in weight. Across all taxa, adhesive pad area showed extreme positive allometry and scaled with weight, implying a 200-fold increase of relative pad area from mites to geckos. However, allometric scaling coefficients for pad area systematically decreased with taxonomic level and were close to isometry when evolutionary history was accounted for, indicating that the substantial anatomical changes required to achieve this increase in relative pad area are limited by phylogenetic constraints. Using a comparative phylogenetic approach, we found that the departure from isometry is almost exclusively caused by large differences in size-corrected pad area between arthropods and vertebrates. To mitigate the expected decrease of weight-specific adhesion within closely related taxa where pad area scaled close to isometry, data for several taxa suggest that the pads' adhesive strength increased for larger animals. The combination of adjustments in relative pad area for distantly related taxa and changes in adhesive strength for closely related groups helps explain how climbing with adhesive pads has evolved in animals varying over seven orders of magnitude in body weight. Our results illustrate the size limits of adhesion-based climbing, with profound implications for large-scale bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:26787862

  14. Allometry of animal–microbe interactions and global census of animal-associated microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Simmons, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Animals live in close association with microorganisms, mostly prokaryotes, living in or on them as commensals, mutualists or parasites, and profoundly affecting host fitness. Most animal–microbe studies focus on microbial community structure; for this project, allometry (scaling of animal attributes with animal size) was applied to animal–microbe relationships across a range of species spanning 12 orders of magnitude in animal mass, from nematodes to whales. Microbial abundances per individual animal were gleaned from published literature and also microscopically counted in three species. Abundance of prokaryotes/individual versus animal mass scales as a nearly linear power function (exponent = 1.07, R2 = 0.94). Combining this power function with allometry of animal abundance indicates that macrofauna have an outsized share of animal-associated microorganisms. The total number of animal-associated prokaryotes in Earth's land animals was calculated to be 1.3–1.4 × 1025 cells and the total of marine animal-associated microbes was calculated to be 8.6–9.0 × 1024 cells. Animal-associated microbes thus total 2.1–2.3 × 1025 of the approximately 1030 prokaryotes on the Earth. Microbes associated with humans comprise 3.3–3.5% of Earth's animal-associated microbes, and domestic animals harbour 14–20% of all animal-associated microbes, adding a new dimension to the scale of human impact on the biosphere. This novel allometric power function may reflect underlying mechanisms involving the transfer of energy and materials between microorganisms and their animal hosts. Microbial diversity indices of animal gut communities and gut microbial species richness for 60 mammals did not indicate significant scaling relationships with animal body mass; however, further research in this area is warranted. PMID:26108631

  15. Allometry of animal-microbe interactions and global census of animal-associated microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Thomas L; Simmons, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    Animals live in close association with microorganisms, mostly prokaryotes, living in or on them as commensals, mutualists or parasites, and profoundly affecting host fitness. Most animal-microbe studies focus on microbial community structure; for this project, allometry (scaling of animal attributes with animal size) was applied to animal-microbe relationships across a range of species spanning 12 orders of magnitude in animal mass, from nematodes to whales. Microbial abundances per individual animal were gleaned from published literature and also microscopically counted in three species. Abundance of prokaryotes/individual versus animal mass scales as a nearly linear power function (exponent = 1.07, R(2) = 0.94). Combining this power function with allometry of animal abundance indicates that macrofauna have an outsized share of animal-associated microorganisms. The total number of animal-associated prokaryotes in Earth's land animals was calculated to be 1.3-1.4 × 10(25) cells and the total of marine animal-associated microbes was calculated to be 8.6-9.0 × 10(24) cells. Animal-associated microbes thus total 2.1-2.3 × 10(25) of the approximately 10(30) prokaryotes on the Earth. Microbes associated with humans comprise 3.3-3.5% of Earth's animal-associated microbes, and domestic animals harbour 14-20% of all animal-associated microbes, adding a new dimension to the scale of human impact on the biosphere. This novel allometric power function may reflect underlying mechanisms involving the transfer of energy and materials between microorganisms and their animal hosts. Microbial diversity indices of animal gut communities and gut microbial species richness for 60 mammals did not indicate significant scaling relationships with animal body mass; however, further research in this area is warranted. PMID:26108631

  16. Foraging and vulnerability traits modify predator-prey body mass allometry: freshwater macroinvertebrates as a case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klečka, Jan; Boukal S., David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 5 (2013), s. 1031-1041. ISSN 0021-8790 Grant ostatní: AquaMod(CZ) PERG04-GA-2008-239543; GA JU(CZ) GAJU 145/2010/P; MŠMT(CZ) 7947/2010 30 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : allometry * aquatic insects * Dytiscidae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.726, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2656.12078/full

  17. Allometry in carcasses of lambs of the Pantaneiro genetic group slaughtered with different subcutaneous fat thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Holtz Alves Pedroso Mora

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four female lambs of the Pantaneiro genetic group, with approximately 100 days of age, average body of 16.24 ± 1.78 kg, were slaughtered with 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 mmof subcutaneous fat thickness, measured by ultrasound in the Longissimus, to evaluate the allometric growth. Lambs fed a complete pelleted diet calculated to ensure a daily weight gain of0.30 kg. Slaughtering was performed as the female lambs reached the pre-established fat thickness. After 24 hours in a cold chamber at 4ºC, chilled carcasses were cut in half and weighed. The right side was separated into five sections to determine the allometry of carcasses and cuts. Neck and rib showed isogonic growth in all treatments. Loin has remained late growth to 2.0 and3.0 mm. Shoulder and leg were isogonic growth in the treatments 3.0 and4.0 mm. The leg in relation to half carcass showed the greatest correlation. The cuts exhibited differentiated development in the growth rates of tissues. It is recommended to slaughter female lambs when they reach3.0 mm of subcutaneous fat thickness, since the carcass has already reached physiological maturity. Shoulder and leg cuts are best suited for dissection for presenting the highest correlation with the carcass in females of the Pantaneiro group.

  18. Inter-site variation in allometry and wood density of Goupia glabra Aubl. in Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliprandi, N C; Nogueira, E M; Toledo, J J; Fearnside, P M; Nascimento, H E M

    2016-02-01

    The present study aims to compare the allometry and wood density of Goupia glabra Aubl. (Goupiaceae) in two different terra-firme sites in Amazonian forest. A total of 65 trees ≥ 10 cm DBH was sampled in both sites, with 39 trees in Nova Olinda do Norte (NOlinda, near the Amazon River) and 29 trees in Apuí (near the southern edge of the Amazon forest). Except for the relationship between DBH (diameter at breast height) and Ht (total height), allometric relationships for G.glabra differed significantly between sites. Apuí had lower intercept and greater slope for log10 (DBH) versus log10 (Hs - stem height), and, conversely, greater intercept and lower slope for log10 (DBH) versus log10 (Ch - crown height). The slope differed significantly between the sites for DBH versus Cd (crown diameter), with greater slope found for NOlinda. Mean basic wood density in Apuí was 8.8% lower than in NOlinda. Our findings highlight the variation in adaptive strategy of G. glabra due to environmental differences between sites. This is probably because of different canopy-understory light gradients, which result in differentiation of resource allocation between vertical and horizontal growth, which, in turn, affects mechanical support related to wood density. We also hypothesize that differences in soil fertility and disturbance regimes between sites may act concomitantly with light. PMID:26909641

  19. Allometry of a neotropical palm, Euterpe edulis Mart. Alometria de uma palmeira Neotropical, Euterpe edulis Mart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana F. Alves

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stem allometry (stem diameter vs. tree height of a Neotropical palm (Euterpe edulis found in rain and seasonal forest of Southeastern Brazil was examined. Observed height-diameter relationships along the stem (diameter at ground level, (dgl, and diameter at breast height (dbh were compared to three theoretical stability mechanical models: elastic similarity, stress similarity and geometric similarity. Slopes of log-transformed height-diameter relationships did not lie near those predicted by any stability mechanical models. Significant differences in stem allometry were found when comparing dgl to dbh, suggesting greater increase in dbh with height. The relationship between stability safety factor (SSF and palm height showed that both dgl and dbh were found to be above McMahon's theoretical buckling limit for dicotyledonous trees, but some individuals approached this limit in relation to dbh. Despite displaying a similar decreasing pattern of SSF with height, differences found in SSF along the stem - greater SSF for dgl when compared to dbh - indicate that the risk of mechanism failure in palms depends upon the size and varies along the stem. Distinct allometric relationships along the stem obtained for Euterpe edulis may be reflecting possible differences in stem design and growth strategies.Neste trabalho foram analisadas as relações entre o diâmetro e a altura de uma palmeira Neotropical (Euterpe edulis comum na Floresta Atlântica do SE do Brasil. As relações observadas entre a altura e o diâmetro ao longo do estipe (diâmetro ao nível do solo (DAS, e diâmetro ao nível do peito (DAP foram comparadas a três modelos teóricos de estabilidade mecânica: similaridade elástica, similaridade de estresse e similaridade geométrica. As inclinações das regressões altura-diâmetro não se ajustaram a nenhum dos modelos de estabilidade mecânica. Diferenças significativas na alometria do estipe foram encontradas comparando-se as rela

  20. Long-Bone Allometry of Terrestrial Mammals and the Geometric-Shape and Elastic-Force Constraints of Bone Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kokshenev, V B; García, G J M

    2003-01-01

    A natural similarity in body dimensions of terrestrial animals noticed by ancient philosophers remains the main key to the problem of mammalian skeletal evolution with body mass explored in theoretical and experimental biology and tested by comparative zoologists. We discuss the long-standing problem of mammalian bone allometry commonly studied in terms of the so-called ''geometric'', ''elastic'', and ''static stress'' similarities by McMahon (1973, 1975a, 1975b). We revise the fundamental assumptions underlying these similarities and give new physical insights into geometric-shape and elastic-force constraints imposed on spatial evolution of mammalian long bones.

  1. Allometry and proximate mechanisms of sexual selection in photinus fireflies, and some other beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencl, Fredric V

    2004-06-01

    Ever since Darwin identified it as the force responsible for the evolution of exaggerated male characters, sexual selection has been the focus of research aimed at understanding the most bizarre and intriguing morphologies and behaviors in Nature. Two congeneric species in the firefly genus Photinus, P. pyralis and P. macdermotti, afford a unique opportunity to examine the interaction between sexual and countervailing natural selection that act to shape the evolution of mating behavior and body size in closely related species with very different courtship strategies. Photinus pyralis males emit very bright flashes during their extended patrolling flights and form 'love knots' of competing suitors, while P. macdermotti males, whose courtships seldom exceed two competing males, produce weaker flashes during a shorter patrolling period.Possibly as a consequence of their scramble competition and long flights, not only is there an extremely wide range of body sizes in P. pyralis males, but they also exhibit wing allometric slopes greater than one, and lantern allometries less than one. In contrast, P. macdermotti males do not have allometric slopes significantly different from one. Small males, when tested in an artificial scramble situation move faster than large males, an advantage in the intense competition that ensues once a female is located. Females answer several males in alternation and fail to respond to all male flashes, with the evident consequence that love knots frequently develop around such fickle females. Allometric relationships in two non-luminescent beetle species with non-visual courtship protocols are compared. Visual, sexually selected characters showed positive allometric slopes, while non-visual characters showed isometry or negative slopes. Data presented here support the existence of distinct patterns in modality-specific sexual selection. PMID:21676703

  2. Influence of shade tolerance and development stage on the allometry of ten temperate tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Tony; Schneider, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Allometry studies the change in scale between two dimensions of an organism. The metabolic theory of ecology predicts invariant allometric scaling exponents, while empirical studies evidenced inter- and intra-specific variations. This work aimed at identifying the sources of variations of the allometric exponents at both inter- and intra-specific levels using stem analysis from 9,363 trees for ten Eastern Canada species with a large shade-tolerance gradient. Specifically, the yearly allometric exponents, α(v,DBH) [volume (v) and diameter at breast height (DBH)], β(v,h) [v and height (h)], and γ(h,DBH) (h and DBH) were modelled as a function of tree age for each species. α(v,DBH), and γ(h,DBH) increased with tree age and then reached a plateau ranging from 2.45 to 3.12 for α(v,DBH), and 0.874-1.48 for γ(h,DBH). Pine species presented a local maximum. No effect of tree age on β(v,h) was found for conifers, while it increased until a plateau ranging from 3.71 to 5.16 for broadleaves. The influence of shade tolerance on the growth trajectories was then explored. In the juvenile stage, α(v,DBH), and γ(h,DBH) increased with shade tolerance while β(v,h) was shade-tolerance independent. In the mature stage, β(v,h) increased with shade tolerance, whereas γ(h,DBH) decreased and α(v,DBH) was shade-tolerance independent. The interaction between development stage and shade tolerance for allometric exponents demonstrates the importance of the changing functional requirements of trees for resource allocation at both the inter- and intra-specific level. These results indicate the need to also integrate specific functional traits, growth strategies and allocation, in allometric theoretical frameworks. PMID:25168006

  3. Dynamics of the Developing Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Assessed by Stereology, Allometry, Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanya, Andrew Ndegwa; Dimova, Ivanka; Koller, Tobias; Styp-Rekowska, Beata; Djonov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    The chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a widely used model for the study of angiogenesis, tumour growth, as well as drug efficacy. In spite of this, little is known about the developmental alteration from its appearance to the time of hatching. In the current study the CAM has been studied by classical stereology and allometry. Expression levels of selected angiogenesis-related molecules were estimated by RT-PCR and cell dynamics assessed by proliferation and apoptosis assays. Absolute CAM volume increased from a low of 0.47 ± 0.11 cm3 at embryonic day 8 (E8) to a high of 2.05 ± 0.27 cm3 at E18, and then decreased to 1.6 ± 0.47 cm3 at E20. On allometric analysis, three growth phases were identifiable. Between E8-13 (phase I), the CAM grew fastest; moderately in phase II (E13-18) but was regressing in phase III (E18-20). The chorion, the mesenchyme and the allantoic layers grew fastest in phase I, but moderately in phase II. The mesenchyme grew slowly in phase III while the chorion and allantois were regressing. Chorionic cell volume increased fastest in phase I and was regressing in phase III. Chorionic capillaries grew steadily in phase I and II but regressed in phase III. Both the chorion and the allantois grew by intrinsic cell proliferation as well as recruitment of cells from the mesenchyme. Cell proliferation was prominent in the allantois and chorion early during development, declined after E17 and apoptosis started mainly in the chorion from E14. VEGFR2 expression peaked at E11 and declined steadily towards E20, VEGF peaked at E13 and E20 while HIF 1α had a peak at E11 and E20. Studies targeting CAM growth and angiogenesis need to take these growth phases into consideration PMID:27046154

  4. Vision in semi-aquatic snakes: Intraocular morphology, accommodation, and eye: Body allometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plylar, Helen Bond

    Vision in vertebrates generally relies on the refractive power of the cornea and crystalline lens to facilitate vision. Light from the environment enters the eye and is refracted by the cornea and lens onto the retina for production of an image. When an animal with a system designed for air submerges underwater, the refractive power of the cornea is lost. Semi-aquatic animals (e.g., water snakes, turtles, aquatic mammals) must overcome this loss of corneal refractive power through visual accommodation. Accommodation relies on change of the position or shape of the lens to change the focal length of the optical system. Intraocular muscles and fibers facilitate lenticular displacement and deformation. Snakes, in general, are largely unstudied in terms of visual acuity and intraocular morphology. I used light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to examine differences in eye anatomy between five sympatric colubrid snake species (Nerodia cyclopion, N. fasciata, N. rhombifer, Pantherophis obsoletus, and Thamnophis proximus) from Southeast Louisiana. I discovered previously undescribed structures associated with the lens in semi-aquatic species. Photorefractive methods were used to assess refractive error. While all species overcame the expected hyperopia imposed by submergence, there was interspecific variation in refractive error. To assess scaling of eye size with body size, I measure of eye size, head size, and body size in Nerodia cyclopion and N. fasciata from the SLU Vertebrate Museum. In both species, body size increases at a significantly faster rate than head size and eye size (negative allometry). Small snakes have large eyes relative to body size, and large snakes have relatively small eyes. There were interspecific differences in scaling of eye size with body size, where N. fasciata had larger eye diameter, but N. cyclopion had longer eyes (axial length).

  5. Honest signaling in domestic piglets (Sus scrofa domesticus): vocal allometry and the information content of grunt calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maxime; Wondrak, Marianne; Huber, Ludwig; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2016-06-15

    The information conveyed in acoustic signals is a central topic in mammal vocal communication research. Body size is one form of information that can be encoded in calls. Acoustic allometry aims to identify the specific acoustic correlates of body size within the vocalizations of a given species, and formants are often a useful acoustic cue in this context. We conducted a longitudinal investigation of acoustic allometry in domestic piglets (Sus scrofa domesticus), asking whether formants of grunt vocalizations provide information concerning the caller's body size over time. On four occasions, we recorded grunts from 20 kunekune piglets, measured their vocal tract length by means of radiographs (X-rays) and weighed them. Controlling for effects of age and sex, we found that body weight strongly predicts vocal tract length, which in turn determines formant frequencies. We conclude that grunt formant frequencies could allow domestic pigs to assess a signaler's body size as it grows. Further research using playback experiments is needed to determine the perceptual role of formants in domestic pig communication. PMID:27059064

  6. Ontogenetic allometry constrains cranial shape of the head-first burrowing worm lizard Cynisca leucura (Squamata: Amphisbaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipsley, Christy A; Rentinck, Marc-Nicolas; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Müller, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Amphisbaenians are fossorial, predominantly limbless squamate reptiles with distinct cranial shapes corresponding to specific burrowing behaviors. Due to their cryptic lifestyles and the scarcity of museum specimens, little is known of their intraspecific variation, particularly regarding cranial osteology. This represents a critical lack of information, because the majority of morphological investigations of squamate relationships are based on cranial characters. We investigated cranial variation in the West African Coast Worm Lizard Cynisca leucura, a round-headed member of the Amphisbaenidae. Using geometric morphometric analyses of three-dimensional computed tomographic scans, we found that cranial osteology of C. leucura is highly conserved, with the majority of shape changes occurring during growth as the cranium becomes more slender and elongate, accompanied by increasing interdigitation among the dermal roofing bones. Elements of the ventral portion of the cranium remain loosely connected in adults, possibly as a protective mechanism against repeated compression and torsion during burrow excavation. Intraspecific variation was strongly correlated with size change from juveniles to adults, indicating a dominant role of ontogenetic allometry in determining cranial shape. We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism, either during growth or among adults. Given the fossorial habits of C. leucura, we hypothesize that cranial allometry is under strong stabilizing selection to maintain adequate proportions for head-first digging, thereby constraining the ability of individuals to respond to differing selection pressures, including sexual selection and variation in diet or microhabitat. For species in which digging imposes less mechanical stress (e.g., in softer sand), allometric associations during growth may be weakened, allowing changes to the ontogenetic trajectory and subsequent morphological traits. Such developmental dissociation between size and shape, known

  7. "allometry" Deterministic Approaches in Cell Size, Cell Number and Crude Fiber Content Related to the Physical Quality of Kangkong (Ipomoea reptans) Grown Under Different Plant Density Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamat, A.; Atiman, S. A.; Puteh, A.; Abdullah, N. A. P.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Zulkeefli, A. A.; Othman, S.

    Kangkong, especially the upland type (Ipomoea reptans) is popularly consumed as a vegetable dish in the South East Asian countries for its quality related to Vitamins (A and C) and crude fiber contents. Higher fiber contents would prevent from the occurrence of colon cancer and diverticular disease. With young stem edible portion, its cell number and size contribute to the stem crude fiber content. The mathematical approach of allometry of cell size, number, and fiber content of stem could be used in determining the 'best' plant density pressure in producing the quality young stem to be consumed. Basically, allometry is the ratio of relative increment (growth or change) rates of two parameters, or the change rate associated to the log of measured variables relationship. Kangkog grown equal or lower than 55 plants m-2 produced bigger individual plant and good quality (physical) kangkong leafy vegetable, but with lower total yield per unit area as compared to those grown at higher densities.

  8. Shoot allometry and biomass productivity in poplar and willow varieties grown as short rotation coppice. Summary of results 1995-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, R.; Henshall, P.; Tubby, I.

    2003-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a 4 year study assessing shoot diameters and lengths using non-destructive measurements in order to establish allometric relationships between biomass and non-destructive measurements and also to provide estimates of increments for the development of a model of short rotation cultivation growth and yield. Details are given of the basic methodology and measurement conventions; the data preparation, quality assurance classification and storage; and shoot diameter and length assessments and allometry analyses.

  9. Intersexual allometry differences and ontogenetic shifts of coloration patterns in two aquatic turtles, Graptemys oculifera and Graptemys flavimaculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, Joshua R; Lindeman, Peter V; Lovich, Jeffrey E

    2015-06-01

    Coloration can play critical roles in a species' biology. The allometry of color patterns may be useful for elucidating the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for shaping the traits. We measured characteristics relating to eight aspects of color patterns from Graptemys oculifera and G. flavimaculata to investigate the allometric differences among male, female, and unsexed juvenile specimens. Additionally, we investigated ontogenetic shifts by incorporating the unsexed juveniles into the male and female datasets. In general, male color traits were isometric (i.e., color scaled with body size), while females and juvenile color traits were hypoallometric, growing in size more slowly than the increase in body size. When we included unsexed juveniles in our male and female datasets, our linear regression analyses found all relationships to be hypoallometric and our model selection analysis found support for nonlinear models describing the relationship between body size and color patterns, suggestive of an ontogenetic shift in coloration traits for both sexes at maturity. Although color is critical for many species' biology and therefore under strong selective pressure in many other species, our results are likely explained by an epiphenomenon related to the different selection pressures on body size and growth rates between juveniles and adults and less attributable to the evolution of color patterns themselves. PMID:26078863

  10. New insights into non-avian dinosaur reproduction and their evolutionary and ecological implications: linking fossil evidence to allometries of extant close relatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Werner

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that a high reproductive output contributes to the unique gigantism in large dinosaur taxa. In order to infer more information on dinosaur reproduction, we established allometries between body mass and different reproductive traits (egg mass, clutch mass, annual clutch mass for extant phylogenetic brackets (birds, crocodiles and tortoises of extinct non-avian dinosaurs. Allometries were applied to nine non-avian dinosaur taxa (theropods, hadrosaurs, and sauropodomorphs for which fossil estimates on relevant traits are currently available. We found that the reproductive traits of most dinosaurs conformed to similar-sized or scaled-up extant reptiles or birds. The reproductive traits of theropods, which are considered more bird-like, were indeed consistent with birds, while the traits of sauropodomorphs conformed better to reptiles. Reproductive traits of hadrosaurs corresponded to both reptiles and birds. Excluding Massospondyluscarinatus, all dinosaurs studied had an intermediary egg to body mass relationship to reptiles and birds. In contrast, dinosaur clutch masses fitted with either the masses predicted from allometries of birds (theropods or to the masses of reptiles (all other taxa. Theropods studied had probably one clutch per year. For sauropodomorphs and hadrosaurs, more than one clutch per year was predicted. Contrary to current hypotheses, large dinosaurs did not have exceptionally high annual egg numbers (AEN. Independent of the extant model, the estimated dinosaur AEN did not exceed 850 eggs (75,000 kg sauropod for any of the taxa studied. This estimated maximum is probably an overestimation due to unrealistic assumptions. According to most AEN estimations, the dinosaurs studied laid less than 200 eggs per year. Only some AEN estimates obtained for medium to large sized sauropods were higher (200-400 eggs. Our results provide new (testable hypotheses, especially for reproductive traits that are insufficiently

  11. Allometric scaling of population variance with mean body size is predicted from Taylor’s law and density-mass allometry

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Joel E.; Xu, Meng; Schuster, William S. F.

    2012-01-01

    Two widely tested empirical patterns in ecology are combined here to predict how the variation of population density relates to the average body size of organisms. Taylor’s law (TL) asserts that the variance of the population density of a set of populations is a power-law function of the mean population density. Density–mass allometry (DMA) asserts that the mean population density of a set of populations is a power-law function of the mean individual body mass. Combined, DMA and TL predict th...

  12. Quantifying the Variability of Internode Allometry within and between Trees for Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. Using a Multilevel Nonlinear Mixed-Effect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Diao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Allometric models of internodes are an important component of Functional-Structural Plant Models (FSPMs, which represent the shape of internodes in tree architecture and help our understanding of resource allocation in organisms. Constant allometry is always assumed in these models. In this paper, multilevel nonlinear mixed-effect models were used to characterize the variability of internode allometry, describing the relationship between the last internode length and biomass of Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. trees within the GreenLab framework. We demonstrated that there is significant variability in allometric relationships at the tree and different-order branch levels, and the variability decreases among levels from trees to first-order branches and, subsequently, to second-order branches. The variability was partially explained by the random effects of site characteristics, stand age, density, and topological position of the internode. Tree- and branch-level-specific allometric models are recommended because they produce unbiased and accurate internode length estimates. The model and method developed in this study are useful for understanding and describing the structure and functioning of trees.

  13. Pitch (F0) and formant profiles of human vowels and vowel-like baboon grunts: The role of vocalizer body size and voice-acoustic allometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Drew; Kollias, Sophie; Ney, Christina; Lloyd, Peter

    2005-02-01

    Key voice features-fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies-can vary extensively between individuals. Much of the variation can be traced to differences in the size of the larynx and vocal-tract cavities, but whether these differences in turn simply reflect differences in speaker body size (i.e., neutral vocal allometry) remains unclear. Quantitative analyses were therefore undertaken to test the relationship between speaker body size and voice F0 and formant frequencies for human vowels. To test the taxonomic generality of the relationships, the same analyses were conducted on the vowel-like grunts of baboons, whose phylogenetic proximity to humans and similar vocal production biology and voice acoustic patterns recommend them for such comparative research. For adults of both species, males were larger than females and had lower mean voice F0 and formant frequencies. However, beyond this, F0 variation did not track body-size variation between the sexes in either species, nor within sexes in humans. In humans, formant variation correlated significantly with speaker height but only in males and not in females. Implications for general vocal allometry are discussed as are implications for speech origins theories, and challenges to them, related to laryngeal position and vocal tract length. .

  14. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria): Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Daniel G.; Maxwell, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria). We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum) was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction. PMID:26579712

  15. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria: Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Dick

    Full Text Available We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria. We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction.

  16. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria): Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Daniel G; Maxwell, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria). We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum) was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction. PMID:26579712

  17. Multivariate allometry and myocardium abnormalities during experimental systemic nitric oxide blockage Alometria multivariada e anormalidades do miocárdio durante bloqueio sistêmico da síntese de óxido nítrico

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Xavier-Vidal; Santiago Segundo Ramirez Carvajal; Sônia Baptista da Cunha; Kalil Madi

    2004-01-01

    Using allometry to evaluate numerical data from normal and experimental hypertensive rats' myocardium, thirteen normotensive Wistar male young rats were examined. Hearts were processed using histological routine methods. For myocardial quantification we utilized an M-42 Test-System. Fifteen fields were randomly considered. Parameters utilized: volumetric density (Vv %); volume (V µm³) and cardiac weight. The chi2 proposed by Anderson and the F proposed by Jolicoeur were utilized to test the i...

  18. Interspecies scaling of excretory amounts using allometry - retrospective analysis with rifapentine, aztreonam, carumonam, pefloxacin, miloxacin, trovafloxacin, doripenem, imipenem, cefozopran, ceftazidime, linezolid for urinary excretion and rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir for fecal excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-09-01

    1. Interspecies allometry scaling for prediction of human excretory amounts in urine or feces was performed for numerous antibacterials. Antibacterials used for urinary scaling were: rifapentine, pefloxacin, trovafloxacin (Gr1/low; 50%). Rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir was used for fecal scaling (high; >50%). 2. The employment of allometry equation: Y = aW(b) enabled scaling of urine/fecal amounts from animal species. Corresponding predicted amounts were converted into % recovery by considering the respective human dose. Comparison of predicted/observed values enabled fold difference and error calculations (mean absolute error [MAE] and root mean square error [RMSE]). Comparisons were made for urinary/fecal data; and qualitative assessment was made amongst Gr1/Gr2/Gr3 for urine. 3. Average correlation coefficient for the allometry scaling was >0.995. Excretory amount predictions were largely within 0.75- to 1.5-fold differences. Average MAE and RMSE were within ±22% and 23%, respectively. Although robust predictions were achieved for higher urinary/fecal excretion (>50%), interspecies scaling was applicable for low/medium excretory drugs. 4. Based on the data, interspecies scaling of urine or fecal excretory amounts may be potentially used as a tool to understand the significance of either urinary or fecal routes of elimination in humans in early development. PMID:26711252

  19. On the geometry and allometry of big-buttressed trees - a challenge for forest monitoring: new insights from 3D-modeling with terrestrial laser scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nölke N

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In many old-growth natural and close-to-natural forest types, notably in humid tropical forests, a relatively small number of very tall trees contribute considerably to stand basal area and biomass. Such trees often show distinct buttress roots with irregular non-convex shapes. Buttresses are complex structures in the lowest stem section, where most tree biomass is located. The methods used to assess the diameter of buttressed trees have a large impact on the determination of volume and biomass, as well as on the resulting estimates of the aboveground carbon stock in tropical forests. As the measurement of diameter at breast height (DBH at 1.3 m is not feasible in such conditions, the diameter above buttress (DAB, where the cylindrical bole of the tree begins, is usually measured and included as an independent variable in biomass models. We conducted a methodological study aimed at determining the volume and biomass of individual buttressed trees belonging to several tropical species by the application of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. The geometry and allometry of the buttresses, as well as the change with height along the stem in buttress volume and cross-sectional area were analyzed. Our results suggest that the relationship between cross-sectional areas at DAB height (ADAB and the actual tree basal area measured at 1.3 m height is relatively strong (R² = 0.87 across a range of different species, buttress morphologies and tree dimensions. Furthermore, the change in stem cross-sectional area with tree height was surprisingly similar and smooth. Despite the small number of trees sampled, the methodological approach used in this study provided new insights on the very irregular geometry of buttressed trees. Our results may help improving the volume and biomass models for buttressed trees, that are crucial contributors to carbon stocks in tropical forests.

  20. Bioaccumulation Potential Of Air Contaminants: Combining Biological Allometry, Chemical Equilibrium And Mass-Balances To Predict Accumulation Of Air Pollutants In Various Mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltman, Karin; McKone, Thomas E.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2009-03-01

    In the present study we develop and test a uniform model intended for single compartment analysis in the context of human and environmental risk assessment of airborne contaminants. The new aspects of the model are the integration of biological allometry with fugacity-based mass-balance theory to describe exchange of contaminants with air. The developed model is applicable to various mammalian species and a range of chemicals, while requiring few and typically well-known input parameters, such as the adult mass and composition of the species, and the octanol-water and air-water partition coefficient of the chemical. Accumulation of organic chemicals is typically considered to be a function of the chemical affinity forlipid components in tissues. Here, we use a generic description of chemical affinity for neutral and polar lipids and proteins to estimate blood-air partition coefficients (Kba) and tissue-air partition coefficients (Kta) for various mammals. This provides a more accurate prediction of blood-air partition coefficients, as proteins make up a large fraction of total blood components. The results show that 75percent of the modeled inhalation and exhalation rate constants are within a factor of 2 from independent empirical values for humans, rats and mice, and 87percent of the predicted blood-air partition coefficients are within a factor of 5 from empirical data. At steady-state, the bioaccumulation potential of air pollutants is shown to be mainly a function of the tissue-air partition coefficient and the biotransformation capacity of the species and depends weakly on the ventilation rate and the cardiac output of mammals.

  1. Allometry in dinosaurs and mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott

    2015-03-01

    The proportions of the leg bones change as the size of an animal becomes larger since the mass of the animal increases at a faster rate than the cross-sectional area of its leg bones. For the case of elastic similarity (in which the longitudinal stress in the legs remains constant in animals of all sizes), the diameter d and length L of the femur should be related as d = A L3/2. For geometric similarity (in which all dimensions are scaled by the same factor), d = A L. For animals with femora longer than 20 cm, we find the power law relationship to be d = A Lb with b = 1.13 +/- 0.06 for extant mammals (the largest mammal being Loxodonta africana with a 1.00-m-long femur) and b = 1.18 +/- 0.02 for dinosaurs (the largest dinosaur being Brachiosaurus brancai with a 2.03-m-long femur). These data show that extinct dinosaurs and extant animals scale in the same basic manner. The large sauropods (with femora twice as long as found in elephants) scale in a manner consistent with extrapolation of the scaling shown by extant mammals. These results argue that extinct dinosaurs moved in a manner very similar to extant mammals.

  2. Multivariate allometry and myocardium abnormalities during experimental systemic nitric oxide blockage Alometria multivariada e anormalidades do miocárdio durante bloqueio sistêmico da síntese de óxido nítrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Xavier-Vidal

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Using allometry to evaluate numerical data from normal and experimental hypertensive rats' myocardium, thirteen normotensive Wistar male young rats were examined. Hearts were processed using histological routine methods. For myocardial quantification we utilized an M-42 Test-System. Fifteen fields were randomly considered. Parameters utilized: volumetric density (Vv %; volume (V µm³ and cardiac weight. The chi2 proposed by Anderson and the F proposed by Jolicoeur were utilized to test the isometric hypothesis in multivariate allometry. Results in the first analysis show eigenvalues at first principal component with proportions of 70.11%. Results concerning coefficients show V nuclei with a coefficient greater than the isometric point. In the second analysis, eigenvalues of first principal component show a proportion of 75.68%, using three variables. Results of the second analysis show Vv matrix with a coefficient greater than the isometric point. In the third analysis, eigenvalues of first principal component show a proportion of 70.18%, using three variables. Results of the third analysis show V nuclei with a coefficient greater than the isometric point. This suggests that the nuclei of the myocytes have the major variance between the variables utilized. Using chi2 and F tests we rejected isometric hypothesis. Then we can clearly identify the growth center advocated by Huxley as the myocyte nuclei. In conclusion, the data show that under this experimental hypertension, myocytes undergo intense nuclear changes probably involving great metabolic activities. In other words, these data also suggested that, to researchers interested in L-Name models on the 21st day of submission, it is important to emphasize cardiomyocyte nuclei and occurrences linked to them.Utilizamos alometria para avaliar dados numéricos experimentais oriundos do miocárdio de ratos machos jovens normais e induzidos à hipertensão. Os corações foram processados com uso de

  3. Características da carcaça e alometria dos tecidos de cabritos F1 Boer × Saanen Carcass traits and tissue allometry in Boer × Saanen kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Morais Pereira Filho

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar as características de carcaça e a alometria dos cortes comerciais e dos tecidos de cabritos F1 Boer × Saanen, 35 animais foram abatidos ao atingirem 5, 10, 15, 20 e 25 kg de peso vivo (PV. A dieta dos animais foi composta de leite de vaca nos primeiros 49 dias e ração à vontade do sétimo dia até o abate. Os cortes foram obtidos após o resfriamento da carcaça e a perna foi dissecada em músculo, osso e gordura. O PV teve efeito linear decrescente no rendimento de carcaça fria e na área de olho-de-lombo por kg de carcaça. Os pesos de perna, paleta e pescoço em relação à carcaça fria decresceram linearmente, mas houve efeito quadrático sobre o rendimento de costelas e lombo. O crescimento de paleta, pescoço e perna foi isométrico (b=1 ao do corpo, enquanto o das costelas e do lombo foi mais lento (b¹ 1. Os músculos da perna cresceram igualmente, a gordura mais lenta e os ossos mais rapidamente que a perna, enquanto o desenvolvimento da gordura subcutânea foi mais tardio que o da intermuscular. Para obtenção de carcaça de 8 a 11 kg com rendimento superior a 44%, boa proporção de músculo e gordura com menor perda durante o resfriamento, recomenda-se abater os animais com PV entre 20 e 25 kg, mas, se o objetivo for carcaça de menor peso, o abate dos animais deve ser feito ao final do aleitamento com aproximadamente 10 kg de peso corporal.Thirty-five male kids Boer × Saanen kids were shaughtered at 5, 10, 15, 20 e 25 kg BW to evaluate the carcass traits and commercial cuts and tissues allometry. The diet fed to the animas was composed by cow milk in the first 49 days and ad libitum ration from the seventh day until slaughter. The cuts were obtained after cooling of the carcass and the leg dissected in muscle, bone and fat. The body weight showed a negative linear effect on cold carcass dressing and the loin-eye area/kg of carcass. The weights of leg, shoulder and neck in relation to cold carcass

  4. Watershed hydrology, network allometry and ecosystem structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The lecture covers recent advances relevant to watershed hydrology, in particular derived from the realm of data now available, covering a wide range of scales and objectively collected and analyzed. It is intended to summarize results that are, in the lecturer's opinion, crucial to our current understanding of a variety of issues. Key among them, landscape evolution models, models of the hydrologic response and, indeed a scientific challenge, ecosystem structure. In particular, a new allometric scaling law for loopless networks, confirmed through studies on rivers, exact network results and computer simulations, offers unique insight on a variety of phenomena, ranging from the ubiquity of the 'quarter-power' law in biology to the origin of scaling size spectra in marine microbial ecosystems, to the proper geomorphological description of a river basin and its hydrological implications. In a sense, networks are a byproduct of the hydrologic dynamics, and indeed can be shown to be related to ecosystem structure. Si parva licet, I will provide evidence suggesting that ensemble averaging of the allometric property (where individual realizations are different networks) leads to results in excellent accord with the known limit scaling of efficient and compact networks with remarkably little scatter with implications of somewhat general character. Such results complement recent work suggesting that scaling features are quite robust to geometrical fluctuations of network properties. Finally, I shall gather from the morphological analysis on river networks the potential for predicting the main characters of the hydrologic response in ungauged basins - a task of practical nature with many social implications, possibly relevant to the Session's aims.

  5. Growth and Allometry in Modern Morphometrics: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz SIĞIRLI; Ercan, İlker

    2013-01-01

    In traditional shape analysis, linear distance, angles and ratios of measurements are used in multivariate statistical analyses. The challenge in any analysis of growth is to extend quantitative description and to explore aspects of the biology of a given organism, such as the genetic basis of morphogenesis, the phylogenetic underpinnings of developmental patterns, or the role of hormones, teratogens, dietary elements, and other environmental variables on the growth process. It is important t...

  6. Entropy and its relationship to allometry

    CERN Document Server

    Shour, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The entropy of an organism's capacity to supply energy through its circulatory system is 4/3 the entropy of the organism's energy requirements. Organisms appear to maximize entropy. The concept of entropy enables shorter derivations of some allometric equations, further evidence of the concept's utility. Entropy helps explain emergence in social, lexical, and biological networks.

  7. Altitudinal changes in the growth and allometry of Rumex alpinus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, P.; Klimešová, Jitka; Doležal, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 1 (2012), s. 35-44. ISSN 1664-2201 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/07/0808; GA AV ČR IAA600050802; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB061007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Clonal growth * Flowering * Morphological markers Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.769, year: 2012

  8. Allometry, temperature, and the stability of food webs

    OpenAIRE

    Rall, Björn Christian

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms driving stability in natural ecosystems is of crucial importance, especially in the current context of global change. A classic paradigm in ecology was that complex food webs (the “who eats whom” of natural ecosystems) should be unstable. This paradigm, however, was based on simple mathematical models. Throughout the last decades, scientists proposed solutions to the contradictions between the predictions of simple models and the observation of the complexity of n...

  9. Brain Allometry and Neural Plasticity in the Bumblebee Bombus occidentalis

    OpenAIRE

    Riveros, Andre J.; Gronenberg, Wulfila

    2010-01-01

    Brain plasticity is a common phenomenon across animals and in many cases it is associated with behavioral transitions. In social insects, such as bees, wasps and ants, plasticity in a particular brain compartment involved in multisensory integration (the mushroom body) has been associated with transitions between tasks differing in cognitive demands. However, in most of these cases, transitions between tasks are age-related, requiring the experimental manipulation of the age structure in the ...

  10. Allometry of the Duration of Flight Feather Molt in Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Rohwer, Sievert; Ricklefs, Robert E.; Rohwer, Vanya G.; Copple, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    We used allometric scaling to explain why the regular replacement of the primary flight feathers requires disproportionately more time for large birds. Primary growth rate scales to mass (M) as M 0.171, whereas the summed length of the primaries scales almost twice as fast (M 0.316). The ratio of length (mm) to rate (mm/day), which would be the time needed to replace all the primaries one by one, increases as the 0.14 power of mass (M 0.316/M 0.171 = M 0.145), illustrating why the time requir...

  11. Allometria da palmeira babaçu em um agroecossistema de derruba-e-queima na periferia este da Amazônia Allometry of the babassu palm growing on a slash-and-burn agroecosystem of the eastern periphery of Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Gehring

    2011-03-01

    .Babassu (Attalea speciosa C.Martius, Arecaceae is a palm with extraordinary socioeconomic and ecologic importance in large areas of tropical Brazil, especially in frequently burned and degraded landscapes. Nevertheless, surprisingly little is known about this keystone species. This paper investigates the allometry of babassu, in order to improve understanding on palm architecture and to provide researchers with an efficient tool for aboveground biomass estimation of juvenile and adult palms. Juvenile leaf biomass can be accurately predicted with the easily measurable minimum diameter of rachis at 30 cm extension. Adult palm biomass can be estimated based on woody stem height, a variable fairly easily measurable on-field. Leaf biomass of adult palms was highly variable, averaged 31.7% of aboveground biomass and can be estimated only indirectly through the relationships between wood:leaf-ratio and total aboveground biomass. Carbon contents varied little in the babassu palm, without size- or growth-stage related differences, suggesting the general applicability of values (42.5% C for stems, 39.8% C for leaves. As a consequence of the limited secondary diameter growth inherent to palms, stem diameter of adult palms is unrelated to palm height and biomass. Stem tapering decreases with increasing palm height. This is partially compensated by increasing wood density in near cylindrical stems. Nevertheless, maximum babassu palm height of about 30 meters appears to be dictated by mechanical stability constraints. All allometric relationships of babassu described in this study are not affected by vegetation stand age, indicating the general applicability of these relationships.

  12. Uncertainty of Forest Biomass Estimates in North Temperate Forests Due to Allometry: Implications for Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of above ground biomass density in forests are crucial for refining global climate models and understanding climate change. Although data from field studies can be aggregated to estimate carbon stocks on global scales, the sparsity of such field data, temporal heterogeneity and methodological variations introduce large errors. Remote sensing measurements from spaceborne sensors are a realistic alternative for global carbon accounting; however, the uncertainty of such measurements is not well known and remains an active area of research. This article describes an effort to collect field data at the Harvard and Howland Forest sites, set in the temperate forests of the Northeastern United States in an attempt to establish ground truth forest biomass for calibration of remote sensing measurements. We present an assessment of the quality of ground truth biomass estimates derived from three different sets of diameter-based allometric equations over the Harvard and Howland Forests to establish the contribution of errors in ground truth data to the error in biomass estimates from remote sensing measurements.

  13. Closing a gap in tropical forest biomass estimation: accounting for crown mass variation in pantropical allometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploton, P.; Barbier, N.; Momo, S. T.; Réjou-Méchain, M.; Boyemba Bosela, F.; Chuyong, G.; Dauby, G.; Droissart, V.; Fayolle, A.; Goodman, R. C.; Henry, M.; Kamdem, N. G.; Katembo Mukirania, J.; Kenfack, D.; Libalah, M.; Ngomanda, A.; Rossi, V.; Sonké, B.; Texier, N.; Thomas, D.; Zebaze, D.; Couteron, P.; Berger, U.; Pélissier, R.

    2015-12-01

    Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is an outstanding challenge. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most tropical forest carbon studies. In particular, a pantropical biomass model has been widely used for approximately a decade, and its most recent version will certainly constitute a reference in the coming years. However, this reference model shows a systematic bias for the largest trees. Because large trees are key drivers of forest carbon stocks and dynamics, understanding the origin and the consequences of this bias is of utmost concern. In this study, we compiled a unique tree mass dataset on 673 trees measured in five tropical countries (101 trees > 100 cm in diameter) and an original dataset of 130 forest plots (1 ha) from central Africa to quantify the error of biomass allometric models at the individual and plot levels when explicitly accounting or not accounting for crown mass variations. We first showed that the proportion of crown to total tree aboveground biomass is highly variable among trees, ranging from 3 to 88 %. This proportion was constant on average for trees 1 Mg) and reduced the range of plot-level error from -23-16 to 0-10 %. The disproportionally higher allocation of large trees to crown mass may thus explain the bias observed recently in the reference pantropical model. This bias leads to far-from-negligible, but often overlooked, systematic errors at the plot level and may be easily corrected by accounting for a crown mass proxy for the largest trees in a stand, thus suggesting that the accuracy of forest carbon estimates can be significantly improved at a minimal cost.

  14. Changes in biomass allocation in species rich meadow after abandonment: Ecological strategy or allometry?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartušková, Alena; Doležal, Jiří; Janeček, Štěpán; Lanta, V.; Klimešová, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2015), s. 379-387. ISSN 1433-8319 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Biomass allocation * species-rich meadow * abandonment Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.606, year: 2014

  15. Closing a gap in tropical forest biomass estimation: accounting for crown mass variation in pantropical allometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ploton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is an outstanding challenge. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most tropical forest carbon studies. In particular, a pantropical biomass model has been widely used for approximately a decade, and its most recent version will certainly constitute a reference in the coming years. However, this reference model shows a systematic bias for the largest trees. Because large trees are key drivers of forest carbon stocks and dynamics, understanding the origin and the consequences of this bias is of utmost concern. In this study, we compiled a unique tree mass dataset on 673 trees measured in five tropical countries (101 trees > 100 cm in diameter and an original dataset of 130 forest plots (1 ha from central Africa to quantify the error of biomass allometric models at the individual and plot levels when explicitly accounting or not accounting for crown mass variations. We first showed that the proportion of crown to total tree aboveground biomass is highly variable among trees, ranging from 3 to 88 %. This proportion was constant on average for trees 1 Mg and reduced the range of plot-level error from −23–16 to 0–10 %. The disproportionally higher allocation of large trees to crown mass may thus explain the bias observed recently in the reference pantropical model. This bias leads to far-from-negligible, but often overlooked, systematic errors at the plot level and may be easily corrected by accounting for a crown mass proxy for the largest trees in a stand, thus suggesting that the accuracy of forest carbon estimates can be significantly improved at a minimal cost.

  16. Measuring and modelling above-ground carbon and tree allometry along a tropical elevation gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, A.R.; Willcock, S.; Platts, P.J.;

    2012-01-01

    associated with AGC, revealed significant positive influence of basal area, stem density, and height:diameter ratio, rather than the mean wood density of species present. Large stems (⩾70 cm dbh; 4.6% of stems) contained 52% of AGC in all plots, declining to 36% in lowland plots. We discuss the cost...

  17. Allometry and growth of eight tree taxa in United Kingdom woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Matthew R; Moustakas, Aristides; Carey, Gregory; Malhi, Yadvinder; Butt, Nathalie; Benham, Sue; Pallett, Denise; Schäfer, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    As part of a project to develop predictive ecosystem models of United Kingdom woodlands we have collated data from two United Kingdom woodlands - Wytham Woods and Alice Holt. Here we present data from 582 individual trees of eight taxa in the form of summary variables relating to the allometric relationships between trunk diameter, height, crown height, crown radius and trunk radial growth rate to the tree's light environment and diameter at breast height. In addition the raw data files containing the variables from which the summary data were obtained. Large sample sizes with longitudinal data spanning 22 years make these datasets useful for future studies concerned with the way trees change in size and shape over their life-span. PMID:25977813

  18. Reproductive allometry in Pedicularis species changes with elevation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hui; Weiner, Jacob; Mazer, Susan J.;

    2012-01-01

    1. Plants produce biomass and then allocate some of it to reproductive structures, so the relationship between reproductive (R) and vegetative (V) mass is a fundamental aspect of a plant’s reproductive strategy. 2. Differences among populations or taxa in the allometric relationship between R and V...... reproductive allocation at smaller sizes and a smaller investment in reproduction per additional unit of biomass accumulated. 3. We investigated variation in the allometric relationship between R and V among 44 naturally occurring populations representing 24 species of Pedicularis in the Tibetan Plateau, to...... test the hypothesis that the slope of the relationship declines with increasing elevation. 4. There was a significant negative relationship between the slope of the log R vs. log V relationship and elevation among populations, although the relationship among populations within species varied. We...

  19. Allometries for Widely Spaced Populus ssp. and Betula ssp. in Nurse Crop Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Stark

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nurse crops of widely spaced pioneer trees are a silvicultural approach to protect the regeneration of frost sensitive target tree species. If overstorey nurse crops are harvested, they can provide additional short-term benefits through increased biomass production, e.g., for bioenergy. However, the intensification of biomass exports from forests might impact negatively on ecosystem nutrient pools. Thus, precise allometric biomass equations are required to quantify biomass and nutrient removals. Since an analysis of published allometric equations developed for typical, dense aspen or birch forests showed that the tree height-to-diameter ratio correlated positively and the proportion of branch biomass negatively with stand density, we developed new allometric biomass equations for widely spaced aspen and birch growing at 4 x 4 m spacing. These equations yielded a root mean squared error of 13% when predicting total aboveground woody biomass for our sample trees. In contrast, the corresponding root mean squared error produced by allometric biomass equations from the literature ranged between 17% to 106% of actual dry biomass. Our results show that specific allometric biomass equations are needed for widely spaced pioneer trees both for accurate estimates of biomass and the nutrients contained within.

  20. Wing shape allometry and aerodynamics in calopterygid damselflies: a comparative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Outomuro, David; Adams, Dean C; Johansson, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background: Wing size and shape have important aerodynamic implications on flight performance. We explored how wing size was related to wing shape in territorial males of 37 taxa of the damselfly family Calopterygidae. Wing coloration was also included in the analyses because it is sexually and naturally selected and has been shown to be related to wing shape. We studied wing shape using both the non-dimensional radius of the second moment of wing area (RSM) and geometric morphometrics. Lower...

  1. Describing urban evolution with the fractal parameters based on area-perimeter allometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    The area-perimeter allometric scaling is a basic and important approach for researching fractal cities and has been studied for a long time. However, the boundary dimension of a city is always numerically overestimated by the traditional formula. An adjusting formula has been derived to revise the overestimated boundary dimension and estimate the form dimension, but the association between the global and local fractal parameters is not clear. This paper is devoted to describing the urban evolution by using the improved fractal parameters based on the area-perimeter measure relation. A system of 68 cities and towns in Yangtze River Delta, China, is taken as an example to make a case study. A discovery is that the average values of the local fractal parameters are approximately equal to the corresponding global fractal parameters of cities. This suggests that the local parameters are the decomposition of the global parameters. The novelty of this empirical study is as follows: first, the form dimension and boun...

  2. Metabolic allometry during development and metamorphosis of the silkworm Bombyx mori: analyses, patterns, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossman-Myer, Bonnie L; Burggren, Warren W

    2010-01-01

    Intraspecific allometric (scaling) relationships for metabolism, which have received little examination compared to interspecific relationships, reflect a complex interplay of organogenesis, growth, and shifting physiologies. In this study of the silkworm Bombyx mori, we hypothesized that allometric relationships for metabolism both across all developmental stages and within each stage would not reflect conventional scaling coefficients (e.g., b not equal to 0.75). Histology, gross morphology, body surface and cross-sectional area, total lipid content, and cytochrome c oxidase activity levels (as evidence of the total metabolic potential of mitochondria) were determined across development. Also measured were oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and the respiratory exchange ratio. The overall slope, b, in the allometric equation relating to body mass across all developmental stages was 0.82, not greatly different from the value of 0.75 typical of interspecific data. However, within larval instars II-V and in prepupae, b varied between 0.99 and 1.49, far higher than hypothesized. Thus, in B. mori, an analytical approach that lumps all developmental stages hides interinstar variability. Morphological and biochemical data suggest that observed scaling patterns in B. mori are likely correlated with changes in overall mitochondrial density rather than with specific changes in body proportion of tissues with higher intrinsic metabolic intensity. PMID:20105069

  3. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouache, Moussa A.; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac0.67, where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. PMID:26990431

  4. Grass allometry and estimation of above-ground biomass in tropical alpine tussock grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Eynden, van der M.; Malhi, Y.; Cahuana, N.; Menor, C.; Zamora, F.; Haugaasen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The puna/páramo grasslands span across the highest altitudes of the tropical Andes, and their ecosystem dynamics are still poorly understood. In this study we examined the above-ground biomass and developed species specific and multispecies power-law allometric equations for four tussock grass speci

  5. Functional differences in the allometry of the water, carbon and nitrogen content of gelatinous organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Molina-Ramírez, Axayacatl

    2015-05-19

    We have supplemented available, concurrent measurements of fresh weight (W, g) and body carbon (C, g) (46 individuals, 14 species) and nitrogen (N, g) (11 individuals, 9 species) of marine gelatinous animals with data obtained during the global ocean MALASPINA 2010 Expedition (totalling 267 individuals and 33 species for the W versus C data; totalling 232 individuals and 31 species for the N versus C data). We then used those data to test the allometric properties of the W versus C and N versus C relationships. Overall, gelatinous organisms contain 1.13 ± 1.57% of C (by weight, mean ± SD) in their bodies and show a C:N of 4.56 ± 2.46, respectively, although estimations can be improved by using separate conversion coefficients for the carnivores and the filter feeders. Reduced major axis regression indicates that W increases isometrically with C in the carnivores (cnidarians and ctenophores), implying that their water content can be described by a single conversion coefficient of 173.78 gW(g C)-1, or a C content of 1.17 ± 1.90% by weight, although there is much variability due to the existence of carbon-dense species. In contrast, W increases more rapidly than C in the filter feeders (salps and doliolids), according to a power relationship W = 446.68C1.54. This exponent is not significantly different from 1.2, which is consistent with the idea that the watery bodies of gelatinous animals represent an evolutionary response towards increasing food capture surfaces, i.e. a bottom-up rather than a top-down mechanism. Thus, the available evidence negates a bottom-up mechanism in the carnivores, but supports it in the filter feeders. Last, N increases isometrically with C in both carnivores and filter feeders with C:N ratios of 3.89 ± 1.34 and 4.38 ± 1.21, respectively. These values are similar to those of compact, non-gelatinous organisms and reflect a predominantly herbivorous diet in the filter feeders, which is confirmed by a difference of one trophic level between filter feeders and carnivores, according to stable N isotope enrichment data. © 2015 The Author.

