WorldWideScience

Sample records for allied health providers

  1. Development and early experience from an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practices and allied health providers: the Team-link study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwar Nick

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the development and implementation of an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practice and outside allied and community health services and providers. Methods A review of organizational theory and a qualitative study of 9 practices was used to design an intervention which was applied in four Divisions of General Practice and 26 urban practices. Clinical record review and qualitative interviews with participants were used to determine the key lessons from its implementation. Results Facilitating teamwork across organizational boundaries was very challenging. The quality of the relationship between professionals was of key importance. This was enabled by joint education and direct communication between providers. Practice nurses were key links between general practices and allied and community health services. Conclusions Current arrangements for Team Care planning provide increased opportunities for access to allied health. However the current paper based system is insufficient to build relationships or effectively share roles as part of a patient care team. Facilitation is feasible but constrained by barriers to communication and trust.

  2. Allied health professionals with 2020 vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas W; Gallicchio, Vincent S

    2007-01-01

    Allied health professionals in all disciplines must be visionary as they address education, training, and health care delivery in the next decade. Examined herein are forces of change in education, training, health care, the recognition of essential leadership styles, and the paradigm shifts facing the allied health profession in the health care arena. Some visionary directions are offered for allied health professionals to consider as health policy and clinical agendas emerge toward the year 2020.

  3. Predictors of Success for Allied Health Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Steven C.

    1989-01-01

    A study of 424 allied health students (259 dental hygiene, 104 radiologic technology, and 61 respiratory therapy) found that the greater predictors of their academic success were the natural science subscore on the American College Test (ACT), high school grade point average, and class rank, age, and composite ACT score. (SK)

  4. Research experience and research interests of allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Delwyne; Taylor, Nicholas F; Taylor, Nicholas; Leggat, Sandra G

    2009-01-01

    Allied heath professionals are expected to utilize evidence-based practices in their workplaces, and there is an increasing expectation that clinicians will become involved in clinical research. With the aim of establishing the level of interest and experience in clinical research among allied health professionals in Australia, 132 allied health professional in Australia were surveyed to determine their level of interest and their level of experience in clinical research. The Research Spider survey tool was used to examine clinicians' level of research experience and level of research interest across ten core areas. These areas included writing a research proposal, using quantitative methods, publishing research, writing and presenting a research report, analysing and interpreting results, using qualitative research methods, critically reviewing literature, finding relevant literature, generating research ideas and applying for research funding. Overall, allied health professionals rated themselves as having "little research experience." While clinicians' level of interest in research was significantly greater than their level of research experience, clinicians as a whole only had "some interest" in research. Fifteen percent of the sample were very interested in research. The results of this study have implications for the implementation of education and support programs aimed at providing clinical research opportunities for allied health professionals.

  5. [Citizens: allies of the health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venne, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Many international declarations recognize citizen participation as an important driver of success for health policy; however, in most countries the implementation of this principle has been delayed. Yet well-known phenomena, like ageing and incurred costs, should motivate decision makers to rely more on citizens and make them allies of the system, giving them power and responsibility. Citizens can first exercise this responsibility within the areas of prevention and health promotion. This responsibility then expands to include mutual assistance between community members. It is called upon in the definition of new social norms. It is recognized by the participation of citizens in health care decision-making bodies. Lastly, this responsibility applies when the time comes to choose which health services will be covered by the public system and which will be sent on to private insurers. The reasons to create a space for citizens are many. The methods to do it exist. What is needed is political willpower and means.

  6. Diffusion of a quality improvement programme among allied health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, E.M.; Dekker, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diffusion of a quality improvement (QI) programme among allied health professions in The Netherlands. Design: Descriptive study, based on a questionnaire distributed to allied health professionals; response rate, 63%. Settings and participants: All subsectors in health care

  7. Building an Interdisciplinary Faculty Team for Allied Health Gerontology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glista, Sandra; Petersons, Maija

    2003-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team from various college allied health departments implemented Project AGE: Alliance for Gerontology Education to develop content to infuse in courses on the themes of age and culture, assistive technology, collaboration, and consumer health education. One goal was to foster interaction among allied health students to prepare…

  8. Research culture in allied health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Donna; McKinstry, Carol; Cotchett, Matthew; Williams, Cylie; Haines, Terry

    2016-06-07

    Research evidence is required to guide optimal allied health practice and inform policymakers in primary health care. Factors that influence a positive research culture are not fully understood, and nor is the impact of a positive research culture on allied health professionals. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that affect allied health research culture and capacity. An extensive search of 11 databases was conducted in June 2015. Studies were included if they were published in English, had full-text availability and reported research findings relating to allied health professions. Study quality was evaluated using the McMaster Critical Review Forms. Fifteen studies were eligible for inclusion. A meta-analysis was not performed because of heterogeneity between studies. Allied health professionals perceive that their individual research skills are lower in comparison to their teams and organisation. Motivators for conducting research for allied health professionals include developing skills, increasing job satisfaction and career advancement. Barriers include a lack of time, limited research skills and other work roles taking priority. Multilayered strategies, such as collaborations with external partners and developing research leadership positions, aimed at addressing barriers and enablers, are important to enhance allied health research culture and capacity.

  9. Faculty research productivity in allied health settings: a TQM approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, M; Baker, D; Gable, C; Michael, S; Wintch, K

    1993-01-01

    Faculty research productivity in colleges of allied health has often been discussed in the literature over the last five years. Articles have focused on the problem of faculty research productivity from various viewpoints, but none have used a theoretical framework to analyze the problem. The total quality management (TQM) framework is currently being used in health care to improve quality and productivity. This article uses the TQM framework to synthesize literature concerning faculty research productivity and verifies the current relevance of synthesis findings using an allied health faculty survey. These analyses show that the TQM framework is useful in suggesting ways to increase faculty research productivity in colleges of allied health.

  10. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors.

  11. Allied Health Field, Tenth Grade. Introduction to Allied Health and the Health Care Team. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Curriculum [and Teachers' Handbook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracy

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the tenth grade level. The student handbook consists of seven units which focus on the biology curriculum: (1) community water examination, (2) bacteriological examination of water, (3) the microscope, (4) microbes and man, (5)…

  12. ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators: Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Grzesikowski, Tami; Tucker-Lively, Felicia; Weinstein, George; Haden, N Karl

    2015-05-01

    Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.

  13. The perceptual domain: a taxonomy for allied health educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, E Z

    1981-08-01

    A taxonomy of the perceptual domain was proposed over a decade ago. It is hierarchical, as are the taxonomies in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. Perception involves extraction of information from presenting stimuli, and there is progression of information extraction as the hierarchy is ascended. Perceptual performance at the higher levels of the taxonomy assumes perceptual abilities at the lower levels. A modified version of the perceptual taxonomy applicable to allied health education is presented. Methods concerning application of the taxonomy are suggested. Use of the taxonomy of the perceptual domain would help allied health educators plan instruction and evaluate teaching.

  14. Improving health services in developing countries with new types of public and allied health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, K D; Trulove, J W

    1982-10-01

    Allied health manpower in developing countries should be able to serve the specific needs of these countries in solving malnutrition, diarrheal disease, and other health problems. Disease patterns tend to evolve in stages with each stage requiring a special type of health manpower: 1) the 1st stage where infectious diseases are linked to poverty, malnutrition, and poor personal hygiene for which personnel trained to improve health through providing safe water supplies, improving sanitation, and immunizing the population are needed; 2) in the 2nd stages, diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and cardiac diseases exist, requiring extensive technology such as is available in the US; and 3) the 3rd stage relates to an awareness of health hazards (caused by the environment, by the lifestyle dysfunctions of the society, and an emphasis on health promotion) and implies a responsibility for one's own health by the individual; this is a difficult stage to apply to developing countries since the ability to bring about change assumes literacy on the part of the population which is not always the case. Since most developing countries need to cause change in the 1st stage, more public health personnel such as sanitarians and generalist workers are needed. Training of these personnel should include on-the-job education; traditionally trained US allied health professionals are not always equipped to deal with health problems in developing countries. Health educators should look to the lessons learned by the US in the allied health movement: 1) the system of control that national membership organizations have over schooling and the job environment has contributed to an increased cost of health care delivery, unnecessary prolonged curricula, overspecialization, extreme protectionism for membership, and inappropriate fractionalization of health care delivery; 2) the emphasis on prolonged curricula sometimes causes the student to lose sight of the supposed direct relationship between

  15. Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health: A Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    A summary of proceedings of the Forum on Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health is presented. The keynote address, "The Burden of Arthritis," by Dorothy P. Rice, provides data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics on the prevalence of arthritis, the burden it imposes, and the volume, type, and cost…

  16. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only) an

  17. Allied health personnel's attitudes and perceptions of teamwork supporting children with developmental concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A; Malone, D Michael

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the attitudes and perceptions of allied health personnel toward the efficacy and performance characteristics of school-based teams supporting children with developmental concerns. Sixty-three allied health personnel were asked to complete the Attitudes About Teamwork Survey, the Team Characteristics Survey, and the Team Process Perception Survey. Respondents held a generally positive attitude about teamwork. Respondents' beliefs about the efficacy of the team process were moderately associated with critical performance characteristics. Effect sizes associated with these data suggest that the results were not only statistically significant but also noteworthy. Respondents also provided their perspectives on the benefits, limitations, supports, and recommendations of teamwork. Results were consistent with both the general teamwork literature and that focused on allied health professions. The authors describe practical implications of the results and directions for further investigation on this topic.

  18. Retention in the allied health workforce: boomers, generation X, and generation Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jenny; Saggers, Sherry; Wildy, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The recruitment and retention of allied health workers present challenges for organizations in Australia and internationally. Australia, in common with other developed countries, faces the prospect of a rapidly aging population and the high turnover of younger allied health workers (the majority of whom are female) from employing organizations. Emphases on the individual characteristics of Boomer, Generation X, and Generation Y workers may provide a useful starting base for recruitment and retention strategies, but our study shows that these need to be contextualized within broader political, social, and structural factors that take account of gender and the changing needs of workers over their life span.

  19. Allied health deans' and program directors' perspectives of specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah S; Morrone, Anastasia S; Gable, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    Criticisms, calls for change, and recommendations for specialized accreditation improvement have been made by individuals or groups external to the daily operations of allied health educational programs, frequently as opinion pieces or articles lacking a research foundation. While there is a great deal of concern related to specialized accreditation, little input has been provided from those within, and integral to, allied health educational programs affected by specialized accreditation standards. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of selected allied health deans and program directors regarding specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform. Survey research was used to study perspectives of allied health deans and program directors located in four-year colleges and universities and in academic health centers and medical schools. Surveys were mailed to program directors offering-programs in clinical laboratory sciences and medical technology, nuclear medicine technology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiation therapy, and radiography. Simultaneously, allied health deans located within these institutions were surveyed. A total of 773 surveys were mailed and 424 valid responses were received, yielding a response rate of 55%. The results affirmed the role of accreditation as an effective system for assuring quality in higher education. The role of specialized accreditation in improving the quality of allied health programs was clearly articulated by the respondents. Respondents voiced strong opposition to governmental or state-level requirements for accountability and emphasized the vital role of peer evaluators. Significant differences in deans' and program directors' perspectives related to specialized accreditation were evident. Whereas deans and program directors agreed with the purposes of specialized accreditation, they expressed less support for the process and effectiveness, and critique and reform, of specialized

  20. Tackling racism as a "wicked" public health problem: Enabling allies in anti-racism praxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Came, Heather; Griffith, Derek

    2017-03-16

    Racism is a "wicked" public health problem that fuels systemic health inequities between population groups in New Zealand, the United States and elsewhere. While literature has examined racism and its effects on health, the work describing how to intervene to address racism in public health is less developed. While the notion of raising awareness of racism through socio-political education is not new, given the way racism has morphed into new narratives in health institutional settings, it has become critical to support allies to make informing efforts to address racism as a fundamental cause of health inequities. In this paper, we make the case for anti-racism praxis as a tool to address inequities in public health, and focus on describing an anti-racism praxis framework to inform the training and support of allies. The limited work on anti-racism rarely articulates the unique challenges or needs of allies or targets of racism, but we seek to help fill that gap. Our anti-racism praxis for allies includes five core elements: reflexive relational praxis, structural power analysis, socio-political education, monitoring and evaluation and systems change approaches. We recognize that racism is a modifiable determinant of health and racial inequities can be eliminated with the necessary political will and a planned system change approach. Anti-racism praxis provides the tools to examine the interconnection and interdependence of cultural and institutional factors as a foundation for examining where and how to intervene to address racism.

  1. Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

  2. The availability and use of allied health care in care homes in the Midlands, UK: commentaries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemrijse, C.; Veenhof, C.; Boer, M.E. de

    2009-01-01

    The demographic trends of continuing growth of the number of older people will lead to an increasing need for long-term services such as nursing homes. The intensive work delivered by the rehabilitative services provided in the nursing homes includes care by a variety of allied health care personnel

  3. Impairment measures in rheumatic disorders for rehabilitation medicine and allied health care: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, R.A.H.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a critical overview of available instruments to assess impairments in patients with rheumatic disorders, and to recommend reliable and valid instruments for use in allied health care and rehabilitation medicine. A computer-aided literature search (1982–2004)

  4. Impairment measures in rheumatic disorders for rehabilitation medicine and allied health care: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, R.A.H.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Ende, van den C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a critical overview of available instruments to assess impairments in patients with rheumatic disorders, and to recommend reliable and valid instruments for use in allied health care and rehabilitation medicine. A computer-aided literature search (1982-2004)

  5. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein, and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD.

  6. Extended roles for allied health professionals: an updated systematic review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxon RL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Robyn L Saxon,1–3 Marion A Gray,1,2 Florin I Oprescu1,2 1School of Health and Sports Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, 2Cluster for Health Improvement, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, 3Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Background: Internationally, health care services are under increasing pressure to provide high quality, accessible, timely interventions to an ever increasing aging population, with finite resources. Extended scope roles for allied health professionals is one strategy that could be undertaken by health care services to meet this demand. This review builds upon an earlier paper published in 2006 on the evidence relating to the impact extended scope roles have on health care services. Methods: A systematic review of the literature focused on extended scope roles in three allied health professional groups, ie, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology, was conducted. The search strategy mirrored an earlier systematic review methodology and was designed to include articles from 2005 onwards. All peer-reviewed published papers with evidence relating to effects on patients, other professionals, or the health service were included. All papers were critically appraised prior to data extraction. Results: A total of 1,000 articles were identified by the search strategy; 254 articles were screened for relevance and 21 progressed to data extraction for inclusion in the systematic review. Conclusion: Literature supporting extended scope roles exists; however, despite the earlier review calling for more robust evaluations regarding the impact on patient outcomes, cost-effectiveness, training requirements, niche identification, or sustainability, there appears to be limited research reported on the topic in the last 7 years. The evidence available suggests that extended scope practice allied health practitioners could be a cost-effective and consumer

  7. A controlled vocabulary for nursing and allied health in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, P; Jakobsson, A; Mogset, I; Taylor, S; Aasen, S E

    2001-03-01

    Nursing and allied health libraries at educational institutions in Norway have generally indexed their book collections with uncontrolled terms. With the reorganization of higher education in 1994, the majority of these libraries joined BIBSYS, which is a joint library system for higher education and research in Norway. This has led to chaos when searching the joint catalogue for literature on nursing and related fields. A term such as 'behaviour problems' may have up to five synonyms. In an attempt to improve the quality of searching the health literature, BIBSYS appointed a working group in the Spring of 1999 to find a suitable controlled vocabulary for this subject area, and to see how this vocabulary could be integrated into BIBSYS. The group presented its recommendations in October 1999. The report has been well received by the BIBSYS Board and by user groups. There are no Norwegian vocabularies that are suitable for use in nursing and allied health, therefore it will be necessary to translate and combine existing thesauri. The group has looked at the Nordic Multilingual Thesaurus on Health Promotion, the Swedish Spriline Thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and CINAHL Subject Heading List. Other relevant thesauri are AMED/CATS Thesaurus, Bioethics Thesaurus (Bioethicsline) and the RCN thesaurus. The group recommends the development of a Norwegian thesaurus based on a translation of parts of MeSH and CINAHL Subject Heading List.

  8. Factors associated with sense of community among allied health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haar, Mindy; Scanlan, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a substantial increase in online education in the health professions, as well as growing recognition that teamwork and collaboration are essential to success. While the impact of students' sense of community on factors such as course satisfaction and retention has been studied among college enrollees in general, there is little research exploring this concept among allied health students. To address this shortcoming, a convenience sample of students enrolled in a large northeastern school of health-related professions was surveyed to gather information on their demographics, curriculum and selected course attributes, perceived instructor teaching perspectives, and sense of community. Univariate analysis indicated that entry-level students experienced a greater sense of community than post-professional students. Multivariate analysis revealed that instructor-determined factors of encouraging discussion, encouraging expression of opinions, and specifying response times best predicted sense of community. With all other variables controlled, perceptions of community were significantly lower in online courses, among students for whom English was their second language, and in courses where instructors were perceived as focused primarily on content delivery. This study supports promoting selected course and instructor-related attributes associated with sense of community in allied health education, with a particular focus on both non-native English speakers and post-professional students. Enhancement of online courses with strategies that increase instructor presence, better engage students, and facilitate interaction also are warranted.

  9. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  10. Allied health care in Parkinson's disease: referral, consultation, and professional expertise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkrake, M.J.; Keus, S.H.J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Overeem, S.; Mulleners, W.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence for the efficacy of allied health care in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, barriers exist that hamper implementation of evidence into daily practice. We conducted a survey to investigate: (1) to what extent PD patients currently utilize allied health care for relevant problems in

  11. Organisational governance structures in allied health services: a decade of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, R A

    2001-01-01

    A ten year review of developments in the organisation and management of allied health services in Australian acute care public hospitals reveals a steady transformation away from a medically managed universal model towards more complex and contested models of governance. This article revisits early observations about the reorganisation of allied health services and presents more recent research findings to guide managerial decision-making about restructuring the diverse disciplines that constitute allied health. A new organisational model "integrated decentralization" is presented as an approach to managing allied health services which accommodates multiple stakeholder demands in the context of New Public Management (NPM) related reforms. The focus on the institutional level is complemented by examining developments in the profile and activity of allied health at the regional, state and national levels to present a more comprehensive picture of change over the decade of the 1990s.

  12. Do structured arrangements for multidisciplinary peer group supervision make a difference for allied health professional outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuipers P

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pim Kuipers,1,2 Susan Pager,1 Karen Bell,3 Fiona Hall,4 Melissa Kendall2,5,6 1Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Centre for Community Science, School of Human Services, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; 3Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, Queensland, Australia; 4Allied Health Professions Office of Queensland, Health Service and Innovation Division, Queensland, Australia; 5Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 6Transitional Rehabilitation Programme, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Abstract: Peer group supervision, particularly in multidisciplinary formats, presents a potential means of providing professional support, and specifically clinical supervision, for allied health professionals. Debate exists regarding the extent to which the activities of these groups should be formalized. Results drawn from an evaluation of a large-scale peer group supervision initiative are described. Analysis of 192 responses from professionals involved in peer groups indicates that participants in groups that used formal documentation – which adopted the tools provided in training, and particularly those that used formal evaluation of their groups – rated their groups as having better processes and greater impact. Interestingly, multidisciplinary peer groups were rated as having similar impacts, processes, and purposes as the more homogenous single-discipline groups. It is concluded that the implementation of formal arrangements enhances the processes and outcomes of peer groups implemented for professional support and clinical supervision. Multidisciplinary membership of such groups is perceived as equally beneficial as single-discipline groups. Keywords: allied health, professional supervision, clinical supervision, professional support, multidisciplinary

  13. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  14. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Schols, L.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied hea

  15. Allied Health Field, Seventh Grade. Operation TACT [Toward an Allied Health Career Today] Field Test Curriculum 1973-1975 [and Teachers' Handbook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Univ., Storrs. School of Allied Health Professions.

    The two-part set consists of a student handbook and a related teachers' handbook in allied health education for use at the seventh grade level. The student handbook contains four units: (1) investigating health care needs, (2) mental health--study of different types of job roles and their related activities and skills, (3) treatment--diagnosis of…

  16. Allied health team management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J R; Brandt, K D

    1984-09-01

    The use of a coordinated team of allied health professionals (AHPs) to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis assigned to experimental groups (EG) and comparison groups (CG) was assessed. The EG patients were evaluated regularly by each AHP team member, whereas CG patients were seen by AHPs only upon referral. Of the 10 EG and 13 CG patients who remained in the study for 2 years, the EG patients initially exhibited somewhat greater disease activity than CG (as reflected by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and duration of morning stiffness). After 2 years, EG patients demonstrated less disease activity than at the outset, whereas CG patients either showed little change in these parameters or deteriorated during the study. Grip strength, which was initially similar in the two groups, improved in EG patients but decreased in CG patients, so that after 2 years a significant difference was noted between the two groups (p less than .05). Tendency to lose hand range of motion was also greater in CG than in EG patients. Some EG patients showed improvement in finger flexion deformities during the study. Furthermore, EG patients showed a greater tendency to acquire positive attitudes regarding themselves and family relationships. These results suggest that ongoing "team care" may be more efficacious than episodic use of AHPs in management of patients with mild rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Age and gender as predictors of allied health quality stroke care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luker JA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Luker1, Julie Bernhardt2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers11International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and Stroke Division, Florey Neurosciences Institutes Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Improvement in acute stroke care requires the identification of variables which may influence care quality. The nature and impact of demographic and stroke-related variables on care quality provided by allied health (AH professionals is unknown.Aims: Our research explores the association of age and gender on an index of acute stroke care quality provided by AH professionals.Methods: A retrospective clinical audit of 300 acute stroke patients extracted data on AH care, patients' age and gender. AH care quality was determined by the summed compliance with 20 predetermined process indicators. Our analysis explored relationships between this index of quality, age, and gender. Age was considered in different ways (as a continuous variable, and in different categories. It was correlated with care quality, using gender-specific linear and logistic regression models. Gender was then considered as a confounder in an overall model.Results: No significant association was found for any treatment of age and the index of AH care quality. There were no differences in gender-specific models, and gender did not significantly adjust the age association with care quality.Conclusion: Age and gender were not predictors of the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients by AH professionals.Keywords: acute stroke, allied health, quality of care, age, gender

  18. A systematic review of professional supervision experiences and effects for allied health practitioners working in non-metropolitan health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducat WH

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wendy H Ducat,1,3 Saravana Kumar2 1Cunningham Centre, Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, Sansom Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Rural Clinical School, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Introduction: In regional, rural, and remote settings, allied health professional supervision is one organizational mechanism designed to support and retain the workforce, provide clinical governance, and enhance service delivery. A systematic approach to evaluating the evidence of the experience and effects of professional supervision for non-metropolitan allied health practitioners and their service delivery is needed. Methods: Studies investigating the experience and effects of professional supervision across 17 allied health disciplines in non-metropolitan health services were systematically searched for using standardized keywords across seven databases. The initial search identified 1,574 references. Of these studies, five met inclusion criteria and were subject to full methodological appraisal by both reviewers. Two studies were primarily qualitative with three studies primarily quantitative in their approach. Studies were appraised using McMaster critical appraisal tools and data were extracted and synthesized. Results: Studies reported the context specific benefits and challenges of supervision in non-metropolitan areas and the importance of supervision in enhancing satisfaction and support in these areas. Comparison of findings between metropolitan and non-metropolitan settings within one study suggested that allied health in non-metropolitan settings were more satisfied with supervision though less likely to access it and preferred supervision with other non-metropolitan practitioners over access to more experienced supervisors. One study in a regional health service identified the lack

  19. Successfully living with chronic arthritis. The role of the allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Erik; Bobietinska, Elzbieta; Lloyd, Jill; Veehof, Martine; Rasker, Wietske Jm; Oosterveld, F G J Frits; Rasker, J J Hans

    2006-03-01

    The treatment and care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and various health professionals with different areas of expertise may be involved. The objective of this article is to review the treatments and their efficacy as provided by health care professionals in RA care. The requirements for further research in this area are formulated. To achieve better effects of treatment it is necessary to improve the coordination of services as provided by the different specialists. The important roles of the patients themselves in the care and management of the disease are emphasized, as well as the roles of the informal caregivers such as a spouse or other family members and friends and the role of patient societies. The possible role of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to improve the communication and facilitate the coordination among health professionals and between patients and health professionals is mentioned. The topics presented in this article may encourage further discussion and research, particularly concerning the effects of the treatments as provided by allied health professionals. Health professionals play an important role in the life of patients with rheumatic disorders, in all the domains of the ICF: body functions and structure, activities (action by an individual) and participation (involvement in a life situation). Health professionals in rheumatology can make the difference in the lives of RA patients and their families.

  20. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Dorothy R; Stickell, Henry N

    2003-01-01

    This list of 434 books and 79 journals is intended as a selection guide for print literature to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Because of the impossibility of covering the large number of and wide variety of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the educational programs listed and recognized by the American Medical Association and other accrediting bodies. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index and the subject list of journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (169 books and 32 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (2002 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $36,744. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $14,465.

  1. A Proposed Curriculum on Death and Dying for the Allied Health Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Marie C.

    1980-01-01

    This article summarizes the existing curricular models on death education for health professions students. A proposed course design for allied health professions students modified from Bloch's medical education objectives for a thanatology course is presented. The development of listening skills is given special emphasis. (Author/CT)

  2. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne J. Snodgrass

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296 working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71% believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14% or continuing education (16%. Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01, training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01 and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01. Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels.

  3. Measuring the quality of allied health services in Australia: is it a case of “the more we learn, the less we know?”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanese S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Karen Grimmer-Somers, Steve Milanese, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence (iCAHE, University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, AustraliaBackground: Sensitive and reliable measurement of allied health (AH service quality is in its infancy. This is largely related to the complexity of the AH discipline-mix, the services these disciplines provide, and the locations in which services are provided. AH is variably described, with up to 49 disciplines being listed in the literature. These disciplines often undertake a range of interlinked activities such as assessment and diagnosis, counseling, therapy and rehabilitation, manufacture, education, and service organization. AH disciplines work in a range of roles in a range of public and private sector organizations, and often consult with their patients/clients a number of times for the management of one condition. They operate under a variety of funding models, and often within service delivery constraints. This evidence-informed analytical review outlines factors which should be considered by allied health leaders, reflecting clinicians, policy-makers, managers, and academics, in regards to making an informed choice of sensitive and reliable measures of AH service quality. Strong, visionary, and collaborative leadership is required to ensure that allied health activities and outcomes are measured and reported effectively and efficiently.Keywords: allied health (AH, sensitive, reliable measures, health service quality

  4. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  5. Respiratory Therapy Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Respiratory therapy education in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed a statewide system to promote entry and exit of prepared personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource utilization. The…

  6. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  7. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  8. The Allied Health Care Professional's Role in Assisting Medical Decision Making at the End of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Heather

    2012-01-01

    As a patient approaches the end of life, he or she faces a number of very difficult medical decisions. Allied health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs), can be instrumental in assisting their patients to make advance care plans, although their traditional job descriptions do not…

  9. A National Study of Student Selection Practices in the Allied Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Marie C.; Crowley, Judeth A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the outcomes of a 1978 national survey of candidate selection practices in 4 baccalaureate level and 7 associate degree level allied health disciplines. Found that few programs conducted evaluation of their admissions activities and that physical therapy and dental hygiene programs were the most structured in student selection. (JOW)

  10. Past and future use of the ICF (former ICIDH) by nursing and allied health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerkens, Y.F.; Brug, Y. van der; Napel, H.M.T.D. ten; Ravensberg, C.D. van

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study describes the use of the ICIDH by allied health professionals and the nursing professions in The Netherlands. It is an example for showing how in recent years the application of the ICIDH has developed within professions. The data elements of patient descriptors documented by nur

  11. The Impact of Word Processing on Office Administration in the Medical and Allied Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Naomi Dornfeld

    The effect of word processing equipment on the future medical secretarial science curriculum was studied. A literature search focused on word processing and the medical and allied health professions, word processing and business education, and futuring of and changes in the secretarial science curriculum. Questionnaires to identify various aspects…

  12. Prestige of Allied Health Professions: Perceptions of Occupational and Physical Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Harry J.; Chan, Fong

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-six occupational therapists and 48 physical therapists were surveyed to determine how they rate various allied health occupations in terms of social status. Findings indicate that both groups rate status similarly, although they rate occupational therapy lower than physical therapy, pointing to the need for image enhancement. (CH)

  13. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism.

  14. Self-Medication Practice Among Allied and Non-Allied Health Students of the University of Santo Tomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAY P. JAZUL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available – Self-medication is presumed to be widely practiced around the world. This can be defined as the use of drugs to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, or the intermittent or continued use of a prescribed drug for chronic or recurrent disease or symptoms. High level of education and professional status has also been mentioned as predictive factors for self-medication. Students from the allied and nonallied health institutions of the University of Santo Tomas were assessed for the factors of self-medication practices.A total of 66 graduating students were asked to accomplish the questionnaire. To ensure valid responses, the researchers supervised the respondents on accomplishing the questionnaires. Mean and range summarized the age while counts and percentages summarized the gender, school, practice of selfmedication, therapeutic classes, health conditions, reasons and sources of self-medication. A total of 55 reported that they practice self-medication. On the total 66 respondents practicing self-medication is antibiotics, anti-allergic and antihistamine, and decongestants. The 55 respondents documented headache to be the most self-treated health condition followed by cough and cold, toothache, muscle pain pimples, back/chest pain, dizziness, and diarrhea/constipation. Significantly greater percentage of females (p=0.038 use antibiotics. Respondents with high self-care orientation are self-medicating on antibiotics (p=0.027, anti-allergic (p<0.001, and herbal medicine (p=0.001 than respondents with low self-care orientation.

  15. Integration of Practice Experiences into the Allied Health Curriculum: Curriculum and Pedagogic Considerations Before, during and after Work-Integrated Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is an essential component of all allied health university courses. In allied health, learning that occurs during WIL experiences and the relationship between academic and WIL experiences are not well understood. Good integration of WIL experiences into the allied health curriculum is key to realizing the full…

  16. Five Years of Acute Stroke Unit Care: Comparing ASU and Non-ASU Admissions and Allied Health Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel J. Hubbard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n=2525 and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n=826. The study’s primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days, and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi2=5.81; P=0.016. There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z=−8.233; P=0.0000 and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall’s ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall’s Stroke Unit and allied healthcare.

  17. Building interdisciplinary teamwork among allied health students through live clinical case simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Janet R; Rathsack, Christi; Downs, David; Jorgensen, Kathy; Karges, Joy R; Nelson, Debralee

    2008-01-01

    A limited, yet growing, body of research suggests that health care students educated in interdisciplinary teamwork may become more collaborative professionals in the workplace, which, in turn, may foster more productive and satisfied health care professionals. Researchers also have identified lower mortality and morbidity rates, fewer hospitalizations, decreased costs, and improved function by patients among significant health benefits of interdisciplinary teamwork, especially when it is applied to underserved and geriatric populations. Such positive outcomes have prompted medical schools and accreditation boards of many allied health professions to add interdisciplinary education into their training requirements. Meeting these requirements has challenged universities, where there are multiple allied health programs and limited time, faculty, and financial resources to coordinate interdisciplinary education. The challenges have been magnified by insufficient research on the most effective methods to educate university students about interdisciplinary teamwork. This article presents the background, evolution, and key building blocks of one such method: a simulation-based workshop designed at our university over 7 years to educate its allied health students about various health professions through shared learning, interaction, and collaboration.

  18. Achievements and challenges on policies for allied health professionals who use telehealth in the Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, D; Foerster, V; Nakagawa, B; Wapshall, T M; Murtagh, J A; Smitten, J; Steblecki, J A; Wong, G

    2005-01-01

    We formulated policies and procedures for allied health professionals (AHPs) who provide services using telehealth in Nunavut, Canada's newest Arctic territory. These are a supplement to the clinical policies and procedures already established for Nunavut physicians and nurses. The services were in the areas of audiology, dietetics/nutrition, midwifery, occupational therapy, ophthalmic services, pharmacy, physiotherapy, psychology, respiratory therapy, social work and speech therapy. Documents specific to each of the services were developed, drawing on information from Government of Nunavut data, Nunavut healthcare providers and links made through the Internet. Topics included the scope and limitations of telehealth services, staff responsibilities, training and reporting, professional standards and cultural considerations. We also considered generic policies covering common issues such as jurisdiction, licensing and liability. The policies and procedures for AHPs will enhance and expand the successes already achieved with telehealth in Nunavut. The challenges are to balance the preferred approaches to service provision with the realities of health care and communications in an Arctic setting.

  19. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce survey: helping to fill the evidence gap in primary health workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Deirdre; Smith, Tony; Newbury, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of detailed evidence about the allied health workforce to inform proposed health care reforms. The South Australian Allied Health Workforce (SAAHW) survey collected data about the demographic characteristics, employment, education and recruitment and retention of allied health professionals in South Australia. The SAAHW questionnaire was widely distributed and 1539 responses were received. The average age of the sample was 40 years; males were significantly older than females, the latter making up 82% of respondents. Three-quarters of the sample worked in the city; 60% worked full time and the remainder in part-time, casual or locum positions. 'Work-life balance' was the most common attraction to respondents' current jobs and 'Better career prospects' the most common reason for intending to leave. Practice in a rural location was influenced by rural background and rural experience during training. A greater proportion of Generation Y (1982-2000) respondents intended to leave within 2 years than Generation X (1961-81) or Baby Boomers (1943-60). Most respondents were satisfied with their job, although some reported lack of recognition of their knowledge and skills. Systematic, robust allied health workforce data are required for integrated and sustainable primary health care delivery.

  20. Nutrition economics - food as an ally of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Jones, P J; Uauy, R; Segal, L; Milner, J

    2013-03-14

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a major and increasing contributor to morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. Much of the chronic disease burden is preventable through modification of lifestyle behaviours, and increased attention is being focused on identifying and implementing effective preventative health strategies. Nutrition has been identified as a major modifiable determinant of NCD. The recent merging of health economics and nutritional sciences to form the nascent discipline of nutrition economics aims to assess the impact of diet on health and disease prevention, and to evaluate options for changing dietary choices, while incorporating an understanding of the immediate impacts and downstream consequences. In short, nutrition economics allows for generation of policy-relevant evidence, and as such the discipline is a crucial partner in achieving better population nutritional status and improvements in public health and wellness. The objective of the present paper is to summarise presentations made at a satellite symposium held during the 11th European Nutrition Conference, 28 October 2011, where the role of nutrition and its potential to reduce the public health burden through alleviating undernutrition and nutrition deficiencies, promoting better-quality diets and incorporating a role for functional foods were discussed.

  1. A study of student perceptions of learning transfer from a human anatomy and physiology course in an allied health program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Leigh S.

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First the study was designed to determine student perceptions regarding the perceived degree of original learning from a human anatomy and physiology course, and the student perception of the use of the knowledge in an allied health program. Second, the intention of the study was to establish student beliefs on the characteristics of the transfer of learning including those factors which enhance learning transfer and those that serve as barriers to learning transfer. The study participants were those students enrolled in any allied health program at a community college in a Midwest state, including: nursing, radiology, surgical technology, health information technology, and paramedic. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed from the responses to the survey. A sub-group of participants were chosen to participate in semi-structured formal interviews. From the interviews, additional qualitative data were gathered. The data collected through the study demonstrated student perception of successful transfer experiences. The students in the study were able to provide specific examples of learning transfer experienced from the human anatomy and physiology course in their allied health program. Findings also suggested students who earned higher grades in the human anatomy and physiology course perceived greater understanding and greater use of the course's learning objectives in their allied health program. The study found the students believed the following learning activities enhances the transfer of learning: (1) Providing application of the information or skills being learned during the instruction of the course content enhances the transfer of learning. (2) Providing resource materials and activities which allow the students to practice the content being taught facilitates the transfer of learning. The students made the following recommendations to remove barriers to the transfer of learning: (1

  2. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  3. Guiding principles in a merger of allied health and nursing schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, William L; Royeen, Charlotte Brasic

    2007-01-01

    Mergers have long been a reality in higher education during periods of financial challenge. More recently, academic mergers have evolved to become a strategy for achieving academic excellence, broadening institutional vision, and solidifying the competitive position of the merged entities. This report summarizes literature focused on critical considerations when evaluating and implementing mergers in an academic environment using a conceptual model adapted from Kotter. In addition, this paper reports on the planning and initial 9 months of the merger between the Edward and Margaret Doisy School of Allied Health Professions and the School of Nursing to form the Edward and Margaret Doisy College of Health Sciences at Saint Louis University.

  4. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  5. Astronomy Allies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Heather; Alatalo, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Imagine you are a grad student, at your first conference, and a prominent senior scientist shows interest in your work, and he makes things get way too personal? What would you do? Would you report it? Or would you decide, after a few other instances of harassment, that maybe you shouldn't pursue astronomy? Harassment is under-reported, the policies can be difficult to understand or hard to find, and it can be very intimidating as a young scientist to report it to the proper individuals. The Astronomy Allies Program is designed to help you with these sorts of problems. We are a group of volunteers that will help by doing the following: provide safe walks home during the conference, someone to talk to confidentially, as an intervener, as a resource to report harassment. The Allies are a diverse group of scientists committed to acting as mentors, advocates, and liaisons. The Winter 2015 AAS meeting was the first meeting that had Astronomy Allies, and Astronomy Allies provided a website for information, as well as a twitter, email, and phone number for anyone who needs our help or would like more information. We posted about the Astronomy Allies on the Women In Astronomy blog, and this program resonates with many people: either they want to help, or they have experienced harassment in the past and don't want to see it in the future. Harassment may not happen to most conference participants, but it's wrong, it's against the AAS anti-harassment policy ( http://aas.org/policies/anti-harassment-policy ), it can be very damaging, and if it happens to even one person, that is unacceptable. We intend to improve the culture at conferences to make it so that harassers feel they can't get away with their unprofessional behavior.

  6. A systematic review of the individual determinants of research evidence use in allied health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizarondo L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available L Lizarondo, K Grimmer-Somers, S KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: The use of evidence-based practice (EBP is often not reflected in allied health (AH practitioners’ day-to-day practice (the research-practice gap. Research suggests that considerable differences between and within AH disciplines exist, which require different approaches in order to influence practice behavior. It is therefore important to develop a better understanding of what influences individual AH practitioners’ adoption of evidence into daily practice.Objective: This systematic review aims to examine the individual characteristics of AH practitioners which determine their uptake of evidence into practice.Methods: Studies which examined individual factors or variables that influence research evidence use by any AH practitioner were included in the review. The methodological quality of the included papers was assessed using the Quality Assessment and Validity Tool for Cross-sectional Studies. A narrative summary of the findings was presented.Results: Six studies were included and the methodological quality scores indicated that two were weak and the remainder had moderate–weak quality. The review demonstrated that factors such as educational degree or academic qualification, involvement in research or EBP-related activities, and practitioners’ perceptions, attitudes and beliefs about research and EBP are significant predictors of self-reported research evidence use in AH. The effect of other factors such as professional characteristics, clinical setting/work environment, information-seeking behavior and sociodemographic variables are less clear. Whether there is an interaction effect between evidence-uptake factors has not been tested.Conclusion: Improving the research knowledge of clinicians and overcoming negative attitudes toward EBP have the potential to move AH

  7. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Frank JH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. Methods The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in

  8. What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne-Gittens, Reynolette; Lisako, E.; McKyer, J.; Goodson, Patricia; Guidry, Jeffrey; Outley, Corliss

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health educators are critical members of the health care team who may be called upon to provide nutrition education. However, are health educators prepared for this task? What have scholars concluded regarding this pertinent topic? Purpose: This study has three purposes: (1) to determine the definition of and criteria for nutrition…

  9. A success of a genetics educational intervention for nursing and dietetic students: A model for incorporating genetics into nursing and allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragun, Deborah L; Couch, Sarah C; Prows, Cynthia A; Warren, Nancy S; Christianson, Carol A

    2005-01-01

    Allied health care professionals and nurses provide genetic-related client services, such as eliciting family medical history information and discussing the genetic component of health conditions. However, these professionals report a lack of confidence in their ability to perform genetic services and have little formal education in genetics. A barrier to incorporating genetics into allied health curricula includes the limited flexibility to expand curricula. This barrier was addressed by incorporating a Web-based tutorial on basic genetics and a lecture on the genetics of diabetes into preexisting undergraduate nutrition courses for nursing and dietetic students. The vast majority of students enrolled in these required courses participated in the intervention. Most participants agreed that genetics is important to their future career. Following the intervention, students' knowledge of genetics and confidence in their ability to provide genetic-related services increased significantly. Despite the short-term success and positive student evaluations, a single educational intervention does not appear to be sufficient for students to become proficient in performing the recommended genetic competencies for all health care professionals. Recommendations and resources for incorporating genetics into allied health curricula are included.