  6. Impacts of Tree Height-Dbh Allometry on Lidar-Based Tree Aboveground Biomass Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, R.

    2016-06-01

    Lidar has been widely used in tree aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation at plot or stand levels. Lidar-based AGB models are usually constructed with the ground AGB reference as the response variable and lidar canopy indices as predictor variables. Tree diameter at breast height (dbh) is the major variable of most allometric models for estimating reference AGB. However, lidar measurements are mainly related to tree vertical structure. Therefore, tree height-dbh allometric model residuals are expected to have a large impact on lidar-based AGB model performance. This study attempts to investigate sensitivity of lidar-based AGB model to the decreasing strength of height-dbh relationship using a Monte Carlo simulation approach. Striking decrease in R2 and increase in relative RMSE were found in lidar-based AGB model, as the variance of height-dbh model residuals grew. I, therefore, concluded that individual tree height-dbh model residuals fundamentally introduce errors to lidar-AGB models.

  7. Closing a gap in tropical forest biomass estimation: taking crown mass variation into account in pantropical allometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploton, Pierre; Barbier, Nicolas; Takoudjou Momo, Stéphane; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime; Boyemba Bosela, Faustin; Chuyong, Georges; Dauby, Gilles; Droissart, Vincent; Fayolle, Adeline; Calisto Goodman, Rosa; Henry, Matieu; Kamdem, Narcisse Guy; Katembo Mukirania, John; Kenfack, David; Libalah, Moses; Ngomanda, Alfred; Rossi, Vivien; Sonké, Bonaventure; Texier, Nicolas; Thomas, Duncan; Zebaze, Donatien; Couteron, Pierre; Berger, Uta; Pélissier, Raphaël

    2016-03-01

    Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is a challenge that remains outstanding. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most tropical forest carbon studies. In particular, a pantropical biomass model has been widely used for approximately a decade, and its most recent version will certainly constitute a reference model in the coming years. However, this reference model shows a systematic bias towards the largest trees. Because large trees are key drivers of forest carbon stocks and dynamics, understanding the origin and the consequences of this bias is of utmost concern. In this study, we compiled a unique tree mass data set of 673 trees destructively sampled in five tropical countries (101 trees > 100 cm in diameter) and an original data set of 130 forest plots (1 ha) from central Africa to quantify the prediction error of biomass allometric models at the individual and plot levels when explicitly taking crown mass variations into account or not doing so. We first showed that the proportion of crown to total tree aboveground biomass is highly variable among trees, ranging from 3 to 88 %. This proportion was constant on average for trees biomass model estimations and actual tree mass. Taking a crown mass proxy into account in a newly developed model consistently removed the bias observed for large trees (> 1 Mg) and reduced the range of plot-level error (in %) from [-23; 16] to [0; 10]. The disproportionally higher allocation of large trees to crown mass may thus explain the bias observed recently in the reference pantropical model. This bias leads to far-from-negligible, but often overlooked, systematic errors at the plot level and may be easily corrected by taking a crown mass proxy for the largest trees in a stand into account, thus suggesting that the accuracy of forest carbon estimates can be significantly improved at a minimal cost.

  8. Habitat Effect on Allometry of a Xeric Shrub (Artemisia ordosica Krasch in the Mu Us Desert of Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei She

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Allometric models are useful for assessment of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP and aboveground biomass (AGB of forests and shrubs, and are widely implemented in forest inventory and management. Multiple forms of allometric models have been used to estimate vegetation carbon storage for desert shrubland, but their validity for biomass estimation has not been tested at a region scale with different habitats. To verify the validity of habitat-specific models, general models (combining data from all habitats/sites, and previously developed models for biomass prediction, we developed both general models and habitat-specific models for aboveground biomass and ANPP of Artemisia ordosica Krasch, a dominant shrub of the Mu Us Desert. Our results showed that models based on crown area or canopy volume consistently explained large parts of the variations in aboveground biomass and ANPP. Model fitting highlighted that general allometric models were inadequate across different habitats, and habitat-specific models were useful for that specific habitat. Previous models might be inappropriate for other sites because of site quality differences. There was a strong habitat effect on the allometric relationships of A. ordosica. Although our study is a case in point, the results indicate that allometric models for desert shrubs should be used with caution and require robust validation if adopted from other studies or applied to different sites/habitats.

  9. Closing a gap in tropical forest biomass estimation: taking crown mass variation into account in pantropical allometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploton, Pierre; Barbier, Nicolas; Takoudjou Momo, Stéphane; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime; Boyemba Bosela, Faustin; Chuyong, Georges; Dauby, Gilles; Droissart, Vincent; Fayolle, Adeline; Calisto Goodman, Rosa; Henry, Matieu; Kamdem, Narcisse Guy; Katembo Mukirania, John; Kenfack, David; Libalah, Moses; Ngomanda, Alfred; Rossi, Vivien; Sonké, Bonaventure; Texier, Nicolas; Thomas, Duncan; Zebaze, Donatien; Couteron, Pierre; Berger, Uta; Pélissier, Raphaël

    2016-03-01

    Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is a challenge that remains outstanding. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most tropical forest carbon studies. In particular, a pantropical biomass model has been widely used for approximately a decade, and its most recent version will certainly constitute a reference model in the coming years. However, this reference model shows a systematic bias towards the largest trees. Because large trees are key drivers of forest carbon stocks and dynamics, understanding the origin and the consequences of this bias is of utmost concern. In this study, we compiled a unique tree mass data set of 673 trees destructively sampled in five tropical countries (101 trees > 100 cm in diameter) and an original data set of 130 forest plots (1 ha) from central Africa to quantify the prediction error of biomass allometric models at the individual and plot levels when explicitly taking crown mass variations into account or not doing so. We first showed that the proportion of crown to total tree aboveground biomass is highly variable among trees, ranging from 3 to 88 %. This proportion was constant on average for trees 1 Mg) and reduced the range of plot-level error (in %) from [-23; 16] to [0; 10]. The disproportionally higher allocation of large trees to crown mass may thus explain the bias observed recently in the reference pantropical model. This bias leads to far-from-negligible, but often overlooked, systematic errors at the plot level and may be easily corrected by taking a crown mass proxy for the largest trees in a stand into account, thus suggesting that the accuracy of forest carbon estimates can be significantly improved at a minimal cost.

  10. Axial allometry in a neutrally buoyant environment: effects of the terrestrial-aquatic transition on vertebral scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K E; Pierce, S E

    2016-03-01

    Ecological diversification into new environments presents new mechanical challenges for locomotion. An extreme example of this is the transition from a terrestrial to an aquatic lifestyle. Here, we examine the implications of life in a neutrally buoyant environment on adaptations of the axial skeleton to evolutionary increases in body size. On land, mammals must use their thoracolumbar vertebral column for body support against gravity and thus exhibit increasing stabilization of the trunk as body size increases. Conversely, in water, the role of the axial skeleton in body support is reduced, and, in aquatic mammals, the vertebral column functions primarily in locomotion. Therefore, we hypothesize that the allometric stabilization associated with increasing body size in terrestrial mammals will be minimized in secondarily aquatic mammals. We test this by comparing the scaling exponent (slope) of vertebral measures from 57 terrestrial species (23 felids, 34 bovids) to 23 semi-aquatic species (pinnipeds), using phylogenetically corrected regressions. Terrestrial taxa meet predictions of allometric stabilization, with posterior vertebral column (lumbar region) shortening, increased vertebral height compared to width, and shorter, more disc-shaped centra. In contrast, pinniped vertebral proportions (e.g. length, width, height) scale with isometry, and in some cases, centra even become more spool-shaped with increasing size, suggesting increased flexibility. Our results demonstrate that evolution of a secondarily aquatic lifestyle has modified the mechanical constraints associated with evolutionary increases in body size, relative to terrestrial taxa. PMID:26679743

  11. Allometry and partitioning of above- and below-ground biomass in farmed eucalyptus species dominant in Western Kenyan agricultural landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmers in developing countries are one of the world's largest and most efficient producers of sequestered carbon. However, measuring, monitoring and verifying how much carbon trees in smallholder farms are removing from the atmosphere has remained a great challenge in developing nations. Devising a reliable way for measuring carbon associated with trees in agricultural landscapes is essential for helping smallholder farmers benefit from emerging carbon markets. This study aimed to develop biomass equations specific to dominant eucalyptus species found in agricultural landscapes in Western Kenya. Allometric relationships were developed by regressing diameter at breast height (DBH) alone or DBH in combination with height, wood density or crown area against the biomass of 48 trees destructively sampled from a 100 km2 site. DBH alone was a significant predictor variable and estimated aboveground biomass (AGB) with over 95% accuracy. The stems, branches and leaves formed up to 74, 22 and 4% of AGB, respectively, while belowground biomass (BGB) of the harvested trees accounted for 21% of the total tree biomass, yielding an overall root-to-shoot ratio (RS) of 0.27, which varied across tree size. Total tree biomass held in live Eucalyptus trees was estimated to be 24.4 ± 0.01 Mg ha−1, equivalent to 11.7 ± 0.01 Mg of carbon per hectare. The equations presented provide useful tools for estimating tree carbon stocks of Eucalyptus in agricultural landscapes for bio-energy and carbon accounting. These equations can be applied to Eucalyptus in most agricultural systems with similar agro-ecological settings where tree growth parameters would fall within ranges comparable to the sampled population. -- Highlights: ► Equation with DBH alone estimated aboveground biomass with about 95% accuracy. ► Local generic equations overestimated above- and below-ground biomass by 10 and 48%. ► Height, wood density and crown area data did not improve model accuracy. ► Stems, roots, branches and leaves formed 58, 21, 18 and 3% of total tree biomass

  12. Allometry of root branching and its relationship to root morphological and functional traits in three range grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several studies have documented the existence of correlative mechanisms that control lateral root emergence in plants. To better understand root branching responses to nutrients, root growth in three range grasses [Whitmar cultivar of bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) Love), Hyc...

  13. Rain, prey and predators: climatically driven shifts in frog abundance modify reproductive allometry in a tropical snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2007-11-01

    To predict the impacts of climate change on animal populations, we need long-term data sets on the effects of annual climatic variation on the demographic traits (growth, survival, reproductive output) that determine population viability. One frequent complication is that fecundity also depends upon maternal body size, a trait that often spans a wide range within a single population. During an eight-year field study, we measured annual variation in weather conditions, frog abundance and snake reproduction on a floodplain in the Australian wet-dry tropics. Frog numbers varied considerably from year to year, and were highest in years with hotter wetter conditions during the monsoonal season ("wet season"). Mean maternal body sizes, egg sizes and post-partum maternal body conditions of frog-eating snakes (keelback, Tropidonophis mairii, Colubridae) showed no significant annual variation over this period, but mean clutch sizes were higher in years with higher prey abundance. Larger females were more sensitive to frog abundance in this respect than were smaller conspecifics, so that the rate at which fecundity increased with body size varied among years, and was highest when prey availability was greatest. Thus, the link between female body size and reproductive output varied among years, with climatic factors modifying the relative reproductive rates of larger (older) versus smaller (younger) animals within the keelback population. PMID:17724615

  14. The structural rigidity of the cranium of Australopithecus africanus: implications for diet, dietary adaptations, and the allometry of feeding biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, David S; Grosse, Ian R; Dechow, Paul C; Smith, Amanda L; Wang, Qian; Weber, Gerhard W; Neubauer, Simon; Slice, Dennis E; Chalk, Janine; Richmond, Brian G; Lucas, Peter W; Spencer, Mark A; Schrein, Caitlin; Wright, Barth W; Byron, Craig; Ross, Callum F

    2010-04-01

    Australopithecus africanus is an early hominin (i.e., human relative) believed to exhibit stress-reducing adaptations in its craniofacial skeleton that may be related to the consumption of resistant food items using its premolar teeth. Finite element analyses simulating molar and premolar biting were used to test the hypothesis that the cranium of A. africanus is structurally more rigid than that of Macaca fascicularis, an Old World monkey that lacks derived australopith facial features. Previously generated finite element models of crania of these species were subjected to isometrically scaled loads, permitting a direct comparison of strain magnitudes. Moreover, strain energy (SE) in the models was compared after results were scaled to account for differences in bone volume and muscle forces. Results indicate that strains in certain skeletal regions below the orbits are higher in M. fascicularis than in A. africanus. Moreover, although premolar bites produce von Mises strains in the rostrum that are elevated relative to those produced by molar biting in both species, rostral strains are much higher in the macaque than in the australopith. These data suggest that at least the midface of A. africanus is more rigid than that of M. fascicularis. Comparisons of SE reveal that the A. africanus cranium is, overall, more rigid than that of M. fascicularis during premolar biting. This is consistent with the hypothesis that this hominin may have periodically consumed large, hard food items. However, the SE data suggest that the A. africanus cranium is marginally less rigid than that of the macaque during molar biting. It is hypothesized that the SE results are being influenced by the allometric scaling of cranial cortical bone thickness. PMID:20235314

  15. Testing the generality of above-ground biomass allometry across plant functional types at the continent scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Keryn I; Roxburgh, Stephen H; Chave, Jerome; England, Jacqueline R; Zerihun, Ayalsew; Specht, Alison; Lewis, Tom; Bennett, Lauren T; Baker, Thomas G; Adams, Mark A; Huxtable, Dan; Montagu, Kelvin D; Falster, Daniel S; Feller, Mike; Sochacki, Stan; Ritson, Peter; Bastin, Gary; Bartle, John; Wildy, Dan; Hobbs, Trevor; Larmour, John; Waterworth, Rob; Stewart, Hugh T L; Jonson, Justin; Forrester, David I; Applegate, Grahame; Mendham, Daniel; Bradford, Matt; O'Grady, Anthony; Green, Daryl; Sudmeyer, Rob; Rance, Stan J; Turner, John; Barton, Craig; Wenk, Elizabeth H; Grove, Tim; Attiwill, Peter M; Pinkard, Elizabeth; Butler, Don; Brooksbank, Kim; Spencer, Beren; Snowdon, Peter; O'Brien, Nick; Battaglia, Michael; Cameron, David M; Hamilton, Steve; McAuthur, Geoff; Sinclair, Jenny

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground-based estimation of the carbon stored in terrestrial ecosystems is critical to quantifying the global carbon budget. Allometric models provide cost-effective methods for biomass prediction. But do such models vary with ecoregion or plant functional type? We compiled 15 054 measurements of individual tree or shrub biomass from across Australia to examine the generality of allometric models for above-ground biomass prediction. This provided a robust case study because Australia includes ecoregions ranging from arid shrublands to tropical rainforests, and has a rich history of biomass research, particularly in planted forests. Regardless of ecoregion, for five broad categories of plant functional type (shrubs; multistemmed trees; trees of the genus Eucalyptus and closely related genera; other trees of high wood density; and other trees of low wood density), relationships between biomass and stem diameter were generic. Simple power-law models explained 84-95% of the variation in biomass, with little improvement in model performance when other plant variables (height, bole wood density), or site characteristics (climate, age, management) were included. Predictions of stand-based biomass from allometric models of varying levels of generalization (species-specific, plant functional type) were validated using whole-plot harvest data from 17 contrasting stands (range: 9-356 Mg ha(-1) ). Losses in efficiency of prediction were plant functional types. Development of new species-specific models is only warranted when gains in accuracy of stand-based predictions are relatively high (e.g. high-value monocultures). PMID:26683241

  16. Herbivory and Body Size: Allometries of Diet Quality and Gastrointestinal Physiology, and Implications for Herbivore Ecology and Dinosaur Gigantism

    OpenAIRE

    Clauss, Marcus; Steuer, Patrick; Müller, Dennis W. H.; Codron, Daryl; Hummel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Digestive physiology has played a prominent role in explanations for terrestrial herbivore body size evolution and size-driven diversification and niche differ- entiation. This is based on the association of increasing body mass (BM) with diets of lower quality, and with putative mechanisms by which a higher BM could translate into a higher digestive efficiency. Such concepts, however, often do not match empirical data. Here, we review concepts and data on terrestrial herbivore BM, diet quali...

  17. Herbivory and body size: allometries of diet quality and gastrointestinal physiology, and implications for herbivore ecology and dinosaur gigantism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Clauss

    Full Text Available Digestive physiology has played a prominent role in explanations for terrestrial herbivore body size evolution and size-driven diversification and niche differentiation. This is based on the association of increasing body mass (BM with diets of lower quality, and with putative mechanisms by which a higher BM could translate into a higher digestive efficiency. Such concepts, however, often do not match empirical data. Here, we review concepts and data on terrestrial herbivore BM, diet quality, digestive physiology and metabolism, and in doing so give examples for problems in using allometric analyses and extrapolations. A digestive advantage of larger BM is not corroborated by conceptual or empirical approaches. We suggest that explanatory models should shift from physiological to ecological scenarios based on the association of forage quality and biomass availability, and the association between BM and feeding selectivity. These associations mostly (but not exclusively allow large herbivores to use low quality forage only, whereas they allow small herbivores the use of any forage they can physically manage. Examples of small herbivores able to subsist on lower quality diets are rare but exist. We speculate that this could be explained by evolutionary adaptations to the ecological opportunity of selective feeding in smaller animals, rather than by a physiologic or metabolic necessity linked to BM. For gigantic herbivores such as sauropod dinosaurs, other factors than digestive physiology appear more promising candidates to explain evolutionary drives towards extreme BM.

  18. Clutch and egg allometry of the turtle Mauremys leprosa (Chelonia: Geoemydidae) from a polluted peri-urban river in west-central Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimi, Mohamed; Znari, Mohammed; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Feddadi, Youssef; Baamrane, Moulay Abdeljalil Ait

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationships of clutch size (CS) and egg size to female body size (straight-line carapace length, CL) in a population of the turtle Mauremys leprosa from a polluted segment of oued (river) Tensift in arid west-central Morocco. Twenty-eight adult females were collected in May–July, 2009 and all were gravid. Each was weighed, measured, humanely euthanized and then dissected. Oviductal shelled eggs were removed, weighed (egg mass, EM) and measured for length (EL) and width (EW). Clutch mass (CM) was the sum of EM for a clutch. Pelvic aperture width (PAW) was measured at the widest point between the ilia bones through which eggs must pass at oviposition. The smallest gravid female had a CL of 124.0 mm. Mean CS was relatively large (9.7±2.0 eggs, range: 3–13) and may reflect high productivity associated with polluted (eutrophic) waters. Regression analyses were conducted using log-transformed data. CM increased isometrically with maternal body size. CS, EW and EM were all significantly hypoallometric in their relationship with CL. EL did not change significantly with increases in CL. EW increased at a hypoallometric rate with increasing CL but was unconstrained by PAW since the widest egg was smaller than the narrowest PAW measurement when excluding the three smallest females. Smaller females may have EW constrained by PAW. As females increase in size they increase both clutch size and egg width in contradiction to predictions of optimal egg size theory.

  19. Allometries of maximum growth rate versus body mass at maximum growth indicate that non-avian dinosaurs had growth rates typical of fast growing ectothermic sauropsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Werner

    Full Text Available We tested if growth rates of recent taxa are unequivocally separated between endotherms and ectotherms, and compared these to dinosaurian growth rates. We therefore performed linear regression analyses on the log-transformed maximum growth rate against log-transformed body mass at maximum growth for extant altricial birds, precocial birds, eutherians, marsupials, reptiles, fishes and dinosaurs. Regression models of precocial birds (and fishes strongly differed from Case's study (1978, which is often used to compare dinosaurian growth rates to those of extant vertebrates. For all taxonomic groups, the slope of 0.75 expected from the Metabolic Theory of Ecology was statistically supported. To compare growth rates between taxonomic groups we therefore used regressions with this fixed slope and group-specific intercepts. On average, maximum growth rates of ectotherms were about 10 (reptiles to 20 (fishes times (in comparison to mammals or even 45 (reptiles to 100 (fishes times (in comparison to birds lower than in endotherms. While on average all taxa were clearly separated from each other, individual growth rates overlapped between several taxa and even between endotherms and ectotherms. Dinosaurs had growth rates intermediate between similar sized/scaled-up reptiles and mammals, but a much lower rate than scaled-up birds. All dinosaurian growth rates were within the range of extant reptiles and mammals, and were lower than those of birds. Under the assumption that growth rate and metabolic rate are indeed linked, our results suggest two alternative interpretations. Compared to other sauropsids, the growth rates of studied dinosaurs clearly indicate that they had an ectothermic rather than an endothermic metabolic rate. Compared to other vertebrate growth rates, the overall high variability in growth rates of extant groups and the high overlap between individual growth rates of endothermic and ectothermic extant species make it impossible to rule out either of the two thermoregulation strategies for studied dinosaurs.

  20. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria): Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina

    OpenAIRE

    Dick, Daniel G.; Maxwell, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria). We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum) was p...

  1. Development of a Model for Estimation of Acacia Senegal Tree Biomass Using Allometry and Aster Satellite Imagery at Ennuhud, West Kordofan State, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Hatim; Elnour Adam, Hassan; Csaplovics, Elmar

    The current paper deals with the development of a biomass model for Acacia senegal trees by applying allometric equations for ground data combined with ASTER satellite data sets. The current study is conducted around Ennuhud area which is located in Ennuhud locality in West Kordofan State, Sudan. Primary data are obtained by application of random sampling around Ennuhud town where Acacia senegal tree species is abundant. Ten sample units are taken. Each unit contains five sample plots (15x15 m), one in the centre and the others in the four directions 100 m away from the centre forming a total of 50 sample plots. The tree coordinates, diameter/diameters (diameter at breast height ≥ 5 cm), height and crown diameters will be recorded. Sensor data were acquired from ASTER remote sensing satellite (29.03.2007 & 26.01.2011) and integrated with the in-situ data. The expected findings allow for the calculation of the mean diameter of trees. The tree above ground biomass (TAGB), tree below ground biomass (TBGB) and the tree total biomass (TTB) of Acacia senegal are computed consequently. Remotely sensed data are integrated with the ground data for creating the data base for calculating the correlation of the relationship between the two methods of data collection. The application of allometric equations is useful as a non-destructive method for biomass estimation by the application of remote sensing is recommended for biomass modelling over large areas. Keywords: Biomass model, Acacia senegal tree, remote sensing, Ennuhud, North Kordofan

  2. Population structure and allometry of Podocnemis unifilis (Testudines, Podocnemididae) in a protected area upstream Belo Monte dam in Xingu River, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miorando, Priscila S; Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Pezzuti, Juarez C B

    2015-01-01

    Amazon river turtles are increasingly threatened by habitat loss and alteration due to the Brazilian energy policy based on construction of hydroelectric dams, meanwhile, populational studies remain scarce. We described the population structure, and established body allometric relationships of Podocnemis unifilis in the Terra do Meio Ecological Station in the Iriri River, tributary of the Xingu River upstream the Belo Monte dam under construction Turtles were captured by hand net and diving in 2012 and 2013 dry seasons, and 2013 rainy season. A total of 728 males, 296 females and four juveniles were captured. Adult sex ratio was male-biased by 9.15 ♂:1 ♀. Females were significantly larger than males. Mean straight carapace length was 268.9 ± 46.7 mm (165 - 403) for females; and 232.7 ± 24.8 mm (167 - 303) for males. The sexes were morphologically distinct in function of a proportionally larger plastron, and higher carapace, on females. Allometric relationships between straight carapace length and other morphometric traits were strong for males (R2 range = 0.87 - 0.96 and females (R2 range =0.79 - 0.98. Exploitation of P. unifilis in biomass extirpated from the Middle Xingu River may be estimated from body parts found post-consumption by the presented regressions. PMID:26628030

  3. Effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on morphology, physiology and allometry of Amaranthus retroflexus%增强紫外-B对反枝苋的形态、生理及异速生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛慧君; 王勋陵; 岳明

    2003-01-01

    在田间条件下,模拟西安地区21.6%的臭氧层减薄,研究增强紫外-B辐射(280~320 nm,3.18 kJ*m-2*d-1)对双子叶阔叶杂草反枝苋(Amaranthus retroflexus)生理、形态及异速生长的影响.结果表明:(1)与对照相比,处理组的叶绿素、类胡萝卜素含量降低,但叶片紫外吸收物质的含量增加;(2)处理组的株高、叶数及单株重有明显降低;(3)株高与单株重的线性关系有较大的偏离,表现在同等株高下处理组的生物量低于对照.这些表明在补充的紫外-B条件下,反枝苋的形态有较大的可塑性,并进一步会影响该植物在群落中的竞争能力.

  4. 海草形态、生长的种间差异及其相关生长关系%Interspecific differences of seagrass morphology and growth patterns and their allometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑凤英; 韩晓弟; 金艳梅; 张伟; 赵宏

    2012-01-01

    Seagrass is a kind of marine submersed higher plants, and belongs to typical rhizoma-tous-clonar plants. Rhizome diameter and ramet weight are the first and the second useful descriptors of seagrass size, respectively, while body size is a key identification feature for see-grasses. In this paper, a comprehensive analysis was made on the 6 module indices and 18 growth indices of seagrass. The results indicated that fruit size, leaf size, and shoot weight were species-specific. Shoot plastochrone, branching rate of horizontal rhizome, leaf production per year, shoot longevity, and branching rate of vertical rhizome were the most species-specific dynamic properties, suggesting that the difference in seagrasses growth dynamics was mainly reflected in the clonal growth capacity and ramet life cycle length. Large seagrasses displayed a phalanx clonal architecture, while small seagrasses except Cymodocea nodosa displayed a guerrilla growth strategy. The horizontal spreading rate of large seagrasses genets was slower than that of small ones. There existed allometric relationships between segrasses size and their architectural properties and dynamic properties. With increasing seagrass size, the plastochrone interval and longevity of leaf, ramet, and node extended in modular growth level, and the horizontal internod-al length and elongation rate of horizontal rhizome, ramet production rate, branching rate, and ' branching angle decreased while spacer increased in clonal growth level. The physiological integration among clonal fragments enhanced with the increasing size. For the seagrass populations,the biomass increased while the density decreased when the seagrass size increased. Therefore, seagrass size strongly affected the architecture module, growth type, clonal architecture, population density, and productivity of seagrasses. The differences in form, growth dynamics, and module component showed the differences of seagrasses in their life strategy and ecological functions, which could be the useful information in exploring the restoration theory of seagrass bed.%海草是海洋沉水高等植物,属典型的根茎克隆植物.根状茎直径和分株重分别是其个体大小的第一、二表征指标,个体大小是海草重要的种间识别特征.对海草6个形态构件指标和18个生长指标的综合分析表明:果实大小、单株叶面积、分株重具有显著的种特异性;分株发出的时间差、水平根状茎分枝率、叶年产量、分株寿命和垂直茎分枝率是海草种特异性最强的5个生长动态指标,海草生长动态的差异主要体现在克隆生长能力强弱和分株生活史长短上;大海草趋于游击型克隆构型,而小海草则趋于密集型,但小海草Cymodocea nodosa例外;大海草基株水平扩展能力较小海草差.海草个体大小与生长特征的相关生长关系表明:随个体的增大,海草在有机构件生长上表现出两相邻叶、相邻分株、相邻节发出的时间差延长,分株、叶、茎寿命延长的特点;在克隆生长水平上表现出根状茎节间长变短、延伸速率降低,分枝率和根状茎上年产分株数降低,分枝角度变小和间隔子增大的趋势;在克隆片段水平上表现为生理整合性增强;在种群层面则表现出生物量增大和种群密度降低的特点.因此,海草个体大小对其形态、生长特征、克隆构型、种群密度和生产力起到了决定作用.大小海草不同的形态、生长动态和克隆构型特征导致它们的生存策略及生态功能也不同,这一点可能对海草场修复基础理论研究具有一定的指示作用.

  5. XEROMORPHY INCREASES IN SHOOTS OF PSEUDOTSUGA MENZIESII (MIRB.) FRANCO SEEDLINGS WITH EXPOSURE TO ELEVATED TEMPERATURE BUT NOT ELEVATED CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedling structure influences tree structure and function, ultimately determining the potential productivity of trees and their competitiveness for resources. We investigated changes in shoot organ structure, as indicated by biomass allocation, allometry and anatomy in response ...

  6. Preliminary study of Isometry in pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) from Ivars and Vila-sana lake, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Parés Casanova, Pere-Miquel; Cano, Lídia

    2014-01-01

    The present analysis of sexual allometry is based on the study of 26 adult specimens (12 females and 14 males) of pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) from the same lake. On their left lateral aspect, 19 homologous landmarks were obtained which were studied according to geometric morphometric methods. The utilization of geometric morphometric techniques in assessing allometry in the present study showed that size only accounted for a 4.4% of the shape and that it did not appear allometric relationsh...

  7. Crescimento relativo do camarão canela Macrobrachium amazonicum (Heller (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae em viveiros Relative growth of Amazon river prawn Macrobrachium amazonicum (Heller (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae in earthen ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M.C. Moraes-Riodades

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Some morphometric relationships in Macrobrachium amazonicum (Heller, 1862 reared in earthen ponds were studied. A total of 239 individuals were collected, sexed and sorted to juvenile or adult. Total length (Lt, post-orbital length (Lpo, carapace length (Lcp and queliped length (Lql were measured. The relationships Lt/Lpo, Lpo/Lcp and Lt/Lcp are the same for juveniles, males and females, indicating unchanged growth pattern during post-larval ontogenetic development. While Lt/Lpo showed isometric growth, Lpo/Lcp and Lt/Lcp showed negative allometry. On the other hand, for the Lql/Lcp relationship, juveniles showed isometric growth, females slight positive allometry and males a strong positive allometry. It suggests that the importance of chelipeds may be different in these groups. Quelipeds play important role on food capture and on agonistic, social and reproductive behavior. Therefore, inter and intraspecific interactions may change during prawn growth, even after morphological

  8. An allometric scaling relation based on logistic growth of cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An allometric scaling based on logistic process can be used to model urban growth. • The traditional allometry is based on exponential growth instead of logistic growth. • The exponential allometry represents a local scaling of urban growth. • The logistic allometry represents a global scaling of urban growth. • The exponential allometry is an approximation relation of the logistic allometry. - Abstract: The relationships between urban area and population size have been empirically demonstrated to follow the scaling law of allometric growth. This allometric scaling is based on exponential growth of city size and can be termed “exponential allometry”, which is associated with the concepts of fractals. However, both city population and urban area comply with the course of logistic growth rather than exponential growth. In this paper, I will present a new allometric scaling based on logistic growth to solve the above mentioned problem. The logistic growth is a process of replacement dynamics. Defining a pair of replacement quotients as new measurements, which are functions of urban area and population, we can derive an allometric scaling relation from the logistic processes of urban growth, which can be termed “logistic allometry”. The exponential allometric relation between urban area and population is the approximate expression of the logistic allometric equation when the city size is not large enough. The proper range of the allometric scaling exponent value is reconsidered through the logistic process. Then, a medium-sized city of Henan Province, China, is employed as an example to validate the new allometric relation. The logistic allometry is helpful for further understanding the fractal property and self-organized process of urban evolution in the right perspective

  9. Are ontogenetic shifts in diet linked to shifts in feeding mechanics? Scaling of the feeding apparatus in the banded watersnake Nerodia fasciata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Shawn E; Moon, Brad R; Herrel, Anthony; Kley, Nathan J

    2007-06-01

    The effects of size on animal behaviour, ecology, and physiology are widespread. Theoretical models have been developed to predict how animal form, function, and performance should change with increasing size. Yet, numerous animals undergo dramatic shifts in ecology (e.g. habitat use, diet) that may directly influence the functioning and presumably the scaling of the musculoskeletal system. For example, previous studies have shown that banded watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata) switch from fish prey as juveniles to frog prey as adults, and that fish and frogs represent functionally distinct prey types to watersnakes. We therefore tested whether this ontogenetic shift in diet was coupled to changes in the scaling patterns of the cranial musculoskeletal system in an ontogenetic size series (70-600 mm snout-vent length) of banded watersnakes. We found that all cranial bones and gape size exhibited significant negative allometry, whereas the muscle physiological cross-sectional area (pCSAs) scaled either isometrically or with positive allometry against snout-vent length. By contrast, we found that gape size, most cranial bones, and muscle pCSAs exhibited highly significant positive allometry against head length. Furthermore, the mechanical advantage of the jaw-closing lever system remained constant over ontogeny. Overall, these cranial allometries should enable watersnakes to meet the functional requirements of switching from fusiform fish to bulky frog prey. However, recent studies have reported highly similar allometries in a wide diversity of vertebrate taxa, suggesting that positive allometry within the cranial musculoskeletal system may actually be a general characteristic of vertebrates. PMID:17562879

  10. Sexually dimorphic proportions of the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius, Anders

    2005-01-01

    allometry. Throughout the range of individual sizes, females have significantly larger skulls and shorter vertebral columns than males for similarly sized individuals. In fully grown specimens, the condylobasal length of females makes up a smaller proportion of total length, and the vertebrae make up a...... larger proportion as compared with males. As these characters show negative and positive allometry, respectively, it is suggested that males finish their development at an earlier stage than females, retaining more paedomorphic proportions of the skeleton. Paedomorphosis in fully grown males relative to...

  11. Shrinkage of body size of small insects: A possible link to global warming?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jihuan [College of Science, Donghua University, 1882 Yan' an Xilu Road, Shanghai 200051 (China)]. E-mail: jhhe@dhu.edu.cn

    2007-11-15

    The increase of global mean surface temperature leads to the increase of metabolic rate. This might lead to an unexpected threat from the small insect world. Global warming shrinks cell size, shorten lifespan, and accelerate evolution. The present note speculates on possible connections between allometry and E-infinity theory.

  12. Shape shifting predicts ontogenetic changes in metabolic scaling in diverse aquatic invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazier, Douglas S.; Hirst, Andrew G.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-01-01

    metabolic scaling that deviate from 3/4-power scaling predicted by general models. Here, we show that in diverse aquatic invertebrates, ontogenetic shifts in the scaling of routine metabolic rate from near isometry (bR = scaling exponent approx. 1) to negative allometry (bR < 1), or the reverse, are...

  13. Shrinkage of body size of small insects: A possible link to global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of global mean surface temperature leads to the increase of metabolic rate. This might lead to an unexpected threat from the small insect world. Global warming shrinks cell size, shorten lifespan, and accelerate evolution. The present note speculates on possible connections between allometry and E-infinity theory

  14. Canine evolution in sabretoothed carnivores: natural selection or sexual selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randau, Marcela; Carbone, Chris; Turvey, Samuel T

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable elongated upper canines of extinct sabretoothed carnivorous mammals have been the subject of considerable speculation on their adaptive function, but the absence of living analogues prevents any direct inference about their evolution. We analysed scaling relationships of the upper canines of 20 sabretoothed feliform carnivores (Nimravidae, Barbourofelidae, Machairodontinae), representing both dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, and 33 non-sabretoothed felids in relation to body size in order to characterize and identify the evolutionary processes driving their development, using the scaling relationships of carnassial teeth in both groups as a control. Carnassials display isometric allometry in both sabretooths and non-sabretooths, supporting their close relationship with meat-slicing, whereas the upper canines of both groups display positive allometry with body size. Whereas there is no statistical difference in allometry of upper canine height between dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, the significantly stronger positive allometry of upper canine height shown by sabretooths as a whole compared to non-sabretooths reveals that different processes drove canine evolution in these groups. Although sabretoothed canines must still have been effective for prey capture and processing by hypercarnivorous predators, canine morphology in these extinct carnivores was likely to have been driven to a greater extent by sexual selection than in non-sabretooths. Scaling relationships therefore indicate the probable importance of sexual selection in the evolution of the hypertrophied sabretooth anterior dentition. PMID:23951334

  15. Canine evolution in sabretoothed carnivores: natural selection or sexual selection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Randau

    Full Text Available The remarkable elongated upper canines of extinct sabretoothed carnivorous mammals have been the subject of considerable speculation on their adaptive function, but the absence of living analogues prevents any direct inference about their evolution. We analysed scaling relationships of the upper canines of 20 sabretoothed feliform carnivores (Nimravidae, Barbourofelidae, Machairodontinae, representing both dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, and 33 non-sabretoothed felids in relation to body size in order to characterize and identify the evolutionary processes driving their development, using the scaling relationships of carnassial teeth in both groups as a control. Carnassials display isometric allometry in both sabretooths and non-sabretooths, supporting their close relationship with meat-slicing, whereas the upper canines of both groups display positive allometry with body size. Whereas there is no statistical difference in allometry of upper canine height between dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, the significantly stronger positive allometry of upper canine height shown by sabretooths as a whole compared to non-sabretooths reveals that different processes drove canine evolution in these groups. Although sabretoothed canines must still have been effective for prey capture and processing by hypercarnivorous predators, canine morphology in these extinct carnivores was likely to have been driven to a greater extent by sexual selection than in non-sabretooths. Scaling relationships therefore indicate the probable importance of sexual selection in the evolution of the hypertrophied sabretooth anterior dentition.

  16. The three-quarter power scaling of extinction risk in Late Pleistocene mammals, and a new theory of the size selectivity of extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polishchuk, L.

    2010-01-01

    Questions: What is the pattern of body mass versus extinction risk in the Late Pleistocene extinctions of mammals, both qualitatively and quantitatively? Are there patterns that relate extinction risk to the well-known allometries of body mass with population density or population growth rate? Theor

  17. Saprovisca sarangay, new species, a second species in an unusual Philippine genus of Eupariini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Skelley, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Saprovisca Stebnicka (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is described from the Philippines. This new species possesses sexual dimorphism in the form of clypeal horns in males which also show major and minor allometry, both are conditions rare in the Aphodiinae.

  18. Estimation of above ground woody biomass of SRC hybrid poplar clone J-105 in different fertilizer treatments in Czech-Moravian highland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tripathi, A.M.; Trnka, Miroslav; Fischer, Milan; Orság, Matěj; Fajman, M.; Marek, Michal V.; Žalud, Zdeněk

    Brno: Mendelova univerzita v Brně, 2012, s. 534-541. ISBN 978-80-7375-656-7. [MendelNet 2012. Brno (CZ), 21.11.2012-22.11.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : short rotation coppice * bio-energy * poplar * allometry * biomass * dry matter content (dmc) * shoot ratio Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  19. Clonal architecture and patch formation of Potamogeton perfoliatus L. : in response to environmental conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfer, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords submersed macrophyte, P. perfoliatus, clonal architecture, spatial growth, shoot density, rhizome, biomass allocation, growth plasticity, foraging, allometry, sediment, porewater, nutrients, fertilization, clonal integration, individual-based model, Lake Constance Clonal growth governs the aboveground growth pattern of submerged clonal macrophytes. The research project provides detailed data on the architectural growth rules of Potamogeton perfoliatus L. (perfoliate pondweed) such as...

  20. Scale effects between body size and limb design in quadrupedal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Brandon M; Hoffman, Louwrens C

    2013-01-01

    Recently the metabolic cost of swinging the limbs has been found to be much greater than previously thought, raising the possibility that limb rotational inertia influences the energetics of locomotion. Larger mammals have a lower mass-specific cost of transport than smaller mammals. The scaling of the mass-specific cost of transport is partly explained by decreasing stride frequency with increasing body size; however, it is unknown if limb rotational inertia also influences the mass-specific cost of transport. Limb length and inertial properties--limb mass, center of mass (COM) position, moment of inertia, radius of gyration, and natural frequency--were measured in 44 species of terrestrial mammals, spanning eight taxonomic orders. Limb length increases disproportionately with body mass via positive allometry (length ∝ body mass(0.40)); the positive allometry of limb length may help explain the scaling of the metabolic cost of transport. When scaled against body mass, forelimb inertial properties, apart from mass, scale with positive allometry. Fore- and hindlimb mass scale according to geometric similarity (limb mass ∝ body mass(1.0)), as do the remaining hindlimb inertial properties. The positive allometry of limb length is largely the result of absolute differences in limb inertial properties between mammalian subgroups. Though likely detrimental to locomotor costs in large mammals, scale effects in limb inertial properties appear to be concomitant with scale effects in sensorimotor control and locomotor ability in terrestrial mammals. Across mammals, the forelimb's potential for angular acceleration scales according to geometric similarity, whereas the hindlimb's potential for angular acceleration scales with positive allometry. PMID:24260117

  1. Scale effects between body size and limb design in quadrupedal mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M Kilbourne

    Full Text Available Recently the metabolic cost of swinging the limbs has been found to be much greater than previously thought, raising the possibility that limb rotational inertia influences the energetics of locomotion. Larger mammals have a lower mass-specific cost of transport than smaller mammals. The scaling of the mass-specific cost of transport is partly explained by decreasing stride frequency with increasing body size; however, it is unknown if limb rotational inertia also influences the mass-specific cost of transport. Limb length and inertial properties--limb mass, center of mass (COM position, moment of inertia, radius of gyration, and natural frequency--were measured in 44 species of terrestrial mammals, spanning eight taxonomic orders. Limb length increases disproportionately with body mass via positive allometry (length ∝ body mass(0.40; the positive allometry of limb length may help explain the scaling of the metabolic cost of transport. When scaled against body mass, forelimb inertial properties, apart from mass, scale with positive allometry. Fore- and hindlimb mass scale according to geometric similarity (limb mass ∝ body mass(1.0, as do the remaining hindlimb inertial properties. The positive allometry of limb length is largely the result of absolute differences in limb inertial properties between mammalian subgroups. Though likely detrimental to locomotor costs in large mammals, scale effects in limb inertial properties appear to be concomitant with scale effects in sensorimotor control and locomotor ability in terrestrial mammals. Across mammals, the forelimb's potential for angular acceleration scales according to geometric similarity, whereas the hindlimb's potential for angular acceleration scales with positive allometry.

  2. Improving estimation of tree carbon stocks by harvesting aboveground woody biomass within airborne LiDAR flight areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, M.; Asner, G. P.; Swemmer, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The accurate estimation of carbon stored in a tree is essential to accounting for the carbon emissions due to deforestation and degradation. Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has been successful in estimating aboveground carbon density (ACD) by correlating airborne metrics, such as canopy height, to field-estimated biomass. This latter step is reliant on field allometry which is applied to forest inventory quantities, such as stem diameter and height, to predict the biomass of a given tree stem. Constructing such allometry is expensive, time consuming, and requires destructive sampling. Consequently, the sample sizes used to construct such allometry are often small, and the largest tree sampled is often much smaller than the largest in the forest population. The uncertainty resulting from these sampling errors can lead to severe biases when the allometry is applied to stems larger than those harvested to construct the allometry, which is then subsequently propagated to airborne ACD estimates. The Kruger National Park (KNP) mission of maintaining biodiversity coincides with preserving ecosystem carbon stocks. However, one hurdle to accurately quantifying carbon density in savannas is that small stems are typically harvested to construct woody biomass allometry, yet they are not representative of Kruger's distribution of biomass. Consequently, these equations inadequately capture large tree variation in sapwood/hardwood composition, root/shoot/leaf allocation, branch fall, and stem rot. This study eliminates the "middleman" of field allometry by directly measuring, or harvesting, tree biomass within the extent of airborne LiDAR. This enables comparisons of field and airborne ACD estimates, and also enables creation of new airborne algorithms to estimate biomass at the scale of individual trees. A field campaign was conducted at Pompey Silica Mine 5km outside Kruger National Park, South Africa, in Mar-Aug 2010 to harvest and weigh tree mass. Since

  3. Fitness consequences of artificial selection on relative male genital size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booksmythe, Isobel; Head, Megan L; Keogh, J Scott; Jennions, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Male genitalia often show remarkable differences among related species in size, shape and complexity. Across poeciliid fishes, the elongated fin (gonopodium) that males use to inseminate females ranges from 18 to 53% of body length. Relative genital size therefore varies greatly among species. In contrast, there is often tight within-species allometric scaling, which suggests strong selection against genital-body size combinations that deviate from a species' natural line of allometry. We tested this constraint by artificially selecting on the allometric intercept, creating lines of males with relatively longer or shorter gonopodia than occur naturally for a given body size in mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki. We show that relative genital length is heritable and diverged 7.6-8.9% between our up-selected and down-selected lines, with correlated changes in body shape. However, deviation from the natural line of allometry does not affect male success in assays of attractiveness, swimming performance and, crucially, reproductive success (paternity). PMID:27188478

  4. Logistic Growth and Ergodic Properties of Urban Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Masucci, A Paolo; Wang, Jiaqiu; Hatna, Erez; Stanilov, Kiril; Batty, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Urban morphology has presented significant intellectual challenges to mathematicians and physicists ever since the eighteenth century, when Euler first explored the famous Konigsberg bridges problem. Many important regularities and allometries have been observed in urban studies, including Zipf's law and Gibrat's law, rendering cities attractive systems for analysis within statistical physics. Nevertheless, a broad consensus on how cities and their boundaries are defined is still lacking. Applying percolation theory to the street intersection space, we show that growth curves for the maximum cluster size of the largest cities in the UK and in California collapse to a single curve, namely the logistic. Subsequently, by introducing the concept of the condensation threshold, we show that natural boundaries of cities can be well defined in a universal way. This allows us to study and discuss systematically some of the allometries that are present in cities, thus casting light on the concept of ergodicity as relat...

  5. An allometric scaling relation based on logistic growth of cities

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2013-01-01

    The relationships between urban area and population size have been empirically demonstrated to follow the scaling law of allometric growth. This allometric scaling is based on exponential growth of city size and can be termed "exponential allometry", which is associated with the concepts of fractals. However, both city population and urban area comply with the course of logistic growth rather than exponential growth. In this paper, I will present a new allometric scaling based on logistic growth to solve the abovementioned problem. The logistic growth is a process of replacement dynamics. Defining a pair of replacement quotients as new measurements, which are functions of urban area and population, we can derive an allometric scaling relation from the logistic processes of urban growth, which can be termed "logistic allometry". The exponential allometric relation between urban area and population is the approximate expression of the logistic allometric equation when the city size is not large enough. The prop...

  6. Sexual differences in size and shape of the Mosor rock lizard [Dinarolacerta mosorensis (Kolombatović, 1886] (squamata: lacertidae: A case study of the Lovćen mountain population (Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual differences in size and shape of the Mosor rock lizard, Dinarolacerta mosorensis (Kolombatović, 1886, from Lovćen Mountain (Montenegro were examined on the basis of the intersex variation pattern of nine morphometric, eight pholidotic, and four qualitative traits. Sexual dimorphism was apparent for all morphometric characters except snout-vent length, while scalation and dorsal pattern exhibited small differences between sexes. The value of the sexual size difference (SSD index based on snout-vent length was 1.028. The sex-specific allometric slopes for head dimensions and interlimb distance significantly diverged. Head dimensions, especially head height, showed strong positive allometry in males, while interlimb distance was the only character which showed positive allometry in females. Generally, males had significantly greater body size than females. This was true of all body measurements except interlimb distance. The influence of sexual and natural selection on the examined traits is discussed.

  7. Musculoskeletal determinants of pelvic sucker function in Hawaiian stream gobiid fishes: interspecific comparisons and allometric scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maie, Takashi; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Blob, Richard W

    2013-07-01

    Gobiid fishes possess a distinctive ventral sucker, formed from fusion of the pelvic fins. This sucker is used to adhere to a wide range of substrates including, in some species, the vertical cliffs of waterfalls that are climbed during upstream migrations. Previous studies of waterfall-climbing goby species have found that pressure differentials and adhesive forces generated by the sucker increase with positive allometry as fish grow in size, despite isometry or negative allometry of sucker area. To produce such scaling patterns for pressure differential and adhesive force, waterfall-climbing gobies might exhibit allometry for other muscular or skeletal components of the pelvic sucker that contribute to its adhesive function. In this study, we used anatomical dissections and modeling to evaluate the potential for allometric growth in the cross-sectional area, effective mechanical advantage (EMA), and force generating capacity of major protractor and retractor muscles of the pelvic sucker (m. protractor ischii and m. retractor ischii) that help to expand the sealed volume of the sucker to produce pressure differentials and adhesive force. We compared patterns for three Hawaiian gobiid species: a nonclimber (Stenogobius hawaiiensis), an ontogenetically limited climber (Awaous guamensis), and a proficient climber (Sicyopterus stimpsoni). Scaling patterns were relatively similar for all three species, typically exhibiting isometric or negatively allometric scaling for the muscles and lever systems examined. Although these scaling patterns do not help to explain the positive allometry of pressure differentials and adhesive force as climbing gobies grow, the best climber among the species we compared, S. stimpsoni, does exhibit the highest calculated estimates of EMA, muscular input force, and output force for pelvic sucker retraction at any body size, potentially facilitating its adhesive ability. PMID:23450656

  8. Contrasting size evolution in marine and freshwater diatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Litchman, E.; C. A. Klausmeier; YOSHIYAMA, K

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are key players in the global carbon cycle and most aquatic ecosystems. Their cell sizes impact carbon sequestration and energy transfer to higher trophic levels. We report fundamental differences in size distributions of marine and freshwater diatoms, with marine diatoms significantly larger than freshwater species. An evolutionary game theoretical model with empirical allometries of growth and nutrient uptake shows that these differences can be explained by nitrogen versus phosphoru...

  9. Influence of planting methods on root development, crop productivity and water use efficiency in maize hybrids Influencia de métodos de siembra sobre el desarrollo radical, productividad y eficiencia del uso del agua en híbridos de maíz

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad B. Khan; Farhan Yousaf; Mubshar Hussain; Muhammad W. Haq; Dong-J Lee; Muhammad Farooq

    2012-01-01

    Optimum planting methods better ensure water and nutrient supply through improved root development resulting in better crop growth and productivity. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of planting methods on root development, crop allometry, water use efficiency (WUE), productivity and economic returns of different maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids. Maize hybrids NK-6621, Pioneer-30Y87, and Pioneer-30Y58 were sown on beds, ridges, and flat surface. Ridge sowing was better followed by b...

  10. Emergence, Development, and Maturity of the Gonad of Two Species of Chitons “Sea Cockroach” (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) through the Early Life Stages

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Hernando Avila-Poveda; Quetzalli Yasú Abadia-Chanona

    2013-01-01

    This study describes and recognises, using histological and microscopical examinations on a morphometrical basis, several gonad traits through the early life stages of Chiton articulatus and C. albolineatus. Gonadal ontogenesis, gonad development stages, sexual differentiation, onset of the first sexual maturity, and growth sequences or "early life stages" were determined. In addition, allometry between lengths and body weight pooled for both sexes per each chiton were calculated using equati...

  11. Interaction between Orobanche crenata and its Host Legumes: Unsuccessful Haustorial Penetration and Necrosis of the Developing Parasite

    OpenAIRE

    PÉREZ-DE-LUQUE, A.; Rubiales, D.; CUBERO, J. I.; Press, M C; SCHOLES, J.; Yoneyama, K.; Takeuchi, Y; PLAKHINE, D.; JOEL, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Orobanche species represent major constraints to crop production in many parts of the world as they reduce yield and alter root/shoot allometry. Although much is known about the histology and effect of Orobanche spp. on susceptible hosts, less is known about the basis of host resistance to these parasites. In this work, histological aspects related to the resistance of some legumes to Orobanche crenata have been investigated in order to determine which types of resistanc...

  12. Fitness consequences of artificial selection on relative male genital size

    OpenAIRE

    Booksmythe, Isobel; Head, Megan L; Keogh, J. Scott; Jennions, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Male genitalia often show remarkable differences among related species in size, shape and complexity. Across poeciliid fishes, the elongated fin (gonopodium) that males use to inseminate females ranges from 18 to 53% of body length. Relative genital size therefore varies greatly among species. In contrast, there is often tight within-species allometric scaling, which suggests strong selection against genital–body size combinations that deviate from a species’ natural line of allometry. We tes...

  13. Modelling Size Structured Food Webs Using a Modified Niche Model with Two Predator Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Klecka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The structure of food webs is frequently described using phenomenological stochastic models. A prominent example, the niche model, was found to produce artificial food webs resembling real food webs according to a range of summary statistics. However, the size structure of food webs generated by the niche model and real food webs has not yet been rigorously compared. To fill this void, I use a body mass based version of the niche model and compare prey-predator body mass allometry and predato...

  14. Growth of the eye lens: II. Allometric studies

    OpenAIRE

    Augusteyn, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the ontogeny and phylogeny of lens growth in a variety of species using allometry. Methods Data on the accumulation of wet and/or dry lens weight as a function of bodyweight were obtained for 40 species and subjected to allometric analysis to examine ontogenic growth and compaction. Allometric analysis was also used to compare the maximum adult lens weights for 147 species with the maximum adult bodyweight and to compare lens volumes calculated...

  15. The Roles of Sex, Mass and Individual Specialisation in Partitioning Foraging-Depth Niches of a Pursuit-Diving Predator

    OpenAIRE

    Norman Ratcliffe; Akinori Takahashi; Claire O'Sullivan; Stacey Adlard; Philip N Trathan; Michael P Harris; Sarah Wanless

    2013-01-01

    Intra-specific foraging niche partitioning can arise due to gender differences or individual specialisation in behaviour or prey selection. These may in turn be related to sexual size dimorphism or individual variation in body size through allometry. These variables are often inter-related and challenging to separate statistically. We present a case study in which the effects of sex, body mass and individual specialisation on the dive depths of the South Georgia shag on Bird Island, South Geo...