  10. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  11. Becoming an Academic: The Reconstruction of Identity by Recently Appointed Lecturers in Nursing, Midwifery and the Allied Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline; Boyd, Pete

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the workplace learning experiences of recently appointed lecturers in UK higher education in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions. Health care practitioners, appointed to academic posts in Universities, are experts in their respective clinical fields and hold strong practitioner identities developed through…

  12. Involvement of practice nurses and allied health professionals in the development and management of care planning processes for patients with chronic disease – A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, KM; Adaji, A; Schattner, PS

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Medicare items were introduced in 2005 to encourage general practitioners (GPs) to involve other healthcare providers in the management of patients with chronic disease. However, there appears to be barriers to converting financial incentives and the use of information technology as a communication tool to better patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore these barriers from the perspectives of practice nurses and allied health practitioners.

  13. Building competency in the novice allied health professional through peer coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The development of competence is an ongoing journey, and one that is particularly punctuated in the early part of a health professional's career. These novice practitioners need to recognize that the challenges inherent in building competency might be resolved more readily by engaging with peers. This paper outlines what it means to be a novice practitioner, and how peer coaching can be used to support professional development in the allied health sciences. An overview of the reasoning process and how peer coaching and experiential learning can be used to build competence is described. A structured and formal approach to peer coaching is outlined in this paper. Novices who embrace this professional development strategy will find the model of coaching practice and underlying strategies described in this paper beneficial to their experience. The importance of formalizing the process and the underlying communication skills needed for coaching are described in detail with accompanying examples to illustrate the model in practice.

  14. Systematic review of knowledge translation strategies in the allied health professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Shannon D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge translation (KT aims to close the research-practice gap in order to realize and maximize the benefits of research within the practice setting. Previous studies have investigated KT strategies in nursing and medicine; however, the present study is the first systematic review of the effectiveness of a variety of KT interventions in five allied health disciplines: dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, and speech-language pathology. Methods A health research librarian developed and implemented search strategies in eight electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PASCAL, EMBASE, IPA, Scopus, CENTRAL using language (English and date restrictions (1985 to March 2010. Other relevant sources were manually searched. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, performed data extraction, and performed quality assessment. Within each profession, evidence tables were created, grouping and analyzing data by research design, KT strategy, targeted behaviour, and primary outcome. The published descriptions of the KT interventions were compared to the Workgroup for Intervention Development and Evaluation Research (WIDER Recommendations to Improve the Reporting of the Content of Behaviour Change Interventions. Results A total of 2,638 articles were located and the titles and abstracts were screened. Of those, 1,172 full-text articles were reviewed and subsequently 32 studies were included in the systematic review. A variety of single (n = 15 and multiple (n = 17 KT interventions were identified, with educational meetings being the predominant KT strategy (n = 11. The majority of primary outcomes were identified as professional/process outcomes (n = 25; however, patient outcomes (n = 4, economic outcomes (n = 2, and multiple primary outcomes (n = 1 were also represented. Generally, the studies were of low methodological quality. Outcome

  15. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  16. Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG): Mobilizing Allied Health Students and Community Partners to Put Data into Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zertuche, Adrienne D; Spelke, Bridget; Julian, Zoë; Pinto, Meredith; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Despite having an obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce comparable to the national average, Georgia is ranked 50th in maternal mortality and 40th in infant mortality. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group (GMIHRG) was founded in 2010 to evaluate and address this paradox. Description In the several years since GMIHRG's inception, its graduate allied health student researchers and advisors have collaborated with community partners to complete several requisite research initiatives. Their initial work demonstrated that over half the Georgia areas outside metropolitan Atlanta lack adequate access to obstetric services, and their subsequent research evaluated the reasons for and the consequences of this maldistribution of obstetric providers. Assessment In order to translate their workforce and outcomes data for use in policymaking and programming, GMIHRG created reader-friendly reports for distribution to a wide variety of stakeholders and prepared concise, compelling presentations with targeted recommendations for change. This commitment to advocacy ultimately enabled them to: (a) inspire the Georgia Study Committees on Medicaid Reform and Medical Education, (b) influence Georgia General Assembly abortion bills, medical scholarship/loan legislation, and appropriations, and (c) motivate programming initiatives to improve midwifery education and perinatal regionalization in Georgia. Conclusion GMIHRG members have employed inventive research methods and maximized collaborative partnerships to enable their data on Georgia's maternal and infant outcomes and obstetric workforce to effectively inform state organizations and policymakers. With this unique approach, GMIHRG serves as a cost-efficient and valuable model for student engagement in the translation of research into advocacy efforts, policy change, and innovative programming.

  17. Evaluation of a supplementary retention program for black allied health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, A; Lewis, L; Abbott, B; Vericella, B

    1993-01-01

    The Medical College of Georgia's (MCG's) Minority Academic Advising Program (MAAP), which began in 1984, is a supplementary retention program for Black students. This paper describes an evaluation study of the effectiveness of MAAP within the MCG School of Allied Health Sciences (SAHS). The study sample consisted of 89 Black students who enrolled in the SAHS from fall 1978 to fall 1982 (preMAAP period) plus 129 Black students who entered the SAHS from fall 1984 through fall 1988 (MAAP period). The comparison group consisted of all other students who entered the SAHS (n = 1,884) within those same time periods. Using an evaluation design produced by merging a quasi-experimental and a time-series design, the authors found that the MAAP succeeded in increasing both the Black student retention-to-graduation rate and the time-persisted-in-program, to the extent that Black students achieved parity with other SAHS students.

  18. Methodological Orientations of Articles Appearing in Allied Health's Top Journals: Who Publishes What and Where

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Pamela Lea McCloud

    2012-01-01

    This study examined articles published in the major peer-reviewed journals, either hard copy, web, or both formats, in five allied health professions from January 2006 to December 2010. Research journals used in this study include: "Journal of Dental Hygiene," "Journal of the American Dietetic Association," "Journal of…

  19. The Use of Technical Skill Standards in the Admissions Process for Florida Allied Dental Health Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Rita H.

    2001-01-01

    Among 47 respondents from 26 Florida institutions offering allied dental health education programs, 66% have no established technical skill standards for admissions; a sizeable number felt the need for uniform published standards. Although a majority had some knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 96% responded negatively regarding its…

  20. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  1. Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning in a Massive First-Year Core Physiology for Allied Health Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L.; Rathner, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of…

  2. What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paans, Wolter; Wijkamp, Inge; Wiltens, Egbert; Wolfensberger, Marca V

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP) is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also determines the quality of care. Aim To describe perspectives of AHCPs on which characteristics are commonly associated with an excellent AHCP. Methods AHCPs’ perspectives were derived from three focus group discussions. Twenty-one health care professionals participated. The final analysis of the focus group discussions produced eight domains, in which content validity was obtained through a Delphi panel survey of 27 contributing experts. Results According to the survey, a combination of the following characteristics defines an excellent AHCP: (1) cognizance, to obtain and to apply knowledge in a broad multidisciplinary health care field; (2) cooperativity, to effectively work with others in a multidisciplinary context; (3) communicative, to communicate effectively at different levels in complex situations; (4) initiative, to initiate new ideas, to act proactively, and to follow them through; (5) innovative, to devise new ideas and to implement alternatives beyond current practices; (6) introspective, to self-examine and to reflect; (7) broad perspective, to capture the big picture; and (8) evidence-driven, to find and to use scientific evidence to guide one’s decisions. Conclusion The AHCPs perspectives can be used as a reference for personal improvement for supervisors and professionals in clinical practice and for educational purposes. These perspectives may serve as a guide against which talented students can evaluate themselves. PMID:24049449

  3. A national survey of admissions criteria and processes in selected allied health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A H; Chase, L M; Lefkowitz, R; Morton-Rias, D; Chambers, C; Joe, J; Holmes, G; Bloomberg, S

    1995-01-01

    A national survey of admissions criteria and procedures was conducted for allied health programs in diagnostic medical imaging, health information management, nurse-midwifery, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and physician assistant education. From a sample of 462, 63.2% responded. The survey canvassed general program information, prerequisites, admissions procedures, and demographic trends. Respondents were primarily from public institutions with faculty actively involved in admissions. The most common prerequisites were anatomy/physiology, physics, biology, chemistry, and psychology; and the most frequently required admissions criteria were GPA, references, interviews, science GPA, and writing sample. Standardized tests were rarely utilized. The following were the major prerequisite characteristics and skills considered: academic skills, communication skills, problem-solving abilities, maturity/confidence, motivation, and work/study habits. Changing demographics were reported, including an increase in second-career, older, and ethnically diverse applicants. Also discussed were nontraditional and minority applicant admissions issues. Future research suggestions include use of noncognitive variables, and academic and clinical outcome studies. The utility of this information for validation/revision of admissions criteria are presented.

  4. What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paans W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wolter Paans, Inge Wijkamp, Egbert Wiltens, Marca V Wolfensberger Research and Innovation Group Talent Development in Higher Education and Society, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, The Netherlands. Background: Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also determines the quality of care. Aim: To describe perspectives of AHCPs on which characteristics are commonly associated with an excellent AHCP. Methods: AHCPs' perspectives were derived from three focus group discussions. Twenty-one health care professionals participated. The final analysis of the focus group discussions produced eight domains, in which content validity was obtained through a Delphi panel survey of 27 contributing experts. Results: According to the survey, a combination of the following characteristics defines an excellent AHCP: (1 cognizance, to obtain and to apply knowledge in a broad multidisciplinary health care field; (2 cooperativity, to effectively work with others in a multidisciplinary context; (3 communicative, to communicate effectively at different levels in complex situations; (4 initiative, to initiate new ideas, to act proactively, and to follow them through; (5 innovative, to devise new ideas and to implement alternatives beyond current practices; (6 introspective, to self-examine and to reflect; (7 broad perspective, to capture the big picture; and (8 evidence-driven, to find and to use scientific evidence to guide one's decisions. Conclusion: The AHCPs perspectives can be used as a reference for personal improvement for supervisors and professionals in clinical practice and for educational purposes. These perspectives may serve as a guide against which talented students can evaluate themselves. Keywords: clinical

  5. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ... manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  6. Knowledge and beliefs concerning evidence-based practice amongst complementary and alternative medicine health care practitioners and allied health care professionals: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Khalid S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practice (EBP has become an important competency in many allied and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM health care practitioners' professional standards of proficiency. Methods To compliment an EBP course for allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners, we undertook a questionnaire survey to assess learning needs. We developed a questionnaire to measure allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners' basic knowledge, skills and beliefs concerning the main principles of EBP. The questionnaires were administered to all attendees of one-day EBP workshops. Results During 2004–5 we surveyed 193 allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners who attended one-day EBP courses prior to commencement of teaching. Of the respondents 121 (62.7% were allied health care professionals and 65 (33.7% practitioners stated that they work in the CAM field Our survey found that the majority of the respondents had not previously attended a literature appraisal skills workshop (87.3% or received formal training in research methods (69.9%, epidemiology (91.2% or statistics (80.8%. Furthermore, 67.1% of practitioners specified that they felt that they had not had adequate training in EBM and they identified that they needed more training and education in the principles of EBM (86.7%. Differences in knowledge and beliefs concerning EBP amongst allied and CAM practitioners were found and length of time since qualification was also found to be an important factor in practitioner's beliefs. More CAM practitioners compared to allied health professionals accessed educational literature via the Internet (95.3% v 68.1%, p = 0.008. Whilst, practitioners with more than 11 years experience felt that original research papers were far more confusing (p = 0.02 than their less experienced colleagues. Conclusion The results demonstrate that practitioner's learning needs do vary according to the type of profession

  7. Using a Team Structure for Student-Assisted Facilitation of Laboratories in an Introductory Allied Health Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jesse Sanchez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As many instructors have noted, it is challenging to lead a successful microbiology laboratory, especially for students without sufficient prerequisite training such as in pre-allied health/nursing classes. In the community college setting, this is compounded by the lack of adequate resources, especially teaching assistants or others, to help individual students during a laboratory experience. In addition, there is much transition in the student population of the college so asking students who have completed a class to help in this setting is often impractical. To modify our system to allow students to more easily ask questions and get feedback, we designed a student facilitator system. This system allowed each student to be a leader of the team for a particular laboratory experience. Each student was individually trained to be supportive of the team as a whole. This program is useful in that it can be applied to any class-based laboratory setting to provide better student team interactions than if there were no facilitator.

  8. Implementation of a patient safety incident management system as viewed by doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglia, Joanne F; Westbrook, Mary T; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Incident reporting systems have become a central mechanism of most health services patient safety strategies. In this article we compare health professionals' anonymous, free text responses in an evaluation of a newly implemented electronic incident management system. The professions' answers were compared using classic content analysis and Leximancer, a computer assisted text analysis package. The classic analysis identified issues which differentiated the professions. More doctors commented on lack of feedback following incidents and evaluated the system negatively. More allied health staff found that the system lacked fields necessary to report incidents. More nurses complained incident reporting was time consuming. The Leximancer analysis revealed that while the professions all used the more frequently employed concepts (which described basic components of the reporting system), nurses and allied health shared many additional concepts concerned with actual reporting. Doctors applied fewer and more unique (used only by one profession) concepts when writing about the system. Doctors' unique concepts centred on criticism of the incident management system and the broader implications of safety issues, while the other professions' unique concepts focused on more practical issues. The classic analysis identified specific problems needing to be targeted in ongoing modifications of the system. The Leximancer findings, while complementing the classical analysis results, gave greater insight into professional groups' attitudes that relate to use of the system, e.g. doctors' relatively limited conceptual vocabulary regarding the system was consistent with their lower incident reporting rates. Such professional differences in reaction to healthcare innovations may constrain inter-disciplinary communication and cooperation.

  9. Successfully living with chronic arthritis : the role of the allied health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, E.; Bobiatynska, E.; Lloyd, J.; Veehof, M.M.; Rasker, W.J.; Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Rasker, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment and care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and various health professionals with different areas of expertise may be involved. The objective of this article is to review the treatments and their efficacy as provided by health care professionals in RA care. The requi

  10. A protocol for literature triage in online learning for the net-generation nursing and allied health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ateya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nursing and allied health care students use online learning resources with their own perspective of learning, often combined with curiosity. Although, students are overwhelmed with access to an enormous pool of information, we hypothesized that students may not possess the skills to appraise the merits of all online resources. Our pilot survey results have shown that students’ knowledge of literature appraisal is inadequate. Circumventing this barrier requires adopting a three-phase protocol for literature triage such as: selection, appraisal, and critical reading. These skills would facilitate assessing all aspects of the literature, and identifying the best learning material.

  11. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  12. An exploration of issues of management and intention to stay: allied health professionals in South West Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnitti, Karen; Schoo, Adrian; Dunbar, James; Reid, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Management of allied health staff and services often has implications for staff stability and retention. A survey of allied health staff in South West Victoria was conducted in 2003 to explore issues relating to recruitment and retention. Findings relating to management and retention of staff in their current job are addressed in this report. A total of 138 staff returned their questionnaires. Results were related to Maslow's hierarchy of needs, level of belonging, with professional needs identified as feeling supported, orientation to the position, clear job description, and able to recommend the position to others. Qualitative data showed that recommending the position was associated with job satisfaction, autonomy, flexibility, and variety of work. The immediate management structure was significantly related to retention. Reasons given for intending to leave were related to management categories. These were management structure, lack of career structure, and lack of professional support. Reasons given by respondents for not recommending their current position were as follows: not for long-term career, risk of deskilling if staying too long, and financially unrewarding. These reasons were also related to management. Positive reasons for staying, which were related to management, included flexible work conditions, variety of clinical and management experience, good working environment, good support, and autonomy. Recommendations are given for organizational development and training for managers.

  13. Allies in the struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draughn, Tricia; Elkins, Becki; Roy, Rakhi

    2002-10-01

    SUMMARY Providing a community that is committed to standards, diversity, and enhancement of the academic environment is often difficult. Offering an Allies or Safe Zone program is among of the first steps an institution can take to achieve a community that embraces diversity and creates a learning environment that is accepting of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered individuals. While there are many opportunities in institutional group settings to address these issues, they often go either unnoticed or untapped. How can being an ally impact the greater institutional environment? This paper will discuss the campus environment for LGBT students, examine existing Allies and Safe Zone programs, and offer a framework to assist program coordinators and participants in establishing comprehensive programs to change the campus climate and develop institutional environments that are gay affirmative.

  14. Curricular transformation of health professions education in Tanzania: the process at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (2008-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngassapa, Olipa D; Kaaya, Ephata E; Fyfe, Molly V; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kakoko, Deodatus C; Kayombo, Edmund J; Kisenge, Rodrick R; Loeser, Helen; Mwakigonja, Amos R; Outwater, Anne H; Martin-Holland, Judy; Mwambete, Kennedy D; Kida, Irene; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Tanzania requires more health professionals equipped to tackle its serious health challenges. When it became an independent university in 2007, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) decided to transform its educational offerings to ensure its students practice competently and contribute to improving population health. In 2008, in collaboration with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), all MUHAS's schools (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health and social sciences) and institutes (traditional medicine and allied health sciences) began a university-wide process to revise curricula. Adopting university-wide committee structures, procedures, and a common schedule, MUHAS faculty set out to: (i) identify specific competencies for students to achieve by graduation (in eight domains, six that are inter-professional, hence consistent across schools); (ii) engage stakeholders to understand adequacies and inadequacies of current curricula; and (iii) restructure and revise curricula introducing competencies. The Tanzania Commission for Universities accredited the curricula in September 2011, and faculty started implementation with first-year students in October 2011. We learned that curricular revision of this magnitude requires: a compelling directive for change, designated leadership, resource mobilization inclusion of all stakeholders, clear guiding principles, an iterative plan linking flexible timetables to phases for curriculum development, engagement in skills training for the cultivation of future leaders, and extensive communication.

  15. 78 FR 14034 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... techniques or other forms of information technology; and Estimates of capital or start-up costs and costs of... the 111th Congress, JCS-2-11 (March 2011) (JCT General Explanation) at 330. A State health department... select a person as the designated entity on Form 8963, ``Report of Health Insurance Provider...

  16. Differences between African-American and Caucasian students on enrollment influences and barriers in kinesiology-based allied health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J P; Cobler, D C; Lam, Eddie T C; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-06-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the workforce (3). To improve workforce diversity, kinesiology departments must understand how enrollment influences and barriers differ by race among prospective students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify differences in allied health education enrollment influences and enrollment barriers between minority and Caucasian students. Participants (n = 601) consisted of students enrolled in kinesiology-based allied health education programs. Multivariate ANOVA was used to compare group differences in enrollment decision making. "Personal influence," "career opportunity," and "physical self-efficacy" were all significantly stronger enrollment influences among African-American students than among Caucasian students, and "social influence," "experiential opportunity," "academic preparation," and "physical self-efficacy" were all perceived as significantly greater barriers compared with Caucasian students. Findings support the need to recruit African-American students through sport and physical education settings and to market program-based experiential opportunities.

  17. Cost Effective Analysis of New Markets: First Steps of Enrollment Management for Nursing and Allied Health Programs. AIR 1997 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Thomas J.; Nordone, Ronald; Donovan, Joseph W.; Thygeson, William

    This paper describes the initial analyses needed to help institutions of higher education plan majors in nursing and allied health as institutions look for new markets based on demographic and employment factors. Twelve variables were identified and weighted to describe an ideal recruitment market. Using a three-phase process, potential U.S.…

  18. Homeless health needs: shelter and health service provider perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauff, Alicia J; Secor-Turner, Molly

    2014-01-01

    The effects of homelessness on health are well documented, although less is known about the challenges of health care delivery from the perspective of service providers. Using data from a larger health needs assessment, the purpose of this study was to describe homeless health care needs and barriers to access utilizing qualitative data collected from shelter staff (n = 10) and health service staff (n = 14). Shelter staff members described many unmet health needs and barriers to health care access, and discussed needs for other supportive services in the area. Health service providers also described multiple health and service needs, and the need for a recuperative care setting for this population. Although a variety of resources are currently available for homeless health service delivery, barriers to access and gaps in care still exist. Recommendations for program planning are discussed and examined in the context of contributing factors and health care reform.

  19. Female farmworkers' health during pregnancy: health care providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen A; Flocks, Joan D; Economos, Jeannie; McCauley, Linda A

    2013-07-01

    Pregnant farmworkers and their fetuses are at increased risk of negative health outcomes due to environmental and occupational factors at their workplaces. Health care providers who serve farm communities can positively affect workers' health through the informed care they deliver. Yet, interviews with rural health care providers reveal limited knowledge about agricultural work or occupational and environmental health risks during pregnancy. Professional associations, government organizations, academic institutions, and practice settings must renew their efforts to ensure that environmental and occupational health education, especially as it relates to women and their children, is incorporated into academic and practice environments.

  20. A thematic analysis of the role of the organisation in building allied health research capacity: a senior managers’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golenko Xanthe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practice aims to achieve better health outcomes in the community. It relies on high quality research to inform policy and practice; however research in primary health care continues to lag behind that of other medical professions. The literature suggests that research capacity building (RCB functions across four levels; individual, team, organisation and external environment. Many RCB interventions are aimed at an individual or team level, yet evidence indicates that many barriers to RCB occur at an organisational or external environment level. This study asks senior managers from a large healthcare organisation to identify the barriers and enablers to RCB. The paper then describes strategies for building allied health (AH research capacity at an organisational level from a senior managers’ perspective. Methods This qualitative study is part of a larger collaborative RCB project. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with nine allied health senior managers. Recorded interviews were transcribed and NVivo was used to analyse findings and emergent themes were defined. Results The dominant themes indicate that the organisation plays an integral role in building AH research capacity and is the critical link in creating synergy across the four levels of RCB. The organisation can achieve this by incorporating research into its core business with a whole of organisation approach including its mission, vision and strategic planning. Critical success factors include: developing a co-ordinated and multidisciplinary approach to attain critical mass of research-active AH and enhance learning and development; support from senior managers demonstrated through structures, processes and systems designed to facilitate research; forming partnerships to increase collaboration and sharing of resources and knowledge; and establishing in internal framework to promote recognition for research and career path

  1. Important, misunderstood, and challenging: a qualitative study of nurses’ and allied health professionals’ perceptions of implementing self-management for patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young HML

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hannah ML Young,1 Lindsay D Apps,1 Samantha L Harrison,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,1 Nicky Hudson,2 Sally J Singh1,3 1National Institute of Health Research CLAHRC-LNR Pulmonary Rehabilitation Research Group, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, 2School of Applied Social Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, 3Applied Research Centre in Health and Lifestyle Interventions, Coventry University, Coventry, UK Background: In light of the growing burden of COPD, there is increasing focus on the role of self-management for this population. Currently, self-management varies widely. Little is known either about nurses’ and allied health professionals’ (AHPs’ understanding and provision of self-management in clinical practice. This study explores nurses’ and AHPs’ understanding and implementation of supported COPD self-management within routine clinical practice. Materials and methods: Nurses and AHPs participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews to explore their understanding and provision of COPD self-management, as well as their perceptions of the challenges to providing such care. Purposive sampling was used to select participants from a range of professions working within primary, community, and secondary care settings. Three researchers independently analyzed each transcript using a thematic approach. Results: A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Nurses and AHPs viewed self-management as an important aspect of COPD care, but often misunderstood what it involved, leading to variation in practice. A number of challenges to supporting self-management were identified, which related to lack of time, lack of insight regarding training needs, and assumptions regarding patients’ perceived self-management abilities. Conclusion: Nurses and AHPs delivering self-management require clear guidance, training in the use of effective self-management skills, and education that challenges their preconceptions regarding

  2. Uneasy allies: pro-choice physicians, feminist health activists and the struggle for abortion rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, C E; Weitz, T A; Stacey, C L

    2004-09-01

    Abortion represents a particularly interesting subject for a social movements analysis of healthcare issues because of the involvement of both feminist pro-choice activists and a segment of the medical profession. Although both groups have long shared the same general goal of legal abortion, the alliance has over time been an uneasy one, and in many ways a contradictory one. This paper traces points of convergence as well as points of contention between the two groups, specifically: highlighting the tensions between the feminist view of abortion as a women-centred service, with a limited, 'technical' role for the physicians, and the abortion-providing physicians' logic of further medicalization/professional upgrading of abortion services as a response to the longstanding marginality and stigmatisation of abortion providers. Only by noting the evolving relationships between these two crucial sets of actors can one fully understand the contemporary abortion rights movement. We conclude by speculating about similar patterns in medical/lay relationships in other health social movements where 'dissident doctors' and lay activists are similarly seeking recognition for medical services that are controversial.

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vaginitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the treatments? Are there complications? Does it affect pregnancy? How is it prevented? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vaginitis? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content To find out ...

  4. 78 FR 71476 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... under subchapter L, an entity providing health insurance under Medicare Advantage, Medicare Part D, or... entities from the DOL reporting requirements under 29 CFR 2520.101-2 governing MEWAs. The reasons... entity's status as an ECE is only relevant for reporting during a limited period of time. For...

  5. Management of behavioral health provider networks in private health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnick, Deborah W; Horgan, Constance M; Reif, Sharon; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Hodgkin, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    We explored the techniques used by private health plans or by their contracted managed behavioral healthcare organizations (MBHOs) to maintain networks of behavioral health providers. In particular, we focused on differences by health plans' product types (health maintenance organization, point-of-service plan, or preferred provider organization) and contracting arrangements (MBHO contracts, comprehensive contracts, or no contracts). More than 94% of products selected providers using credentialing standards, particular specialists, or geographic coverage. To retain providers viewed as high quality, 54% offer reduced administrative burden and 44% higher fees. Only 16% reported steerage to a core group of highest-quality providers and few reported an annual bonus or guaranteed volume of referrals. Some standard activities are common, but some health plans are adopting other approaches to retain higher-quality providers.

  6. Clinical trials in allied medical fields: A cross-sectional analysis of World Health Organization International Clinical Trial Registry Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The number of clinical trials done in allied fields of medicine other than the allopathic system has lowered down, and furthermore focus is required regarding the methodological quality of these trials and more support from various organizations.

  7. Use of Shadowing-Based Learning in an Allied Health Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex A. Lowrey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Students in an undergraduate microbiology course for health professions majors perform a shadowing-based learning exercise for their course project. Students accomplish this by shadowing a health care professional of their choice, specifically incorporating basic microbiological concept themes into their observations. These concept themes include the biological nature, health effects, detection, and control of microorganisms. Upon completion of the shadowing experience, students present a concise report, which is graded on how well the students connect course scientific concepts with actual clinical practice.

  8. Student perceptions and learning outcomes of blended learning in a massive first-year core physiology for allied health subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L; Rathner, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of their learning experience. Here we report data covering a 3-yr period in a physiology subject that has been redesigned for blended and online presentation. Consistent with previous reports, we show that when we undertook a blended mode of delivery, students demonstrated better grades than traditional modes of teaching; however the absence of didactic teaching in this subject resulted in lower grades overall. Students have very strong positive attitudes to weekly quizzes (80% positive approval) but report ambivalent attitudes to online self-directed learning (61% negative perception), even though they had 2-h weekly facilitated workshops. Overwhelmingly, students who undertook the subject in a self-directed online learning mode requested more face-to-face-teaching (70% of comments). From these data, we suggest that there is a quantifiable benefit to didactic teaching in the blended teaching mode that is not reproduced in online self-directed learning, even when face-to-face guided inquiry-based learning is embedded in the subject.

  9. Risky business: Lived experience mental health practice, nurses as potential allies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2016-09-21

    Mental health policy includes a clear expectation that consumers will participate in all aspects of the design and delivery of mental health services. This edict has led to employment roles for people with lived experience of significant mental health challenges and service use. Despite the proliferation of these roles, research into factors impacting their success or otherwise is limited. This paper presents findings from a grounded theory study investigating the experiences of Lived Experience Practitioners in the context of their employment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 Lived Experience Practitioners. Risk was identified as a core category, and included sub-categories: vulnerability, 'out and proud', fear to disclose, and self-care. Essentially participants described the unique vulnerabilities of their mental health challenges being known, and while there were many positives about disclosing there was also apprehension about personal information being so publically known. Self-care techniques were important mediators against these identified risks. The success of lived experience roles requires support and nurses can play an important role, given the size of the nursing workforce in mental health, the close relationships nurses enjoy with consumers and the contribution they have made to the development of lived experience roles within academia.

  10. Research and Practice Communications Between Oral Health Providers and Prenatal Health Providers: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvoretz, John; Dyer, Karen; Daley, Ellen; Debate, Rita; Vamos, Cheryl; Kline, Nolan; Thompson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine scholarly collaboration between oral health and prenatal providers. Oral disease is a silent epidemic with significant public health implications for pregnant women. Evidence linking poor oral health during pregnancy to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes requires oral health and prenatal providers to communicate on the prevention, treatment and co-management matters pertaining to oral health issues among their pregnant patients. The need for inter-professional collaboration is highlighted by guidelines co-endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Dental Association, stressing the importance of oral health care during pregnancy. Methods To assess if interdisciplinary communication occurs between oral health and prenatal disciplines, we conducted a network analysis of research on pregnancy-related periodontal disease. Results Social Network analysis allowed us to identify communication patterns between communities of oral health and prenatal professionals via scientific journals. Analysis of networks of citations linking journals in different fields reveals a core-periphery pattern dominated by oral health journals with some participation from medicine journals. However, an analysis of dyadic ties of citation reveals statistically significant "inbreeding" tendencies in the citation patterns: both medical and oral health journals tend to cite their own kind at greater-than-chance levels. Conclusions Despite evidence suggesting that professional collaboration benefits patients' overall health, findings from this research imply that little collaboration occurs between these two professional groups. More collaboration may be useful in addressing women's oral-systemic health concerns that result in adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vermetten

    2014-08-01

    members. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrated that in all five partners state-of-the-art preventative mental healthcare was included in the last deployment in Afghanistan, including a positive approach towards strengthening the mental resilience, a focus on self-regulatory skills and self-empowerment, and several initiatives that were well-integrated in a military context. These initiatives were partly/completely implemented by the military/colleagues/supervisors and applicable during several phases of the deployment cycle. Important new developments in operational mental health support are recognition of the role of social leadership and enhancement of operational peer support. This requires awareness of mental problems that will contribute to reduction of the barriers to care in case of problems. Finally, comparing mental health support services across countries can contribute to optimal preparation for the challenges of military deployment.

  12. An investigation of academic dishonesty in allied health: incidence and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falleur, D

    1990-01-01

    Educators in the health sciences are concerned about academic dishonesty and are searching for methods to control misconduct. If students falsify academic work, their behavior pattern may continue in professional practice, endangering the health and well-being of the patients in their care. This paper presents the results of a study of the attitudes and experiences regarding dishonest academic behaviors of a sample of 244 students and 31 faculty in the School of Health Professions at Southwest Texas State University. Student and faculty definitions of dishonest behavior were compared, and the incidence of dishonest behavior and the experiences of faculty in recognizing and disciplining students for academic misconduct were analyzed. Major findings included: 1) faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students differ in their definitions of some types of dishonest behavior; and 2) the most common types of dishonest behavior identified by faculty and students involve cheating and plagiarism. Future research is warranted with attention given to the causal factors leading to academic dishonesty and patterns of dishonesty in academic and practice settings.

  13. Engaging Allied-Health Students with Virtual Learning Environment Using Course Management System Tutorial Site

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Nguyen; Mangala Tawde

    2013-01-01

    Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II are major gateway courses into nursing and other health related sciences careers.  Being a New York City community college, the students at Queensborough Community College are highly diverse not only in their ethnic and cultural background, but also in the levels of preparedness. When they take Human Anatomy-Physiology I as the first pre-requisite class, many are either freshman or returning students after a hiatus. Many students lack formal training in S...

  14. Influencing Factors of Radiological Technologist Image of Allied Health College Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Jong Kwon; Shin, Seong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Dong A University Medical Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Perception level and social position of radiological technologist influence satisfaction level of their job. This study aims to use foundational data to improve perception level and social position of radiological technologists. We conducted interviews and a fill-out survey with 233 students who have been majoring in health-related fields at five universities and colleges located in Busan and who finished internship programs. The study analyzed 233 answer sheets excluding 17 inadequate answer sheets using T-test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis with SAS9.1. The mean score of perception level was 3.33{+-}0.56. The personal image of radiological technologist showed the best score(3.43{+-}0.56) whereas the social image showed the worst(3.12{+-}0.79). According to the classification of the subject, the answer, 'radiological technologist is specialized job', showed the best score(3.99{+-}0.79). The answer 'radiological technologist suffered from less stress and workload than others when they work usually' showed the worst score(2.88{+-}0.98). According to the classification of each health-related major, the mean score of students who are a major in the department of the radiological technologist was the best(3.46{+-}0.46) and the students who are major in department of the physical therapy was the worst(3.24{+-}0.40). The radiological technologist have to effort to make positive image in the hospital. It is possible to be developed their knowledge and professionalism by cooperating between school and hospital as well as advertising with mass madia.

  15. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... subchapter. They include: (1) Orientation and on-the-job training. (2) Part-time education for bona fide full-time employees at properly accredited academic or technical institutions (including other providers... specific time period (for example, semester or quarter), and for which a student receives a grade....

  16. Engaging Allied-Health Students with Virtual Learning Environment Using Course Management System Tutorial Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II are major gateway courses into nursing and other health related sciences careers.  Being a New York City community college, the students at Queensborough Community College are highly diverse not only in their ethnic and cultural background, but also in the levels of preparedness. When they take Human Anatomy-Physiology I as the first pre-requisite class, many are either freshman or returning students after a hiatus. Many students lack formal training in Science or Biology and are overwhelmed by the depth and immensity of the material presented in above courses. Though the enrollment for these classes is heavy; above factors lead to high attrition rates. However one common feature of this new generation of students is their access and familiarity to the internet, digital technology and other techno gadgets such as smart phones, tablets, etc. Though it is hard for us to accept, it is a fact that today’s generation of students (generation Y is more techno savvy and these gadgets engage (or distract them more than books. This indicated a clear need for developing alternatives to traditional teaching methods to engage students of an urban community college setting. We decided to investigate if a web-based supplemental tutorial would help engage these students and thus help them build their course knowledge base to improve their academic performance.

  17. Medicare Provider Payment Data - Home Health Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Home Health Agency PUF contains information on utilization, payment (Medicare payment and standard payment), and submitted charges organized by CMS Certification...

  18. Enhancing teamwork among allied health students: evaluation of an interprofessional workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Mickan, Sharon; Marinac, Julie; Woodyatt, Gail

    2005-01-01

    This report outlines the teamwork learning outcomes of an interprofessional workshop conducted with a cohort of 81 graduate-entry students of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology, and audiology. This four-hour workshop was based around a case scenario of a child with developmental coordination disorder. This report describes and evaluates the development of knowledge and skills of teamwork that were facilitated through this workshop. Students completed questionnaires before and after the workshop about their knowledge of teamwork, requisites for working together, the utility of the workshop, and learning outcomes. The evaluation indicated that the workshop was successful from the students' perspectives in confirming the importance of teamwork and the processes of communication and collaborative goal setting. Students refined their own professional roles and developed an appreciation of the contribution of other professions and parents. This recognition of the comparative value of different professional contributions in providing holistic patient care is one of the starting points for education about interprofessional teamwork.

  19. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  20. What are the Mental Health Needs of Adolescents in Rural South Australia? The Perceptions of Human Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms Marijeta Kurtin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND:Up to 20% of Australian adolescents experience the burden of having a mental health problem. Priorresearch has suggested that inhabitants of rural areas are at particular risk of mental healthmorbidity due to their location. The current study sought to investigate how ‘rurality’ influences themental health of adolescents in rural South Australia, and to explore the perceptions of the mentalhealth needs of adolescents as described by service providers in rural South Australia.METHODS:Four focus group discussions and 14 interviews were conducted with 38 human (allied health serviceproviders in the Eyre Peninsula, Spencer Gulf, Limestone Coast and Greater Green Triangle regions ofSouth Australia. Semi-structured telephone interviews were also conducted with three Victorianhuman service providers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed to identify emergentthemes.RESULTS:Ninety codes were developed and subsequently categorised into five major themes: Community andSociety Factors; Youth Issues, Indigeneity; Service Delivery and Utilisation; and Occupational Factors.Significant gaps in mental health service delivery were identified. Better utilisation of currentresources was identified as a greater concern than the absence of resources per se.CONCLUSIONS:This study provided a unique opportunity for rural allied and primary health care service providers todiscuss adolescent mental health issues in their communities and as part of their work. The datagenerated by these discussions identified areas where practice could be improved.

  1. Capturing patient encounters during health care provider training using Personal Digital Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles R; Day, David; Griffin, Audrey; Huckstadt, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary allied health education requires students experience both a depth and breadth of clinical encounters to prepare them to provide an increasingly broadening and evolving scope of practice. The Physician Assistant (PA) Studies program and the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Graduate Nursing Program at Wichita State University, College of Health Professions joined forces to undertake a project to introduce Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) to their students. One aspect of this project was the logging method used by students. The PA program further studied the tracking and used three different logging methods with three different cohorts to capture patent encounter data during standard clinical rotations: paper logs, web-based logs and Using Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs). Results indicate that patient encounter data were significantly better using PDAs than the other two methods. This report presents the background and results of the project as well as lessons learned.

  2. Allied Health Leadership in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Invitational Conference Proceedings (Williamsburg, Virginia, April 17-19, 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kra, Eleanor, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Opening Remarks" (McTernan); "Conference Goals and Plans" (Douglas); "Challenge to Leadership" (Pearson); "Implications of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for the Practice of Respiratory Care" (Axton); "Health Promotion Strategies in Dietetic Practice"…

  3. Attitudes toward the elderly with CNS trauma: a cross-sectional study of neuroscientists, clinicians, and allied-health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Julio C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2009-02-11

    Despite the potential impact of ageist attitudes on outcomes of central nervous system (CNS)-injured patients, little has been reported on this issue. Given this, we sought to conduct a questionnaire-based survey to assess the attitudes toward the elderly among basic and clinical neuroscientists, clinicians, and allied-health professionals whose research or medical practice is focused on neurotrauma. We also reviewed all abstracts presented in the National Neurotrauma Symposia from 1984 to 2007 and identified previous studies on the potential effects of age/aging on outcomes. The Kogan's Old People (KOP) scale was used to assess attitudes toward elderly individuals among all members of the National Neurotrauma Society (NNS). Of the 504 registered members, 137 subjects completed the survey that was re-mailed for non-respondents 4 weeks apart. There were no significant differences between respondents of the first and second mailings regarding their demographic and professional profiles or regarding their responses. These results support the validity of our findings in spite of the relatively low mail survey response rate (27.2%). Female gender was significantly associated with more positive attitudes toward old people compared to males. Clinicians showed significantly fewer negative attitudes toward old people in comparison with basic and clinical neuroscientists. Of the 4,194 abstracts reviewed, we identified only 44 studies (1.05%) that were explicitly focused on the effects of aging/old age on neurotrauma. In conclusion, our questionnaire-based survey, which appears to be representative of the population of interest, recognized significant differences in the attitudes toward old people among various professional groups and between male and female professionals. These findings may reflect a lack of knowledge and misconceptions regarding the impact of aging and old age on outcomes after CNS trauma. Further research on the impact of aging on outcomes after

  4. Health Information Provided by Retail Health Food Outlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn Calder

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative health practices have become increasingly popular in recent years. Many patients visit specific complementary practitioners, while others attempt to educate themselves, trusting advice from employees at local health food stores or the Internet. Thirty-two retail health food stores were surveyed on the nature of the information provided by their staff. A research assistant visited the stores and presented as the mother of a child in whom Crohn’s disease had been diagnosed. Seventy-two per cent (23 of 32 of store employees offered advice, such as to take nutritional and herbal supplements. Of the 23 stores where recommendations were made, 15 (65% based their recommendation on a source of information. Fourteen of the 15 stores using information sources used the same reference book. This had a significant impact on the recommendations; the use of nutritional supplements was favoured. In conclusion, retail health food stores are not as inconsistent as hypothesized, although there are many variances in the types of supplements recommended for the same chronic disease.