  16. Comparação do peso dos quelípodos e crescimento em duas espécies de "sirís" do gênero Callinectes (Brachyura, Portunidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Margarita Guerrero-Ocampo

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, as espécies C. danae e C. ornatus foram comparadas quanto ao peso dos quelípodos. Os siris foram coletados com 2 redes de arrasto do tipo "otter trawl" na Enseada de Ubatuba (23° 26' S e 45° 02' W. As constantes alométricas obtidas foram analisadas por meio da função potência (Y = aXb . As espécies apresentaram diferentes graus alométricos para cada sexo. A relação PQ X PC apresentou alometria positiva em ambas espécies, porém os machos apresentam maior alometria positiva do que as fêmeas. C. danae apresenta maior alometria positiva para os quelípodos do que C. ornatus. O fato de C. danae atingir maior porte e possuir quelípodos maiores indica que esta espécie tem potencial para o cultivo.A comparison of the cheliped's weight in two species of the genus Callinectes was accomplished. The species C. danae e C. ornatus were collected by two otter trawl in Ubatuba bay (23º 26' S and 45º 02' W. The allometric constants obtained from the regression adjusted to a power function (Y = aXb were analyzed. These species presented different allometry degrees for each sex considered. The relation PQ x PC presented positive allometry for sex of both species, but male presented higher positive allometry than female. C. danae presented higher positive allometry for chelipeds than C. ornatus. We suggest here that C. danae could be indicated to be submitted to grow out in ponds since it reaches higher size and bigger chelipeds.

  17. Evidence of variant intra- and interspecific scaling of tree crown structure and relevance for allometric theory

    OpenAIRE

    Pretzsch, Hans; Dieler, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    General scaling rules or constants for metabolic and structural plant allometry as assumed by the theory of Euclidian geometric scaling (2/3-scaling) or metabolic scaling (3/4-scaling) may meet human’s innate propensity for simplicity and generality of pattern and processes in nature. However, numerous empirical works show that variability of crown structure rather than constancy is essential for a tree’s success in coping with crowding. In order to link theory and empiricism, we analyzed the...

  18. Relative femoral head size in early hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corruccini, R S; McHenry, H M

    1978-07-01

    Relative growth of the human femur head is studied by a logarithmic principal components method. Growth rates differ according to the population sampled and the other body dimensions being compared, and especially according to sex. The results do not support biomechanical assumptions of strongly positive allometry of the femur head, which have been used to argue that the australopithecine hip joint was not relatively small. PMID:98052

  19. Simulated effects of site salinity and inundation on long-term growth trajectory and carbon sequestration in monospecific $Rhizophora\\; mucronata$ plantation in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Juanico, Drandreb Earl; Salmo III, Severino

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model of coastal forest growth is proposed to describe and test the effects of salinity and inundation in the long-term growth performance and carbon sequestration of monospecific mangrove ($Rhizophora\\; mucronata$) plantation in the Philippines. We used allometry in expressing the mangrove growth equation, and stochasticity in scheduling population-level events that drive the development of the mangrove forest. Analysis of the model unveils an index, $\\xi$, that could be used ...

  20. PEMETAAN POTENSI ENERGI BIOMASSA HUTAN RAKYAT BAMBU DI KECAMATAN TANRALILI KABUPATEN MAROS

    OpenAIRE

    Beta Putranto

    2014-01-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui potensi energi biomassa yang tersimpan dalam hutan rakyat bambu dan mengetahui model-model pengelolaan tegakan bambu dalam kaitannya dengan potensi biomassa bambu. Penelitian dilakukan dengan melakukan inventarisasi luas hutan rakyat bambu dengan menggunakan data citra dengan luas minimal 0.25 ha. Biomassa bambu ditentukan dengan persamaan allometri w = 0,348 x D1,830 (Baharuddin, 2013). Nilai kalor ditentukan dengan menggunakan bom calorimeter. Pot...

  1. Apparent plasticity in functional traits determining competitive ability and spatial distribution: a case from desert

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang-Bo Xie; Gui-Qing Xu; G. Darrel Jenerette; Yong-fei Bai; Zhong-Yuan Wang; Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Species competitive abilities and their distributions are closely related to functional traits such as biomass allocation patterns. When we consider how nutrient supply affects competitive abilities, quantifying the apparent and true plasticity in functional traits is important because the allometric relationships among traits are universal in plants. We propose to integrate the notion of allometry and the classical reaction norm into a composite theoretical framework that quantifies the appa...

  2. A Sceptics View: “Kleiber’s Law” or the “3/4 Rule” is neither a Law nor a Rule but Rather an Empirical Approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Hulbert, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Early studies showed the metabolic rate (MR) of different-sized animals was not directly related to body mass. The initial explanation of this difference, the “surface law”, was replaced by the suggestion that MR be expressed relative to massn, where the scaling exponent “n” be empirically determined. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) conditions were developed and BMR became important clinically, especially concerning thyroid diseases. Allometry, the technique previously used to empirically analyse ...

  3. Radar backscatter modelling of forests using a macroecological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Brolly, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This thesis provides a new explanation for the behaviour of radar backscatter of forests using vegetation structure models from the field of macroecology. The forests modelled in this work are produced using allometry-based ecological models with backscatter derived from the parameterisation of a radiative transfer model. This work is produced as a series of papers, each portraying the importance of macroecology in defining the forest radar response. Each contribution does so b...

  4. Scaling of avian primary feather length

    OpenAIRE

    Nudds, Robert L.; Kaiser, Gary V.; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the avian wing has long fascinated biologists, yet almost no work includes the length of primary feathers in consideration of overall wing length variation. Here we show that the length of the longest primary feather ( ) contributing to overall wing length scales with negative allometry against total arm (ta = humerus+ulna+manus). The scaling exponent varied slightly, although not significantly so, depending on whether a species level analysis was used or phylogeny was contro...

  5. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallardy, Stephen G

    2013-04-19

    by June 14, 2004, the MOFLUX site was fully instrumented and data streams started to flow. A primary accomplished deliverable for the project period was the data streams of CO{sub 2} and water vapor fluxes and numerous meteorological variables (from which prepared datasets have been submitted to the AmeriFlux data archive for 2004-2006, Additionally, measurements of leaf biochemistry and physiology, biomass inventory, tree allometry, successional trends other variables were obtained.

  6. Does encephalization correlate with life history or metabolic rate in Carnivora?

    OpenAIRE

    Finarelli, John A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent analysis of brain size evolution reconstructed the plesiomorphic brain–body size allometry for the mammalian order Carnivora, providing an important reference frame for comparative analyses of encephalization (brain volume scaled to body mass). I performed phylogenetically corrected regressions to remove the effects of body mass, calculating correlations between residual values of encephalization with basal metabolic rate (BMR) and six life-history variables (gestation time, neonatal...

  7. Relative growth of the limbs and trunk in the African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, B T

    1981-10-01

    Examination of relative growth and allometry is important for our understanding of the African apes, as they represent a closely related group of species of increasing body size. This study presents a comparison of ontogenetic relative growth patterns of some postcranial dimensions in Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, and Gorilla gorilla. Interspecific proportion differences among the three species are also analyzed. It is stressed that reliable ontogenetic information can only be obtained if subadults are examined-growth data cannot be inferred from static adult scaling. Results indicate that some postcranial relative growth patterns are very similar in the three species, suggesting differential extrapolation of a common growth pattern, whereas for other proportion comparisons the growth trends differ markedly among the species, producing distinct shape differences in the adults. Interspecific shape changes among the three species are characterized by positive allometry of chest girth and negative allometry of body height and leg length. It is suggested that relative decrease of leg length with increasing body size among the African pongids might be expected on biomechanical grounds, in quadrupedal terrestrialism. Relative to body weight or trunk length, the limbs of the bonobo (Pan paniscus) are longer than in the common chimpanzee or the gorilla, with a lower intermembral index. This may most closely resemble the primitive condition for the African apes. PMID:7325219

  8. Ontogeny of the Early Triassic Cynodont Thrinaxodon liorhinus (Therapsida): Cranial Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinoski, Sandra C; Abdala, Fernando; Fernandez, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    The cranial morphology of 68 Thrinaxodon liorhinus specimens, ranging in size from 30 to 96 mm in basal skull length, is investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analyses. From this comprehensive survey, we determined that nine cranial features, including five in the temporal region, separated the sample into four ontogenetic stages. A bivariate analysis of 60 specimens indicated that the skull generally increased in size isometrically, with the exception of four regions. The orbit had negative allometry, a result consistent with other ontogenetic studies of tetrapods, whereas the length of the snout, palate, and temporal region showed positive allometry. The last trend had strong positive allometry indicating that during ontogeny the length of the sagittal crest increased at a much faster rate than the rest of the skull. The large number of changes in the temporal region of the skull of Thrinaxodon may indicate a greater development of the posterior fibres of the temporalis musculature from an early ontogenetic stage. For example, the posterior sagittal crest developed much earlier in ontogeny than the anterior crest that formed in adults, and bone was deposited dorsally creating a unified posterior sagittal crest rather than having a suture that spanned the entire depth of the skull roof. In combination with the isometric height of the zygomatic arch and the almost complete absence of the zygomatic arch angulation, these ontogenetic changes suggest that there was greater development of the temporalis relative to the masseter muscles, indicating a strong posterodorsal movement of the mandible in Thrinaxodon. PMID:25620050

  9. Post-weaning cranial ontogeny in two bandicoots (Mammalia, Peramelomorphia, Peramelidae) and comparison with carnivorous marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, David A; Abdala, Fernando; Giannini, Norberto P

    2013-12-01

    The ontogeny of the skull has been studied in several marsupial groups such as didelphids, microbiotheriids, and dasyurids. Here, we describe and compare the post-weaning ontogeny of the skull in two species of bandicoots, Echymipera kalubu (Echymiperinae) and Isoodon macrourus (Peramelinae), analyzing specific allometric trends in both groups, describing common (and specific) patterns, and discussing them on functional and phylogenetic grounds. Growth patterns were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively, including bivariate and multivariate analyses of allometry. We also evaluated character transformation and phylogenetic signals of the allometric patterns in several groups of marsupials and some placentals. We identified morphological changes between juvenile and adult stages in both species of peramelids, many related to the development of the trophic apparatus. Notable differences were detected in the patterns of growth, suggesting divergences in ontogenetic trajectories between both species. Both bivariate and multivariate methods indicate that positive allometries in E. kalubu apply to longitudinal dimensions, whereas in I. macrourus, positive allometries are restricted to vertical dimensions of the skull. The comparison of the allometric trends of two bandicoots with previously studied taxa reveals that although peramelids exhibit a particularly short gestation period and divergent morphology compared to other marsupials, their pattern does not show any particular trend. Some allometric trends seem to be highly conserved among the species studied, showing weak phylogenetic signal. Marsupials in general do not show particular patterns of post-weaning skull growth compared with placentals. PMID:24210769

  10. A morphometric analysis of prognathism and evaluation of the gnathic index in modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesciotto, K M; Cabo, L L; Garvin, H M

    2016-08-01

    Subnasal prognathism is a morphological feature often described in studies of paleoanthropology, bioarchaeology, and forensic anthropology. This trait is commonly quantified using the gnathic index, which compares basion-prosthion and basion-nasion lengths. This study used geometric morphometrics to assess whether the gnathic index is a reliable indicator of subnasal prognathism and to explore the effects of sex, population, and allometry on this trait. Nineteen craniofacial landmarks were collected from three-dimensional cranial surface scans of 192 individuals across five population groups. Generalized Procrustes analysis and principal components analysis were employed to identify shape components related to changes in subnasal prognathism, comparing component scores to gnathic index values. M/ANOVAs were used to determine the effects of sex and population on prognathism, and linear regression served to assess static allometry. The gnathic index was significantly correlated with PCs 1 and 3, which appeared to capture prognathic shape change, but also with PCs 2 and 6, which reflected other craniofacial shape changes. Population differences in levels of prognathism were identified, but no significant effects of sex or allometry were found. The results show that, although the gnathic index correlates with prognathic shape variation, it is also influenced by other variables, such as the relative position of basion. In this sense, the gnathic index serves to illustrate the shortcomings of linear measurement analysis as compared to landmark configurations. Further, the results demonstrate that subnasal prognathism is a complex feature in need of redefinition. PMID:27132876

  11. Scaling and Accommodation of Jaw Adductor Muscles in Canidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penrose, Fay; Kemp, Graham J; Jeffery, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    The masticatory apparatus amongst closely related carnivoran species raises intriguing questions about the interplay between allometry, function, and phylogeny in defining interspecific variations of cranial morphology. Here we describe the gross structure of the jaw adductor muscles of several species of canid, and then examine how the muscles are scaled across the range of body sizes, phylogenies, and trophic groups. We also consider how the muscles are accommodated on the skull, and how this is influenced by differences of endocranial size. Data were collected for a suite of morphological metrics, including body mass, endocranial volume, and muscle masses and we used geometric morphometric shape analysis to reveal associated form changes. We find that all jaw adductor muscles scale isometrically against body mass, regardless of phylogeny or trophic group, but that endocranial volume scales with negative allometry against body mass. These findings suggest that head shape is partly influenced by the need to house isometrically scaling muscles on a neurocranium scaling with negative allometry. Principal component analysis suggests that skull shape changes, such as the relatively wide zygomatic arches and large sagittal crests seen in species with higher body masses, allow the skull to accommodate a relative enlargement of the jaw adductors compared with the endocranium. Anat Rec, 299:951-966, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27103346

  12. Ontogenetic scaling patterns and functional anatomy of the pelvic limb musculature in emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Lamas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae are exclusively terrestrial, bipedal and cursorial ratites with some similar biomechanical characteristics to humans. Their growth rates are impressive, as their body mass increases eighty-fold from hatching to adulthood whilst maintaining the same mode of locomotion throughout life. These ontogenetic characteristics stimulate biomechanical questions about the strategies that allow emus to cope with their rapid growth and locomotion, which can be partly addressed via scaling (allometric analysis of morphology. In this study we have collected pelvic limb anatomical data (muscle architecture, tendon length, tendon mass and bone lengths and calculated muscle physiological cross sectional area (PCSA and average tendon cross sectional area from emus across three ontogenetic stages (n = 17, body masses from 3.6 to 42 kg. The data were analysed by reduced major axis regression to determine how these biomechanically relevant aspects of morphology scaled with body mass. Muscle mass and PCSA showed a marked trend towards positive allometry (26 and 27 out of 34 muscles respectively and fascicle length showed a more mixed scaling pattern. The long tendons of the main digital flexors scaled with positive allometry for all characteristics whilst other tendons demonstrated a less clear scaling pattern. Finally, the two longer bones of the limb (tibiotarsus and tarsometatarsus also exhibited positive allometry for length, and two others (femur and first phalanx of digit III had trends towards isometry. These results indicate that emus experience a relative increase in their muscle force-generating capacities, as well as potentially increasing the force-sustaining capacities of their tendons, as they grow. Furthermore, we have clarified anatomical descriptions and provided illustrations of the pelvic limb muscle–tendon units in emus.

  13. Scaling of feeding biomechanics in the horn shark Heterodontus francisci: ontogenetic constraints on durophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    Organismal performance changes over ontogeny as the musculoskeletal systems underlying animal behavior grow in relative size and shape. As performance is a determinant of feeding ecology, ontogenetic changes in the former can influence the latter. The horn shark Heterodontus francisci consumes hard-shelled benthic invertebrates, which may be problematic for younger animals with lower performance capacities. Scaling of feeding biomechanics was investigated in H. francisci (n=16, 19-59cm standard length (SL)) to determine the biomechanical basis of allometric changes in feeding performance and whether this performance capacity constrains hard-prey consumption over ontogeny. Positive allometry of anterior (8-163N) and posterior (15-382N) theoretical bite force was attributed to positive allometry of cross-sectional area in two jaw adducting muscles and mechanical advantage at the posterior bite point (0.79-1.26). Mechanical advantage for anterior biting scaled isometrically (0.52). Fracture forces for purple sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus consumed by H. francisci ranged from 24 to 430N. Comparison of these fracture forces to the bite force of H. francisci suggests that H. francisci is unable to consume hard prey early in its life history, but can consume the majority of S. purpuratus by the time it reaches maximum size. Despite this constraint, positive allometry of biting performance appears to facilitate an earlier entry into the durophagous niche than would an isometric ontogenetic trajectory. The posterior gape of H. francisci is significantly smaller than the urchins capable of being crushed by its posterior bite force. Thus, the high posterior bite forces of H. francisci cannot be fully utilized while consuming prey of similar toughness and size to S. purpuratus, and its potential trophic niche is primarily determined by anterior biting capacity. PMID:19428230

  14. Interspecies allometric scaling. Part I: prediction of clearance in large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, I; Martinez, M; Hunter, R P

    2006-10-01

    Interspecies scaling is a useful tool for the prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters from animals to humans, and it is often used for estimating a first-time in human dose. The knowledge of pharmacokinetics in veterinary species is important for dosage selection, particularly in the treatment of large zoo animal species, such as elephants, giant cats and camels, for which pharmacokinetic data are scant. Therefore, the accuracy in clearance predictions in large animal species, with and without the use of correction factors (rule of exponents), and the impact of species selection in the prediction of clearance in large animal species was examined. Based upon this analysis, it was determined that there is a much larger risk of inaccuracies in the clearance estimates in large animal species when compared with that observed for humans. Unlike in humans, for large animal species, correction factors could not be applied because there was no trend between the exponents of simple allometry and the appropriate correction factor for improving our predictions. Nevertheless, we did see an indication that the exponents of simple allometry may alert us as to when the predicted clearance in the large animal may be underestimated or overpredicted. For example, if a large animal is included in the scaling, the predicted clearance in a large animal should be considered overestimated if the exponent of simple allometry is >1.3. Despite the potential for extrapolation error, the reality is that allometric scaling is needed across many veterinary practice situations, and therefore will be used. For this reason, it is important to consider mechanisms for reducing the risk of extrapolation errors that can seriously affect target animal safety, therapeutic response, or the accuracy of withdrawal time predictions. PMID:16958787

  15. Observation of Mammalian Similarity Through Allometric Scaling Laws

    OpenAIRE

    Kokshenev, Valery B.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the problem of observation of natural similarity in skeletal evolution of terrestrial mammals. Analysis is given by means of testing of the power scaling laws established in long bone allometry, which describe development of bones (of length $L$ and diameter $D$) with body mass in terms of the growth exponents, \\QTR{it}{e.g.} $\\lambda =d\\log L/d\\log D$. The bone-size evolution scenario given three decades ago by McMahon was quiet explicit on the geometrical-shape and mechanical-for...

  16. A stand-alone demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieradzik, L. P.; Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Cook, G. D.; Briggs, P.; Roxburgh, S.; Liedloff, A.; Meyer, C.; Canadell, J.

    2013-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new approach for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any earth system model (Haverd et al., 2013). The approach is encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP). We demonstrate the behaviour and performance of POP coupled to the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange model (CABLE) for two contrasting applications: (i) to the Northern Australian Tropical Transect, featuring gradients in savanna vegetation cover, rainfall and fire disturbance and (ii) to a set of globally distributed forest locations coinciding with observations of forest biomass allometry. Along the Northern Australian Tropical Transect, CABLE-POP is able to simultaneously reproduce observation-based estimates of key functional and structural variables, namely gross primary production, tree foliage projective cover, basal area and maximum tree height. This application particularly demonstrates the ability of POP to quantify the contributions of drought and fire to tree mortality. Drought is manifested as an increase in mortality due to a decline in growth efficiency, while fires are treated as partial disturbance events, with tree mortality depending on tree size and fire intensity. In the application to global forests, POP is integrated with global forest data by calibrating it against paired observations of stem biomass and number density. The calibrated POP model is then coupled with CABLE and the coupled model is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 20 to 400 years. Results indicate that, in contrast to simulations from many global land surface models (Wolf et al., 2011), simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP, which can readily be coupled to the terrestrial carbon cycle

  17. Applying GreenLab Model to Adult Chinese Pine Trees with Topology Simplification

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hong; Lei, Xiangdong; Lu, Yuanchang; De Reffye, P

    2010-01-01

    This paper applied the functional structural model GreenLab to adult Chinese pine trees (pinus tabulaeformis Carr.). Basic hypotheses of the model were validated such as constant allometry rules, relative sink relationships and topology simplification. To overcome the limitations raised by the complexity of tree structure for collecting experimental data, a simplified pattern of tree description was introduced and compared with the complete pattern for the computational time and the parameter accuracy. The results showed that this simplified pattern was well adapted to fit adult trees with GreenLab.

  18. Evidence that gestation duration and lactation duration are coupled traits in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubman, Evgenia; Collard, Mark; Mooers, Arne Ø

    2012-12-23

    Gestation duration and lactation duration are usually treated as independently evolving traits in primates, but the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) suggests both durations should be determined by metabolic rate. We used phylogenetic generalized least-squares linear regression to test these different perspectives. We found that the allometries of the durations are divergent from each other and different from the scaling exponent predicted by the MTE (0.25). Gestation duration increases much more slowly (0.06 switch from gestation to lactation in relation to some as-yet-unidentified body-size-related factor. PMID:22915631

  19. Body mass and body weight: a dual reference system in biology Masa y peso corporales: un sistema dual de referencia en biología

    OpenAIRE

    BRUNO GÜNTHER; ENRIQUE MORGADO

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of the present study was to compare two different biological similarity criteria, one was based on body mass (M) as a theoretical reference system in accordance with the MLT-system of physics, while the other utilized the body weight (W) for the same purpose. The mass-dependent allometry should be applied during space flights as well as during fetal and newborn conditions of life, whereas the weight-dependence should prevail in earth-bound physiology. The above mentioned dist...

  20. BIOMETRIC AND MORPHOMETRIC STUDIES OF Perna v iridis AND Pe rna i ndica ALONG THE SOUTHWEST COAST OF INDIA: A STATISTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmy KV

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth indices of the Mussels, Perna viridis and Perna indica collected from the south west coast of India were examined using statistical methods. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA sepa rated 2 morphometric gradient groups (spat and adult, indicating the different phenotypic plasticity between them. The factor scores classified P. indica as a unimodal, positively skewed leptokurtic population and P. viridis as a unimodal, negatively skewed leptokurtic population. The allometry was not static, but simple and ontogenetic since their population was continuously varying. The present study shows that factor analysis is better than principal component analysis for delineating the morphometric characteristics of living organisms

  1. An early Australopithecus afarensis postcranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Haile-Selassie, Yohannes; Latimer, Bruce M.; Alene, Mulugeta; Deino, Alan L.; Gibert, Luis; Melillo, Stephanie M.; Saylor, Beverly Z.; Scott, Gary R.; Lovejoy, C. Owen

    2010-01-01

    Only one partial skeleton that includes both forelimb and hindlimb elements has been reported for Australopithecus afarensis. The diminutive size of this specimen (A.L. 288-1 ["Lucy"]) has hampered our understanding of the paleobiology of this species absent the potential impact of allometry. Here we describe a large-bodied (i.e., well within the range of living Homo) specimen that, at 3.58 Ma, also substantially antedates A.L. 288–1. It provides fundamental evidence of limb proportions, thor...

  2. Size‐Dependent Growth and the Development Of Inequality in Maize, Sunflower and Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    VEGA, C. R. C.; SADRAS, V. O.

    2003-01-01

    Links were investigated between allometry of plant growth and dynamics of size structure of well‐fertilized, irrigated crops of soybean (Glycine max L.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) grown at standard plant‐population densities (D), as in commercial crops (D = 30, 6 and 8·5 plants m–2, respectively), and at high densities (2D). Patterns of size‐dependent growth of shoot and seed mass accumulation were distinctly different among species. In soybean and sunflower, no...

  3. Stochastic ontogenetic growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, B. J.; West, D.

    2012-02-01

    An ontogenetic growth model (OGM) for a thermodynamically closed system is generalized to satisfy both the first and second law of thermodynamics. The hypothesized stochastic ontogenetic growth model (SOGM) is shown to entail the interspecies allometry relation by explicitly averaging the basal metabolic rate and the total body mass over the steady-state probability density for the total body mass (TBM). This is the first derivation of the interspecies metabolic allometric relation from a dynamical model and the asymptotic steady-state distribution of the TBM is fit to data and shown to be inverse power law.

  4. Fitness consequences of artificial selection on relative male genital size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booksmythe, Isobel; Head, Megan L.; Keogh, J. Scott; Jennions, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Male genitalia often show remarkable differences among related species in size, shape and complexity. Across poeciliid fishes, the elongated fin (gonopodium) that males use to inseminate females ranges from 18 to 53% of body length. Relative genital size therefore varies greatly among species. In contrast, there is often tight within-species allometric scaling, which suggests strong selection against genital–body size combinations that deviate from a species' natural line of allometry. We tested this constraint by artificially selecting on the allometric intercept, creating lines of males with relatively longer or shorter gonopodia than occur naturally for a given body size in mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki. We show that relative genital length is heritable and diverged 7.6–8.9% between our up-selected and down-selected lines, with correlated changes in body shape. However, deviation from the natural line of allometry does not affect male success in assays of attractiveness, swimming performance and, crucially, reproductive success (paternity). PMID:27188478

  5. Anatomical and physiological basis for the allometric scaling of cisplatin clearance in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achanta, S; Sewell, A; Ritchey, J W; Broaddus, K; Bourne, D W A; Clarke, C R; Maxwell, L K

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-containing cytotoxic drug indicated for the treatment of solid tumors in veterinary and human patients. Several of the algorithms used to standardize the doses of cytotoxic drugs utilize allometry, or the nonproportional relationships between anatomical and physiological variables, but the underlying basis for these relationships is poorly understood. The objective of this proof of concept study was to determine whether allometric equations explain the relationships between body weight, kidney weight, renal physiology, and clearance of a model, renally cleared anticancer agent in dogs. Postmortem body, kidney, and heart weights were collected from 364 dogs (127 juveniles and 237 adults, including 51 dogs ≥ 8 years of age). Renal physiological and cisplatin pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in ten intact male dogs including two juvenile and eight adult dogs (4-55 kg). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), effective renal plasma flow, effective renal blood flow, renal cisplatin clearance, and total cisplatin clearance were allometrically related to body weight with powers of 0.75, 0.59, 0.61, 0.71, and 0.70, respectively. The similar values of these diverse mass exponents suggest a common underlying basis for the allometry of kidney size, renal physiology, and renal drug handling. PMID:26440900

  6. Relative growth and reproductive cycle of the date mussel Lithophaga lithophaga (Linnaeus, 1758) sampled from the Bizerte Bay (Northern Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefi, Ferdaous Jaafar; Boubaker, Samir; Menif, Najoua Trigui El

    2014-09-01

    Relative growth and the reproductive cycle of the date mussel Lithophaga lithophaga were studied from September 2002 to October 2003 in the Bizerte Bay (Northern Tunisia). Relationships between shell length and shell width, shell height as well as volume-related variables (shell dry weight, soft tissues dry weight and total wet weight) showed negative allometries in both sexes except for shell width in males (isometry) and shell height in both sexes (positive allometry). The sex ratio was unbalanced, within the length range of 6-48 mm, 49.43 % of the animals were males, 24.39 % females and 26.17 % sexually undifferentiated; within the length range of 49-92 mm, the respective values were 41.19, 52.7 and 6.1 %. Histological investigations as well as analyses of the condition index and the gonadosomatic index (CI and GSI) revealed the presence of a single reproductive cycle per year. Spawning occurred at the end of August and early September and was associated with a decrease in seawater temperature and salinity. A resting phase occurred in winter, coinciding with the lowest water temperatures. Histological examinations of the gonads of a total of 130 specimens revealed only two cases of hermaphroditism. The present study constitutes a useful baseline for a sustainable management of local wild stocks of L. lithophaga.

  7. Scale-adjusted metrics for predicting the evolution of urban indicators and quantifying the performance of cities

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Luiz G A; Lenzi, Ervin K; Ribeiro, Haroldo V

    2015-01-01

    More than a half of world population is now living in cities and this number is expected to be two-thirds by 2050. Fostered by the relevancy of a scientific characterization of cities and for the availability of an unprecedented amount of data, academics have recently immersed in this topic and one of the most striking and universal finding was the discovery of robust allometric scaling laws between several urban indicators and the population size. Despite that, most governmental reports and several academic works still ignore these nonlinearities by often analyzing the raw or the per capita value of urban indicators, a practice that actually makes the urban metrics biased towards small or large cities depending on whether we have super or sublinear allometries. By following the ideas of Bettencourt et al., we account for this bias by evaluating the difference between the actual value of an urban indicator and the value expected by the allometry with the population size. We show that this scale-adjusted metri...

  8. Comparison of the morphology of the limbs of juvenile and adult horses (Equus caballus) and their implications on the locomotor biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Bruno; Canals, Mauricio

    2010-06-01

    We analyzed the morphology and the walk-trot and trot-gallop transition velocities of nine juvenile horses and compared them with their mothers. We also compared the relative stride length and the duty factor of the juveniles with respect to adults at three equivalent trotting speeds (Froude numbers 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0), to determine dynamic similarity. Juveniles had a negative allometry in their leg bones, mainly because of little size changes of the distal portions. The negative allometry of extremities allows juveniles to increase stride length without increasing step frequency, which can be biomechanically advantageous. The Froude number during the walk-trot velocity transition of juveniles was similar to that of adult horses, but walk-trot transition velocity in juveniles was greater than expected for their mass. However, during the change trot-gallop, the trot-gallop velocity transition was conserved, but the Froude number was lower. Thus, juvenile horses did not move in a manner that was dynamically similar to the adult horses. At low speed (walk-trot), the gait approaches the behavior predicted by the inverted pendulum model, but at high speed (trot-gallop) dominates the inertial forces. The trot-gallop gait change would be conducted at speeds that would minimize energy costs of transport owing to collisions and changes in the trajectory of the center of mass. PMID:20213826

  9. Shape and size variations of Aegla uruguayana (Anomura, Aeglidae under laboratory conditions: A geometric morphometric approach to the growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria P. Diawol

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crustacean growth studies typically use modal analysis rather than focusing on the growth of individuals. In the present work, we use geometric morphometrics to determine how organism shape and size varies during the life of the freshwater crab, Aegla uruguayana Schmitt, 1942. A total of 66 individuals from diverse life cycle stages were examined daily and each exuvia was recorded. Digital images of the dorsal region of the cephalothorax were obtained for each exuvia and were subsequently used to record landmark configurations. Moult increment and intermoult period were estimated for each crab. Differences in shape between crabs of different sizes (allometry and sexes (sexual dimorphism; SD were observed. Allometry was registered among specimens; however, SD was not statistically significant between crabs of a given size. The intermoult period increased as size increased, but the moult frequency was similar between the sexes. Regarding ontogeny, juveniles had short and blunt rostrum, robust forehead region, and narrow cephalothorax. Unlike juveniles crabs, adults presented a well-defined anterior and posterior cephalothorax region. The rostrum was long and stylised and the forehead narrow. Geometric morphometric methods were highly effective for the analysis of aeglid-individual- growth and avoided excessive handling of individuals through exuvia analysis.

  10. Modeling aboveground tree woody biomass using national-scale allometric methods and airborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Estimating tree aboveground biomass (AGB) and carbon (C) stocks using remote sensing is a critical component for understanding the global C cycle and mitigating climate change. However, the importance of allometry for remote sensing of AGB has not been recognized until recently. The overarching goals of this study are to understand the differences and relationships among three national-scale allometric methods (CRM, Jenkins, and the regional models) of the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program in the U.S. and to examine the impacts of using alternative allometry on the fitting statistics of remote sensing-based woody AGB models. Airborne lidar data from three study sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA were used to predict woody AGB estimated from the different allometric methods. It was found that the CRM and Jenkins estimates of woody AGB are related via the CRM adjustment factor. In terms of lidar-biomass modeling, CRM had the smallest model errors, while the Jenkins method had the largest ones and the regional method was between. The best model fitting from CRM is attributed to its inclusion of tree height in calculating merchantable stem volume and the strong dependence of non-merchantable stem biomass on merchantable stem biomass. This study also argues that it is important to characterize the allometric model errors for gaining a complete understanding of the remotely-sensed AGB prediction errors.

  11. Comparative morphology of the avian cerebellum: I. Degree of foliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Hurd, Peter L; Wylie, Douglas R W

    2006-01-01

    Despite the conservative circuitry of the cerebellum, there is considerable variation in the shape of the cerebellum among vertebrates. One aspect of cerebellar morphology that is of particular interest is the degree of folding, or foliation, of the cerebellum and its functional significance. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of variation in cerebellar foliation in birds with the aim of determining the effects that allometry, phylogeny and development have on species differences in the degree of cerebellar foliation. Using both conventional and phylogenetically based statistics, we assess the effects of these variables on cerebellar foliation among 91 species of birds. Overall, our results indicate that allometry exerts the strongest effect and accounts for more than half of the interspecific variation in cerebellar foliation. In addition, we detected a significant phylogenetic effect. A comparison among orders revealed that several groups, corvids, parrots and seabirds, have significantly more foliated cerebella than other groups, after accounting for allometric effects. Lastly, developmental mode was weakly correlated with relative cerebellar foliation, but incubation period and fledging age were not. From our analyses, we conclude that allometric and phylogenetic effects exert the strongest effects and developmental mode a weak effect on avian cerebellar foliation. The phylogenetic distribution of highly foliated cerebella also suggests that cognitive and/or behavioral differences play a role in the evolution of the cerebellum. PMID:16717442

  12. Observation of Mammalian Similarity Through Allometric Scaling Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Kokshenev, V B

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the problem of observation of natural similarity in skeletal evolution of terrestrial mammals. Analysis is given by means of testing of the power scaling laws established in long bone allometry, which describe development of bones (of length $L$ and diameter $D$) with body mass in terms of the growth exponents, \\QTR{it}{e.g.} $\\lambda =d\\log L/d\\log D$ . The bone-size evolution scenario given three decades ago by McMahon was quiet explicit on the geometrical-shape and mechanical-force constraints that predicted $\\lambda =2/3$. This remains too far from the mammalian allometric exponent $\\lambda ^{(\\exp)}=0.80\\pm 0.2$, recently revised by Christiansen, that is a chief puzzle in long bone allometry. We give therefore new insights into McMagon's constraints and report on the first observation of the critical-elastic-force, bending-deformation, muscle-induced mechanism found with $\\lambda =0.80\\pm 0.3$. This mechanism governs the bone-size evolution with avoiding skeletal fracture caused by muscle-indu...

  13. Primate molar crown formation times and life history evolution revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, G A

    2001-12-01

    Comparative studies have convincingly demonstrated that the pattern and timing of tooth emergence are highly correlated with life-history variables and brain size. Conversely, a firm relationship between molar formation time and life-history variables has not yet been established. It seems counterintuitive that one aspect of dental development should be correlated with life-history variables, whereas the other should not. In order to shed light on this apparent discrepancy this study analyzed all data on primate molar crown formations available in the published literature in relation to life-history variables, brain size, and female body mass. Crown formation times were found to be particularly highly correlated with both female body mass and brain size. Species that depart from the overall brain/body allometry by being relatively large-bodied, e.g., Gorilla gorilla and later Theropithecus oswaldi, also have shorter molar crown formation times than expected. The reverse is not found for species that depart from the overall brain/body allometry due to their larger brains, i.e., Homo sapiens. This finding is interpreted within an evolutionary and ecological framework. Specifically, by focusing on ecological commonalities, a scenario is proposed which may allow predictions to be made about the evolutionary history of other extinct primates also. If confirmed in future studies, crown formation time may again become a powerful tool in evolutionary enquiry. PMID:11748692

  14. Biomass and Volume Yield in Mature Hybrid Poplar Plantations on Temperate Abandoned Farmland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Truax

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed clone-specific allometric relationships, with the objective of calculating volume and biomass production after 13 years in 8 poplar plantations, located across an environmental gradient, and composed of 5 unrelated hybrid poplar clones. Allometry was found to be very similar for clones MxB-915311, NxM-3729 and DNxM-915508, all having P. maximoviczii parentage. Clones DxN-3570 and TxD-3230 also had a similar allometry; for a given DBH they have a lower stem volume, stem biomass and branch biomass than P. maximoviczii hybrids. Strong Site × Clone interactions were observed for volume and woody biomass growth, with DxN and TxD hybrids only productive on low elevation fertile sites, whereas P. maximovizcii hybrids were also very productive on higher elevation sites with moderate to high soil fertility. At the site level (5 clones mean, yield reached 27.5 and 22.7 m3/ha/yr. on the two best sites (high fertility and low elevation, confirming the great potential of southern Québec (Canada for poplar culture. The productivity gap between the most and least productive sites has widened from year 8 to year 13, highlighting the need for high quality abandoned farmland site selection in terms of climate and soil fertility. Although clone selection could optimize yield across the studied environmental gradient, it cannot fully compensate for inadequate site selection.

  15. Decapod crustacean chelipeds: an overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pitchaimuthu Mariappan; Chellam Balasundaram; Barbara Schmitz

    2000-09-01

    The structure, growth, differentiation and function of crustacean chelipeds are reviewed. In many decapod crustaceans growth of chelae is isometric with allometry level reaching unity till the puberty moult. Afterwards the same trend continues in females, while in males there is a marked spurt in the level of allometry accompanied by a sudden increase in the relative size of chelae. Subsequently they are differentiated morphologically into crusher and cutter making them heterochelous and sexually dimorphic. Of the two, the major chela is used during agonistic encounters while the minor is used for prey capture and grooming. Various biotic and abiotic factors exert a negative effect on cheliped growth. The dimorphic growth pattern of chelae can be adversely affected by factors such as parasitic infection and substrate conditions. Display patterns of chelipeds have an important role in agonistic and aggressive interactions. Of the five pairs of pereiopods, the chelae are versatile organs of offence and defence which also make them the most vulnerable for autotomy. Regeneration of the autotomized chelipeds imposes an additional energy demand called “regeneration load” on the incumbent, altering energy allocation for somatic and/or reproductive processes. Partial withdrawal of chelae leading to incomplete exuviation is reported for the first time in the laboratory and field in Macrobrachium species.

  16. A Sceptics View: “Kleiber’s Law” or the “3/4 Rule” is neither a Law nor a Rule but Rather an Empirical Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Hulbert

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Early studies showed the metabolic rate (MR of different-sized animals was not directly related to body mass. The initial explanation of this difference, the “surface law”, was replaced by the suggestion that MR be expressed relative to massn, where the scaling exponent “n” be empirically determined. Basal metabolic rate (BMR conditions were developed and BMR became important clinically, especially concerning thyroid diseases. Allometry, the technique previously used to empirically analyse relative growth, showed BMR of endotherms varied with 0.73–0.74 power of body mass. Kleiber suggested that mass3/4 be used, partly because of its easy calculation with a slide rule. Later studies have produced a range of BMR scaling exponents, depending on species measured. Measurement of maximal metabolism produced scaling exponents ranging from 0.80 to 0.97, while scaling of mammalian MR during growth display multi-phasic allometric relationships with scaling exponents >3/4 initially, followed by scaling exponents <3/4. There is no universal metabolic scaling exponent. The fact that “allometry” is an empirical technique to analyse relative change and not a biological law is discussed. Relative tissue size is an important determinant of MR. There is also a need to avoid simplistic assumptions regarding the allometry of surface area.

  17. Studying avian encephalization with geometric morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Watanabe, Akinobu; Kawabe, Soichiro

    2016-08-01

    Encephalization is a core concept in comparative neurobiology, aiming to quantify the neurological capacity of organisms. For measuring encephalization, many studies have employed relative brain sizes corrected for expected allometric scaling to body size. Here we highlight the utility of a multivariate geometric morphometric (GM) approach for visualizing and analyzing neuroanatomical shape variation associated with encephalization. GM readily allows the statistical evaluation of covariates, such as size, and many software tools exist for visualizing their effects on shape. Thus far, however, studies using GM have not attempted to translate the meaning of encephalization to shape data. As such, we tested the statistical relationship between size and encephalization quotients (EQs) to brain shape utilizing a broad interspecific sample of avian endocranial data. Although statistically significant, the analyses indicate that allometry accounts for <10% of total neuroanatomical shape variation. Notably, we find that EQs, despite being corrected for allometric scaling based on size, contain size-related neuroanatomical shape changes. In addition, much of what is traditionally considered encephalization comprises clade-specific trends in relative forebrain expansion, particularly driven by landbirds. EQs, therefore, fail to capture 90% of the total neuroanatomical variation after correcting for allometry and shared phylogenetic history. Moving forward, GM techniques provide crucial tools for investigating key drivers of this vast, largely unexplored aspect of avian brain morphology. PMID:27112986

  18. Sexual dimorphism of Colorado beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae in the west and northwest of Iran by geometric morphometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Abdolahi Mesbah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The males and females of Colorado beetles do not reveal clear dimorphism and therefore they have high resemblance so that recognition of the sexes by simple eye is too difficult. In order to study sexual dimorphism in Colorado beetle, three geographical populations were collected from potato fields in Ardabil, Bahar and Hamedan regions by manual method and direct observation in the summer of 2012. Fore and hind wings were separated and 7 and 8 landmarks were orderly selected for the fore and hind wings at the end and angle of veins. Geometric coordinate of landmarks were converted to shape and size variables as comparison factors between the sexes. Wings relative variations were determined separately in male and female and it revealed variations of wing shape in evolutionary process. Multivariate analysis based on the results of regression of shape variables showed fore wing had allometry and hind wing had not allometry. Two way MANOVA analysis was conducted for observation of shape differences (base on average of shape variables and size differences. The analysis showed that there were significant differences in shape of fore wing between the sexes.

  19. Colony-Level Differences in the Scaling Rules Governing Wood Ant Compound Eye Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Craig D; Niven, Jeremy E

    2016-01-01

    Differential organ growth during development is essential for adults to maintain the correct proportions and achieve their characteristic shape. Organs scale with body size, a process known as allometry that has been studied extensively in a range of organisms. Such scaling rules, typically studied from a limited sample, are assumed to apply to all members of a population and/or species. Here we study scaling in the compound eyes of workers of the wood ant, Formica rufa, from different colonies within a single population. Workers' eye area increased with body size in all the colonies showing a negative allometry. However, both the slope and intercept of some allometric scaling relationships differed significantly among colonies. Moreover, though mean facet diameter and facet number increased with body size, some colonies primarily increased facet number whereas others increased facet diameter, showing that the cellular level processes underlying organ scaling differed among colonies. Thus, the rules that govern scaling at the organ and cellular levels can differ even within a single population. PMID:27068571

  20. The scaling of postcranial muscles in cats (Felidae) II: hindlimb and lumbosacral muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Andrew R; Sparkes, Emily L; Randau, Marcela; Pierce, Stephanie E; Kitchener, Andrew C; Goswami, Anjali; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-07-01

    In quadrupeds the musculature of the hindlimbs is expected to be responsible for generating most of the propulsive locomotory forces, as well as contributing to body support by generating vertical forces. In supporting the body, postural changes from crouched to upright limbs are often associated with an increase of body mass in terrestrial tetrapods. However, felids do not change their crouched limb posture despite undergoing a 300-fold size increase between the smallest and largest extant species. Here, we test how changes in the muscle architecture (masses and lengths of components of the muscle-tendon units) of the hindlimbs and lumbosacral region are related to body mass, to assess whether there are muscular compensations for the maintenance of a crouched limb posture at larger body sizes. We use regression and principal component analyses to detect allometries in muscle architecture, with and without phylogenetic correction. Of the muscle lengths that scale allometrically, all scale with negative allometry (i.e. relative shortening with increasing body mass), whereas all tendon lengths scale isometrically. Only two muscles' belly masses and two tendons' masses scale with positive allometry (i.e. relatively more massive with increasing body mass). Of the muscles that scale allometrically for physiological cross-sectional area, all scale positively (i.e. relatively greater area with increasing body mass). These muscles are mostly linked to control of hip and thigh movements. When the architecture data are phylogenetically corrected, there are few significant results, and only the strongest signals remain. None of the vertebral muscles scaled significantly differently from isometry. Principal component analysis and manovas showed that neither body size nor locomotor mode separate the felid species in morphospace. Our results support the inference that, despite some positively allometric trends in muscle areas related to thigh movement, larger cats have

  1. Efficacy of generic allometric equations for estimating biomass: a test in Japanese natural forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Masae I; Utsugi, Hajime; Tanouchi, Hiroyuki; Aiba, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Hiroko; Onoda, Yusuke; Nagano, Masahiro; Umehara, Toru; Ando, Makoto; Miyata, Rie; Hiura, Tsutom

    2015-07-01

    Accurate estimation of tree and forest biomass is key to evaluating forest ecosystem functions and the global carbon cycle. Allometric equations that estimate tree biomass from a set of predictors, such as stem diameter and tree height, are commonly used. Most allometric equations are site specific, usually developed from a small number of trees harvested in a small area, and are either species specific or ignore interspecific differences in allometry. Due to lack of site-specific allometries, local equations are often applied to sites for which they were not originally developed (foreign sites), sometimes leading to large errors in biomass estimates. In this study, we developed generic allometric equations for aboveground biomass and component (stem, branch, leaf, and root) biomass using large, compiled data sets of 1203 harvested trees belonging to 102 species (60 deciduous angiosperm, 32 evergreen angiosperm, and 10 evergreen gymnosperm species) from 70 boreal, temperate, and subtropical natural forests in Japan. The best generic equations provided better biomass estimates than did local equations that were applied to foreign sites. The best generic equations included explanatory variables that represent interspecific differences in allometry in addition to stem diameter, reducing error by 4-12% compared to the generic equations that did not include the interspecific difference. Different explanatory variables were selected for different components. For aboveground and stem biomass, the best generic equations had species-specific wood specific gravity as an explanatory variable. For branch, leaf, and root biomass, the best equations had functional types (deciduous angiosperm, evergreen angiosperm, and evergreen gymnosperm) instead of functional traits (wood specific gravity or leaf mass per area), suggesting importance of other traits in addition to these traits, such as canopy and root architecture. Inclusion of tree height in addition to stem diameter improved

  2. Brain structure evolution in a basal vertebrate clade: evidence from phylogenetic comparative analysis of cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolm Niclas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate brain is composed of several interconnected, functionally distinct structures and much debate has surrounded the basic question of how these structures evolve. On the one hand, according to the 'mosaic evolution hypothesis', because of the elevated metabolic cost of brain tissue, selection is expected to target specific structures mediating the cognitive abilities which are being favored. On the other hand, the 'concerted evolution hypothesis' argues that developmental constraints limit such mosaic evolution and instead the size of the entire brain varies in response to selection on any of its constituent parts. To date, analyses of these hypotheses of brain evolution have been limited to mammals and birds; excluding Actinopterygii, the basal and most diverse class of vertebrates. Using a combination of recently developed phylogenetic multivariate allometry analyses and comparative methods that can identify distinct rates of evolution, even in highly correlated traits, we studied brain structure evolution in a highly variable clade of ray-finned fishes; the Tanganyikan cichlids. Results Total brain size explained 86% of the variance in brain structure volume in cichlids, a lower proportion than what has previously been reported for mammals. Brain structures showed variation in pair-wise allometry suggesting some degree of independence in evolutionary changes in size. This result is supported by variation among structures on the strength of their loadings on the principal size axis of the allometric analysis. The rate of evolution analyses generally supported the results of the multivariate allometry analyses, showing variation among several structures in their evolutionary patterns. The olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus were found to evolve faster than other structures while the dorsal medulla presented the slowest evolutionary rate. Conclusion Our results favor a mosaic model of brain evolution, as certain

  3. Architecture, eTrees, & Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Dollens

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One vision for grafting biological performance into buildings includes inventing, growing, and synthesizing biological attributes for architectural life—thinking of architecture as metabolically evolved nature/culture. This requires a parallel strategy fostering collaborations between design, biology, art, horticulture, e-plant simulation, synthetic life, bio-mineralization, and advanced fabrication. It encourages designers to integrate industrial and agricultural information as design research with the goal of embedding specific environmental-life responses in architecture. This text discusses and illustrates induced evolution in one emerging method for design realized through software simulation—in this case, plant-to-architecture generation based in naturally occurring algorithms, found for example, in botanic phyllotaxy and allometry.

  4. Salient features in locomotor evolutionary adaptations of proboscideans revealed via the differential scaling of limb long bones

    CERN Document Server

    Kokshenev, Valery B

    2009-01-01

    The standard differential scaling of proportions in limb long bones (length against circumference) is applied to a phylogenetically wide sample of the Proboscidea, Elephantidae and the Asian (Elephas maximus) and African elephant (Loxodonta africana). In order to investigate allometric patterns in proboscideans and terrestrial mammals with parasagittal limb kinematics, the computed slopes (slenderness exponents) are compared with published values for mammals and studied within a framework of theoretical models of long bone scaling under gravity and muscle forces. Limb bone allometry in E. maximus and the Elephantidae are congruent with adaptation to bending and/or torsion induced by muscular forces during fast locomotion, as in other mammals, whereas limb bones in L. africana appear adapted for coping with the compressive forces of gravity. Consequently, hindlimb bones are expected to be more compliant than forelimb bones in accordance with in vivo studies on elephant locomotory kinetics and kinematics, and t...

  5. Spatial Allometric Scaling of Cities Based on Variable Urban Boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang; Li, Xijing

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that urban growth and hierarchies of cities follow the allometric scaling law. However, there is no study on the allometric relations of the internal spatial structure within a city. This paper is devoted to explore the allometric scaling of intraurban patterns by means of variable boundaries of cities. Based on a digital map, an urban boundary can be determined by given searching radius. Changing the searching radius, we have different urban boundaries for the same city. A set of urban boundaries based on different searching radius is similar to a set of isograms. Three typical measurements can be obtained, including urban area, total length of streets, and number of street nodes. These measurements represent three basic spatial elements of geographical systems, i.e., area, lines, and points. A finding is that the numerical relationships between urban area, street length, and node number follow allometric scaling laws. In practice, the spatial allometry can be used to estimate the fr...

  6. Shifts in mass-scaling of respiration, feeding, and growth rates across life-form transitions in marine pelagic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hirst, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic rate of organisms may be viewed as a basic property from which other vital rates and many ecological patterns emerge and that follows a universal allometric mass scaling law, or it may be considered a property of the organism that emerges as a result of the adaptation to the...... life-form-dependent allometries that have similar scaling but different intercepts, such that the mass-specific rates converge on a rather narrow size-independent range. In contrast, ingestion and growth rates follow a near-universal taxa-independent ~3/4 mass scaling power law.We argue that the...... environment, with consequently fewer universal mass scaling properties. Here, we examine the mass scaling of respiration and maximum feeding (clearance and ingestion rates) and growth rates of heterotrophic pelagic organisms over an ~1015 range in body mass. We show that clearance and respiration rates have...

  7. Variant Scaling Relationship for Mass-Density Across Tree-Dominated Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The past few decades have seen a resurgence of interest in biological allometry. Specifically, a number of recent studies has suggested a -4/3 invariant scaling relationship between mass and density that is universally valid for tree-dominated communities, regardless of their phyletic affiliation or habitat. In the present study, we test this scaling relationship using a comprehensive forest biomass database, including 1 266 plots of six biomes and 17 forest types across China. The present study shows that the scaling exponent of the massdensity relationship varies across different tree-dominated communities and habitats. This great variability in the scaling exponent makes any generalization unwarranted. Although inappropriate regression methods can lead to flawed estimation of the scaling exponent, inconsistency of theoretical framework and empirical patterns may have undermined the validity of previous work.

  8. Encyclopedia of distances

    CERN Document Server

    Deza, Michel Marie

    2016-01-01

    This 4th edition of the leading reference volume on distance metrics is characterized by updated and rewritten sections on some items suggested by experts and readers, as well a general streamlining of content and the addition of essential new topics. Though the structure remains unchanged, the new edition also explores recent advances in the use of distances and metrics for e.g. generalized distances, probability theory, graph theory, coding theory, data analysis. New topics in the purely mathematical sections include e.g. the Vitanyi multiset-metric, algebraic point-conic distance, triangular ratio metric, Rossi-Hamming metric, Taneja distance, spectral semimetric between graphs, channel metrization, and Maryland bridge distance. The multidisciplinary sections have also been supplemented with new topics, including: dynamic time wrapping distance, memory distance, allometry, atmospheric depth, elliptic orbit distance, VLBI distance measurements, the astronomical system of units, and walkability distance. Lea...

  9. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: An allometric comparative analysis of different ECG markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, M. P.; Ingallina, F.; Barone, V.; Valentinuzzi, M. E.; Arini, P. D.

    2011-12-01

    Allometry, in general biology, measures the relative growth of a part in relation to the whole living organism. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is the heart adaptation to excessive load (systolic or diastolic). The increase in left ventricular mass leads to an increase in the electrocardiographic voltages. Based on clinical data, we compared the allometric behavior of three different ECG markers of LVH. To do this, the allometric fit AECG = δ + β (VM) relating left ventricular mass (estimated from ecocardiographic data) and ECG amplitudes (expressed as the Cornell-Voltage, Sokolow and the ECG overall voltage indexes) were compared. Besides, sensitivity and specifity for each index were analyzed. The more sensitive the ECG criteria, the better the allometric fit. In conclusion: The allometric paradigm should be regarded as the way to design new and more sensitive ECG-based LVH markers.

  10. Sheldon Spectrum and the Plankton Paradox: Two Sides of the Same Coin. A trait-based plankton size-spectrum model

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A; Law, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Sheldon spectrum describes a remarkable regularity in aquatic ecosystems: the biomass density as a function of logarithmic body mass is approximately constant over many orders of magnitude. While size-spectrum models have explained this phenomenon for assemblages of multicellular organisms, this paper introduces a species-resolved size-spectrum model to explain the phenomenon in unicellular plankton. A Sheldon spectrum spanning the cell-size range of unicellular plankton necessarily consists of a large number of coexisting species covering a wide range of characteristic sizes. The coexistence of many phytoplankton species feeding on a small number of resources is known as the Paradox of the Plankton. Our model resolves the paradox by showing that coexistence is facilitated by the allometric scaling of four physiological rates. Two of the allometries have empirical support, the remaining two emerge from predator-prey interactions exactly when the abundances follow a Sheldon spectrum. Our plankton model is ...

  11. L\\'evy flights in ecology

    CERN Document Server

    Jourdain, Benjamin; Woyczynski, Wojbor

    2011-01-01

    We are interested in modeling Darwinian evolution resulting from the interplay of phenotypic variation and natural selection through ecological interactions. The population is modeled as a stochastic point process whose generator captures the probabilistic dynamics over continuous time of birth, mutation, and death, as influenced by each individual's trait values, and interactions between individuals. An offspring usually inherits the trait values of her progenitor, except when a random mutation causes the offspring to take an instantaneous mutation step at birth to new trait values. In the case we are interested in, the probability distribution of mutations has a heavy tail and belongs to the domain of attraction of a stable law. We investigate the large-population limit with allometric demographies: larger populations made up of smaller individuals which reproduce and die faster, as is typical for micro-organisms. We show that depending on the allometry coefficient the limit behavior of the population proce...

  12. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic influences on life history expression: metabolism and parentally induced temperature influences on embryo development rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E.; Ton, Riccardo; Nikilson, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic processes are assumed to underlie life history expression and trade-offs, but extrinsic inputs are theorised to shift trait expression and mask trade-offs within species. Here, we explore application of this theory across species. We do this based on parentally induced embryo temperature as an extrinsic input, and mass-specific embryo metabolism as an intrinsic process, underlying embryonic development rate. We found that embryonic metabolism followed intrinsic allometry rules among 49 songbird species from temperate and tropical sites. Extrinsic inputs via parentally induced temperatures explained the majority of variation in development rates and masked a relationship with metabolism; metabolism explained a minor proportion of the variation in development rates among species, and only after accounting for temperature effects. We discuss evidence that temperature further obscures the expected interspecific trade-off between development rate and offspring quality. These results demonstrate the importance of considering extrinsic inputs to trait expression and trade-offs across species.

  13. Ornament Complexity Is Correlated with Sexual Selection: (A Comment on Raia et al., "Cope's Rule and the Universal Scaling Law of Ornament Complexity").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Luke; Bro-Jørgensen, Jakob

    2016-08-01

    Raia et al. propose that the evolution of the shape and complexity of animal ornaments (e.g., deer antlers) can be explained by interspecific variation in body size and is not influenced by sexual selection. They claim to show that ornament complexity is related to body size by an 0.25-power law and argue that this finding precludes a role for sexual selection in the evolution of ornament complexity. However, their study does not test alternative hypotheses and mismeasures antler shape allometry by omitting much of the published data. We show that an index of sexual selection (sexual size dimorphism) is positively correlated with size-corrected antler complexity and that the allometric slope of complexity is substantially greater than 0.25, contra Raia et al. We conclude that sexual selection and physical constraints both affect the evolution of antler shape. PMID:27420791

  14. Vector field embryogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Steiner

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach toward evolving artificial embryogenies, which omits the graph representation of gene regulatory networks and directly shapes the dynamics of a system, i.e., its phase space. We show the feasibility of the approach by evolving cellular differentiation, a basic feature of both biological and artificial development. We demonstrate how a spatial hierarchy formulation can be integrated into the framework and investigate the evolution of a hierarchical system. Finally, we show how the framework allows the investigation of allometry, a biological phenomenon, and its role for evolution. We find that direct evolution of allometric change, i.e., the evolutionary adaptation of the speed of system states on transient trajectories in phase space, is advantageous for a cellular differentiation task.

  15. An early Australopithecus afarensis postcranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile-Selassie, Yohannes; Latimer, Bruce M; Alene, Mulugeta; Deino, Alan L; Gibert, Luis; Melillo, Stephanie M; Saylor, Beverly Z; Scott, Gary R; Lovejoy, C Owen

    2010-07-01

    Only one partial skeleton that includes both forelimb and hindlimb elements has been reported for Australopithecus afarensis. The diminutive size of this specimen (A.L. 288-1 ["Lucy"]) has hampered our understanding of the paleobiology of this species absent the potential impact of allometry. Here we describe a large-bodied (i.e., well within the range of living Homo) specimen that, at 3.58 Ma, also substantially antedates A.L. 288-1. It provides fundamental evidence of limb proportions, thoracic form, and locomotor heritage in Australopithecus afarensis. Together, these characteristics further establish that bipedality in Australopithecus was highly evolved and that thoracic form differed substantially from that of either extant African ape. PMID:20566837

  16. Biomass, stem basic density and expansion factor functions for five exotic conifers grown in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Nielsen, Anders Tærø

    2015-01-01

    five species were estimated simultaneously using a linear, mixed effects model that allowed contemporaneous correlations between the different tree components. Models differed among species and included dbh and tree height. The models explained more than 98% of the variation in above-ground biomass and...... reflected differences in the allometry between tree species. Stem density differed among species but generally declined with increasing site index and dbh. The overall model for predicting stem basic density included dbh, H100 and site index and explained 66% of the total variation. Expansion factors...... decreased from 1.8–2.0 in small trees (dbh < 10 cm) to 1.1–1.2 for large trees (dbh > 25 cm), but differed among species. The overall model explained 86% of the variation and included quadratic mean diameter and dbh....

  17. Convergent acoustic field of view in echolocating bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Ratcliffe, John M; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    Most echolocating bats exhibit a strong correlation between body size and the frequency of maximum energy in their echolocation calls (peak frequency), with smaller species using signals of higher frequency than larger ones. Size-signal allometry or acoustic detection constraints imposed on...... wavelength by preferred prey size have been used to explain this relationship. Here we propose the hypothesis that smaller bats emit higher frequencies to achieve directional sonar beams, and that variable beam width is critical for bats. Shorter wavelengths relative to the size of the emitter translate into...... more directional sound beams. Therefore, bats that emit their calls through their mouths should show a relationship between mouth size and wavelength, driving smaller bats to signals of higher frequency. We found that in a flight room mimicking a closed habitat, six aerial hawking vespertilionid...

  18. Allometric and temporal scaling of movement characteristics in Galapagos tortoises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Yackulic, Charles B; Frair, Jacqueline L; Cabrera, Freddy; Blake, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how individual movement scales with body size is of fundamental importance in predicting ecological relationships for diverse species. One-dimensional movement metrics scale consistently with body size yet vary over different temporal scales. Knowing how temporal scale influences the relationship between animal body size and movement would better inform hypotheses about the efficiency of foraging behaviour, the ontogeny of energy budgets, and numerous life-history trade-offs. We investigated how the temporal scaling of allometric patterns in movement varies over the course of a year, specifically during periods of motivated (directional and fast movement) and unmotivated (stationary and tortuous movement) behaviour. We focused on a recently diverged group of species that displays wide variation in movement behaviour - giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) - to test how movement metrics estimated on a monthly basis scaled with body size. We used state-space modelling to estimate seven different movement metrics of Galapagos tortoises. We used log-log regression of the power law to evaluate allometric scaling for these movement metrics and contrasted relationships by species and sex. Allometric scaling of movement was more apparent during motivated periods of movement. During this period, allometry was revealed at multiple temporal intervals (hourly, daily and monthly), with values observed at daily and monthly intervals corresponding most closely to the expected one-fourth scaling coefficient, albeit with wide credible intervals. We further detected differences in the magnitude of scaling among taxa uncoupled from observed differences in the temporal structuring of their movement rates. Our results indicate that the definition of temporal scales is fundamental to the detection of allometry of movement and should be given more attention in movement studies. Our approach not only provides new conceptual insights into temporal attributes in one

  19. The process-based stand growth model Formix 3-Q applied in a GIS environment for growth and yield analysis in a tropical rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzer, T.; Glauner, R.; Förster, M.; Köhler, P.; Huth, A.

    2000-03-01

    Managing tropical rain forests is difficult because few long-term field data on forest growth and the impact of harvesting disturbance are available. Growth models may provide a valuable tool for managers of tropical forests, particularly if applied to the extended forest areas of up to 100,000 ha that typically constitute the so-called forest management units (FMUs). We used a stand growth model in a geographic information system (GIS) environment to simulate tropical rain forest growth at the FMU level. We applied the process-based rain forest growth model Formix 3-Q to the 55,000 ha Deramakot Forest Reserve (DFR) in Sabah, Malaysia. The FMU was considered to be composed of single and independent small-scale stands differing in site conditions and forest structure. Field data, which were analyzed with a GIS, comprised a terrestrial forest inventory, site and soil analyses (water, nutrients, slope), the interpretation of aerial photographs of the present vegetation and topographic maps. Different stand types were determined based on a classification of site quality (three classes), slopes (four classes), and present forest structure (four strata). The effects of site quality on tree allometry (height-diameter curve, biomass allometry, leaf area) and growth (increment size) are incorporated into Formix 3-Q. We derived allometric relations and growth factors for different site conditions from the field data. Climax forest structure at the stand level was shown to depend strongly on site conditions. Simulated successional pattern and climax structure were compared with field observations. Based on the current management plan for the DFR, harvesting scenarios were simulated for stands on different sites. The effects of harvesting guidelines on forest structure and the implications for sustainable forest management at Deramakot were analyzed. Based on the stand types and GIS analysis, we also simulated undisturbed regeneration of the logged-over forest in the DFR at

  20. Geometric morphometric analysis of allometric variation in the mandibular morphology of the hominids of Atapuerca, Sima de los Huesos site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Antonio; Bastir, Markus

    2004-06-01

    Allometry is an important factor of morphological integration that contributes to the organization of the phenotype and its variation. Variation in the allometric shape of the mandible is particularly important in hominid evolution because the mandible carries important taxonomic traits. Some of these traits are known to covary with size, particularly the retromolar space, symphyseal curvature, and position of the mental foramen. The mandible is a well studied system in the context of the evolutionary development of complex morphological structures because it is composed of different developmental units that are integrated within a single bone. In the present study, we investigated the allometric variation of two important developmental units that are separated by the inferior nerve (a branch of CN V3). We tested the null hypothesis that there would be no difference in allometric variation between the two components. Procrustes-based geometric morphometrics of 20 two-dimensional (2D) landmarks were analyzed by multivariate regressions of shape on size in samples from 121 humans, 48 chimpanzees, and 50 gorillas (all recent specimens), eight fossil hominids from Atapuerca, Sima de los Huesos (AT-SH), and 17 Neandertals. The findings show that in all of the examined species, there was significantly greater allometric variation in the supra-nerve unit than in the infra-nerve unit. The formation of the retromolar space exhibited an allometric relationship with the supra-nerve unit in all of the species studied. The formation of the chin-like morphology is an "apodynamic" feature of the infra-nerve unit in the AT-SH hominids. The results of this study support the hypothesis that allometry contributes to the organization of variation in complex morphological structures. PMID:15164343

  1. Facial heights: evolutionary relevance of postnatal ontogeny for facial orientation and skull morphology in humans and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    Facial heights, i.e. the vertical distances between the superior and inferior limits of facial compartments, contribute to the orientation of the viscerocranium in the primate skull. In humans, vertical facial variation is among the main sources of diversity and frequently associated with an integrated suite of other cranio-mandibular traits. Facial heights and kyphosis are also important factors in interspecific variation and models of hominoid evolution. The ontogenetic determination of adult facial orientation and its relation to phylogenetic variation are unclear, but crucial in all previously mentioned respects. We addressed these issues in a sample of 175 humans and chimpanzees with Procrustes based geometric morphometrics, testing hypotheses of interspecific similarity in postnatal ontogenetic trajectories, early versus later ontogenetic facial pattern determination, and a developmental model of morphological integration. We analyzed the contribution of postnatal morphogenesis to adult vertical facial variation by partitioning morphological variation into a portion of pure growth allometry and a non-allometric fraction. A statistically significant difference of growth-allometries revealed that in both species growth established the adult skull proportions by vertical facial expansion, but while in chimpanzees the complete viscerocranium showed reorientation, in humans only the lower face was modified. In both species the results support a hypothesis of early facial pattern determination. A coincident emergence of morphological traits favors a hypothesis of developmental integration of the face, excluding traits of the basi- and neurocranium. Interspecific differences in integration may have implications for evolutionary studies. The present findings indicate that growth establishes the adult skull proportions and integrates principal facial orientation patterns, already there in early postnatal ontogeny. PMID:15530353

  2. Feeding biomechanics and theoretical calculations of bite force in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) during ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, Maria L; Motta, Philip J; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N

    2012-12-01

    Evaluations of bite force, either measured directly or calculated theoretically, have been used to investigate the maximum feeding performance of a wide variety of vertebrates. However, bite force studies of fishes have focused primarily on small species due to the intractable nature of large apex predators. More massive muscles can generate higher forces and many of these fishes attain immense sizes; it is unclear how much of their biting performance is driven purely by dramatic ontogenetic increases in body size versus size-specific selection for enhanced feeding performance. In this study, we investigated biting performance and feeding biomechanics of immature and mature individuals from an ontogenetic series of an apex predator, the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas (73-285cm total length). Theoretical bite force ranged from 36 to 2128N at the most anterior bite point, and 170 to 5914N at the most posterior bite point over the ontogenetic series. Scaling patterns differed among the two age groups investigated; immature bull shark bite force scaled with positive allometry, whereas adult bite force scaled isometrically. When the bite force of C. leucas was compared to those of 12 other cartilaginous fishes, bull sharks presented the highest mass-specific bite force, greater than that of the white shark or the great hammerhead shark. A phylogenetic independent contrast analysis of anatomical and dietary variables as determinants of bite force in these 13 species indicated that the evolution of large adult bite forces in cartilaginous fishes is linked predominantly to the evolution of large body size. Multiple regressions based on mass-specific standardized contrasts suggest that the evolution of high bite forces in Chondrichthyes is further correlated with hypertrophication of the jaw adductors, increased leverage for anterior biting, and widening of the head. Lastly, we discuss the ecological significance of positive allometry in bite force as a possible

  3. The roles of sex, mass and individual specialisation in partitioning foraging-depth niches of a pursuit-diving predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Norman; Takahashi, Akinori; O'Sullivan, Claire; Adlard, Stacey; Trathan, Philip N; Harris, Michael P; Wanless, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Intra-specific foraging niche partitioning can arise due to gender differences or individual specialisation in behaviour or prey selection. These may in turn be related to sexual size dimorphism or individual variation in body size through allometry. These variables are often inter-related and challenging to separate statistically. We present a case study in which the effects of sex, body mass and individual specialisation on the dive depths of the South Georgia shag on Bird Island, South Georgia are investigated simultaneously using a linear mixed model. The nested random effects of trip within individual explained a highly significant amount of the variance. The effects of sex and body mass were both significant independently but could not be separated statistically owing to them being strongly interrelated. Variance components analysis revealed that 45.5% of the variation occurred among individuals, 22.6% among trips and 31.8% among Dives, while R(2) approximations showed gender explained 31.4% and body mass 55.9% of the variation among individuals. Male dive depths were more variable than those of females at the levels of individual, trip and dive. The effect of body mass on individual dive depths was only marginally significant within sexes. The percentage of individual variation in dive depths explained by mass was trivial in males (0.8%) but substantial in females (24.1%), suggesting that differences in dive depths among males was largely due to them adopting different behavioural strategies whereas in females allometry played an additional role. Niche partitioning in the study population therefore appears to be achieved through the interactive effects of individual specialisation and gender upon vertical foraging patch selection, and has the potential to interact in complex ways with other axes of the niche hypervolume such as foraging locations, timing of foraging and diet. PMID:24205368

  4. The roles of sex, mass and individual specialisation in partitioning foraging-depth niches of a pursuit-diving predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Ratcliffe

    Full Text Available Intra-specific foraging niche partitioning can arise due to gender differences or individual specialisation in behaviour or prey selection. These may in turn be related to sexual size dimorphism or individual variation in body size through allometry. These variables are often inter-related and challenging to separate statistically. We present a case study in which the effects of sex, body mass and individual specialisation on the dive depths of the South Georgia shag on Bird Island, South Georgia are investigated simultaneously using a linear mixed model. The nested random effects of trip within individual explained a highly significant amount of the variance. The effects of sex and body mass were both significant independently but could not be separated statistically owing to them being strongly interrelated. Variance components analysis revealed that 45.5% of the variation occurred among individuals, 22.6% among trips and 31.8% among Dives, while R(2 approximations showed gender explained 31.4% and body mass 55.9% of the variation among individuals. Male dive depths were more variable than those of females at the levels of individual, trip and dive. The effect of body mass on individual dive depths was only marginally significant within sexes. The percentage of individual variation in dive depths explained by mass was trivial in males (0.8% but substantial in females (24.1%, suggesting that differences in dive depths among males was largely due to them adopting different behavioural strategies whereas in females allometry played an additional role. Niche partitioning in the study population therefore appears to be achieved through the interactive effects of individual specialisation and gender upon vertical foraging patch selection, and has the potential to interact in complex ways with other axes of the niche hypervolume such as foraging locations, timing of foraging and diet.

  5. A stand-alone tree demography and landscape structure module for Earth system models: integration with global forest data

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    V. Haverd

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Poorly constrained rates of biomass turnover are a key limitation of Earth system models (ESM. In light of this, we recently proposed a new approach encoded in a model called Populations-Order-Physiology (POP, for the simulation of woody ecosystem stand dynamics, demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. POP is suitable for continental to global applications and designed for coupling to the terrestrial ecosystem component of any ESM. POP bridges the gap between first generation Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs with simple large-area parameterisations of woody biomass (typically used in current ESMs and complex second generation DVMs, that explicitly simulate demographic processes and landscape heterogeneity of forests. The key simplification in the POP approach, compared with second-generation DVMs, is to compute physiological processes such as assimilation at grid-scale (with CABLE or a similar land surface model, but to partition the grid-scale biomass increment among age classes defined at sub grid-scale, each subject to its own dynamics. POP was successfully demonstrated along a savanna transect in northern Australia, replicating the effects of strong rainfall and fire disturbance gradients on observed stand productivity and structure. Here, we extend the application of POP to a range of forest types around the globe, employing paired observations of stem biomass and density from forest inventory data to calibrate model parameters governing stand demography and biomass evolution. The calibrated POP model is then coupled to the CABLE land surface model and the combined model (CABLE-POP is evaluated against leaf-stem allometry observations from forest stands ranging in age from 3 to 200 yr. Results indicate that simulated biomass pools conform well with observed allometry. We conclude that POP represents a preferable alternative to large-area parameterisations of woody biomass turnover, typically used in current ESMs.

  6. Relative cheek-tooth size in Australopithecus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, H M

    1984-07-01

    Until the discovery of Australopithecus afarensis, cheek-tooth megadontia was unequivocally one of the defining characteristics of the australopithecine grade in human evolution along with bipedalism and small brains. This species, however, has an average postcanine area of 757 mm2, which is more like Homo habilis (759 mm2) than A. africanus (856 mm2). But what is its relative cheek-tooth size in comparison to body size? One approach to this question is to compare postcanine tooth area to estimated body weight. By this method all Australopithecus species are megadont: they have cheek teeth 1.7 to 2.3 times larger than modern hominoids of similar body size. The series from A. afarensis to A. africanus to A. robustus to A. boisei shows strong positive allometry indicating increasing megadontia through time. The series from H. habilis to H. erectus to H. sapiens shows strong negative allometry which implies a sharp reduction in the relative size of the posterior teeth. Postcanine megadontia in Australopithecus species can also be demonstrated by comparing tooth size and body size in associated skeletons: A. afarensis (represented by A.L. 288-1) has a cheek-tooth size 2.8 times larger than expected from modern hominoids; A. africanus (Sts 7) and A. robustus (TM 1517) are over twice the expected size. The evolutionary transition from the megadont condition of Australopithecus to the trend of decreasing megadontia seen in the Homo lineage may have occurred between 3.0 and 2.5 m.y. from A. afarensis to H.habilis but other evidence indicates that it is more likely to have occurred between 2.5 to 2.0 m.y. from an A. africanus-like form to H. habilis. PMID:6433716

  7. An examination of cetacean brain structure with a novel hypothesis correlating thermogenesis to the evolution of a big brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Paul R

    2006-05-01

    This review examines aspects of cetacean brain structure related to behaviour and evolution. Major considerations include cetacean brain-body allometry, structure of the cerebral cortex, the hippocampal formation, specialisations of the cetacean brain related to vocalisations and sleep phenomenology, paleoneurology, and brain-body allometry during cetacean evolution. These data are assimilated to demonstrate that there is no neural basis for the often-asserted high intellectual abilities of cetaceans. Despite this, the cetaceans do have volumetrically large brains. A novel hypothesis regarding the evolution of large brain size in cetaceans is put forward. It is shown that a combination of an unusually high number of glial cells and unihemispheric sleep phenomenology make the cetacean brain an efficient thermogenetic organ, which is needed to counteract heat loss to the water. It is demonstrated that water temperature is the major selection pressure driving an altered scaling of brain and body size and an increased actual brain size in cetaceans. A point in the evolutionary history of cetaceans is identified as the moment in which water temperature became a significant selection pressure in cetacean brain evolution. This occurred at the Archaeoceti - modern cetacean faunal transition. The size, structure and scaling of the cetacean brain continues to be shaped by water temperature in extant cetaceans. The alterations in cetacean brain structure, function and scaling, combined with the imperative of producing offspring that can withstand the rate of heat loss experienced in water, within the genetic confines of eutherian mammal reproductive constraints, provides an explanation for the evolution of the large size of the cetacean brain. These observations provide an alternative to the widely held belief of a correlation between brain size and intelligence in cetaceans. PMID:16573845

  8. Internal dosimetry for [4-14C]-cholesterol in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work is to provide a biokinetic model in order to estimate the radiometric dose due to intake of [4-14C]-cholesterol. The model was validated comparing the values of fecal excretion and absorption described in literature with that predicted by the model. The proposed model achieved good concordance between the results (p = 0.416 for excretion and p = 0.423 for absorption). The coefficients of effective dose (SvBq-1), equivalent dose (SvBq-1) and absorbed dose (GyBq-1) in human organs and tissues were calculated using the MIRD methodology and the compartmental analysis software ANACOMP. The coefficients were estimated for four phantoms: adult with a body mass of 73.3 kg, 15 years old adolescent (56.9 kg), 10 years old child (33.2 kg) and five years old child (19.8 kg). The organ that received the highest absorbed dose for all phantoms was the lower large intestine (LLI). The allometry theory was used to interpolate the coefficient of absorbed dose in the lower large intestine (DLLI) for unknown body mass (m): DLLI (GyBq-1)=161.26 m (kg)-1.025. For the same administered activity, the effective dose coefficient (E) decreases as the body mass increases. On other words, for the same intake activity, individuals with low body mass are exposed to higher doses. The allometry theory was used to interpolate the coefficient effective dose (E) for unknown body mass (m): E(SvB-1)= 171.1 m(kg)-1,021. (author)

  9. Internal dosimetry for [4-{sup 14}C]-cholesterol in humans; Dosimetria interna para o [4-{sup 14}C]-colesterol em humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcato, Larissa Andreto

    2012-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide a biokinetic model in order to estimate the radiometric dose due to intake of [4-{sup 14}C]-cholesterol. The model was validated comparing the values of fecal excretion and absorption described in literature with that predicted by the model. The proposed model achieved good concordance between the results (p = 0.416 for excretion and p = 0.423 for absorption). The coefficients of effective dose (SvBq{sup -1}), equivalent dose (SvBq{sup -1}) and absorbed dose (GyBq{sup -1}) in human organs and tissues were calculated using the MIRD methodology and the compartmental analysis software ANACOMP. The coefficients were estimated for four phantoms: adult with a body mass of 73.3 kg, 15 years old adolescent (56.9 kg), 10 years old child (33.2 kg) and five years old child (19.8 kg). The organ that received the highest absorbed dose for all phantoms was the lower large intestine (LLI). The allometry theory was used to interpolate the coefficient of absorbed dose in the lower large intestine (DLLI) for unknown body mass (m): DLLI (GyBq{sup -1})=161.26 m (kg){sup -1.025}. For the same administered activity, the effective dose coefficient (E) decreases as the body mass increases. On other words, for the same intake activity, individuals with low body mass are exposed to higher doses. The allometry theory was used to interpolate the coefficient effective dose (E) for unknown body mass (m): E(SvB{sup -1})= 171.1 m(kg){sup -1,021}. (author)

  10. Controls on benthic biomass size spectra in shelf and deep-sea sediments – a modelling study

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    B. A. Kelly-Gerreyn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling biomass distributions in marine benthic organisms (meio- to macro-fauna, 1 μg–32 mg wet weight were investigated through observations and allometric modelling. Biomass (and abundance size spectra were measured at three locations: the Faroe-Shetland Channel in the north-east Atlantic (FSC, water depth 1600 m, September 2000; the Fladen Ground in the North Sea (FG, 150 m, September 2000; and the hypoxic Oman Margin (OM, 500 m, September 2002 in the Arabian Sea. Biomass increased with body size through a power law at FG (allometric exponent, b = 0.16 and at FSC (b = 0.32, but less convincingly at OM (b was not significantly different from −1/4 or 0. Our results question the assumption that metazoan biomass spectra are bimodal in marine sediments.

    The model incorporated 16 metazoan size classes, as derived from the observed spectra, all reliant on a common detrital food pool. All physiological (ingestion, mortality, assimilation and respiration parameters scaled to body size following optimisation to the data at each site, the resulting values being consistent within expectations from the literature. For all sites, body size related changes in mortality played the greatest role in determining the trend of the biomass size spectra. The body size trend in the respiration rate was most sensitive to allometry in both mortality and ingestion, and the trend in body size spectra of the production: biomass ratio was explained by the allometry in ingestion.

    Our results suggest that size-scaling mortality and ingestion are important factors determining the distribution of biomass across the meiofauna to macrofauna size range in marine sedimentary communities, in agreement with the general observation that biomass tends to accumulates in larger rather than smaller size classes in these environments.

  11. Scale-Adjusted Metrics for Predicting the Evolution of Urban Indicators and Quantifying the Performance of Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luiz G A; Mendes, Renio S; Lenzi, Ervin K; Ribeiro, Haroldo V

    2015-01-01

    More than a half of world population is now living in cities and this number is expected to be two-thirds by 2050. Fostered by the relevancy of a scientific characterization of cities and for the availability of an unprecedented amount of data, academics have recently immersed in this topic and one of the most striking and universal finding was the discovery of robust allometric scaling laws between several urban indicators and the population size. Despite that, most governmental reports and several academic works still ignore these nonlinearities by often analyzing the raw or the per capita value of urban indicators, a practice that actually makes the urban metrics biased towards small or large cities depending on whether we have super or sublinear allometries. By following the ideas of Bettencourt et al. [PLoS ONE 5 (2010) e13541], we account for this bias by evaluating the difference between the actual value of an urban indicator and the value expected by the allometry with the population size. We show that this scale-adjusted metric provides a more appropriate/informative summary of the evolution of urban indicators and reveals patterns that do not appear in the evolution of per capita values of indicators obtained from Brazilian cities. We also show that these scale-adjusted metrics are strongly correlated with their past values by a linear correspondence and that they also display crosscorrelations among themselves. Simple linear models account for 31%-97% of the observed variance in data and correctly reproduce the average of the scale-adjusted metric when grouping the cities in above and below the allometric laws. We further employ these models to forecast future values of urban indicators and, by visualizing the predicted changes, we verify the emergence of spatial clusters characterized by regions of the Brazilian territory where we expect an increase or a decrease in the values of urban indicators. PMID:26356081

  12. Scale-Adjusted Metrics for Predicting the Evolution of Urban Indicators and Quantifying the Performance of Cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz G A Alves

    Full Text Available More than a half of world population is now living in cities and this number is expected to be two-thirds by 2050. Fostered by the relevancy of a scientific characterization of cities and for the availability of an unprecedented amount of data, academics have recently immersed in this topic and one of the most striking and universal finding was the discovery of robust allometric scaling laws between several urban indicators and the population size. Despite that, most governmental reports and several academic works still ignore these nonlinearities by often analyzing the raw or the per capita value of urban indicators, a practice that actually makes the urban metrics biased towards small or large cities depending on whether we have super or sublinear allometries. By following the ideas of Bettencourt et al. [PLoS ONE 5 (2010 e13541], we account for this bias by evaluating the difference between the actual value of an urban indicator and the value expected by the allometry with the population size. We show that this scale-adjusted metric provides a more appropriate/informative summary of the evolution of urban indicators and reveals patterns that do not appear in the evolution of per capita values of indicators obtained from Brazilian cities. We also show that these scale-adjusted metrics are strongly correlated with their past values by a linear correspondence and that they also display crosscorrelations among themselves. Simple linear models account for 31%-97% of the observed variance in data and correctly reproduce the average of the scale-adjusted metric when grouping the cities in above and below the allometric laws. We further employ these models to forecast future values of urban indicators and, by visualizing the predicted changes, we verify the emergence of spatial clusters characterized by regions of the Brazilian territory where we expect an increase or a decrease in the values of urban indicators.

  13. Crescimento alométrico de osso, músculo e gordura em cortes da carcaça de cordeiros Texel segundo os métodos de alimentação e peso de abate Muscle, fat and bone allometric growth in Texel lambs carcasses cuts in relation to the feeding methods and slaughter weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Teixeira da Rosa

    2005-08-01

    sexo com coeficientes de alometria variando de 1,80 a 2,12.The experiment aimed at studying the allometric growth of the different tissues of neck, rib, shoulder blade and leg in relation to the cutting weight of male and female lambs. Twenty-two intact Texel males and 23 Texel females were used. Seven of them were slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment and the others at the weight of 25 or 33kg. Sheep and lambs were distributed into three methods of feeding: M1 - Corn silage and concentrate, only to lambs until weaning at 60 days old; M2 - Corn silage and concentrate, only to lambs until weaning at 45 days old and M3 - Corn silage and concentrate to ewe and lamb until weaning at 60 days old. After weaning, lambs were fed with silage plus concentrate. A completely randomized design outlined in a factorial arrangement 3 x 2 x 2 (3 methods, 2 sexes and 2 slaughter weights was used. Determination of growth was obtained through the equation log y = log.a + b log.x, by using the logarithm of bone, muscle and fat weight in function of cutting weight logarithm. It was observed that neck and rib bone was precocious (b1, regardless of sex and feeding method with allometry coefficients varying from 1.78 to 2.15 (neck and 1.51 to 1.65 (rib. In shoulder blade, bone was precocious in both sexes, with allometry coefficients varying from 0.76 to 0.79 and 0.54 to 0.58 for males and females, respectively. Muscle presented isometric growth (b = 1, regardless of sex and slaughter weight. Fat was late (b>1, regardless of slaughter weight and sex, with allometry coefficients varying from 1.80 to 2.12. In leg, bone growth was precocious in females and isometric in males, with allometry coefficients varying from 0.57 to 0.63 and 0.78 to 0.80, respectively, for both sexes. Muscle presented isometric growth (b = 1, regardless of sex and slaughter weight. Fat was late (b>1, regardless of slaughter weight and sex, with allometry coefficients varying from 1.80 to 2.12.

  14. Relative growth and morphological sexual maturity of Chasmagnathus granulatus (Crustacea, Varunidae from a mangrove area in southeastern Brazilian coast Crescimento relativo e maturidade sexual morfológica de Chasmagnathus granulatus (Crustacea, Varunidae de uma área de manguezal no sudeste do Brasil

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    Rafael Augusto Gregati

    Full Text Available The relative growth and morphological sexual maturity of Chasmagnathus granulatus Dana, 1851 are presented for the first time to a mangrove population. The crabs were obtained during low tide periods, in the mangrove of Jabaquara Beach, Paraty, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. All crabs in intermolt stage were sexed and had their body parts measured as follows: body height (BH, carapace length (CL and width (CW, major cheliped propodus height (PH and length (PL for each sex, gonopod length (GL and abdomen width (AW for males and females, respectively. The relative growth was described using the allometric equation y=ax b and the size at onset sexual maturity was achieved using the software Mature I. The size of specimens ranged from 4.1 mm to 39.5 mm CW. The growth pattern was different between sexes in the cheliped relationships; the relationships BH vs. CW evidenced positive allometry for juveniles; PL vs. CW and PH vs. CW positive allometry for most crabs except juvenile females; AW vs. CW and GL vs. CW evidenced positive allometry for juveniles and isometry for adults. The relationships that best indicated the change from the juvenile to the adult phase were PH vs. CW for males and AW vs. CW for females. The size in which 50% of males from this population are mature is at 19.7 mm of CW (F=144.14; pO crescimento relativo e a maturidade sexual morfológica de Chasmagnathus granulatus Dana, 1851 são apresentados pela primeira vez para uma população de manguezal. Os caranguejos foram obtidos durante os períodos de maré baixa, no manguezal da praia do Jabaquara, Paraty, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Todos os caranguejos em estágio de intermuda foram classificados quanto ao sexo e as seguintes medidas lineares foram tomadas: altura do corpo (AC, altura do própodo do quelípodo maior (APQ, comprimento da carapaça (CC, comprimento do própodo do quelípodo maior (CPQ, largura da carapaça (LC, comprimento do gonopódio (CG e largura do abdome (LA para

  15. Predicting biomass of hyperdiverse and structurally complex Central Amazon forests - a virtual approach using extensive field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnabosco Marra, D.; Higuchi, N.; Trumbore, S. E.; Ribeiro, G. H. P. M.; dos Santos, J.; Carneiro, V. M. C.; Lima, A. J. N.; Chambers, J. Q.; Negrón-Juárez, R. I.; Holzwarth, F.; Reu, B.; Wirth, C.

    2015-09-01

    Old-growth forests are subject to substantial changes in structure and species composition due to the intensification of human activities, gradual climate change and extreme weather events. Trees store ca. 90 % of the total AGB above-ground biomass in tropical forests and AGB estimation models are crucial for forest management and conservation. In the Central Amazon, predicting AGB at large spatial-scales is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity of successional stages, high tree species diversity and inherent variations in allometry and architecture. We parameterized generic AGB estimation models applicable across species and a wide range of structural and compositional variation related to species sorting into height layers as well as frequent natural disturbances. We used 727 trees from 101 genera and at least 135 species harvested in a contiguous forest near Manaus, Brazil. Sampling from this dataset we assembled six scenarios designed to span existing gradients in floristic composition and size distribution in order to select models that best predict AGB at the landscape-level across successional gradients. We found that good individual tree model fits do not necessarily translate into good predictions of AGB at the landscape level. When predicting AGB (dry mass) over scenarios using our different models and an available pantropical model, we observed systematic biases ranging from -31 % (pantropical) to +39 %, with RMSE root-mean-square error values of up to 130 Mg ha-1 (pantropical). Our first and second best models had both low mean biases (0.8 and 3.9 %, respectively) and RMSE (9.4 and 18.6 Mg ha-1) when applied over scenarios. Predicting biomass correctly at the landscape-level in complex tropical forests, especially allowing good performance at the margins of data availability for model parametrization, requires the inclusion of predictors related to species architecture. The model of interest should comprise the floristic composition and size

  16. Prediction intervals: Placing real bounds on regression-based allometric estimates of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Biomass allometry studies routinely assume that regression models can be applied across species and sites, and that goodness of fit of a regression model to its derivation dataset indicates both the relevance of the model to a new dataset and the likely error. Assuming that a model is relevant for a new sample, a prediction interval is a useful error measure for stand mass. Prediction coverage tests whether the model and hence the interval are appropriate in the new sample. Data for three similar shrubby species from four similar sites were combined in various ways to test the impact of varying levels of biodiverse heterogeneity on the performance of the four models most commonly used in published biomass studies. No one model performed consistently well predicting new data, and validation checks were not good indicators of prediction coverage. The highly variable results suggest that the common models might contain insufficient variables. Euclidean distance was used to quantify the relative similarity of samples as a possible means of estimating prediction coverage; it proved unsuccessful with these data. PMID:25974741

  17. Patriline Differences Reveal Genetic Influence on Forewing Size and Shape in a Yellowjacket Wasp (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Vespula flavopilosa Jacobson, 1978.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Perrard

    Full Text Available The wing venation is frequently used as a morphological marker to distinguish biological groups among insects. With geometric morphometrics, minute shape differences can be detected between closely related species or populations, making this technique useful for taxonomy. However, the direct influence of genetic differences on wing morphology has not been explored within colonies of social insects. Here, we show that the father's genotype has a direct effect on wing morphology in colonies of social wasps. Using geometric morphometrics on the venation pattern, we found significant differences in wing size and shape between patrilines of yellowjackets, taking allometry and measurement error into account. The genetic influence on wing size accounted for a small part of the overall size variation, but venation shape was highly structured by the differences between patrilines. Overall, our results showed a strong genetic influence on wing morphology likely acting at multiple levels of venation pattern development. This confirmed the pertinence of this marker for taxonomic purposes and suggests this phenotype as a potentially useful marker for phylogenies. This also raises doubts about the strength of selective pressures on this phenotype, which highlights the need to understand better the role of wing venation shape in insect flight.

  18. Soil resource supply influences faunal size-specific distributions in natural food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Christian; den Hollander, Henri A.; Vonk, J. Arie; Rossberg, Axel G.; Jagers Op Akkerhuis, Gerard A. J. M.; Yeates, Gregor W.

    2009-07-01

    The large range of body-mass values of soil organisms provides a tool to assess the ecological organization of soil communities. The goal of this paper is to identify graphical and quantitative indicators of soil community composition and ecosystem functioning, and to illustrate their application to real soil food webs. The relationships between log-transformed mass and abundance of soil organisms in 20 Dutch meadows and heathlands were investigated. Using principles of allometry, maximal use can be made of ecological theory to build and explain food webs. The aggregate contribution of small invertebrates such as nematodes to the entire community is high under low soil phosphorus content and causes shifts in the mass-abundance relationships and in the trophic structures. We show for the first time that the average of the trophic link lengths is a reliable predictor for assessing soil fertility responses. Ordered trophic link pairs suggest a self-organizing structure of food webs according to resource availability and can predict environmental shifts in ecologically meaningful ways.

  19. The structure of tropical forests and sphere packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Franziska; Jahn, Markus Wilhelm; Dobner, Hans-Jürgen; Wiegand, Thorsten; Huth, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The search for simple principles underlying the complex architecture of ecological communities such as forests still challenges ecological theorists. We use tree diameter distributions--fundamental for deriving other forest attributes--to describe the structure of tropical forests. Here we argue that tree diameter distributions of natural tropical forests can be explained by stochastic packing of tree crowns representing a forest crown packing system: a method usually used in physics or chemistry. We demonstrate that tree diameter distributions emerge accurately from a surprisingly simple set of principles that include site-specific tree allometries, random placement of trees, competition for space, and mortality. The simple static model also successfully predicted the canopy structure, revealing that most trees in our two studied forests grow up to 30-50 m in height and that the highest packing density of about 60% is reached between the 25- and 40-m height layer. Our approach is an important step toward identifying a minimal set of processes responsible for generating the spatial structure of tropical forests. PMID:26598678

  20. Comparative analyses of animal-tracking data reveal ecological significance of endothermy in fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuuki Y.; Goldman, Kenneth J.; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Chapman, Demian D.; Papastamatiou, Yannis P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite long evolutionary separations, several sharks and tunas share the ability to maintain slow-twitch, aerobic red muscle (RM) warmer than ambient water. Proximate causes of RM endothermy are well understood, but ultimate causes are unclear. Two advantages often proposed are thermal niche expansion and elevated cruising speeds. The thermal niche hypothesis is generally supported, because fishes with RM endothermy often exhibit greater tolerance to broad temperature ranges. In contrast, whether fishes with RM endothermy cruise faster, and achieve any ecological benefits from doing so, remains unclear. Here, we compiled data recorded by modern animal-tracking tools for a variety of free-swimming marine vertebrates. Using phylogenetically informed allometry, we show that both cruising speeds and maximum annual migration ranges of fishes with RM endothermy are 2–3 times greater than fishes without it, and comparable to nonfish endotherms (i.e., penguins and marine mammals). The estimated cost of transport of fishes with RM endothermy is twice that of fishes without it. We suggest that the high energetic cost of RM endothermy in fishes is offset by the benefit of elevated cruising speeds, which not only increase prey encounter rates, but also enable larger-scale annual migrations and potentially greater access to seasonally available resources. PMID:25902489

  1. Scaling of avian primary feather length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Nudds

    Full Text Available The evolution of the avian wing has long fascinated biologists, yet almost no work includes the length of primary feathers in consideration of overall wing length variation. Here we show that the length of the longest primary feather (f(prim contributing to overall wing length scales with negative allometry against total arm (ta = humerus+ulna+manus. The scaling exponent varied slightly, although not significantly so, depending on whether a species level analysis was used or phylogeny was controlled for using independent contrasts: f(prim is proportional to ta(0.78-0.82. The scaling exponent was not significantly different from that predicted (0.86 by earlier work. It appears that there is a general trend for the primary feathers of birds to contribute proportionally less, and ta proportionally more, to overall wingspan as this dimension increases. Wingspan in birds is constrained close to mass (M(1/3 because of optimisation for lift production, which limits opportunities for exterior morphological change. Within the wing, variations in underlying bone and feather lengths nevertheless may, in altering the joint positions, permit a range of different flight styles by facilitating variation in upstroke kinematics.

  2. Length-weight relationship and metric-meristic characteristics of two scorpion fishes (Scorpaena notata and Scorpaena porcus in İzmir Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sencer Akalın

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 2 species (Scorpaena notata, Scorpaena porcus belong to Scorpaena genus were caught monthly by trawl surveys carried out between January 2005-July 2007 in İzmir Bay, in order to determine of morfometric and meristic characteristics and length-weigth relationships parameters. During the research period, 658 Scorpaena notata and 221 Scorpaena porcus indi¬viduals were investigated. The lenght-weight relationship of fishes were estimated as W=0.0164*L3.074 (r2=0.960 and W=0.0209*L2.987 (r=0.993 for Scorpaena notata and Scorpa¬ena porcus, respectively. As a result of student t-test (p<0.05, it was determined that the growth characteristics of S. notata and S. porcus are positive allometry and isometry respecti¬vely in the bay. In addition, 19 morphometric measurements taken and 7 meristic characteristic were counted for 23 S. notata and 29 S.porcus individuals.

  3. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D

    2014-08-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate ( R: ) and body mass ( M: ), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R: is proportional to MB: , the precise value of B: much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts B: to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH ('ocean acidification'). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; B: is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size. PMID:25122741

  4. Individual-Based Allometric Equations Accurately Measure Carbon Storage and Sequestration in Shrublands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman W.H. Mason

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have quantified uncertainty in forest carbon (C storage estimation, but there is little work examining the degree of uncertainty in shrubland C storage estimates. We used field data to simulate uncertainty in carbon storage estimates from three error sources: (1 allometric biomass equations; (2 measurement errors of shrubs harvested for the allometry; and (3 measurement errors of shrubs in survey plots. We also assessed uncertainty for all possible combinations of these error sources. Allometric uncertainty had the greatest independent effect on C storage estimates for individual plots. The largest error arose when all three error sources were included in simulations (where the 95% confidence interval spanned a range equivalent to 40% of mean C storage. Mean C sequestration (1.73 Mg C ha–1 year–1 exceeded the margin of error produced by the simulated sources of uncertainty. This demonstrates that, even when the major sources of uncertainty were accounted for, we were able to detect relatively modest gains in shrubland C storage.

  5. Scaling of suction-induced flows in bluegill: morphological and kinematic predictors for the ontogeny of feeding performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, Roi; Collar, David C; Day, Steven W; Bishop, Kristin L; Wainwright, Peter C

    2008-08-01

    During ontogeny, animals undergo changes in size and shape that result in shifts in performance, behavior and resource use. These ontogenetic changes provide an opportunity to test hypotheses about how the growth of structures affects biological functions. In the present study, we ask how ontogenetic changes in skull biomechanics affect the ability of bluegill sunfish, a high-performance suction feeder, to produce flow speeds and accelerations during suction feeding. The flow of water in front of the mouth was measured directly for fish ranging from young-of-year to large adults, using digital particle imaging velocimetry (DPIV). As bluegill size increased, the magnitude of peak flow speed they produced increased, and the effective suction distance increased because of increasing mouth size. However, throughout the size range, the timing of peak fluid speed remained unchanged, and flow was constrained to approximately one gape distance from the mouth. The observed scaling relationships between standard length and peak flow speed conformed to expectations derived from two biomechanical models, one based on morphological potential to produce suction pressure (the Suction Index model) and the other derived from a combination of morphological and kinematic variables (the Expanding Cone model). The success of these models in qualitatively predicting the observed allometry of induced flow speed reveals that the scaling of cranial morphology underlies the scaling of suction performance in bluegill. PMID:18689419

  6. Leaf morphology correlates with water and light availability:What consequences for simple and compound leaves?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Xu; Weihua Guo; Weihong Xu; Yinghua Wei; Renqing Wang

    2009-01-01

    Leaves are organs sensitive to environmental changes in the process of evolution and may exhibit phenotypic plasticity as a response to abiotic stress.However,affirmation of leaf morphological plasticity and its regulations in different environments are still unclear.We performed a simulated experiment to study the variations of leaf morphology in different gradients of water and light availability.Considering different types of leaves and venation,we chose pinnate-veined simple leaves of Quercus acutissima and compound leaves of Robinia pseudoacacia as the study objects.The morphological parameters we investigated include leaf size,shape and venation pattern which can be easily measured in the field.Significant variations occurred in many parameters due to the effects of the environment and/or allometry.There were broadly consistent trends for leaf morphological variations along the gradients.The leaf size became smaller with a short supply of resources.Leaf elongation and fractions of the lamina area altered to enhance resources acquisition and conservation.Trade-offs between investments in support and functional structures optimized the venation pattern of major and minor veins.Leaflets partially played a role such as leaf teeth,for they are not only individual units,but also a part of the compound leaf.We suggest that more or less the same trends in morphological variations may be an important explanation for coexisting species to adapt to similar habitats and form the niche differentiation.

  7. Hybridization and adaptation to introduced balloon vines in an Australian soapberry bug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, J A; Thampy, P R; Mathieson, M T; Loye, J; Zalucki, M P; Dingle, H; Carroll, S P

    2013-12-01

    Contemporary adaptation of plant feeding insects to introduced hosts provides clear cases of ecologically based population divergence. In most cases the mechanisms permitting rapid differentiation are not well known. Here we study morphological and genetic variation associated with recent shifts by the Australian soapberry bug Leptocoris tagalicus onto two naturalized Neotropical balloon vines, Cardiospermum halicacabum and C. grandiflorum that differ in time since introduction. Our results show that these vines have much larger fruits than the native hosts (Whitewood tree -Atalaya hemiglauca- and Woolly Rambutan -Alectryon tomentosus-) and that bugs living on them have evolved significantly longer beaks and new allometries. Genetic analyses of mitochondrial haplotypes and amplified fragment length polymorphic (AFLP) markers indicate that the lineage of bugs on the annual vine C. halicacabum, the older introduction, is intermediate between the two subspecies of L. tagalicus found on native hosts. Moreover, where the annual vine and Whitewood tree co-occur, the morphology and genomic composition of the bugs are similar to those occurring in allopatry. These results show that hybridization provided the genetic elements underlying the strongly differentiated 'Halicacabum bugs'. In contrast, the bugs feeding on the recently introduced perennial balloon vine (C. grandiflorum) showed no evidence of admixture, and are genetically indistinguishable from the nearby populations on a native host. PMID:24237450

  8. Mammalian development does not recapitulate suspected key transformations in the evolutionary detachment of the mammalian middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Chaves, Héctor E; Wroe, Stephen W; Selwood, Lynne; Hinds, Lyn A; Leigh, Chris; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Weisbecker, Vera

    2016-01-13

    The ectotympanic, malleus and incus of the developing mammalian middle ear (ME) are initially attached to the dentary via Meckel's cartilage, betraying their origins from the primary jaw joint of land vertebrates. This recapitulation has prompted mostly unquantified suggestions that several suspected--but similarly unquantified--key evolutionary transformations leading to the mammalian ME are recapitulated in development, through negative allometry and posterior/medial displacement of ME bones relative to the jaw joint. Here we show, using µCT reconstructions, that neither allometric nor topological change is quantifiable in the pre-detachment ME development of six marsupials and two monotremes. Also, differential ME positioning in the two monotreme species is not recapitulated. This challenges the developmental prerequisites of widely cited evolutionary scenarios of definitive mammalian middle ear (DMME) evolution, highlighting the requirement for further fossil evidence to test these hypotheses. Possible association between rear molar eruption, full ME ossification and ME detachment in marsupials suggests functional divergence between dentary and ME as a trigger for developmental, and possibly also evolutionary, ME detachment. The stable positioning of the dentary and ME supports suggestions that a 'partial mammalian middle ear' as found in many mammaliaforms--probably with a cartilaginous Meckel's cartilage--represents the only developmentally plausible evolutionary DMME precursor. PMID:26763693

  9. Integrating mixed-effect models into an architectural plant model to simulate inter- and intra-progeny variability: a case study on oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Raphaël P A; Pallas, Benoît; Le Moguédec, Gilles; Rey, Hervé; Griffon, Sébastien; Caliman, Jean-Pierre; Costes, Evelyne; Dauzat, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of plants is time-consuming and involves considerable levels of data acquisition. This is possibly one reason why the integration of genetic variability into 3D architectural models has so far been largely overlooked. In this study, an allometry-based approach was developed to account for architectural variability in 3D architectural models of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) as a case study. Allometric relationships were used to model architectural traits from individual leaflets to the entire crown while accounting for ontogenetic and morphogenetic gradients. Inter- and intra-progeny variabilities were evaluated for each trait and mixed-effect models were used to estimate the mean and variance parameters required for complete 3D virtual plants. Significant differences in leaf geometry (petiole length, density of leaflets, and rachis curvature) and leaflet morphology (gradients of leaflet length and width) were detected between and within progenies and were modelled in order to generate populations of plants that were consistent with the observed populations. The application of mixed-effect models on allometric relationships highlighted an interesting trade-off between model accuracy and ease of defining parameters for the 3D reconstruction of plants while at the same time integrating their observed variability. Future research will be dedicated to sensitivity analyses coupling the structural model presented here with a radiative balance model in order to identify the key architectural traits involved in light interception efficiency. PMID:27302128

  10. 14C and tritium dynamics in wild mammals: a metabolic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protection of biota from ionising radiations needs reliable predictions of radionuclide dynamics in wild animals. Data specific for many wild animals radionuclide combinations is lacking and a number of approaches including allometry have been proposed to address this. However, for 14C and tritium, which are integral components of animals tissues and their diets, a different approach is needed in the absence of experimental data. Here we propose a metabolically based model which can be parameterized predominantly on the basis of published metabolic data. We begin with a metabolic definition of the 14C and OBT loss rate (assumed to be the same) from the whole body and also specific organs, using available information on field metabolic rate and body composition. The mammalian body is conceptually partitioned into compartments (body water, viscera, adipose, muscle, blood and remainder) and a simple model defined using net maintenance and growth needs of mammals. Intake and excretion, and transfer to body water are modelled using basic metabolic knowledge and published relationships. The model is tested with data from studies using rats and sheep. It provides a reliable prediction for whole body and muscle activity concentrations without the requirement for any calibration specific to 3H and 14C. Predictions from the model for representative wild mammals (as selected to be reference organisms within international programmes) are presented. Potential developments of a metabolic model for birds and the application of our work to human food chain modelling are also discussed. (author)

  11. Ontogeny of photophore pattern in the velvet belly lantern shark, Etmopterus spinax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence is known to be of great ecological importance to a luminous organism but extremely few studies investigate the ontogeny of luminous capabilities. The photogenic pattern of the velvet belly lantern shark Etmopterus spinax was investigated over ontogeny (14.0-52.5 cm total length) to determine the scaling of the surface area and the photophore density of different luminous zones as well as the ecological consequences of ontogenetic variations in bioluminescence efficiency. According to the luminous zone considered, different scaling patterns were found for the surface areas while the photophore densities of all zones scale with negative allometry, even though photophore insertion occurs. No sexual differences in these relationships were found. Luminous zones can be placed in two morphologically different groups: the "coverage" and the "isolated" zones. While counter-illumination is certainly the function of the former, the latter are probably involved in intraspecific behaviours. Due to the discrepancy between luminous capabilities of these two luminous zone categories, there is an ontogenetic increase in the luminescence heterogeneity of the luminous pattern as it was shown by luminescence modelling and confirmed by direct observations of spontaneous luminescence in living sharks. This heterogeneity certainly represents a trade-off between an efficient ventral camouflage and a strong identification tool for intraspecific behaviours such as coordinate hunting, which would be particularly useful when E. spinax become fish eaters (>19 cm total length), and for sexual recognition in mature individuals. PMID:19674879

  12. A model for allometric scaling of mammalian metabolism with ambient heat loss

    KAUST Repository

    Kwak, Ho Sang

    2016-02-02

    Background Allometric scaling, which represents the dependence of biological trait or process relates on body size, is a long-standing subject in biological science. However, there has been no study to consider heat loss to the ambient and an insulation layer representing mammalian skin and fur for the derivation of the scaling law of metabolism. Methods A simple heat transfer model is proposed to analyze the allometry of mammalian metabolism. The present model extends existing studies by incorporating various external heat transfer parameters and additional insulation layers. The model equations were solved numerically and by an analytic heat balance approach. Results A general observation is that the present heat transfer model predicted the 2/3 surface scaling law, which is primarily attributed to the dependence of the surface area on the body mass. External heat transfer effects introduced deviations in the scaling law, mainly due to natural convection heat transfer which becomes more prominent at smaller mass. These deviations resulted in a slight modification of the scaling exponent to a value smaller than 2/3. Conclusion The finding that additional radiative heat loss and the consideration of an outer insulation fur layer attenuate these deviation effects and render the scaling law closer to 2/3 provides in silico evidence for a functional impact of heat transfer mode on the allometric scaling law in mammalian metabolism.