  5. Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training for Allied Professionals and Nonprofessionals in Community Mental Health. Public Health Service Publication No. 1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography presents 169 entries of materials published between 1960 and 1967 classified into the following sections: (1) Physicians--Roles and Continuing Education, (2) Nurses, (3) School Psychologists, (4) Teachers, Special Educators, (5) Clergy, (6) Social Work Technicians, Welfare Workers, (7) Police, (8) Mental Health Workers…

  6. Internet health information in the patient-provider dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Traci

    2008-10-01

    A patient discussing Internet health information with a health care provider (referred to as "patient-provider communication about Internet health information") can contribute positively to health outcomes. Although research has found that once Internet access is achieved, there are no ethnic differences in Internet health information seeking, it is unclear if there are ethnic differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information. To help fill this gap in the literature, the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey 2005 was analyzed with Stata 9. Two sets of logistic regression analyses were conducted, one for a subsample of Internet users (n = 3,244) and one for a subsample of Internet users who are first-generation immigrants (n = 563). The dependent variable was patient-provider communication about Internet health information, which assessed whether survey participants had discussed online health information with a health care provider. The predictor variables included trust of health care provider, trust of online health information, Internet use, health care coverage, frequency of visits to health care provider, health status, and demographics. Among all Internet users, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. Similarly, among Internet users who are immigrants, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. While the digital divide is narrowing in terms of Internet access, racial differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information may undermine the potential benefits of the information age.

  7. 医学技术一级学科建设基础理论研究%Basic Theory Research on Allied Health Professions as A Primary Discipline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺庆军; 万学红

    2013-01-01

    Allied Health Professions is a new primary discipline of medicine in China. This paper studies the evolution, disciplinary connotation, research object, academic domains and nature, disciplinary framework, and significance and influence of the construction and development of Allied Health Professions, and points out that the disciplinary construction process still needs to enrich a theoretical system, branch disciplines to be differentiated, high-end talents in lack, and multi-level talent cultivation and degree systems to be constructed.%医学技术是我国医学门类下的新兴一级学科,通过分析医学技术一级学科的发展历程、学科内涵、研究对象、学科性质、学科体系、学科建设的意义和作用等方面,指出该学科发展建设过程中仍存在理论体系尚待丰富、分支学科尚需分化、高端人才缺乏、多层次人才培养和学位体系需要构建等问题.

  8. Medical Services: Nonphysician Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of osteopathy ). (2) PAs may write routine orders on inpatients, using DA Form 4256 (Doctor’s Orders). (3) When required, inpatient treatment...of medicine or osteopathy , who are authorized and responsible for determining, starting, or altering the regimen of medical treatment provided to a

  9. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Gärtner; S.M. Ketelaar; O. Smeets; L. Bolier; E. Fischer; F.J.H. van Dijk; K. Nieuwenhuijsen; J.K. Sluiter

    2011-01-01

    Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions

  10. The $500,000 deduction limitation for remuneration provided by certain health insurance providers. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-23

    This document contains final regulations on the application of the $500,000 deduction limitation for remuneration provided by certain health insurance providers under section 162(m)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). These regulations affect certain health insurance providers providing remuneration that exceeds the deduction limitation.

  11. Using the National Provider Identifier for Health Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The establishment in recent years of a National Provider Identifier (NPI) offers a new method for counting and categorizing physicians and other health care...

  12. Informal sector providers in Bangladesh: how equipped are they to provide rational health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Masud; Hossain, Md Awlad; Chowdhury, Mushtaque Raja

    2009-11-01

    In Bangladesh, there is a lack of knowledge about the large body of informal sector practitioners, who are the major providers of health care to the poor, especially in rural areas, knowledge which is essential for designing a need-based, pro-poor health system. This paper addresses this gap by presenting descriptive data on their professional background including knowledge and practices on common illnesses and conditions from a nationwide, population-based health-care provider survey undertaken in 2007. The traditional healers (43%), traditional birth attendants (TBAs, 22%), and unqualified allopathic providers (village doctors and drug sellers, 16%) emerged as major providers in the health care scenario of Bangladesh. Community health workers (CHWs) comprised about 7% of the providers. The TBAs/traditional healers had sector, instead of ignoring, recognize the importance of the informal providers for the health care of the poor. Consequently, their capacity should be developed through training, supportive supervision and regulatory measures so as to accommodate them in the mainstream health system until constraints on the supply of qualified and motivated health care providers into the system can be alleviated.

  13. The Use of Personal Narrative in Classroom Case Study Analysis to Improve Long-term Knowledge Retention and Cultivate Professional Qualities in Allied Health Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M. Young

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the use of two different case study formats (clinically-oriented cases versus personally-oriented cases to determine which was most effective in promoting long-term retention of clinically significant microbiology concepts, developing patient empathy, improving comprehension of patient compliance problems, and facilitating student understanding of transcultural health care concerns. The analysis was conducted in multiple sections of three different introductory microbiology classes targeting specific cohorts: nursing students, pharmacy students and other allied health students (pre-med, pre-PA, CLS, etc.. Retention of course content was determined by evaluation of multiple-choice and short answer examinations at least three weeks after completing case studies. Evaluation of patient empathy, understanding of patient compliance issues and transcultural health care concerns were determined via student surveys. The results of the study indicated that personalized cases significantly improved long-term retention of course content. In addition, student responses indicated that personalized case studies were more effective in developing patient empathy and aiding students in understanding issues patients have with complying with treatment recommendations. Finally, personalized case studies were effective tools for introducing students to the challenges of transcultural health care.

  14. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  15. Aligning Provider Team Members With Polyvalent Community Health Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Beth A; Davis, Sheila; Kulbok, Pamela; Frank-Lightfoot, Loraine; Sgarlata, Lisa; Poree, Shawanda

    2015-01-01

    In light of the fragmentation of health care services and the need for health promotion and disease prevention, it is time to consider the important role community health workers (CHWs) could play as part of the health care team. Globally, CHWs tend to focus on a single patient condition, resulting in fragmented, uncoordinated health care services. Polyvalent (or multimodal) CHWs can provide a comprehensive, patient-centric range of care coordination services with other members of the health care team, ultimately improving patient outcomes and decreasing the cost of care. The potential benefits of the polyvalent CHW to the health care team are not widely understood in the United States. To fill this knowledge gap, a toolkit for nurse leaders in mainstream health care settings was created. The toolkit outlines the key elements essential to a successful CHW program and offers strategies for navigating the various challenges involved when integrating this new role into existing models of care.

  16. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  17. Human Trafficking: The Role of the Health Care Provider

    OpenAIRE

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setti...

  18. Human trafficking: the role of the health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed.

  19. Health service providers in Somalia: their readiness to provide malaria case-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen Bruno

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have highlighted the inadequacies of the public health sector in sub-Saharan African countries in providing appropriate malaria case management. The readiness of the public health sector to provide malaria case-management in Somalia, a country where there has been no functioning central government for almost two decades, was investigated. Methods Three districts were purposively sampled in each of the two self-declared states of Puntland and Somaliland and the south-central region of Somalia, in April-November 2007. A survey and mapping of all public and private health service providers was undertaken. Information was recorded on services provided, types of anti-malarial drugs used and stock, numbers and qualifications of staff, sources of financial support and presence of malaria diagnostic services, new treatment guidelines and job aides for malaria case-management. All settlements were mapped and a semi-quantitative approach was used to estimate their population size. Distances from settlements to public health services were computed. Results There were 45 public health facilities, 227 public health professionals, and 194 private pharmacies for approximately 0.6 million people in the three districts. The median distance to public health facilities was 6 km. 62.3% of public health facilities prescribed the nationally recommended anti-malarial drug and 37.7% prescribed chloroquine as first-line therapy. 66.7% of public facilities did not have in stock the recommended first-line malaria therapy. Diagnosis of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT or microscopy was performed routinely in over 90% of the recommended public facilities but only 50% of these had RDT in stock at the time of survey. National treatment guidelines were available in 31.3% of public health facilities recommended by the national strategy. Only 8.8% of the private pharmacies prescribed artesunate plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, while 53

  20. Providing Mental Health Services to Arab Americans: Recommendations and Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Chris D.; Al-Timimi, Nada R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents background information on the cultural sociopathology of the Arab American experience. It discusses how, in order to effectively deliver services, mental health workers need to be aware of their own biases. It explores ways to provide culturally relevant mental health services to Arab Americans. (JDM)

  1. Patient provider communication about the health effects of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durant, Nefertiti H.; Bartman, Barbara; Person, Sharina D.; Collins, Felicia; Austin, S. Bryn

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the influence of race/ethnicity and provider Communication oil overweight and obese patients' perceptions of the damage weight causes to their health. Methods: The-study included 1071 overweight and obese patients who completed the 2002 Community Health Center (CHC) User surve

  2. Physician and provider education for improving health and eliminating disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, George; Pattillo, Roland A; Matthews, Roland; Dubois, Anne M

    2007-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Primary Care and Prevention Conference and the Eleventh Annual HeLa Women's Health Conference was held on September 11-13, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia. The reports in this supplement of Ethnicity & Disease provide a sample of the presentations made during the primary care and women's health sessions.

  3. Mental Health Service Providers: College Student Perceptions of Helper Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Ashley M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael W; Poindexter, Dawn C.; Pujara, Amita L.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate perceptions of the overall effectiveness of six types of mental health service providers (MHSPs) were obtained with a survey. Although many mental health services are available to consumers in the United States, research has indicated that these services are underutilized. Perceptions have been linked to therapeutic outcomes and may…

  4. Enhancement of Anatomical Learning and Developing Clinical Competence of First-Year Medical and Allied Health Profession Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A.; VanderMeulen, Stephane P.; Shostrom, Valerie K.; Lomneth, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession…

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... menstruating. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Bacterial vaginosis: CDC fact sheet . Retrieved May 10, 2012, from ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... in 166 boys, adolescents and adults with nonmosaic Klinefelter syndrome: A Copenhagen experience. Acta Paediatrica , Jun;100(6), ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant is ...

  8. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Spina Bifida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Publications How do health care providers diagnose spina bifida? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Doctors diagnose spina bifida before or after the infant is born. Spina ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ee-on-ik VILL-uhs ) sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis (pronounced am-nee-oh-sen-TEE-sis ). The ... tested for the presence of abnormal collagen. For amniocentesis, a health care provider takes a small amount ...

  10. Sexual health service providers' perceptions of transgender youth in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Ayla R F; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2017-01-23

    Transgender youth often face difficulties when accessing sexual health services. However, few studies investigate health service providers' perceptions of transgender youth, and fewer focus on sexual health. To fill this gap, our study draws on social representations theory to examine sexual health service providers' perceptions of transgender youth and how this influences the provision of health services for this marginalised population in England. A thematic analysis of 20 semi-structured interviews with service providers, conducted between March and June 2014, resulted in five main themes centred on: binary representations of transgender; transgender as homosexuality; uncertain bodies; unstable mental states; and too young to know. Of the service providers interviewed, many understood transgender within a male/female binary, and perceived being transgender to be synonymous with being gay. There was confusion among service providers regarding transgender youths' sexual organs, and most of those interviewed saw transgender youth as mentally unstable and confused. Finally, many service providers perceived that transgender youth are too young to know that they are transgender and make decisions about their body. Some of these representations were potentially stigmatising and many conflicted with transgender youths' representations of themselves. Training by transgender people is recommended to help address these misunderstandings.

  11. Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Decia Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

  12. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... no intelligence about the health care provider in the number. (b) Required and permitted uses for the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section 162.406 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  13. Managing smarter: a decision support system for mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, L; Muse, L; McInerney, C

    1998-11-01

    Financing of mental health care has changed radically, especially with managed care. Shrinking revenues have forced providers to look for creative ways in which to provide quality services at less expense. Delivery of quality services depends largely on the productive use of the provider's prime resource--the clinicians. Productivity was the focus of the PC-based decision support system developed for mental health providers in New York State. It enables administrators to track key indicators of productivity such as face-to-face time and non-face-to-face time against goals. Unmet goals can be pinpointed quickly, and clinicians' caseloads can be reviewed to determine the underlying causes. A key feature of the system is the conversion of raw data into actionable information to help in problem finding and problem solving. The system has been implemented in Ulster County, the pilot site for the project. The software can be customized easily to suit the data of other providers.

  14. Provider-owned health plans: El Dorado or Armageddon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, E J

    1999-11-01

    The development of provider-owned health plans continues to be an important strategy of integrated delivery systems (IDSs). While HMO enrollment growth has continued, reaching almost 70 million people, average health plan profit margins have declined from 8 percent in 1994 to less than 1 percent in 1997. About 56 percent of HMOs lost money in 1998. The ability to successfully develop and operate a provider-owned HMO is affected by conditions inherent to the managed care industry, the level of cooperation among IDS business, units, and local market conditions.

  15. Who Do Batswana Men Prefer: Male or Female Health Providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letshwenyo-Maruatona, Sandra

    2015-12-14

    Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services are rarely designed specifically to meet men's needs. There is a general consensus among clinicians that males need access to SRH services. Studies have reported that men are often hesitant to go to health facilities because they feel uncomfortable being served by female providers. The study sought to determine whether men who participate in SRH services have specific preference for the gender of health workers for consultation on different types of services. A mixed-method design was employed. A combination of stratified proportional sampling of facilities and criterion purposive sampling of participants were used. Questionnaires were used to collect data from 390 participants, which were complemented with 10 in-depth interviews. Chi-square analysis with post hoc comparisons were used to determine whether there were significant differences in gender preference for specific services. Based on the data, Batswana males did not have any gender preference of the health provider for consultation on SRH services. The gender of the provider is of minor importance compared with other characteristics such as competence and confidentiality. However, the gender of the provider seems to be more important to younger men for delivery, sexually transmitted infections, voluntary counselling, and testing services. Further research is needed because the study was conducted in the city and the participants' characteristics may be unique to an urban setting. Preferences for providers among demographic groups can be useful in informing resource prioritization and help direct program efforts to reach different subgroups of males.

  16. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Ria; Kolli, Santharam; Bauer, Johannes H

    2013-01-01

    The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans). Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health.

  17. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Chhabra

    Full Text Available The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans. Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health.

  18. HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papagiannopoulou E.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The term domestic violence describes a violent behaviour that ranges from verbal abuse, physical and sexual assault to rape and homicide. The vast majority of domestic violence incidents involve men being violent to women that they do not “break their silence”, as they usually do not know from whom they can ask help. Domestic violence against women has been defined as an important problem of public health with serious consequences for women, which it offends their physical and emotional integrity in short and long-term period and causes negative social impact. Studies, that have been conducted by researchers who come from different health care systems, have developed important evaluation methods, action kit and screening tools in order to support women that are victims of intimate partner violence. The potential use of these tools by health care providers could contribute in the effective confrontation of such incidents. The failure of health care providers to identify intimate partner violence incidents and offer support to its victims, constitutes an important problem for which various factors are incriminated, such as their lack of special education, their negative attitude towards the victims, and their difficulty to comprehend why women stay in violent relationships. In conclusion, it is noticed that the assistance and support of women victims of domestic violence is a moral obligation for the health care providers.

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These symptoms may include delays in speech and language skills, social and emotional difficulties, and being sensitive to certain sensations. Children may also be delayed in or have problems with motor skills such as learning to walk. A health care provider can perform ...

  20. Enhancing Healthcare Provider Feedback and Personal Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Salkeld, Glenn;

    2015-01-01

    In this protocol for a pilot study we seek to establish the feasibility of using a web-based survey to simultaneously supply healthcare organisations and agencies with feedback on a key aspect of the care experience they provide and increase the generic health decision literacy of the individuals...

  1. Behavioral Genetics and the Forensic Mental Health Provider: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Tracy D

    2015-10-01

    The area of behavioral genetics has sufficiently entered the area of forensic mental health work that providers should have some working knowledge of the strengths and limitations of these exciting technical advances. Using MAOA as an example, this essay reviews some of the recurring themes in forensic behavioral genetics and suggests additional ways in which the technology might be used in legal matters.

  2. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  3. The State of the Psychology Health Service Provider Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Daniel S.; Kohout, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of…

  4. From vision to reality--managing change in the provision of library and information services to nurses, midwives, health visitors and PAMs: (professions allied to medicine) a case study of the North Thames experience with the Inner London Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbolt, S; Williamson, J; Wilson, A

    1997-06-01

    One of the North Thames' pioneering consortia, the Inner London Consortium (ILC) is a complex body which includes NHS Trusts with teaching hospital university connections, community-based Trusts and general hospital acute Trusts. Within the consortium there are 12,000 trained nurses, midwives, health visitors and other professional staff working in the professions allied to medicine (PAMs), all of whom require access to and provision of appropriate library information services. In 1994, taking into account experiences elsewhere in the Region and nationally, it became clear that library issues were complex and would become acute with the move of nursing libraries from ILC Trust sites over a very short timescale. A report on the issues commissioned by the Consortium recommended that a library project, which built on existing NHS Trust PGMDE funded library resources and moved these to a multidisciplinary base to serve the consortium membership, be implemented. The objective of providing access to library information services for nurses and PAMs was achieved. Successes that emerged from the implementation included: The registration in Trust libraries of almost 12 000 new members within the initial 6-month monitoring period. The development of service level agreements and standards for the delivery of services to these new user groups. This paper describes the processes behind these significant and complex changes.

  5. 78 FR 19949 - The $500,000 Deduction Limitation for Remuneration Provided by Certain Health Insurance Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... Deduction Limitation for Remuneration Provided by Certain Health Insurance Providers; Proposed Rule #0;#0... Remuneration Provided by Certain Health Insurance Providers AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury... application of the $500,000 deduction limitation for remuneration provided by certain health...

  6. Providing nursing leadership in a community residential mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Frances A; Bamford, Anita

    2011-07-01

    The worldwide burden of mental illness is increasing. Strong leadership is increasingly emerging as a core component of good mental health nursing. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ways in which nurses can provide strong and consistent leadership in a values-based practice environment that embodies respect for individuals' dignity and self-determination within a community residential mental health service, which provides a structural foundation for effective action. This is accomplished through the presentation of two vignettes, which highlight how the seemingly impossible becomes possible when an economic paradigm such as agency theory is exchanged for a sociological and psychological paradigm found in leadership as stewardship at the point of service. It is through stronger nursing leadership in mental health that stigma and discrimination can be reduced and better access to treatments and services can be gained by those with mental illness. Nurse leadership in mental health services is not new, but it is still relatively uncommon to see residential services for "high needs" individuals being led by nurses. How nurses meet the challenges faced by mental health services are often at the heart of effective leadership skills and strategies.

  7. Career choices in allied health: A study of influencing factors on students of medical technology at an Indian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammita J Jadhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, entry level medical technology (MT students usually decide their career choice before the commencement of the graduate programs. There is no provision for assimilating the intricacies of different specializations in the field of MT. Aim: The research aims at identifying the factors that play a major role in reaching a career choice by MT students and disseminating this information to stakeholders for effective program design and delivery. Setting and Designs: An exploratory study was carried out at an Indian university on 78 students of MT programs in Cardiac care, dialysis, respiratory therapy, imaging sciences, clinical laboratory, operation theater and Anesthesia technology. Materials and Methods: Students were surveyed to ascertain the influencing factors that shape their preferences for career choice preceded by focus group interview. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using SPSS Inc. Version 16.0; frequency distribution was used to obtain valid percentage. Cross tabulation was used to arrive at P value. Results: The prime factors influencing career choices emerged as Hospital infrastructure (91.3%, working environment (87%, alumni (P = 0.04 and status of specialization (P = 0.02 at 95% of the confidence interval however; profile of patient, use of equipment and career growth (78% also played an influential role. Conclusion: It is critical to understand and address the influencing factors that affect career choices; necessitating academia and the health care industry to partner in creating better adapted medical technologists.

  8. Mindfulness meditation for veterans---implications for occupational health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Norma G

    2008-08-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MfM) is a mind-body therapy identified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Initially taught in a formal classroom setting, MfM is a sustainable intervention with minimal costs that can be used over time. For veterans, after mastery, this technique shows promise in improving health outcomes and quality of life. This article describes MfM, discusses the conceptual framework and evidence-based research for MfM, and identifies the implications of MfM use by health care providers who are caring for war veterans.

  9. Quality of Health Services Provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghrid S. Suifan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Quality of services measurement has been the concern of many scholars who have tried to develop scales for it. The most popular scale used was SERVQUAL. Hence the aim of this study is to discover the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers in Amman. Approach: A sample study was derived from (1652 male and female patients from five health centers: Ashrafieh Health Center; Al-Hashemi Health Center; Marka Health Center; Al-Taj Health Center and AL-Hussein Health Center. Means, Standard Deviation, Independent Sample T-Test, simple regression and the Scheffe Test were used to answer the study's main questions. Results: It was found that the quality of health services provided to the Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent health centers was high in all dimensions, the highest quality dimensions displayed among the health service available at Jordan Red Crescent health centers were tangibles and assurance, whereas the lowest quality dimensions were empathy and responsiveness, there was a significant difference in the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers (Ashrafieh Health Center, Al-Hashemi Health Center, Marka Health Center, Al-Taj Health Center and AL-Hussein Health Center from one center to another and there was a significant difference in the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent health centers based on the number of visits the Iraqis made to the center. Conclusion: The main recommendation presented in this study is that there is a need to expand the health services in cooperation with international humanitarian organizations in order to accommodate the rising number of Iraqis frequenting the centers.

  10. Behavioral Health Providers and Electronic Health Records: An Exploratory Beliefs Elicitation and Segmentation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is a public policy strategy to improve healthcare quality and reduce accelerating health care costs. Much research has focused on medical providers' perceptions of EHRs, but little is known about those of behavioral health providers. This research was informed by the theory of reasoned…

  11. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Carotenoids and Lycopenes Chemistry; Metabolism, Absorption, Nutrition, and Allied Health Claims--A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Rashida; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Pasha, Imran; Ahmad, Sarfraz

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most essential herbaceous plants that have been probed against various life sight related disorders owing to array of phytochemicals. It is important source of vitamin C, potassium, folic acid, and carotenoids, such as lycopene. Carotenoids are the pigments synthesized during fruit ripening and responsible for the final red color of the tomato. Consumption of tomato and tomato-based products contribute to the absorption of carotenoids and lycopenes in human serum. Lycopene is chemically acyclic carotene with 11 conjugated double bonds, normally in transconfiguration while isomerization occur in blood plasma for its better absorption. It has ability for adenosine deaminase inhibition that plays important role in the regression of tumor. Tomato also contain other active compounds, namely, neoxanthin, lutein, α-cryptoxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene, cyclolycopene, and β-carotene 5, 6-epoxide. These components provide synergistic effect against various threats but still need further attention of the researchers. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the potential of tomato against variety of metabolic syndromes. Latest research highlights the relationship between consuming tomato and its products with reduced risk of various maladies like obesity, hyperglycemic and hypercholesterolemic attributes, cardiovascular disorders, and cancer insurgences. Moreover, tomato and its bioactive components hold potential to become effective modules in diet-based regimens; however, integrated research and meta-analysis are still required to enhance meticulousness.

  12. Reproductive tract infections in northern Vietnam: health providers' diagnostic dilemmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, My Hu'o'ng; Gammeltoft, Tine; Christoffersen, Sarah Vigh

    2010-01-01

    -technicians providing reproductive health services. A marked tendency was observed among both clinicians and lab-technicians to overdiagnose reproductive tract infections and to prescribe antibiotics routinely. Social, cultural, and clinical factors associated with the tendency to overdiagnose reproductive tract...... infections included: inadequate training of health staff, lack of equipment, and cultural assumptions regarding the overwhelming prevalence of reproductive tract infections in Vietnamese women, especially among those who receive abortion services. Misconceptions of reproductive tract infections led...... to substantial over-diagnosis and unnecessary treatment of reproductive tract infections in this hospital. To enhance reproductive tract infection care, providers need to be sensitized to the social and medical consequences of their own cultural perceptions and to increase their awareness of the risks associated...

  13. Financial health and customer satisfaction in private health care providers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiozer, Rafael Felipe; Saito, Cristiana Checchia; Saito, Richard

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the financial health and organizational form of private health care providers in Brazil. It also examines the major determinants of customer satisfaction associated with the provider's organizational form. An adjusted Altman's z-score is used as an indicator of financial health. A proxy variable based on customer complaints filed at the Brazilian National Agency for Supplementary Health is used as an indicator for customer satisfaction. The study uses a sample of 270 private health care providers and their operations over the period 2003-2005. Panel data analysis includes control variables related to market, operations, and management. Principal results indicate that: (1) private health care providers benefit from economies of scale; (2) self-funded health plans have better financial health; (3) spending on marketing does not have a significant impact on customer satisfaction in Brazil; (4) weak empirical evidence exists showing that good financial performance enhances customer's satisfaction.

  14. Knowledge and Attitudes of Allied Health Professional Students regarding the Stroke Rehabilitation Team and the Role of the Speech and Language Therapist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Aine; Pettigrew, Catharine M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: One of the major barriers to effective team working among healthcare professionals is a lack of knowledge of each other's roles. The importance of understanding Irish healthcare students' attitudes towards team working and each other's roles led to the development of this study. Aims: The aims were to investigate allied health…

  15. Treatment essentials and training for health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil M Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of awareness among health care providers (HCPs is one of the biggest challenges for the management of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM in India. Major challenges faced by HCPs include lack of awareness about the disease among general physicians and inadequately trained staff to deal with children with T1DM. The changing diabetes in children (CDiC program is helping in overcoming these barriers faced by HCPs. CDiC provides treatment, monitoring tools, and education to children affected with T1DM and has been instrumental is developing various education and awareness tools.

  16. Provider barriers to telemental health: obstacles overcome, obstacles remaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth; Turvey, Carolyn; Augusterfer, Eugene F

    2013-06-01

    Many providers are hesitant to use telemental health technologies. When providers are queried, various barriers are presented, such as the clinician's skepticism about the effectiveness of telemental health (TMH), viewing telehealth technologies as inconvenient, or reporting difficulties with medical reimbursement. Provider support for TMH is critical to its diffusion because clinicians often serve as the initial gatekeepers to telehealth implementation and program success. In this article, we address provider concerns in three broad domains: (1) personal barriers, (2) clinical workflow and technology barriers, and (3) licensure, credentialing, and reimbursement barriers. We found evidence that, although many barriers have been discussed in the literature for years, advancements in TMH have rapidly reduced obstacles for its use. Improvements include extensive opportunities for training, a growing evidence base supporting positive TMH outcomes, and transformations in technologies that improve provider convenience and transmission quality. Recommendations for further change are discussed within each domain. In particular, it is important to grow and disseminate data underscoring the promise and effectiveness of TMH, integrate videoconferencing capabilities into electronic medical record platforms, expand TMH reimbursement, and modify licensure standards.

  17. Facilitating communication about sexual health between aging women and their health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Anne K; Lewinson, Terri D W

    2015-04-01

    Many women experience changes in sexual health as they age, and discussing these changes with health care providers is an essential component of optimal health management. The purpose of this study was to understand aging women's perspectives about communicating with providers about sexual health. We used the integrative model of behavioral prediction as a theoretical lens to explore women's attitudes, perceived norms, and perceived self-efficacy that promote or inhibit the likelihood of communicating about sexual health. In this theory-based qualitative study, we interviewed 28 community-dwelling older women in the Midwestern United States. Through thematic analysis, we identified both positive and negative attitudes about communicating with providers. Women seemed most inclined to discuss sexual health if they perceived that important patient-provider conditions, such as trust and rapport, were in place. Despite situational obstacles and perceived norms, these women held strong beliefs about their abilities to discuss sexual health topics with providers.

  18. PROVIDER CHOICE FOR OUTPATIENT HEALTH CARE SERVICES IN INDONESIA: THE ROLE OF HEALTH INSURANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Hidayat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesian's health care system is characterized by underutilized of the health-care infrastructure. One of the ways to improve the demand for formal health care is through health insurance. Responding to this potentially effective policy leads the Government of Indonesia to expand health insurance coverage by enacting the National Social Security Act in 2004. In this particular issue, understanding provider choice is therefore a key to address the broader policy question as to how the current low uptake of health care services could be turned in to an optimal utilization. Objective:To estimate a model of provider choice for outpatient care in Indonesia with specific attention being paid to the role of health insurance. Methods: A total of 16485 individuals were obtained from the second wave of the Indonesian Family Life survey. A multinomial logit regression model was applied to a estimate provider choice for outpatient care in three provider alternative (public, private and self-treatment. A policy simulation is reported as to how expanding insurance benefits could change the patterns of provider choice for outpatient health care services. Results: Individuals who are covered by civil servant insurance (Askes are more likely to use public providers, while the beneficiaries of private employees insurance (Jamsostek are more likely to use private ones compared with the uninsured population. The results also reveal that less healthy, unmarried, wealthier and better educated individuals are more likely to choose private providers than public providers. Conclusions: Any efforts to improve access to health care through health insurance will fail if policy-makers do not accommodate peoples' preferences for choosing health care providers. The likely changes in demand from public providers to private ones need to be considered in the current social health insurance reform process, especially in devising premium policies and benefit packages

  19. Sex differences in health care provider communication during genital herpes care and patients' health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary care medicine demonstrates that health care providers' communication varies depending on their sex, and that these sex differences in communication can influence patients' health outcomes. The present study aimed to examine the extent to which sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to the sensitive context of gynecological care for genital herpes and whether these potential sex differences in communication influence patients' herpes transmission prevention behaviors and herpes-related quality of life. Women (N = 123) from the United States recently diagnosed with genital herpes anonymously completed established measures in which they rated (a) their health care providers' communication, (b) their herpes transmission prevention behaviors, and (c) their herpes-related quality of life. The authors found significant sex differences in health care providers' communication; this finding supports that sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to gynecological care for herpes. Specifically, patients with female health care providers indicated that their providers engaged in more patient-centered communication and were more satisfied with their providers' communication. However, health care providers' sex did not predict women's quality of life, a finding that suggests that health care providers' sex alone is of little importance in patients' health outcomes. Patient-centered communication was significantly associated with greater quality-of-life scores and may provide a promising avenue for intervention.

  20. HIV/AIDS EDUCATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević Agima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine perceptions of service providers in the healthcare on their awareness and knowledge about HIV/AIDS, as well as the relationship of the above parameters and the existence of stigma and discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS. Method: The type of the study was a behavioral cross sectional study. The survey was conducted in 2012, on a representative sample of health workers in Montenegro. The main survey instrument was specifically designed questionnaire that consisted of six parts, out of which one was related to knowledge about HIV and AIDS. Data were analyzed by methods of inferential statistics. Results: More than four out of ten respondents have never attended educational workshops on HIV/AIDS. Research has shown that there is a highly significant statistical correlation between estimates of their own knowledge about HIV / AIDS and previous educations. Almost two-thirds of respondents, who attended some type of education in the field of HIV/AIDS, believe to have a satisfactory level of knowledge in the area. Conclusion: Health care service providers evaluate their knowledge of HIV/AIDS as insufficient.

  1. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  2. Health care providers' perspective of the gender influences on immigrant women's mental health care experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Joyce M; Donnelly, Tamphd T

    2007-10-01

    The number of immigrants coming to Canada has increased in the last three decades. It is well documented that many immigrant women suffer from serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders. Evidence has shown that immigrant women experience difficulties in accessing and using mental health services. Informed by the post-colonial feminist perspective, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provide mental health services to immigrant women. In-depth interviews were used to obtain information about immigrant women's mental health care experiences. The primary goal was to explore how contextual factors intersect with race, gender, and class to influence the ways in which immigrant women seek help and to increase awareness and understanding of what would be helpful in meeting the mental health care needs of the immigrant women. The study's results reveal that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties accessing mental health care due to insufficient language skills, unfamiliarity/unawareness of services, and low socioeconomic status; (b) participants identified structural barriers and gender roles as barriers to accessing the available mental health services; (c) the health care relationship between health care providers and women had profound effects on whether or not immigrant women seek help for mental health problems.

  3. Vietnamese Health Care Providers' Preferences Regarding Recommendation of HPV Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiedu, Gladys B; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Kremers, Walter K; Ngo, Quang V; Nguyen, Nguyen V; Barenberg, Benjamin J; Tran, Vinh D; Dinh, Tri A

    2015-01-01

    Physician recommendation is an important predictor of HPV vaccine acceptance; however, physician willingness and preferences regarding HPV vaccination may be influenced by factors including patient age, vaccine type, and cost. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a convenience sample of health care providers in Da Nang, Vietnam, to evaluate awareness, perceptions about HPV and HPV vaccines, and willingness to vaccinate a female patient. Willingness to vaccinate was evaluated using a full-factorial presentation of scenarios featuring the following factors: vaccine cost (free vs 1,000,000 VND), patient age (12, 16, or 22 years), and HPV vaccine type (bivalent vs quadrivalent). Responses from 244 providers were analyzed; providers had a mean age of 34±11.9 years; a majority were female, married, and had children of their own. Thirty-six percent specialized in obstetrics/gynecology and 24% were providers in family medicine. Of the three factors considered in conjoint analysis, vaccine cost was the most important factor in willingness to vaccinate, followed by patient age, and vaccine type. The most favorable scenario for vaccinating a female patient was when the vaccine was free, the patient was 22 years of age, and the HPV4 vaccine was described. In multivariable analysis, older age, being a physician, being married, and having children were all associated with increased willingness to recommend HPV vaccination (p<0.05). Provider willingness is an important aspect of successful HPV vaccination programs; identifying preferences and biases in recommendation patterns will highlight potential areas for education and intervention.

  4. Estimating the Costs of Services Provided by Health House and Health Centers in Shahroud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad amiri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calculating cost is an important management tool for programming, control, supervision and evaluation of health services in order that informed decisions can be done. This study was done to determine the cost of services provided by health centers, and health house in Shahroud in 2009.Methods: In this study, all health centers in urban and rural regions were studied. 70 forms for provided services, public and specific materials used for each service, medicine and equipment, time required for each service and activities, buildings and equipment depreciation costs were used to collect the data. Then the costs of each unit including direct and indirect costs (overhead, as well as the costs of one center and one health care home were calculated through cost analysis software. Results: Findings from data analysis showed that 44.4% of health care providers were male and 55.6% were female. 22.8% of the personnel were working in health house, 26.1% in rural health centers, 9.1% in urban health centers, health centers 24.5% in urban boarding health centers, 2.6% in health care posts and 14.9% were working in Healthcare Department. The highest cost were personnel costs (66.1% followed by central department costs (12.8%. Next were the costs for drug consumption with 11.0% and specific use with 3.8%. The highest cost was also for training healthcare providers (1325209 RLS and lowest cost was for sampling of influenza (3872 RLS. Conclusion: Due to high personnel costs, increasing of productivity will play an important role in reducing labor costs .Also, moderating workforce and the using private sector participation in services and outsourcing costly units can play an important role in optimum utilization of resources.

  5. Defense Health Care: Additional Information Needed about Mental Health Provider Staffing Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Members, and Military Families (Aug. 31, 2012). Page 2 GAO-15-184 DOD Mental Health Staffing of mental health providers.4 These...improve these services. See Executive Order 13625, Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Veterans, Service Members, and Military Families ...beneficiary population has missing information for one or more risk factor data elements. PHRAMS assigns these individuals to an “unknown” group

  6. OIG’s Compliance Resources for Health Care Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — OIG has developed a series of voluntary compliance program guidance documents directed at various segments of the health care industry, such as hospitals, nursing...

  7. Review: Increasing Awareness and Education on Health Disparities for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Shawna; Palomarez, Rigo Estevan

    2016-04-21

    The focus of this review is to highlight health care disparities and trends in several common diseases in selected populations while offering evidence-based approaches to mitigating health care disparities. Health care disparities cross many barriers and affect multiple populations and diseases. Ethnic minorities, the elderly, and those of lower socioeconomic status (SES) are more at-risk than others. However, many low SES Whites and higher SES racial minorities have poorer health than their racial or SES peers. Also, recent immigrant groups and Hispanics, in particular, maintain high health ratings. The so-called Hispanic Paradox provides an example of how culture and social background can be used to improve health outcomes. These groups have unique determinants of disparity that are based on a wide range of cultural and societal factors. Providing improved access to care and reducing the social determinants of disparity is crucial to improving public health. At the same time, for providers, increasing an understanding of the social determinants promotes better models of individualized care to encourage more equitable care. These approaches include increasing provider education on disparities encountered by different populations, practicing active listening skills, and utilizing a patient's cultural background to promote healthy behaviors.

  8. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  9. Providing primary health care through integrated microfinance and health services in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Kimberley H; Leatherman, Sheila

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous burdens of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in middle-income countries. The poor are at particular risk, with lower access to health care and higher rates of avoidable mortality. Integrating health-related services with microfinance has been shown to improve health knowledge, behaviors, and access to appropriate health care. However, limited evidence is available on effects of fully integrating clinical health service delivery alongside microfinance services through large scale and sustained long-term programs. Using a conceptual model of health services access, we examine supply- and demand-side factors in a microfinance client population receiving integrated services. We conduct a case study using data from 2010 to 2012 of the design of a universal screening program and primary care services provided in conjunction with microfinance loans by Pro Mujer, a women's development organization in Latin America. The program operates in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru. We analyze descriptive reports and administrative data for measures related to improving access to primary health services and management of chronic diseases. We find provision of preventive care is substantial, with an average of 13% of Pro Mujer clients being screened for cervical cancer each year, 21% receiving breast exams, 16% having a blood glucose measurement, 39% receiving a blood pressure measurement, and 46% having their body mass index calculated. This population, with more than half of those screened being overweight or obese and 9% of those screened having elevated glucose measures, has major risk factors for diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease without intervention. The components of the Pro Mujer health program address four dimensions of healthcare access: geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, and acceptability. Significant progress has been made to meet basic

  10. Human trafficking: Role of oral health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzolese, E

    2014-11-30

    Trafficking in human beings is a modern form of slavery and is a well-known phenomenon throughout the European Union and beyond. After drug dealing and the weapons industry, human trafficking is the second largest criminal activity in the world today and it is a growing crime. The aim of governmental and non-governmental agencies, which are either directly or indirectly involved in combating trafficking in human beings, is the identification and referral of victims of trafficking and also to encourage self-referrals. Identification is the most important step to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking. Victims often have a variety of physical and mental health needs, including psychological trauma, injuries from violence, head and neck trauma, sexually transmitted infections and other gynaecological problems, dental/oral problems and have poor nutrition. The author's experience in the field of community dentistry in presented within. Volunteer dental services are offered to non-European Union patients held in a centre for asylum seekers in Bari (Italy). Dental professionals can, in fact, contribute to the identification, assistance and protection of trafficked persons, as well as offering forensic services to assist the police investigation in order to identify crimes and find the criminal organizations behind them. As for domestic violence and child abuse cases, there are ethical concerns involved in the identification and protection of the trafficked persons, as well as the need for interdisciplinary work and awareness. Adequate training in behavioural science and intercultural learning is paramount in order to avoid misunderstandings and increase sensitivity.

  11. Providing multilingual access to health-related content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumbaum, Till; Narr, Sascha; Eryilmaz, Elif; Hopfgartner, Frank; Klein-Ellinghaus, Funda; Reese, Anna; Albayrak, Sahin

    2014-01-01

    Finding health-related content is not an easy task. People have to know what to search for, which medical terms to use, and where to find accurate information. This task becomes even harder when people such as immigrants wish to find information in their country of residence and do not speak the national language very well. In this paper, we present a new health information system that allows users to search for health information using natural language queries composed of multiple languages. We present the technical details of the system and outline the results of a preliminary user study to demonstrate the usability of the system.