  13. Go big or go fish: morphological specializations in carnivorous bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Sharlene E; Cheung, Elena

    2016-05-11

    Specialized carnivory is relatively uncommon across mammals, and bats constitute one of the few groups in which this diet has evolved multiple times. While size and morphological adaptations for carnivory have been identified in other taxa, it is unclear what phenotypic traits characterize the relatively recent evolution of carnivory in bats. To address this gap, we apply geometric morphometric and phylogenetic comparative analyses to elucidate which characters are associated with ecological divergence of carnivorous bats from insectivorous ancestors, and if there is morphological convergence among independent origins of carnivory within bats, and with other carnivorous mammals. We find that carnivorous bats are larger and converged to occupy a subset of the insectivorous morphospace, characterized by skull shapes that enhance bite force at relatively wide gapes. Piscivorous bats are morphologically distinct, with cranial shapes that enable high bite force at narrow gapes, which is necessary for processing fish prey. All animal-eating species exhibit positive allometry in rostrum elongation with respect to skull size, which could allow larger bats to take relatively larger prey. The skull shapes of carnivorous bats share similarities with generalized carnivorans, but tend to be more suited for increased bite force production at the expense of gape, when compared with specialized carnivorans. PMID:27170718

  14. The biology of gliding in flying lizards (genus Draco) and their fossil and extant analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jimmy A; Dudley, Robert

    2011-12-01

    The flying lizards of the genus Draco are among the most remarkable and successful clades of gliding vertebrates. Here, we evaluate the evolution of gliding in Draco and other lizards, describe the suite of morphological innovations that characterize Draco, discuss the ecological context of gliding in this genus, describe functions of their patagial membranes that are not related to gliding, and summarize the interspecific allometry of the Draco gliding apparatus, as well as the corresponding consequences for their now empirically quantified gliding performance. Several fossil reptilian lineages had morphologies similar to that of modern Draco, with patagial membranes supported by elongated ribs or rib-like dermal structures. Using Draco's snout-vent length/mass relationships, we provide improved estimates of wing loading for three of these fossil gliders (Icarosaurus seifkeri, Kuehneosaurus sp., Coelurosauravus elivensis) and then estimate absolute gliding performance for each taxon by extrapolating from Draco's wing loading/glide performance relationship. We find that I. seifkeri likely represented the best nonflapping terrestrial vertebrate glider yet described, whereas the larger Kuehneosaurus and Coelurosauravus probably required high descent velocities to achieve sufficient lift for gliding, with commensurately greater height loss with each glide. PMID:21798987

  15. Theophylline Population Pharmacokinetics and Dosing in Children Following Congenital Heart Surgery With Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frymoyer, Adam; Su, Felice; Grimm, Paul C; Sutherland, Scott M; Axelrod, David M

    2016-09-01

    Children undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) frequently develop acute kidney injury due to renal ischemia. Theophylline, which improves renal perfusion via adenosine receptor inhibition, is a potential targeted therapy. However, children undergoing cardiac surgery and CPB commonly have alterations in drug pharmacokinetics. To help understand optimal aminophylline (salt formulation of theophylline) dosing strategies in this population, a population-based pharmacokinetic model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) from 71 children (median age 5 months; 90% range 1 week to 10 years) who underwent cardiac surgery requiring CPB and received aminophylline as part of a previous randomized controlled trial. A 1-compartment model with linear elimination adequately described the pharmacokinetics of theophylline. Weight scaled via allometry was a significant predictor of clearance and volume. In addition, allometric scaled clearance increased with age implemented as a power maturation function. Compared to prior reports in noncardiac children, theophylline clearance was markedly reduced across age. In the final population pharmacokinetic model, optimized empiric dosing regimens were developed via Monte Carlo simulations. Doses 50% to 75% lower than those recommended in noncardiac children were needed to achieve target serum concentrations of 5 to 10 mg/L. PMID:26712558

  16. Tree Species and Their Space Requirements in Six Urban Environments Worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Dahlhausen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Urban trees have gained in importance during recent decades, but little is known about the temporal dynamic of tree growth in urban areas. The present study investigated the allometric relationships of stem diameter, tree height, and crown radius for six different tree species in six metropolises worldwide. Increment cores of the trees were used for identifying the relationship of basal area and basal area increment and for extrapolating the temporal dynamics for each species in relation to the allometric parameters and growth extensions. Space limitation and its direct influence on growth were quantified, as well as the aboveground woody biomass and the carbon storage capacity. The results show that, among the investigated species, Quercus nigra and Khaya senegalensis have the highest growth rates for stem diameter and crown radius, whereas Tilia cordata and Aesculus hippocastanum remain on a lower level. A significant reduction of tree growth due to restricted non-paved area was found for Aesculus hippocastanum and Khaya senegalensis. Estimations of aboveground biomass were highest for Quercus nigra and lowest for Tilia cordata. These results show the species-specific allometries of urban trees over a projected time period. Thus, the data set is highly relevant for planners and urban green managers.

  17. Polonium-210 in marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) inhabiting the southern coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Feroz; Wesley, S Godwin; Rajan, M P

    2014-12-01

    The present study focused on the determination of the alpha-emitter, (210)Po, in two species of marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) commonly available in the southern coastal region of India. The brown mussel, Perna indica was collected from the west coast and the green mussel, Perna viridis from the east coast. The concentration of (210)Po was related to the allometry (length of shell, wet/dry weight of shell/soft tissue) of the mussels and significant results were found. The study period focused on three seasons namely, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon for a 1-year period (2010-2011). The results revealed higher activity levels in smaller-sized mussels compared to larger ones. Marked variation in (210)Po activity concentration was noted in the whole-body soft tissues between seasons and sampling site (p mussels was performed using the ERICA Assessment tool. The chronic exposure to mussels due to (210)Po was found to be lesser than the global benchmark dose rate of 10 μGy h(-1). The effective ingestion dose to adults who intake mussels was estimated to be in the range 5.1-34.9 μSv y(-1). The measurement contributes to the furthering of knowledge of (210)Po, since no data exist in this region. PMID:25042075

  18. The mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channel: key component of a plasmalemmal control centre?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, B. G.; Ding, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channels probably serve to detect not only mechanical stress but also electrical, thermal, and diverse chemical stimuli. Because all stimuli result in a common output, most notably a shift in second messenger calcium concentration, the channels are presumed to serve as signal integrators. Further, insofar as second messenger calcium in turn gives rise to mechanical, electrical, and diverse chemical changes, the channels are postulated to initiate regulatory feedbacks. It is proposed that the channels and the feedback loops play a wide range of roles in regulating normal plant function, as well as in mediating disturbance of normal function by environmental stressors and various pathogens. In developing evidence for the physiological performance of the channel, a model for a cluster of regulatory plasmalemmal proteins and cytoskeletal elements grouped around a set of wall-to-membrane and transmembrane linkers has proved useful. An illustration of how the model might operate is presented. It is founded on the demonstration that several xenobiotics interfere both with normal channel behaviour and with gravitropic reception. Accordingly, the first part of the illustration deals with how the channels and the control system within which they putatively operate might initiate gravitropism. Assuming that gravitropism is an asymmetric expression of growth, the activities of the channels and the plasmalemmal control system are extrapolated to account for regulation of both rate and allometry of cell expansion. Finally, it is discussed how light, hormones, redox agents and herbicides could in principle affect growth via the putative plasmalemmal control cluster or centre.

  19. Reproduction and population structure of the sea cucumber Holothuria tubulosa in the Dardanelles Strait, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. DERELİ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Holothuria tubulosa Gmelin 1791 was investigated from April 2013 to March 2014 in the Dardanelles Strait, to outline the morphological characteristics, reproductive patterns and the relationship between population characteristics and environmental parameters. Between 15 and 30 individuals of this species were sampled monthly from three stations. There was a negative allometry between length and weight, being gutted weight the most reliable measurement for this species. Reproductive patterns of the species were identified the first time for Turkish coasts. By macroscopic examination of the gonads, smallest sizes (gutted length were measured as 8.4 and 8.1 cm for female and male, respectively. Sex ratio was calculated as 1: 1.1 with differences between seasons. The reproduction of sea cucumbers occurred between August and September after Gonadosomatic Index (GSI values reached their maximum in July. The species was found down to 10 m depth with a population density of 0.21 / m2, which was rather low compared to previously reported values for Mediterranean populations of this species. There was a high positive correlation between population density and GSI of the species. The highest population density was observed where the largest sea grass meadows are found.

  20. How sexual selection can drive the evolution of costly sperm ornamentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüpold, Stefan; Manier, Mollie K; Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Schoff, Christopher; Starmer, William T; Luepold, Shannon H Buckley; Belote, John M; Pitnick, Scott

    2016-05-26

    Post-copulatory sexual selection (PSS), fuelled by female promiscuity, is credited with the rapid evolution of sperm quality traits across diverse taxa. Yet, our understanding of the adaptive significance of sperm ornaments and the cryptic female preferences driving their evolution is extremely limited. Here we review the evolutionary allometry of exaggerated sexual traits (for example, antlers, horns, tail feathers, mandibles and dewlaps), show that the giant sperm of some Drosophila species are possibly the most extreme ornaments in all of nature and demonstrate how their existence challenges theories explaining the intensity of sexual selection, mating-system evolution and the fundamental nature of sex differences. We also combine quantitative genetic analyses of interacting sex-specific traits in D. melanogaster with comparative analyses of the condition dependence of male and female reproductive potential across species with varying ornament size to reveal complex dynamics that may underlie sperm-length evolution. Our results suggest that producing few gigantic sperm evolved by (1) Fisherian runaway selection mediated by genetic correlations between sperm length, the female preference for long sperm and female mating frequency, and (2) longer sperm increasing the indirect benefits to females. Our results also suggest that the developmental integration of sperm quality and quantity renders post-copulatory sexual selection on ejaculates unlikely to treat male-male competition and female choice as discrete processes. PMID:27225128

  1. Traditional and Modern Morphometrics: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan OCAKOĞLU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphometrics, a branch of morphology, is the study of the size and shape components of biological forms and their variation in the population. In biological and medical sciences, there is a long history of attempts to quantitatively express the diversity of the size and shape of biological forms. On the basis of historical developments in morphometry, we address several questions related to the shape of organs or organisms that are considered in biological and medical studies. In the field of morphometrics, multivariate statistical analysis is used to rigorously address such questions. Historically, these methods have involved the analysis of collections of distances or angles, but recent theoretical, computational, and other advances have shifted the focus of morphometric procedures to the Cartesian coordinates of anatomical points. In recent years, in biology and medicine, the traditional morphometric studies that aim to analyze shape variation have been replaced by modern morphometric studies. In the biological and medical sciences, morphometric methods are frequently preferred for examining the morphologic structures of organs or organisms with regard to diseases or environmental factors. These methods are also preferred for evaluating and classifying the variation of organs or organisms with respect to growth or allometry time dependently. Geometric morphometric methods are more valid than traditional morphometric methods in protecting more morphological information and in permitting analysis of this information.

  2. Reconsidering the evolution of brain, cognition, and behavior in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemet, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of research, some of the most basic issues concerning the extraordinarily complex brains and behavior of birds and mammals, such as the factors responsible for the diversity of brain size and composition, are still unclear. This is partly due to a number of conceptual and methodological issues. Determining species and group differences in brain composition requires accounting for the presence of taxon-cerebrotypes and the use of precise statistical methods. The role of allometry in determining brain variables should be revised. In particular, bird and mammalian brains appear to have evolved in response to a variety of selective pressures influencing both brain size and composition. "Brain" and "cognition" are indeed meta-variables, made up of the variables that are ecologically relevant and evolutionarily selected. External indicators of species differences in cognition and behavior are limited by the complexity of these differences. Indeed, behavioral differences between species and individuals are caused by cognitive and affective components. Although intra-species variability forms the basis of species evolution, some of the mechanisms underlying individual differences in brain and behavior appear to differ from those between species. While many issues have persisted over the years because of a lack of appropriate data or methods to test them; several fallacies, particularly those related to the human brain, reflect scientists' preconceptions. The theoretical framework on the evolution of brain, cognition, and behavior in birds and mammals should be reconsidered with these biases in mind. PMID:23847570

  3. Differential Performance between Two Timber Species in Forest Logging Gaps and in Plantations in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Fayolle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To develop silvicultural guidelines for high-value timber species of Central African moist forests, we assessed the performance of the pioneer Milicia excelsa (iroko, Moraceae, and of the non-pioneer light demander Pericopsis elata (assamela, Fabaceae in logging gaps and in plantations in highly degraded areas in south-eastern Cameroon. The survival and size of each seedling was regularly monitored in the silvicultural experiments. Differences in performance and allometry were tested between species in logging gaps and in plantations. The two species performance in logging gaps was significantly different from plantations and concurred with the expectations of the performance trade-off hypothesis but not with the expectations of species light requirements. The pioneer M. excelsa survived significantly better in logging gaps while the non-pioneer P. elata grew significantly faster in plantations. The high mortality and slow growth of M. excelsa in plantations is surprising for a pioneer species but could be explained by herbivory (attacks from a gall-making psyllid. Identifying high-value native timber species (i with good performance in plantations such as P. elata is of importance to restore degraded areas; and (ii with good performance in logging gaps such as M. excelsa is of importance to maintain timber resources and biodiversity in production forests.

  4. How sexual selection can drive the evolution of costly sperm ornamentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüpold, Stefan; Manier, Mollie K.; Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Schoff, Christopher; Starmer, William T.; Luepold, Shannon H. Buckley; Belote, John M.; Pitnick, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Post-copulatory sexual selection (PSS), fuelled by female promiscuity, is credited with the rapid evolution of sperm quality traits across diverse taxa. Yet, our understanding of the adaptive significance of sperm ornaments and the cryptic female preferences driving their evolution is extremely limited. Here we review the evolutionary allometry of exaggerated sexual traits (for example, antlers, horns, tail feathers, mandibles and dewlaps), show that the giant sperm of some Drosophila species are possibly the most extreme ornaments in all of nature and demonstrate how their existence challenges theories explaining the intensity of sexual selection, mating-system evolution and the fundamental nature of sex differences. We also combine quantitative genetic analyses of interacting sex-specific traits in D. melanogaster with comparative analyses of the condition dependence of male and female reproductive potential across species with varying ornament size to reveal complex dynamics that may underlie sperm-length evolution. Our results suggest that producing few gigantic sperm evolved by (1) Fisherian runaway selection mediated by genetic correlations between sperm length, the female preference for long sperm and female mating frequency, and (2) longer sperm increasing the indirect benefits to females. Our results also suggest that the developmental integration of sperm quality and quantity renders post-copulatory sexual selection on ejaculates unlikely to treat male–male competition and female choice as discrete processes.

  5. The potential influence of morphology on the evolutionary divergence of an acoustic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchers, W R; Klingenberg, C P; Tregenza, T; Hunt, J; Dworkin, I

    2014-10-01

    The evolution of acoustic behaviour and that of the morphological traits mediating its production are often coupled. Lack of variation in the underlying morphology of signalling traits has the potential to constrain signal evolution. This relationship is particularly likely in field crickets, where males produce acoustic advertisement signals to attract females by stridulating with specialized structures on their forewings. In this study, we characterize the size and geometric shape of the forewings of males from six allopatric populations of the black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus) known to have divergent advertisement calls. We sample from each of these populations using both wild-caught and common-garden-reared cohorts, allowing us to test for multivariate relationships between wing morphology and call structure. We show that the allometry of shape has diverged across populations. However, there was a surprisingly small amount of covariation between wing shape and call structure within populations. Given the importance of male size for sexual selection in crickets, the divergence we observe among populations has the potential to influence the evolution of advertisement calls in this species. PMID:25223712

  6. Sexual Dimorphism and Allometric Effects Associated With the Wing Shape of Seven Moth Species of Sphingidae (Lepidoptera: Bombycoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Willian Rogers Ferreira; de Camargo, Nícholas Ferreira; Corrêa, Danilo do Carmo Vieira; de Camargo, Amabílio J Aires; Diniz, Ivone Rezende

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism is a pronounced pattern of intraspecific variation in Lepidoptera. However, moths of the family Sphingidae (Lepidoptera: Bombycoidea) are considered exceptions to this rule. We used geometric morphometric techniques to detect shape and size sexual dimorphism in the fore and hindwings of seven hawkmoth species. The shape variables produced were then subjected to a discriminant analysis. The allometric effects were measured with a simple regression between the canonical variables and the centroid size. We also used the normalized residuals to assess the nonallometric component of shape variation with a t-test. The deformations in wing shape between sexes per species were assessed with a regression between the nonreduced shape variables and the residuals. We found sexual dimorphism in both wings in all analyzed species, and that the allometric effects were responsible for much of the wing shape variation between the sexes. However, when we removed the size effects, we observed shape sexual dimorphism. It is very common for females to be larger than males in Lepidoptera, so it is expected that the shape of structures such as wings suffers deformations in order to preserve their function. However, sources of variation other than allometry could be a reflection of different reproductive flight behavior (long flights in search for sexual mates in males, and flight in search for host plants in females). PMID:26206895

  7. Reconsidering the evolution of brain, cognition and behaviour in birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Willemet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, some of the most basic issues concerning the extraordinarily complex brains and behaviour of birds and mammals, such as the factors responsible for the diversity of brain size and composition, are still unclear. This is partly due to a number of conceptual and methodological issues. Determining species and group differences in brain composition requires accounting for the presence of taxon-cerebrotypes and the use of precise statistical methods. The role of allometry in determining brain variables should be revised. In particular, bird and mammalian brains appear to have evolved in response to a variety of selective pressures influencing both brain size and composition. Brain and cognition are indeed meta-variables, made up of the variables that are ecologically relevant and evolutionarily selected. External indicators of species differences in cognition and behaviour are limited by the complexity of these differences. Indeed, behavioural differences between species and individuals are caused by cognitive and affective components. Although intra-species variability forms the basis of species evolution, some of the mechanisms underlying individual differences in brain and behaviour appear to differ from those between species. While many issues have persisted over the years because of a lack of appropriate data or methods to test them; several fallacies, particularly those related to the human brain, reflect scientists’ preconceptions. The theoretical framework on the evolution of brain, cognition and behaviour in birds and mammals should be reconsidered with these biases in mind.

  8. Scaling of flow distance in random self-similar channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, B.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural river channel networks have been shown in empirical studies to exhibit power-law scaling behavior characteristic of self-similar and self-affine structures. Of particular interest is to describe how the distribution of distance to the outlet changes as a function of network size. In this paper, networks are modeled as random self-similar rooted tree graphs and scaling of distance to the root is studied using methods in stochastic branching theory. In particular, the asymptotic expectation of the width function (number of nodes as a function of distance to the outlet) is derived under conditions on the replacement generators. It is demonstrated further that the branching number describing rate of growth of node distance to the outlet is identical to the length ratio under a Horton-Strahler ordering scheme as order gets large, again under certain restrictions on the generators. These results are discussed in relation to drainage basin allometry and an application to an actual drainage network is presented. ?? World Scientific Publishing Company.

  9. Correlates of average daily metabolism of field-active zebra-tailed lizards (Callisaurus draconoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasov, W H; Anderson, R A

    1998-01-01

    The extent of variation in reptile field metabolism, and its causal bases, are poorly understood. We studied the energetics of the insectivorous lizard Callisaurus draconoides at a site in the California Desert (Desert Center) and at a site at the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula (Cabo San Lucas; hereafter, Cabo). Reproducing Callisaurus were smaller at Cabo than at Desert Center. The allometry of metabolism with body mass can account for most differences in whole-animal metabolism. There was no significant effect of sex or source population on mass-adjusted metabolic rate in the laboratory (resting metabolism, measured by closed-system respirometry) or in the field (field metabolism, measured with doubly labeled water). The mass-adjusted resting metabolism and field metabolism of gravid females and the field metabolism of juvenile lizards were not significantly different from those of nonreproductive adults. Temperature had a significant effect on resting metabolism (Q10 = 2.7); fed lizards had resting metabolism that was 22% higher than that of fasted lizards; field metabolism was positively correlated with growth rate in juveniles; and field metabolism of adults increased from spring to late summer at Desert Center by 25%, probably because of longer activity period length and slightly higher activity period body temperature. We calculated from water influx and field metabolism that juveniles allocated 18% of their metabolizable energy intake to growth and that most energy deposited into eggs was transferred from energy stores rather than ingested in the weeks prior to laying. PMID:9472817

  10. Allometric scaling relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and body size in rodents and rabbits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hossein-Ali Arab; Samad Muhammadnejad; Saeideh Naeimi; Attieh Arab

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to establish an allometric scaling relationship between the frequency of intestinal contractions and body mass of different mammalian species. The frequency of intestinal contractions of rabbit, guinea pig, rat and mouse were measured using an isolated organ system. The isolated rings were prepared from proximal segments of jejunums and the frequency of contractions was recorded by an isometric force procedure. The coefficients of the obtained allometric equation were ascertained by computation of least squares after logarithmic transformation of both body mass and frequency. Significant differences ( <0.001) were shown in the frequency of contractions between different species. The highest frequency that corresponded to the mice was 57.7 min−1 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) ranged from 45.4 to 70, while rabbits showed the lowest frequency (12.71 min−1, CI: 8.6–16.8). Logarithms of frequency were statistically proportional to logarithms of body mass (r=0.99; < 0.001). The data fitted an equation = 18:51 -0.31 and the 95% confidence interval of the exponent ranged from −0.30 to −0.32. The results of this study suggest that it is probably possible to extrapolate the intestinal contraction frequency of other mammalian species by the means of allometry scaling.

  11. Multivariate analysis of the sexual dimorphism of the hip bone in a modern human population and in early hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsuaga, J L; Carretero, J M

    1994-02-01

    A large sample of hip bones of known sex coming from one modern population is studied morphologically and by multivariate analysis to investigate sexual dimorphism patterns. A principal component analysis of raw data shows that a large amount of the hip bone sexual dimorphism is accounted for by size differences, but that sex-linked shape variation is also very conspicuous and cannot be considered an allometric consequence of differences in body size between the sexes. The PCA of transformed ("shape") variables indicates that the female hip bones are different in those traits associated with a relatively larger pelvic inlet (longer pubic bones, a greater degree of curvature of the iliopectineal line, and more posterior position of the auricular surface), as well as a broader sciatic notch. The analysis of nonmetric traits also shows marked sexual dimorphism in the position of the sacroiliac joint in the iliac bone, in the shape of the sciatic notch, in pubic morphology, and in the presence of the pre-auricular sulcus in females. When the australopithecine AL 288-1 and Sts 14 hip bones are included in the multivariate analysis, they appear as "ultra-females." In particular these early hominids exhibit extraordinarily long pubic bones and iliopectineal lines, which cannot be explained by allometry. PMID:8147439

  12. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  13. Nano-science and nano-technology is the basis of a new era industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: After discovering fullerenes in 1985 and nanotubes later in 1991 one could speculate about the new allotrope state of carbon-frame structure consisted allometry from carbon atoms. Before just two allotrope structures were known - diamond and graphite; but the third form is a huge (sometimes enormous) molecules that has a unique physical and chemical properties. For instance, it is one hundred times crash-proved than steel, but weights just one sixth of the one. Though nanotubes properties are similar to the conductor's, but if nano-tube has a structure defect (one carbon six angle would be replaced by pentagons) we can produce a semiconductor belt. If to locate inside nanotubes the whole chain from fullerenes with already inserted in them by atoms of gadolinium, we receive a semiconductor. We offer a new and cheap method of obtaining of nano-tubes at an etching of catalytic agents. The essence of carbides in the mechanism of derivation of carbonaceous deposition on dispersible particles of metals is described by common scheme. According to this mechanism at interaction of hydrocarbons with oxides there is restoring metals, which again interacting with hydrocarbons, will generate acetylide(carbides). The decay last again is carried on to derivation by ferrous and free carbonium, on the basis of which the carbonaceous deposition of various frame can be shaped, including the nanotubes

  14. Optimal allocation of leaf epidermal area for gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo J; Price, Charles A; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C; Franks, Peter J; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2016-06-01

    A long-standing research focus in phytology has been to understand how plants allocate leaf epidermal space to stomata in order to achieve an economic balance between the plant's carbon needs and water use. Here, we present a quantitative theoretical framework to predict allometric relationships between morphological stomatal traits in relation to leaf gas exchange and the required allocation of epidermal area to stomata. Our theoretical framework was derived from first principles of diffusion and geometry based on the hypothesis that selection for higher anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax ) involves a trade-off to minimize the fraction of the epidermis that is allocated to stomata. Predicted allometric relationships between stomatal traits were tested with a comprehensive compilation of published and unpublished data on 1057 species from all major clades. In support of our theoretical framework, stomatal traits of this phylogenetically diverse sample reflect spatially optimal allometry that minimizes investment in the allocation of epidermal area when plants evolve towards higher gsmax . Our results specifically highlight that the stomatal morphology of angiosperms evolved along spatially optimal allometric relationships. We propose that the resulting wide range of viable stomatal trait combinations equips angiosperms with developmental and evolutionary flexibility in leaf gas exchange unrivalled by gymnosperms and pteridophytes. PMID:26991124

  15. A general allometric and life-history model for cellular differentiation in the transition to multicellularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-03-01

    The transition from unicellular, to colonial, to larger multicellular organisms has benefits, costs, and requirements. Here we present a model inspired by the volvocine green algae that explains the dynamics involved in the unicellular-multicellular transition using life-history theory and allometry. We model the two fitness components (fecundity and viability) and compare the fitness of hypothetical colonies of different sizes with varying degrees of cellular differentiation to understand the general principles that underlie the evolution of multicellularity. We argue that germ-soma separation may have evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. The model shows that the cost of investing in soma decreases with size. For lineages such as the Volvocales, as reproduction costs increase with size for undifferentiated colonies, soma specialization benefits the colony indirectly by decreasing such costs and directly by helping reproductive cells acquire resources for their metabolic needs. Germ specialization is favored once soma evolves and takes care of vegetative functions. To illustrate the model, we use some allometric relationships measured in Volvocales. Our analysis shows that the cost of reproducing an increasingly larger group has likely played an important role in the transition to multicellularity and cellular differentiation. PMID:23448886

  16. Comparative analyses of animal-tracking data reveal ecological significance of endothermy in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Goldman, Kenneth J; Caselle, Jennifer E; Chapman, Demian D; Papastamatiou, Yannis P

    2015-05-12

    Despite long evolutionary separations, several sharks and tunas share the ability to maintain slow-twitch, aerobic red muscle (RM) warmer than ambient water. Proximate causes of RM endothermy are well understood, but ultimate causes are unclear. Two advantages often proposed are thermal niche expansion and elevated cruising speeds. The thermal niche hypothesis is generally supported, because fishes with RM endothermy often exhibit greater tolerance to broad temperature ranges. In contrast, whether fishes with RM endothermy cruise faster, and achieve any ecological benefits from doing so, remains unclear. Here, we compiled data recorded by modern animal-tracking tools for a variety of free-swimming marine vertebrates. Using phylogenetically informed allometry, we show that both cruising speeds and maximum annual migration ranges of fishes with RM endothermy are 2-3 times greater than fishes without it, and comparable to nonfish endotherms (i.e., penguins and marine mammals). The estimated cost of transport of fishes with RM endothermy is twice that of fishes without it. We suggest that the high energetic cost of RM endothermy in fishes is offset by the benefit of elevated cruising speeds, which not only increase prey encounter rates, but also enable larger-scale annual migrations and potentially greater access to seasonally available resources. PMID:25902489

  17. Convergent evolution of vascular optimization in kelp (Laminariales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnitch, Sarah Tepler; Jensen, Kaare H; Prentice, Paige; Pittermann, Jarmila

    2015-10-01

    Terrestrial plants and mammals, although separated by a great evolutionary distance, have each arrived at a highly conserved body plan in which universal allometric scaling relationships govern the anatomy of vascular networks and key functional metabolic traits. The universality of allometric scaling suggests that these phyla have each evolved an 'optimal' transport strategy that has been overwhelmingly adopted by extant species. To truly evaluate the dominance and universality of vascular optimization, however, it is critical to examine other, lesser-known, vascularized phyla. The brown algae (Phaeophyceae) are one such group--as distantly related to plants as mammals, they have convergently evolved a plant-like body plan and a specialized phloem-like transport network. To evaluate possible scaling and optimization in the kelp vascular system, we developed a model of optimized transport anatomy and tested it with measurements of the giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, which is among the largest and most successful of macroalgae. We also evaluated three classical allometric relationships pertaining to plant vascular tissues with a diverse sampling of kelp species. Macrocystis pyrifera displays strong scaling relationships between all tested vascular parameters and agrees with our model; other species within the Laminariales display weak or inconsistent vascular allometries. The lack of universal scaling in the kelps and the presence of optimized transport anatomy in M. pyrifera raises important questions about the evolution of optimization and the possible competitive advantage conferred by optimized vascular systems to multicellular phyla. PMID:26423844

  18. A meta-analysis of zooplankton functional traits influencing ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Marie-Pier; Beisner, Beatrix E; Maranger, Roxane

    2016-04-01

    The use of functional traits to characterize community composition has been proposed as a more effective way to link community structure to ecosystem functioning. Organismal morphology, body stoichiometry, and physiology can be readily linked to large-scale ecosystem processes through functional traits that inform on interspecific and species-environment interactions; yet such effect traits are still poorly included in trait-based approaches. Given their key trophic position in aquatic ecosystems, individual zooplankton affect energy fluxes and elemental processing. We compiled a large database of zooplankton traits contributing to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling and examined the effect of classification and habitat (marine vs. freshwater) on trait relationships. Respiration and nutrient excretion rates followed mass-dependent scaling in both habitats, with exponents ranging from 0.70 to 0.90. Our analyses revealed surprising differences in allometry and respiration between habitats, with freshwater species having lower length-specific mass and three times higher mass-specific respiration rates. These differences in traits point to implications for ecological strategies as well as overall carbon storage and fluxes based on habitat type. Our synthesis quantifies multiple trait relationships and links organisms to ecosystem processes they influence, enabling a more complete integration of aquatic community ecology and biogeochemistry through the promising use of effect traits. PMID:27220222

  19. Diversity among African pygmies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando V Ramírez Rozzi

    Full Text Available Although dissimilarities in cranial and post-cranial morphology among African pygmies groups have been recognized, comparative studies on skull morphology usually pull all pygmies together assuming that morphological characters are similar among them and different with respect to other populations. The main aim of this study is to compare cranial morphology between African pygmies and non-pygmies populations from Equatorial Africa derived from both the Eastern and the Western regions in order to test if the greatest morphological difference is obtained in the comparison between pygmies and non-pygmies. Thirty three-dimensional (3D landmarks registered with Microscribe in four cranial samples (Western and Eastern pygmies and non-pygmies were obtained. Multivariate analysis (generalized Procrustes analysis, Mahalanobis distances, multivariate regression and complementary dimensions of size were evaluated with ANOVA and post hoc LSD. Results suggest that important cranial shape differentiation does occur between pygmies and non-pygmies but also between Eastern and Western populations and that size changes and allometries do not affect similarly Eastern and Western pygmies. Therefore, our findings raise serious doubt about the fact to consider African pygmies as a homogenous group in studies on skull morphology. Differences in cranial morphology among pygmies would suggest differentiation after divergence. Although not directly related to skull differentiation, the diversity among pygmies would probably suggest that the process responsible for reduced stature occurred after the split of the ancestors of modern Eastern and Western pygmies.

  20. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Tinker, M. Tim; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison C.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/data​baseui).

  1. Allometric biomass partitioning under nitrogen enrichment: Evidence from manipulative experiments around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunfeng; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    Allometric and optimal hypotheses have been widely used to explain biomass partitioning in response to resource changes for individual plants; however, little evidence has been reported from measurements at the community level across a broad geographic scale. This study assessed the nitrogen (N) effect on community-level root to shoot (R/S) ratios and biomass partitioning functions by synthesizing global manipulative experiments. Results showed that, in aggregate, N addition decreased the R/S ratios in various biomes. However, the scaling slopes of the allometric equations were not significantly altered by the N enrichment, possibly indicating that N-induced reduction of the R/S ratio is a consequence of allometric allocation as a function of increasing plant size rather than an optimal partitioning model. To further illustrate this point, we developed power function models to explore the relationships between aboveground and belowground biomass for various biomes; then, we generated the predicted root biomass from the observed shoot biomass and predicted R/S ratios. The comparison of predicted and observed N-induced changes of the R/S ratio revealed no significant differences between each other, supporting the allometric allocation hypothesis. These results suggest that allometry, rather than optimal allocation, explains the N-induced reduction in the R/S ratio across global biomes. PMID:27349584

  2. On the Relationships of Postcanine Tooth Size with Dietary Quality and Brain Volume in Primates: Implications for Hominin Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Jiménez-Arenas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain volume and cheek-tooth size have traditionally been considered as two traits that show opposite evolutionary trends during the evolution of Homo. As a result, differences in encephalization and molarization among hominins tend to be interpreted in paleobiological grounds, because both traits were presumably linked to the dietary quality of extinct species. Here we show that there is an essential difference between the genus Homo and the living primate species, because postcanine tooth size and brain volume are related to negative allometry in primates and show an inverse relationship in Homo. However, when size effects are removed, the negative relationship between encephalization and molarization holds only for platyrrhines and the genus Homo. In addition, there is no general trend for the relationship between postcanine tooth size and dietary quality among the living primates. If size and phylogeny effects are both removed, this relationship vanishes in many taxonomic groups. As a result, the suggestion that the presence of well-developed postcanine teeth in extinct hominins should be indicative of a poor-quality diet cannot be generalized to all extant and extinct primates.

  3. Morphological analysis of the flippers in the Franciscana dolphin, Pontoporia blainvillei, applying X-ray technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, Daniela Laura; Panebianco, María Victoria; Negri, María Fernanda; Cappozzo, Humberto Luis

    2014-07-01

    Pectoral flippers of cetaceans function to provide stability and maneuverability during locomotion. Directional asymmetry (DA) is a common feature among odontocete cetaceans, as well as sexual dimorphism (SD). For the first time DA, allometry, physical maturity, and SD of the flipper skeleton--by X-ray technique--of Pontoporia blainvillei were analyzed. The number of carpals, metacarpals, phalanges, and morphometric characters from the humerus, radius, ulna, and digit two were studied in franciscana dolphins from Buenos Aires, Argentina. The number of visible epiphyses and their degree of fusion at the proximal and distal ends of the humerus, radius, and ulna were also analyzed. The flipper skeleton was symmetrical, showing a negative allometric trend, with similar growth patterns in both sexes with the exception of the width of the radius (P ≤ 0.01). SD was found on the number of phalanges of digit two (P ≤ 0.01), ulna and digit two lengths. Females showed a higher relative ulna length and shorter relative digit two length, and the opposite occurred in males (P ≤ 0.01). Epiphyseal fusion pattern proved to be a tool to determine dolphin's age; franciscana dolphins with a mature flipper were, at least, four years old. This study indicates that the flippers of franciscana dolphins are symmetrical; both sexes show a negative allometric trend; SD is observed in radius, ulna, and digit two; and flipper skeleton allows determine the age class of the dolphins. PMID:24700648

  4. Mandibular development in Australopithecus robustus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofran, Zachary

    2014-07-01

    Australopithecus robustus has a distinct mandibular anatomy, with a broad and deep corpus and a tall, relatively upright ramus. How this anatomy arose through development is unknown, as gross mandibular size and shape change have not been thoroughly examined quantitatively in this species. Herein, I investigate A. robustus mandibular growth by comparing its ontogenetic series with a sample of recent humans, examining age-related size variation in 28 linear measurements. Resampling is used to compare the amount of proportional size change occurring between tooth eruption stages in the small and fragmentary A. robustus sample, with that of a more complete human skeletal population. Ontogenetic allometry of corpus robusticity is also assessed with least squares regression. Results show that nearly all measurements experience greater average increase in A. robustus than in humans. Most notably, A. robustus corpus breadth undergoes a spurt of growth before eruption of M1 , likely due in part to delayed resorption of the ramus root on the lateral corpus. Between the occlusion of M1 and M2 , nearly all dimensions experience greater proportional size change in A. robustus. Nested resampling analysis affirms that this pattern of growth differences between species is biologically significant, and not a mere byproduct of the fossil sample size. Some species differences are likely a function of postcanine megadontia in A. robustus, although the causes of other differences are less clear. This study demonstrates an important role of the postnatal period for mandibular shape development in this species. PMID:24820665

  5. Postnatal temporal bone ontogeny in Pan, Gorilla, and Homo, and the implications for temporal bone ontogeny in Australopithecus afarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Claire E; Kimbel, William H; Lockwood, Charles A

    2013-08-01

    Assessments of temporal bone morphology have played an important role in taxonomic and phylogenetic evaluations of fossil taxa, and recent three-dimensional analyses of this region have supported the utility of the temporal bone for testing taxonomic and phylogenetic hypotheses. But while clinical analyses have examined aspects of temporal bone ontogeny in humans, the ontogeny of the temporal bone in non-human taxa is less well documented. This study examines ontogenetic allometry of the temporal bone in order to address several research questions related to the pattern and trajectory of temporal bone shape change during ontogeny in the African apes and humans. We further apply these data to a preliminary analysis of temporal bone ontogeny in Australopithecus afarensis. Three-dimensional landmarks were digitized on an ontogenetic series of specimens of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, and Gorilla gorilla. Data were analyzed using geometric morphometric methods, and shape changes throughout ontogeny in relation to size were compared. Results of these analyses indicate that, despite broadly similar patterns, African apes and humans show marked differences in development of the mandibular fossa and tympanic portions of the temporal bone. These findings indicate divergent, rather than parallel, postnatal ontogenetic allometric trajectories for temporal bone shape in these taxa. The pattern of temporal bone shape change with size exhibited by A. afarensis showed some affinities to that of humans, but was most similar to extant African apes, particularly Gorilla. PMID:23868175

  6. Shell shape variation in the Nassariid Buccinanops globulosus in northern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaca, María Soledad; Narvarte, Maite; Martín, Pablo; van der Molen, Silvina

    2013-09-01

    Morphological variation among natural populations is a phenomenon commonly observed in marine invertebrates and well studied, particularly, in shelled gastropods. The nassariid Buccinanops globulosus is interesting to study shell shape variation because it exhibits strong interpopulation differences in life history features, including maximum size, fecundity and growth rate. In this study, we examined the pattern of variation in size and shell shape among populations and between sexes of B. globulosus (Bahía San Antonio 40°29'S 63°01'W, Playa Villarino 40°45'S 64°40'W and Bahía Nueva 42°46'S 65°02'W). In particular, we used geometric morphometric techniques to test: (1) whether the two components of shell morphology (size and shape) are independent and (2) whether shape differences between sexes are consistently found among populations, regardless of their body sizes. Our results show shell shape variation between the populations of B. globulosus of northern Patagonia. Intra-specific shell shape variation is affected by body size, indicating allometry. Regardless of the size differences, individuals from Playa Villarino have high-spired shells, and shorter apertures and wider columellar area than individuals from the other populations. Also, sex-related shape differences were consistently found at each population, thus suggesting a common sexual dimorphism in shell morphology for this species. The functional significance of the variability found is discussed in terms of the flexibility of developmental programmes for morphology as well as the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

  7. Bat Species Comparisons Based on External Morphology: A Test of Traditional versus Geometric Morphometric Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A Schmieder

    Full Text Available External morphology is commonly used to identify bats as well as to investigate flight and foraging behavior, typically relying on simple length and area measures or ratios. However, geometric morphometrics is increasingly used in the biological sciences to analyse variation in shape and discriminate among species and populations. Here we compare the ability of traditional versus geometric morphometric methods in discriminating between closely related bat species--in this case European horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera--based on morphology of the wing, body and tail. In addition to comparing morphometric methods, we used geometric morphometrics to detect interspecies differences as shape changes. Geometric morphometrics yielded improved species discrimination relative to traditional methods. The predicted shape for the variation along the between group principal components revealed that the largest differences between species lay in the extent to which the wing reaches in the direction of the head. This strong trend in interspecific shape variation is associated with size, which we interpret as an evolutionary allometry pattern.

  8. Nonhuman Primate Ocular Biometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine ocular growth in nonhuman primates (NHPs) from measurements on ex vivo eyes. Methods We obtained NHP eyes from animals that had been killed as part of other studies or because of health-related issues. Digital calipers were used to measure the horizontal, vertical, and anteroposterior globe diameters as well as corneal horizontal and vertical diameters of excised globes from 98 hamadryas baboons, 551 cynomolgus monkeys, and 112 rhesus monkeys, at ages ranging from 23 to 360 months. Isolated lens sagittal thickness and equatorial diameter were measured by shadowphotogrammetry. Wet and fixed dry weights were obtained for lenses. Results Nonhuman primate globe growth continues throughout life, slowing toward an asymptotic maximum. The final globe size scales with negative allometry to adult body size. Corneal growth ceases at around 20 months. Lens diameter increases but thickness decreases with increasing age. Nonhuman primate lens wet and dry weight accumulation is monophasic, continuing throughout life toward asymptotic maxima. The dry/wet weight ratio reaches a maximum of 0.33. Conclusions Nonhuman primate ocular globe and lens growth differ in several respects from those in humans. Although age-related losses of lens power and accommodative amplitude are similar, lens growth and properties are different indicating care should be taken in extrapolating NHP observations to the study of human accommodation. PMID:26780314

  9. In vivo bite and grip forces, morphology and prey-killing behavior of North American accipiters (Accipitridae) and falcons (Falconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustaita, Diego; Hertel, Fritz

    2010-08-01

    Raptors exhibit a diversity of strategies to procure their prey but ultimately kill using their beaks and/or talons. Thus, bite and grip forces are ecologically important variables that have direct survival implications. Whereas hawks rely primarily on their feet for killing prey, falcons tend to employ their beaks. Consequently, falcons are expected to achieve relatively greater bite forces, and hawks are expected to generate relatively greater grip forces. Force estimates predicted from musculoskeletal morphology in a previous study indicated that falcons (Falco spp.) possess greater jaw force capabilities than accipiters (Accipiter spp.) but there were no clear differences in predicted grip-force capacity outside of differences in scaling. The objective of this study was to complement those results with measurements of in vivo forces by inducing captive and wild accipiters and falcons to bite and grasp force transducers. Bite force increased isometrically in both groups whereas grip force tended toward positive allometry. After adjusting for body mass, falcons produced greater bite forces, and accipiters produced greater grip forces. Thus, previous anatomical estimates of forces predicted the expected direction and magnitude of differences in bite forces but the overall greater in vivo grip forces of accipiters deviated from the pattern obtained from biomechanical estimates. Although the scaling relationships were similar between data sets, forces generated by live birds were consistently lower than those predicted from biomechanics. Estimated and in vivo jaw and digital forces were nevertheless correlated, and therefore provide an important link between morphology and killing behavior in these raptors. PMID:20639423

  10. Allometric scaling relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and body size in rodents and rabbits.

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    Arab, Hossein-Ali; Muhammadnejad, Samad; Naeimi, Saeideh; Arab, Attieh

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to establish an allometric scaling relationship between the frequency of intestinal contractions and body mass of different mammalian species. The frequency of intestinal contractions of rabbit, guinea pig, rat and mouse were measured using an isolated organ system. The isolated rings were prepared from proximal segments of jejunums and the frequency of contractions was recorded by an isometric force procedure. The coefficients of the obtained allometric equation were ascertained by computation of least squares after logarithmic transformation of both body mass and frequency. Significant differences (p less than 0.001) were shown in the frequency of contractions between different species. The highest frequency that corresponded to the mice was 57.7 min-1 and the 95 percent confidence interval (CI) ranged from 45.4 to 70, while rabbits showed the lowest frequency (12.71 min-1, CI: 8.6-16.8). Logarithms of frequency were statistically proportional to logarithms of body mass (r00.99; p less than 0.001). The data fitted an equation F 1/4 18:51B 0:31 and the 95 percent confidence interval of the exponent ranged from -0.30 to -0.32. The results of this study suggest that it is probably possible to extrapolate the intestinal contraction frequency of other mammalian species by the means of allometry scaling. PMID:23660674

  11. Interspecies allometric scaling: prediction of clearance in large animal species: part II: mathematical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M; Mahmood, I; Hunter, R P

    2006-10-01

    Interspecies scaling is a useful tool for the prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters from animals to humans, and it is often used for estimating a first-time in human dose. However, it is important to appreciate the mathematical underpinnings of this scaling procedure when using it to predict pharmacokinetic parameter values across animal species. When cautiously applied, allometry can be a tool for estimating clearance in veterinary species for the purpose of dosage selection. It is particularly valuable during the selection of dosages in large zoo animal species, such as elephants, large cats and camels, for which pharmacokinetic data are scant. In Part I, allometric predictions of clearance in large animal species were found to pose substantially greater risks of inaccuracies when compared with that observed for humans. In this report, we examine the factors influencing the accuracy of our clearance estimates from the perspective of the relationship between prediction error and such variables as the distribution of body weight values used in the regression analysis, the influence of a particular observation on the clearance estimate, and the 'goodness of fit' (R(2)) of the regression line. Ultimately, these considerations are used to generate recommendations regarding the data to be included in the allometric prediction of clearance in large animal species. PMID:16958788

  12. RELATIVE GROWTH AND ALLOMETRIC COEFFICIENTS OF BODY COMPONENTS OF STRAINS OF NILE TILAPIA(Oreochromis niloticus CRESCIMENTO RELATIVO E COEFICIENTES ALOMÉTRICOS DE COMPONENTES DO CORPO DE LINHAGENS DE TILÁPIAS-DO-NILO (Oreochromis niloticus

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    Rilke Tadeu Fonseca de Freitas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out in the fish production facilities of the Federal University of Lavras, MG – Brazil, to study relative growth and allometric coefficients of body components on body weight of Nile tilapia. Fishes, weighing between 150 and 790g, were randomly sampled during every period of growing, have been 93 of the Chitralada strain and 78 of the Supreme. After 24 hours of fasting, the fishes were insensibilized (thermal shock, slaughtered (anoxia, weighed and dissected to obtain body components weights. The allometric equation y = axb of Huxley (1932 and the statistic t (á = 0,01 were used for hypothesis test of b=1 and than the growth of the body components parts were classified in: isogonic (b=1, later (b>1 and early (b<1. The scale and fins, head and viscera didn’t show significant difference between the strains and obtained, respectively, allometry coefficient b=1, b>1 and b<1. Chitralada strain showed early growth for carcass and filleting remnants, late for skin andisogonic for fillet. On the other hand, Supreme showed isogonic growth for carcass, skin and filleting remnants and late growth for fillet, that is desirable for meat production. KEY WORDS: Allometry, fillet, fish, Supreme, Thai. Este trabalho foi desenvolvido no setor de piscicultura da Universidade Federal de Lavras, MG, com o objetivo de estudar o crescimento relativo e coeficientes alométricos de componentes do corpo em relação ao peso corporal de tilápias-do-nilo. Amostraram-se, aleatoriamente, peixes pesando entre 150 e 790g durante todo o período de crescimento, sendo 93 da linhagem Chitralada e 78 da Supreme. Após jejum de 24 horas, foram insensibilizados por choque térmico, abatidos (por anóxia, pesados e dissecados para se obter o peso das partes componentes do corpo. Utilizou-se a equação alométrica de Huxley (1932, y = axb e a estatística t (á = 0,01 para testar a hipótese b=1 e classificar o crescimento das partes componentes do

  13. Influence of planting methods on root development, crop productivity and water use efficiency in maize hybrids Influencia de métodos de siembra sobre el desarrollo radical, productividad y eficiencia del uso del agua en híbridos de maíz

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    Muhammad B. Khan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimum planting methods better ensure water and nutrient supply through improved root development resulting in better crop growth and productivity. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of planting methods on root development, crop allometry, water use efficiency (WUE, productivity and economic returns of different maize (Zea mays L. hybrids. Maize hybrids NK-6621, Pioneer-30Y87, and Pioneer-30Y58 were sown on beds, ridges, and flat surface. Ridge sowing was better followed by bed sowing; while amongst the hybrids, 'Pioneer-30Y87' performed the best. Well-developed root system, with longer primary root, more number of lateral roots and higher root growth rate, was observed in 'Pioneer-30Y87' planted on ridges, which led to higher WUE, grain yield and its related traits. The same hybrid exhibited higher leaf area index and crop growth rate, and maximum net return and benefit:cost ratio sowed on ridges. Overall, the ridge sowing improved root development resulting in better allometry, productivity (5.45 t ha-1, and WUE (1.345 kg m-3, in all the maize hybrids. Although maize hybrids exhibited different response to different planting methods; maximum grain yield (5.63 t ha-1, WUE (1.41 kg m-3, and net economic returns were observed from hybrid Pioneer-30Y87.Métodos óptimos de siembra aseguran mejor suministro de agua y nutrientes a través del mejorado desarrollo de raíces que resulta en mejor crecimiento y productividad de los cultivos. Este estudio se realizó para evaluar los efectos de los métodos de siembra en el desarrollo de las raíces, alometría de cultivos, uso eficiente del agua (WUE, productividad y rentabilidad económica de diferentes híbridos de maíz (Zea mays L.. Híbridos de maíz NK-6621, Pioneer 30Y87, y 30Y58-Pioneer se sembraron en camas, surcos, y superficie plana. La siembra en surco fue mejor, seguida por siembra en cama, mientras entre los híbridos, 'Pioneer 30Y87' tuvo los mejores resultados. Se observ

  14. The scaling of postcranial muscles in cats (Felidae) I: forelimb, cervical, and thoracic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Andrew R; Sparkes, Emily L; Randau, Marcela; Pierce, Stephanie E; Kitchener, Andrew C; Goswami, Anjali; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-07-01

    The body masses of cats (Mammalia, Carnivora, Felidae) span a ~300-fold range from the smallest to largest species. Despite this range, felid musculoskeletal anatomy remains remarkably conservative, including the maintenance of a crouched limb posture at unusually large sizes. The forelimbs in felids are important for body support and other aspects of locomotion, as well as climbing and prey capture, with the assistance of the vertebral (and hindlimb) muscles. Here, we examine the scaling of the anterior postcranial musculature across felids to assess scaling patterns between different species spanning the range of felid body sizes. The muscle architecture (lengths and masses of the muscle-tendon unit components) for the forelimb, cervical and thoracic muscles was quantified to analyse how the muscles scale with body mass. Our results demonstrate that physiological cross-sectional areas of the forelimb muscles scale positively with increasing body mass (i.e. becoming relatively larger). Many significantly allometric variables pertain to shoulder support, whereas the rest of the limb muscles become relatively weaker in larger felid species. However, when phylogenetic relationships were corrected for, most of these significant relationships disappeared, leaving no significantly allometric muscle metrics. The majority of cervical and thoracic muscle metrics are not significantly allometric, despite there being many allometric skeletal elements in these regions. When forelimb muscle data were considered in isolation or in combination with those of the vertebral muscles in principal components analyses and MANOVAs, there was no significant discrimination among species by either size or locomotory mode. Our results support the inference that larger felid species have relatively weaker anterior postcranial musculature compared with smaller species, due to an absence of significant positive allometry of forelimb or vertebral muscle architecture. This difference in strength

  15. Integrating body and organ size in Drosophila: recent advances and outstanding problems

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    ChristenKerryMirth

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, fundamental strides in physiology and genetics have allowed us to finally grasp the developmental mechanisms regulating body size, primarily in one model organism: the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In Drosophila, as in all animals, final body size is regulated by the rate and duration of growth. These studies have identified important roles for the insulin and the target of rapamycin (TOR signaling pathways in regulating the growth rate of the larva, the stage that determines final adult size. Furthermore, they have shown that the insulin/TOR pathway interacts with hormonal systems, like ecdysone and juvenile hormone, to regulate the timing of development and hence the duration of growth. This interaction allows the growing larvae to integrate cues from the environment with environmentally-sensitive developmental windows to ensure that optimal size and proportions are reached given the larval rearing conditions. Results from this work has opened up new avenues of studies, including how environmental cues are integrated to regulate developmental time and how organs maintain proportional growth. Other researchers interested in the evolution of body size are beginning to apply these results to studies of body size evolution and the generation of allometry. With these new findings, and with the developments to come, the field of size control finds itself in the fortunate position of finally being able to tackle century old questions of how organisms achieve final adult size and proportions. This review discusses the state of the art of size control from a Drosophila perspective, and outlines an approach to resolving outstanding issues.