  12. Health Care Provider Advice for African American Adults Not Meeting Health Behavior Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Fallon, PhD

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Poor dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle contribute to excessive morbidity and mortality. Healthy People 2010 goals are for 85% of physicians to counsel their patients about physical activity and for 75% of physician office visits made by patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or dyslipidemia to include dietary counseling. The purpose of this study was to 1 determine the rate of participant-reported health care provider advice for healthy lifestyle changes among African Americans who do not meet recommendations for physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and healthy weight; 2 examine correlates of provider advice; and 3 assess the association between provider advice and stage of readiness for change for each of these health behaviors. Methods Data for this study were collected as part of a statewide faith-based physical activity program for African Americans. A stratified random sample of 20 African Methodist Episcopal churches in South Carolina was selected to participate in a telephone survey of members aged 18 years and older. The telephone survey, conducted over a 5-month period, asked participants a series of questions about sociodemographics, health status, physical activity, and nutrition. Analyses for moderate to vigorous physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and weight loss were conducted separately. For each of these behaviors, logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the independent association of sex, age, body mass index, education, number of diagnosed diseases, perceived health, and stage of change with health care provider advice for health behaviors. Results A total of 572 church members (407 women, 165 men; mean age, 53.9 years; range, 18–102 years completed the survey. Overall, participant-reported provider advice for lifestyle changes was 47.0% for physical activity, 38.7% for fruit and vegetable consumption, and 39.7% for weight. A greater number of diagnosed

  13. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  14. Will the new Australian health privacy law provide adequate protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, David; Hallit, George

    2002-01-01

    Amendments to the original Privacy Act (1988) come at a key point in time, as a national medical record system looms on the Australian horizon. Changes to The Privacy Act have the potential to define a level of information privacy prior to the implementation of such a system. We have therefore collected expert opinions on the ability of the Health Privacy Guidelines (enacted in December 2001 under The Privacy Act and hereafter more specifically known as Health Privacy Legislation) to ensure the privacy and security of patient information. We conclude that the legislation is flawed in its capacity to withstand an increasingly corporatised health sector. Deficiencies in consent requirements, together with feeble enforcement capabilities, mean The Legislation cannot effectively ensure that personally identifiable information will not end up in corporate third party hands. To significantly bolster the new legislation, we argue that it should be supplemented with explicit health data legislation and privacy auditing.

  15. Allis Prize Lecture: Gaseous Electronics Physics Inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garscadden, Alan

    2002-10-01

    I was fortunate to enjoy the advice of K. G. Emeleus during my graduate studies and for many years afterwards. He introduced me to the papers of Will Allis and later I was privileged to correspond with Professor Allis. At this time I had moved from the Queens university environment to work at a large Air Force base. There I have worked with a lot of smart people, including several who also come to the GEC each year to be refreshed and calibrated. A personal overview is presented on a few of the many roles that atomic, molecular and optical physics, including gaseous electronics, play in programs of the Air Force Research Laboratory and subsequently on AF systems and operations. While there have been misses, overall there have been many successes with impacts that provide more effective systems, as recent experiences have demonstrated. Some example studies, involving primarily electron collision physics, successful and unsuccessful in being chosen for application, are discussed.

  16. 42 CFR 51.46 - Disclosing information obtained from a provider of mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mental health services. 51.46 Section 51.46 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... a provider of mental health services. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, if a... of mental health services, it may not disclose information from such records to the individual who...

  17. Intimate Partner Violence: What Health Care Providers Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    and mental health diagnoses in perinatal women. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2011 Dec;20(12):1797-803.  Moore AM, Frohwirth L, Miller E. Male ...reduce risk associated with reproductive coercion. Contraception . 2011 Mar;83(3):274-80.  O’Campo P, Kirst M, Tsamis C, Chambers C, Ahmad F...Gerlock, et al. Documentation of screening for perpetration of intimate partner violence in male veterans with PTSD. Amer J Nurs 2011;111(11):26-32

  18. New mental health indicators provide a snapshot on performance of the mental health system in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Carolyn; Couris, Chantal; Leeb, Kira

    2012-01-01

    Although the general hospital remains an important place for stabilizing crises, most services for mental illnesses are provided in outpatient/community settings. In the absence of comprehensive data at the community level, data that are routinely collected from general hospitals can provide insights on the performance of mental health services for people living with mental illness or poor mental health. This article describes three new indicators that provide a snapshot on the performance of the mental health system in Canada: self-injury hospitalization rate, 30-day readmission rate for mental illness and percentage of patients with repeat hospitalizations for mental illness. Findings suggest a need for the early detection and treatment of mental illnesses and for optimal transitions between general hospitals and community services.

  19. Turning gadflies into allies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaziji, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Multinational companies are the driving force behind globalization, but they are also the source of many of its most painful consequences, including currency crises, cross-border pollution, and overfishing. These problems remain unsolved because they are beyond the scope of individual governments; transnational organizations have also proved unequal to the task. Nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations have leaped into the breach. To force policy changes, they have seized on all forms of modern persuasion to influence public sentiment toward global traders, manufacturers, and investors. By partnering with NGOs instead of opposing them, companies can avoid costly conflict and can use NGOs' assets to gain competitive advantage. So far, however, most companies have proved ill equipped to deal with NGOs. Large companies know how to compete on the basis of product attributes and price. But NGO attacks focus on production methods and their spillover effects, which are often noneconomic. Similarly, NGOs are able to convert companies' standard competitive strengths--such as size and wide market awareness of their brands--into liabilities. That's because the wealthier and better known a company is, the juicier the target it makes. Emboldened by their successes, NGOs continue to take on new causes. By partnering with NGOs instead of reflexively opposing them, companies could draw on NGOs' key strengths--legitimacy, awareness of social forces, distinct networks, and specialized technical expertise--which most companies could use more of. And with NGOs as allies and guides, companies should also be able to accelerate innovation, foresee shifts in demand, shape legislation affecting them, and, in effect, set technical and regulatory standards for their industries.

  20. Attitudes regarding the safety of health care provider attire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Kanishka W; Lipira, Lauren; Neradilek, Moni; Fox, Anna; Ali, Fatima; Pottinger, Paul S

    2014-11-01

    The majority of medical providers, nurses, and patients agree that appearance is important for patient care. However, at our institution, concerns regarding providers' white coats as fomites are expressed primarily by providers and nurses, not by patients. We provide a framework for approaching this important issue through a structured quality-improvement process.

  1. Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme: insights from members, administrators and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barimah, Kofi Bobi; Mensah, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    The Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) was established as part of a poverty reduction strategy to make health care more affordable to Ghanaians. It is envisaged that it will eventually replace the existing cash-and-carry system. This paper examines the views of NHIS administrators, members/enrollees, and health care providers on how the Scheme operates in practice. It is part of a larger evaluation project on Ghana's NHIS, sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Development Network as part of a two-year global research. We rely primarily on qualitative data from focus group discussion in the Brong Ahafo and the Upper East regions respectively. Our findings suggest that the NHIS has improved access to affordable health care services and prescription drugs to many people in Ghana. However, there are concerns about fraud and corruption that must be addressed if the Scheme is to be financially viable.

  2. Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Communications with Health Care Providers: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchin Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care providers (HCPs play an important role in public health emergency preparedness and response (PHEPR so need to be aware of public health threats and emergencies. To inform HCPs, public health issues PHEPR messages that provide guidelines and updates, and facilitate surveillance so HCPs will recognize and control communicable diseases, prevent excess deaths and mitigate suffering. Public health agencies need to know that the PHEPR messages sent to HCPs reach their target audience and are effective and informative. Public health agencies need to know that the PHEPR messages sent to HCPs reach their target audience and are effective and informative. We conducted a literature review to investigate the systems and tools used by public health to generate PHEPR communications to HCPs, and to identify specific characteristics of message delivery mechanisms and formats that may be associated with effective PHEPR communications. Methods A systematic review of peer- and non-peer-reviewed literature focused on the following questions: 1 What public health systems exist for communicating PHEPR messages from public health agencies to HCPs? 2 Have these systems been evaluated and, if yes, what criteria were used to evaluate these systems? 3 What have these evaluations discovered about characterizations of the most effective ways for public health agencies to communicate PHEPR messages to HCPs? Results We identified 25 systems or tools for communicating PHEPR messages from public health agencies to HCPs. Few articles assessed PHEPR communication systems or messaging methods or outcomes. Only one study compared the effectiveness of the delivery format, device or message itself. We also discovered that the potential is high for HCPs to experience "message overload" given redundancy of PHEPR messaging in multiple formats and/or through different delivery systems. Conclusions We found that detailed descriptions of PHEPR messaging from

  3. Paternal postpartum depression: what health care providers should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Anna K; Ahmed, Azza H; Foli, Karen J; Coddington, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Paternal postpartum depression (PPD) is a clinically significant problem for families that is currently underscreened, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Maternal PPD is a well-known condition and has been extensively researched. In comparison, PPD in fathers and its potential effects on the family are not widely recognized. Studies have shown the importance of optimal mental health in fathers during the postpartum period. Negative effects of paternal PPD affect marital/partner relationships, infant bonding, and child development. To promote optimal health for parents and children, pediatric nurse practitioners must stay up to date on this topic. This article discusses the relationship of paternal PPD to maternal PPD; the consequences, signs, and symptoms; and the pediatric nurse practitioner's role in assessing and managing paternal PPD.

  4. SupportNet for Frontline Behavioral Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    and Coping. Accepted for publication. 5 Conference presentations completed (in chronological order; Objectives 2 & 3): d) Poster presented at APA ...adherence. The current study sought to standardize the eHealth readiness scale, implemented to examine individual characteristics assessing participant...increase dissemination of our findings. d) Attended five conferences to present SupportNet findings (Objective 3): APA (August 2014), Medicine 2.0

  5. Can we select health professionals who provide safer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth-Cozens, J; Cording, H; Ginsburg, R

    2003-12-01

    In order to improve patient safety, health services are looking to other industries' experiences and as a result are adopting a systems approach to learning from error, rather than simply focusing the blame on the individual. However, in health care the individual will remain an important contributor to safety and this paper looks at other literatures besides health to consider a number of individual characteristics and the role they might play in terms of work practices that affect patient safety. It considers the effects of a variety of personality profiles including sensation seeking, Type A, and those with high self esteem; looks at our ability to select for psychological wellbeing; and discusses the ways that psychometrics have been used in medicine to predict performance. It concludes that although rarely used, psychometrics has been shown to be useful in predicting some aspects of performance in medicine and suggests that this is an area well worth further study for the benefit of patient care. Nevertheless, we are a long way away from being able to select safer staff and should instead be developing this knowledge to enable us to recognise and address potential difficulties.

  6. Evaluation on the effect of allied health intervention on the elderly in nursing home%养老机构实施团队健康干预的效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲艺文; 沈军

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨实施团队健康干预在提升养老机构老人生活质量的作用.方法:运用方便抽样对2所养老机构82位老人实施团队健康干预,分别在老人入住1周内与入住3个月后运用SF-36健康调查问卷(the Mos 36-item short form health survey,SF-36)和微型营养评估问卷(mini nutritional assessment,MNA)对养老机构老人进行生活质量评价.结果:养老机构老人实施3个月团队健康干预后老人SF-36总均分和个维度得分显著提高,较入住1周内比较,差异有统计学意义(P=0.000).MNA得分差异比较无统计学意义(P>0.05),但MNA得分与SF-36总均值和其8个维度呈正相关性,其干预后相关系数分别为:总均分r5=0.684、生理机能(physical functioning,PF)rs=0.643、生理职能(role physical,RP)rs=0.439、躯体疼痛(bodily pain,BP)rs=0.551、一般健康状况(general health,GH)rs=0.602、精力(vitality,VT)rs=0.532、社会功能(social functioning,SF)rs=0.478、情感职能(role-emotional,RE)rs=0.333、精神健康(mental health,MH)rs=0.396.结论:对养老机构老人实施团队健康干预,能有效提高老人生活质量.%Objective:To explore the role of allied health intervention in improving the life quality of the elderly in nursing home.Methods:The 82 elderly were selected through convenience sampling from two nursing homes and allied health intervention was implemented.The Mos 36-item short form health survey(SF-36) and the mini nutritional assessment(MNA) were applied to evaluate the life quality at one week and three months after the check in.Results:After three months,the total mean score and eight dimensional scores of SF-36 were improved significantly and there were statistical differences in the scores of the SF-36(P=0.000) but no statistical difference in the scores of MNA between one week and three months(P>0.05).There were positive correlation between the total mean score and eight dimensional scores of SF-36 and MNA score(the total mean

  7. Behavioral health providers' perspectives of delivering behavioral health services in primary care: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beehler Gregory P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-located, collaborative care (CCC is one component of VA’s model of Integrated Primary Care that embeds behavioral health providers (BHPs into primary care clinics to treat commonly occurring mental health concerns among Veterans. Key features of the CCC model include time-limited, brief treatments (up to 6 encounters of 30 minutes each and emphasis on multi-dimensional functional assessment. Although CCC is a mandated model of care, the barriers and facilitators to implementing this approach as identified from the perspective of BHPs have not been previously identified. Methods This secondary data analysis used interview data captured as part of a quality improvement project in 2008. Fourteen BHPs (48% of providers in a regional VA network agreed to participate in a 30-minute, semi-structured phone interview. The interview included questions about their perceived role as a CCC provider, depiction of usual practice styles and behaviors, and perceptions of typical barriers and facilitators to providing behavioral healthcare to Veterans in CCC. Interviews were transcribed verbatim into a text database and analyzed using grounded theory. Results Six main categories emerged from the analysis: (a Working in the VA Context, (b Managing Access to Care on the Front Line, (c Assessing a Care Trajectory, (d Developing a Local Integrated Model, (e Working in Collaborative Teams, and (f Being a Behavioral Health Generalist. These categories pointed to system, clinic, and provider level factors that impacted BHP’s role and ability to implement CCC. Across categories, participants identified ways in which they provided Veteran-centered care within variable environments. Conclusions This study provided a contextualized account of the experiences of BHP’s in CCC. Results suggest that these providers play a multifaceted role in delivering clinical services to Veterans while also acting as an interdependent component of the larger VA

  8. Linked Health Data: how linked data can help provide better health decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinelli, Fernanda; Barcellos de Almeida, Maurício; Linhares de Souza, Yóris

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a brief survey about the use of linked data in healthcare to foster better health decisions and increase health knowledge. We present real cases from the Brazilian experience and emphasize some issues in research. This paper is not intending to be fully comprehensive, we discuss some open issues and research challenges in linked data and the technologies involved. We conclude that even though linked data has been adopted in many countries, some challenges have to be overcome, for example, interoperability between different standards. A defined solution able to foster the semantic interoperability between different standards must be developed. Benefits contributed through linked health data involve better decision making on diagnostics, assertive treatments, knowledge acquisition, improvements in quality healthcare service to citizens.

  9. A longitudinal perspective on health plan-provider risk contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Robert; Grossman, Joy; Lake, Timothy; Casalino, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    During the past decade many health plans adopted risk-contracting arrangements that transferred substantial financial risk and care management responsibility to physician groups and hospital-sponsored integrated delivery systems. Risk transfer arrangements are now believed to be in steep decline, but there is little empirical evidence on this topic, particularly at the local-market level. Data from the Community Tracking Study were used to examine changes in risk contracting from 1996 to 2000. A decline in reliance on risk contracting is evident in nearly all markets. However, retrenchment in risk contracting has followed different patterns ranging from refinements in the scope of risk transfer to reduced use of risk arrangements to total rejection of risk-sharing arrangements. Modified risk-transfer agreements remain viable in several markets, but continued refinement in the nature and scope of risk sharing will be necessary.

  10. The Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication: A Mixed-Method Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Harrod, Molly; Sales, Anne; Hofer, Timothy P.; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Communication failures between physicians and nurses are one of the most common causes of adverse events for hospitalized patients, as well as a major root cause of all sentinel events. Communication technology (ie, the electronic medical record, computerized provider order entry, email, and pagers), which is a component of health information technology (HIT), may help reduce some communication failures but increase others because of an inadequate understanding of how communication...

  11. Misalignment between medicare policies and depression care in home health care: home health provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A; Richardson, Joshua E; Bruce, Martha L

    2014-07-01

    Semistructured interviews with nurses working for home health care agencies in five states raise serious questions about the deleterious effects of Medicare policies and procedures on depression care. The agencies have strong incentives to limit nursing time in a given payment episode and to increase volume, making it difficult to provide high-quality depression care for homebound patients. Some nurses felt forced to "abandon" many patients with depression. The authors call for incremental policy changes in several key areas.

  12. Health Care Provider Advice for African American Adults Not Meeting Health Behavior Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Poor dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle contribute to excessive morbidity and mortality. Healthy People 2010 goals are for 85% of physicians to counsel their patients about physical activity and for 75% of physician office visits made by patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or dyslipidemia to include dietary counseling. The purpose of this study was to 1) determine the rate of participant-reported health care provider advice for healthy lifestyle changes among Afr...

  13. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted ... help address your problems. Why do I need a PCP? You need a PCP so that your ...

  14. 76 FR 9968 - Regulation for the Enforcement of Federal Health Care Provider Conscience Protection Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... rights afforded to health care providers, including medical students, under the federal health care... regulatory enforcement scheme to protect the rights afforded to health care providers, including medical... beliefs. They were never intended to allow providers to refuse to ] provide medical care to an...

  15. Research Needs Assessment in the Health Insurance Organization: Level of Health Care Provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Setting research priorities in the research management cycle is a key. It is important to set the research priorities to make optimal use of scarce resources. The aim of this research was to determine the research needs of Health Insurance Organization based on its health care centers research needs.Methods: This is a qualitative, descriptive and cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2011. A purposeful sample of 60 participants from 14 hospitals, seven dispensaries, five dental clinics, two rehabilitation centers, four radiology centers, six medical diagnostic laboratories, 12 pharmacies, and 20 medical offices that were contracted with the Health Insurance Organization in Iran was interviewed. The framework analysis method (a qualitative research method was used for analysis of interviews. Atlas-Ti software was used to analyze quantitative data, respectively. The topics were prioritized using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method through Expert Choice software.Results: Based on the problems extracted in our qualitative study, 12 research topics were proposed by the experts. Among these “Design of standard treatment protocols,” “Designing model of ranking the health care centers under contract,” and “Pathology of payment system” took the priority ranks of 1 to 3, earning the scores of 0.44, 0.42, and 0.37, respectively.Conclusion: Considering limited resources and unlimited needs and to prevent research resource wasting, conducting research related to health care providers in the Health Insurance Organization can help it achieve its goals.

  16. Immunization of Health-Care Providers: Necessity and Public Health Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezou, Helena C.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Health-care providers (HCPs) are at increased risk for exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) in the workplace. The rationale for immunization of HCPs relies on the need to protect them and, indirectly, their patients from health-care-associated VPDs. Published evidence indicates significant immunity gaps for VPDs of HCPs globally. Deficits in knowledge and false perceptions about VPDs and vaccines are the most common barriers for vaccine uptake and may also influence communication about vaccines between HCPs and their patients. Most countries have immunization recommendations for HCPs; however, there are no universal policies and significant heterogeneity exists between countries in terms of vaccines, schedules, frame of implementation (recommendation or mandatory), and target categories of HCPs. Mandatory influenza immunization policies for HCPs have been implemented with high vaccine uptake rates. Stronger recommendations for HCP immunization and commitment at the level of the health-care facility are critical in order to achieve high vaccine coverage rates. Given the importance to health, mandatory immunization policies for VPDs that can cause serious morbidity and mortality to vulnerable patients should be considered. PMID:27490580

  17. Immunization of Health-Care Providers: Necessity and Public Health Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezou, Helena C; Poland, Gregory A

    2016-08-01

    Health-care providers (HCPs) are at increased risk for exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) in the workplace. The rationale for immunization of HCPs relies on the need to protect them and, indirectly, their patients from health-care-associated VPDs. Published evidence indicates significant immunity gaps for VPDs of HCPs globally. Deficits in knowledge and false perceptions about VPDs and vaccines are the most common barriers for vaccine uptake and may also influence communication about vaccines between HCPs and their patients. Most countries have immunization recommendations for HCPs; however, there are no universal policies and significant heterogeneity exists between countries in terms of vaccines, schedules, frame of implementation (recommendation or mandatory), and target categories of HCPs. Mandatory influenza immunization policies for HCPs have been implemented with high vaccine uptake rates. Stronger recommendations for HCP immunization and commitment at the level of the health-care facility are critical in order to achieve high vaccine coverage rates. Given the importance to health, mandatory immunization policies for VPDs that can cause serious morbidity and mortality to vulnerable patients should be considered.

  18. Burnout in Veterans Health Administration mental health providers in posttraumatic stress clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hector A; McGeary, Cindy A; McGeary, Donald D; Finley, Erin P; Peterson, Alan L

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct the first assessment of burnout among Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health clinicians providing evidence-based posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) care. This study consisted of 138 participants and the sample was mostly female (67%), Caucasian (non-Hispanic; 81%), and married (70%) with a mean age of 44.3 years (SD = 11.2). Recruitment was directed through VHA PTSD Clinical Teams (PCT) throughout the United States based on a nationwide mailing list of PCT Clinic Directors. Participants completed an electronic survey that assessed demographics, organizational work factors, absenteeism, and burnout (assessed through the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, MBI-GS). Twelve percent of the sample reported low Professional Efficacy, 50% reported high levels of Exhaustion, and 47% reported high levels of Cynicism as determined by the MBI-GS cut-off scores. Only workplace characteristics were significantly associated with provider scores on all 3 scales. Exhaustion and Cynicism were most impacted by perceptions of organizational politics/bureaucracy, increased clinical workload, and control over how work is done. Organizational factors were also significantly associated with provider absenteeism and intent to leave his or her job. Findings suggest that providers in VHA specialty PTSD-care settings may benefit from programs or supports aimed at preventing and/or ameliorating burnout.

  19. Knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness of primary health care providers to provide oral health services to children in Niagara, Ontario: a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sonica; Figueiredo, Rafael; Dupuis, Sandy; Skellet, Rachel; Wincott, Tara; Dyer, Carolyn; Feller, Andrea; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Background: Most children are exposed to medical, but not dental, care at an early age, making primary health care providers an important player in the reduction of tooth decay. The goal of this research was to understand the feasibility of using primary health care providers in promoting oral health by assessing their knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness in this regard. Methods: Using the Dillman method, a mail-in cross-sectional survey was conducted among all family physicians and pediatricians in the Niagara region of Ontario who have primary contact with children. A descriptive analysis was performed. Results: Close to 70% (181/265) of providers responded. More than 90% know that untreated tooth decay could affect the general health of a child. More than 80% examine the oral cavity for more than 50% of their child patients. However, more than 50% are not aware that white spots or lines on the tooth surface are the first signs of tooth decay. Lack of clinical time was the top reason for not performing oral disease prevention measures. Interpretation: Overall, survey responses show a positive attitude and willingness to engage in the oral health of children. To capitalize on this, there is a need to identify mechanisms of providing preventive oral health care services by primary health care providers; including improving their knowledge of oral health and addressing other potential barriers.

  20. Non-Psychiatric Services Provided in a Mental Health Unit in a County Jail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Diane S.

    2002-01-01

    Examines mental health service provision by social workers in a county jail through a retrospective review of 359 mentally ill jail inmates' health and mental health records. Of the non-psychiatric, mental health services provided beyond initial assessment, housing placement evaluations and follow-up sessions were the most frequent. Suggestions…

  1. Health Care Marketing: Opinions of Providers. North Dakota Economic Studies, Number 46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald G.; And Others

    The health care industry in the United States has undergone tremendous change. Health care providers must view their health care delivery organizations as businesses and must use the tools of business, including marketing. Most research on health care marketing has focused on the practices of large, urban facilities. Little work has been…

  2. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers... methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. The proposed rulemaking would include home health services and hospice care under the VA regulation governing payment for other...

  3. Market competition, ownership, payment systems and the performance of health care providers - a panel study among Finnish occupational health services providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanpää, Eila; Linnosmaa, Ismo; Valtonen, Hannu

    2013-10-01

    Many health care reforms rely on competition although health care differs in many respects from the assumptions of perfect competition. Finnish occupational health services provide an opportunity to study empirically competition, ownership and payment systems and the performance of providers. In these markets employers (purchasers) choose the provider and prices are market determined. The price regulation of public providers was abolished in 1995. We had data on providers from 1992, 1995, 1997, 2000 and 2004. The unbalanced panel consisted of 1145 providers and 4059 observations. Our results show that in more competitive markets providers in general offered a higher share of medical care compared to preventive services. The association between unit prices and revenues and market environment varied according to the provider type. For-profit providers had lower prices and revenues in markets with numerous providers. The public providers in more competitive regions were more sensitive to react to the abolishment of their price regulation by raising their prices. Employer governed providers had weaker association between unit prices or revenues and competition. The market share of for-profit providers was negatively associated with productivity, which was the only sign of market spillovers we found in our study.

  4. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted ... taking care of yourself. Why do I need a PCP? You need a PCP so that your ...

  5. Oral-systemic health during pregnancy: exploring prenatal and oral health providers' information, motivation and behavioral skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamos, Cheryl A; Walsh, Margaret L; Thompson, Erika; Daley, Ellen M; Detman, Linda; DeBate, Rita

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy is identified as a sensitive period of increased risk for poor oral health among mothers and offspring. Subsequently, both medical and dental associations have re-endorsed consolidated, inter-professional guidelines promoting oral health during pregnancy. The objective was to explore prenatal and oral health providers' information, motivation and practice behaviors related to oral health during pregnancy. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with prenatal and oral health providers based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method in NVivo 10. Providers held variable knowledge with regards to identified oral-systemic connections and implications. Most providers were unaware of the guidelines; however, some oral health providers reported avoiding specific treatment behaviors during this period. Motivation to address oral-systemic health during pregnancy included: prevention; healthy pregnancy/birth outcomes; patient's complaint/question as cue to action; comprehensive, patient-centered, and family-centered care; ethical duty; and professional governing body. Oral health providers reported assessing, educating, and communicating with patients about oral health issues; whereas prenatal providers rarely addressed oral health but reported signing approval forms to receive such care. A few oral health providers highlighted lifecourse implications and the need for family-centered care when addressing poor oral health among pregnant patients. Findings suggest gaps in oral health prevention information and behaviors among prenatal and oral health providers. Future efforts should examine effective dissemination and implementation strategies that translate evidence-based guidelines into clinical practice, with the ultimate goal of improve oral-systemic health among women and their offspring across the lifecourse.

  6. Mental health provider perspectives regarding integrated medical care for patients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Greenwald, Devra E; Bauer, Mark S; Charns, Martin P; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2012-11-01

    Integrated care for medical conditions is essential for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This qualitative study describes mental health provider perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators of integrated care for patients with SMI. We interviewed providers from a national sample of Veterans Health Administration facilities that scored in the top or bottom percentile in medical care quality. Providers from high-performing sites reported substantial in-person contacts with general medical providers, while providers from low-performing sites reported stigma and limited communication with medical providers as major concerns. Interventions to improve mental health and medical provider communication may facilitate integrated care for persons with SMI.

  7. Forging partnerships between rural women with chronic conditions and their health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudney, Shirley; Weinert, Clarann; Kinion, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Successful adaptation to chronic illness is enhanced by active client-health care provider partnerships. The purposes of this article are to (a) examine the health care partnership needs of western rural women with chronic illness who participated in a computer-based support and education project, (b) describe how the role of the women in the partnership can be maximized by the use of a personal health record and improving health literacy, and (c) discuss ways health care providers can enhance their role in the partnership by careful listening and creating environments conducive to forging productive client-provider partnerships.

  8. Holding health providers in developing countries accountable to consumers: a synthesis of relevant scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlan, David; Shiffman, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    Health care providers in low-income countries often treat consumers poorly. Many providers do not consider it their responsibility to listen carefully to consumer preferences, to facilitate access to care, to offer detailed information, or to treat patients with respect. A lack of provider accountability to health consumers may have adverse effects on the quality of health care they provide, and ultimately on health outcomes. This paper synthesizes relevant research on health provision in low-, middle- and high-income countries with the aim of identifying factors that shape health provider accountability to consumers, and discerning promising interventions to enhance responsiveness. Drawing on this scholarship, we develop a framework that classifies factors into two categories: those concerning the health system and those that pertain to social influences. Among the health systems factors that may shape provider accountability are oversight mechanisms, revenue sources, and the nature of competition in the health sector-all influences that may lead providers to be accountable to entities other than consumers, such as governments and donors. Among the social factors we explore are consumer power, especially information levels, and provider beliefs surrounding accountability. Evidence on factors and interventions shaping health provider accountability is thin. For this reason, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions on what works to enhance accountability. This being said, research does suggest four mechanisms that may improve provider responsiveness: 1. Creating official community participation mechanisms in the context of health service decentralization; 2. Enhancing the quality of health information that consumers receive; 3. Establishing community groups that empower consumers to take action; 4. Including non-governmental organizations in efforts to expand access to care. This synthesis reviews evidence on these and other interventions, and points to future

  9. Medical Providers as Global Warming and Climate Change Health Educators: A Health Literacy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran, Melinda; Weathers, Melinda; Keefe, Brian; Sparks, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is a threat to wildlife and the environment, but it also one of the most pervasive threats to human health. The goal of this study was to examine the relationships among dimensions of health literacy, patient education about global warming and climate change (GWCC), and health behaviors. Results reveal that patients who have higher…

  10. INFLUENCE OF SOCIOECONOMIC AND DEMOGRAPHIC ENVIRONMENT ON PRIVATE HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Kordić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Health care systems face pressure to increase the quality of health care at the same time with pressure to reduce public spending. The attempt to overcome the gap between needs and opportunities can be resolved through the introduction of public-private partnerships. Goals of this study are to investigate variation of the number, form and efficiency of private providers of general/family medicine services in primary health care and the contribution of socioeconomic and demographic environment on those variations, among counties. Socioeconomic and demographic factors are identified as independent variables that influence the health care need and utilization and consequently the decision of private entities to engage in the provision of health care services. This study extended previous studies because it has introduced socioeconomic and demographic variables. This may shed same new lights on the relationship between private providers of health service and efficiency of providing health service in primary health care.

  11. Factors influencing mental health providers' intention to use telepsychotherapy in First Nations communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthuy-Blanc, Johana; Bouchard, Stéphane; Maïano, Christophe; Séguin, Monique

    2013-04-01

    Telemental health is the use of information and communications technologies and broadband networks to deliver mental health services and support wellness. Although numerous studies have demonstrated the efficiency and utility of telemental health, certain barriers may impede its implementation, including the attitudes of mental health service providers. The current study draws on the technology acceptance model (TAM) to understand the role of mental health service providers' attitudes and perceptions of telemental health (psychotherapy delivered via videoconferencing) on their intention to use this technology with their patients. A sample of 205 broadly defined mental health service providers working on 32 First Nations reserves in the province of Quebec completed the questionnaire adapted to assess TAM for telepsychotherapy. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling provided evidence for the factor validity and reliability of the TAM in this sample. The key predictor of the intention to use telepsychotherapy was not mental health providers' attitude toward telepsychotherapy, nor how much they expected this service to be complicated to use, but essentially how useful they expect it to be for their First Nations patients. If telemental health via videoconferencing is to be implemented in First Nations communities, it is essential to thoroughly demonstrate its utility to mental health providers. Perceived usefulness will have a positive impact on attitudes toward this technology, and perceived ease of use will positively influence perceived usefulness. Cultural issues specific to the populations receiving telemental health services may be more efficiently addressed from the angle of perceived usefulness.

  12. Examining the Importance of Incorporating Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Training Core Competencies into Allied Health Curricula as Perceived by College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and health care professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To…

  13. Ways of Doing: Restorative Practices, Governmentality, and Provider Conduct in Post-Apartheid Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Goudge, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider the conduct of post-apartheid health care in a policy context directed toward entrenching democracy, ensuring treatment-adherent patients, and creating a healthy populace actively responsible for their own health. We ask how tuberculosis treatment, antiretroviral therapy, and maternal services are delivered within South Africa's health system, an institutional site of colonial and apartheid injustice, and democratic reform. Using Foucauldian and post-Foucauldian notions of governmentality, we explore provider ways of doing to, for, and with patients in three health subdistricts. Although restorative provider engagements are expected in policy, older authoritarian and paternalistic norms persist in practice. These challenge and reshape, even 'undo' democratic assertions of citizenship, while producing compliant, self-responsible patients. Alongside the need to address pervasive structural barriers to health care, a restorative approach requires community participation, provider accountability, and a health system that does with providers as much as providers who do with patients.

  14. Health organizations providing and seeking social support: a Twitter-based content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Jian Raymond; Chen, Yixin; Damiano, Amanda

    2013-09-01

    Providing and seeking social support are important aspects of social exchange. New communication technologies, especially social network sites (SNSs), facilitate the process of support exchange. An increasing number of health organizations are using SNSs. However, how they provide and seek social support via SNSs has yet to garner academic attention. This study examined the types of social support provided and sought by health organizations on Twitter. A content analysis was conducted on 1,500 tweets sent by a random sample of 58 health organizations within 2 months. Findings indicate that providing informational and emotional support, as well as seeking instrumental support, were the main types of social support exchanged by health organizations through Twitter. This study provides a typology for studying social support exchanges by health organizations, and recommends strategies for health organizations regarding the effective use of Twitter.

  15. VA Community Mental Health Service Providers' Utilization of and Attitudes toward Telemental Health Care: The Gatekeeper's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, John Paul; Farmer, Mary Sue; Head, Katharine J.; Fortney, John; Teal, Cayla R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Mental health (MH) providers in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) are important stakeholders in the development of the Veterans Health Administration (VA) telemental health (TMH) system, but their perceptions of these technologies have not been systematically examined. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  16. Students Seeking Help for Mental Health Problems: Do Australian University Websites Provide Clear Pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Thomas A.; Fiedler, Brenton A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental health problems in young Australians continue to be a major public health issue. Studying at university can generate social pressures particularly for youth, which have been associated with the onset of a mental illness or a worsening of an existing condition. Many universities provide health services to support students with health…

  17. The transposability of the Mediterranean-type diet in non-Mediterranean regions: application to the physician/allied health team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, C

    2004-12-01

    Studies are consistently declaring that the Mediterranean-type diet is transposable to non-Mediterranean regions. The nutritional end points of Med-type eating appear to be achievable through foods from a variety of traditions and appear to support predetermined expectations surrounding food preparation, choice, taste and sensory appeal. The broad emphasis on minimally processed plants and their products (vegetables, fruit, legumes, wholegrains, nuts, seeds and oils); low fat dairy, fish, less emphasis on animal products and removal of partially hydrogenated fats has piqued the attention of health professionals who are interested in arresting the incidence of chronic disease. The theoretical underpinnings of Med-type eating have driven new understandings in dietary guidelines, which is especially timely as well-marketed fad diets loom large on the current health horizon.

  18. Climate change & infectious diseases in India: implications for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, V Ramana; Schramm, Paul J; Luber, George

    2013-12-01

    Climate change has the potential to influence the earth's biological systems, however, its effects on human health are not well defined. Developing nations with limited resources are expected to face a host of health effects due to climate change, including vector-borne and water-borne diseases such as malaria, cholera, and dengue. This article reviews common and prevalent infectious diseases in India, their links to climate change, and how health care providers might discuss preventive health care strategies with their patients.

  19. Characteristics of genomic test consumers who spontaneously share results with their health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darst, Burcu F; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J; Topol, Eric J; Bloss, Cinnamon S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic test consumers who spontaneously shared their test results with their health care provider. Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative, we compared demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics of DTC genomic test consumers who shared their results with their physician or health care provider versus those who did not share. We also compared genomic risk estimates between the two groups. Of 2,024 individuals assessed at approximately 6 months post testing, 540 individuals (26.5%) reported sharing their results with their physician or health care provider. Those who shared were older (p consumers.

  20. Health insurance system and provider payment reform in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doncho M. Donev

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an insight to the current health insurance system in the Republic of Macedonia. Special emphasis is given to the specificities and practice of both obligatory and voluntary health insurance, to the scope of the insured persons and their benefits and obligations, the way of calculating and payment of the contributions and the other sources of revenues for health insurance, user participation in health care expenses, payment to the health care providers and some other aspects of realization of health insurance in practice. According to the Health Insurance Law, which was adopted in March 2000, a person can become an insured to the Health Insurance Fund on various modalities. More than 90% of the citizens are eligible to the obligatory health insurance, which provides a broad scope of basic health care benefits. Till end of 2008 payroll contributions were equal to 9.2%, and from January 1st, 2009 are equal to 7.5% of gross earned wages and almost 60% of health sector revenues are derived from them. Within the autonomy and scope of activities of the Health Insurance Fund the structures of the revenues and expenditures are presented. Health financing and reform of the payment to health care providers are of high importance within the ongoing health care reform in Macedonia. It is expected that the newly introduced methods of payments at the primary health care level (capitation and at the hospital sector (global budgeting, DRGs will lead to increased equity, efficiency and quality of health care in hospitals and overall system

  1. SMS for Sexual Health: A Comparison of Service Types and Recommendations for Sexual Health Text Message Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Muldrow, Adrienne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Text message-based interventions may provide sexual health information to young people through a number of service types, from sending information on a regularly scheduled timeline, to providing an automated menu, to allowing young people to connect directly with health educators. While such service types exist, it is not clear which…

  2. Health and education: service providers in partnership to improve mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen Valsamma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children and adolescents from complex or disadvantaged backgrounds and multiple needs often are reluctant to seek help and this is particularly relevant in the context of mental health difficulties. Further, the complexity of the health system can be overwhelming to the family who are likely to be chaotic and less able to seek help. The current project piloted an integrated service delivery model involving a child psychiatry service and the department of education to promote access to mental health assessment and intervention to young people attending special education schools in Sydney, Australia. Findings and conclusion The project allowed improved access to mental health services for a group of young people who would otherwise not have sought help through traditional referral pathways. Our findings support strategies to promote the social milieu of schools as a way of achieving better mental health and learning outcomes.

  3. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA has specifically contracted, this rulemaking will only affect home health and hospice care providers who do...

  4. Providing animal health services to the poor in Northern Ghana: rethinking the role of community animal health workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockshell, Jonathan; Ilukor, John; Birner, Regina

    2014-02-01

    The Community Animal Health Workers (CAHWs) system has been promoted as an alternative solution to providing animal health services in marginal areas. Yet, access to quality animal health services still remains a fundamental problem for livestock dependent communities. This paper uses the concepts of accessibility, affordability, and transaction costs to examine the perceptions of livestock keepers about the various animal health service providers. The empirical analysis is based on a survey of 120 livestock-keeping households in the Tolon-Kumbungu and Savelugu-Nanton districts in the Northern Region of Ghana. A multinomial logit model was used to determine the factors that influence households' choice of alternative animal health service providers. The results show that the government para-vets are the most preferred type of animal health service providers while CAHWs are the least preferred. Reasons for this observation include high transaction costs and low performance resulting from limited training. In areas with few or no government para-vets, farmers have resorted to self-treatment or to selling sick animals for consumption, which has undesirable health implications. These practices also result in significant financial losses for farmers. This paper finds that the CAHWs' system is insufficient for providing quality animal health services to the rural poor in marginal areas. Therefore, market-smart alternative solutions requiring strong public sector engagement to support livestock farmers in marginal areas and setting minimum training standards for animal health service providers merit policy consideration.

  5. Medical provider attitudes about behavioral health consultants in integrated primary care: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrence, Nicole D; Mueller, Anne E; Ilem, Allison A; Renn, Brenna N; DeSantis, Brian; Segal, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    Integrated behavioral health increases service utilization and treatment success, particularly with high-risk populations. This study assessed medical personnel's attitudes and perceptions of behavioral health clinicians (BHCs) in primary care using a brief self-report measure. A 6-item survey was given to medical providers (n = 45) from a health care system that includes integrated behavioral health services. Survey items assessed providers' attitudes and perceptions about BHCs. Attitudes about behavioral health were largely favorable. For all items, 73.3% to 100% of participants endorsed strongly agree or agree. Chi-square analyses revealed that those who interacted more frequently with BHCs were more comfortable discussing behavioral health issues with their patients, χ²(6, n = 45) = 13.43, p providers worked were not significantly related to any survey items. Medical providers surveyed believe that BHCs are valuable members of integrated health care, improving their abilities to provide care and to address their patients' physical and behavioral health problems. Although these preliminary results are promising, the setting surveyed has well-integrated behavioral health care services and thus might not be representative of other settings without such integration. Future studies should address medical providers' opinions of BHCs in a variety of settings with larger samples.

  6. Inequalities in advice provided by public health workers to women during antenatal sessions in rural India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Studies have widely documented the socioeconomic inequalities in maternal and child health related outcomes in developing countries including India. However, there is limited research on the inequalities in advice provided by public health workers on maternal and child health during antenatal visits. This paper investigates the inequalities in advice provided by public health workers to women during antenatal visits in rural India. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The District Level Household Survey (2007-08 was used to compute rich-poor ratios and concentration indices. Binary logistic regressions were used to investigate inequalities in advice provided by public health workers. The dependent variables comprised the advice provided on seven essential components of maternal and child health care. A significant proportion of pregnant women who attended at least four ANC sessions were not advised on these components during their antenatal sessions. Only 51%-72% of the pregnant women were advised on at least one of the components. Moreover, socioeconomic inequalities in providing advice were significant and the provision of advice concentrated disproportionately among the rich. Inequalities were highest in the case of advice on family planning methods. Advice on breastfeeding was least unequal. Public health workers working in lower level health facilities were significantly less likely than their counterparts in the higher level health facilities to provide specific advice. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of women were not advised on recommended components of maternal and child health in rural India. Moreover, there were enormous socioeconomic inequalities. The findings of this study raise questions about the capacity of the public health care system in providing equitable services in India. The Government of India must focus on training and capacity building of the public health workers in communication skills so that they can deliver

  7. Providing medical care for undocumented migrants in Denmark: what are the challenges for health professionals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræbel, Tania Aase; K Jensen, Natascha; Nørredam, Marie;

    2011-01-01

    Background: The rights of undocumented migrants are frequently overlooked. Denmark has ratified several international conventions recognizing the right to health care for all human beings, but has very scanty legislation and no existing policies for providing health care to undocumented migrants...... experience an unequal access to primary care facilities and that great uncertainties exist amongst health professionals as how to respond in such situations. The lack of official policies concerning the right to health care for undocumented migrants continue to pass on the responsibility to healt....... This study focuses on how health professionals navigate and how they experience providing treatment for undocumented migrants in the Danish health care system. Methods: The study was carried out as part of an EU-project on European Best Practices in Access, Quality and Appropriateness of Health Services...

  8. Electronic Health Record Vendors Reported by Health Care Providers Participating in Federal EHR Incentive Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This public use file combines registration data compiled from two federal programs that are on-going since February 2009 – the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  9. How Allies Collaborate; The NATO Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevanter, E., Jr.

    A survey was made of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) coordination of training programs for allied military forces and its implications about collaboration among allies in peacetime. Three types of training were analyzed: (1) higher training, or the coordination of large military formations; (2) unit training of smaller teams; (3)…

  10. Gaps in understanding health and engagement with healthcare providers across common long-term conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Karina; Lasgaard, Mathias; Osborne, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    difficulties in understanding health information and engaging with healthcare providers. These two dimensions are critical to the provision of patient-centred healthcare and for optimising health outcomes. More effort should be made to respond to the health literacy needs among individuals with long......Objectives: To (1) quantify levels of subjective health literacy in people with long-term health conditions (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, musculoskeletal disorders, cancer and mental disorders) and compare these to levels in the general population and (2......) examine the association between health literacy, socioeconomic characteristics and comorbidity in each long-term condition group. Design: Population-based survey in the Central Denmark Region (n=29 473). Main outcome measures: Health literacy was measured using two scales from the Health Literacy...

  11. Advancing adolescent health and health services in Saudi Arabia: exploring health-care providers' training, interest, and perceptions of the health-care needs of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlBuhairan FS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fadia S AlBuhairan,1–3 Tina M Olsson3,4 1Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Background: Adolescent health is regarded as central to global health goals. Investments made in adolescent health and health services protect the improvements witnessed in child health. Though Saudi Arabia has a large adolescent population, adolescent health-care only began to emerge in recent years, yet widespread uptake has been very limited. Health-care providers are key in addressing and providing the necessary health-care services for adolescents, and so this study was conducted with the aim of identifying opportunities for the advancement of knowledge transfer for adolescent health services in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This Web-based, cross-sectional study was carried out at four hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Physicians and nurses were invited to participate in an online survey addressing their contact with adolescent patients, and training, knowledge, and attitudes towards adolescent health-care. Results: A total of 232 professionals participated. The majority (82.3% reported sometimes or always coming into contact with adolescent patients. Less than half (44%, however, had received any sort of training on adolescent health during their undergraduate or postgraduate education, and only 53.9% reported having adequate knowledge about the health-care needs of adolescents. Nurses perceived themselves as having more knowledge in the health-care needs of adolescents and reported feeling more comfortable in communicating with adolescents as compared with physicians. The majority of participants were interested in gaining further skills and knowledge in adolescent health-care and agreed or strongly agreed that adolescents have

  12. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-02-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for youths and families. Correlation analyses and multilevel hierarchical regressions, controlling for effects of provider characteristics, showed that constructive culture was associated with more positive attitudes toward adoption of EBP and poor organizational climates with perceived divergence of usual practice and EBP. Behavioral health organizations may benefit from consideration of how culture and climate affect staff attitudes toward change in practice.

  13. Contact With Mental Health and Primary Care Providers Before Suicide: A Review of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Jason B.; Martin, Catherine E.; Pearson, Jane L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined rates of contact with primary care and mental health care professionals by individuals before they died by suicide. Method The authors reviewed 40 studies for which there was information available on rates of health care contact and examined age and gender differences among the subjects. Results Contact with primary care providers in the time leading up to suicide is common. While three of four suicide victims had contact with primary care providers within the year of suicide, approximately one-third of the suicide victims had contact with mental health services. About one in five suicide victims had contact with mental health services within a month before their suicide. On average, 45% of suicide victims had contact with primary care providers within 1 month of suicide. Older adults had higher rates of contact with primary care providers within 1 month of suicide than younger adults. Conclusions While it is not known to what degree contact with mental health care and primary care providers can prevent suicide, the majority of individuals who die by suicide do make contact with primary care providers, particularly older adults. Given that this pattern is consistent with overall health-service-seeking, alternate approaches to suicide-prevention efforts may be needed for those less likely to be seen in primary care or mental health specialty care, specifically young men. PMID:12042175

  14. The influence of culture on immigrant women's mental health care experiences from the perspectives of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Joyce Maureen; Donnelly, Tam Truong

    2007-05-01

    It is well documented that serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders exist among immigrant women. Informed by Kleinman's explanatory model, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provided mental health services to immigrant women. Analysis of the data revealed that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties when accessing mental health care services due to cultural differences, social stigma, and unfamiliarity with Western biomedicine, (b) spiritual beliefs and practices that influence immigrant women's mental health care practices, and (c) the health care provider-client relationship, which exerts great influence on how immigrant women seek mental health care. The study also revealed that cultural background exerts both positive and negative influences on how immigrant women seek mental health care. We suggest that although cultural knowledge and practices influence immigrant women's coping choices and strategies, awareness of social and economic differences among diverse groups of immigrant women is necessary to improve the accessibility of mental health care for immigrant women.

  15. Special Considerations When Providing Mental Health Services for Persons with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Jill F.

    Unique challenges surface when providing services in community mental health centers for persons with mental retardation and mental illness. Before any type of mental health treatment for a client with this dual diagnosis can begin, proper assessment is critical. Clinicians working with this population have to adapt their treatment strategies and…

  16. Fragile X-Associated Disorders (FXD): A Handbook for Families, Health Care Providers, Counselors, and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragile X-associated Disorders (FXD) A Handbook for Families, Health Care Providers, Counselors, and Educators For Personal Use Only ... contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Section 1: Genetics of Fragile X-Associated Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Case Scenario of a Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Preeclampsia, Eclampsia, and HELLP Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Publications How do health care providers diagnose preeclampsia, eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... weeks of pregnancy. Gestational hypertension can develop into preeclampsia. 1 Mild preeclampsia is diagnosed when a pregnant ...

  18. 76 FR 28226 - Southwest Health Alliances, Inc., Doing Business as BSA Provider Network; Analysis of Agreement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Southwest Health Alliances, Inc., Doing Business as BSA Provider Network; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Order To Aid Public Comment AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Proposed Consent...

  19. Health care provider knowledge and routine management of pre-eclampsia in Pakistan.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh, S; Qureshi, RN; Khowaja, AR; Salam, R; Vidler, M; Sawchuck, D.; von Dadelszen, P; Zaidi, S; Bhutta, Z; CLIP Working Group,

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality ratio is 276 per 100,000 live births in Pakistan. Eclampsia is responsible for one in every ten maternal deaths despite the fact that management of this disease is inexpensive and has been available for decades. Many studies have shown that health care providers in low and middle-income countries have limited training to manage patients with eclampsia. Hence, we aimed to explore the knowledge of different cadres of health care providers regarding aetiology, diagn...

  20. Patient-provider connectivity and the role of e-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Suzanne C; Kearns, Ellen Hope

    2003-01-01

    Patient-provider connectivity (PPC) offers innovative approaches to control costs, improve quality, and sustain a healthy workforce. The application of e-commerce to health care is one facet of PPC and provides solutions to educating, informing, and more efficiently using scarce resources to sustain the nation's health. Technology is available to provide real-time access to clinical results, medical records, health-care providers, and other time-sensitive patient information. This is the first article in a series on PPC that explores the application of e-commerce to the health-care industry from the consumers' and providers' points of view and examines and assesses trends and data from various interdisciplinary sources and studies. Two models exemplifying PPC are explored including the Science Business & Education, Inc., proof-of-concept patient demonstration project, and the emerging application of peer-to-peer (P2P) technology. PPC promises to improve efficiency, facilitate communication between physician and patient, monitor compliance with medical regimens, and positively affect the quality of health care provided and the overall health of the patient. Future articles will address the growth of telemedicine, issues of confidentiality and e-risk, and other PPC applications.

  1. Knowledge and attitudes about intrauterine devices among women's health care providers in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Heather Lyn; Cremer, Miriam L; Gonzalez, Enrique; Maza, Mauricio

    2011-03-01

    In order to gain an understanding of Salvadoran health care providers' clinical knowledge, attitudes, and practice toward the intrauterine device (IUD), Ministry of Health providers completed a self-administered, anonymous survey. Surveys were completed by 135 participants. The majority (94.7% and 97.0%) agreed the IUD is a safe and effective form of contraception. Only 46.6% of participants had ever received training in IUD placement, and 32.0% of them had ever inserted more than 10 IUDs. The majority of providers (54.2%) believed that the IUD was associated with a higher rate of infection than is described in the literature. Lack of formal training and knowledge about persistent infection rates associated with IUDs may contribute to low IUD placement by Salvadoran providers. Health care providers surveyed are open to learning more about the IUD and sharing the information with their patients.

  2. Six health care trends that will reshape the patient-provider dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Joshua M; Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Navathe, Amol S

    2016-09-01

    Six trends - movement towards value-based payment, rapid adoption of digital health technology, care delivery in non-traditional settings, development of individualized clinical guidelines, increased transparency, and growing cultural awareness about the harms of medical overuse - are driving the US health care system towards a future defined by quality- and patient-centric care. Health care organizations are responding to these changes by implementing provider and workforce changes, pursuing stronger payer-provider integration, and accelerating the use of digital technology and data. While these efforts can also improve the clinical relationship and create positive system redesign among health care organizations, they require alignment between organizational and physician incentives that can inadvertently harm the dynamic between patients and providers. Organizations can utilize several strategies to preserve the patient-physician relationship and advance the positive benefits of new organizational strategies while guarding against unintended consequences.

  3. Listening to the experts: provider recommendations on the health needs of immigrants and refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, exploratory study was to better understand the needs of immigrants and refugees and how they are affected by poverty and post-immigration stresses. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews with 62 health and social service providers working with immigrants in the state of Minnesota. Although the state is home to many refugees who were victims of torture or severe deprivation in their home countries, the majority of providers defined the principal needs of their clients as affordable housing, jobs, and access to health services rather than needs related to health conditions or services per se. The providers' open-ended comments painted a picture of the ways in which post-immigration experiences lead to tangible stresses that compromise immigrants' health and well-being.

  4. Health providers' perception of quality of care for neonates in health facilities in a municipality in Southern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikplim Pomevor, Kokui; Adomah-Afari, Augustine

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess available human resources for neonatal care and their skills, in order to explore health providers' perceptions of quality of neonatal care in health facilities in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered using qualitative interviews with health providers working in the maternity and paediatric wards and midwives; direct observation; and documentary review at a regional hospital, a municipal hospital and four health centres in a municipality in a region in Southern Ghana. Data were analysed using thematic framework through the process of coding in six phases to create and establish meaningful patterns. Findings The study revealed that health providers were concerned about the number of staff available, their competence and also equipment available for them to work more efficiently. Some essential equipment for neonatal care was either not available or was non-functional where it was available, while aseptic procedures were not adhered to. Moreover, personal protective equipment such as facemask, caps, aprons were not used except in the labour wards where staff had to change their footwear before entering. Research limitations/implications Limited number of health providers and facilities used, lack of exploration of parents of neonates' perspective of quality of neonatal care in this study and other settings, including the teaching hospitals. The authors did not examine issues related to the ineffective use of IV cannulation for neonates by nurses as well as referral of neonates. Additionally, the authors did not explore the perspectives of management of the municipal and regional health directorates or policy makers of the Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service regarding the shortage of staff, inadequate provision of medical equipment and infrastructure. Practical implications This paper suggests the need for policy makers to redirect their attention to the issues that would improve the quality of

  5. Examining clinicians' experiences providing sexual health services for LGBTQ youth: considering social and structural determinants of health in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R E; Shoveller, J A; Carson, A M; Contreras-Whitney, J G

    2014-08-01

    Although barriers related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) youth's experiences accessing sexual health services have been examined in detail, research into the experiences and perceptions of clinicians providing these services has been conspicuously absent. The aim of this article is to explore the perceptions and experiences of clinicians providing sexual health services for LGBTQ youth. Drawing on in-depth, semi-structured interviews, this study examines 24 clinicians' experiences providing sexual health services to LGBTQ youth in five communities in British Columbia, Canada. Our findings reveal how many clinicians provide services to LGBTQ youth with a lack of cultural competency-either implicitly (e.g., by describing heteronormative practices) or explicitly (e.g., by expressing frustration that they had not been sufficiently provided with appropriate training related to LGBTQ youth sexual health). Institutional norms and values were identified as the dominant barriers in the effective provision of LGBTQ-tailored services. Many clinicians find themselves unprepared to provide culturally competent sexual health services that have both the capacity to address individual-level issues (e.g. promoting condom use) while considering (and adapting services to) the broader socio-cultural and structural conditions that can render LGBTQ youth socially vulnerable.

  6. Effects of visitation among allied health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuis, H.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Bakker, D. de

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Visitation is a method for external peer review. The goal is to improve the quality of patient care by giving feedback on quality of competence and performance of a professional during a practice visit. Feedback is offered as recommendations for improvement. This study aims to evaluate th

  7. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  8. Transparency of Mandatory Information Disclosure and Concerns of Health Services Providers and Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study analyzed differences between transparency of information disclosure and related demands from the health service consumer’s perspective. It also compared how health service providers and consumers are associated by different levels of mandatory information disclosure. Methods: We obtained our research data using a questionnaire survey (health services providers, n = 201; health service consumers, n = 384. Results: Health service consumers do not have major concerns regarding mandatory information disclosure. However, they are concerned about complaint channels and settlement results, results of patient satisfaction surveys, and disclosure of hospital financial statements (p < 0.001. We identified significant differences in health service providers’ and consumers’ awareness regarding the transparency of information disclosure (p < 0.001. Conclusions: It may not be possible for outsiders to properly interpret the information provided by hospitals. Thus, when a hospital discloses information, it is necessary for the government to consider the information’s applicability. Toward improving medical expertise and information asymmetry, the government has to reduce the burden among health service consumers in dealing with this information, and it has to use the information effectively.

  9. Patients' and providers' perceptions of the impact of health literacy on communication in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Shiva; Brooks, Dina; Goldstein, Roger S

    2013-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the most prevalent form of chronic respiratory diseases worldwide. Pulmonary rehabilitation, including self-management education, highlights the importance of good patient-provider communication in establishing optimal care. There is a growing awareness of the potential impact of health literacy (HL) on the patients' access to and understanding of medical information. This study was designed to explore the patients' and health care professionals' (HCPs) perceptions of the role of HL in health communication. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with 12 patients and 20 HCPs at a Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center in Metropolitan Toronto. Although the term health literacy was not familiar to many patients, the contribution of knowledge to patient well-being was consistently identified by patients and HCPs. Barriers to communication included provider time constraints and the use of medical jargon. For providers they also included patient characteristics, language, culture and awareness of health resources. Approaches that might improve communication incorporated family support, peer support, better print and visual teaching material and a trusting empathic patient-provider relationship. The findings provide an increased understanding of patients' and providers' perceptions of HL as a barrier to effective communication of medical information to patients with COPD as well as approaches that might improve this communication.

  10. BUSINESS PERFORMANCE OF HEALTH TOURISM SERVICE PROVIDERS IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkljan, Sanela; Hendija, Zvjezdana

    2016-03-01

    Health tourism can be generally divided into medical, health spa and wellness tourism. Health spa tourism services are provided in special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts, and include under medical supervision controlled use of natural healing factors and physical therapy in order to improve and preserve health. There are 13 special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts in Croatia. Most of them are financed through the state budget and lesser by sale on the market. More than half of their accommodation capacity is offered for sale on the market while the rest is under contract with the Croatian Health Insurance Fund. Domestic overnights are several times higher than foreign overnights. The aim of this study was to analyze business performance of special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts in Croatia in relation to the sources of financing and the structure of service users. The assumption was that those who are more market-oriented achieve better business performance. In proving these assumptions, an empirical research was conducted and the assumptions were tested. A positive correlation was proven in tested indicators of business performance of the analyzed service providers of health-spa tourism with a higher amount of overnight stays realized through sales on the market in relation to total overnight stays, with a greater share of foreign overnights in total of overnights and with a higher share of realized revenue on the market out of total revenue. The results of the research show that special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts that are more market-oriented are more successful in their business performance. These findings are important for planning the health and tourism policies in countries like Croatia.

  11. Community Mental Health Service Providers' Codes of Ethics and the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nicholas A.; Juhnke, Gerald A.; Nilsen, Keith A.

    2001-01-01

    Compares the codes of ethics of 13 professional organizations for community mental health service providers. Results suggest that only two of the codes of ethics address many of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing." Provides implications and recommendations for professional organizations. (Contains 20 references and…

  12. Transformational leadership moderates the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention among community mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Miller, Elizabeth A; Aarons, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout and emotional exhaustion which negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. Few studies have examined ways to reduce these associations, but transformational leadership may have a positive effect. We examine the relationships between transformational leadership, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention in a sample of 388 community mental health providers. Emotional exhaustion was positively related to turnover intention, and transformational leadership was negatively related to both emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. Transformational leadership moderated the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention, indicating that having a transformational leader may buffer the effects of providers' emotional exhaustion on turnover intention. Investing in transformational leadership development for supervisors could reduce emotional exhaustion and turnover among public sector mental health providers.

  13. HIV health-care providers' burnout: can organizational culture make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Oetzel, John; Hill, Ricky; Avila, Magdalena; Archiopoli, Ashley; Wilcox, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing those working with people living with HIV (PLWH) is the increased potential for burnout, which results in increased turnover and reduces quality of care provided for PLWH. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship among HIV health-care providers' burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and organizational culture including teamwork, involvement in decision-making, and critical appraisal. Health-care providers for PLWH (N = 47) in federally funded clinics in a southwestern state completed a cross-sectional survey questionnaire about their perceptions of organizational culture and burnout. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that positive organizational culture (i.e., teamwork) was negatively related to emotional burnout (p organizational culture (i.e., critical appraisal) was positively related to depersonalization (p < .005, R(2) = .18). These findings suggest that effective organizational communication interventions might protect HIV health-care providers from burnout.

  14. QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF SOME PREVENTIVE HEALTH SERVICES PROVIDED FOR ADOLESCENT INDIVIDUALS IN DUBAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansaheb, Hamda; Hussein, Ayman; Hamidi, Samer; Brown, David; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2016-01-01

    The United Arab Emirate (UAE) of Dubai, faces significant adolescent health problems. In 2009, evidence based clinical guidelines were developed for primary health care professionals in Dubai to help reduce adolescent health problems. This research study explores adolescents' self-reports about health education services received between 2008 and 2010. The sample consisted of 730 public high school students in grades 10 through 12 between the ages of 15 and 19. 357 (48.9%) of the sample were males and 373 (51.1%) were female. The major language spoken in the home was Arabic (77.4%). All students completed a 27-item survey in Arabic that was adapted from the Young Adult Health Care Survey (YAHCS). The YAHCS is a 56-item research instrument traditionally administered in English and Spanish. The sample reported they had received little or no health education from their health care providers. 94.2% reported receiving no information about using a helmet for bicycle and motorbike safety; 88.2% reported receiving no information about drug use; and 81.9% reported that they received no information about smoking. The instrument also explored the health education material students received within the last 12 months. 65.5% of the sample reported seeing and/or hearing safety tips; 84.9% reported hearing and/or seeing health information about healthy diet, physical activity and exercise; and 79.2% reported seeing and/or hearing information about the risks of smoking and substance abuse.

  15. Freeing France: The Allies, the Resistance, and the JEDBURGHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    EMILY, Jean Kohn of Operational Group PEG, Erasmus Kloman of SPOC , Robert LeBlanc, of SF Detachment 11, Geoffrey M. T. Jones, and the irrepressible R. W...Special Operations Executive SPOC – Special Projects Operations Centre SF Det. – Special Force Detachment ULTRA – Allied program that provided...April AFHQ had agreed to take direction regarding their activities with the French Résistance and on 23 May, the Special Projects Office Command ( SPOC

  16. Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Training: Systematic Development and Implementation in a Large Medical System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Corso, Meghan L; Nielsen, Matthew K; Corso, Kent A; Polizzi, Nicholas C; Earles, Jay E

    2016-09-01

    The expansion of integrated, collaborative, behavioral health services in primary care requires a trained behavioral health workforce with specific competencies to deliver effective, evidence-informed, team-based care. Most behavioral health providers do not have training or experience working as primary care behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and require structured training to function effectively in this role. This article discusses one such training program developed to meet the needs of a large healthcare system initiating widespread implementation of the primary care behavioral health model of service delivery. It details the Department of Defense's experience in developing its extensive BHC training program, including challenges of addressing personnel selection and hiring issues, selecting a model for training, developing and implementing a phased training curriculum, and improving the training over time to address identified gaps. Future directions for training improvements and lessons learned in a large healthcare system are discussed.

  17. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  18. Men as Allies Against Sexism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezgin Cihangir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sexism is often expressed in subtle and ambiguous ways, causing targets to doubt their own capabilities or to show stereotype-confirming behavior. This research examines whether the self-confidence and stereotype (dis-confirming behavior of targets of sexism can be bolstered when other male versus female sources suggest that sexism may have played a role. Both Study 1 (N = 78 and Study 2 (N = 90 show that a suggestion of sexism has more beneficial effects when it is made by male sources than when it is made by female sources. When males suggested that sexism had taken place, targets reported more self-confidence (less self-handicapping and higher personal performance state self-esteem and showed less stereotype confirmation (less self-stereotyping and better task performance than when sexism was suggested by a female source. Study 2 additionally revealed that targets are more likely to file a complaint when men suggest that sexism took place than when this same suggestion was made by women. These results indicate that men can constitute important allies against sexism if they speak out when sexist treatment takes place.

  19. Digitally enabled patients, professionals and providers: making the case for an electronic health record in mental health services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jonathan; McDonald, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The move to a digital health service may improve some components of health systems: information, communication and documentation of care. This article gives a brief definition and history of what is meant by an electronic health record (EHR). There is some evidence of benefits in a number of areas, including legibility, accuracy and the secondary use of information, but there is a need for further research, which may need to use different methodologies to analyse the impact an EHR has on patients, professionals and providers. PMID:27752348

  20. Nutrition and oral health considerations in children with special health care needs: implications for oral health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moursi, Amr M; Fernandez, Jill B; Daronch, Marcia; Zee, Lena; Jones, Cassandra L

    2010-01-01

    Children with special health care needs are at increased risk for oral diseases. The purpose of this article was to discuss: nutritional and oral health factors routinely observed in most chronic childhood disorders; dietary modifications associated with select systemic disorders and how they may impact oral health in children; and the following factors common to chronic disorders associated with diet modifications-decreased appetite and increased nutritional risk; frequency of food intake; parental overindulgence; long-term use of cariogenic medications; and xerostomia. Characteristics of childhood disorders that require dietary modifications (congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, AIDS/HIV, diabetes mellitus, and phenylketonuria) are summarized. In addition, healthy dietary modifications and oral health recommendations are suggested. Implementation of these recommendations can assist the dentist and dental team as they join physicians and nutritionists in delivering the best possible care to children with special health care needs.

  1. In the right words: addressing language and culture in providing health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    As part of its continuing mission to serve trustees, executives, and staff of health foundations and corporate giving programs, Grantmakers In Health (GIH) convened a group of experts from philanthropy, research, health care practice, and policy on April 4, 2003, to discuss the roles of language and culture in providing effective health care. During this Issue Dialogue, In the Right Words: Addressing Language and Culture in Providing Health Care, health grantmakers and experts from policy and practice participated in an open exchange of ideas and perspectives on language access and heard from fellow grantmakers who are funding innovative programs in this area. Together they explored ways to effectively support comprehensive language services, including the use of interpreters and translation of written materials. This Issue Brief synthesizes key points from the day's discussion with a background paper previously prepared for Issue Dialogue participants. It focuses on the challenges and opportunities involved with ensuring language access for the growing number of people who require it. Sections include: recent immigration trends and demographic changes; the effect of language barriers on health outcomes and health care processes; laws and policies regarding the provision of language services to patients, including an overview of public financing mechanisms; strategies for improving language access, including enhancing access in delivery settings, promoting advocacy and policy change, improving interpreter training, and advancing research; and roles for foundations in supporting improved language access, including examples of current activities. The Issue Dialogue focused mainly on activities and programs that ensure linguistic access to health care for all patients. Although language and culture are clearly inseparable, a full exploration of the field of cultural competence and initiatives that promote its application to the health care setting are beyond the scope

  2. Why Provide Music Therapy in the Community for Adults With Mental Health Problems?

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Odell-Miller

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes music therapy within a community mental health setting for adults using a care programme approach in England. It describes the setting, and emphasises the importance of multidisciplinary teamwork in order to enable music therapy to be effective. It provides some statistics and descriptive clinical information which demonstrate the efficacy of music therapy for adults with long-term mental health problems, and argues that music therapy should be a priority for this client ...

  3. Health care providers' attitudes towards termination of pregnancy: A qualitative study in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Orner Phyllis; Stinson Kathryn; Harries Jane

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite changes to the abortion legislation in South Africa in 1996, barriers to women accessing abortion services still exist including provider opposition to abortions and a shortage of trained and willing abortion care providers. The dearth of abortion providers undermines the availability of safe, legal abortion, and has serious implications for women's access to abortion services and health service planning. In South Africa, little is known about the personal and prof...

  4. Personal values and attitudes toward people living with HIV among health care providers in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Hamama, Liat

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigates the relationship between health care providers' personal value preferences and their attitudes toward people living with HIV (PLWH). The study was conducted among nurses (n = 38) and physicians (n = 87) working in HIV Centers in Kazakhstan. Significant relationships were found between the providers' personal value preferences and their attitudes toward PLWH: higher preferences for tradition and power values and lower preferences for benevolence values were associated with more negative attitudes toward PLWH. In addition, more years of experience working with PLWH was associated with more positive attitudes toward this population. Age, gender, family status, religiosity, occupation, and number of years working in health care were not related to the health care providers' attitudes toward PLWH. Theoretical and practical implications of the results obtained are discussed.

  5. Incorporating human rights into reproductive health care provider education programs in Nicaragua and El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H Luz McNaughton; Zuniga, Karen Padilla; Billings, Deborah L; Blandon, Marta Maria

    2013-07-01

    Health care providers play a central role in the promotion and protection of human rights in patient care. Consequently, the World Medical Association, among others, has called on medical and nursing schools to incorporate human rights education into their training programs. This report describes the efforts of one Central American nongovernmental organization to include human rights - related content into reproductive health care provider training programs in Nicaragua and El Salvador. Baseline findings suggest that health care providers are not being adequately prepared to fulfill their duty to protect and promote human rights in patient care. Medical and nursing school administrators, faculty, and students recognize the need to strengthen training in this area and are enthusiastic about incorporating human rights content into their education programs. Evaluation findings suggest that exposure to educational materials and methodologies that emphasize the relationship between human rights and reproductive health may lead to changes in health care provider attitudes and behaviors that help promote and safeguard human rights in patient care.

  6. Political and cultural factors in achieving continuity with a primary health care provider at an Indian Health Service hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, A J; Olson, A L

    1981-01-01

    A primary care system was established at Zuni-Ramah Indian Health Service Hospital and clinic in New Mexico. Continuity and coordination of care were added to a health care system that was already accountable, accessible, and comprehensive. The new system offered each patient a personal health care provider who worked as a member of a multidisciplinary team. In changing the health care system, special attention was given to its cultural and political setting, the village of Zuni. After thorough discussion with community and staff, community members' concerns about patients' privacy and free choice were better understood, and special efforts were made to safeguard them. Ongoing evaluation is essential to maintain continuity. Eight months after the primary care system was begun, 64 percent of patients who came for care had established a personal relationship with a health care provider. For 59 percent of the visits during the 1-month evaluation period, patients saw their regular provider and, for 82 percent, patients saw their provider or one of his or her team colleagues. These percentages include night and walk-in visits. The system required no extra funding or staff. The political process of planning and consultation helped anticipate and alleviate the community's concerns, but resistance from physician's assistants and some physicians was unexpected. A flexible approach has led to a gradual acceptance of this voluntary system. This experience with the people of Zuni village shows that a primary care system can be started in a rural Indian Health Service facility with minimal outside help. Apparent improvements in quality of care make the continuity of primary care worthy of further consideration in the IHS and similar health services systems.

  7. Structure-Induced Covalent Bonding in Al-Li Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Kazuki; Ishii, Yasushi

    2010-06-01

    Formation mechanism of a deep pseudogap in the electronic density of states of the Al-Li Bergman and Zintl compounds is discussed with an emphasis on the differences among isostructural Al-Mg compounds. Since Li scatters electrons very weakly in comparison with Al and Mg, the potential landscape for electrons in Al-Li compounds is not that of the entire close-packed structure but that of the Al sublattice, which is a rather porous network like the diamond lattice. The porous network structure realized by the chemical decoration of close-packed structures enhances the covalent nature of electronic structures, hence the deep pseudogap in the electronic density of states. A concept of structure-induced covalent bonding in a network realized by the chemical decoration of close-packed structures may provide a novel picture in the electronic structures of complex intermetallic compounds.

  8. Providing health information to the general public: a survey of current practices in academic health sciences libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, S M

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to 148 publicly and privately supported academic health sciences libraries affiliated with Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC-accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada to determine level of access and services provided to the general public. For purposes of this study, "general public" was defined as nonaffiliated students or health care professionals, attorneys and other nonhealth-related professionals, patients from affiliated or other hospitals or clinics, and general consumers. One hundred five (71%) libraries responded. Results showed 98% of publicly supported libraries and 88% of privately supported libraries provided access to some or all of the general public. Publicly supported libraries saw greater numbers of public patrons, often provided more services, and were more likely to circulate materials from their collections than were privately supported libraries. A significant number of academic health sciences libraries housed a collection of consumer-oriented materials and many provided some level of document delivery service, usually for a fee. Most allowed the public to use some or all library computers. Results of this study indicated that academic health sciences libraries played a significant role in serving the information-seeking public and suggested a need to develop written policies or guidelines covering the services that will be provided to minimize the impact of this service on primary clientele.

  9. Outreach syphilis testing services by different health providers to female sex workers in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Sheng Chen

    Full Text Available Health providers have played important roles on delivering prevention and care services to control syphilis in China. The current study was aimed to evaluate the performance of different health providers in providing outreach syphilis testing services to female sex workers (FSWs. The current study carried out during April to August 2009 in Liuzhou was aimed to investigate the services delivered by two different types of clinics in China. A total of 1,808 FSWs recruited from sex work venues were included in the study. Prevalence of positive syphilis test (6.4% among FSWs accessed by the local center for disease control outreach teams (CDC teams was significantly lower than that (9.3% among FSWs accessed by the local reproductive health hospital outreach teams (RHH teams. As compared with CDC teams, RHH teams had more FSWs to be successfully referred to the designated STD clinics for further syphilis confirmation and intervention (85.7% vs. 26.7%, P<0.001. These findings indicate that RHH teams may be more efficient than CDC teams to provide outreach-based services to FSWs. Participation of the reproductive health providers or other medical facilities in outreach services to FSWs should be considered in developing intervention programs in China.

  10. Outreach Syphilis Testing Services by Different Health Providers to Female Sex Workers in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Yin, Yue-Ping; Liu, Guo-Gu; Wei, Wan-Hui; Wang, Hong-Chun; Yu, Yuan-Lin; Mabey, David C.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2013-01-01

    Health providers have played important roles on delivering prevention and care services to control syphilis in China. The current study was aimed to evaluate the performance of different health providers in providing outreach syphilis testing services to female sex workers (FSWs). The current study carried out during April to August 2009 in Liuzhou was aimed to investigate the services delivered by two different types of clinics in China. A total of 1,808 FSWs recruited from sex work venues were included in the study. Prevalence of positive syphilis test (6.4%) among FSWs accessed by the local center for disease control outreach teams (CDC teams) was significantly lower than that (9.3%) among FSWs accessed by the local reproductive health hospital outreach teams (RHH teams). As compared with CDC teams, RHH teams had more FSWs to be successfully referred to the designated STD clinics for further syphilis confirmation and intervention (85.7% vs. 26.7%, P<0.001). These findings indicate that RHH teams may be more efficient than CDC teams to provide outreach-based services to FSWs. Participation of the reproductive health providers or other medical facilities in outreach services to FSWs should be considered in developing intervention programs in China. PMID:23637755

  11. Health care providers' attitudes towards termination of pregnancy: A qualitative study in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orner Phyllis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite changes to the abortion legislation in South Africa in 1996, barriers to women accessing abortion services still exist including provider opposition to abortions and a shortage of trained and willing abortion care providers. The dearth of abortion providers undermines the availability of safe, legal abortion, and has serious implications for women's access to abortion services and health service planning. In South Africa, little is known about the personal and professional attitudes of individuals who are currently working in abortion service provision. Exploring the factors which determine health care providers' involvement or disengagement in abortion services may facilitate improvement in the planning and provision of future services. Methods Qualitative research methods were used to collect data. Thirty four in-depth interviews and one focus group discussion were conducted during 2006 and 2007 with health care providers who were involved in a range of abortion provision in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Complex patterns of service delivery were prevalent throughout many of the health care facilities, and fragmented levels of service provision operated in order to accommodate health care providers' willingness to be involved in different aspects of abortion provision. Related to this was the need expressed by many providers for dedicated, stand-alone abortion clinics thereby creating a more supportive environment for both clients and providers. Almost all providers were concerned about the numerous difficulties women faced in seeking an abortion and their general quality of care. An overriding concern was poor pre and post abortion counselling including contraceptive counselling and provision. Conclusion This is the first known qualitative study undertaken in South Africa exploring providers' attitudes towards abortion and adds to the body of

  12. Exploring Ayurvedic knowledge on food and health for providing innovative solutions to contemporary healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnikrishnan ePayyappallimana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine that originated over 3 millennia ago in the South Asian region, offers extensive insights about food and health based on certain unique conceptual as well as theoretical positions. Health is defined as a state of equilibrium with one self (svasthya but which is inextricably linked to the environment. Ayurvedic principles like the tridosha (three humours theory provide the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm that can be applied in day to day practice. Classical Ayurveda texts cover an array of themes on food ranging from diversity of natural sources, their properties in relation to seasons and places and to their specific function both in physiological and pathological states. The epistemic perspective on health and nutrition in Ayurveda is very different from that of biomedicine and modern nutrition. However, contemporary knowledge is reinventing and advancing several of these concepts in an era of systems biology, personalized medicine, and the broader context of a more holistic transition in sciences in general. Trans-disciplinary research could be important not only for pushing the boundaries of food and health sciences but also for providing practical solutions for contemporary health conditions. This article briefly reviews the parallels in Ayurveda and biomedicine and draws attention to the need for a deeper engagement with traditional knowledge systems like Ayurveda. It points out that recreation of the methodologies that enabled the holistic view point about health in Ayurveda may unravel some of the complex connections with Nature.

  13. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  14. Role Of Health Agencies In Providing Benzathine Penicillin To Sore Throat Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya R.K

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This study (ICMR collaborative has been conducted In Chiraigaon Block of Varanasi District, up, between January 1984 and September 1987. Health personnel of the Primary Health Center (PHC, Rural Health Training Center (RHTC and voluntary Health Agency (VHA were trained to detect sore throats in children in the age group 5 to 15 years. The average number of sore throat cases detected per effective worker month was 12.3 and 8.3 for PHC and RHTC respectively. Injection Benzathine Penicillin was provided as sledgehammer approach compliance ranged from 97.1% to 100%. This study can be helpful for implementation of the national programme for prevention of the Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease.

  15. Coping of health care providers with the death of a patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Mlinšek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available RQ: With an aging population, health care professionals are often faced with the death of a patient in acute hospitals. The experience of dying patients’ to health care professionals and to the health care system brings many challenges that need to be faced.Purpose: The present study was to determine how health care providers are faced with the death of a patient, what is the care needed for the dying patient and how to participate in interdisciplinary team care of among themselves and family members of dying patients.Method: We conducted a small-scale quantitative survey of nursing care in a Slovenian acute hospital. To analyze the results, we used frequency statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient.Results: Health care providers need additional skills needed to care for a dying patient as well as to the family of the dying patient.They try to control distress of the dying experience reasonably and less with conversation. The effect on the loss of a patient affects work experience, but we did not notice any other effects. Theinvolvement of an interdisciplinary team in the care of the dying patient is satisfactory; family members are under-involved in the care.Organization: Health organizations that are more focused on acute treatment have to become aware of palliative care that needs to be included in nursing care as an integral process of care for the terminally ill. Health care staff need to communicate more with one another and go through additional training.Society: Attitudes to death in a broader cultural environment also affects the attitude of health workers towards death. Involvement of the social environment, especially family members, is very important.Originality: The survey was conducted on the basis of comparing two surveys.Limitations: The survey was conducted on a small sample size.