  16. Anatomical and biomechanical traits of broiler chickens across ontogeny. Part I. Anatomy of the musculoskeletal respiratory apparatus and changes in organ size

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    Peter G. Tickle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic selection for improved meat yields, digestive efficiency and growth rates have transformed the biology of broiler chickens. Modern birds undergo a 50-fold multiplication in body mass in just six weeks, from hatching to slaughter weight. However, this selection for rapid growth and improvements in broiler productivity is also widely thought to be associated with increased welfare problems as many birds suffer from leg, circulatory and respiratory diseases. To understand growth-related changes in musculoskeletal and organ morphology and respiratory skeletal development over the standard six-week rearing period, we present data from post-hatch cadaveric commercial broiler chickens aged 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The heart, lungs and intestines decreased in size for hatch to slaughter weight when considered as a proportion of body mass. Proportional liver size increased in the two weeks after hatch but decreased between 2 and 6 weeks. Breast muscle mass on the other hand displayed strong positive allometry, increasing in mass faster than the increase in body mass. Contrastingly, less rapid isometric growth was found in the external oblique muscle, a major respiratory muscle that moves the sternum dorsally during expiration. Considered together with the relatively slow ossification of elements of the respiratory skeleton, it seems that rapid growth of the breast muscles might compromise the efficacy of the respiratory apparatus. Furthermore, the relative reduction in size of the major organs indicates that selective breeding in meat-producing birds has unintended consequences that may bias these birds toward compromised welfare and could limit further improvements in meat-production and feed efficiency.

  17. Exploring metameric variation in human molars: a morphological study using morphometric mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Wataru; Morimoto, Naoki; Ohshima, Hayato

    2016-09-01

    Human molars exhibit a type of metameric variation, which is the difference in serially repeated morphology within an organism. Various theories have been proposed to explain how this variation is brought about in the molars. Actualistic data that support the theories, however, are still relatively scarce because of methodological limitations. Here we propose new methods to analyse detailed tooth crown morphologies. We applied morphometric mapping to the enamel-dentine junction of human maxillary molars and examined whether odontogenetic models were adaptable to human maxillary molars. Our results showed that the upper first molar is phenotypically distinct among the maxillary molars. The average shape of the upper first molar is characterized by four well-defined cusps and precipitous surface relief of the occlusal table. On the other hand, upper third molar is characterized by smooth surface relief of the occlusal table and shows greater shape variation and distinct distribution patterns in morphospace. The upper second molar represents an intermediate state between first and third molar. Size-related shape variation was investigated by the allometric vector analysis, and it appeared that human maxillary molars tend to converge toward the shape of the upper first molar as the size increases. Differences between the upper first molar and the upper second and third molar can thus be largely explained as an effect of allometry. Collectively, these results indicate that the observed pattern of metameric variation in human molars is consistent with odontogenetic models of molar row structure (inhibitory cascade model) and molar crown morphology (patterning cascade model). This study shows that morphometric mapping is a useful tool to visualize and quantify the morphological features of teeth, which can provide the basis for a better understanding of tooth evolution linking morphology and development. PMID:27098351

  18. Chronic nitrogen deposition alters tree allometric relationships: implications for biomass production and carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Inés; Zak, Donald R; Burton, Andrew J; Pregitzer, Kurt S

    2016-04-01

    As increasing levels of nitrogen (N) deposition impact many terrestrial ecosystems, understanding the potential effects of higher N availability is critical for forecasting tree carbon allocation patterns and thus future forest productivity. Most regional estimates of forest biomass apply allometric equations, with parameters estimated from a limited number of studies, to forest inventory data (i.e., tree diameter). However most of these allometric equations cannot account for potential effects of increased N availability on biomass allocation patterns. Using 18 yr of tree diameter, height, and mortality data collected for a dominant tree species (Acer saccharum) in an atmospheric N deposition experiment, we evaluated how greater N availability affects allometric relationships in this species. After taking into account site and individual variability, our results reveal significant differences in allometric parameters between ambient and experimental N deposition treatments. Large trees under experimental N deposition reached greater heights at a given diameter; moreover, their estimated maximum height (mean ± standard deviation: 33.7 ± 0.38 m) was significantly higher than that estimated under the ambient condition (31.3 ± 0.31 m). Within small tree sizes (5-10 cm diameter) there was greater mortality under experimental N deposition, whereas the relative growth rates of small trees were greater under experimental N deposition. Calculations of stemwood biomass using our parameter estimates for the diameter-height relationship indicated the potential for significant biases in these estimates (~2.5%), with under predictions of stemwood biomass averaging 4 Mg/ha lower if ambient parameters were to be used to estimate stem biomass of trees in the experimental N deposition treatment. As atmospheric N deposition continues to increase into the future, ignoring changes in tree allometry will contribute to the uncertainty associated with aboveground carbon storage

  19. Can foraging ecology drive the evolution of body size in a diving endotherm?

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    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available Within a single animal species, different morphs can allow for differential exploitation of foraging niches between populations, while sexual size dimorphism can provide each sex with access to different resources. Despite being potentially important agents of evolution, resource polymorphisms, and the way they operate in wild populations, remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine how trophic factors can select for different body sizes between populations and sexes in a diving endotherm. Dive depth and duration are positively related to body size in diving birds and mammals, a relationship explained by a lower mass-specific metabolic rate and greater oxygen stores in larger individuals. Based on this allometry, we predict that selection for exploiting resources situated at different depths can drive the evolution of body size in species of diving endotherms at the population and sexual level. To test this prediction, we studied the foraging ecology of Blue-eyed Shags, a group of cormorants with male-biased sexual size dimorphism from across the Southern Ocean. We found that mean body mass and relative difference in body mass between sexes varied by up to 77% and 107% between neighbouring colonies, respectively. Birds from colonies with larger individuals dived deeper than birds from colonies with smaller individuals, when accounting for sex. In parallel, males dived further offshore and deeper than females and the sexual difference in dive depth reflected the level of sexual size dimorphism at each colony. We argue that body size in this group of birds is under intense selection for diving to depths of profitable benthic prey patches and that, locally, sexual niche divergence selection can exaggerate the sexual size dimorphism of Blue-eyed Shags initially set up by sexual selection. Our findings suggest that trophic resources can select for important geographic micro-variability in body size between populations and sexes.

  20. Spatial heterogeneity of light and tree sapling responses in the understory of disturbed montane forests

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    Méndez-Dewar G

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Attributes and frequency of forest gaps are usually described in reference to a one-dimensional gradient of light, which may relate to their disturbance dynamics. Similarly, species are customarily classified by their light response. We propose that a bi-dimensional light framework facilitates the understanding and comparison of forest systems and the understanding of plant responses to the complex light environment. This light plane is based on two spatially related components: 1 light received directly on a particular point (Focal; and 2 a statistical summary of the immediate environment representing the light conditions surrounding that point (Context. The contrast between these two values is null when Focal = Context and positive when Focal > Context or otherwise negative. Light was assessed using hemispherical photographs using a spatial arrangement of pictures spaced ~3 metres (m in-between. Eight forest plots were surveyed, each with a central gap of different size. Sapling performance of Alnus acuminata, Cornus excelsa, Liquidambar styraciflua, Persea americana and Quercus laurina was also assessed within these plots. Measurements of stem height, basal diameter, and slenderness allometry were taken over a period of more than two years. We found in the light plane that plots were distributed in a pattern congruent with their estimated degree of disturbance (gap size, which spanned wide areas in the plane. Liquidambar styraciflua. and Quercus laurina were found to be sensitive to Focal light, irrespective of Context light. All species responded to Focal light under negative Contrast. Cornus and Persea grew taller and more slender as Focal light increased, particularly under null contrast. There is evidence suggesting that plant growth is dependent on the contrast measured. Thus, it would be relevant to devise a functional classification of tree species that considers their response to both direct light and luminosity of the immediate

  1. Scaling effect on the mid-diaphysis properties of long bones—the case of the Cervidae (deer)

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    Amson, Eli; Kolb, Christian

    2016-08-01

    How skeletal elements scale to size is a fundamental question in biology. While the external shape of long bones was intensively studied, an important component of their organization is also found in their less accessible inner structure. Here, we studied mid-diaphyseal properties of limb long bones, characterizing notably the thickness of their cortices (bone walls), in order to test whether body size directly influences bone inner organization. Previous examinations of scaling in long bones used broad samplings to encompass a wide range of body sizes. To account for the effect of confounding factors related to different lifestyles, we focused our comprehensive sampling on a mammalian clade that comprises various body sizes but a relatively uniform lifestyle, the Cervidae. Positive allometry was found in femoral cross-sectional shape, indicating greater directional bending rigidity in large-sized taxa. None of the compactness parameters scaled allometrically in any of their bones. The cortices of sampled zeugopodial bones (tibia and radius) were found as significantly thicker than those of stylopodial bones (femur and humerus). Furthermore, while the mean relative cortical thickness values for both stylopodial and zeugopodial bones are close to mass-saving optima, the variance for the stylopodial bones is significantly lower. This suggests that mass saving is less intensively selected in zeugopodial bones. Finally, the long-legged Elk ( Alces) and the short-legged dwarf Cretan deer ( Candiacervus) featured rather thin and thick cortices, respectively, suggesting that the acquisition of a different limb proportion is accompanied by a modification of the relative mid-diaphyseal cortical thickness.

  2. Inner architecture of vertebral centra in terrestrial and aquatic mammals: a two-dimensional comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Maitena; Laurin, Michel; Jacques, Florian; Pellé, Eric; Dabin, Willy; de Buffrénil, Vivian

    2013-05-01

    Inner vertebral architecture is poorly known, except in human and laboratory animals. In order to document this topic at a broad comparative level, a 2D-histomorphometric study of vertebral centra was conducted in a sample of 98 therian mammal species, spanning most of the size range and representing the main locomotor adaptations known in therian taxa. Eleven variables relative to the development and geometry of trabecular networks were extracted from CT scan mid-sagittal sections. Phylogeny-informed statistical tests were used to reveal the respective influences of phylogeny, size, and locomotion adaptations on mammalian vertebral structure. The use of random taxon reshuffling and squared change parsimony reveals that 9 of the 11 characteristics (the two exceptions are total sectional area and structural polarization) contain a phylogenetic signal. Linear discriminant analyses suggest that the sampled taxa can be arranged into three categories with respect to locomotion mode: a) terrestrial + flying + digging + amphibious forms, b) coastal oscillatory aquatic taxa, and c) pelagic oscillatory aquatic forms represented by oceanic cetaceans. Pairwise comparison tests and linear regressions show that, when specific size increases, the length of trabecular network (Tt.Tb.Le), as well as trabecular proliferation in total sections (Pr.Tb.Tt), increase with positive allometry. This process occurs in all locomotion categories but is particularly pronounced in pelagic oscillators. Conversely, mean trabecular width has a lesser increase with size in pelagic oscillators. Trabecular orientation is not influenced by size. All tests were corrected for multiple testing. By using six structural variables or indices, locomotion mode can be predicted with a 97.4% success rate for terrestrial forms, 66.7% for coastal oscillatory, and 81.3% for pelagic oscillatory. The possible functional meaning of these results and their potential use for paleobiological inference of locomotion in

  3. Kleiber's Law: How the Fire of Life ignited debate, fueled theory, and neglected plants as model organisms.

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    Niklas, Karl J; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Size is a key feature of any organism since it influences the rate at which resources are consumed and thus affects metabolic rates. In the 1930s, size-dependent relationships were codified as "allometry" and it was shown that most of these could be quantified using the slopes of log-log plots of any 2 variables of interest. During the decades that followed, physiologists explored how animal respiration rates varied as a function of body size across taxa. The expectation was that rates would scale as the 2/3 power of body size as a reflection of the Euclidean relationship between surface area and volume. However, the work of Max Kleiber (1893-1976) and others revealed that animal respiration rates apparently scale more closely as the 3/4 power of body size. This phenomenology, which is called "Kleiber's Law," has been described for a broad range of organisms, including some algae and plants. It has also been severely criticized on theoretical and empirical grounds. Here, we review the history of the analysis of metabolism, which originated with the works of Antoine L. Lavoisier (1743-1794) and Julius Sachs (1832-1897), and culminated in Kleiber's book The Fire of Life (1961; 2. ed. 1975). We then evaluate some of the criticisms that have been leveled against Kleiber's Law and some examples of the theories that have tried to explain it. We revive the speculation that intracellular exo- and endocytotic processes are resource delivery-systems, analogous to the supercellular systems in multicellular organisms. Finally, we present data that cast doubt on the existence of a single scaling relationship between growth and body size in plants. PMID:26156204

  4. A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping.

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    Asner, Gregory P; Mascaro, Joseph; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Vaudry, Romuald; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Hall, Jefferson S; van Breugel, Michiel

    2012-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is fast turning the corner from demonstration technology to a key tool for assessing carbon stocks in tropical forests. With its ability to penetrate tropical forest canopies and detect three-dimensional forest structure, LiDAR may prove to be a major component of international strategies to measure and account for carbon emissions from and uptake by tropical forests. To date, however, basic ecological information such as height-diameter allometry and stand-level wood density have not been mechanistically incorporated into methods for mapping forest carbon at regional and global scales. A better incorporation of these structural patterns in forests may reduce the considerable time needed to calibrate airborne data with ground-based forest inventory plots, which presently necessitate exhaustive measurements of tree diameters and heights, as well as tree identifications for wood density estimation. Here, we develop a new approach that can facilitate rapid LiDAR calibration with minimal field data. Throughout four tropical regions (Panama, Peru, Madagascar, and Hawaii), we were able to predict aboveground carbon density estimated in field inventory plots using a single universal LiDAR model (r ( 2 ) = 0.80, RMSE = 27.6 Mg C ha(-1)). This model is comparable in predictive power to locally calibrated models, but relies on limited inputs of basal area and wood density information for a given region, rather than on traditional plot inventories. With this approach, we propose to radically decrease the time required to calibrate airborne LiDAR data and thus increase the output of high-resolution carbon maps, supporting tropical forest conservation and climate mitigation policy. PMID:22033763

  5. Diet Switching by Mammalian Herbivores in Response to Exotic Grass Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremm, Carolina; Carvalho, Paulo C F; Fonseca, Lidiane; Amaral, Glaucia A; Mezzalira, Jean C; Perez, Naylor B; Nabinger, Carlos; Laca, Emilio A

    2016-01-01

    Invasion by exotic grasses is a severe threat to the integrity of grassland ecosystems all over the world. Because grasslands are typically grazed by livestock and wildlife, the invasion is a community process modulated by herbivory. We hypothesized that the invasion of native South American grasslands by Eragrostis plana Nees, an exotic tussock-forming grass from Africa, could be deterred by grazing if grazers switched dietary preferences and included the invasive grass as a large proportion of their diets. Bos taurus (heifers) and Ovis aries (ewes) grazed plots with varying degrees of invasion by E. plana in a replicated manipulative experiment. Animal positions and species grazed were observed every minute in 45-min grazing session. Proportion of bites and steps in and out of E. plana tussocks were measured and used to calculate several indices of selectivity. Both heifers and ewes exhibited increasing probability of grazing E. plana as the proportion of area covered by tussocks increased, but they behaved differently. In agreement with expectations based on the allometry of dietary preferences and morphology, ewes consumed a low proportion of E. plana, except in areas that had more than 90% E. plana cover. Heifers consumed proportionally more E. plana than ewes. Contrary to our hypothesis, herbivores did not exhibit dietary switching towards the invasive grass. Moreover, they exhibited avoidance of the invasive grass and preference for short-statured native species, both of which should tend to enhance invasion. Unless invasive plants are highly palatable to livestock, the effect of grazing to deter the invasion is limited, due to the inherent avoidance of the invasive grass by the main grazers in the ecosystem, particularly sheep. PMID:26919613

  6. Sex differences in gait utilization and energy metabolism during terrestrial locomotion in two varieties of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus selected for different body size

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    Kayleigh A. Rose

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus of standard breed (large and bantam (small varieties, artificial selection has led to females being permanently gravid and sexual selection has led to male-biased size dimorphism. Using respirometry, videography and morphological measurements, sex and variety differences in metabolic cost of locomotion, gait utilisation and maximum sustainable speed (Umax were investigated during treadmill locomotion. Males were capable of greater Umax than females and used a grounded running gait at high speeds, which was only observed in a few bantam females and no standard breed females. Body mass accounted for variation in the incremental increase in metabolic power with speed between the varieties, but not the sexes. For the first time in an avian species, a greater mass-specific incremental cost of locomotion, and minimum measured cost of transport (CoTmin were found in males than in females. Furthermore, in both varieties, the female CoTmin was lower than predicted from interspecific allometry. Even when compared at equivalent speeds (using Froude number, CoT decreased more rapidly in females than in males. These trends were common to both varieties despite a more upright limb in females than in males in the standard breed, and a lack of dimorphism in posture in the bantam variety. Females may possess compensatory adaptations for metabolic efficiency during gravidity (e.g. in muscle specialization/posture/kinematics. Furthermore, the elevated power at faster speeds in males may be linked to their muscle properties being suited to inter-male aggressive combat.

  7. Quantifying the curvilinear metabolic scaling in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Gary C

    2015-10-01

    A perplexing problem confronting students of metabolic allometry concerns the convex curvature that seemingly occurs in log-log plots of basal metabolic rate (BMR) vs. body mass in mammals. This putative curvilinearity has typically been interpreted in the context of a simple power function, Y=a*Xb, on the arithmetic scale, with the allometric exponent, b, supposedly increasing steadily as a dependent function of body size. The relationship can be quantified in arithmetic domain by exponentiating a quadratic equation fitted to logarithmic transformations of the original data, but the resulting model is not in the form of a power function and it is unlikely to describe accurately the pattern in the original distribution. I therefore re-examined a dataset for 636 species of mammal and discovered that the relationship between BMR and body mass is well-described by a power function with an explicit, non-zero intercept and lognormal, heteroscedastic error. The model has an invariant allometric exponent of 0.75, so the appearance in prior investigations of a steadily increasing exponent probably was an aberration resulting from undue reliance on logarithmic transformations to estimate statistical models in arithmetic domain. Theoretical constructs relating BMR to body mass in mammals may need to be modified to accommodate a positive intercept in the statistical model, but they do not need to be revised, or rejected, at present time on grounds that the allometric exponent varies with body size. New data from planned experiments will be needed to confirm any hypothesis based on data currently available. PMID:26173580

  8. Benthic biomass size spectra in shelf and deep-sea sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kelly-Gerreyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomass distributions of marine benthic organisms (meio- to macro-fauna, 1 μg–32 mg wet weight across three contrasting sites were investigated to test the hypothesis that allometry can consistently explain observed trends in biomass spectra. Biomass (and abundance size spectra were determined from observations made at the Faroe–Shetland Channel in the north-east Atlantic (water depth 1600 m, the Fladen Ground in the North Sea (150 m, and the hypoxic Oman Margin (500 m in the Arabian Sea. Observed biomass increased with body size as a power law at FG (scaling exponent, b = 0.16 and FSC (b = 0.32, but less convincingly at OM (b = 0.12 but not significantly different from 0. A simple model was constructed to represent the same 16 metazoan size classes used for the observed spectra, all reliant on a common detrital food pool, and allowing the three key processes of ingestion, respiration and mortality to scale with body size. A micro-genetic algorithm was used to fit the model to observations at the sites. The model accurately reproduces the observed scaling without recourse to including the effects of local influences such as hypoxia. Our results suggest that the size-scaling of mortality and ingestion are dominant factors determining the distribution of biomass across the meio- to macrofaunal size range in contrasting marine sediment communities. Both the observations and the model results are broadly in agreement with the "Metabolic Theory of Ecology" in predicting a quarter power scaling of biomass across geometric body size classes.

  9. Allometric and metameric shape variation in Pan mandibular molars: a digital morphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Michelle; Rosenberger, Alfred L; Robinson, Chris; O'neill, Rob

    2011-02-01

    The predominance of molar teeth in fossil hominin assemblages makes the patterning of molar shape variation a topic of bioanthropological interest. Extant models are the principal basis for understanding dental variation in the fossil record. As the sister taxon to the hominin clade, Pan is one such model and the only widely accepted extant hominid model for both interspecific and intraspecific variation. To explore the contributions of allometric scaling and meristic variation to molar variation in Pan, we applied geometric shape analysis to 3D landmarks collected from virtual replicas of chimpanzee and bonobo mandibular molars. Multivariate statistical analysis and 3D visualization of metameric and allometric shape vectors were used to characterize shape differences and test the hypothesis that species of Pan share patterns of metameric variation and molar shape allometry. Procrustes-based shape variables were found to effectively characterize crown shape, sorting molars into species and tooth-row positions with ≥ 95% accuracy. Chimpanzees and bonobos share a common pattern of M(1) -M(2) metameric variation, which is defined by differences in the relative position of the metaconid, size of the hypoconulid, curvature of the buccal wall, and proportions of the basins and foveae. Allometric scaling of molar shape is homogeneous for M(1) and M(2) within species, but bonobo and chimpanzee allometric vectors are significantly different. Nevertheless, the common allometric shape trend explains most molar-shape differences between P. paniscus and P. troglodytes. When allometric effects are factored out, chimpanzee and bonobo molars are not morphometrically distinguishable. Implications for hominid taxonomy and dietary reconstruction are discussed. PMID:21235007

  10. Respiratory and olfactory turbinal size in canid and arctoid carnivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Patrick A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Pang, Benison; Bird, Deborah; Rowe, Timothy; Curtis, Abigail

    2012-12-01

    Within the nasal cavity of mammals is a complex scaffold of paper-thin bones that function in respiration and olfaction. Known as turbinals, the bones greatly enlarge the surface area available for conditioning inspired air, reducing water loss, and improving olfaction. Given their functional significance, the relative development of turbinal bones might be expected to differ among species with distinct olfactory, thermoregulatory and/or water conservation requirements. Here we explore the surface area of olfactory and respiratory turbinals relative to latitude and diet in terrestrial Caniformia, a group that includes the canid and arctoid carnivorans (mustelids, ursids, procyonids, mephitids, ailurids). Using high-resolution computed tomography x-ray scans, we estimated respiratory and olfactory turbinal surface area and nasal chamber volume from three-dimensional virtual models of skulls. Across the Caniformia, respiratory surface area scaled isometrically with estimates of body size and there was no significant association with climate, as estimated by latitude. Nevertheless, one-on-one comparisons of sister taxa suggest that arctic species may have expanded respiratory turbinals. Olfactory surface area scaled isometrically among arctoids, but showed positive allometry in canids, reflecting the fact that larger canids, all of which are carnivorous, had relatively greater olfactory surface areas. In addition, among the arctoids, large carnivorous species such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and wolverine (Gulo gulo) also displayed enlarged olfactory turbinals. More omnivorous caniform species that feed on substantial quantities of non-vertebrate foods had less expansive olfactory turbinals. Because large carnivorous species hunt widely dispersed prey, an expanded olfactory turbinal surface area may improve a carnivore's ability to detect prey over great distances using olfactory cues. PMID:23035637

  11. Allometric relationships for predicting the stem volume in a Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. plantation in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan MNI

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Allometric relationships for estimating stem volumes of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. (Sissoo trees were investigated in monoculture plantations in Bangladesh. The various allometric relationships between stem volume and different dimensions were tested and the coefficient of determination R2 values were used to compare the strength of the relationships. Although the allometric equations were highly significant (P<0.01 there was considerable variation among them as indicated by the R2 values. Our results suggested that tree volume is more correlated with basal area than with simple D (stem diameter at 1.3 m height above the ground. The allometric relationships of stem volume to the tree diameter at 10% of tree height (D0.1 did not improve the allometric strength in comparison with simple D as reported in case of some other tree species. The multiplication of tree height H with D in the allometric equation gives a little improvement in the degree of fitness of the allometric equations. However, for the Sissoo plantations studied the stem dbh alone showed a very strong accuracy of estimation (R2 = 0.997 especially when used as D2. It is concluded that the use of tree height in the allometric equation can be neglected for the species, as far as the present study area is concerned. Therefore, for estimating the stem volume of Sissoo, the use of D2 as an independent variable in the allometric equation with a linear or quadratic equation is recommended. The paper describes details of tree volume allometry, which is important in silviculture and forest management.

  12. Characterization of vegetation properties: Canopy modeling of pinyon-juniper and ponderosa pine woodlands; Final report. Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    This report is comprised of two studies. The first study focuses on plant canopies in pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine woodland, and waste sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory which involved five basic areas of research: (1) application of hemispherical photography and other gap fraction techniques to study solar radiation regimes and canopy architecture, coupled with application of time-domain reflectometry to study soil moisture; (2) detailed characterization of canopy architecture using stand mapping and allometry; (3) development of an integrated geographical information system (GIS) database for relating canopy architecture with ecological, hydrological, and system modeling approaches; (4) development of geometric models that simulate complex sky obstruction, incoming solar radiation for complex topographic surfaces, and the coupling of incoming solar radiation with energy and water balance, with simulations of incoming solar radiation for selected native vegetation and experimental waste cover design sites; and (5) evaluation of the strengths and limitations of the various field sampling techniques. The second study describes an approach to develop software that takes advantage of new generation computers to model insolation on complex topographic surfaces. SOLARFLUX is a GIS-based (ARC/INFO, GRID) computer program that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modelling insolation on complex surfaces, the theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modelling.

  13. Allometric Scaling Across Environmental Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncanson, L.; Dubayah, R.

    2014-12-01

    Developing a better understanding of the controls on biomass allocation in forested systems and the consequences for carbon stocks and fluxes is required for improved ecosystem and climate modeling. A simple model, based largely on resource distribution networks, was presented by West, Brown and Enquist (1999). Their model predicts that the exponents of allometric relationships between many forest structural and functional properties will be constants, irrespective of environment or species. In this research we assess the validity of model predictions across the United States and examine their independence with respect to environment. We focus on two relationships with particular importance to biomass: Ht ∝ DBH2/3 nDBH ∝ DBH-2 where Ht is height, DBH is Diameter at Breast Height, and nDBH is the number of trees in a given DBH size class. We obtained DBH and height data from the U.S. Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) dataset, and fit an exponent to each relationship for every FIA plot across the US. We extracted environmental data from the FIA plots (forest maximum height, species type, age, topography) and the North American Regional Reassessment dataset (precipitation, temperature, PAR) and performed random forest regression to estimate observed exponents as a function of environment. We found that forest height, age, and forest type were the most important drivers of allometry, explaining about 40% of observed variability. We found that for both relationships, as forest height and age increase, exponents constrain to the theoretical predictions presented by WBE. This suggests that WBE predictions are valid and may be useful constraints in biomass mapping and ecosystem flux models. However, they deviate from predictions in younger, shorter stands where forests have not had time to develop a complex size structure. Additionally, there is a significant difference in both relationships between conifer and deciduous-dominated stands, suggesting that species type

  14. Intraspecific scaling in frog calls: the interplay of temperature, body size and metabolic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Lucia; Arim, Matías; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Understanding physiological and environmental determinants of strategies of reproductive allocation is a pivotal aim in biology. Because of their high metabolic cost, properties of sexual acoustic signals may correlate with body size, temperature, and an individual's energetic state. A quantitative theory of acoustic communication, based on the metabolic scaling with temperature and mass, was recently proposed, adding to the well-reported empirical patterns. It provides quantitative predictions for frequencies, call rate, and durations. Here, we analysed the mass, temperature, and body condition scaling of spectral and temporal attributes of the advertisement call of the treefrog Hypsiboas pulchellus. Mass dependence of call frequency followed metabolic expectations (f~M (-0.25), where f is frequency and M is mass) although non-metabolic allometry could also account for the observed pattern. Temporal variables scaled inversely with mass contradicting metabolic expectations (d~M (0.25), where d is duration), supporting instead empirical patterns reported to date. Temperature was positively associated with call rate and negatively with temporal variables, which is congruent with metabolic predictions. We found no significant association between temperature and frequencies, adding to the bulk of empirical evidence. Finally, a result of particular relevance was that body condition consistently determined call characteristics, in interaction with temperature or mass. Our intraspecific study highlights that even if proximate determinants of call variability are rather well understood, the mechanisms through which they operate are proving to be more complex than previously thought. The determinants of call characteristics emerge as a key topic of research in behavioural and physiological biology, with several clear points under debate which need to be analysed on theoretical and empirical grounds. PMID:26552381

  15. Allometric modeling does not determine a dimensionless power function ratio for maximal muscular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, A M; George, K P

    1997-12-01

    In the exercise sciences, simple allometry (y = axb) is rapidly becoming the method of choice for scaling physiological and human performance data for differences in body size. The purpose of this study is to detail the specific regression diagnostics required to validate such models. The sum (T, in kg) of the "snatch" and "clean-and-jerk" lifts of the medalists from the 1995 Men's and Women's World Weightlifting Championships was modeled as a function of body mass (M, in kg). A log-linearized allometric model (ln T = ln a + b ln M) yielded a common mass exponent (b) of 0. 47 (95% confidence interval = 0.43-0.51, P < 0.01). However, size-related patterned deviations in the residuals were evident, indicating that the allometric model was poorly specified and that the mass exponent was not size independent. Model respecification revealed that second-order polynomials provided the best fit, supporting previous modeling of weightlifting data (R. G. Sinclair. Can. J. Appl. Sport Sci. 10: 94-98, 1985). The model parameters (means +/- SE) were T = (21.48 +/- 16.55) + (6.119 +/- 0.359)M - (0. 022 +/- 0.002)M2 (R2 = 0.97) for men and T = (-20.73 +/- 24.14) + (5. 662 +/- 0.722)M - (0.031 +/- 0.005)M2 (R2 = 0.92) for women. We conclude that allometric scaling should be applied only when all underlying model assumptions have been rigorously evaluated. PMID:9390994

  16. The soil water balance in a mosaic of clumped vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolla, Teresa; Manfreda, Salvatore; Caylor, Kelly; Gioia, Andrea; Iacobellis, Vito

    2014-05-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture influences the plant growth and the distribution of terrestrial vegetation. This effect is more evident in arid and semiarid ecosystems where the interaction between individuals and the water limited conditions play a fundamental role, providing environmental conditions which drive a variety of non-linear ecohydrological response functions (such as transpiration, photosynthesis, leakage). In this context, modeling vegetation patterns at multiple spatial aggregation scales is important to understand how different vegetation structures can modify the soil water distribution and the exchanged fluxes between soil and atmosphere. In the present paper, the effect of different spatial vegetation patterns, under different climatic scenarios, is investigated in a patchy vegetation mosaic generated by a random process of individual tree canopies and their accompanying root system. Vegetation pattern are generated using the mathematical framework proposed by Caylor et al. (2006) characterized by a three dimensional stochastic vegetation structure, based on the density, dispersion, size distribution, and allometry of individuals within a landscape. A Poisson distribution is applied to generate different distribution of individuals paying particular attention on the role of clumping on water distribution dynamics. The soil water balance is evaluated using the analytical expression proposed by Laio et al. (2001) to explore the influence of climate and vegetation patterns on soil water balance steady-state components (such as the average rates of evaporation, the root water uptake and leakage) and on the stress-weighted plant water uptake. Results of numerical simulations show that clumping may be beneficial for water use efficiency at the landscape scale. References Caylor, Kelly K., P. D'Odorico and I. Rodriguez Iturbe: On the ecohydrology of structurally heterogeneous semiarid landscape. Water Resour. Res., 28, W07424, 2006

  17. Allometric convergence in savanna trees and implications for the use of plant scaling models in variable ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Tredennick

    Full Text Available Theoretical models of allometric scaling provide frameworks for understanding and predicting how and why the morphology and function of organisms vary with scale. It remains unclear, however, if the predictions of 'universal' scaling models for vascular plants hold across diverse species in variable environments. Phenomena such as competition and disturbance may drive allometric scaling relationships away from theoretical predictions based on an optimized tree. Here, we use a hierarchical Bayesian approach to calculate tree-specific, species-specific, and 'global' (i.e. interspecific scaling exponents for several allometric relationships using tree- and branch-level data harvested from three savanna sites across a rainfall gradient in Mali, West Africa. We use these exponents to provide a rigorous test of three plant scaling models (Metabolic Scaling Theory (MST, Geometric Similarity, and Stress Similarity in savanna systems. For the allometric relationships we evaluated (diameter vs. length, aboveground mass, stem mass, and leaf mass the empirically calculated exponents broadly overlapped among species from diverse environments, except for the scaling exponents for length, which increased with tree cover and density. When we compare empirical scaling exponents to the theoretical predictions from the three models we find MST predictions are most consistent with our observed allometries. In those situations where observations are inconsistent with MST we find that departure from theory corresponds with expected tradeoffs related to disturbance and competitive interactions. We hypothesize savanna trees have greater length-scaling exponents than predicted by MST due to an evolutionary tradeoff between fire escape and optimization of mechanical stability and internal resource transport. Future research on the drivers of systematic allometric variation could reconcile the differences between observed scaling relationships in variable ecosystems and

  18. Sex-related shape dimorphism in the human radiocarpal and midcarpal joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivell, Tracy L; Guimont, Isabelle; Wall, Christine E

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has revealed significant size differences between human male and female carpal bones but it is unknown if there are significant shape differences as well. This study investigated sex-related shape variation and allometric patterns in five carpal bones that make up the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints in modern humans. We found that many aspects of carpal shape (76% of all variables quantified) were similar between males and females, despite variation in size. However, 10 of the shape ratios were significantly different between males and females, with at least one significant shape difference observed in each carpal bone. Within-sex standard major axis regressions (SMA) of the numerator (i.e., the linear variables) on the denominator (i.e., the geometric mean) for each significantly different shape ratio indicated that most linear variables scaled with positive allometry in both males and females, and that for eight of the shape ratios, sex-related shape variation is associated with statistically similar sex-specific scaling relationships. Only the length of the scaphoid body and the height of the lunate triquetrum facet showed a significantly higher SMA slope in females compared with males. These findings indicate that the significant differences in the majority of the shape ratios are a function of subtle (i.e., not statistically significant) scaling differences between males and females. There are a number of potential developmental, functional, and evolutionary factors that may cause sex-related shape differences in the human carpus. The results highlight the potential for subtle differences in scaling to result in functionally significant differences in shape. PMID:23125173

  19. Polonium-210 in marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) inhabiting the southern coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study focused on the determination of the alpha-emitter, 210Po, in two species of marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) commonly available in the southern coastal region of India. The brown mussel, Perna indica was collected from the west coast and the green mussel, Perna viridis from the east coast. The concentration of 210Po was related to the allometry (length of shell, wet/dry weight of shell/soft tissue) of the mussels and significant results were found. The study period focused on three seasons namely, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon for a 1-year period (2010–2011). The results revealed higher activity levels in smaller-sized mussels compared to larger ones. Marked variation in 210Po activity concentration was noted in the whole-body soft tissues between seasons and sampling site (p < 0.05). The dose rate assessment for mussels was performed using the ERICA Assessment tool. The chronic exposure to mussels due to 210Po was found to be lesser than the global benchmark dose rate of 10 μGy h−1. The effective ingestion dose to adults who intake mussels was estimated to be in the range 5.1–34.9 μSv y−1. The measurement contributes to the furthering of knowledge of 210Po, since no data exist in this region. - Highlights: • Polonium-210 was quantified in two species of Mytilid mussels inhabiting southern coast of India. • Polonium-210 activity showed significant variation among size classes, between seasons and sampling site. • The internal dose rate to mussels and the dose assessment to the adult population were performed

  20. Morphometric differentiation in Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae): associations with sex, chromosome, and geographic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, María Luciana; Colombo, Pablo César; Remis, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The water-hyacinth grasshopper Cornops aquaticum (Bruner) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) is native to South America and inhabits lowlands from southern Mexico to central Argentina and Uruguay. This grasshopper feeds and lays eggs on species from the genera Eichhornia and Pontederia. Particularly, Eichhornia crassipes is considered "the world's worst water weed," and the release of C. aquaticum was proposed as a form of biological control. Morphometric variation on the chromosomally differentiated populations from the middle and lower Paraná River and its possible association with geographic, sex, and chromosomal conditions was analyzed. Significant phenotype variation in C. aquaticum population was detected. C. aquaticum presents body-size sexual dimorphism, females being bigger than males. Female-biased sexual size dimorphism for all five analyzed traits was detected. The assessment of variation in sexual size dimorphism for tegmen length showed that this trait scaled allometrically, indicating that males and females did not vary in a similar fashion. The detected allometry was consistent with Rensch's rule demonstrating greater evolutionary divergence in male size than in female size and suggests that males are more sensitive to environmental condition. The analysis of morphometric variation in the context of chromosome constitution showed that the presence of fusion 1/6 was related to body-size variation. Fusion carriers displayed bigger body size than standard homozygotes. Besides, a positive relationship between tegmen length and the number of fused chromosomes was detected, showing a chromosome dose effect. Because the highest frequency of fusions has been found in the lower Paraná River, a marginal environment for this species, the results found would support the hypothesis that some supergenes located in the fusions may be favored in the southern populations, thus contributing to the establishment and maintenance of the polymorphism. PMID:25399431

  1. Scaling effect on the mid-diaphysis properties of long bones-the case of the Cervidae (deer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amson, Eli; Kolb, Christian

    2016-08-01

    How skeletal elements scale to size is a fundamental question in biology. While the external shape of long bones was intensively studied, an important component of their organization is also found in their less accessible inner structure. Here, we studied mid-diaphyseal properties of limb long bones, characterizing notably the thickness of their cortices (bone walls), in order to test whether body size directly influences bone inner organization. Previous examinations of scaling in long bones used broad samplings to encompass a wide range of body sizes. To account for the effect of confounding factors related to different lifestyles, we focused our comprehensive sampling on a mammalian clade that comprises various body sizes but a relatively uniform lifestyle, the Cervidae. Positive allometry was found in femoral cross-sectional shape, indicating greater directional bending rigidity in large-sized taxa. None of the compactness parameters scaled allometrically in any of their bones. The cortices of sampled zeugopodial bones (tibia and radius) were found as significantly thicker than those of stylopodial bones (femur and humerus). Furthermore, while the mean relative cortical thickness values for both stylopodial and zeugopodial bones are close to mass-saving optima, the variance for the stylopodial bones is significantly lower. This suggests that mass saving is less intensively selected in zeugopodial bones. Finally, the long-legged Elk (Alces) and the short-legged dwarf Cretan deer (Candiacervus) featured rather thin and thick cortices, respectively, suggesting that the acquisition of a different limb proportion is accompanied by a modification of the relative mid-diaphyseal cortical thickness. PMID:27350329

  2. Estimating urban trees and carbon stock potentials for mitigating climate change in Lagos: Case of Ikeja Government Reserved Area (GRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, P. O.; Faderin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Urban trees are a component of the urban infrastructure which offers diverse services including environmental, aesthetic and economic. The accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere resulting from the indiscriminate distribution of human populations and urban activities with the unsustainable consumption of natural resources contributes to global environmental change especially in coastal cities like Lagos. Carbon stocks and sequestration by urban trees are increasingly recognized to play significant roles for mitigating climate change. This paper focuses on the estimation of carbon stock and sequestration through biomass estimation and quantification in Ikeja GRA, Lagos. Ikeja possesses a characteristic feature as a microcosm of Lagos due to the wide range of land uses. A canopy assessment of tree population was carried out using itree canopy software. A GPS survey was used to collect an inventory of all trees showing their location, spatial distribution and other attributes. The analysis of the carbon storage and sequestration potential of both actual and potential tree planting sites involved biomass estimations from tree allometry equations. Trees were identified at species level and measurements of their dendrometric values were recorded and integrated into the GIS database to estimate biomass of trees and carbon storage. The trees in the study area were estimated to have a biomass of 441.9 mg and carbon storage of 221.395 kg/tree. By considering the potential tree planting sites the estimated carbon stored increased to 11,352.73 kg. Carbon sequestration value in the study area was found to be 1.6790 tonnes for the existing trees and 40.707 tonnes for the potential tree planting sites (PTPS). The estimation of carbon storage and sequestration values of trees are important incentives for carbon accounting/footprints and monitoring of climate change mitigation which has implications for evaluation and monitoring of urban ecosystem.

  3. Improvement of boreal vegetation modelling and climate interactions through the introduction of new bryophyte and artic-shrub plant functional types in a land surface model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druel, Arsène; Krinner, Gerhard; Peylin, Philippe; Ciais, Philippe; Viovy, Nicolas; Peregon, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Boreal and tundra vegetation, which represents 22% of the global land area, has had a significant impact on climate through changes of albedo, snow cover, soil thermal dynamics, etc. However, it is frequently poorly represented in earth system models used for climate predictions. We improved the description of high-latitude vegetation and its interactions with the environment in the ORCHIDEE land surface model by creating new plant functional types with specific biogeochemical and biophysical properties: boreal shrubs, bryophytes (mosses and lichens) and boreal C3 grasses. The introduction of shrub specificities allows for an intermediate stratum between trees and grasses, with a new carbon allometry within the plant, inducing new interactions between wooden species and their environment, especially the complex snow-shrubs interaction. Similarly, the introduction of non-vascular plants (i.e. bryophytes) involves numerous changes both in physical and biological processes, such as the response of photosynthesis to surface humidity, the decomposition of carbon and the soil thermal conductivity. These changes in turn lead to new processes and interactions between vegetation and moisture (soil and air), carbon cycle, energy balance, etc. For the boreal C3 grasses we did not include new processes compared to the generic C3 grass PFT, but improved the realism of the carbon and water budgets with new boreal adjusted parameters. We assess the performance of the modified ORCHIDEE land surface model and in particular its ability to represent the new plant types (their phenology etc.), and evaluate the effects of these new PFTs on the simulated energy, water and carbon balances of boreal ecosystems. The potential impact of these refinements on future climate simulations will be discussed.

  4. The Price of Precision: Large-Scale Mapping of Forest Structure and Biomass Using Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing provides one of the best means for acquiring detailed information on forest structure. However, its application over large areas has been limited largely because of its expense. Nonetheless, extant data exist over many states in the U.S., funded largely by state and federal consortia and mainly for infrastructure, emergency response, flood plain and coastal mapping. These lidar data are almost always acquired in leaf-off seasons, and until recently, usually with low point count densities. Even with these limitations, they provide unprecedented wall-to-wall mappings that enable development of appropriate methodologies for large-scale deployment of lidar. In this talk we summarize our research and lessons learned in deriving forest structure over regional areas as part of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). We focus on two areas: the entire state of Maryland and Sonoma County, California. The Maryland effort used low density, leaf-off data acquired by each county in varying epochs, while the on-going Sonoma work employs state-of-the-art, high density, wall-to-wall, leaf-on lidar data. In each area we combine these lidar coverages with high-resolution multispectral imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) and in situ plot data to produce maps of canopy height, tree cover and biomass, and compare our results against FIA plot data and national biomass maps. Our work demonstrates that large-scale mapping of forest structure at high spatial resolution is achievable but products may be complex to produce and validate over large areas. Furthermore, fundamental issues involving statistical approaches, plot types and sizes, geolocation, modeling scales, allometry, and even the definitions of "forest" and "non-forest" must be approached carefully. Ultimately, determining the "price of precision", that is, does the value of wall-to-wall forest structure data justify their expense, should consider not only carbon market applications

  5. Diet Switching by Mammalian Herbivores in Response to Exotic Grass Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremm, Carolina; Carvalho, Paulo C. F.; Fonseca, Lidiane; Amaral, Glaucia A.; Mezzalira, Jean C.; Perez, Naylor B.; Nabinger, Carlos; Laca, Emilio A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasion by exotic grasses is a severe threat to the integrity of grassland ecosystems all over the world. Because grasslands are typically grazed by livestock and wildlife, the invasion is a community process modulated by herbivory. We hypothesized that the invasion of native South American grasslands by Eragrostis plana Nees, an exotic tussock-forming grass from Africa, could be deterred by grazing if grazers switched dietary preferences and included the invasive grass as a large proportion of their diets. Bos taurus (heifers) and Ovis aries (ewes) grazed plots with varying degrees of invasion by E. plana in a replicated manipulative experiment. Animal positions and species grazed were observed every minute in 45-min grazing session. Proportion of bites and steps in and out of E. plana tussocks were measured and used to calculate several indices of selectivity. Both heifers and ewes exhibited increasing probability of grazing E. plana as the proportion of area covered by tussocks increased, but they behaved differently. In agreement with expectations based on the allometry of dietary preferences and morphology, ewes consumed a low proportion of E. plana, except in areas that had more than 90% E. plana cover. Heifers consumed proportionally more E. plana than ewes. Contrary to our hypothesis, herbivores did not exhibit dietary switching towards the invasive grass. Moreover, they exhibited avoidance of the invasive grass and preference for short-statured native species, both of which should tend to enhance invasion. Unless invasive plants are highly palatable to livestock, the effect of grazing to deter the invasion is limited, due to the inherent avoidance of the invasive grass by the main grazers in the ecosystem, particularly sheep. PMID:26919613

  6. Spatial and Temporal Evolution of Urban Systems in China during Rapid Urbanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure of urban hierarchy and the role of cities of different sizes have drawn considerable scholarly interests and societal concerns. This paper analyzes the evolution and underlying mechanisms of urban hierarchy in China during the recent period of rapid urbanization. By comparing scale changes of seven types of cities (megacity, large city, Type I big city, Type II big city, medium-sized city, type I small city and type II small city, we find that allometry is the main characteristic of urban hierarchical evolution in China. We also test the validity of Zipf’s law and Gibrat’s law, which broaden the scope of existing studies by including county-level cities. We find that urban hierarchical distribution is lognormal, rather than Pareto. The result also shows that city size growth rates are constant across cities of different types. For better understanding of the mechanisms of urban hierarchical formation, we measure the optimal city size and resource allocation by the Pareto optimality criterion and non-parametric frontier method. The main findings are as follows: (1 scale efficiency is still at a relatively low level among the seven types of cities; (2 the economic efficiency of megacities and large cities is overestimated when compared to economic-environmental efficiency. Hence, this paper has two policy implications: (1 to correct factor market (land, labor and infrastructure investment distortions among different types of cities for the improvement of efficiency; (2 to strengthen rural property rights to improve social equity, as well as land use intensity.

  7. Variety, sex and ontogenetic differences in the pelvic limb muscle architectural properties of leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their links with locomotor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kayleigh A; Nudds, Robert L; Codd, Jonathan R

    2016-06-01

    Leghorn (layer) chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) differ in locomotor morphology and performance due to artificial selection for standard (large) and bantam (small) varieties, sexual dimorphisms and ontogenetic stage. Here, the hind limb skeletal muscle architectural properties of mature and juvenile standard breeds and mature bantams are compared and linked to measures of locomotor performance. Mature males possessed greater relative muscle physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) than their conspecific females, indicative of greater force-generating capacity, and in line with their greater maximum sustainable speeds compared with females. Furthermore, some of the relative fascicle lengths of the pennate muscles were greater in mature males than in mature females, which may permit greater muscle contractibility. Immature standard leghorns, however, did not share the same dimorphisms as their mature forms. The differences in architectural properties between immature and mature standard males indicate that with the onset of male sexual maturity, concomitant with increasing muscle mass in males, the relative fascicle lengths of pennate muscles and the relative PCSAs of the parallel-fibred muscles also increase. The age-related differences in standard breed male muscle architecture are linked to the presence and absence of sex differences in maximum aerobic speeds. Males of bantam and standard varieties shared similar muscle proportions (% body mass), but exhibited intrinsic muscle differences with a tendency for greater force-generating capabilities in bantams and greater contractile capabilities in standards. The metabolic costs associated with the longer fascicle lengths, together with more crouched limbs in standard than in bantam males may explain the lack of allometry in the minimum metabolic cost of transport between these birds of different size. PMID:26969917

  8. Size Scaling in Western North Atlantic Loggerhead Turtles Permits Extrapolation between Regions, but Not Life Stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Marn

    Full Text Available Sea turtles face threats globally and are protected by national and international laws. Allometry and scaling models greatly aid sea turtle conservation and research, and help to better understand the biology of sea turtles. Scaling, however, may differ between regions and/or life stages. We analyze differences between (i two different regional subsets and (ii three different life stage subsets of the western North Atlantic loggerhead turtles by comparing the relative growth of body width and depth in relation to body length, and discuss the implications.Results suggest that the differences between scaling relationships of different regional subsets are negligible, and models fitted on data from one region of the western North Atlantic can safely be used on data for the same life stage from another North Atlantic region. On the other hand, using models fitted on data for one life stage to describe other life stages is not recommended if accuracy is of paramount importance. In particular, young loggerhead turtles that have not recruited to neritic habitats should be studied and modeled separately whenever practical, while neritic juveniles and adults can be modeled together as one group. Even though morphometric scaling varies among life stages, a common model for all life stages can be used as a general description of scaling, and assuming isometric growth as a simplification is justified. In addition to linear models traditionally used for scaling on log-log axes, we test the performance of a saturating (curvilinear model. The saturating model is statistically preferred in some cases, but the accuracy gained by the saturating model is marginal.

  9. Osmo and hydro priming improvement germination characteristics and enzyme activity of Mountain Rye (Secale montanum seeds under drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari O.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of various concentrations of polyetylenglycol 6000 (PEG 6000(0, -9, -11, -13 and -15 bar and hydro priming on Mountain Rye (secale montanum germination characteristic and enzyme activity were evaluated under drought stress in the seed laboratory of Natural Resources Faculty, University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran. Analyze of variance for hydro priming showed that temperature × time of priming interaction was significantly for germination percentage (GP, normal seedling percentage (NSP, coefficient of velocity of germination (CVG, seedling vigor index (SVI, coefficient of allometry (AC and seedling length (SL under drought stress and for osmo priming showed that Concentration of PEG × Temperature × Time of priming interaction was significantly for all traits under drought stress. Results of interaction effects for hydro priming showed that the highest GP (53% and NSP (23.5% were attained from hydro priming for 16h at 15 ◦C and the highest CVG (0.21 and AC (0.49 were attained from hydro priming for 8h at 10 ◦C, also hydro priming for 8h at 15 ◦C increased SL (3.15 as compared to the unprimed.Osmo priming with concentration of -15 bar PEG for 24h at 15 ◦C increased GP (80.5 %, GI (17.9, NSP (45 %, SVI (257.85 and SL (5.73 cm and decreased MTG as compared to the unprimed and other treatments of osmo priming. The highest CVG was attained from concentration of -9 bar PEG for 24h at 10 ◦C. the highest AC was attained from concentration of -9 bar PEG for 12h at 15 ◦C. Also osmo and hydro priming increased catalase (CAT and ascorbate peroxidase (APX as compared to the unprimed.

  10. Relative crystallinity of plant biomass: studies on assembly, adaptation and acclimation.

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    Darby Harris

    Full Text Available Plant biomechanical design is central to cell shape, morphogenesis, reproductive performance and protection against environmental and mechanical stress. The cell wall forms the central load bearing support structure for plant design, yet a mechanistic understanding of its synthesis is incomplete. A key tool for studying the structure of cellulose polymorphs has been x-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Relative crystallinity index (RCI is based on the x-ray diffraction characteristics of two signature peaks and we used this technique to probe plant assembly, adaptation and acclimation. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of cellulose synthase in transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a homozygous YFP::CESA6. Assembly: RCI values for stems and roots were indistinguishable but leaves had 23.4 and 21.6% lower RCI than stems and roots respectively. Adaptation: over 3-fold variability in RCI was apparent in leaves from 35 plant species spanning Ordovician to Cretaceous periods. Within this study, RCI correlated positively with leaf geometric constraints and with mass per unit area, suggestive of allometry. Acclimation: biomass crystallinity was found to decrease under conditions of thigmomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. Further, in etiolated pea hypocotyls, RCI values also decreased compared to plants that were grown in light, consistent with alterations in FTIR cellulose fingerprint peaks and live cell imaging experiments revealing rapid orientation of the YFP::cellulose synthase-6 array in response to light. Herein, results and technical challenges associated with the structure of the cell wall that gives rise to sample crystallinity are presented and examined with respect to adaptation, acclimation and assembly in ecosystem-level processes.

  11. Allometric scaling of UK urban emissions: interpretation and implications for air quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Rob; Barnes, Matt; Whyatt, Duncan; Hewitt, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Allometry uncovers structures and patterns by relating the characteristics of complex systems to a measure of scale. We present an allometric analysis of air quality for UK urban settlements, beginning with emissions and moving on to consider air concentrations. We consider both airshed-average 'urban background' concentrations (cf. those derived from satellites for NO2) and local pollution 'hotspots'. We show that there is a strong and robust scaling (with respect to population) of the non-point-source emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane, as well as the toxic pollutants nitrogen dioxide, PM2.5, and 1,3-butadiene. The scaling of traffic-related emissions is not simply a reflection of road length, but rather results from the socio-economic patterning of road-use. The recent controversy regarding diesel vehicle emissions is germane to our study but does not affect our overall conclusions. We next develop an hypothesis for the population-scaling of airshed-average air concentrations, with which we demonstrate that, although average air quality is expected to be worse in large urban centres compared to small urban centres, the overall effect is an economy of scale (i.e., large cities reduce the overall burden of emissions compared to the same population spread over many smaller urban settlements). Our hypothesis explains satellite-derived observations of airshed-average urban NO2 concentrations. The theory derived also explains which properties of nature-based solutions (urban greening) can make a significant contribution at city scale, and points to a hitherto unforeseen opportunity to make large cities cleaner than smaller cities in absolute terms with respect to their airshed-average pollutant concentration.

  12. Global trends and vulnerabilities of mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, M.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Castaneda, E.; Roy Chowdhury, R.