  16. Health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Al-Manaa, Hamad A.; Khoja, Tawfik A.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Aburisheh, Khaled H.; Youssef, Amira M.; Alotaibi, Metib S.; Al-Gamdi, Ali A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and diabetes health care expenditure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: This study was part of a nationwide, household, population based cross-sectional survey conducted at the University Diabetes Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2007 and December 2009 covering 13 administrative regions of the Kingdom. Using patients’ interview questionnaires, health care services data were collected by trained staff. Results: A total of 5,983 diabetic patients were chosen to assess health care services and expenditure. Approximately 92.2% of health services were governmental and the remaining 7.8% were in private services. The mean annual number of visits to physicians was 6.5±3.9 and laboratories was 5.1±3.9. Diabetic patients required one admission every 3 years with a mean admission duration of 13.3±28.3 days. General practitioners managed 85.9% of diabetic cases alone, or shared with internists and/or endocrinologists. Health care expenditure was governmental in 90% of cases, while it was personal in 7.7% or based on insurance payment in 2.3%. Conclusion: Health services and its expenditure provided to diabetic citizens in Saudi Arabia are mainly governmental. Empowerment of the role of both the private sector and health insurance system is badly needed, aside from implementing proper management guidelines to deliver good services at different levels. PMID:26446334

  17. Health providers' perceptions of clinical trials: lessons from Ghana, Kenya and Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibian Angwenyi

    Full Text Available Clinical trials conducted in Africa often require substantial investments to support trial centres and public health facilities. Trial resources could potentially generate benefits for routine health service delivery but may have unintended consequences. Strengthening ethical practice requires understanding the potential effects of trial inputs on the perceptions and practices of routine health care providers. This study explores the influence of malaria vaccine trials on health service delivery in Ghana, Kenya and Burkina Faso.We conducted: audits of trial inputs in 10 trial facilities and among 144 health workers; individual interviews with frontline providers (n=99 and health managers (n=14; and group discussions with fieldworkers (n=9 discussions. Descriptive summaries were generated from audit data. Qualitative data were analysed using a framework approach.Facilities involved in trials benefited from infrastructure and equipment upgrades, support with essential drugs, access to trial vehicles, and placement of additional qualified trial staff. Qualified trial staff in facilities were often seen as role models by their colleagues; assisting with supportive supervision and reducing facility workload. Some facility staff in place before the trial also received formal training and salary top-ups from the trials. However, differential access to support caused dissatisfaction, and some interviewees expressed concerns about what would happen at the end of the trial once financial and supervisory support was removed.Clinical trials function as short-term complex health service delivery interventions in the facilities in which they are based. They have the potential to both benefit facilities, staff and communities through providing the supportive environment required for improvements in routine care, but they can also generate dissatisfaction, relationship challenges and demoralisation among staff. Minimising trial related harm and maximising

  18. Estimating the development assistance for health provided to faith-based organizations, 1990-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Haakenstad

    Full Text Available Faith-based organizations (FBOs have been active in the health sector for decades. Recently, the role of FBOs in global health has been of increased interest. However, little is known about the magnitude and trends in development assistance for health (DAH channeled through these organizations.Data were collected from the 21 most recent editions of the Report of Voluntary Agencies. These reports provide information on the revenue and expenditure of organizations. Project-level data were also collected and reviewed from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. More than 1,900 non-governmental organizations received funds from at least one of these three organizations. Background information on these organizations was examined by two independent reviewers to identify the amount of funding channeled through FBOs.In 2013, total spending by the FBOs identified in the VolAg amounted to US$1.53 billion. In 1990, FB0s spent 34.1% of total DAH provided by private voluntary organizations reported in the VolAg. In 2013, FBOs expended 31.0%. Funds provided by the Global Fund to FBOs have grown since 2002, amounting to $80.9 million in 2011, or 16.7% of the Global Fund's contributions to NGOs. In 2011, the Gates Foundation's contributions to FBOs amounted to $7.1 million, or 1.1% of the total provided to NGOs.Development assistance partners exhibit a range of preferences with respect to the amount of funds provided to FBOs. Overall, estimates show that FBOS have maintained a substantial and consistent share over time, in line with overall spending in global health on NGOs. These estimates provide the foundation for further research on the spending trends and effectiveness of FBOs in global health.

  19. An empirical study of healthcare providers and patients' perceptions of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandé, Giovanni; Nocco, Luca; Peigné, Violette

    2015-04-01

    This paper is the result of a legal and policy analysis of a statistical poll focused on the area of Livorno conducted by the LIDER-Lab of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna (Pisa, Italy). Information were gathered by submitting questionnaires to both healthcare providers and their patients. The scope was to evaluate the interest engendered by the application of technology on health data processing along with the needs, expectations and concerns of patients and healthcare providers. The paper leads to the main policy proposals of increasing financial investments in e-health (or at least preserve this area from the generalized budget constraints public health is suffering nowadays) and introducing incentives to use computers for general practitioners.

  20. Developing personal values: trainees' attitudes toward strikes by health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Srinivasan, Malathi; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Kravitz, Richard L; Wilkes, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Worldwide, health care providers use strikes and job actions to influence policy. For health care providers, especially physicians, strikes create an ethical tension between an obligation to care for current patients (e.g., to provide care and avoid abandonment) and an obligation to better care for future patients by seeking system improvements (e.g., improvements in safety, to access, and in the composition and strength of the health care workforce). This tension is further intensified when the potential benefit of a strike involves professional self-interest and the potential risk involves patient harm or death. By definition, trainees are still forming their professional identities and values, including their opinions on fair wages, health policy, employee benefits, professionalism, and strikes. In this article, the authors explore these ethical tensions, beginning with a discussion of reactions to a potential 2005 nursing strike at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. The authors then propose a conceptual model describing factors that may influence health care providers' decisions to strike (including personal ethics, personal agency, and strike-related context). In particular, the authors explore the relationship between training level and attitudes toward taking a job action, such as going on strike. Because trainees' attitudes toward strikes continue to evolve during training, the authors maintain that open discussion around the ethics of health care professionals' strikes and other methods of conflict resolution should be included in medical education to enhance professionalism and systems-based practice training. The authors include sample case vignettes to help initiate these important discussions.

  1. Attitudes of Health Care Providers toward Elderly Patients with Normal Aging and Disease-Related Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rodney R.

    1984-01-01

    Examined preferences of 275 health care providers for working with elderly patients exhibiting symptoms of normal aging or diseases. In comparing descriptions of two hospitalized patients, physicians, nurses and social workers expressed a preference for working with patients with disease symptoms, raising concerns about geriatric care. (JAC)

  2. A comparison of the efficiency of health systems in providing life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenart, Adam; Zarulli, Virginia

    their efficiency in absolute terms, the countries can be compared with each other. The relative efficiency of health systems can be measured by the life expectancy that they provide by taking education level and their funding structure into account. Based on data coming from the HMD, GGS, OECD and WHO, data...

  3. A Qualitative Investigation of the Referral Process from School Counselors to Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Matthew E.; Wachter Morris, Carrie A.; Clemens, Elysia V.; Smith, Allison L.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the referral process to mental health providers by school counselors, as perceived by school counselors. Using an open-ended survey instrument, school counselors were asked to describe the referral process, including prevalence, decisional factors, follow-up, and evaluation. Results suggest that school counselors…

  4. Screening and Brief Intervention for Tobacco Use by Student Health Providers on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutfin, Erin L.; McNamara, Robert S.; Blocker, Jill N.; Ip, Edward H.; O'Brien, Mary Claire; Wolfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed college students' reports of tobacco screening and brief intervention by student health center providers. Participants: Participants were 3,800 students from 8 universities in North Carolina. Methods: Web-based survey of a stratified random sample of undergraduates. Results: Fifty-three percent reported ever visiting…

  5. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... organizations, preferred provider organizations); (9) Ambulatory surgical center services, as described for... defined. 433.56 Section 433.56 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...) Nursing facility services (other than services of intermediate care facilities for the mentally...

  6. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure…

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Precocious Puberty and Delayed Puberty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a health care provider to monitor organs and blood flow in real time An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan of the brain and pituitary gland using an instrument that produces detailed images of organs ... 3 : Blood tests to measure hormone levels Blood tests to ...

  8. Health Care providers and Teen Driving Safety: Topics Discussed and Educational Resources Used in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Ann M; West, Bethany A

    2015-11-01

    Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death among teens. Health care providers have an opportunity to address what works to keep teens safe on the road during the patient visit. An online survey was conducted of 1088 health care providers who saw patients at or near driving age. The survey assessed which road safety topics were discussed and which types of educational products were used most often. Family and general practice physicians represented 44.3% of the sample, followed by pediatricians (22.5%), nurse practitioners (17.6%), and internists (15.5%). Nearly all respondents (92.9%) reported addressing one or more driving safety factors (seat belt use, nighttime driving, fatigue, teen passengers, alcohol/drug use, speeding/reckless driving, and cell phone use/texting) with adolescent patients and/or their parents. Seat belt use was reported more often (83.7%) than other topics. The use of parent-teen driving agreements, a known effective intervention, was reported by less than 10% of respondents. Since health care providers expressed interest in receiving written resource materials, distribution of parent-teen driving agreements to health care providers might encourage greater uptake and use of this effective intervention.

  9. The Politics of Resistance to Workplace Cultural Diversity Education for Health Service Providers: An Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study has as its focus an exploration of health service providers' perceptions and experiences of the processes and implications of delivering workplace cultural diversity education for staff. Data were obtained from conducting in-depth individual and focus group interviews with a purposeful sample of 137 healthcare professionals,…

  10. Building the Bridge between Operations and Outcomes : Modelling and Evaluation of Health Service Provider Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Mahdavi (Mahdi)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The PhD research has two objectives: - To develop generally applicable operational models which allow developing the evidence base for health service operations in provider networks. - To contribute to the evidence base by validating the model through application to hea

  11. Cameroon mid-level providers offer a promising public health dentistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achembong Leo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Oral health services are inadequate and unevenly distributed in many developing countries, particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa. Rural areas in these countries and poorer sections of the population in urban areas often do not have access to oral health services mainly because of a significant shortage of dentists and the high costs of care. We reviewed Cameroon’s experience with deploying a mid-level cadre of oral health professionals and the feasibility of establishing a more formal and predictable role for these health workers. We anticipate that a task-shifting approach in the provision of dental care will significantly improve the uneven distribution of oral health services particularly in the rural areas of Cameroon, which is currently served by only 3% of the total number of dentists. Methods The setting of this study was the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board (BCHB, which has four dentists and 42 mid-level providers. De-identified data were collected manually from the registries of 10 Baptist Convention clinics located in six of Cameroon’s 10 regions and then entered into an Excel format before importing into STATA. A retrospective abstraction of all entries for patient visits starting October 2010, and going back in time until 1500 visits were extracted from each clinic. Results This study showed that mid-level providers in BCHB clinics are offering a full scope of dental work across the 10 clinics, with the exception of treatment for major facial injuries. Mid-level providers alone performed 93.5% of all extractions, 87.5% of all fillings, 96.5% of all root canals, 97.5% of all cleanings, and 98.1% of all dentures. The dentists also typically played a teaching role in training the mid-level providers. Conclusions The Ministry of Health in Cameroon has an opportunity to learn from the BCHB model to expand access to oral health care across the country. This study shows the benefits of using a simple, workable, low

  12. Provider-Initiated Late Preterm Births in Brazil: Differences between Public and Private Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Maria do Carmo; Esteves-Pereira, Ana Paula; Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Moreira, Maria Elizabeth; Theme-Filha, Mariza; da Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Background A large proportion of the rise in prematurity worldwide is owing to late preterm births, which may be due to the expansion of obstetric interventions, especially pre-labour caesarean section. Late preterm births pose similar risks to overall prematurity, making this trend a concern. In this study, we describe factors associated with provider-initiated late preterm birth and verify differences in provider-initiated late preterm birth rates between public and private health services according to obstetric risk. Methods This is a sub-analysis of a national population-based survey of postpartum women entitled “Birth in Brazil”, performed between 2011 and 2012. We included 23,472 singleton live births. We performed non-conditional multiple logistic regressions assessing associated factors and analysing differences between public and private health services. Results Provider-initiated births accounted for 38% of late preterm births; 32% in public health services and 61% in private health services. They were associated with previous preterm birth(s) and maternal pathologies for women receiving both public and private services and with maternal age ≥35 years for women receiving public services. Women receiving private health services had higher rates of provider-initiated late preterm birth (rate of 4.8%) when compared to the ones receiving public services (rate of 2.4%), regardless of obstetric risk–adjusted OR of 2.3 (CI 1.5–3.6) for women of low obstetric risk and adjusted OR of 1.6 (CI 1.1–2.3) for women of high obstetric risk. Conclusion The high rates of provider-initiated late preterm birth suggests a considerable potential for reduction, as such prematurity can be avoided, especially in women of low obstetric risk. To promote healthy births, we advise introducing policies with incentives for the adoption of new models of birth care. PMID:27196102

  13. Provider-Initiated Late Preterm Births in Brazil: Differences between Public and Private Health Services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Leal

    Full Text Available A large proportion of the rise in prematurity worldwide is owing to late preterm births, which may be due to the expansion of obstetric interventions, especially pre-labour caesarean section. Late preterm births pose similar risks to overall prematurity, making this trend a concern. In this study, we describe factors associated with provider-initiated late preterm birth and verify differences in provider-initiated late preterm birth rates between public and private health services according to obstetric risk.This is a sub-analysis of a national population-based survey of postpartum women entitled "Birth in Brazil", performed between 2011 and 2012. We included 23,472 singleton live births. We performed non-conditional multiple logistic regressions assessing associated factors and analysing differences between public and private health services.Provider-initiated births accounted for 38% of late preterm births; 32% in public health services and 61% in private health services. They were associated with previous preterm birth(s and maternal pathologies for women receiving both public and private services and with maternal age ≥35 years for women receiving public services. Women receiving private health services had higher rates of provider-initiated late preterm birth (rate of 4.8% when compared to the ones receiving public services (rate of 2.4%, regardless of obstetric risk-adjusted OR of 2.3 (CI 1.5-3.6 for women of low obstetric risk and adjusted OR of 1.6 (CI 1.1-2.3 for women of high obstetric risk.The high rates of provider-initiated late preterm birth suggests a considerable potential for reduction, as such prematurity can be avoided, especially in women of low obstetric risk. To promote healthy births, we advise introducing policies with incentives for the adoption of new models of birth care.

  14. Exploring new health markets: experiences from informal providers of transport for maternal health services in Eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloom Gerald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a number of intermediate transport initiatives have been used in some developing countries, available evidence reveals a dearth of local knowledge on the effect of these rural informal transport mechanisms on access to maternal health care services, the cost of implementing such schemes and their scalability. This paper, attempts to provide insights into the functioning of the informal transport markets in facilitating access to maternal health care. It also demonstrates the role that higher institutions of learning can play in designing projects that can increase the utilization of maternal health services. Objectives To explore the use of intermediate transport mechanisms to improve access to maternal health services, with emphasis on the benefits and unintended consequences of the transport scheme, as well as challenges in the implementation of the scheme. Methods This paper is based on the pilot phase to inform a quasi experimental study aimed at increasing access to maternal health services using demand and supply side incentives. The data collection for this paper included qualitative and quantitative methods that included focus group interviews, review of project documents and facility level data. Results There was a marked increase in attendance of antenatal, and delivery care services, with the contracted transporters playing a leading role in mobilizing mothers to attend services. The project also had economic spill-over effects to the transport providers, their families and community generally. However, some challenges were faced including difficulty in setting prices for paying transporters, and poor enforcement of existing traffic regulations. Conclusions and implications The findings indicate that locally existing resources such as motorcycle riders, also known as “boda boda” can be used innovatively to reduce challenges caused by geographical inaccessibility and a poor transport network with

  15. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan – a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled “the worst country in which to be a mom” in Save the Children’s World’s Mothers’ Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Methods Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi’s phenomenological analysis. Results Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. Conclusion This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and

  16. Ferns and fern allies of District Shopian, Kashmir Valley, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAKOOR A. MIR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Mir SA, Mishra AK, Pala SA, Reshi ZA, Sharma MP. Ferns and fern allies of District Shopian, Kashmir Valley, India Biodiversitas 16: 27-43. Shopian, recently created hilly district of Kashmir valley, Jammu and Kashmir is surrounded by the lofty mountains of Pir-Panjal range. More than half area of district is occupied by different forests, subalpine, alpine and mountainous zones. Great altitudinal variation, adequate rainfall, high forest cover, large number of streams, springs and topographic variations render the district worthy for supporting rich fern flora. Therefore, the current study was aimed to undertake in-depth systematic survey of different habitats of Shopian for the collection of diversity of pteridophytes. Specimens were collected during 2010, 2011 and 2012 growing seasons from June to November. A total 81 species of ferns and fern allies belonging 27 genera and 11 families were reported. The dominant families of the region are Dryopteridaceae (25 species followed by Woodsiaceae (16 species, Aspleniaceae (13 species and Pteridaceae (12 species. Similarly, the dominant genera collected from here are Dryopteris (14 species, Asplenium (13, Polystichum (11 species and Athyrium (6 species. A list of the fern and fern allies, along with update nomenclature, their selected Synonym, diagnostic features, distributional and ecological notes have been provided here.

  17. Community health center provider and staff's Spanish language ability and cultural awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Arshiya A; Benitez, Amanda; Locklin, Cara A; Campbell, Amanda; Schaefer, Cynthia T; Heuer, Loretta J; Lee, Sang Mee; Solomon, Marla C; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L; Chin, Marshall H

    2014-05-01

    Many community health center providers and staff care for Latinos with diabetes, but their Spanish language ability and awareness of Latino culture are unknown. We surveyed 512 Midwestern health center providers and staff who managed Latino patients with diabetes. Few respondents had high Spanish language (13%) or cultural awareness scores (22%). Of respondents who self-reported 76-100% of their patients were Latino, 48% had moderate/low Spanish language and 49% had moderate/low cultural competency scores. Among these respondents, 3% lacked access to interpreters and 27% had neither received cultural competency training nor had access to training. Among all respondents, Spanish skills and Latino cultural awareness were low. Respondents who saw a significant number of Latinos had good access to interpretation services but not cultural competency training. Improved Spanish-language skills and increased access to cultural competency training and Latino cultural knowledge are needed to provide linguistically and culturally tailored care to Latino patients.

  18. Health insurance eroding for working families: employer-provided coverage declines for fifth consecutive year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elise

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the percentage of Americans with employer-provided health insurance fell for the fifth year in a row. Workers and their families have been falling into the ranks of the uninsured at alarming rates. The downward trend in employer-provided coverage for children also continued into 2005. In the previous four years, children were less likely to become uninsured as public sector health coverage expanded, but in 2005 the rate of uninsured children increased. While Medicaid and SCHIP still work for many, the government has not picked up coverage for everybody who lost insurance. The weakening of this system-notably for children-is particularly difficult for workers and their families in a time of stagnating incomes. Furthermore, these programs are not designed to prevent low-income adults or middle- or high-income families from becoming uninsured. Government at the federal and state levels has responded to medical inflation with policy changes that reduce public insurance eligibility or with proposals to reduce government costs. Federal policy proposals to lessen the tax advantage of workplace insurance or to encourage a private purchase system could further destabilize the employer-provided system. Now is a critical time to consider health insurance reform. Several promising solutions could increase access to affordable health care. The key is to create large, varied, and stable risk pools.

  19. Providing comprehensive health services for young key populations: needs, barriers and gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead Delany-Moretlwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescence is a time of physical, emotional and social transitions that have implications for health. In addition to being at high risk for HIV, young key populations (YKP may experience other health problems attributable to high-risk behaviour or their developmental stage, or a combination of both. Methods: We reviewed the needs, barriers and gaps for other non-HIV health services for YKP. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for articles that provided specific age-related data on sexual and reproductive health; mental health; violence; and substance use problems for adolescent, youth or young sex workers, men who have sex with men, transgender people, and people who inject drugs. Results: YKP experience more unprotected sex, sexually transmitted infections including HIV, unintended pregnancy, violence, mental health disorders and substance use compared to older members of key populations and youth among the general population. YKP experience significant barriers to accessing care; coverage of services is low, largely because of stigma and discrimination experienced at both the health system and policy levels. Discussion: YKP require comprehensive, integrated services that respond to their specific developmental needs, including health, educational and social services within the context of a human rights-based approach. The recent WHO Consolidated Guidelines on HIV Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment and Care for Key Populations are an important first step for a more comprehensive approach to HIV programming for YKP, but there are limited data on the effective delivery of combined interventions for YKP. Significant investments in research and implementation will be required to ensure adequate provision and coverage of services for YKP. In addition, greater commitments to harm reduction and rights-based approaches are needed to address structural barriers to access to care.

  20. Comparison Quality of Health Services between Public and Private Providers: The Iranian People’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijanzadeh, Mehran; Zare, Seyed Ali Moosaniaye; Rajaee, Roya; Fard, Seyed Mohammad Ali Mousavi; Asefzadeh, Saeed; Alijanzadeh, Mahnaz; Gholami, Soheyla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health services quality has been the most important criteria of judging, and its improvement causes people’s satisfaction of health systems. In a health system, public and private sectors provide services and typically have been effective in promoting health services quality of community. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of health services in both public and private sectors from the perspective of residents in Qazvin (Iran). Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study population included all residents of Qazvin Province, and the sample size was estimated to 1002. The research tool was a perceptions of services quality standard questionnaire. Data were collected by trained interviewers visiting homes and were analyzed by IBM-SPSS software version 22 and t-test and linear regression. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.91 and test–re-test coefficient was 83%. Results 741 people (74%) in their last visit to receive services were referred to the public sector. Between the perception of people participating in the study about medical equipment and supplies, welfare facilities, competence and experience of doctor, waiting time, rapid reception, and access to doctor in public and private sectors, significant differences were observed (p < 0.05). In the tangible realm in perception of health services, there was a significant difference in quality between the public and private sectors (p < 0.05). In addition, place of receiving services, waiting time, education, occupation, and type of received services were affecting factors in regards to perceptions of health services from the perspective of Iran’s population (p < 0.05). Conclusion The results showed the importance of a tangible realm on people’s satisfaction of health services. It seems that the public sector should pay more attention to this issue. PMID:27790347

  1. Burnout: Interpreting the perception of Iranian primary rural health care providers from working and organizational conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Keshvari

    2012-01-01

    Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; "instability and frequent changes", "involved in laws and regulations", "pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower", "helplessness in performing the tasks and duties", "sense of identity threat and low self-concept", and "deprivation of professional development". The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called "burnout". Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community.

  2. Training providers on issues of race and racism improve health care equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen C; Prasad, Shailendra; Hackman, Heather W

    2015-05-01

    Race is an independent factor in health disparity. We developed a training module to address race, racism, and health care. A group of 19 physicians participated in our training module. Anonymous survey results before and after the training were compared using a two-sample t-test. The awareness of racism and its impact on care increased in all participants. White participants showed a decrease in self-efficacy in caring for patients of color when compared to white patients. This training was successful in deconstructing white providers' previously held beliefs about race and racism.

  3. Helping the public 'Discover Health' in their local library. Providing health information in public libraries: a partnership approach in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elspeth; Marley, Lesley

    2004-06-01

    A partnership between the Specialist Health Promotion Service of NHS Tayside and Dundee City Council developed a project, 'Discover Health', to bring health information to the public. The two main formats used were traditional leaflets and Internet access via the People's Network, both available in public libraries. The steering group for the project was made up of staff from both organisations. The NHS side secured the funding; the Council side provided the accommodation and information and communication technologies. The partnership worked well, and the project is continuing, with expansion in the pipeline for other areas within Tayside. The various aspects of the functioning of the partnership are discussed. A literature review of similar initiatives is included.

  4. Embedded sensor systems for health - providing the tools in future healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Maria; Björkman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Wearable, embedded sensor systems for health applications are foreseen to be enablers in the future healthcare. They will provide ubiquitous monitoring of multiple parameters without restricting the person to stay at home or in the hospital. By following trend changes in the health status, early deteriorations will be detected and treatment can start earlier. Also health prevention will be supported. Such future healthcare requires technology development, including miniaturized sensors, smart textiles and wireless communication. The tremendous amount of data generated by these systems calls for both signal processing and decision support to guarantee the quality of data and avoid overflow of information. Safe and secure communications have to protect the integrity of the persons monitored.

  5. Extreme Heat and Health: Perspectives from Health Service Providers in Rural and Remote Communities in South Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Saniotis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the challenges for rural communities and health services in Australia, climate change and increasing extreme heat are emerging as additional stressors. Effective public health responses to extreme heat require an understanding of the impact on health and well-being, and the risk or protective factors within communities. This study draws on lived experiences to explore these issues in eleven rural and remote communities across South Australia, framing these within a socio-ecological model. Semi-structured interviews with health service providers (n = 13, and a thematic analysis of these data, has identified particular challenges for rural communities and their health services during extreme heat. The findings draw attention to the social impacts of extreme heat in rural communities, the protective factors (independence, social support, education, community safety, and challenges for adaptation (vulnerabilities, infrastructure, community demographics, housing and local industries. With temperatures increasing across South Australia, there is a need for local planning and low-cost strategies to address heat-exacerbating factors in rural communities, to minimise the impact of extreme heat in the future.

  6. Attitude about mental illness of health care providers and community leaders in rural Haryana, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Ramesh Salve

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attitude about mental illness determines health seeking of the people. Success of National Mental Health Programme (NMHP is dependent on attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders in the programme. Material & Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was carried out in Ballabgarh block of Faridabad district in Haryana. We aimed to study attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders of health care providers (HCP, community leaders in rural area of Haryana, north India. Study area consisting of five Primary Health Centers (PHCs serving 2,12,000 rural population. All HCP working at PHCs, Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and community leaders in study area were approached for participation. Hindi version of Opinion about Mental illness Scale for Chinese Community (OMICC was used to study attitude. Results: In total, 467 participants were participated in the study. Of which, HCP, ASHAs and community leaders were 81 (17.4%, 145 (31.0% and 241 (51.6% respectively. Community members reported socially restrictive, pessimistic and stereotyping attitude towards mentally ill person. ASHA and HCP reported stereotyping attitude about person with mental illness. None of the stakeholders reported stigmatizing attitude. Conclusion: Training programme focusing on spectrum of mental illness for HCP and ASHA working in rural area under NMHP programme is needed. Awareness generation of community leaders about bio-medical concept of mental illness is cornerstone of NMHP success in India.

  7. Drug Shortages: Patients and Health Care Providers Are All Drawing the Short Straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, François; de Denus, Simon; Nguyen, Angela; Nattel, Stanley; Bussières, Jean-François

    2017-02-01

    Drug shortages have been reported for > 35 years. Attention to this problem increased recently after the Sandoz crisis, in which a warning letter by the Food and Drug Administration caused supply changes that suspended the availability of numerous medications. The frequency of drug shortages has increased recently. In 2011-2012 alone, Canadian supply shortages occurred for > 1000 drugs (including 150 for cardiovascular diseases). These shortages lasted for an average of 4-5 months, increasing the workload for health care providers, producing impaired health, stress, and anxiety for patients, and increasing the risk of errors. The critical importance of drug shortages is increasingly recognized by members of the public, and health care providers must sometimes make major efforts to minimize their adverse consequences. Although data are limited, such efforts come at a price that patients and the health care system should not have to bear; they divert pharmacists and physicians from their already busy clinical duties and often require complex and risky adjustments in medical regimens. If drug shortages are here to stay, clinicians, drug manufacturers, and relevant organizations should work together to increase accountability for drug availability and adaptation to shortages, and to create more effective tools with which to anticipate and respond to critical supply fluctuations.

  8. Health care providers' readiness to screen for intimate partner violence in Northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, I A; Lawoko, Stephen; Svanström, L; Mohammed, A Z

    2010-01-01

    Research on screening for intimate partner violence (IPV) within health care in a sub-Saharan African context is rare. This paper assessed factors associated with the readiness to screen for IPV among care providers (HCP, n = 274) at Kano hospital, Nigeria. Readiness was measured using the Domestic Violence Health Care Providers' survey instrument, which measures grade of perceived self-efficacy in screening for IPV, fear for victim/provider safety, access to system support to refer IPV victims, professional roles resistant/ fear of offending clients, and blaming the victim for being abused victim. Social workers perceived a higher self-efficacy and better access to system support networks to refer victims than peers in other occupation categories. Female care providers and doctors were less likely to blame the victim than males and social workers, respectively. Younger care providers of Yoruba ethnicity and social workers were less likely to perceive conflicting professional roles related to screening than older providers of Hausa ethnicity and doctors, respectively. Implications of our findings for interventions and further research are discussed.

  9. Association of family and health care provider opinion on infant feeding with mother's breastfeeding decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Erika C; Li, Ruowei; Scanlon, Kelley S; Perrine, Cria G; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    In the United States, about 25% of women choose not to initiate breastfeeding, yet little is known about how opinions of individuals in a woman's support network influence her decision to breastfeed. In the 2005-2007 Infant Feeding Practices Study II, women completed questionnaires from the last trimester of pregnancy until 12 months postpartum. Mothers indicated prenatally their family members' and health care providers' opinion on how newborns should be fed: breastfed only, formula fed only, breast and formula fed, or no opinion/don't know. Breastfeeding initiation was determined by asking mothers around 4 weeks postpartum (n=2,041) whether they ever breastfed. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between mothers' perception of family members' and health care providers' opinion on how to feed the infant and the initiation of breastfeeding, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Nearly 14% of mothers surveyed did not initiate breastfeeding. Mothers who believed their family members or health care providers preferred breastfeeding only were least likely not to initiate breastfeeding. Never breastfeeding was significantly associated with the following perceptions: the infant's father (odds ratio [OR]=110.4; 95% CI 52.0 to 234.4) or maternal grandmother (OR=15.9; 95% CI 7.0 to 36.0) preferred only formula feeding; the infant's father (OR=3.2; 95% CI 1.7 to 5.9) or doctor (OR=2.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 6.2) preferred both breast and formula feeding; and the infant's father (OR=7.6; 95% CI 4.5 to 12.7), maternal grandmother (OR=5.4; 95% CI 2.6 to 11.0), or doctor (OR=1.9; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.7) had no opinion/didn't know their feeding preference. The prenatal opinions of family members and health care providers play an important role in a woman's breastfeeding decisions after the infant's birth.

  10. Level of knowledge about anaphylaxis and its management among health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H S Drupad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the level of knowledge of health care providers regarding anaphylaxis and its management at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: A pretested structured questionnaire was administered to interns, MBBS Phase II students, and nursing students. The subjects were asked to answer the questionnaire, which included questions regarding anaphylaxis and its management. Results: Of 265 subjects, 151 (56.9% of subjects answered correctly that adrenaline is the first line of drug for the treatment of anaphylaxis. Among 151 subjects, 40 (26.4% answered the correct dose of adrenaline, of which 25 (16.5% subjects selected intramuscular injection as the most appropriate route of administration. Medical students′ performance was better than interns and nursing students on questions regarding dose, route, and site of adrenaline administration. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding the management of anaphylaxis was inadequate in almost all the health care providers who were included in the study. Improved education and training of health care providers are necessary for better management of anaphylaxis.

  11. Planning parenthood: Health care providers' perspectives on pregnancy intention, readiness, and family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lindsay M

    2015-08-01

    A major health care goal in the United States is increasing the proportion of pregnancies that are planned. While many studies examine family planning from the perspective of individual women or couples, few investigate the perceptions and practices of health care providers, who are gatekeepers to medicalized fertility control. In this paper, I draw on 24 in-depth interviews with providers to investigate how they interpret and enact the objective to "plan parenthood" and analyze their perspectives in the context of broader discourses about reproduction, family planning, and motherhood. Interviews reveal two central discourses: one defines pregnancy planning as an individual choice, that is as patients setting their own pregnancy intentions; the second incorporates normative expectations about what it means to be ready to have a baby that exclude poor, single, and young women. In the latter discourse, planning is a broader process of achieving middle-class life markers like a long-term relationship, a good job, and financial stability, before having children. Especially illuminating are cases where a patient's pregnancy intention and the normative expectations of "readiness" do not align. With these, I demonstrate that providers may prioritize normative notions of readiness over a patient's own intentions. I argue that these negotiations of intention and readiness reflect broader tensions in family planning and demonstrate that at times the seemingly neutral notion of "planned parenthood" can mask a source of stratification in reproductive health care.

  12. Patient–Provider Rapport in the Health Care of People Who Inject Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginetta Salvalaggio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Little research has described determinants and consequences of patient–provider rapport among people who inject drugs (PWIDs. This mixed-method study (a qualitatively described facilitators, barriers, and consequences to rapport development between PWIDs and their health care providers and (b quantitatively tested the hypothesis that quality of rapport is associated with positive patterns of service use. Two exploratory focus groups with PWIDs and care providers were conducted. Subsequently, 89 PWIDs completed a survey interview; of those, eight completed a follow-up qualitative interview. Qualitative results indicated that rapport is influenced by drug-related behaviors, addiction severity, provider expertise, patient-centered care, and perceived discrimination and that rapport then influences patient compliance, timing of care, and criminal activity. Quantitative results indicated that rapport predicted PWID satisfaction with care as well as frequency and timing of emergency department presentations. Results suggest that PWID–provider rapport has several unique determinants and is associated with positive health care outcomes.

  13. Should health care providers be forced to apologise after things go wrong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Stuart; Walker, Simon; Rich, Leigh E

    2014-12-01

    The issue of apologising to patients harmed by adverse events has been a subject of interest and debate within medicine, politics, and the law since the early 1980s. Although apology serves several important social roles, including recognising the victims of harm, providing an opportunity for redress, and repairing relationships, compelled apologies ring hollow and ultimately undermine these goals. Apologies that stem from external authorities' edicts rather than an offender's own self-criticism and moral reflection are inauthentic and contribute to a "moral flabbiness" that stunts the moral development of both individual providers and the medical profession. Following a discussion of a recent case from New Zealand in which a midwife was required to apologise not only to the parents but also to the baby, it is argued that rather than requiring health care providers to apologise, authorities should instead train, foster, and support the capacity of providers to apologise voluntarily.

  14. Child Welfare, Juvenile Justice, Mental Health, and Education Providers' Conceptualizations of Trauma-Informed Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donisch, Katelyn; Bray, Chris; Gewirtz, Abigail

    2016-05-01

    This study systematically examined child-service providers' conceptualizations of trauma-informed practice (TIP) across service systems, including child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, and education. Eleven focus groups and nine individual interviews were conducted, totaling 126 child-service providers. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data with interrater reliability analyses indicating near perfect agreement between coders. Qualitative analysis revealed that child-service providers identified traumatic stress as an important common theme among children and families served as well as the interest in TIP in their service systems. At the same time, child-service providers generally felt knowledgeable about what they define TIP to be, although they articulated wide variations in the degree to which they are taught skills and strategies to respond to their traumatized clients. The results of this study suggest a need for a common lexicon and metric with which to advance TIP within and across child-service systems.

  15. A study on corporate social responsibility for the health care of the elderly by private health care providers of Mangalore city: A health systems research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Sudarshan Pai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Private sector is the largest provider of health care services in India. But it is expensive. Self-driven corporate social responsibility (CSR providing free or subsidised services will be useful to the elderly. There are no published data reporting the pattern or types of health care services provided to elderly by the private health care sector of India through CSR initiative. So this study was undertaken. Objectives: To know the pattern (Subsidised/free and type (Medical, Surgical etc., of Health care services received by the elderly people as a part of CSR. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire based cross-sectional study conducted among all private health care providers of Mangalore city. List of all private health care providers which included various types of hospitals (corporate hospitals, multispecialty hospitals etc... were obtained from the local chapter of Indian Medical Association. The data was collected form hospitals fulfilling the study criteria. The data was analysed using SPSS software for windows, version 16.0. Results are presented as frequencies and proportions in appropriate tables. Results: Totally 24 hospitals had participated in this study. Most (n = 16, 66.7% reported providing some free or subsidised services. Among them only 7 (29.2% were providing free services like: Health check-up camps, subsidised medical and surgical treatment. However most of them did not respond to the "criteria for selecting of the elderly for such free services." Conclusion: Most of the private hospitals in Mangalore do not provide free or subsidised health care services to the elderly through a self-driven CSR initiative

  16. Lessons of Allied Interoperability: A Portent for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-10

    operating in their area of responsibility. Transportation coordination and movements control proved a major logistical headache in North Africa and Italy...Allied operations, coalition warfare, allied interoperobility, standardizatlon. rationliaaton, laisou, logistica , comand and control. doctrine, training

  17. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is

  18. Preparedness of NGO Health Service Providers in Bangladesh about Distance Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM ALAMGIR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional survey was conducted countrywide from 15 January to 01 March 2004 to explore the potentials of health care service providers (physicians, nurses, paramedics etc. for using distance-based learning materials. Face-to-face in-depth interview was taken from 99 randomly selected direct service providers, 45 midlevel clinic mangers/physicians and 06 administrators or policy planners. Quasi-open questionnaire was developed for three different levels. Pre-trained interviewer team assisted data collection at field level. Total procedure was stringently monitored for completeness and consistency to ensure quality data. SPSS software was used to process and analyze both univariate and multivariate multiple responses. Identified need for training areas were- STD/HIV, tuberculosis updates, family planning, treatment of locally endemic diseases, behavioral change communication & marketing and quality management system for managers. About 76.7% clinic managers and 89.1% service providers had primary information about distance-based learning in spite showed interest. About 51.5% desired monthly, 20.6% biweekly and 26.8% wanted bimonthly circulation of the distance-based study materials. About 35.1% expected print materials with regular facilitators while 58.8% demanded stand-by facilitators. The study suggested wide acceptance of distance-based learning methods as supplementary to the continuing medical education among the countrywide health service providers.

  19. Distribution and cost of wheelchairs and scooters provided by Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Sandra L; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Vogel, Bruce; Reker, Dean M; Cooper, Rory A; Boninger, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    During fiscal years 2000 and 2001, the Veterans Health Administration provided veterans with more than 131,000 wheelchairs and scooters at a cost of $109 million. This national study is the first to investigate Veterans Health Administration costs in providing wheelchairs and scooters and to compare regional prescription patterns. With a retrospective design, we used descriptive methods to analyze fiscal years 2000 and 2001 National Prosthetics Patient Database data (cleaned data set of 113,724 records). Wheelchairs were categorized by function, weight, and adjustability options for meeting individual needs (e.g., axle position, camber, position of wheels, tilt, and recline options). Results displayed a cost distribution that was negatively skewed by low-cost accessories coded as wheelchairs. Of the standard manual wheelchairs, 3.5% could be considered beyond the customary cost. Regionally, 71% to 86% of all wheelchairs provided were manual wheelchairs, 5% to 11% were power wheelchairs, and 5% to 20% were scooters. The considerable variation found in the types of wheelchairs and scooters provided across Veterans Integrated Service Networks may indicate a need for evidence-based prescription guidelines and clinician training in wheeled-mobility technologies.

  20. Zika Virus and Pregnancy: What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney-Delman, Dana; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Staples, J Erin; Oduyebo, Titilope; Ellington, Sascha R; Petersen, Emily E; Fischer, Marc; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes (Stegomyia) species of mosquitoes. In May 2015, the World Health Organization confirmed the first local transmission of Zika virus in the Americas in Brazil. The virus has spread rapidly to other countries in the Americas; as of January 29, 2016, local transmission has been detected in at least 22 countries or territories, including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Zika virus can infect pregnant women in all three trimesters. Although pregnant women do not appear to be more susceptible to or more severely affected by Zika virus infection, maternal-fetal transmission has been documented. Several pieces of evidence suggest that maternal Zika virus infection is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes, most notably microcephaly. Because of the number of countries and territories with local Zika virus transmission, it is likely that obstetric health care providers will care for pregnant women who live in or have traveled to an area of local Zika virus transmission. We review information on Zika virus, its clinical presentation, modes of transmission, laboratory testing, effects during pregnancy, and methods of prevention to assist obstetric health care providers in caring for pregnant women considering travel or with a history of travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.

  1. How Do Patients and Providers React to Different Incentives in the Chinese Multiple Health Security Systems?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Yu Zhang; Hideki Hashimoto

    2015-01-01

    Background:China has achieved universal health insurance coverage.This study examined how patients and hospitals react to the different designs of the plans and to monitoring of patients by the local authority in the Chinese multiple health security schemes.Methods:The sample for analysis consisted of 1006 orthopedic inpatients who were admitted between January and December 2011 at a tertiary teaching hospital located in Beijing.We conducted general linear regression analyses to investigate whether medical expenditure and length of stay differed according to the different incentives.Results:Patients under plans with lower copayment rates consumed significantly more medication compared with those under plans with higher copayment rates.Under plans with an annual ceiling for insurance coverage,patients spent significantly more in the second half of the year than in the first half of the year.The length of stay was shorter among patients when there were government monitoring and a penalty to the hospital service provider.Conclusions:Our results indicate that the different designs and monitoring of the health security systems in China cause opportunistic behavior by patients and providers.Reformation is necessary to reduce those incentives,and improve equity and efficiency in healthcare use.