    2015-12-01

    Mangrove forests are located along Earth's coastlines and estuaries within tropical and subtropical latitudes. They provide numerous services functioning as an extraordinary carbon sequestration system and serving as habitat and nursery for fish, crustaceans and amphibians. To coastal populations, they provide livelihood, food, lumber and act as an effective protection against tsunamis, storm surges and hurricanes. Their vulnerability to sea level rise is strongly related to their extraordinary ability to accumulate soils, which is in part related to their productivity and therefore canopy structure. As a first step to understand their vulnerability, we seek to understand mangrove dependencies on environmental and geophysical setting. To achieve this, we mapped mangrove canopy height and above ground biomass (AGB) at the Global scale. To identify mangrove forests, existing maps derived from a collection of Landsat data around the 2000 era were used. Using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation data collected in February of 2000, we produced a Global map of mangrove canopy height. The estimated heights were validated with the ICESat/Geoscience Altimeter System (GLAS) and in situ field data. Most importantly, field data were also used to derive relationships between canopy height and AGB. While the geographical coverage of in situ data is limited, ICESat/GLAS data provided extensive geographical coverage with independent estimates of maximum canopy height. These estimates were used to calibrate SRTM-estimates of height at the Global scale. We found the difference between GLAS RH100 and SRTM resulted from several sources of uncertainty that are difficult to isolate. These include natural variations of canopy structure with time, system errors from GLAS and SRTM, geo-location errors and discrepancies in spatial resolution. The Global canopy height map was trnasormed into AGB using the field-derived allometry. Depending on the scale of analysis and geographical

  13. Temporal Variation of Wood Density and Carbon in Two Elevational Sites of Pinus cooperi in Relation to Climate Response in Northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompa-García, Marín; Venegas-González, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Forest ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of carbon uptake in forest ecosystems is much needed. Pinus cooperi is a widely distributed species in the Sierra Madre Occidental in northern Mexico and future climatic variations could impact these ecosystems. Here, we analyze the variations of trunk carbon in two populations of P. cooperi situated at different elevational gradients, combining dendrochronological techniques and allometry. Carbon sequestration (50% biomass) was estimated from a specific allometric equation for this species based on: (i) variation of intra-annual wood density and (ii) diameter reconstruction. The results show that the population at a higher elevation had greater wood density, basal area, and hence, carbon accumulation. This finding can be explained by an ecological response of trees to adverse weather conditions, which would cause a change in the cellular structure affecting the within-ring wood density profile. The influence of variations in climate on the maximum density of chronologies showed a positive correlation with precipitation and the Multivariate El Niño Southern Oscillation Index during the winter season, and a negative correlation with maximum temperature during the spring season. Monitoring previous conditions to growth is crucial due to the increased vulnerability to extreme climatic variations on higher elevational sites. We concluded that temporal variability of wood density contributes to a better understanding of environmental historical changes and forest carbon dynamics in Northern Mexico, representing a significant improvement over previous studies on carbon sequestration. Assuming a uniform density according to tree age is incorrect, so this method can be used for environmental mitigation strategies, such as for managing P. cooperi, a dominant species of great ecological amplitude and widely used in forest industries. PMID:27272519

  14. Aboveground and belowground biomass allocation in native Prosopis caldenia Burkart secondaries woodlands in the semi-arid Argentinean pampas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The woodlands in the south-west of the Argentinean pampas are dominated by Prosopis Caldenia Burkart (calden). The current deforestation rate of this woodlands is 0.82% per year. Different compensation initiatives have begun that recognize the role of forests as environmental service providers. The financial incentives they offer make it necessary to quantify the amount of carbon stored in the forest biomass. A model for estimating calden biomass was developed. Thirty-eight trees were selected, felled and divided into sections. An equation system was fitted using joint generalized regression to ensure the additivity property. A weighted regression was used to avoid heteroscedasticity. In these woodlands fire is the main disturbance and it can modify tree allometry, due this all models included the area of the base of the stem and tree height as independent variables since it indirectly collects this variability. Total biomass and the stem fraction had the highest R2Adj. values (0.75), while branches with a diameter less than 7 cm had the lowest (0.58). Tree biomass was also analyzed by partitioning into the basic fractions of stem, crown, roots, and the root/shoot ratio. Biomass allocation was greatest in the crown fraction and the mean root/shoot ratio was 0.58. The carbon stock of the caldenales considering only calden tree biomass is 20.2 Mg ha−1. While the overall carbon balance of the region is negative (deforestation and biomass burning, the remnant forested area has increased their calden density and in an indirect way his carbon sequestration capacity could also be increased. - Highlights: • A model for estimating aboveground and belowground Prosopis caldenia biomass was developed. • Biomass allocation into the tree and the root/shoot ratio were analyzed. • The equation systems presented had made it possible to more accurately estimate the biomass stored in calden woodlands

  15. Size-mediated tree transpiration along soil drainage gradients in a boreal black spruce forest wildfire chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstmann, J L; Ewers, B E; Kwon, H

    2012-05-01

    Boreal forests are crucial to climate change predictions because of their large land area and ability to sequester and store carbon, which is controlled by water availability. Heterogeneity of these forests is predicted to increase with climate change through more frequent wildfires, warmer, longer growing seasons and potential drainage of forested wetlands. This study aims at quantifying controls over tree transpiration with drainage condition, stand age and species in a central Canadian black spruce boreal forest. Heat dissipation sensors were installed in 2007 and data were collected through 2008 on 118 trees (69 Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton, Sterns & Poggenb. (black spruce), 25 Populus tremuloides Michx. (trembling aspen), 19 Pinus banksiana Lamb. (jack pine), 3 Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch (tamarack) and 2 Salix spp. (willow)) at four stand ages (18, 43, 77 and 157 years old) each containing a well- and poorly-drained stand. Transpiration estimates from sap flux were expressed per unit xylem area, J(S), per unit ground area, E(C) and per unit leaf area, E(L), using sapwood (A(S)) and leaf (A(L)) area calculated from stand- and species-specific allometry. Soil drainage differences in transpiration were variable; only the 43- and 157-year-old poorly-drained stands had ∼ 50% higher total stand E(C) than well-drained locations. Total stand E(C) tended to decrease with stand age after an initial increase between the 18- and 43-year-old stands. Soil drainage differences in transpiration were controlled primarily by short-term physiological drivers such as vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture whereas stand age differences were controlled by successional species shifts and changes in tree size (i.e., A(S)). Future predictions of boreal climate change must include stand age, species and soil drainage heterogeneity to avoid biased estimates of forest water loss and latent energy exchanges. PMID:22539635

  16. Forearm articular proportions and the antebrachial index in Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis and the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank L'Engle; Cunningham, Deborah L; Amaral, Lia Q

    2015-12-01

    When hominin bipedality evolved, the forearms were free to adopt nonlocomotor tasks which may have resulted in changes to the articular surfaces of the ulna and the relative lengths of the forearm bones. Similarly, sex differences in forearm proportions may be more likely to emerge in bipeds than in the great apes given the locomotor constraints in Gorilla, Pan and Pongo. To test these assumptions, ulnar articular proportions and the antebrachial index (radius length/ulna length) in Homo sapiens (n=51), Gorilla gorilla (n=88), Pan troglodytes (n=49), Pongo pygmaeus (n=36) and Australopithecus afarensis A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 are compared. Intercept-adjusted ratios are used to control for size and minimize the effects of allometry. Canonical scores axes show that the proximally broad and elongated trochlear notch with respect to size in H. sapiens and A. afarensis is largely distinct from G. gorilla, P. troglodytes and P. pygmaeus. A cluster analysis of scaled ulnar articular dimensions groups H. sapiens males with A.L. 438-1 ulna length estimates, while one A.L. 288-1 ulna length estimate groups with Pan and another clusters most closely with H. sapiens, G. gorilla and A.L. 438-1. The relatively low antebrachial index characterizing H. sapiens and non-outlier estimates of A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 differs from those of the great apes. Unique sex differences in H. sapiens suggest a link between bipedality and forearm functional morphology. PMID:26256651

  17. A macroecological analysis of SERA derived forest heights and implications for forest volume remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Brolly

    Full Text Available Individual trees have been shown to exhibit strong relationships between DBH, height and volume. Often such studies are cited as justification for forest volume or standing biomass estimation through remote sensing. With resolution of common satellite remote sensing systems generally too low to resolve individuals, and a need for larger coverage, these systems rely on descriptive heights, which account for tree collections in forests. For remote sensing and allometric applications, this height is not entirely understood in terms of its location. Here, a forest growth model (SERA analyzes forest canopy height relationships with forest wood volume. Maximum height, mean, H₁₀₀, and Lorey's height are examined for variability under plant number density, resource and species. Our findings, shown to be allometrically consistent with empirical measurements for forested communities world-wide, are analyzed for implications to forest remote sensing techniques such as LiDAR and RADAR. Traditional forestry measures of maximum height, and to a lesser extent H₁₀₀ and Lorey's, exhibit little consistent correlation with forest volume across modeled conditions. The implication is that using forest height to infer volume or biomass from remote sensing requires species and community behavioral information to infer accurate estimates using height alone. SERA predicts mean height to provide the most consistent relationship with volume of the height classifications studied and overall across forest variations. This prediction agrees with empirical data collected from conifer and angiosperm forests with plant densities ranging between 10²-10⁶ plants/hectare and heights 6-49 m. Height classifications investigated are potentially linked to radar scattering centers with implications for allometry. These findings may be used to advance forest biomass estimation accuracy through remote sensing. Furthermore, Lorey's height with its specific relationship to

  18. Confronting remote sensing product with ground base measurements across time and scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmokhtarian, A.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem models are essential tools in forecasting ecosystem responses to global climate change. One of the most challenging issues in ecosystem modeling is scaling while preserving landscape characteristics and minimizing loss of information, when moving from point observation to regional scale. There is a keen interest in providing accurate inputs for ecosystem models which represent ecosystem initial state conditions. Remote sensing land cover products, such as Landsat NLCD and MODIS MCD12Q1, provide extensive spatio-temporal coverage but do not capture forest composition and structure. Lidar and hyperspectral have the potential to meet this need but lack sufficient spatial and historical coverage. Forest inventory measurements provide detailed information on the landscape but in a very small footprint. Combining inventory and land cover could improve estimates of ecosystem state and characteristic across time and space. This study focuses on the challenges associated with fusing and scaling the US Forest Service FIA database and NLCD across regional scales to quantify ecosystem characteristics and reduce associated uncertainties. Across Southeast of U.S. 400 stratified random samples of 10x10 km2 landscapes were selected. Data on plant density, species, age, and DBH of trees in FIA plots within each site were extracted. Using allometry equations, the canopy cover of different plant functional types (PFTs) was estimated using a PPA-style canopy model and used to assign each inventory plot to a land cover class. Inventory and land cover were fused in a Bayesian model that adjusts the fractional coverage of inventory plots while accounting for multiple sources of uncertainty. Results were compared to estimates derived from inventory alone, land cover alone, and model spin-up alone. Our findings create a framework of data assimilation to better interpret remote sensing data using ground-based measurements.

  19. Ratios as a size adjustment in morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, G H; Gelvin, B R; Hartman, S E

    1993-08-01

    Simple ratios in which a measurement variable is divided by a size variable are commonly used but known to be inadequate for eliminating size correlations from morphometric data. Deficiencies in the simple ratio can be alleviated by incorporating regression coefficients describing the bivariate relationship between the measurement and size variables. Recommendations have included: 1) subtracting the regression intercept to force the bivariate relationship through the origin (intercept-adjusted ratios); 2) exponentiating either the measurement or the size variable using an allometry coefficient to achieve linearity (allometrically adjusted ratios); or 3) both subtracting the intercept and exponentiating (fully adjusted ratios). These three strategies for deriving size-adjusted ratios imply different data models for describing the bivariate relationship between the measurement and size variables (i.e., the linear, simple allometric, and full allometric models, respectively). Algebraic rearrangement of the equation associated with each data model leads to a correctly formulated adjusted ratio whose expected value is constant (i.e., size correlation is eliminated). Alternatively, simple algebra can be used to derive an expected value function for assessing whether any proposed ratio formula is effective in eliminating size correlations. Some published ratio adjustments were incorrectly formulated as indicated by expected values that remain a function of size after ratio transformation. Regression coefficients incorporated into adjusted ratios must be estimated using least-squares regression of the measurement variable on the size variable. Use of parameters estimated by any other regression technique (e.g., major axis or reduced major axis) results in residual correlations between size and the adjusted measurement variable. Correctly formulated adjusted ratios, whose parameters are estimated by least-squares methods, do control for size correlations. The size

  20. Cortical bone distribution in the femoral neck of strepsirhine primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demes, B; Jungers, W L; Walker, C

    2000-10-01

    The thickness of the inferior and superior cortices of the femoral neck was measured on X-rays of 181 strepsirhine primate femora representing 24 species. Neck length, neck depth and neck-shaft angle were also measured. The strength of the femoral neck in frontal bending was estimated by modeling the neck as a hollow cylinder, with neck depth as the outer diameter and cortical thickness representing the superior and inferior shell dimensions. Results indicate that the inferior cortex is always thicker than the superior cortex. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is highly variable but distinguishes two of the three locomotor groups in the sample. Vertical clingers and leapers have higher ratios (i.e., a more even distribution of cortical bone) than quadrupeds. The slow climbers tend to have the lowest ratios, although they do not differ significantly from the leapers and quadrupeds. These results do not confirm prior theoretical expectations and reported data for anthropoid primates that link greater asymmetry of the cortical shell to more stereotypical hip excursions. The ratio of superior to inferior cortical thickness is unrelated to body mass, femoral neck length, and neck-shaft angle, calling into question whether the short neck of strepsirhine primates acts as a cantilever beam in bending. On the other hand, the estimated section moduli are highly correlated with body mass and neck length, a correlation that is driven primarily by body mass. In conclusion, we believe that an alternative interpretation to the cantilever beam model is needed to explain the asymmetry in bone distribution in the femoral neck, at least in strepsirhine primates (e.g., a thicker inferior cortex is required to reinforce the strongly curved inferior surface). As in prior studies of cross-sectional geometry of long bones, we found slightly positive allometry of cortical dimensions with body mass. PMID:11006046

  1. Catch Rate, Distribution, Trophic and Reproductive Biology of the African Carp Labeo coubie in the Agbokim Waterfalls, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GU Ikpi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The catch rate, diet, size, and reproduction of 565 specimen of Labeo coubie were studied over 24 months (January 2005–January 2007 in three reaches [upstream, midstream (waterfalls region and downstream] along the 6817.7 m length of Agbokim waterfalls during wet and dry seasons. Data were processed using fecundity (F, allometric coefficient (b, Fultons condition factor, and diet breadth. Fecundity values were 10411.0 ± 121, 15102.0 ± 303.5 and 24143.3 ± 662 eggs for fish from upstream, midstream, and downstream, respectively, with overall mean value of 19811.3 ± 223 eggs. The relationships of fecundity with total weight, ovary weight, ovary length, body breadth were positively linear. Mean allometric coefficient (b of the length–weight relationship of fish in the three reaches were 2.662 ± 0.291 (upstream, 2.592 ± 0.368 (midstream, and 2.622 ± 0.315 (downstream and all showed significant departure from cubic value (negative allometry. Detritus, phytoplanktons and plant materials were the dominant food items in the diet, contributing 36.8%, 32.1%, and 17.2% of stomach content, respectively. Food Richness of 7 and Gut Repletion Index, 100% were recorded. The low mean diet breadth exhibited by fish from the three sampling sites showed that the species has low trophic flexibility and cannot easily change feeding habit. Mean condition factor varied from 0.442 ± 0.127 upstream to 0.648 ± 0.146 downstream. Downstream therefore provided better spawning conditions for Labeo coubie in the tropical waterfalls ecosystems.

  2. Are tree ontogenetic structure and allometric relationship independent of vegetation formation type? A case study with Cordia oncocalyx in the Brazilian caatinga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Andréa P.; Martins, Fernando R.; Araújo, Francisca S.

    2012-08-01

    In temperate and tropical rainforests, ontogenetic structure and allometry during tree ontogeny are often associated with light gradients. Light is not considered a limiting resource in deciduous thorny woodland (DTW), but establishment and growth occur during a short rainy period, when the canopy is fully leaved and light in the understory may be modified. Our aim was to investigate whether the light gradient in DTW and the biomechanical limitations of tree growth would be enough to produce an ontogenetic structure and allometric growth similar to rainforest canopy trees. We investigated the ontogenetic stages and diameter-height relationship of Cordia oncocalyx (Boraginaceae), a dominant canopy tree of the DTW of semiarid northeastern Brazil. We tagged, measured and classified the ontogenetic stages of 2.895 individuals in a 1 ha area (5°6'58.1″S and 40°52'19.4″W). In the rainy season only 4.7% of the light falling on the canopy reached the ground. Initial ontogenetic stages, mainly infant (50.9%) and seedling (42.1%), were predominant in the population, with the remaining 7% distributed among juvenile, immature, virginile and reproductive. The ontogenetic structure was similar to that of rainforest tree species, but the population formed both permanent seed and infant banks in response to long dry periods and erratic rainy spells. Like many other Boraginaceae tree species in tropical rainforests, C. oncocalyx has a Prévost architectural model, but allometric growth was quite different from rainforest trees. C. oncocalyx invested slightly more in diameter at first, then in height and finally invested greatly in diameter and attained an asymptotic height. The continued high investment in diameter growth at late stages and the asymptotic height point to low tree density and more frequent xylem embolism as the main drivers of tree allometric shape in DTW. This indicates that tree ontogenetic structure and allometric relationships depend on vegetation

  3. Below-ground biomass production and allometric relationships of eucalyptus coppice plantation in the central highlands of Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short rotations of Eucalyptus plantations under coppice regime are extensively managed for wood production in Madagascar. Nevertheless, little is known about their biomass production and partitioning and their potential in terms of carbon sequestration. If above-ground biomass (AGB) can be estimated based on established allometric relations, below-ground (BGB) estimates are much less common. The aim of this work was to develop allometric equations to estimate biomass of these plantations, mainly for the root components. Data from 9 Eucalyptus robusta stands (47–87 years of plantation age, 3–5 years of coppice-shoot age) were collected and analyzed. Biomass of 3 sampled trees per stand was determined destructively. Dry weight of AGB components (leaves, branches and stems) were estimated as a function of basal area of all shoots per stump and dry weight for BGB components (mainly stump, coarse root (CR) and medium root (MR)) were estimated as a function of stump circumference. Biomass was then computed using allometric equations from stand inventory data. Stand biomass ranged from 102 to 130 Mg ha−1 with more than 77% contained in the BGB components. The highest dry weight was allocated in the stump and in the CR (51% and 42% respectively) for BGB parts and in the stem (69%) for AGB part. Allometric relationships developed herein could be applied to other Eucalyptus plantations which present similar stand density and growing conditions; anyhow, more is needed to be investigated in understanding biomass production and partitioning over time for this kind of forest ecosystem. -- Highlights: ► We studied the potential of old eucalyptus coppices in Madagascar to mitigate global warming. ► Biomass measurement, mainly for below-ground BGB (stump, coarse-medium-and fine roots) was provided. ► BGB allometry relationships for short rotation forestry under coppice were established. ► BGB were found to be important with their 102-130MgC ha-1 (<77% of the C in the

  4. Net Changes in Above Ground Woody Carbon Stock in Western Juniper Woodlands using Wavelet Techniques and Multi-temporal Aerial Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, E. K.; Bunting, S. C.; Smith, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    Expansion of woody plant cover in semi-arid ecosystems previously occupied primarily by grasses and forbs has been identified as an important land cover change process affecting the global carbon budget. Although woody encroachment occurs worldwide, quantifying changes in carbon pools and fluxes related to this phenomenon via remote sensing is challenging because large areas are affected at a fine spatial resolution (1- 10 m) and, in many cases, at slow temporal rates. Two-dimensional spatial wavelet analysis (SWA) represents a novel image processing technique that has been successful in automatically and objectively quantifying ecologically relevant features at multiple scales. We apply SWA to current and historic 1-m resolution black and white aerial photography to quantify changes in above ground woody biomass and carbon stock of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis subsp. occidentalis) expanding into sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe on the Owyhee Plateau in southwestern Idaho. Due to the large land area (330,000 ha) and variable availability of historical photography, we sampled forty-eight 100-ha blocks situated across the area, stratified using topographic, soil, and land stewardship variables. The average juniper plant cover increased one-fold (from 5.3% to 10.4% total cover) at the site during the time period of 1939-1946 to 1998-2004. Juniper plant density has increased by 128% with a higher percentage of the plant population in the smaller size classes compared to the size distribution 60 years ago. After image-based SWA delineation of tree crown sizes, we computed the change in above ground woody plant biomass and carbon stock between the two time periods using allometry. Areas where the shrub steppe is dominated by low sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) has experienced little to no expansion of western juniper. However, on deeper, more well drained soils capable of supporting mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata subsp. vaseyana), the above

  5. The bony labyrinth of the middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Rolf; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    fully resolved, the low placement of the posterior canal in Neandertals may be related to some combination of absolutely large brain size, a wide cranial base, and an archaic pattern of brain allometry. This more general explanation would not necessarily follow taxonomic lines, even though this morphology of the bony labyrinth occurs at high frequencies among Neandertals. While a functional interpretation of the relatively small vertical canals in the Neandertal clade remains elusive, the relative proportions of the semicircular canals is one of several derived Neandertal features in the Atapuerca (SH) crania. Examination of additional European middle Pleistocene specimens suggests that the full suite of Neandertal features in the bony labyrinth did not emerge in Europe until perhaps <200 kya. PMID:26767955

  6. Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations Model of Total Aboveground Biomass in Forest Stands: Site-scale Test of Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHOI, S.; Shi, Y.; Ni, X.; Simard, M.; Myneni, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Sparseness in in-situ observations has precluded the spatially explicit and accurate mapping of forest biomass. The need for large-scale maps has raised various approaches implementing conjugations between forest biomass and geospatial predictors such as climate, forest type, soil property, and topography. Despite the improved modeling techniques (e.g., machine learning and spatial statistics), a common limitation is that biophysical mechanisms governing tree growth are neglected in these black-box type models. The absence of a priori knowledge may lead to false interpretation of modeled results or unexplainable shifts in outputs due to the inconsistent training samples or study sites. Here, we present a gray-box approach combining known biophysical processes and geospatial predictors through parametric optimizations (inversion of reference measures). Total aboveground biomass in forest stands is estimated by incorporating the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) and Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM). Two main premises of this research are: (a) The Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations (ASRL) theory can provide a relationship between tree geometry and local resource availability constrained by environmental conditions; and (b) The zeroth order theory (size-frequency distribution) can expand individual tree allometry into total aboveground biomass at the forest stand level. In addition to the FIA estimates, two reference maps from the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset (NBCD) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) were produced to evaluate the model. This research focuses on a site-scale test of the biomass model to explore the robustness of predictors, and to potentially improve models using additional geospatial predictors such as climatic variables, vegetation indices, soil properties, and lidar-/radar-derived altimetry products (or existing forest canopy height maps). As results, the optimized ASRL estimates satisfactorily

  7. Population biology of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus (Decapoda: Ucididae) in an estuary from semiarid northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Marcos de Miranda Leão; Rezende, Carla Ferreira; Silva, José Roberto Feitosa

    2013-12-01

    The mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is an important resource of estuarine regions along the Brazilian coast. U. cordatus is distributed from Florida, U.S.A., to the coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The species plays an important role in processing leaf litter in the mangroves, which optimizes the processes of energy transfer and nutrient cycling, and is considered a keystone species in the ecosystem. Population declines have been reported in different parts of the Brazilian coast. In the present study we evaluated aspects of the population structure, sex ratio and size at morphological sexual maturity. We analyzed 977 specimens collected monthly over 24 months (2010-2012), in a mangrove of the Jaguaribe River, in the municipality of Aracati on the East coast of Ceará state, Northeastern Brazil. The study area has a mild semiarid tropical climate, with mean temperatures between 26 and 28 degrees C. The area is located within the eco-region of the semiarid Northeast coast, where mangroves occur in small areas and estuaries are affected by mesomareal regimes. The population structure was evaluated by the frequency distribution of size classes in each month, and the overall sex ratio was analyzed using the chi-square test. Size at morphological sexual maturity was estimated based on the allometry of the cheliped of the males and the abdomen width of the females, using the program REGRANS. The size-frequency distribution was unimodal in both sexes. The overall sex ratio (M:F) (1:0.6) was significantly different from 1:1. Analysis of the sex ratio by size class showed that the proportion of males increased significantly from size class 55-60 mm upward, and this pattern persisted in the larger size classes. In the smaller size classes the sex ratio did not differ from 1:1. The size at morphological sexual maturity was estimated at a carapace width (CW) of 52 mm and 45 mm for males and females, respectively. Analysis of the population parameters indicated that the

  8. Plant hydraulic controls over ecosystem responses to climate-enhanced disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Reed, D. E.; Pendall, E.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Climate-enhanced disturbances such as drought and insect infestation range in severity, contributing minor to severe stress to forests including forest mortality. While neither form of disturbance has been unambiguously implicated as a mechanism of mortality, both induce changes in water, carbon, and nutrient cycling that are key to understanding forest ecosystem response to, and recovery from, disturbance. Each disturbance type has different biophysical, ecohydrological, and biogeochemical signatures that potentially complicate interpretation and development of theory. Plant hydraulic function is arguably a unifying control over these responses to disturbance because it regulates stomatal conductance, leaf biochemistry, carbon (C) uptake and utilization, and nutrient cycling. We demonstrated this idea by focusing on water and C, including non-structural (NSC), resources, and nitrogen (N) uptake across a spectrum of forest ecosystems (e.g., northern temperate mixed forests, lodgepole pine forests in the Rocky Mountains, and pinon pine - juniper woodlands in New Mexico) using the Terrestrial Regional Ecosystem Exchange Simulator (TREES). TREES is grounded in the biophysics of water movement through soil and plants, respectively via hydraulic conductivity of the soil and cavitation of xylem. It combines this dynamic plant hydraulic conductance with canopy biochemical controls over photosynthesis, and the dynamics of structural and non-structural carbon through a carbon budget that responds to plant hydraulic status. As such, the model can be used to develop testable hypotheses on a multitude of disturbance and recovery responses including xylem dysfunction, stomatal and non-stomatal controls on photosynthesis and carbon allocation, respiration, and allocation to defense compounds. For each of the ecosystems we constrained and evaluated the model with allometry, sap flux and/or eddy covariance data, leaf gas exchange measurements, and vulnerability to cavitation data

  9. Emergence, development, and maturity of the gonad of two species of chitons "sea cockroach" (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) through the early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Abadia-Chanona, Quetzalli Yasú

    2013-01-01

    This study describes and recognises, using histological and microscopical examinations on a morphometrical basis, several gonad traits through the early life stages of Chiton articulatus and C. albolineatus. Gonadal ontogenesis, gonad development stages, sexual differentiation, onset of the first sexual maturity, and growth sequences or "early life stages" were determined. In addition, allometry between lengths and body weight pooled for both sexes per each chiton were calculated using equation Y = aX(b) . A total of 125 chitons (4≤TL≤40 mm, in total length "TL") were used. All allometric relations showed a strong positive correlation (r), close to 1, with b-values above three, indicating an isometric growth. Gonadal ontogenesis and gonad development stages were categorised into three periods ("Pw" without gonad, "Pe" gonad emergence, and "Pf" gonadal sac formed) and four stages ("S0" gametocytogenesis, "S1" gametogenesis, "S2" mature, and "S3" spawning), respectively. Compound digital images were attained for each process. Periods and stages are overlapped among them and between species, with the following overall confidence intervals in TL: Pw 6.13-14.32 mm, Pe 10.32-16.93 mm, Pf 12.99-25.01 mm, S0 16.08-24.34 mm (females) and 19.51-26.60 mm (males), S1 27.15-35.63 mm (females) and 23.45-32.27 mm (males), S2 24.48-40.24 mm (females) and 25.45-32.87 mm (males). Sexual differentiation (in S0) of both chitons occurs first as a female then as a male; although, males reach the onset of the first sexual maturity earlier than females, thus for C. articulatus males at 17 mm and females at 32 mm, and for C. albolineatus males at 23.5 mm and females at 28 mm, all in TL. Four early life stages (i.e., subjuvenile, juvenile, subadult, and adult) are described and proposed to distinguish growth sequences. Our results may be useful to diverse disciplines, from developmental biology to fisheries management. PMID:23936353

  10. Emergence, Development, and Maturity of the Gonad of Two Species of Chitons “Sea Cockroach” (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) through the Early Life Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Abadia-Chanona, Quetzalli Yasú

    2013-01-01

    This study describes and recognises, using histological and microscopical examinations on a morphometrical basis, several gonad traits through the early life stages of Chiton articulatus and C. albolineatus. Gonadal ontogenesis, gonad development stages, sexual differentiation, onset of the first sexual maturity, and growth sequences or “early life stages” were determined. In addition, allometry between lengths and body weight pooled for both sexes per each chiton were calculated using equation Y = aXb. A total of 125 chitons (4≤TL≤40 mm, in total length “TL”) were used. All allometric relations showed a strong positive correlation (r), close to 1, with b-values above three, indicating an isometric growth. Gonadal ontogenesis and gonad development stages were categorised into three periods (“Pw” without gonad, “Pe” gonad emergence, and “Pf” gonadal sac formed) and four stages (“S0” gametocytogenesis, “S1” gametogenesis, “S2” mature, and “S3” spawning), respectively. Compound digital images were attained for each process. Periods and stages are overlapped among them and between species, with the following overall confidence intervals in TL: Pw 6.13–14.32 mm, Pe 10.32–16.93 mm, Pf 12.99–25.01 mm, S0 16.08–24.34 mm (females) and 19.51–26.60 mm (males), S1 27.15–35.63 mm (females) and 23.45–32.27 mm (males), S2 24.48–40.24 mm (females) and 25.45–32.87 mm (males). Sexual differentiation (in S0) of both chitons occurs first as a female then as a male; although, males reach the onset of the first sexual maturity earlier than females, thus for C. articulatus males at 17 mm and females at 32 mm, and for C. albolineatus males at 23.5 mm and females at 28 mm, all in TL. Four early life stages (i.e., subjuvenile, juvenile, subadult, and adult) are described and proposed to distinguish growth sequences. Our results may be useful to diverse disciplines, from developmental biology to fisheries management. PMID:23936353

  11. Emergence, development, and maturity of the gonad of two species of chitons "sea cockroach" (Mollusca: Polyplacophora through the early life stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hernando Avila-Poveda

    Full Text Available This study describes and recognises, using histological and microscopical examinations on a morphometrical basis, several gonad traits through the early life stages of Chiton articulatus and C. albolineatus. Gonadal ontogenesis, gonad development stages, sexual differentiation, onset of the first sexual maturity, and growth sequences or "early life stages" were determined. In addition, allometry between lengths and body weight pooled for both sexes per each chiton were calculated using equation Y = aX(b . A total of 125 chitons (4≤TL≤40 mm, in total length "TL" were used. All allometric relations showed a strong positive correlation (r, close to 1, with b-values above three, indicating an isometric growth. Gonadal ontogenesis and gonad development stages were categorised into three periods ("Pw" without gonad, "Pe" gonad emergence, and "Pf" gonadal sac formed and four stages ("S0" gametocytogenesis, "S1" gametogenesis, "S2" mature, and "S3" spawning, respectively. Compound digital images were attained for each process. Periods and stages are overlapped among them and between species, with the following overall confidence intervals in TL: Pw 6.13-14.32 mm, Pe 10.32-16.93 mm, Pf 12.99-25.01 mm, S0 16.08-24.34 mm (females and 19.51-26.60 mm (males, S1 27.15-35.63 mm (females and 23.45-32.27 mm (males, S2 24.48-40.24 mm (females and 25.45-32.87 mm (males. Sexual differentiation (in S0 of both chitons occurs first as a female then as a male; although, males reach the onset of the first sexual maturity earlier than females, thus for C. articulatus males at 17 mm and females at 32 mm, and for C. albolineatus males at 23.5 mm and females at 28 mm, all in TL. Four early life stages (i.e., subjuvenile, juvenile, subadult, and adult are described and proposed to distinguish growth sequences. Our results may be useful to diverse disciplines, from developmental biology to fisheries management.

  12. Masticatory form and function in the African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea B

    2002-02-01

    This study examines variability in masticatory morphology as a function of dietary preference among the African apes. The African apes differ in the degree to which they consume leaves and other fibrous vegetation. Gorilla gorilla beringei, the eastern mountain gorilla, consumes the most restricted diet comprised of mechanically resistant foods such as leaves, pith, bark, and bamboo. Gorilla gorilla gorilla, the western lowland gorilla subspecies, consumes leaves and other terrestrial herbaceous vegetation (THV) but also consumes a fair amount of ripe, fleshy fruit. In contrast to gorillas, chimpanzees are frugivores and rely on vegetation primarily as fallback foods. However, there has been a long-standing debate regarding whether Pan paniscus, the pygmy chimpanzee (or bonobo), consumes greater quantities of THV as compared to Pan troglodytes, the common chimpanzee. Because consumption of resistant foods involves more daily chewing cycles and may require larger average bite force, the mechanical demands placed on the masticatory system are expected to be greater in folivores as compared to primates that consume large quantities of fleshy fruit. Therefore, more folivorous taxa are predicted to exhibit features that improve load-resistance capabilities and increase force production. To test this hypothesis, jaw and skull dimensions were compared in ontogenetic series of G. g. beringei, G. g. gorilla, P. t. troglodytes, and P. paniscus. Controlling for the influence of allometry, results show that compared to both chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas exhibit some features of the jaw complex that are suggestive of improved masticatory efficiency. For example, compared to all other taxa, G. g. beringei has a significantly wider mandibular corpus and symphysis, larger area for the masseter muscle, higher mandibular ramus, and higher mandibular condyle relative to the occlusal plane of the mandible. However, the significantly wider mandibular symphysis may be an

  13. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03

    net primary production (NPP) budgets. Autotrophic respiration budgets will be constructed using chamber measurements for each tissue and NPP and standard allometry techniques (Gower et al. 1999). (4) Compare microbial and root dynamics, and net soil surface CO2 flux, of control and warmed soils to identify causes that may explain the hypothesized minimal effect of soil warming on soil surface CO2 flux. Fine root production and turnover will be quantified using minirhizotrons, and microbial dynamics will be determined using laboratory mineralization incubations. Soil surface CO2 flux will be measured using automated soil surface CO2 flux systems and portable CO2 analyzers. The proposed study builds on the existing research programs Gower has in northern Manitoba and would not be possible without in-kind services and financial support from Manitoba Hydro and University of Wisconsin.

  14. Making the most of what we have: application of extrapolation approaches in wildlife transfer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, Nicholas A.; Barnett, Catherine L.; Wells, Claire [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Center, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Wood, Michael D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Brown, Justin E.; Hosseini, Ali [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway); Yankovich, Tamara L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, 1400, Vienna (Austria); Bradshaw, Clare [Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Willey, Neil [Centre for Research in Biosciences, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Radiological environmental protection models need to predict the transfer of many radionuclides to a large number of organisms. There has been considerable development of transfer (predominantly concentration ratio) databases over the last decade. However, in reality it is unlikely we will ever have empirical data for all the species-radionuclide combinations which may need to be included in assessments. To provide default values for a number of existing models/frameworks various extrapolation approaches have been suggested (e.g. using data for a similar organism or element). This paper presents recent developments in two such extrapolation approaches, namely phylogeny and allometry. An evaluation of how extrapolation approaches have performed and the potential application of Bayesian statistics to make best use of available data will also be given. Using a Residual Maximum Likelihood (REML) mixed-model regression we initially analysed a dataset comprising 597 entries for 53 freshwater fish species from 67 sites to investigate if phylogenetic variation in transfer could be identified. The REML analysis generated an estimated mean value for each species on a common scale after taking account of the effect of the inter-site variation. Using an independent dataset, we tested the hypothesis that the REML model outputs could be used to predict radionuclide activity concentrations in other species from the results of a species which had been sampled at a specific site. The outputs of the REML analysis accurately predicted {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in different species of fish from 27 lakes. Although initially investigated as an extrapolation approach the output of this work is a potential alternative to the highly site dependent concentration ratio model. We are currently applying this approach to a wider range of organism types and different ecosystems. An initial analysis of these results will be presented. The application of allometric, or mass

  15. An allometric approach to quantify the extinction vulnerability of birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbers, J P; Schipper, A M; Hendriks, A J; Verones, F; Pereira, H M; Huijbregts, M A J

    2016-03-01

    Methods to quantify the vulnerability of species to extinction are typically limited by the availability of species-specific input data pertaining to life-history characteristics and population dynamics. This lack of data hampers global biodiversity assessments and conservation planning. Here, we developed a new framework that systematically quantifies extinction risk based on allometric relationships between various wildlife demographic parameters and body size. These allometric relationships have a solid theoretical and ecological foundation. Extinction risk indicators included are (1) the probability of extinction, (2) the mean time to extinction, and (3) the critical patch size. We applied our framework to assess the global extinction vulnerability of terrestrial carnivorous and non-carnivorous birds and mammals. Irrespective of the indicator used, large-bodied species were found to be more vulnerable to extinction than their smaller counterparts. The patterns with body size were confirmed for all species groups by a comparison with IUCN data on the proportion of extant threatened species: the models correctly predicted a multimodal distribution with body size for carnivorous birds and a monotonic distribution for mammals and non-carnivorous birds. Carnivorous mammals were found to have higher extinction risks than non-carnivores, while birds were more prone to extinction than mammals. These results are explained by the allometric relationships, predicting the vulnerable species groups to have lower intrinsic population growth rates, smaller population sizes, lower carrying capacities, or larger dispersal distances, which, in turn, increase the importance of losses due to environmental stochastic effects and dispersal activities. Our study is the first to integrate population viability analysis and allometry into a novel, process-based framework that is able to quantify extinction risk of a large number of species without requiring data-intensive, species

  16. Relações de tamanho e peso das grandes medusas (Cnidaria do litoral do Paraná, Sul do Brasil Size-weight relationship among macromedusae (Cnidaria of Paraná coast Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodeli Nogueira Jr

    2006-12-01

    Xb was used, in which Y = wet weight, X = umbrellar diameter (except for T. haplonema, in which umbrellar height was used, a and b are fitted parameters for each population. The majority of species showed negative allometry, since b was usually less than 3, and varied between 2.415 and 3.028.

  17. Reproductive biology of Plagioscion magdalenae (Teleostei: Sciaenidae (Steindachner, 1878 in the bay of Marajo, Amazon Estuary, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara Barbosa Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagioscion magdalenae (pacora is a commercially important benthopelagic sciaenid and widely distributed in the Amazon River basin. The present study describes the reproductive biology of this species in the bay of Marajo, Amazon Estuary, Brazil. The gonadal development stage, age and size at first sexual maturity (L50, sex ratio, and reproductive strategy were determined. The data were collected bi-monthly from December 2005 to October 2006. A total of 251 specimens were examined, with the total length (TL ranging between 220 and 590 mm. The weight-length relationship for females, males and grouped sexes was highly significant, showing a positive allometry. The L50 was of 279 mm for grouped sexes, with 305 mm and 269 mm TL for females and males respectively. The sex ratio for the total number of individuals favored the males (2.02 males: 1 female. Macroscopically, the gonads were classified as immature, maturing, mature and spent. Considering the macro and microscopic evaluation of the gonads, an extended spawning period, mainly in August to February, was observed.Plagioscion magdalenae (pescada-curuca é um sciaenídeo bentopelágico, de importância comercial, amplamente distribuído na bacia do rio Amazonas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi descrever a biologia reprodutiva dessa espécie na baía do Marajó, estuário Amazônico, Brasil. Neste estudo foi determinado o estádio do desenvolvimento gonadal, tamanho de primeira maturação gonadal (L50, proporção entre sexos, época e o tipo de desova. A coleta foi realizada bimestralmente no período de dezembro de 2005 a outubro de 2006. Foi examinado um total de 251 exemplares, variando entre 220 e 590 mm de comprimento total (CT. A relação peso-comprimento para fêmeas, machos e sexos agrupados foi altamente significativa, com alometria positiva. O L50 foi de 279 mm considerando sexos agrupados, 305 e 269 mm CT para fêmeas e machos respectivamente. A proporção entre sexos para o total de

  18. Crescimento alométrico, morfologia e uso do habitat em cinco espécies de Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae Allometric growth, morphology and habitat use in five species of Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Silva Pinto

    2004-06-01

    allometry, while remaining segments were variable. Some hypothesis relating body form and habitat in these species have been raised, which need to be tested.

  19. Crescimento relativo e composição do ganho de tecidos na carcaça de bubalinos Mediterrâneo jovens abatidos com diferentes pesos Relative growth and gain composition of carcass tissues from young Mediterranean buffaloes slaughtered at different weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Aline Bregion dos Santos

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Utilizaram-se 32 bubalinos machos não-castrados, da raça Mediterrâneo, divididos aleatoriamente em cinco categorias. Os animais de uma categoria foram abatidos imediatamente, enquanto os demais foram alimentados, à vontade, com ração contendo 70% de concentrado (na matéria seca e abatidos ao atingirem 450, 480, 510 ou 540 kg de peso corporal. Adotou-se a equação de regressão do logaritmo da quantidade corporal de carcaça e de seus tecidos (muscular, adiposo e ósseo em função do logaritmo do peso de corpo vazio. A carcaça apresentou valor de alometria, o que indica desenvolvimento proporcionalmente igual ao do peso corporal vazio. Derivando as equações, obtiveram-se as equações de predição da participação dos componentes corporais no ganho de 1 kg de peso de corpo vazio. Na carcaça, o tecido adiposo teve maior impulso de crescimento em idade mais tardia, enquanto os tecidos ósseo e muscular tiveram maior impulso para crescimento em idade mais precoce.Thirty-two non castrated Mediterranean male buffaloes were used, being divided into five groups (categories. One group was randomly assigned to immediate slaughter, four groups were fully fed with ration containing 70% of concentrate, dry matter basis until reaching the slaughter weights of 450, 480, 510 and 540 kg. Regression equations of log content of carcass and their tissues (muscle, adipose tissue and bone were adopted as a function of log empty-body-weight. Carcass presented positive allometry value close to 1, reflecting development proportionally equal to the empty-body-weight. Deriving the equations above, the prediction equations of body components in the body gain of 1 kg of the empty-body-weight were obtained. In the carcass, the adipose tissue presented late growth while bone and muscular tissues developed in an earlier age.

  20. Relação peso-comprimento de Orthopristis ruber (Cuvier (Teleostei, Haemulidae na Baia de Sepetiba, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Length-weight relationship of Orthopristis ruber (Cuvier (Teleostei, Haemulidae in the Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. B. dos Santos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A relação peso-comprimento de Orthopristis ruber (Cuvier, 1830 na Baia de Sepetiba (22º54'-23º04'S; 43º34'-44º10'W, Rio de Janeiro foi determinada. Este trabalho objetiva contribuir com o conhecimento sobre a morfometria desta espécie na baía e fornecer bases para comparações com outros ambientes. Os peixes foram coletados em programas de amostragens de arrasto de praia (juvenis e arrasto de fundo (adultos entre outubro de 1998 e setembro de 1999. A equação encontrada foi W = 0,000006 L3,1368 para machos e W = 0,000006 L3,14º3 para fêmeas. Alometria positiva foi encontrada para machos e fêmeas e a proporção sexual foi de 1:1. Os altos valores para o coeficiente alométrico indicam alto investimento no crescimento, que pode ser devido ao pequeno tamanho relativo dos espécimes da população analisada, ou ser um mecanismo para suportar as condições de estresse nesta área.The lenght-weight relationship of Orthopristis rubber (Cuvier, 1830 in the Sepetiba Bay (22º54'-23º04'S; 43º34'-44º10'W, Rio de Janeiro was determined. It aims to contribute to morphometrics knowledge of this species in a semi-closed coastal area and to supply basis for comparisons with others environment. Fishes were collected by beach seine (juveniles and otter trawl (adults from October 1998 to September 1999. The equation found was W = 0,000006 L3,1368 for males and W = 0,000006 L3,14º3 for females. Positive allometry was found for both sexes and sex rate was 1:1. The comparatively high values for allometric coefficient indicate high investment in growth, which can be due to relatively small size of the examined fish populations, or a mechanism to overcome stress conditions in the area.

  1. Life-history and ecological correlates of geographic variation in egg and clutch mass among passerine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.E.; Bassar, R.D.; Bassar, S.K.; Fontaine, J.J.; Lloyd, P.; Mathewson, H.A.; Niklison, Alina M.; Chalfoun, A.

    2006-01-01

    Broad geographic patterns in egg and clutch mass are poorly described, and potential causes of variation remain largely unexamined. We describe interspecific variation in avian egg and clutch mass within and among diverse geographic regions and explore hypotheses related to allometry, clutch size, nest predation, adult mortality, and parental care as correlates and possible explanations of variation. We studied 74 species of Passeriformes at four latitudes on three continents: the north temperate United States, tropical Venezuela, subtropical Argentina, and south temperate South Africa. Egg and clutch mass increased with adult body mass in all locations, but differed among locations for the same body mass, demonstrating that egg and clutch mass have evolved to some extent independent of body mass among regions. A major portion of egg mass variation was explained by an inverse relationship with clutch size within and among regions, as predicted by life-history theory. However, clutch size did not explain all geographic differences in egg mass; eggs were smallest in South Africa despite small clutch sizes. These small eggs might be explained by high nest predation rates in South Africa; life-history theory predicts reduced reproductive effort under high risk of offspring mortality. This prediction was supported for clutch mass, which was inversely related to nest predation but not for egg mass. Nevertheless, clutch mass variation was not fully explained by nest predation, possibly reflecting interacting effects of adult mortality. Tests of the possible effects of nest predation on egg mass were compromised by limited power and by counterposing direct and indirect effects. Finally, components of parental investment, defined as effort per offspring, might be expected to positively coevolve. Indeed, egg mass, but not clutch mass, was greater in species that shared incubation by males and females compared with species in which only females incubate eggs. However, egg and

  2. Body mass and body weight: a dual reference system in biology Masa y peso corporales: un sistema dual de referencia en biología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO GÜNTHER

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of the present study was to compare two different biological similarity criteria, one was based on body mass (M as a theoretical reference system in accordance with the MLT-system of physics, while the other utilized the body weight (W for the same purpose. The mass-dependent allometry should be applied during space flights as well as during fetal and newborn conditions of life, whereas the weight-dependence should prevail in earth-bound physiology. The above mentioned distinctions are relevant not only for the specific metabolic rates but also for numerous biological time functions, as for instance for the heart and respiratory rates of all mammals, whose allometric exponent is b = - 0.09 during fetal life, and b = - 0.25 in all adult specimens.El objetivo del presente trabajo fue la comparación de dos diferentes criterios de similitud, uno basado en la masa corporal (M como sistema teórico de referencia de acuerdo con el sistema MLT de la Física, en tanto que el otro utilizó el peso corporal (W con este mismo propósito. La alometría dependiente de la masa debería aplicarse durante los vuelos espaciales así como durante la vida fetal y la condición de recién nacido, en tanto que la dependencia del peso debe prevalecer en la fisiología terrestre. La distinción antes mencionada es relevante, no sólo para el metabolismo específico y también para numerosas funciones biológicas en relación con funciones de tiempo, como ser con las frecuencias cardiaca y respiratoria de todos los mamíferos cuyo exponente alométrico es b = - 0,09 durante la vida fetal, y b = - 0,25 en todos los especimenes adultos.

  3. How much Carbon is Stored in Deserts? AN Approach for the Chilean Atacama Desert Using LANDSAT-8 Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, H. J.; Acuña, T.; Reyes, P.; Torres, M.; Figueroa, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is known as the driest place on Earth, with an average rainfall of about 15 mm per year. Despite these conditions, it contains a rich variety of flora with hundreds of species characterised by their extraordinary ability to adapt to this extreme environment. These biotic components have a direct link to important ecosystem services, especially those related to carbon storage and sequestration. No quantitative assessment is currently available for these services and the role of the desert in this matter remains unclear. We propose an approach to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) using Landsat-8 data, which we tested in the Taparacá region, located in the northern section of the desert. To calibrate and validate the models, we used field data from 86 plots and several spectral indexes (NDVI, EVI and SAVI) obtained from the provisional Landsat-8 Surface-reflectance products. We applied randomised branch sampling and allometry principles (non-destructive methods) to collect biomass samples for all plant biological types: wetlands, steppes, shrubs and trees. All samples were dried in an oven until they reached constant weight and the final values were used to extrapolate dry matter content (AGB) to each plot in terms of kg m-2. We used all available scenes from September 2014 to August 2015 to calculate the maximum, minimum and average value for each index in each pixel within this period. For modeling, we used the method based on classification and regression trees called random forest (RF), available in the statistical software R-Project. The explained variance obtained by the RF algorithm was around 80-85%, and it improved when a wetland vector layer was used as the predictive factor in the model to reach the range 85-90%. The mean error was 1.45 kg m-2 of dry matter. The best model was obtained using the maximum and mean values of SAVI and EVI indexes. We were able to estimate total biomass storage of around 8 million tons

  4. [Effects of selective cutting on the carbon density and net primary productivity of a mixed broadleaved-Korean pine forest in Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Hui-Ying; Jin, Guang-Ze

    2013-10-01

    To accurately quantify forest carbon density and net primary productivity (NPP) is of great significance in estimating the role of forest ecosystems in global carbon cycle. By using the forest inventory and allometry approaches, this paper measured the carbon density and NPP of the virgin broadleaved-Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) forest and of the broadleaved-Korean pine forest after 34 years selective-cutting (the cutting intensity was 30%, and the cutting trees were in large diameter class). The total carbon density of the virgin and selective-cutting broadleaved-Korean pine forests was (397.95 +/- 93.82) and (355.61 +/- 59.37) t C x hm(-2), respectively. In the virgin forest, the carbon density of the vegetation, debris, and soil accounted for 31.0%, 3.1%, and 65.9% of the total carbon pool, respectively; in the selective-cutting forest, the corresponding values were 31.7%, 2.9%, and 65.4%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the total carbon density and the carbon density of each component between the two forests. The total NPP of the virgin and selective-cutting forests was (36.27 +/- 0.36) and (6.35 +/- 0.70) t C x hm(-2) x a(-1), among which, the NPP of overstory, understory, and fine roots in virgin forest and selective-cutting forest accounted for 60.3%, 2.0%, and 37.7%, and 66.1%, 2.0%, and 31.2%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the total NPP and the contribution rate of each component between the two forests. However, the ratios of the needle and broadleaf NPPs of the virgin and selective-cutting forests were 47.24:52.76 and 20.48:79.52, respectively, with a significant difference. The results indicated that the carbon density and NPP of the broadleaved-Korean pine forest after 34 years selective-cutting recovered to the levels of the virgin broadleaved-Korean pine forest. PMID:24483061

  5. Developmental dynamics of Ambystoma tigrinum in a changing landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMenamin Sarah K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of pond habitat is catastrophic to aquatic larval amphibians, but even reduction in the amount of time a breeding site holds water (hydroperiod can influence amphibian development and limit reproductive success. Using the landscape variation of a glacial valley in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as the context for a natural experiment, we examined variation in growth pattern and life history of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum melanostictum and determined how these developmental characteristics varied with hydroperiod over several summers. Results In ponds that dried early in the season, maximum larval size was reduced relative to the sizes achieved in permanent ponds. Ephemeral ponds were associated with early metamorphosis at small body sizes, while permanent ponds facilitated longer larval periods and later metamorphosis. Paedomorphosis resulted from indefinite metamorphic postponement, and was identified only in the most permanent environments. Patterns of growth and allometry were similar between ponds with different hydroperiods, but considerable life history variation was derived from modulating the timing of and size at metamorphosis. Considering maximum rates of growth and inferring the minimum size at metamorphosis across 25 ponds over the course of three years, we calculated that hydroperiods longer than three months are necessary to support these populations through metamorphosis and/or reproductive maturity. Conclusions Landscape heterogeneity fosters life history variation in this natural population. Modulation of the complex ambystomatid life cycle allows this species to survive in unpredictable environments, but current trends towards rapid pond drying will promote metamorphosis at smaller sizes and could eliminate the paedomorphic phenotype from this region. Metamorphosis at small size is has been linked to altered fitness traits, including reduced survival and fecundity. Thus, widespread

  6. Shape covariation between the craniofacial complex and first molars in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronis, Georgios; Halazonetis, Demetrios J

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of mutual genetic loci in morphogenesis of the face and teeth implies shape covariation between these structures. However, teeth finalize their shape at an early age, whereas the face grows and is subjected to environmental influences for a prolonged period; it is therefore conceivable that covariation might modulate with age. Here we investigate the extent of this covariation in humans by measuring the 3D shape of the occlusal surface of the permanent first molars and the shape of the craniofacial complex from lateral radiographs, at two maturations stages. A sample of Greek subjects was divided into two groups (110 adult, 110 prepubertal) with equally distributed gender. The occlusal surfaces of the right first molars were 3D scanned from dental casts; 265 and 274 landmarks (including surface and curve semilandmarks) were digitized on the maxillary and mandibular molars, respectively. The corresponding lateral cephalometric radiographs were digitized with 71 landmarks. Geometric morphometric methods were used to assess shape variation and covariation. The vertical dimension of the craniofacial complex was the main parameter of shape variation, followed by anteroposterior deviations. The male craniofacial complex was larger (4.0–5.7%) and was characterized by a prominent chin and clockwise rotation of the cranial base (adult group only). Allometry was weak and statistically significant only when examined for the sample as a whole (percent variance explained: 2.1%, P = 0.0002). Covariation was statistically significant only between the lower first molar and the craniofacial complex (RV = 14.05%, P = 0.0099, and RV = 12.31%, P = 0.0162, for the prepubertal and adult groups, respectively). Subtle age-related covariation differences were noted, indicating that environmental factors may influence the pattern and strength of covariation. However, the main pattern was similar in both groups: a class III skeletal pattern (relative maxillary retrusion and

  7. Quantifying Post-Fire Forest Biomass Recovery in Northeastern Siberia using Hierarchical Multi-Sensor Satellite Imagery and Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, L.; Beck, P. S.; Loranty, M. M.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Goetz, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Russian forests are the largest vegetation carbon pool outside of the tropics, with larch dominating northeastern Siberia where extreme temperatures, permafrost and wildfire currently limit persistence of other tree species. These ecosystems have experienced rapid climate warming over the past century and model simulations suggest that they will undergo profound changes by the end of the century if warming continues. Understanding the responses of these unique deciduous-conifer ecosystems to current and future climate is important given the potential changes in disturbance regimes and other climate feedbacks. The climate implications of changes in fire severity and return interval, as predicted under a warmer and drier climate, are not well understood given the trade-off between storage of C in forest biomass and post-fire surface albedo. We examined forest biomass recovery across a burn chronosequence near Cherskii, Sakha Republic, in far northeastern Siberia. We used high-quality Landsat imagery to date and map fires that occurred between 1972 and 2009, then complemented this data set using tree ring measurements to map older fires. A three stage approach was taken to map current biomass distribution. First, tree shadows were mapped from 50 cm panchromatic WorldView 1 imagery covering a portion of the region. Secondly, the tree shadow map was aggregated to 30 m resolution and used to train a regression-tree model that ingested mosaiced Landsat data. The model output correlated with allometry-based field estimates of biomass, allowing us to transform the model output to a map of regional aboveground biomass using a regression model. When combined with the fire history data, the new biomass map revealed a chronosequence of forest regrowth and carbon sequestration in aboveground biomass after fire. We discuss the potential for future carbon emissions from fires in northeastern Siberia, as well as carbon sequestration during recovery based on the observed biomass

  8. Vertical Forest Sructure Estimation for Global Biomass Mapping by Means of Multi-Baseline Pol-Insar Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, K.; Kugler, F.; Lee, S.; Torano Caicoya, A.; Hajnsek, I.