  2. Acculturation differences in communicating information about child mental health between Latino parents and primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê Cook, Benjamin; Brown, Jonathan D; Loder, Stephen; Wissow, Larry

    2014-12-01

    Significant Latino-white disparities in youth mental health care access and quality exist yet little is known about Latino parents' communication with providers about youth mental health and the role of acculturation in influencing this communication. We estimated regression models to assess the association between time in the US and the number of psychosocial issues discussed with the medical assistant (MA) and doctor, adjusting for child and parent mental health and sociodemographics. Other proxies of acculturation were also investigated including measures of Spanish and English language proficiency and nativity. Parent's length of time in the US was positively associated with their communication of: their child's psychosocial problems with their child's MA, stress in their own life with their child's MA, and their child's school problems with their child's doctor. These differences were especially apparent for parents living in the US for >10 years. Parent-child language discordance, parent and child nativity were also significantly associated with communication of psychosocial problems. Greater provider and MA awareness of variation in resistance to communicating psychosocial issues could improve communication, and improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of youth mental illness.

  3. 22 CFR 120.32 - Major non-NATO ally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Major non-NATO ally. 120.32 Section 120.32... § 120.32 Major non-NATO ally. Major non-NATO ally means a country that is designated in accordance with § 517 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321k) as a major non-NATO ally for purposes...

  4. Section 1--The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The education of nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals in the UK is guided by professional bodies and the over arching Health Professionals Council (HPC)/Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Each of these professional bodies provides regulatory frameworks and guidance notes on the educational content of the degree level programmes…

  5. Quality improvement – rival or ally of practice development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Lavery

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of nurses, doctors, allied health professionals and other healthcare staff possess a strong desire to provide the best possible care and experience for their patients. Unfortunately, this sometimes falls short of what was planned or intended (Institute of Medicine, 2001, p 23. The gap between care intended and care delivered can be explained by problems with systems and processes and/or people and culture. The narrowing of this gap is the focus of many strategies, methodologies and approaches. Practice development is described as ‘an activity focused on developing people and practice for the ultimate purpose of achieving high-quality person-centred care’ and a ‘methodology that aims to achieve effective workplace cultures that are person-centred’ (Shaw, 2012; Manley et al., 2014. Practice development undoubtedly has a strong focus on people and culture and the potential to change processes and systems. Another approach, widely referred to as quality improvement, aims to improve safety, effectiveness and person-centredness in healthcare using principles proven effective in other industries such as manufacturing – notably car manufacturing (Toyota, oil production, nuclear power and aviation. The fundamental principles of quality improvement for healthcare include making care reliable (every patient receiving care as intended every time, using well-designed processes and reducing variation (agreeing a consistent way to provide care. At first glance this may appear to be an approach suited only to systems and processes. However, better processes, designed by those who use them, resulting in fewer errors and less re-working or working around problems, can reduce stress on staff, offer greater job satisfaction with improved morale and free up time to provide person-centred care. In his report, A Promise to Learn – a Commitment to Act (2013, p 24, Professor Don Berwick says: ‘Mastery of quality and patient safety sciences and

  6. Determinants of satisfaction with health care provider interactions at health centres in central Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldie Mirkuzie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary health care, provider-patient interaction is fundamental platform and critically affects service delivery. Nevertheless, it is often ignored in medical research and practice and it is infrequently subjected to scientific inquiry, particularly in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess patient satisfaction with health care provider interactions and its influencing factors among out-patients at health centers in West Shoa, Central Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional facility based study was conducted on 768 out-patients of six health centers in West Shoa Zone, Central Ethiopia. The total sample size was allocated to each of the six health centers based on patient flow during the ten days prior to the start of data collection. Pre-tested instruments were used for data collection and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 statistical software. Factor score was computed for the items identified to represent the satisfaction scale by varimax rotation method. Using this regression factor score, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed and the effect of independent variables on the regression factor score was quantified. Results Seventy three percent of the respondents perceived that provider's empathy was good and 35% complained that providers were not technically competent enough. In addition, 82% of the respondents rated non-verbal communication by the providers to be good, very good or excellent on a five-point ordinal scale. Regardless of the process, only 34.1% of the patients implied that the consultations made a difference in understanding their illness and coping with it. Generally speaking, 62.6% of the patients reported that they have been satisfied with their visit. Perceived empathy, perceived technical competency, non-verbal communication, patient enablement, being told the name of once illness, type and frequency of visit, knowing the providers and educational status were main independent

  7. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment §...

  8. The role of provider-patient communication and trust in online sources in Internet use for health-related activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiran; Shim, Minsun

    2010-01-01

    Provider-patient communication is an important factor influencing patients' satisfaction and health outcomes. This study draws upon the uses and gratification theory to examine how individuals' perception of communication with healthcare providers is associated with their Internet use for health-related activities. Using the data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), we found that as individuals perceived their communication with providers to be less patient-centered, they were more likely to engage in various types of online health activities, such as using websites for healthy lifestyles, searching for healthcare providers, and seeking health information. Trust in online health information was also found to be a significant predictor of online health activities. The results of this study emphasized the important role of provider-patient communication in motivating individuals to turn to the Internet for health purposes.

  9. The Oregon health insurance experiment: when limited policy resources provide research opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Heidi; Baicker, Katherine; Taubman, Sarah; Wright, Bill; Finkelstein, Amy

    2013-12-01

    In 2008 Oregon allocated access to its Medicaid expansion program, Oregon Health Plan Standard, by drawing names from a waiting list by lottery. The lottery was chosen by policy makers and stakeholders as the preferred way to allocate limited resources. At the same time, it also gave rise to the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: an unprecedented opportunity to do a randomized evaluation - the gold standard in medical and scientific research - of the impact of expanding Medicaid. In this article we provide historical context for Oregon's decision to conduct a lottery, discuss the importance of randomized controlled designs for policy evaluation, and describe some of the practical challenges in successfully capitalizing on the research opportunity presented by the Oregon lottery through public-academic partnerships. Since policy makers will always face tough choices about how to distribute scarce resources, we urge thoughtful consideration of the opportunities to incorporate randomization that can substantially improve the evidence available to inform policy decisions without compromising policy goals.

  10. Why Provide Music Therapy in the Community for Adults With Mental Health Problems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Odell-Miller

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes music therapy within a community mental health setting for adults using a care programme approach in England. It describes the setting, and emphasises the importance of multidisciplinary teamwork in order to enable music therapy to be effective. It provides some statistics and descriptive clinical information which demonstrate the efficacy of music therapy for adults with long-term mental health problems, and argues that music therapy should be a priority for this client group. To support these points of view, the article includes a case study showing a psychoanalytically informed approach in music therapy. This paper was given as a keynote address at the 1994 Australian Conference of Music Therapy.

  11. Public Health Approaches and Barriers to Educating Providers about Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Angela M; Supplee, Laura; Blakely, Lindsey; McLosky, Jenna; Duquette, Debra

    2016-01-01

    The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services implemented and evaluated two initiatives designed to enhance provider knowledge of patients appropriate for breast and/or ovarian cancer genetic risk assessment and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome testing. The first initiative targeted select providers who had diagnosed patients meeting HBOC risk criteria. Specifically, the initiative used 2008-2009 state cancer registry data to identify all providers who had diagnosed breast cancers in women ≤50 years of age, male breast cancers, and ovarian cancers in four health systems with newly established cancer genetics clinics. Using a method coined bidirectional reporting (BDR), reports highlighting how many of these cases each provider had seen were generated and mailed. Reports on 475 cancers (9.5% of the 5005 cases statewide meeting criteria) were sent to 69 providers with information about how and why to refer such patients for genetic counseling. Providers who received a report were contacted to assess whether the reports increased awareness or resulted in action (genetic counseling/referral). Based on the few responses received, despite multiple attempts to contact, and attrition rate, it is not possible to ascertain the impact of this initiative on providers. However the project resulted in the MDHHS identifying which providers see the largest proportion of at-risk patients, creating an opportunity to target those providers with HBOC education efforts. The second initiative involved creating and broadly disseminating an online, interactive case-based educational module to increase awareness and referral decisions for HBOC using high- and low-risk patient scenarios. A total of 1835 unique users accessed the module in a one year. Collectively the users viewed topic pages 2724 times and the interactive case studies 1369 times. Point of care tools (fact sheets) were viewed 1624 times and downloaded 764 times. Satisfaction among the subset of

  12. Public Health Approaches and Barriers to Educating Providers about Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Trepanier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services implemented and evaluated two initiatives designed to enhance provider knowledge of patients appropriate for breast and/or ovarian cancer genetic risk assessment and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC syndrome testing. The first initiative targeted select providers who had diagnosed patients meeting HBOC risk criteria. Specifically, the initiative used 2008–2009 state cancer registry data to identify all providers who had diagnosed breast cancers in women ≤50 years of age, male breast cancers, and ovarian cancers in four health systems with newly established cancer genetics clinics. Using a method coined bidirectional reporting (BDR, reports highlighting how many of these cases each provider had seen were generated and mailed. Reports on 475 cancers (9.5% of the 5005 cases statewide meeting criteria were sent to 69 providers with information about how and why to refer such patients for genetic counseling. Providers who received a report were contacted to assess whether the reports increased awareness or resulted in action (genetic counseling/referral. Based on the few responses received, despite multiple attempts to contact, and attrition rate, it is not possible to ascertain the impact of this initiative on providers. However the project resulted in the MDHHS identifying which providers see the largest proportion of at-risk patients, creating an opportunity to target those providers with HBOC education efforts. The second initiative involved creating and broadly disseminating an online, interactive case-based educational module to increase awareness and referral decisions for HBOC using high- and low-risk patient scenarios. A total of 1835 unique users accessed the module in a one year. Collectively the users viewed topic pages 2724 times and the interactive case studies 1369 times. Point of care tools (fact sheets were viewed 1624 times and downloaded 764 times. Satisfaction

  13. Strategies for Engaging Men as Anti-Violence Allies: Implications for Ally Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Casey

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As ally movements become an increasingly prevalent element of social justice efforts, research is needed that illuminates effective strategies to initially engage members of privileged social groups in anti-oppression work. This study presents descriptive findings regarding ally engagement strategies and barriers from a qualitative study of a particular ally movement – male anti-violence against women activism. Twenty-seven men who recently initiated involvement in an organization or event dedicated to ending sexual or domestic violence were interviewed regarding their perceptions of effective approaches to reaching and engaging other men in anti-violence work. Participants viewed tailored engagement strategies that tap into existing social networks, that allow men to see themselves reflected in anti-violence movements, and that help men make personal, emotional connections to the issue of violence as most effective. Implications for engaging men in the project of ending violence against women, and for ally movements more generally are discussed.

  14. Involving private health care providers in delivery of TB care: global strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uplekar, Mukund

    2003-01-01

    Most poor countries have a large and growing private medical sector. Evidence suggests that a large proportion of tuberculosis patients in many high TB- burden countries first approach a private health care provider. Further, private providers manage a significant proportion of tuberculosis cases. Surprisingly though, there is virtually no published evidence on linking private providers to tuberculosis programmes. As a part of global efforts to control tuberculosis through effective DOTS implementation, the World Health Organization has recently begun addressing the issue of private providers in TB control through an evolving global strategy. As a first step, a global assessment of private providers' participation in tuberculosis programmes was undertaken. The findings of the assessment were discussed and debated in a consultation involving private practitioners, TB programme managers and policy makers. Their recommendations have contributed to the evolving global strategy called Public-Private Mix for DOTS implementation (PPM DOTS). This paper presents the guiding principles of PPM DOTS and major elements of the global strategy. These include: informed advocacy; setting-up "learning projects"; scaling-up successful projects and formulation of regional, national and local strategies; developing practical tools to facilitate PPM DOTS and pursuing an operational research agenda to help better design and shape PPM DOTS strategies. Encouraging results from some ongoing project sites are discussed. The paper concludes that concerted global efforts and local input are required for a sustained period to help achieve productive engagement of private practitioners in DOTS implementation. Such efforts have to be targeted as much towards national tuberculosis programmes as towards private providers and their associations. Continued apathy in this area could not only potentially delay achieving global targets for TB control but also undo, in the long run, the hard

  15. An Integrated Curriculum of Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs for Health Care Providers of the Elderly (Project NNED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit-Portage Area Health Education Network, Akron, OH.

    This document is intended to give health care providers interdisciplinary information concerning drugs, nutrition, and exercise to help them enhance health maintenance of the elderly. Prepared as part of Project NNED, (Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs), an integrated curriculum for health care providers of the elderly, the document includes…

  16. Communication between Asian American Adolescents and Health Care Providers about Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Pregnancy Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jessie; Lau, May; Vermette, David; Liang, David; Flores, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Asian American adolescents have been reported to have the lowest amount of communication with health care providers regarding sexual health topics (sexual activity, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy prevention). This study identified Asian American adolescents' attitudes/beliefs regarding how health care providers can…

  17. Characteristics of electronic patient-provider messaging system utilisation in an urban health care organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Patrick Mikles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Research suggests that electronic messaging can improve patient engagement. Studies indicate that a ‘digital divide’ may exist, where certain patient populations may be using electronic messaging less frequently. This study aims to determine which patient characteristics are associated with different levels of usage of an electronic patient-provider messaging system in a diverse urban population.Methods Cross-sectional electronic health record data were extracted for patients 10 years of age or older who live in New York City and who visited a set of clinics between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012. Regression analyses determined which participant characteristics were associated with the sending of electronic messages.Results Older, female, English-speaking participants of white race who received more messages, had any diagnoses, more office visits and a provider who sent messages were more likely to send more messages. Non-Millennial, non-white participants who received fewer messages, had more office visits, any diagnoses, a provider who saw fewer patients with patient portal accounts, lived in a low socioeconomic status neighbourhood, and did not have private insurance were more likely to send zero messages.Conclusion This study found significant differences in electronic messaging usage based on demographic, socioeconomic and health-related patient characteristics. Future studies are needed to support these results and determine the causes of observed associations.

  18. Electronic Health Records: Delivering the Right Information to the Right Health Care Providers at the Right Time

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In 1993 I wrote "Communication and information management consume as much as 40 percent of all inpatient costs, yet errors still occur at an unacceptable rate. The Institute of medicine has suggested that electronic medical records (EMRs) will help lower health care costs, maintain quality of care, and provide physicians with better information" (Tierney et al. 1993, 379). Nearly 20 years later I'm here to tell you how far we've come toward implementing EHRs nationwide, and what we've learned...

  19. Qualitative evaluation of a Positive Prevention training for health care providers in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutin, Sarah A; Cummings, Beverley; Jaiantilal, Prafulta; Johnson, Kelly; Mbofana, Francisco; Dawson Rose, Carol

    2014-04-01

    The rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment in Mozambique has provided an opportunity to reach people living with HIV (PLHIV) with prevention interventions in HIV care and treatment settings. A three-day Positive Prevention (PP) training intervention for health care providers that focused on pressing issues for PLHIV in Mozambique was adapted and delivered at sites in three provinces. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 providers trained in the PP curriculum. Qualitative data were used to assess the appropriateness of the training materials and approach, which lessons providers learned and were able to implement and which PP messages were still difficult to deliver. Providers reported gaining numerous insights from the training, including how to conduct a risk assessment and client-centered counseling, negotiating disclosure, partner testing, condom use, PMTCT, treatment adherence and approaches for positive living. Training topics not commonly mentioned included discordance counseling, STIs, family planning, alcohol and drug use, and frank sexual risk discussions. While areas for improvement exist, the PP training was useful in transferring skills to providers and is a viable component of HIV care. This evaluation helps identify areas where future PP trainings and specific strategies and messages can be refined for the Mozambican context.

  20. Helping the decision maker effectively promote various experts’ views into various optimal solutions to China’s institutional problem of health care provider selection through the organization of a pilot health care provider research system

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Liyang

    2013-01-01

    Background The main aim of China’s Health Care System Reform was to help the decision maker find the optimal solution to China’s institutional problem of health care provider selection. A pilot health care provider research system was recently organized in China’s health care system, and it could efficiently collect the data for determining the optimal solution to China’s institutional problem of health care provider selection from various experts, then the purpose of this study was to apply ...

  1. The Health Tourists’ Satisfaction Level of Services Provided: A Cross-Sectional Study in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Saki, Koroush; Momeni, Khalil; Vasokolaei, Ghasem Rajabi; Khodakaramifard, Zahra; Zouzani, Morteza Arab; Jalilian, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient satisfaction with provided services is used as an indicator of health care quality. Patient satisfaction is defined as patient perception of provided care compared to expected care. This study was administered to evaluate the health tourists’ satisfaction of provided services in Lorestan University of Medical Sciences affiliated hospitals in 2015. Method: In this descriptive case study, 1800 (696 (54.4%) men and 812 (45.6%) women, 74.5 province native) patients were selected by random sampling from among the patients of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences affiliated hospitals in 2015 spring. The data collection instrument is a semi-structured questionnaire in this study. The questionnaire has 62 general and specific items. Each of the specific items is scaled on four points; satisfied, fairly satisfied, dissatisfied and O.K. In order to analyze the data both descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Results: Poldokhtar Imam Khomeini Hospital had the highest Level of satisfaction of 68 percent in all aspects (hoteling, discharge, paramedical, nurses, medical and admission) among the studied hospitals. Kuhdasht Imam Khomeini hospital had the lowest level of satisfaction of 53 percent. The overall satisfaction level in all hospitals was 61%. Discussion and Conclusion: Despite the shortcomings observed in different areas, the results of the present study are in an intermediate status compared to other studies. While treating patients, patient-centered issue and patients ‘need and preferences should be focused on to enhance health care quality. Considering Patients preferences not only are morally good but also lead to improved care and access to sustainable care practices. Therefore it is needed to drive organizational management approach toward the customer preferences management and needs. PMID:27157181

  2. Radiation event medical management (REMM): website guidance for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Judith L; Nemhauser, Jeffrey; Chang, Florence; Mashayekhi, Bijan; Sczcur, Marti; Knebel, Ann; Hrdina, Chad; Coleman, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Planning for and exercising the medical response to potential chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) terrorist events are new responsibilities for most health care providers. Among potential CBRNE events, radiological and/or nuclear (rad/nuc) events are thought to have received the least attention from health care providers and planners. To assist clinicians, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has created a new, innovative tool kit, the Radiation Event Medical Management (REMM) web portal (http://remm.nlm.gov). Goals of REMM include providing (1) algorithm-style, evidence-based, guidance about clinical diagnosis and treatment during mass casualty rad/nuc events; (2) just-in-time, peer-reviewed, usable information supported by sufficient background material and context to make complex diagnosis and management issues understandable to those without formal radiation medicine expertise; (3) a zip-file of complete web portal files downloadable in advance so the site would be available offline without an Internet connection; (4) a concise collection of the printable, key documents that can be taken into the field during an event; (5) a framework for medical teams and individuals to initiate rad/nuc planning and training; and (6) an extensive bibliography of key, peer-reviewed, and official guidance documents relevant to rad/nuc responses. Since its launch, REMM has been well received by individual responders and teams across the country and internationally. It has been accessed extensively, particularly during training exercises. Regular content updates and addition of new features are ongoing. The article reviews the development of REMM and some of its key content areas, features, and plans for future development.

  3. Conflict across organizational boundaries: managed care organizations versus health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, R R; Wall, J A

    2001-08-01

    This research examined conflicts that occur across organizational boundaries, specifically between managed care organizations and health care providers. Using boundary spanning theory as a framework, the authors identified 3 factors in the 1st study (30 interviews) that influence this conflict: (a) organizational power, (b) personal status differences of the individuals handling the conflict, and (c) their previous interactions. These factors affected the individuals' behavioral responses or emotions, specifically anger. After developing hypotheses, the authors tested them in a 2nd study using 109 conflict incidents drawn from 9 different managed care organizations. The results revealed that organizational power affects behavioral responses, whereas status differences and previous negative interactions affect emotions.

  4. Integrating Self-Determination and Job Demands-Resources Theory in Predicting Mental Health Provider Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreison, Kimberly C; White, Dominique A; Bauer, Sarah M; Salyers, Michelle P; McGuire, Alan B

    2016-10-25

    Limited progress has been made in reducing burnout in mental health professionals. Accordingly, we identified factors that might protect against burnout and could be productive focal areas for future interventions. Guided by self-determination theory, we examined whether supervisor autonomy support, self-efficacy, and staff cohesion predict provider burnout. 358 staff from 13 agencies completed surveys. Higher levels of supervisor autonomy support, self-efficacy, and staff cohesion were predictive of lower burnout, even after accounting for job demands. Although administrators may be limited in their ability to reduce job demands, our findings suggest that increasing core job resources may be a viable alternative.

  5. A practical guide about biosimilar data for health care providers treating inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Markenson J; Alvarez DF; Jacobs I; Kirchhoff C

    2017-01-01

    Joseph Markenson,1,2 Daniel F Alvarez,3 Ira Jacobs,4 Carol Kirchhoff5 1Department of Rheumatology, 2Department of Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, 3Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, 4Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, 5Pfizer Inc, Chesterfield, MO, USA Abstract: To make informed decisions about the safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of a biosimilar, health care providers should understand the types and be able to analyze data generated from a biosimilar development program. T...

  6. Building an effective competitive intelligence system for health care service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festervand, T A; Lumpkin, J R

    1990-01-01

    With the increasing competitiveness of the health care marketplace, the need for information by service providers has increased concomitantly. In response to this need, strategic and competitive intelligence systems have emerged as a vital source of information. This article establishes a basis for the development and operation of a competitive intelligence system. Initially, strategic and competitive intelligence systems are conceptualized, then followed by a discussion of the areas which are candidates for inclusion in the intelligence system. The remainder of the article focuses on system development and operation. Attention also is directed toward information utilization and integration.

  7. Acute Mallory-Weiss syndrome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by health care providers in the emergency department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dae Hee Kim; Dong Yoon Rhee; Seon Hee Woo; Woon Jeong Lee; Seung Hwan Seol; Won Jung Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A report of a 62-year-old female patient with severe Mallory-Weiss syndrome after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by health care providers in the emergency department is presented. The bleeding continued for five days, and the patient’s total blood loss was estimated to be approximately 3 000 mL. After 7 days, the patient died due to respiratory distress syndrome. Severe Mallory-Weiss syndrome afterCPR may occur and should be considered as a potentially serious complication afterCPR.

  8. Vaccination for Group B Streptococcus during pregnancy: attitudes and concerns of women and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, San; Vollman, Ardene Robinson; Manning, Shannon D; Mucenski, Melissa; Vidakovich, Jeanne; Davies, H Dele

    2006-07-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) strategies are effective in preventing GBS transmission from mothers to newborns, there are growing concerns about adverse effects, and the development of antibiotic resistance. GBS vaccines targeting the most virulent neonatal disease serotypes are currently under development and may be used during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to explore the key issues and concerns that would be associated with GBS vaccination during pregnancy from the perspectives of pregnant women and health care providers. Twenty-two women and 25 health care professionals in Alberta, Canada participated in 10 focus groups, each group ranging from 2 to 20 participants. Valuable information emerged from the focus groups about the factors that would affect acceptance of a maternal GBS vaccine. This information will be essential for health systems to consider in the introduction, promotion and delivery of such a vaccine. The data may help optimize education about GBS and a putative vaccine to pregnant women.

  9. Travel Health Advice Provided by In-flight Magazines of International Airlines in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat

    1997-06-01

    More than 3 million Australians travel overseas each year, and the most popular destination for these Australian travelers is Asia. Many of the countries in the Asian region are developing, and travelers to such countries may encounter tropical illness or serious injury, particularly diarrheal disease and motor vehicle accidents.1 The latter is the most common preventable cause of death in travelers.2 These problems are in addition to some of the potential problems associated with international flights, such as swelling feet, dehydration, jet lag, and venous thrombosis. There are a number of media through which travelers could receive travel health advice. However, a study of travel agent brochures by Reid et al.3 indicated that about one-third of these carried no travel health advice, with most of those that did carry travel advice providing only general information. Airline magazines also represent a possible source of in-flight and destination-specific travel health advice to which most travelers would have access.

  10. Ending neglect: providing effective childhood tuberculosis training for health care workers in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olotu, R.; Talbot, E. A.; Cronin, B. J.; Christopher, R.; Mkomwa, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: Health care facilities in Dar es Salaam, Pwani, and Arusha, Tanzania. Objective: To assess health care worker (HCW) knowledge and practices 1 year after specialized training in childhood tuberculosis (TB). Design: Using a standardized survey, we interviewed a convenience sample of HCWs providing both general and specialized care to children. Results: We interviewed 117 HCWs in TB clinics, maternal and child health clinics, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics, out-patient departments, and pediatric in-patient wards at 12 facilities. A total of 81 HCWs (62% of nurses, 74% of clinicians) reported having attended the national childhood TB training course. Most HCWs responded correctly to questions on childhood TB diagnosis, treatment, and TB-HIV co-management, regardless of training history. Most HCWs reported that they routinely obtain chest radiographs, HIV testing, and a TB contact history when evaluating children for TB. Less than half of HCWs reported routinely obtaining sputum for mycobacterial culture or performing a tuberculin skin test. Three times as many trained as untrained HCWs reported having ever prescribed isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to a child (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In general, levels of childhood TB knowledge were high and practices were in accordance with national guidance. Specific gaps in diagnosis, treatment and use of IPT were identified for future focused training. PMID:26400701

  11. Sexual and reproductive health services for young people in Kenya and Zambia : Providers attitudes and young peoples needs and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Warenius, Linnéa

    2008-01-01

    Background: Unintended pregnancy, abortion and STI, including HIV are common sexual and reproductive health problems among young people in Kenya and Zambia. Yet, the reproductive health services are underutilised. Nurses and midwives are key providers in the promotion young people s sexual and reproductive health in Kenya and Zambia. Aim: The overall aim was to describe and explore young people s sexual and reproductive health needs and experiences and to describe health ...

  12. Male circumcision for HIV prevention in India: emerging viewpoints and practices of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Anju; Chandhiok, Nomita; Sahay, Seema; Deb, Sibnath; Bharat, Shalini; Gupta, Abhilasha; Bhatt, Sripad; Kanthe, Vidisha; Kumar, Bijesh; Joglekar, Neelam; Paranjape, Ramesh; Mehendale, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    A compelling case for promoting male circumcision (MC) as an intervention for reducing the risk of heterosexually acquired HIV infection was made by dissemination of the results of three studies in Africa. The WHO/UNAIDS recommendation for MC for countries like India, where the epidemic in concentrated in high-risk groups, advocates MC for specific population groups such as men at higher risk for HIV acquisition. A multicentre qualitative study was conducted in four geographically distinct districts (Belgaum, Kolkata, Meerut and Mumbai) in India during June 2009 to June 2011. Two categories of health care providers: Registered Healthcare Providers (RHCPs) and traditional circumcisers were interviewed by trained research staff who had received master's level education using interview guides with probes and open-ended questions. Respondents were selected using purposive sampling. A comparative analysis of the perspectives of the RHCP vs. traditional circumcisers is presented. Representatives of both categories of providers expressed the need for Indian data on MC. Providers feared that promoting circumcision might jeopardize/undermine the progress already made in the field of condom promotion. Reservation was expressed regarding its adoption by Hindus. Behavioural disinhibition was perceived as an important limitation. A contrast in the practice of circumcision was apparent between the traditional and the trained providers. MC should be mentioned as a part of comprehensive HIV prevention services in India that includes HIV counselling and testing, condom distribution and diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. It should become an issue of informed personal choice rather than ethnic identity.

  13. Enhancing client welfare through better communication of private mental health data between rural service providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kisalay Burmeister

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Client welfare is detrimentally affected by poor communication of data between rural service providers, which in part is complicated by privacy legislation. A study of service provision involving interviews with mental health professionals, found challenges in communicative processes between agencies were exacerbated by the heavy workloads. Dependence on individual interpretations of legislation, and on manual handling, led to delays that detrimentally affected client welfare. The main recommendation arising from this article is the creation of an ehealth system that is able to negotiate differing levels of access to client data through centralised controls, where the administration of that system ensures that it stays current with changing legislative requirements. The main contribution of the proposed model is to combine two well-known concepts: data integration and generalisation. People with mental illness are amongst the most vulnerable members of society, and current ehealth systems that provide access to medical records inadequately cater to their needs.

  14. Health and climate related ecosystem services provided by street trees in the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, Jennifer A; Tadaki, Marc; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Arbuthnott, Katherine; Coutts, Andrew; Demuzere, Matthias; Dirks, Kim N; Heaviside, Clare; Lim, Shanon; Macintyre, Helen; McInnes, Rachel N; Wheeler, Benedict W

    2016-03-08

    Urban tree planting initiatives are being actively promoted as a planning tool to enable urban areas to adapt to and mitigate against climate change, enhance urban sustainability and improve human health and well-being. However, opportunities for creating new areas of green space within cities are often limited and tree planting initiatives may be constrained to kerbside locations. At this scale, the net impact of trees on human health and the local environment is less clear, and generalised approaches for evaluating their impact are not well developed.In this review, we use an urban ecosystems services framework to evaluate the direct, and locally-generated, ecosystems services and disservices provided by street trees. We focus our review on the services of major importance to human health and well-being which include 'climate regulation', 'air quality regulation' and 'aesthetics and cultural services'. These are themes that are commonly used to justify new street tree or street tree retention initiatives. We argue that current scientific understanding of the impact of street trees on human health and the urban environment has been limited by predominantly regional-scale reductionist approaches which consider vegetation generally and/or single out individual services or impacts without considering the wider synergistic impacts of street trees on urban ecosystems. This can lead planners and policymakers towards decision making based on single parameter optimisation strategies which may be problematic when a single intervention offers different outcomes and has multiple effects and potential trade-offs in different places.We suggest that a holistic approach is required to evaluate the services and disservices provided by street trees at different scales. We provide information to guide decision makers and planners in their attempts to evaluate the value of vegetation in their local setting. We show that by ensuring that the specific aim of the intervention, the

  15. A practical guide about biosimilar data for health care providers treating inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markenson, Joseph; Alvarez, Daniel F; Jacobs, Ira; Kirchhoff, Carol

    2017-01-01

    To make informed decisions about the safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of a biosimilar, health care providers should understand the types and be able to analyze data generated from a biosimilar development program. This article reviews the biosimilar guidelines, the biosimilar development process to provide education and context about biosimilarity, and uses examples from infliximab biosimilars to review the terminology and potential types of analyses that may be used to compare potential biosimilars to the originator biologic. A biosimilar is a biologic product that is highly similar to an approved (originator) biologic, notwithstanding minor differences in clinically inactive components, and with no clinically meaningful differences in terms of the safety, purity, and potency of the product. Due to their complex nature and production in living systems, it is not possible to exactly duplicate the approved originator biologic. To ensure biosimilars provide consistent, safe, and effective treatment comparable to the originator biologic, extensive analyses of the potential biosimilar are conducted, including side-by-side analytical, nonclinical, and clinical comparisons. A key goal is to determine whether there are sufficient relevant similarities in chemical composition, biologic activity, and pharmacokinetic aspects between the potential biosimilar and the originator. Regulatory approvals and marketing authorizations for biosimilars are made on a case-by-case and agency-by-agency basis after evaluating the totality of the evidence generated from the entire development program. Understanding how regulatory agencies review data for approval can help health care providers make appropriate decisions when biosimilars become available for use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, and therefore they should review the literature to gain further information about specific biosimilars. PMID:28280299

  16. Cultural Competence in Pediatrics: Health Care Provider Knowledge, Awareness, and Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Dabney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a cultural competence training (CCT program on pediatric health care providers’ self-reported ability to provide culturally competent care to a diverse pediatric patient population. This quantitative, nested ecologic level study design used a repeated measure in the form of pre-test and post-test data to assess percent change in providers’ cultural awareness, experience working or learning about different cultures, and preparedness and skills in working with different cultures before and after CCT. The study was conducted between 2011 and 2012 in a pediatric hospital and associated outpatient offices. The sample consisted of pediatric health care providers from various departments, mainly physicians and nurses (n = 69. Participants completed a pre-intervention cultural competence assessment and then were subjected to a cultural competence-training program, after which they completed the assessment a second time. The baseline and post-intervention data were collected in the form of Likert scales and transformed into a quintile or quartile scale as appropriate. Data were assessed using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon’s signed-rank tests. Providers indicated a 13% increase in knowledge (53.9% vs. 66.7%, t = 3.4, p = 0.001, 8.7% increase in awareness (46.7% vs. 55.4%, t = 3.0, p = 0.002, and 8% statistically marginal increase in skills (66.4% vs. 74.5%, z = 1.8, p = 0.06. Culturally competent training in a pediatric environment significantly enhances knowledge, awareness and to some extent skills in providing care to culturally diverse patient population.

  17. A practical guide about biosimilar data for health care providers treating inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markenson J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Markenson,1,2 Daniel F Alvarez,3 Ira Jacobs,4 Carol Kirchhoff5 1Department of Rheumatology, 2Department of Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, 3Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, 4Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, 5Pfizer Inc, Chesterfield, MO, USA Abstract: To make informed decisions about the safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of a biosimilar, health care providers should understand the types and be able to analyze data generated from a biosimilar development program. This article reviews the biosimilar guidelines, the biosimilar development process to provide education and context about biosimilarity, and uses examples from infliximab biosimilars to review the terminology and potential types of analyses that may be used to compare potential biosimilars to the originator biologic. A biosimilar is a biologic product that is highly similar to an approved (originator biologic, notwithstanding minor differences in clinically inactive components, and with no clinically meaningful differences in terms of the safety, purity, and potency of the product. Due to their complex nature and production in living systems, it is not possible to exactly duplicate the approved originator biologic. To ensure biosimilars provide consistent, safe, and effective treatment comparable to the originator biologic, extensive analyses of the potential biosimilar are conducted, including side-by-side analytical, nonclinical, and clinical comparisons. A key goal is to determine whether there are sufficient relevant similarities in chemical composition, biologic activity, and pharmacokinetic aspects between the potential biosimilar and the originator. Regulatory approvals and marketing authorizations for biosimilars are made on a case-by-case and agency-by-agency basis after evaluating the totality of the evidence generated from the entire development program. Understanding how regulatory agencies review data for approval can help health care providers make

  18. Endocrine check-up in adolescents and indications for referral: A guide for health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that young people between the ages of 11 and 21 years should be seen annually by their pediatricians, since annual checkups can be an important opportunity for health evaluation and anticipatory guidance. Parents of infants and young children are accustomed to regularly visiting a pediatrician for their child′s checkups. Unfortunately, when children reach the teen years, these annual checkups may decrease in frequency. In routine check-ups and medical office visits, particular attention should be paid to the possibility of a developmental or endocrine disorder. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent medical complications in adulthood and foster age-appropriate development. Our purpose is to acquaint readers with the concept, based on current scientific understanding, that some endocrine disorders may be associated with a wide range of deleterious health consequences including an increased risk of hypertension and hyperlipidemia, increased risk of coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, significant anxiety and lack of self-esteem. Understanding the milestones and developmental stages of adolescence is essential for pediatricians and all other health providers who care for adolescents. Treating adolescents involves knowledge of a variety of medical, social and legal information; in addition, close working relationships must be established within the adolescent′s network to create an effective care system. In summary, we underline the importance of a periodic endocrine checkup in adolescents in order to identify endocrine problems early and develop an approach to treatment for those patients who need help during this time. Indications for endocrine referral for professional and other healthcare providers are also included. These lists are clearly not intended to be comprehensive, but will hopefully serve as a guide for specific clinical circumstances.

  19. Preferences for results from genomic microarrays: comparing parents and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbitt, E; Halliday, J L; Amor, D J; Metcalfe, S A

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray (CMA) testing is now performed frequently in paediatric care. Although CMAs improve diagnostic yields, they increase detection of variants of unknown and uncertain clinical significance (VUS). Understanding parents', paediatricians' and genetic health professionals' (GHPs) views regarding variant disclosure may reduce the potential for communication of unwanted information. A questionnaire was designed to compare disclosure preferences of these three groups in Australia. One hundred and forty-seven parents, 159 paediatricians and 69 GHPs hold similar views with at least 89% of respondents certainly or probably favouring disclosure of all categories of variants. However, some differences were observed between health care providers (HCPs: paediatricians and GHPs) and parents, who were less sure of their disclosure preferences. There was consensus among respondent groups that knowledge of a variant of certain clinical significance would provide more practical and emotional utility compared to VUS. Compared to HCPs, parents placed more emphasis on using knowledge of a VUS when considering future pregnancies (p exome/genome sequencing is integrated into clinical practice, the potential for differing views of parents and HCPs should be considered when developing guidelines for result disclosure.

  20. Implementation of consumer providers into mental health intensive case management teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Chinman, Matthew; Cohen, Amy N; Oberman, Rebecca Shoai; Young, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    In mental health care, consumer providers (CPs) are individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) who draw upon their lived experiences while providing services to others with SMI. Implementation of CPs has proven to be challenging in a variety of settings. The PEER project (Peers Enhancing Recovery) involved rolling out CPs using an implementation science model and evaluating implementation and impact in mental health treatment settings (three intervention, three control). In qualitative interviews, facilitators and challenges to implementation were described by the CPs, their team members, clients, and study researchers. Site preparation, external facilitation, and positive, reinforcing experiences with CPs facilitated implementation. Role definitions and deficiencies in CPs' technical knowledge posed challenges to implementation. Sustainability was not realized due to insufficient resources. However, implementation was positive overall, characterized by diffusion of innovation concepts of high relative advantage, strong trialability, compatibility with prevailing norms, compelling observability, and relatively low complexity. By preparing and working systematically with intervention sites to incorporate new services, implementation was strengthened and challenges were minimized.

  1. Relationship between low back pain, disability, MR imaging findings and health care provider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Molla, Enrique; Costa, Salvador; Montijano, Ruben [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Vega, Maria [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Bautista, Daniel [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Preventive Medicine, Valencia (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the association between the self-report of pain and disability and findings on lumbar MR images, and to compare two different health care providers in Spanish patients with low back pain (LBP). Cross-sectional A total of 278 patients, 137 men and 141 women aged 44{+-}14 years submitted with low back pain (LBP) were studied. One hundred and nine patients were from the National Health System (NHS) and 169 from private practice. Patients with previous discitis, surgery, neoplasm or traumatic episodes were excluded. Every patient completed a disability questionnaire with six core items, providing a score of disability from 2 to 28. All patients had sagittal spin-echo T1 and turbo spin-echo T2, axial proton-density and MR myelography weighted images. MR images of the two most affected disc levels were read, offering an MR imaging score from 0 to 30. Patients with a combination of LBP and sciatica showed the highest levels of disability (p=0.002). MR imaging scores only correlated with pain interference with normal work (p=0.04), but not with other disability questions. Patients from the NHS showed greater disability scores than private ones (p=0.001) and higher MR imaging scores (p=0.01). In patients with LBP, MR imaging only correlates with pain interference with work but not with other disability questions. Differences are found between private and NHS patients, the latter being more physically affected. (orig.)

  2. Health Care Provider Mobility Counseling Provision to Older Adults: A Rural/Urban Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseth-Zosel, Andrea L; Sanders, Gregory; O'Connor, Melissa; Fuller-Iglesias, Heather; Langley, Linda

    2016-02-01

    The current study examined rural-urban differences in health care provider (HCP) perceptions, attitudes, and practices related to driving safety/cessation-related anticipatory guidance provision to older adults. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with HCPs in several north central states. Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine dimensions of HCP perceptions and attitudes related to mobility counseling. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine if HCP rurality was significantly predictive of HPC provision of mobility counseling by age. Rural HCPs were less likely than urban HCPs to provide mobility counseling to their patients aged 75 or older. Rural HCPs were less likely to refer patients to a driving fitness evaluation resource if they had questions related to driving issues, and were less likely to perceive there were adequate resources to help with driving issues. Rural-urban differences in HCP mobility counseling provision may contribute to potential health disparities between urban and rural patients. Both rural and urban HCPs need training about older driver issues, so they may educate their patients about driving safety/cessation. Future research should examine the association between rural-urban differences in HCP mobility counseling provision and rural older adult overrepresentation in motor vehicle injuries and fatalities statistics.