    2010-12-01

    A central parameter of the terrestrial carbon budget is forest biomass which represents a proxy for the stored carbon. Despite its crucial role in the terrestrial carbon budget, forest biomass is poorly quantified across most parts of the planet due to the great difficulties in measuring biomass on the ground and consistently aggregating measurements across scales. Accurate and reliable estimation of forest biomass is today one of the “hot topics” within the radar remote sensing community. In this paper, we discuss the potential and limitations for estimating forest biomass through vertical forest structure parameters obtained from interferometric syntheric aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing techniques. A first approach was introduced in [5] where biomass estimation based on the allometric relationship between forest biomass and forest (top canopy) height was proposed. This method provides reliable results for forest systems without strong density variations. However, changes in forest density and structure - caused for example by tree species diversity, management system or disturbances - introduce deviations from the “standard” forest height to biomass relationship and limit the performance of biomass estimation from height data. An important extension has been recently proposed where the height to biomass allometry has been extended by means of the vertical biomass distribution function. This compensates widely the structural heterogeneity within and across forest systems and opens the door for accurate and reliable biomass estimation by means of remote sensing techniques. The estimation of forest vertical structure by means of SAR, especially when addressed in terms of a space-borne mission implementation, is a challenge. Conventional SAR tomography has demonstrated the potential to “image” vertical structure by means of multiple acquisitions. However, when only a limited number of acquisitions is available alternative approaches have to be used in

  9. Alligators and Crocodiles Have High Paracellular Absorption of Nutrients, But Differ in Digestive Morphology and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Christopher R; McWhorter, Todd J; Gienger, C M; Starck, J Matthias; Medley, Peter; Manolis, S Charlie; Webb, Grahame J W; Christian, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    Much of what is known about crocodilian nutrition and growth has come from animals propagated in captivity, but captive animals from the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae respond differently to similar diets. Since there are few comparative studies of crocodilian digestive physiology to help explain these differences, we investigated young Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus in terms of (1) gross and microscopic morphology of the intestine, (2) activity of the membrane-bound digestive enzymes aminopeptidase-N, maltase, and sucrase, and (3) nutrient absorption by carrier-mediated and paracellular pathways. We also measured gut morphology of animals over a larger range of body sizes. The two species showed different allometry of length and mass of the gut, with A. mississippiensis having a steeper increase in intestinal mass with body size, and C. porosus having a steeper increase in intestinal length with body size. Both species showed similar patterns of magnification of the intestinal surface area, with decreasing magnification from the proximal to distal ends of the intestine. Although A. mississippiensis had significantly greater surface-area magnification overall, a compensating significant difference in gut length between species meant that total surface area of the intestine was not significantly different from that of C. porosus. The species differed in enzyme activities, with A. mississippiensis having significantly greater ability to digest carbohydrates relative to protein than did C. porosus. These differences in enzyme activity may help explain the differences in performance between the crocodilian families when on artificial diets. Both A. mississippiensis and C. porosus showed high absorption of 3-O methyl d-glucose (absorbed via both carrier-mediated and paracellular transport), as expected. Both species also showed surprisingly high levels of l-glucose-uptake (absorbed paracellularly), with fractional absorptions as high as those

  10. Extensive Sampling of Forest Carbon using High Density Power Line Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, H. M.; Chen, Q.; Dye, D. G.; Hungate, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    unmanaged areas, using high point density lidar collected over transmission line corridors. The lidar metric of quadratic mean height guided our selection of field plots spanning the full range from low to high levels of aboveground biomass across the study region. Before model selection, we minimized two of the major sources of errors in lidar calibration: variance in tree allometry across landscapes and plot edge effects (spatial mismatch between field measurements and lidar points). We tested an assortment of model selection techniques and goodness of fit measures for deriving forest structural metrics of interest. For example, we obtained an R-squared value for aboveground biomass (Mg/ha) of 0.9 using stepwise regression. The forest metrics obtained are being used in the next stage of the project to parameterize biogeochemical models linking terrestrial carbon pools and atmospheric greenhouse gas exchanges.

  11. Nutrient Budgets in Successional Northern Hardwood Forests: Uncertainty in soil, root, and tree concentrations and pools (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, R. D.; Bae, K.; Levine, C. R.; Lilly, P.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.; Fatemi, F. R.; Blum, J. D.; Arthur, M.; Hamburg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem nutrient budgets are difficult to construct and even more difficult to replicate. As a result, uncertainty in the estimates of pools and fluxes are rarely reported, and opportunities to assess confidence through replicated measurements are rare. In this study, we report nutrient concentrations and contents of soil and biomass pools in northern hardwood stands in replicate plots within replicate stands in 3 age classes (14-19 yr, 26-29 yr, and > 100 yr) at the Bartlett Experimental Forest, USA. Soils were described by quantitative soil pits in three plots per stand, excavated by depth increment to the C horizon and analyzed by a sequential extraction procedure. Variation in soil mass among pits within stands averaged 28% (coefficient of variation); variation among stands within an age class ranged from 9-25%. Variation in nutrient concentrations were higher still (averaging 38%, within element, depth increment, and extraction type), perhaps because the depth increments contained varying proportions of genetic horizons. To estimate nutrient contents of aboveground biomass, we propagated model uncertainty through allometric equations, and found errors ranging from 3-7%, depending on the stand. The variation in biomass among plots within stands (6-19%) was always larger than the allometric uncertainties. Variability in measured nutrient concentrations of tree tissues were more variable than the uncertainty in biomass. Foliage had the lowest variability (averaging 16% for Ca, Mg, K, N and P within age class and species), and wood had the highest (averaging 30%), when reported in proportion to the mean, because concentrations in wood are low. For Ca content of aboveground biomass, sampling variation was the greatest source of uncertainty. Coefficients of variation among plots within a stand averaged 16%; stands within an age class ranged from 5-25% CV, including uncertainties in tree allometry and tissue chemistry. Uncertainty analysis can help direct research

  12. Predicting biomass of hyperdiverse and structurally complex central Amazonian forests - a virtual approach using extensive field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnabosco Marra, Daniel; Higuchi, Niro; Trumbore, Susan E.; Ribeiro, Gabriel H. P. M.; dos Santos, Joaquim; Carneiro, Vilany M. C.; Lima, Adriano J. N.; Chambers, Jeffrey Q.; Negrón-Juárez, Robinson I.; Holzwarth, Frederic; Reu, Björn; Wirth, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Old-growth forests are subject to substantial changes in structure and species composition due to the intensification of human activities, gradual climate change and extreme weather events. Trees store ca. 90 % of the total aboveground biomass (AGB) in tropical forests and precise tree biomass estimation models are crucial for management and conservation. In the central Amazon, predicting AGB at large spatial scales is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity of successional stages, high tree species diversity and inherent variations in tree allometry and architecture. We parameterized generic AGB estimation models applicable across species and a wide range of structural and compositional variation related to species sorting into height layers as well as frequent natural disturbances. We used 727 trees (diameter at breast height ≥ 5 cm) from 101 genera and at least 135 species harvested in a contiguous forest near Manaus, Brazil. Sampling from this data set we assembled six scenarios designed to span existing gradients in floristic composition and size distribution in order to select models that best predict AGB at the landscape level across successional gradients. We found that good individual tree model fits do not necessarily translate into reliable predictions of AGB at the landscape level. When predicting AGB (dry mass) over scenarios using our different models and an available pantropical model, we observed systematic biases ranging from -31 % (pantropical) to +39 %, with root-mean-square error (RMSE) values of up to 130 Mg ha-1 (pantropical). Our first and second best models had both low mean biases (0.8 and 3.9 %, respectively) and RMSE (9.4 and 18.6 Mg ha-1) when applied over scenarios. Predicting biomass correctly at the landscape level in hyperdiverse and structurally complex tropical forests, especially allowing good performance at the margins of data availability for model construction/calibration, requires the inclusion of predictors that express

  13. Heterochronic processes in human evolution: an ontogenetic analysis of the hominid pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, C

    1998-04-01

    Changes in pelvic shape in human ontogeny and hominid phylogeny suggest that the heterochronic processes involved differ greatly from the neotenic process traditionally described in the evolution of the skull. The morphology of 150 juvenile and adult pelves of African apes, 60 juvenile and adult pelves of modern humans, two adult pelves and a juvenile hip bone of australopithecines (Sts 14, AL 288, MLD 7) was studied. Multivariate results, ontogenetic allometries, and growth curves confirm that the pelvic growth pattern in humans differs markedly from those of the African apes. The results permit the following conclusions. First, the appearance of a new feature (acetabulo-cristal buttress and cristal tubercle) at the time of human birth allows the addition of traits, such as the attainment of a proportionally narrower pelvis, with more sagittally positioned iliac blades. Pelvic proportions and orientation change progressively in early childhood as bipedalism is practiced. Other changes in pelvic proportions occur later with the adolescent growth spurt. Second, comparison of juvenile and adult australopithecines to modern humans indicates that 1) some pelvic traits of adult Australopithecus resemble those of neonate Homo; 2) the pelvic growth of Australopithecus was probably closer to that of apes, than to that of humans; and 3) prolonged growth in length of hindlimb and pelvis after sexual maturity seems to be a unique feature of Homo. The position of the acetabulo-cristal buttress and of the cristal tubercle on the ilium are similar in adult Australopithecus and neonate Homo suggesting that this feature may have been displaced later during hominid evolution. Progressive displacement of the acetabulo-cristal buttress on the ilium occurs both during hominid evolution (from Australopithecus to Homo sapiens) and human growth (from neonate to adult). This suggests peramorphic evolution of the pelvic morphology of hominids combining three processes of recapitulation

  14. The Jena Diversity-Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (JeDi-DGVM: a diverse approach to representing terrestrial biogeography and biogeochemistry based on plant functional trade-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pavlick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs typically abstract the immense diversity of vegetation forms and functioning into a relatively small set of predefined semi-empirical Plant Functional Types (PFTs. There is growing evidence, however, from the field ecology community as well as from modelling studies that current PFT schemes may not adequately represent the observed variations in plant functional traits and their effect on ecosystem functioning. In this paper, we introduce the Jena Diversity DGVM (JeDi-DGVM as a new approach to global vegetation modelling with a richer representation of functional diversity than traditional modelling approaches based on a small number of fixed PFTs.

    JeDi-DGVM simulates the performance of a large number of randomly-generated plant growth strategies (PGSs, each defined by a set of 15 trait parameters which characterize various aspects of plant functioning including carbon allocation, ecophysiology and phenology. Each trait parameter is involved in one or more functional trade-offs. These trade-offs ultimately determine whether a PGS is able to survive under the climatic conditions in a given model grid cell and its performance relative to the other PGSs. The biogeochemical fluxes and land-surface properties of the individual PGSs are aggregated to the grid cell scale using a mass-based weighting scheme.

    Simulated global biogeochemical and biogeographical patterns are evaluated against a variety of field and satellite-based observations following a protocol established by the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project. The land surface fluxes and vegetation structural properties are reasonably well simulated by JeDi-DGVM, and compare favorably with other state-of-the-art terrestrial biosphere models. This is despite the parameters describing the ecophysiological functioning and allometry of JeDi-DGVM plants evolving as a function of vegetation survival in a given climate, as opposed to

  15. The relationship between body mass and field metabolic rate among individual birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lawrence N; Isaac, Nick J B; Reuman, Daniel C

    2013-09-01

    are consistent with the heat dissipation theory of Speakman & Król (2010) and provided some support for the metabolic levels boundary hypothesis of Glazier (2010). 5. Our analysis provides the first comprehensive empirical analysis of the scaling relationship between field metabolic rate and body mass in individual birds and mammals. Our data set is a valuable contribution to those interested in theories of the allometry of metabolic rates. PMID:23701213

  16. 草兔胚后发育过程中头骨大小与形状变化的几何形态学分析(兔形目:兔科)%Geometric morphometric of postnatal size and shape changes in the cranium of cape hare (Lagomorpha, Leporidea, Lepus capensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛德燕; 吕雪霏; 夏霖; 黄乘明; 杨奇森

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the geometric morphometrics analysis of the crana of 58 Lepus capensis of various ages using 180 landmarks/semi-landmarks.These exhibited rapid establishment of structure and allometric growth in different morphological components.Primary size and shape changes occurred from infant to age Ⅰ (within six months).Nasal size displayed the most prominent positive allometry.Frontal and orbital grew nearly isometrically with the overall size change of the cranium.The parietal,tympanic bulla and foramen magnum displayed negative allometry.Growth trajectories were illustrated for the dorsal,ventral and lateral view of the cranium.Allometric shape changes were observed in the nasal,premaxilla and supraorbital process,as well as in the longitudinal axis of the cranium.The overall shape of the cranium was narrowed.These ontogenetic size and shape changes are beneficial in establishing a complete cranial system in young hares,particularly,in improving ventilation of the respiratory system,enhancing the ability to maintain vigilance,and in stabilization over a diverse range of locomotion activities as well as strengthening the ability for solid food acquisition.This pattern of allometric growth probably is one of the main functional adaptations in herbivorous mammals that have a cursorial lifestyle.%在本文中,我们使用几何形态学的研究方法对58个处于不同年龄阶段的草兔头骨进行了分析.分析中总共使用来自头骨背面、腹面和侧面的180个标点和半标点.研究结果表明,草兔在胚后发育早期即迅速建立起与成年个体近似的形态结构,组成头骨的不同形态单元存在显著的异速生长现象,主要的形变发生在幼年至年龄1阶段,即出生后的6个月以内.从大小的变化来看,鼻骨在胚后发育过程中呈现正的异速生长,额骨和眼眶区则与头骨整体大小变化基本等速,而顶骨、听泡和枕骨大孔则呈现显著的负异速生长.我们亦用几何形

  17. 臭腹腺蝗(直翅目:锥头蝗科)胃盲囊的异速生长和功能特性%Allometric growth and performance of the gastric caeca of Zonocerus variegatus (L.) (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bassey E. AKPAN; Tony G. OKORIE

    2003-01-01

    通过对臭腹腺蝗Zonocerus variegatus(直翅目:锥头蝗科)6个若虫期及成虫期主消化道和胃盲囊分段进行解剖和测量,对其胃盲囊的异速生长和功能特性进行了研究.结果表明,胃盲囊和主消化道的生长是不同速的.胃盲囊前段较后段生长速率更高,但两者生长速率显著相关.消化道和胃盲囊的平均长度亦显著相关.随年龄增长,消化道的生长速率降低,而胃盲囊的生长速率上升.与胃盲囊前段功能相同,胃盲囊后段亦具有消化和吸收功能,被认为能在营养缺乏的旱季起到增加肠胃吸收面的功能.%The allometry, growth and activities of the gastric caeca of Zonocerus variegatus ( L. ) were determined to find outthe functions of its posterior caeca which are unknown. This was done by dissecting out the gut and measuring the main gut re-gions and the gastric caeca in the six nymphal stages and adult. The gut consists of three main regions; the crop, ventriculus,with gastric caeca attached at anterior rim, and the hindgut. Each set of caeca consists of a long anteriorly pointed arm and ashort posteriorly pointed arm. The growth of the caeca relative to the main gut was allometric. The anterior caeca had highergrowth ratios than the posterior caeca and both were highly correlated. The relationship between gut and caeca mean length washighly significant. The mean gut length and age were significantly correlated with growth rate exponent < 1 indicating a decreas-ing growth increment with age. The mean caeca length and age were highly correlated with growth exponent > 1 indicating an in-creasing growth with age. Females had higher mean lengths than males and this was highly significant ( P < 0.05). Males hadhigher growth ratios than females except at growth centres. The growth patterns of the caeca for wet and dry seasons were similarwith a single growth centre. But the mean length of the caeca was significantly different between wet and dry

  18. Ontogenetic study of the skull in modern humans and the common chimpanzees: neotenic hypothesis reconsidered with a tridimensional Procrustes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Xavier; Berge, Christine; Baylac, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Heterochronic studies compare ontogenetic trajectories of an organ in different species: here, the skulls of common chimpanzees and modern humans. A growth trajectory requires three parameters: size, shape, and ontogenetic age. One of the great advantages of the Procrustes method is the precise definition of size and shape for whole organs such as the skull. The estimated ontogenetic age (dental stages) is added to the plot to give a graphical representation to compare growth trajectories. We used the skulls of 41 Homo sapiens and 50 Pan troglodytes at various stages of growth. The Procrustes superimposition of all specimens was completed by statistical procedures (principal component analysis, multivariate regression, and discriminant function) to calculate separately size-related shape changes (allometry common to chimpanzees and humans), and interspecific shape differences (discriminant function). The results confirm the neotenic theory of the human skull (sensu Gould [1977] Ontogeny and Phylogeny, Cambridge: Harvard University Press; Alberch et al. [1979] Paleobiology 5:296-317), but modify it slightly. Human growth is clearly retarded in terms of both the magnitude of changes (size-shape covariation) and shape alone (size-shape dissociation) with respect to the chimpanzees. At the end of growth, the adult skull in humans reaches an allometric shape (size-related shape) which is equivalent to that of juvenile chimpanzees with no permanent teeth, and a size which is equivalent to that of adult chimpanzees. Our results show that human neoteny involves not only shape retardation (paedomorphosis), but also changes in relative growth velocity. Before the eruption of the first molar, human growth is accelerated, and then strongly decelerated, relative to the growth of the chimpanzee as a reference. This entails a complex process, which explains why these species reach the same overall (i.e., brain + face) size in adult stage. The neotenic traits seem to concern

  19. Literacy in Action: A Carbon-Neutral Field Program at Cornell University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A.; Derry, L.

    2010-12-01

    added value by gathering data for and modeling the resulting carbon sequestration. The data include species composition and allometry, outplanting numbers, survivorship, and annual growth increment. Modeling elements include allometric equations, growth trajectories, mortality, and an economic discount rate. Although the project is young, initial estimates indicate that the CO2 offset from outplanting several hundred trees per year significantly exceeds (>3X) the CO2 footprint of the program, including all air travel. The project allows students to gain first hand experience with quantifying multiple aspects of CO2 generation and offsets, and with the rate and scale of transfer and sequestration processes - with which are important and which are not - resulting in valuable and sometimes surprising insights. We view this project as a win-win scenario for all participants.

  20. Size at sexual maturity of female crabs Sesarma rectum Randall (Crustacea, Brachyura and ontogenetic variations in the abdomen relative growth Tamanho da maturidade sexual de fêmeas do caranguejo Sesarma rectum Randall (Crustacea, Brachyura e variações ontogenéticas no crescimento relativo do abdômen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria H. de A. Leme

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to ascertain the size at sexual maturity in females of the crab Sesarma rectum Randall, 1840 by comparing gonadal maturity to morphologic maturity (using abdomen-width data. The relative growth of the abdomen was analysed for all growth phases (for each 3-mm carapace width size class, and the slopes of the separate allometric relationships were compared through analysis of covariance (ANCOVA from log e-transformed data to detect changes in the level of allometry during ontogeny. The physiological size at maturity (gonadal criteria was determined through a logistic curve, indicating the size at which 50% of females presented mature gonads (M50 = 17.4 mm CW. The highest allometric levels occurred in growth phases 2 and 3 (body sizes ranging from 15 to 21 mm CW, indicating faster growth of the abdomen during those phases. Phases 1 (O objetivo do presente estudo foi determinar o tamanho da maturidade sexual em fêmeas do caranguejo Sesarma rectum através de comparações da maturidade gonadal com a maturidade morfológica (usando dados da largura do abdômen. O crescimento relativo do abdômen foi analisado para todas as fases de crescimento (para cada classe de tamanho de 3 mm de largura de carapaça e os coeficientes de regressão foram comparados para cada relação alométrica através de analises de covariância (ANCOVA após transformação logarítmica dos dados, afim de detectar mudanças nos níveis da alometria ao longo da ontogenia. O tamanho da maturidade sexual fisiológica (critério gonadal foi determinado através de uma curva logística, indicando o tamanho no qual 50% das fêmeas apresentaram gônadas maduras (M50 = 17.4 mm LC. Os maiores níveis alométricos ocorreram nas fases de crescimento 2 e 3 (tamanho de corpo variando de 15 a 21 mm LC, indicando acentuado crescimento do abdômen durante estas fases. Crescimento isométrico ocorreu nas fases 1 (< 15 mm LC e fases 4 e 5 (classes de tamanho

  1. Comparative analysis of the relative growth of Uca rapax (Smith (Crustacea, Ocypodidae from two mangroves in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela da Silva Castiglioni

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the relative growth of two populations of Uca rapax (Smith, 1870 was performed primarily to determine the size at onset sexual maturity. The species was sampled monthly in Itamambuca (23º24'43"S and 45º00'73"W and Ubatumirim (23º20'17.8"S and 44º53'2.2"W mangroves. Carapace width (CW and length (CL, abdomen width (AW, major cheliped propodus length (PL and height (PH for each sex, and gonopod length (GL for males were measured with a calliper (0.01 mm. Allometric analyses were used to estimate size at maturity. The relationships that most precisely indicated the size at onset of sexual maturity were AW vs. CW, for females and PL vs. CW, for males. Males and females are mature, respectively at 15.2 and 12.1 mm CW in samples from Itamambuca and 13.5 and 11.2 mm CW in samples from Ubatumirim mangrove. Positive allometric growth of females abdominal width is likely related to the incubation process, while positively allometry growth of male's cheliped almost certainly relates to reproductive behaviour.O estudo do crescimento relativo foi utilizado para determinar quais dimensões evidenciam melhor a maturidade sexual morfológica de Uca rapax (Smith, 1870. Os caranguejos foram coletados mensalmente nos manguezais de Itamambuca (23º24'43"S e 45º00'73"W e Ubatumirim (23º20'17,8"S e 44º53'2,2"W, em período de maré baixa. Os caranguejos de ambos os sexos foram mensurados com um paquímetro (0,01 mm quanto à largura da carapaça (LC, comprimento da carapaça (CC e largura do abdome (LA. Nos machos mensurou-se ainda o comprimento e altura do própodo do quelípodo maior (CPQ e APQ e comprimento do gonopódio (CG e, no caso das fêmeas, comprimento e altura do própodo do quelípodo direito (CPQ e APQ. As análises alométricas foram utilizadas para estimar o tamanho da maturidade sexual morfológica. As relações que melhor evidenciaram o tamanho da maturidade foram LA vs. LC para fêmeas e CPQ vs. LC para machos. Machos e f

  2. G-LiHT: Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal Airborne Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce; Corp, Lawrence; Nelson, Ross; Morton, Douglas; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Masek, Jeffrey; Middleton, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center have developed an ultra-portable, low-cost, multi-sensor remote sensing system for studying the form and function of terrestrial ecosystems. G-LiHT integrates two LIDARs, a 905 nanometer single beam profiler and 1550 nm scanner, with a narrowband (1.5 nanometers) VNIR imaging spectrometer and a broadband (8-14 micrometers) thermal imager. The small footprint (approximately 12 centimeters) LIDAR data and approximately 1 meter ground resolution imagery are advantageous for high resolution applications such as the delineation of canopy crowns, characterization of canopy gaps, and the identification of sparse, low-stature vegetation, which is difficult to detect from space-based instruments and large-footprint LiDAR. The hyperspectral and thermal imagery can be used to characterize species composition, variations in biophysical variables (e.g., photosynthetic pigments), surface temperature, and responses to environmental stressors (e.g., heat, moisture loss). Additionally, the combination of LIDAR optical, and thermal data from G-LiHT is being used to assess forest health by sensing differences in foliage density, photosynthetic pigments, and transpiration. Low operating costs (approximately $1 ha) have allowed us to evaluate seasonal differences in LiDAR, passive optical and thermal data, which provides insight into year-round observations from space. Canopy characteristics and tree allometry (e.g., crown height:width, canopy:ground reflectance) derived from G-LiHT data are being used to generate realistic scenes for radiative transfer models, which in turn are being used to improve instrument design and ensure continuity between LiDAR instruments. G-LiHT has been installed and tested in aircraft with fuselage viewports and in a custom wing-mounted pod that allows G-LiHT to be flown on any Cessna 206, a common aircraft in use throughout the world. G-LiHT is currently being used for forest biomass and growth estimation

  3. Effect of different stocking density on growth performance of develop-ing fry of Salmo trutta%不同养殖密度对褐鳟(Salmo trutta)稚鱼生长性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王炳谦; 王芳; 谷伟; 户国; 白庆利

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study presented was to determine the effects of different stocking density on the growth and survival of Salmo trutta fry at two months age. Experimental fish were reared at five different stocking densities, 400, 600, 800, 1 000 and 1 200 individuals per tank. Over the experimental period of 49 days, the weight of Salmo trutta fry went up from 0.14g to 1g, the results showed that stocking density had insignificant effects on the survival rate and condition factor. The final body, daily weight gain, specific growth rate and weight growth efficiency of fry were decreased with the increase of stocking densities, among those, daily weight gain decreased significantly from (0.018±0.001) g to (0.013 ± 0.001) g. The result showed that stocking density had negative effects on growth. However, net yield was increased with the increase of stocking densities, and there were significant differences between the low and high densities groups (P<0.05). The fry of Salmo trutta reared in different densities grew in allometry, but the stocking density had insignificant effect on the variation in growth.%以褐鳟(Salmo trutta)商业品系为研究对象,通过设置不同养殖密度梯度,对处于稚鱼期的褐鳟进行常规生长指标差异测定,综合分析养殖密度对其生长性能的影响。试验共设置5个养殖密度组,每个试验槽分别放养400、600、800、1000、1200尾,每组3个重复。经过49 d的养殖试验,褐鳟稚鱼体重从0.14 g长到1 g,结果表明,不同养殖密度条件下褐鳟稚鱼的生长指标明显不同,其中最终体重、日增重、特定生长率及增重率均随着养殖密度增大而呈现出明显下降趋势,其中日增重由(0.018±0.001)g下降为(0.013±0.001)g,降幅明显;净增重却随着养殖密度增大而上升,各养殖密度组之间差异性显著(P<0.05),这可能是由于高密度组种群个体基数较大。各密度组褐鳟稚鱼

  4. Bridging structure and function in semi-arid ecosystems by integrating remote sensing and ground based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofcheck, Dan J.

    ), and photoysnthesis, potentially presenting a significant source of error in existing light use efficiency models of carbon uptake. Our analysis also suggested that leveraging remeote sensing data which measures in the red-edge portion of reflected light can provide increased sensitivity to the low leaf area, ephemeral pulses of greenup that we identified post canopy mortality. Given these findings, we developed a hierarchy of simple linear models to test the ability of a moisture sensitive VI, and a red-edge leveraging VI, to predict carbon uptake. We determined that the red-edge VI and the moisture sensitive VI both constrained uncertainty associated with carbon uptake, but that the variability in satellite view angle from scene to scene can impose a significant amount of noise in sparse canopy ecosystems. Finally, given the extent and prevalence of j. monosperma across the region, and its complex growth morphology, we tested the ability of aerial lidar to quantify the biomass of juniperous ecosystems. In this simplified case study, we developed a methodology to relate the volume of canopy objects to the equivalent stem area at the root crown. By working in a single species ecosystem, we circumvented many challenges associated with driving allometries remotely, but also present a workflow that we intend adapted to more complex systems, namely pinon-juniper woodlands. Together, this work describes and addresses existing challenges with respect to remote sensing of semi-arid vegetation, and provides a body of research that can mitigate the difficulties associated with monitoring mortality / recovery dynamics, predicting canopy funciton, and determining ecosystem state parameters in these complex, sensitive biomes.

  5. Space-borne polarimetric SAR sensors or the golden age of radar polarimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pottier E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available SAR Polarimetry represents an active area of research in Active Earth Remote Sensing. This interest is clearly supported by the fact that nowadays there exists, or there will exist in a very next future, a non negligible quantity of launched Polarimetric SAR Spaceborne sensors. The ENVISAT satellite, developed by ESA, was launched on March 2002, and was the first Spaceborne sensor offering an innovative dualpolarization Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR system operating at C-band. The second Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor is ALOS, a Japanese Earth-Observation satellite, developed by JAXA and was launched in January 2006. This mission includes an active L-band polarimetric radar sensor (PALSAR whose highresolution data may be used for environmental and hazard monitoring. The third Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor is TerraSAR-X, a new German radar satellite, developed by DLR, EADS-Astrium and Infoterra GmbH, was launched on June 2007. This sensor carries a dual-polarimetric and high frequency X-Band SAR sensor that can be operated in different modes and offers features that were not available from space before. At least, the Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor, developed by CSA and MDA, and named RADARSAT-2 was launched in December 2007 The Radarsat program was born out the need for effective monitoring of Canada’s icy waters, and some Radarsat-2 capabilities that benefit sea- and river ice applications are the multi-polarization options that will improve ice-edge detection, ice-type discrimination and structure information. The many advances in these different Polarimetric Spaceborne platforms were developed to respond to specific needs for radar data in environmental monitoring applications around the world, like : sea- and river-ice monitoring, marine surveillance, disaster management, oil spill detection, snow monitoring, hydrology, mapping, geology, agriculture, soil characterisation, forestry applications (biomass, allometry, height

  6. COMPARISON OF THREE METHODS TO PROJECT FUTURE BASELINE CARBON EMISSIONS IN TEMPERATE RAINFOREST, CURINANCO, CHILE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Antonio Lara; Jorge Gayoso; Eduardo Neira; Patricio Romero; Leonardo Sotomayor

    2005-07-14

    Deforestation of temperate rainforests in Chile has decreased the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation can restore those ecosystem services. Greenhouse gas policies that offer financing for the carbon emissions avoided by preventing deforestation require a projection of future baseline carbon emissions for an area if no forest conservation occurs. For a proposed 570 km{sup 2} conservation area in temperate rainforest around the rural community of Curinanco, Chile, we compared three methods to project future baseline carbon emissions: extrapolation from Landsat observations, Geomod, and Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis (FRCA). Analyses of forest inventory and Landsat remote sensing data show 1986-1999 net deforestation of 1900 ha in the analysis area, proceeding at a rate of 0.0003 y{sup -1}. The gross rate of loss of closed natural forest was 0.042 y{sup -1}. In the period 1986-1999, closed natural forest decreased from 20,000 ha to 11,000 ha, with timber companies clearing natural forest to establish plantations of non-native species. Analyses of previous field measurements of species-specific forest biomass, tree allometry, and the carbon content of vegetation show that the dominant native forest type, broadleaf evergreen (bosque siempreverde), contains 370 {+-} 170 t ha{sup -1} carbon, compared to the carbon density of non-native Pinus radiata plantations of 240 {+-} 60 t ha{sup -1}. The 1986-1999 conversion of closed broadleaf evergreen forest to open broadleaf evergreen forest, Pinus radiata plantations, shrublands, grasslands, urban areas, and bare ground decreased the carbon density from 370 {+-} 170 t ha{sup -1} carbon to an average of 100 t ha{sup -1} (maximum 160 t ha{sup -1}, minimum 50 t ha{sup -1}). Consequently, the conversion released 1.1 million t carbon. These analyses of forest inventory and Landsat remote sensing data provided the data to

  7. Estimation of Above-Ground Tree Biomass Based on Probability Distribution of Allometric Parameters%基于异速参数概率分布的立木地上生物量估算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄兴召; 陈东升; 孙晓梅; 张守攻

    2014-01-01

    Allometric biomass equations are widely used to predict above-ground biomass in forest ecosystems. It found the distribution of the parameters a and b of the allometry between above-ground biomass ( M ) and diameter at breast height( D) ,lnM = a + blnD,well approximated by a bivariate normal from analysis a data of 304 functions of 80 papers. ANOVA was tested to parameters in seven genera. In contrast to the parameter a,there was significant difference in parameter b. There were negative correlation between the parameter a and b,the parameter b and latitude. From this negative correlation,simultaneous-equation was used to build general model for parameters which were changed by latitude . Three methods which include established general model,minimum-least-square regression and Bayesian approach were used to fitting the above-ground biomass of Larix kaempferi in sub-tropical alpine area. The result showed that general model was the lowest precise quantifications ( R2 =0. 892 ) ,but it could estimate the biomass where forest situated in latitude without samples. With sample size was more than 50,both Bayesian method and minimum-least-square regression was no significant difference in the mean absolute error. And it was less than 50,Bayesian method was better than minimum-least-square regression. Therefore,it was suggested that Bayesian method was used to estimate above-ground biomass when the sample size was less than 50 .%对收集的80篇文献中304个地上部分生物量( M)和胸径( D)的异速生物量模型 lnM =a+blnD数据集研究发现:模型参数a和b符合二元正态分布;参数a和b之间、参数b和纬度间呈负相关,并依此相关关系应用联立方程组建立参数a和b随纬度变化的通用模型。以实测的北亚热带高山区日本落叶松地上部分生物量数据对新建的通用模型、最小二乘法和贝叶斯方法拟合生物量的适用性进行研究,结果表明:虽然通用模型的拟合精度最低( R

  8. 14C and tritium dynamics in wild mammals: a metabolic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The protection of biota from ionising radiations needs reliable predictions of radionuclide dynamics in wild animals. Specific data for many wild animal - radionuclide combinations is lacking and a number of approaches including allometry have been proposed to address this situation. However, for 14C and 3H, which are integral components of animal tissues and their diets, a different approach is needed. Here we propose a metabolism based model which can be parameterized predominantly on the basis of published metabolic data. We begin with a metabolic definition of the 14C and OBT loss rate, assumed to be the same, for the whole body and specific organs. The mammalian body is conceptually partitioned into compartments (body water, viscera, adipose, muscle, blood and remainder) and a simple model is defined using net maintenance and growth needs of mammals. The model is tested with data from studies using rats and sheep. It provides a reliable prediction for whole body and muscle activity concentrations without the requirement for any calibration specific to 3H and 14C. Predictions from the model for representative wild mammals) are presented. Potential developments of a metabolic model for birds and the application of our work to human food chain modelling are also discussed. The key point in our model is the assessment of loss rate from compartments to the blood plasma organic pool. Based on a published review of cellular energy utilisation and molecular origin of standard metabolic rate in mammals we advanced the working hypothesis that the energy turnover rate can be used as a surrogate for organic carbon/tritium transfer rates from organs in our model. We consider a mammal with daily energy expenditure (DEE) required as the net energy to sustain basal metabolism, thermo-regulation and activity. To demonstrate the model application we selected mammals representative of reference organism suggested for use within some of the proposed environmental

  9. Carbon sequestration by young Norway spruce monoculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, R.; Rajsnerova, P.; Kubásek, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many studies have been focused on allometry, wood-mass inventory, carbon (C) sequestration, and biomass expansion factors as the first step for the evaluation of C sinks of different plant ecosystems. To identify and quantify these terrestrial C sinks, and evaluate CO2 human-induced emissions on the other hand, information for C balance accounting (for impletion of commitment to Kyoto protocol) are currently highly needed. Temperate forest ecosystems have recently been identified as important C sink. Carbon sink might be associated with environmental changes (elevated [CO2], air temperature, N deposition etc.) and large areas of managed fast-growing young forests. Norway spruce (Pice abies L. Karst) is the dominant tree species (35%) in Central European forests. It covers 55 % of the total forested area in the Czech Republic, mostly at high altitudes. In this contribution we present C sequestration by young (30-35 year-old) Norway spruce monocultures in highland (650-700 m a.s.l., AT- mean annual temperature: 6.9 ° C; P- annual amount of precipitation: 700 mm; GL- growing season duration: 150 days) and mountain (850-900 m a.s.l.; AT of 5.5 ° C; P of 1300 mm; and GL of 120 days) areas and an effect of a different type of thinning. However, the similar stem diameter at the breast height and biomass proportions among above-ground tree organs were obtained in the both localities; the trees highly differ in their height, above-ground organ's biomass values and total above ground biomass, particularly in stem. On the total mean tree biomass needle, branch and stem biomass participated by 22 %, 24 % and 54 % in highland, and by 19 %, 23 % and 58 % in mountain area, respectively. Silvicultural management affects mainly structure, density, and tree species composition of the stand. Therefore, dendrometric parameters of a tree resulted from genotype, growth conditions and from management history as well. Low type of thinning (LT; common in highland) stimulates rather tree

  10. Climate-dependent evolution of Antarctic ectotherms: An integrative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörtner, Hans O.

    2006-04-01

    , and the use of lipid body stores for neutral buoyancy. Important trade-offs result from obligatory energy savings in the permanent cold: low metabolic rates support cold-compensated growth but imply narrow windows of thermal tolerance and reduced scopes for activity. The degree of thermal specialization is not uniformly defined by cold temperature but varies with life style characteristics and activity levels and associated aerobic scope. Trade-offs for the sake of cold compensated growth parallel reduced capacities for exercise performance, exacerbated by the effect of high haemolymph magnesium levels in crustaceans and, possibly, other invertebrates. High magnesium levels likely exclude the group of reptant decapod crustaceans from Antarctic waters below 0 °C. The hypothesis is developed that energy savings imposed by the permanent cold bear specific life history consequences. Due to effects of allometry, energy savings are exacerbated at small body size, favouring passive lecithotrophic larvae. At all stages of life history, reduced energy turnover for the sake of growth causes delays and low rates in other higher functions, with the result of late maturity, fecundity and offspring release, as well as extended development. As a consequence, extended life spans evolved due to life history requirements. At the same time, polar gigantism is enabled by a combination of elevated oxygen levels in cold waters, of reduced metabolism and of extended periods of growth at slow developmental rates.

  11. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15

    indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  12. Consistent allometric scaling of stomatal sizes and densities across taxonomic ranks and geologic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H. J.; Price, C. A.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Dekker, S. C.; Veneklaas, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Stomatal pores on plants leaves are an important link in the chain of processes that determine biosphere fluxes of water and carbon. Stomatal density (i.e. the number of stomata per area) and the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture are particularly relevant traits in this context because they determine the theoretical maximum diffusive stomatal conductance (gsmax) and thereby set an upper limit for leaf gas exchange. Observations on (sub)fossil leaves revealed that changes in stomatal densities are anti-correlated with changes in stomatal sizes at developmental and evolutionary timescales. Moreover, this anti-correlation appears consistently within single species, across multiple species in the extant plant community and at evolutionary time scales. The consistency of the relation between stomatal densities and sizes suggests that common mechanisms constrain the adaptation of these traits across the plant community. In an attempt to identify such potential generic constraints, we investigated the allometry between stomatal densities and sizes in the extant plant community and across geological time. As the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture is typically derived from the length of the stomatal pore, we considered the allometric scaling of pore length (lp) with stomatal density (Ds) as the power law: lp = k . Dsa in which k is a normalization constant and the exponent a is the slope of the scaling relation. Our null-hypothesis predicts that stomatal density and pore length scale along a constant slope of -1/2 based on a scale-invariant relation between pore length and the distance between neighboring pores. Our alternative hypothesis predicts a constant slope of -1 based on the idea that stomatal density and pore length scale along an invariant gsmax. To explore these scaling hypotheses in the extant plant community we compiled a dataset of combined observations of stomatal density and pore length on 111 species from published literature and new

  13. Evaluation of Water Use Efficiency of Short Rotation Poplar Coppice at Bohemian-Moravian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaváčová, Marcela; Fischer, Milan; Mani Tripathi, Abhishek; Orság, Matěj; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    comparison of both approaches. Since application of the two mentioned scripts led to two sets of resulting values, calculations of Fd and consequent sap flow values were computed for both variants of ΔTmaxvalues. The sample trees were divided into 3 diameter classes according to DBH values at the beginning of regular measurements (April 24, 2013). Allometry was carried out on February 20, 2014 to calculation of aboveground woody biomass. The input data for calculations of WUE of aboveground woody biomass productivity was biomass increments and monthly totals of sap flow for 16 sample trees. The total WUE for 16 measured trees reached 4.93 g kg-1 (when calculated with data set without VPD condition) and 4.63 g kg-1 (when calculated with data set under VPD condition). This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought" No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248 and LD130030 supporting COST Action ES1106.

  14. 异速生长法计算秋茄红树林生物量%An assessment method of Kandelia obovata population biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金川; 王金旺; 郑坚; 陈秋夏; 李俊清; 卢翔

    2012-01-01

    conducted to assess the population biomass of K. obovata in Aojiang Estuary. Mathematical methods that use easily measured variables to predict difficult-to-measure variables are important to mangrove managers. As a result, standard plant methods and allometric equations have been developed for several decades to estimate mangrove biomass. Single-stemed mangrove production was usually estimated by allometry between biomass and stem diameter at breast height. Because mangroves are usually dwarf forests in higher latitude sites, and moreover, the crown bases and multi-stems of dominant individuals may begin within a few decimeters of ground level, estimates of community production that depend on allometry based on single-stemed mangrove may not be accurate. Here, we develop allometric relations to predict total biomass and individual components of biomass (e. g. , leaves, stemts, roots and butts) of K. obovata, a multi-stemmed mangrove, in the Aojiang Estuary, Zhejiang province.This procedure treated each stem as a discrete tree that shared a proportion of the butt and other elements common to all stems. linear log-log relationships were obtained between biomass and stem diameter at one-tenth of the stem length nearly the ground. Population biomass of artificial K. obovata forest in Aojiang Estuary was calculated according to the function model. We compared the difference on population biomass of K. obovata in different regions of China. The results showed that K. obovata biomass ( W) correlated to the stem diameter (D) at a significance level (P < 0.001). The function model between plant biomass (leaf, WL; stem, WS; Root and butt, WB; and total, WT) and stem diameter (D) was as follows-WL=0. 187D1.855 =0.612, P< 0.0001); WS=0.267D1.906(R2 =0.821, P<0.0001); WB=4.6D1.136(R2=0.644, P < 0.0001) ; WT = 3. 614D1.446 (R2 = 0. 801, P < 0. 0001). The regression relationship between K. obovata aboveground biomass and stand age and latitude was significant in different regions of

  15. Ontogenetic variation in light interception, self-shading and biomass distribution of seedlings of the conifer Araucaria araucana (Molina K. Koch Variación ontogenética en la intercepción lumínica, autosombramiento y distribución de biomasa en plántulas de la conífera Araucaria araucana (Molina K. Koch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPHER H LUSK

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors thought to contribute to ontogenetic declines in plant growth rates is diminishing light interception efficiency, as a result of the difficulties of avoiding self-shading among a growing number of leaves, and by stems. The effects of plant size on self-shading and light interception have rarely been quantified, however. We used a three-dimensional digitising system to construct virtual models of the architecture of Araucaria araucana seedlings 71 to 358 mm tall, and modelled their light interception in the forest understorey using the program YPLANT. We also analyzed seedling allometry, to determine the combined effects of biomass distribution and self-shading on total light interception. Average light interception efficiencies calculated for A. araucana (29 % were the lowest reported for rainforest tree seedlings, reflecting the limitations imposed by short leaves, lack of petioles and an inability to develop planar foliage geometry on branches. Total light interception was related to seedling leaf area by an exponent of 0.735, reflecting increasing self-shading as seedlings grew bigger. However, because leaf area was related to seedling mass by an exponent of 1.24, light interception scaled nearly isometrically (0.91 power with seedling mass. This resulted from taller plants having proportionally thinner stems, and a smaller fraction of their biomass in roots. Thus, an ontogenetic increase in self-shading in A. araucana is largely offset by allocation changes which increase leaf area ratio as seedlings grow bigger. These mechanisms conserving the relationship of light interception with plant mass seem likely to be restricted to species with long-lived leaves, growing in humid situations protected from wind stress. In open habitats, where wind and drought stress likely make such allocation patterns less feasible, the role of self-shading in ontogenetic declines in relative growth rate may be more evidentLa caída en la

  16. Allometric relationships of the arboreal community in different areas of a mixed ombrophylous forest in south Brazil Relações alométricas da comunidade arbórea de diferentes áreas de uma floresta ombrófila mista do sul do Brasil

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    Yves Rafael Bovolenta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of allometry is important for understanding ecological and evolutionary aspects of plant species, and also in understanding the structure and dynamics of forests. This study aimed to assess the tree community allometric relationships of two areas in different successional stage (more advanced – area 1, and less advanced – area 2 of a Mixed Ombrophylous Forest located in the Klabin’s Ecological Park, Telêmaco Borba/Paraná state (24º17´S 50º35´W. The edge arboreal community was also included in the analysis. A 4 m width transect was established in each area, where 150 arboreal individuals with height equal to or greater than 1,5 m were sampled. Individuals had the diameter at breast height (DBH, total height and branching height recorded. The allometric relationships studied were total height x DBH, total height x branching height and branching height x DBH. Analysis of covariance was used to test allometric differences, and a posteriori Scheffé test. Plants of areas 1 and 2 invested more in diameter growth in relation to height, and also invested more in diameter growth in relation to branching height. Colonization of the edge and area 2 by pioneer species and the presence of understory species in area 1 may be the main causes of differences in the community tree architecture of the studied areas. O estudo da alometria é importante para a compreensão de aspectos ecológicos e evolutivos em espécies de plantas, além de auxiliar no entendimento da estrutura e dinâmica das florestas. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar as relações alométricas da comunidade arbórea de duas áreas em diferentes estádios sucessionais (mais avançado - área 1, e menos avançado - área 2 da Floresta Ombrófila Mista do Parque Ecológico da Klabin, Telêmaco Borba/PR/Brasil (24º17´S 50º35´W. A comunidade arbórea da borda do fragmento em estádio sucessional mais avançado também foi incluída nas análises. Foi estabelecida uma

  17. Alometria no crescimento de Uca mordax (Smith (Crustacea, Decapoda, Ocypodidae na Baía de Guaratuba, Paraná, Brasil Allometric growth in the fiddler crab Uca mordax (Smith (Crustacea, Decapoda, Ocypodidae from Guaratuba Bay, Parana, Brazil

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    Setuko Masunari

    2005-12-01

    undifferentiated crabs were measured. Carapace width (LC was the reference dimension for both sexes, which ranged from 1.94 to 20.0 mm for males, from 2.50 to 18.85 mm for females, and from 1.94 to 3.15 mm for sexually undifferentiated crabs. Relationship between LC and CMQ showed a transition point at 11.70 mm LC in males, and between LC and LAB, at 8.77 mm LC in females. Males (mean LC = 14.24 mm showed a slightly greater size than females (mean LC = 13,97 mm. These dimensions had positive allometrical growth during all life for both sexes: before and after the puberal molting. Regressions between LC and CMQ in males read as: logCMQ = -0,542265 + 1,51.logLC for male juveniles and logCMQ = -1,446281 + 2,37.logLC for male adults. In females, the regressions between LC and LAB were: logLAB = -0,607282 + 1,22.logLC for juveniles and logLAB = -0,912074 + 1,60.logLC for adults. These body dimensions are related to reproductive activities of this species. The level of allometry in CMQ of adult males was the highest among Uca species which relative growth of this dimension is known. The handedness had a proportion of 1:1 between right-handed and left-handed males.

  18. Amphibian fertilization and development in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Kenneth A.

    1993-01-01

    correlation between the SEP and the dorsal lip of the blastopore will be determined. Under normal terrestrial conditions it was shown that the SEP typically is located on the side of the egg opposite the future dorsal side of the embryo. The neurulae will be examined for the normality and completeness of the neural plate and archenteron expansion. The tadpole stages will be used to study the allometry and morphology of the various organ systems.

  19. Associação de cetamina S(+ e midazolam pelo método convencional de cálculo e pela extrapolação alométrica em bugios-ruivo (Alouatta guariba clamitans: resposta clínica e cardiorrespiratória S(+ ketamine and midazolam association by the conventional method of calculation and allometric extrapolation in red howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans: clinical and cardiopulmonary response

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    Joana Aurora Braun Chagas

    2010-02-01

    calculation (weight dose and allometric extrapolation. Twelve healthy red howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans, average weight 4.84±0.97kg, male and female, were used for this study. After a 12-hour period of food restriction and 6 hours of water restriction, the animals were physically restraint and the following parameters were measured: heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, capillary refill time (CRT, rectal temperature (RT, non invasive systolic arterial pressure (NISAP and arterial blood gases analysis. The animals were distributed into two groups: CG (Conventional Group, n=6, in which the animals received S(+ ketamine (5mg kg-1 and midazolam (0.5mg kg-1, by intramuscular (IM injection; and AG (Allometry Group, n=6, in which the animals also received S(+ ketamine and midazolan IM, but the doses were calculated by allometric extrapolation. Parameters were evaluated at the following moments: M5, M10, M20 and M30 (5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes after IM injection, respectively. Muscle relaxation, pedal and caudal reflexes, interdigital pinch, recumbency time, sedation's quality and duration, and recovery time and its quality were also evaluated. The AG had a faster time for recumbency, higher period and quality of sedation, and a significantly reduction on HR and SAP from M5 to M30 when compared to CG. It was concluded that allometric extrapolation presented a better muscle relaxation and sedation without significant cardiorespiratory depression.

  20. GENETIC MODIFICATION OF GIBBERELLIC ACID SIGNALING TO PROMOTE CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN TREE ROOTS AND STEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    poplar GA 2-oxidases predominantly expressed in roots also decreased lateral root formation. GAs negatively affected lateral root formation by inhibiting lateral root primordium initiation. A whole-genome microarray analysis of root development in GA-modified transgenic plants revealed 2069 genes with significantly altered expression. The expression of 1178 genes, including genes that promote cell proliferation, growth, and cell wall loosening, corresponded to the phenotypic severity of the root traits when transgenic events with differential phenotypic expression were compared. The array data and direct hormone measurements suggested crosstalk of GA signaling with other hormone pathways, including auxin and abscisic acid. Transgenic modification of a differentially expressed gene encoding an auxin efflux carrier suggests that GA modulation of lateral root development is at least partly imparted by polar auxin transport modification. These results suggest a mechanism for GA-regulated modulation of lateral root proliferation associated with regulation of plant allometry during the stress response. Here we summarize progress in identification of three classes of genes useful for control of plant architecture: those affecting hormone metabolism and signaling; transcription and other regulatory factors; and the cell cycle. We focus on strong modifiers of stature and form that may be useful for directed modification of plant architecture, rather than the detailed mechanisms of gene action. Gibberellin (GA) metabolic and response genes are particularly attractive targets for manipulation because many act in a dose-dependent manner; similar phenotypic effects can be readily achieved in heterologous species; and induced pleiotropic effects--such as on nitrogen assimilation, photosynthesis, and lateral root production--are usually positive with respect to crop performance. Genes encoding transcription factors represent strong candidates for manipulation of plant architecture. For

  1. GENOME ENABLED MODIFICATION OF POPLAR ROOT DEVELOPMENT FOR INCREASED CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    designated as a bioenergy crop by the U.S. Department of Energy, as a result of research following the oil embargo. Populus species also serve as model trees for plant molecular biology research. In this article, we will review recent progress in the genetic improvement of Populus, considering both classical breeding and genetic engineering for bioenergy, as well as in using transgenics to elucidate gene functionality. A perspective for future improvement of Populus via functional genomics will also be presented. The role of gibberellins (GAs) in regulation of lateral root development is poorly understood. We show that GA-deficient (35S:PcGA2ox1) and GA-insensitive (35S:rgl1) transgenic Populus exhibited increased lateral root proliferation and elongation under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, and these effects were reversed by exogenous GA treatment. In addition, RNA interference suppression of two poplar GA 2-oxidases predominantly expressed in roots also decreased lateral root formation. GAs negatively affected lateral root formation by inhibiting lateral root primordium initiation. A whole-genome microarray analysis of root development in GA-modified transgenic plants revealed 2069 genes with significantly altered expression. The expression of 1178 genes, including genes that promote cell proliferation, growth, and cell wall loosening, corresponded to the phenotypic severity of the root traits when transgenic events with differential phenotypic expression were compared. The array data and direct hormone measurements suggested crosstalk of GA signaling with other hormone pathways, including auxin and abscisic acid. Transgenic modification of a differentially expressed gene encoding an auxin efflux carrier suggests that GA modulation of lateral root development is at least partly imparted by polar auxin transport modification. These results suggest a mechanism for GA-regulated modulation of lateral root proliferation associated with regulation of plant allometry during