  3. Consultations of health service providers amongst patients of pulmonary tuberculosis from an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta S. Pardeshi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To describe the number, types and reasons of consultations amongst patients of pulmonary tuberculosis from an urban area. Settings and Design Cross sectional study was conducted amongst new patients of pulmonary tuberculosis initiated on DOTS at District Tuberculosis Centre (DTC, Yavatmal from January to June 2006. Material and Methods: The data regarding consultations were collected along a time line. The reasons for consultations were studied by in-depth interviews. Statistical analysis: Logistic regression analysis and transcripts of interviews. Results and Conclusions A total of 55 patients were studied in whom median duration between first consultation to treatment initiation was 15 days. A majority of cases (87.27% had first consulted a private practitioner. A total of 32 patients reported more than two consultations and 19 had consulted more than two private health service providers. Amongst the movements between consultations, a majority were from private to government. Only four patients had come to DTC without any prior consultation. Many patients came to government health service provider on their own when the symptomatic treatment prescribed by the private practitioners did not relieve their symptoms.

  4. Patient and referring health care provider satisfaction with a physiotherapy spinal triage assessment service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bath B

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Brenna Bath1, Bonnie Janzen21School of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 2Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaPurpose: To evaluate participant and referring care provider satisfaction associated with a spinal triage assessment service delivered by physiotherapists in collaboration with orthopedic surgeons.Methods: People with low back-related complaints were recruited from those referred to a spinal triage assessment program delivered by physiotherapists. Measures of patient and provider satisfaction were completed at approximately 4 weeks after the assessment. The satisfaction surveys were analyzed quantitatively with descriptive statistics and qualitatively with an inductive thematic approach of open and axial coding.Results: A total of 108/115 participants completed the posttest satisfaction survey. Sixty-six percent of participants were “very satisfied” with the service and 55% were “very satisfied” with the recommendations that were made. Only 18% of referring care providers completed the satisfaction survey and 90.5% of those were “very satisfied” with the recommendations. Sixty-one participants and 14 care providers provided comments which revealed a diverse range of themes which were coded into positive (ie, understanding the problem, communication, customer service, efficiency, and management direction, negative (ie, lack of detail, time to follow-up, cost and neutral related to the triage service, and an “other” category unrelated to the service (ie, chronic symptoms, comorbidities, and limited access to health care.Conclusion: The quantitative results of the participant survey demonstrated very high levels of satisfaction with the service and slightly less satisfaction with the recommendations that were made. Satisfaction of referring care providers with the recommendations and report was also high, but given

  5. 发展健康相关专业高等教育应成为我国医学教育现代化的重要任务%The development of high educatiou of allied health profession should play a principal role in medical modernization chinese education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周同甫; 梁宗安; 李甘地; 贺庆军

    2002-01-01

    健康相关专业(Allied Health Profession,AHP)教育的任务是培养与现代医学相关的各类高级技师.尽快弥补我国在高等教育层次上缺乏相应的专业设置的缺陷,开展有关的本科和高等职业教育,是关系到实现我国医学和医疗服务现代化的重要任务.通过介绍四川大学华西临床医学院的初步实践,并就我国开展AHP教育的理念、方向、策略和存在的问题进行了讨论.

  6. Commentary: educating the present and future health care workforce to provide care to populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garr, David R; Margalit, Ruth; Jameton, Andrew; Cerra, Frank B

    2012-09-01

    The crisis of the rising cost of health care in the United States is stimulating major changes in the way care is being delivered. New models such as patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations are being developed with the expectation that health care professionals will address and improve the health of populations. Electronic health records and interprofessional teams will be critical to achieving the goal of better health. It is now time to bring together educators and clinicians at academic health centers, public health educators and practitioners, along with researchers, representatives from the health care delivery and financing systems, and community partners to reengineer health professions education to prepare health professions students for the health care system of the future.

  7. Communicating about eating behaviors. A qualitative study of Chilean women and their health-care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Patricia; Valencia, Alejandra; Palomino, Ana M; Cataldo, Marjorie; Schwingel, Andiara

    2015-01-01

    Good communication between health care providers (HCPs) and patients is critical in achieving positive health outcomes. The purpose of this article was to compare the perceptions of Chilean woman and their HCPs with respect to determinants of eating behaviors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women (n=15) visiting a public health care center in Chile and with their HCPs (n=8) who were in charge of promoting healthy eating behaviors among women. Data from the interviews indicated similarities and inconsistencies in determinants of eating behaviors between the groups. Both mentioned many important factors that influence women's eating behaviors, including food preferences, dietary knowledge, self-control and self-efficacy, family, food cost, and food availability. HCPs appeared to be less aware of the role that personality traits and past experiences play as potential determinants which women mentioned. In contrast, women were less aware of the influence of anxiety and low self-esteem on eating choices, which HCPs noted as key factors. Although it was encouraging to see agreement between women and their HCPs in some areas, it is important to work on increasing understanding among the groups with respect to the important role psychological factors play in influencing eating behavior. We suggest that HCPs should focus on the importance of women's personality traits and past eating behaviors, as well as work on improving women's self-esteem and helping to decrease their anxiety levels. HCPs should be encouraged to develop good communication with each person in order to help them understand the roles that external and internal factors play in eating behaviors.

  8. Willingness to provide behavioral health recommendations: a cross-sectional study of entering medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCurdy Stephen A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behavioral factors contribute importantly to morbidity and mortality, and physicians are trusted sources for information on reducing associated risks. Unfortunately, many clinical encounters do not include prevention counseling, and medical school curriculum plays an important role in training and promoting such counseling among medical students. Methods We surveyed all 93 freshman medical students at entry to the University of California, Davis School of Medicine in 2009 to evaluate baseline knowledge of population health principles and examine their approach to clinical situations involving four common behavioral risk factors illustrated in brief clinical vignettes: smoking, alcohol use in a patient with indications of alcoholism, diet and exercise in an overweight sedentary patient, and a 16-year-old contemplating initiation of sexual intercourse. Based on vignette responses, we assessed willingness to (1 provide information on risks, (2 recommend elimination of the behavior as the most efficacious means for reducing risk, (3 include strategies apart from elimination of the behavior for lowering risk (i.e., harm reduction, and (4 assure of their intention to continue care whether or not recommendations are accepted. Results Students answered correctly 71.4 % (median; interquartile range 66.7 % - 85.7 % of clinical prevention and population health knowledge questions; men scored higher than women (median 83.3 % vs. 66.7 %, p Conclusion Students showed high willingness to educate and respect patient autonomy. There was high willingness to recommend elimination of risk behaviors for smoking, alcohol, and poor diet/exercise, but not for sexual intercourse in an adolescent considering sexual debut. Further research should address promoting appropriate science-based preventive health messages, and curriculum should include explicit discussion of content of recommendations.

  9. Tuberculosis treatment managed by providers outside the Public Health Department: lessons for the Affordable Care Act.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ehman

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tuberculosis (TB requires at least six months of multidrug treatment and necessitates monitoring for response to treatment. Historically, public health departments (HDs have cared for most TB patients in the United States. The Affordable Care Act (ACA provides coverage for uninsured persons and may increase the proportion of TB patients cared for by private medical providers and other providers outside HDs (PMPs. We sought to determine whether there were differences in care provided by HDs and PMPs to inform public health planning under the ACA. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of California TB registry data. We included adult TB patients with culture-positive, pulmonary TB reported in California during 2007-2011. We examined trends, described case characteristics, and created multivariate models measuring two standards of TB care in PMP- and HD-managed patients: documented culture conversion within 60 days, and use of directly observed therapy (DOT. RESULTS: The proportion of PMP-managed TB patients increased during 2007-2011 (p = 0.002. On univariable analysis (N = 4,606, older age, white, black or Asian/Pacific Islander race, and birth in the United States were significantly associated with PMP care (p<0.05. Younger age, Hispanic ethnicity, homelessness, drug or alcohol use, and cavitary and/or smear-positive TB disease, were associated with HD care. Multivariable analysis showed PMP care was associated with lack of documented culture conversion (adjusted relative risk [aRR] = 1.37, confidence interval [CI] 1.25-1.51 and lack of DOT (aRR = 8.56, CI 6.59-11.1. CONCLUSION: While HDs cared for TB cases with more social and clinical complexities, patients under PMP care were less likely to receive DOT and have documented culture conversion. This indicates a need for close collaboration between PMPs and HDs to ensure that optimal care is provided to all TB patients and TB transmission is

  10. Transitions: A Guide to Teens Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have By age 17 or 18, you should: Work on managing your health care Learn about your health insurance ... health care to in an adult setting Actively work with your health care team to ensure that you receive optimal care Update ...

  11. Telepsychiatry program eases patient crowding in the ED, expedites mental health services to patients and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    With funding from the Duke Endowment, the Albemarle Hospital Foundation in Elizabeth City, NC, implemented a telepsychiatry program aimed at decreasing patient backlogs in the health system's EDs, while also quickly connecting patients with needed mental health care. The approach has more than halved LOS for patients who are discharged to inpatient treatment facilities. The approach is also credited with reducing recidivism rates and the need for involuntary commitments. Now the state has announced plans to employ a similar approach statewide. Patients in the ED are connected with psychiatric providers at a remote location through the use of telemedicine carts that are equipped with wireless technology. With expedited psychiatric treatment, administrators say that nearly 30% of patients with involuntary commitment (IVC) orders stabilize to the point that their IVC orders can be rescinded and they can be discharged from the ED to outpatient care. Since the start of the pilot program in March of 2011, project administrators report that the average LOS in the ED for patients discharged to inpatient treatment facilities has decreased from 48 hours to 22.5 hours.

  12. Validation of Single-Item Screening Measures for Provider Burnout in a Rural Health Care Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddimba, Anthony C; Scribani, Melissa; Nieves, Melinda A; Krupa, Nicole; May, John J; Jenkins, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We validated three single-item measures for emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP) among rural physician/nonphysician practitioners. We linked cross-sectional survey data (on provider demographics, satisfaction, resilience, and burnout) with administrative information from an integrated health care network (1 academic medical center, 6 community hospitals, 31 clinics, and 19 school-based health centers) in an eight-county underserved area of upstate New York. In total, 308 physicians and advanced-practice clinicians completed a self-administered, multi-instrument questionnaire (65.1% response rate). Significant proportions of respondents reported high EE (36.1%) and DP (9.9%). In multivariable linear mixed models, scores on EE/DP subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory were regressed on each single-item measure. The Physician Work-Life Study's single-item measure (classifying 32.8% of respondents as burning out/completely burned out) was correlated with EE and DP (Spearman's ρ = .72 and .41, p burnout.

  13. Nutrition advice during pregnancy: do women receive it and can health professionals provide it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Catherine; Charlton, Karen E; Yeatman, Heather

    2014-12-01

    A healthy diet during pregnancy is essential for normal growth and development of the foetus. Pregnant women may obtain nutrition information from a number of sources but evidence regarding the adequacy and extent of this information is sparse. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify sources of nutrition information accessed by pregnant women, their perceived needs for nutrition education, the perceptions of healthcare providers about nutrition education in pregnancy, and to assess the effectiveness of public health programs that aim to improve nutritional practices. The Scopus data base was searched during January, 2013 and in February 2014 to access both qualitative and quantitative studies published between 2002 and 2014 which focused on healthy pregnant women and their healthcare providers in developed countries. Articles were excluded if they focused on the needs of women with medical conditions, including obesity, gestational diabetes or malnutrition. Of 506 articles identified by the search terms, 25 articles were deemed to be eligible for inclusion. Generally, women were not receiving adequate nutrition education during pregnancy. Although healthcare practitioners perceived nutrition education to be important, barriers to providing education to clients included lack of time, lack of resources and lack of relevant training. Further well designed studies are needed to identify the most effective nutrition education strategies to improve nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviours for women during antenatal care.

  14. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Review and assessment of administrative activities... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  15. Hydrogen diffusion in Al-Li alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyalebechi, P. N.

    1990-08-01

    The diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in binary Al-Li alloys containing 1,2, and 3 wt pct Li have been determined from desorption curves of samples saturated with hydrogen at 473 to 873 K. Within this temperature range, the diffusivity of hydrogen in the binary Al-Li alloys investigated has an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence and follows the equation of the general form D = DT) where D 0exp(-Q/R is the diffusion coefficient (m2/s), D 0 is the preexponential or frequency factor (m2/s), R is the gas constant (J/K mol), Q is the activation energy (J/mol), and T is absolute temperature (K). The rate of diffusion of hydrogen in aluminum decreases with increase in lithium additions. This is provisionally attributed to the stronger local binding energy between hydrogen and lithium atoms in the aluminum metal lattice.

  16. Can naturopathy provide answers to the escalating health care costs in India?

    OpenAIRE

    TRIPATHY, Jaya Prasad

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial areas of overlap between naturopathy and public health, which include a focus on health rather than disease, a preventive approach, and an emphasis on health promotion and health education. Public health can look to naturopathy for answers to the emergence of chronic disease through natural therapies, many of which can take the role of primordial and primary prevention of several diseases. Some selected naturopathic therapies include nutrition, hydrotherapy, fasting ther...

  17. Organization Complexity and Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Quality Improvement Culture Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; Canamucio, Anne; Lempa, Michele; Yano, Elizabeth M; Long, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how aspects of quality improvement (QI) culture changed during the introduction of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient-centered medical home initiative and how they were influenced by existing organizational factors, including VHA facility complexity and practice location. A voluntary survey, measuring primary care providers' (PCPs') perspectives on QI culture at their primary care clinics, was administered in 2010 and 2012. Participants were 320 PCPs from hospital- and community-based primary care practices in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio. PCPs in community-based outpatient clinics reported an improvement in established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation from 2010 to 2012. However, their peers in hospital-based clinics did not report any significant improvements in QI culture. In both years, compared with high-complexity facilities, medium- and low-complexity facilities had better scores on the scales assessing established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation.

  18. Contracting private sector providers for public sector health services in Jalisco, Mexico: perspectives of system actors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Luz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Contracting out health services is a strategy that many health systems in the developing world are following, despite the lack of decisive evidence that this is the best way to improve quality, increase efficiency and expand coverage. A large body of literature has appeared in recent years focusing on the results of several contracting strategies, but very few papers have addressed aspects of the managerial process and how this can affect results. Case description This paper describes and analyses the perceptions and opinions of managers and workers about the benefits and challenges of the contracting model that has been in place for almost 10 years in the State of Jalisco, Mexico. Both qualitative and quantitative information was collected. An open-ended questionnaire was used to obtain information from a group of managers, while information provided by a self-selected group of workers was collected via a closed-ended questionnaire. The analysis contrasted the information obtained from each source. Discussion and Evaluation Findings show that perceptions of managers and workers vary for most of the items studied. For managers the model has been a success, as it has allowed for expansion of coverage based on a cost-effective strategy, while for workers the model also possesses positive elements but fails to provide fair labour relationships, which negatively affects their performance. Conclusion Perspectives of the two main groups of actors in Jalisco's contracting model are important in the design and adjustment of an adequate contracting model that includes managerial elements to give incentives to worker performance, a key element necessary to achieve the model's ultimate objectives. Lessons learnt from this study could be relevant for the experience of contracting models in other developing countries.

  19. Intercultural communication between patients and health care providers: an exploration of intercultural communication effectiveness, cultural sensitivity, stress, and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrey, K L; Amason, P

    2001-01-01

    Cultural diversity is becoming increasingly more important in the workplace. This is particularly true in health care organizations facing demographic shifts in the patients served and their families. This study serves to aid the development of intercultural communication training programs for health care providers by examining how cultural sensitivity and effective intercultural communication, besides helping patients, personally benefit health care providers by reducing their stress. Effective intercultural communication and cultural sensitivity were found to be related. Health care providers' levels of intercultural anxiety also were found to correlate with effective intercultural communication.

  20. Centrifugal pumps and allied machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, HH

    1994-01-01

    This book will be of vital interest to all engineers and designers concerned with centrifugal pumps and turbines. Including statistical information derived from 20000 pumps and 700 turbines with capacities of 5gpm to 5000000gpm, this book offers the widest range and scope of information currently available. Statistical analyses suggest practical methods of increasing pump performance and provide valuable data for new design aspects.

  1. Creating a Pediatric Digital Library for Pediatric Health Care Providers and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Donna; Kingsley, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to complete a literature-based needs assessment with regard to common pediatric problems encountered by pediatric health care providers (PHCPs) and families, and to develop a problem-based pediatric digital library to meet those needs. The needs assessment yielded 65 information sources. Common problems were identified and categorized, and the Internet was manually searched for authoritative Web sites. The created pediatric digital library (www.generalpediatrics.com) used a problem-based interface and was deployed in November 1999. From November 1999 to November 2000, the number of hyperlinks and authoritative Web sites increased 51.1 and 32.2 percent, respectively. Over the same time, visitors increased by 57.3 percent and overall usage increased by 255 percent. A pediatric digital library has been created that begins to bring order to general pediatric resources on the Internet. This pediatric digital library provides current, authoritative, easily accessed pediatric information whenever and wherever the PHCPs and families want assistance. PMID:11861631

  2. Qualitative assessment of the dental health services provided at a dental school in Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Maryam; Haghani, Jahangir; Shahravan, Arash; Khosravifar, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Increasing the quality of the services provided in a Dental School can raise the satisfaction level of patients and consequently increase the level of their oral health. This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of dental care and services provided to patients referred to a Dental School in Kerman, Iran. In this qualitative study, face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted with 41 participants [25 patients (P), 5 nurses (N), 6 dental academic staff (AS), and 5 dental students (S)]. Then, the interviews were transcribed and analyzed, using content analysis of data. Data analysis in qualitative research involves breaking down the data and searching for codes and categories that are then reassembled to form themes. Both positive and negative themes emerged. Positive themes included: good infection control, service accessibility, patient appointments and visits were not assigned on merit, precise examinations, and comprehensive treatment plans. Negative themes included: long wait time, lack of options to pass waiting time, such as newspapers and television, an insufficient number of nurses, and not enough professors for supervision. In addition, the results of this study show that the patients and dental staff have high expectations in relation to dental services, and that implementation of these expectations would increase the overall satisfaction with and the quality of the level of services. Finally, some recommendations for improving services in the Kerman Dental School were given to the managing team of the Dental School.

  3. Zika Virus Disease: A CDC Update for Pediatric Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Mateusz P; Nelson, Jennifer M; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc; Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E; Villanueva, Julie; Powers, Ann M; Mead, Paul; Honein, Margaret A; Moore, Cynthia A; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-05-01

    Zika virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus discovered in Africa in 1947. Most persons with Zika virus infection are asymptomatic; symptoms when present are generally mild and include fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis. Since early 2015, Zika virus has spread rapidly through the Americas, with local transmission identified in 31 countries and territories as of February 29, 2016, including several US territories. All age groups are susceptible to Zika virus infection, including children. Maternal-fetal transmission of Zika virus has been documented; evidence suggests that congenital Zika virus infection is associated with microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy and infant outcomes. Perinatal transmission has been reported in 2 cases; 1 was asymptomatic, and the other had thrombocytopenia and a rash. Based on limited information, Zika virus infection in children is mild, similar to that in adults. The long-term sequelae of congenital, perinatal, and pediatric Zika virus infection are largely unknown. No vaccine to prevent Zika virus infection is available, and treatment is supportive. The primary means of preventing Zika virus infection is prevention of mosquito bites in areas with local Zika virus transmission. Given the possibility of limited local transmission of Zika virus in the continental United States and frequent travel from affected countries to the United States, US pediatric health care providers need to be familiar with Zika virus infection. This article reviews the Zika virus, its epidemiologic characteristics, clinical presentation, laboratory testing, treatment, and prevention to assist providers in the evaluation and management of children with possible Zika virus infection.

  4. [How much can we trust health related information provided by mass media in Argentina?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izcovich, Ariel; Criniti, Juan Martín; Popoff, Federico; González Malla, Carlos; Catalano, Hugo N

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the certainty and accuracy of the healthcare information provided by the mass media in Argentina, a group of senior medical students, blind to the study objectives, identified healthcare related statements transmitted through mass media. These findings were challenged against the recommendations of a group of physicians trained in evidence-based decision making (EBDM). We compared the strength and direction of the mass media recommendations with those of experts on EBDM. Eighty one recommendations/questions were identified and answered by the experts on EBDM, 15 with high, 18 with moderate, 30 with low and 18 with very low quality of evidence. Only 53% (CI95% 42-64%) of the mass media recommendations agreed with the expert recommendation in direction (for or against) and 28% (CI95% 18-39%) were classified as inappropriate (significant discrepancies both in direction and strength). Subgroup analysis revealed that 71% (CI95% 56-86%) of there commendations made by professionals in mass media agreed with experts in direction and 17% (IC95% 6-33%) were classified as inappropriate, OR = 0.35 (CI95% 0.1-1.1) compared to recommendations in mass media by non-professionals. We conclude that the healthcare information provided by mass media in Argentina is unreliable; this fact can probably have a negative impact in the health system performance and physician-patient relationship.

  5. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. The preamble of that final rule stated the effective date was November 15, 2013..., applicable to non-VA home health services and hospice care. Section 17.56 provides, among other things,...

  6. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mehrotra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ware G Kuschner, Sunayana Reddy, Nidhi Mehrotra, Harman S PaintalDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Primary care providers should be aware of two new developments in nicotine addiction and smoking cessation: 1 the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e- cigarette; and 2 new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as “thirdhand smoke”. The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS. The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room

  7. Providing web-based mental health services to at-risk women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Meghan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the feasibility of providing web-based mental health services, including synchronous internet video conferencing of an evidence-based support/education group, to at-risk women, specifically poor lone mothers. The objectives of this study were to: (i adapt a face-to-face support/education group intervention to a web-based format for lone mothers, and (ii evaluate lone mothers' response to web-based services, including an online video conferencing group intervention program. Methods Participating mothers were recruited through advertisements. To adapt the face-to-face intervention to a web-based format, we evaluated participant motivation through focus group/key informant interviews (n = 7, adapted the intervention training manual for a web-based environment and provided a computer training manual. To evaluate response to web-based services, we provided the intervention to two groups of lone mothers (n = 15. Pre-post quantitative evaluation of mood, self-esteem, social support and parenting was done. Post intervention follow up interviews explored responses to the group and to using technology to access a health service. Participants received $20 per occasion of data collection. Interviews were taped, transcribed and content analysis was used to code and interpret the data. Adherence to the intervention protocol was evaluated. Results Mothers participating in this project experienced multiple difficulties, including financial and mood problems. We adapted the intervention training manual for use in a web-based group environment and ensured adherence to the intervention protocol based on viewing videoconferencing group sessions and discussion with the leaders. Participant responses to the group intervention included decreased isolation, and increased knowledge and confidence in themselves and their parenting; the responses closely matched those of mothers who obtained same service in face-to-face groups. Pre-and post

  8. Factors affecting the performance of maternal health care providers in Armenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltero Lauren

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last five years, international development organizations began to modify and adapt the conventional Performance Improvement Model for use in low-resource settings. This model outlines the five key factors believed to influence performance outcomes: job expectations, performance feedback, environment and tools, motivation and incentives, and knowledge and skills. Each of these factors should be supplied by the organization in which the provider works, and thus, organizational support is considered as an overarching element for analysis. Little research, domestically or internationally, has been conducted on the actual effects of each of the factors on performance outcomes and most PI practitioners assume that all the factors are needed in order for performance to improve. This study presents a unique exploration of how the factors, individually as well as in combination, affect the performance of primary reproductive health providers (nurse-midwives in two regions of Armenia. Methods Two hundred and eighty-five nurses and midwives were observed conducting real or simulated antenatal and postpartum/neonatal care services and interviewed about the presence or absence of the performance factors within their work environment. Results were analyzed to compare average performance with the existence or absence of the factors; then, multiple regression analysis was conducted with the merged datasets to obtain the best models of "predictors" of performance within each clinical service. Results Baseline results revealed that performance was sub-standard in several areas and several performance factors were deficient or nonexistent. The multivariate analysis showed that (a training in the use of the clinic tools; and (b receiving recognition from the employer or the client/community, are factors strongly associated with performance, followed by (c receiving performance feedback in postpartum care. Other – extraneous

  9. NHSC Jobs Center for Primary Care Medical, Dental and Mental Health Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Jobs Center helps doctors and nurses who are interested in working at areas where there is the highest need find out more...

  10. 75 FR 2562 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... document announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by...

  11. 75 FR 26276 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by ARRA,...

  12. 75 FR 13595 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... document announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by...

  13. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo; da Cruz, Lucila Pedroso; Kishima, Vanessa Chaer; Pollara, Wilson Modesto; de Lira, Antônio Carlos Onofre; Couttolenc, Bernard François

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities), 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed. CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals.

  14. Do health care providers adhere to the revised malaria control guidelines? '

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Ray

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malaria is a public health problem worldwide with India contributing to 77% cases in the South East Asian region of World Health Organization (WHO. Karnataka is one of the project states under World Bank with API>2. Statistics from the district of Udupi, which is the setting for this study, shows a rise in malaria cases from January-May 2009. There were a total of 1189 malaria cases reported of which 103 were positive for P. falciparum. The National Programme to control malaria has recently revised its strategies, thus involved personnel need to be aware of it for the programme to be effective.Objectives: Keeping in mind the emergence of Choloroquine resistant malaria, The National Malaria Control Programme has revised its strategy. This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the awareness and practice of National Guidelines for malaria among health care providers in Urban Udupi, Karnataka (which is one of the project states under the World Bank for malaria control and the problems in implementation of these guidelines.Settings and design: Cross sectional study, Udupi district.Methods: Data was collected by personal interview (structured questionnaire after obtaining due consent.Statistical analysis used: Data was analyzed by SPSS software.ObservationsResults: Most respondents were from both Manipal and Udupi and had been practicing for over 5 years. Chills and headache were used as main guiding symptoms for diagnosis, all insisted on lab diagnosis with QBC being the most preferred test followed by smear. Cases were treated on pure clinical diagnosis in case of typical signs, unresponsiveness to other therapy, unwillingness or non-affordability of tests. Both species of Plasmodium were prevalent, Chloroquine being first line treatment for P. Vivax and Artemisinin compounds for Falciparum. Clinical failure was encountered against Falciparum due to chloroquine resistance and quinine was mainly used to combat it. Medical

  15. Incarcerated adolescents. The need for the development of professional ethical standards for institutional health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, E J

    1989-11-01

    Large numbers of children are incarcerated in juvenile correctional facilities each year in the United States. These children suffer from a wide range of physical and psychiatric illnesses and are in critical need of professional health care services. This article summarizes the health care needs of these children and documents the ethical problems faced by health care professionals who work in juvenile institutions. The adequacy of current ethical standards as a source of guidance and support for institutional health care professionals is reviewed and a series of recommendations for the development of comprehensive health care standards is set forth.

  16. [Prophylaxis and health promotion--whether and for whom they provide profit?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szozda, Ryszard J

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this article is employee and his family, employer, the state in all aspects and health as a profit and a lack of health as a loss. Healthy employee brings a profit to himself, to the employer and to the state. Up to these times nobody has thought about the health value. Work is a commodity. Prophylaxis and health promotion are work. Health can be sold as each commodity. Prophylaxis and health promotion incur expenses but they must be compared with illness results expenses (including immeasurable ones). Having analysed the literature the author claims that the thesis is right so it means that the effects of prophylaxis and health promotion determine the profit to employees and their families, to employers and to the state--which means to all of us.

  17. Migrant beer promoters' experiences accessing reproductive health care in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam: lessons for planners and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Gail C; Spitzer, Denise L; Somrongthong, Ratana; Dat, Truong Cong; Kounnavongsa, Somphone

    2015-03-01

    Migrant beer promoters in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam were surveyed to determine their experiences in accessing reproductive health care services in the cities of Phnom Penh, Vientiane, Bangkok, and Hanoi. A total of 7 health care institutions were chosen as popular with migrant beer promoters. Staff at these institutions provided information on the institution, and 390 beer promoters were surveyed about their experiences while accessing services. There were discrepancies between findings from the staff interviews and the experiences of the beer promoters. In general, the migrant women were satisfied with the cost, location, friendliness of the health care providers, and knowledge and skills of the providers. They were less positive about confidentiality and waiting times, though many still agreed that these were not an issue. Health care planners and providers should take note of the issues affecting access to reproductive health care services for migrant women when they design and implement services.

  18. Migrant Beer Promoters’ Experiences Accessing Reproductive Health Care in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam: Lessons for Planners and Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Gail C.; Spitzer, Denise L.; Somrongthong, Ratana; Dat, Truong Cong; Kounnavongsa, Somphone

    2014-01-01

    Migrant beer promoters in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam were surveyed to determine their experiences in accessing reproductive health care services in the cities of Phnom Penh, Vientiane, Bangkok, and Hanoi. A total of 7 health care institutions were chosen as popular with migrant beer promoters. Staff at these institutions provided information on the institution, and 390 beer promoters were surveyed about their experiences while accessing services. There were discrepancies between findings from the staff interviews and the experiences of the beer promoters. In general, the migrant women were satisfied with the cost, location, friendliness of the health care providers, and knowledge and skills of the providers. They were less positive about confidentiality and waiting times, though many still agreed that these were not an issue. Health care planners and providers should take note of the issues affecting access to reproductive health care services for migrant women when they design and implement services. PMID:22743859

  19. Building Trust and Relationships Between Patients and Providers: An Essential Complement to Health Literacy in HIV Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Rose, Carol; Cuca, Yvette P; Webel, Allison R; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Holzemer, William L; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Reid, Paula; Johnson, Mallory O; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reyes, Darcel; Nokes, Kathleen; Nicholas, Patrice K; Matshediso, Ellah; Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Sabone, Motshedisi B; Ntsayagae, Esther I; Shaibu, Sheila; Corless, Inge B; Wantland, Dean; Lindgren, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is important for access to and quality of HIV care. While most models of health literacy acknowledge the importance of the patient-provider relationship to disease management, a more nuanced understanding of this relationship is needed. Thematic analysis from 28 focus groups with HIV-experienced patients (n = 135) and providers (n = 71) identified a long-term and trusting relationship as an essential part of HIV treatment over the continuum of HIV care. We found that trust and relationship building over time were important for patients with HIV as well as for their providers. An expanded definition of health literacy that includes gaining a patient's trust and engaging in a process of health education and information sharing over time could improve HIV care. Expanding clinical perspectives to include trust and the importance of the patient-provider relationship to a shared understanding of health literacy may improve patient experiences and engagement in care.

  20. The providers of health services in Lebanon: a survey of physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osseiran Arabia

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging from civil distress carries with it major challenges to reforming a health system. One such challenge is to ensure an adequate supply of competent human resources. The objective of this study was to assess the supply of physicians in Lebanon in 1998, with an assessment of their practice patterns and capacity building. Methods Lists of members of physician's associations were examined to determine the number of physicians in Lebanon and their geographical distribution. A self-administered survey targeted 388 physicians (5% randomly stratified by the five regions of Lebanon. Some 377 providers reported information on their demographic profile, practice patterns and development. Further, information on continuing education activities was acquired. Results In Lebanon, the overall physician-to-population ratio was 248 per 100, 000, characterized by an evident maldistribution at the intracountry regional level. Physicians worked 38 hours per week examining on average 21 patients per day, with an average time of 30 minutes spent per visit. They also reported spending 11% of their time waiting for patients. Respondents reported a very wide range of income, with 90% earning less than USD 2,000 per month. Moreover, the continuing education profile revealed a total of 43.7 hours per year, similar to that required for board certification in many developed countries. Conference attendance was the dominant continuing education activity (95% of respondents and consumed most of the time allotted for continuing education, reported at 32 hours per year. Discussion and conclusion Various economic indicators point to an oversupply of physicians in Lebanon and a poor allocation of their time for capacity building. Therefore, it is crucial for decision-makers to closely monitor the increasing supply of providers and institute appropriate intervention strategies, taking into consideration appropriate provision of good-quality services and

  1. Providing interoperability of eHealth communities through peer-to-peer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ozgur; Dogac, Asuman; Eichelberg, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Providing an interoperability infrastructure for Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs) is on the agenda of many national and regional eHealth initiatives. Two important integration profiles have been specified for this purpose, namely, the "Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Cross-enterprise Document Sharing (XDS)" and the "IHE Cross Community Access (XCA)." IHE XDS describes how to share EHRs in a community of healthcare enterprises and IHE XCA describes how EHRs are shared across communities. However, the current version of the IHE XCA integration profile does not address some of the important challenges of cross-community exchange environments. The first challenge is scalability. If every community that joins the network needs to connect to every other community, i.e., a pure peer-to-peer network, this solution will not scale. Furthermore, each community may use a different coding vocabulary for the same metadata attribute, in which case, the target community cannot interpret the query involving such an attribute. Yet another important challenge is that each community may (and typically will) have a different patient identifier domain. Querying for the patient identifiers in the target community using patient demographic data may create patient privacy concerns. In this paper, we address each of these challenges and show how they can be handled effectively in a superpeer-based peer-to-peer architecture.

  2. A terrorist bomb blast, a real challenge for any tertiary care health provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Katyal, Surabhi

    2014-01-01

    Multiple casualties and the complex set of injuries in survivors of a terrorist bomb blast poses a real challenge to health care providers. We are presenting three such cases, first case suffered a fracture of both bone lower limb bilaterally along with head injury (foreign bodies were impacted in the scalp and brain parenchyma). Following primary resuscitation, patient shifted to operation theatre after a quick computerized tomography scan and external fixator applied in general anesthesia using the rapid sequence induction. No active neurosurgical intervention was done. As this patient had acute post-traumatic stress response, he was subjected to low pressure hyperbaric oxygen therapy (pressure of 1.5 ATA for 60 min a day for 10 days) and group counseling. He had good recovery except one lost a limb because of extensive neurovascular damage due to blast. Second case had much more extensive damage involving multiple organ systems. He had blast lung, big cerebrovascular hemorrhage along with gut perforation. Despite best possible surgical and intensive care interventions, patent developed multiple organ failure and unfortunately we lost our patient. Third case was of a right sided globe rupture resulted from blast induced flying foreign bodies. After primary survey and initial resuscitation evisceration done for the damaged eye and patient later on discharged with necessary instruction (including warning signs) for follow-up.

  3. A terrorist bomb blast, a real challenge for any tertiary care health provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Katyal, Surabhi

    2014-01-01

    Multiple casualties and the complex set of injuries in survivors of a terrorist bomb blast poses a real challenge to health care providers. We are presenting three such cases, first case suffered a fracture of both bone lower limb bilaterally along with head injury (foreign bodies were impacted in the scalp and brain parenchyma). Following primary resuscitation, patient shifted to operation theatre after a quick computerized tomography scan and external fixator applied in general anesthesia using the rapid sequence induction. No active neurosurgical intervention was done. As this patient had acute post-traumatic stress response, he was subjected to low pressure hyperbaric oxygen therapy (pressure of 1.5 ATA for 60 min a day for 10 days) and group counseling. He had good recovery except one lost a limb because of extensive neurovascular damage due to blast. Second case had much more extensive damage involving multiple organ systems. He had blast lung, big cerebrovascular hemorrhage along with gut perforation. Despite best possible surgical and intensive care interventions, patent developed multiple organ failure and unfortunately we lost our patient. Third case was of a right sided globe rupture resulted from blast induced flying foreign bodies. After primary survey and initial resuscitation evisceration done for the damaged eye and patient later on discharged with necessary instruction (including warning signs) for follow-up. PMID:25886231

  4. [Internationalized medical care services increase need of health care providers to improve English communication skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Ling

    2011-02-01

    English is the most important language used in international communication. Nurses today have significantly more opportunities to come into contact with clients of different nationalities. Therefore, English communication abilities are a critical to the effective care of foreign clients. Miscommunication due to language barriers can endanger the health and safety of foreign clients and hinder their access to healthcare resources. Basic English communicate skills allow nurses to better understand the feelings of foreign clients and to affect their satisfaction with healthcare services provided. The majority of clinical nurses in Taiwan are inadequately prepared to communicate with foreign clients or use English when delivering nursing care services. Although English is not an official language in Taiwan, strengthening English communication skills is necessary for Taiwan's healthcare service system. Faced with increasing numbers of foreign clients in their daily work, first-line nursing staffs need more training to improve English proficiency. In order to do so, support from the hospital director is the first priority. The second priority is to motivate nursing staffs to learn English; the third is to incorporate different English classes into the medical system and schedule class times to meet nurse scheduling needs; and the fourth is to establish international medical wards, with appropriate incentives in pay designed to attract and retain nursing staff proficient in English communication.

  5. Developing Allies to Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth: Training for Counselors and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Kim A.; Meier, S. Colton

    2014-01-01

    Lack of training regarding transgender youth leaves K-12 educators unprepared to become allies to this disenfranchised community and attend to their needs. This article explores the pedagogical strategies of two professional workshop models (GLSEN Houston training and the Gender Infinity practitioner training), which provide skills and resources…

  6. Gaps in understanding health and engagement with healthcare providers across common long-term conditions: a population survey of health literacy in 29 473 Danish citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Karina; Lasgaard, Mathias; Osborne, Richard H; Maindal, Helle T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) quantify levels of subjective health literacy in people with long-term health conditions (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, musculoskeletal disorders, cancer and mental disorders) and compare these to levels in the general population and (2) examine the association between health literacy, socioeconomic characteristics and comorbidity in each long-term condition group. Design Population-based survey in the Central Denmark Region (n=29 473). Main outcome measures Health literacy was measured using two scales from the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ): (1) Ability to understand health information and (2) Ability to actively engage with healthcare providers. Results People with long-term conditions reported more difficulties than the general population in understanding health information and actively engaging with healthcare providers. Wide variation was found between disease groups, with people with cancer having fewer difficulties and people with mental health disorders having more difficulties in actively engaging with healthcare providers than other long-term condition groups. Having more than one long-term condition was associated with more difficulty in engaging with healthcare providers and understanding health information. People with low levels of education had lower health literacy than people with high levels of education. Conclusions Compared with the general population, people with long-term conditions report more difficulties in understanding health information and engaging with healthcare providers. These two dimensions are critical to the provision of patient-centred healthcare and for optimising health outcomes. More effort should be made to respond to the health literacy needs among individuals with long-term conditions, multiple comorbidities and low education levels, to improve health outcomes and to reduce social inequality in health. PMID:26769783

  7. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Your Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... electromagnetic fields. o Example: Magnet therapy Exercise Therapies: Health-enhancing systems of exercise and movement. • Example: Yoga Manipulative and Body-Based Methods: Methods based on ...

  8. Trust in health providers as a catalyst for malaria prevention: Heterogeneous impacts of health education in rural Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoop, T.J. de; Kempen, L.A.C.M. van

    2010-01-01

    Although knowledge about effectiveness of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) is fairly widespread in Ghana, their use remains far from universal. We test and validate the hypothesis that health education of hospitals and health centers in rural Ghana is more effective for groups that display relati

  9. Making non-discrimination and equal opportunity a reality in Kenya's health provider education system: results of a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance; Kimeu, Anastasiah; Shamblin, Leigh; Penders, Christopher; McQuide, Pamela A; Bwonya, Judith

    2011-01-01

    IntraHealth International's USAID-funded Capacity Kenya project conducted a performance needs assessment of the Kenya health provider education system in 2010. Various stakeholders shared their understandings of the role played by gender and identified opportunities to improve gender equality in health provider education. Findings suggest that occupational segregation, sexual harassment and discrimination based on pregnancy and family responsibilities present problems, especially for female students and faculty. To grow and sustain its workforce over the long term, Kenyan human resource leaders and managers must act to eliminate gender-based obstacles by implementing existing non-discrimination and equal opportunity policies and laws to increase the entry, retention and productivity of students and faculty. Families and communities must support girls' schooling and defer early marriage. All this will result in a fuller pool of students, faculty and matriculated health workers and, ultimately, a more robust health workforce to meet Kenya's health challenges.

  10. What health plans do people prefer? : The trade-off between premium and provider choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Determann, Domino; Lambooij, Mattijs S; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W; Hayen, Arthur P; Varkevisser, Marco; Schut, Frederik T; Wit, G Ardine de

    2016-01-01

    Within a healthcare system with managed competition, health insurers are expected to act as prudent buyers of care on behalf of their customers. To fulfil this role adequately, understanding consumer preferences for health plan characteristics is of vital importance. Little is known, however, about

  11. Comparative health care information: consumer quality index (CQI) information on differences between providers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Stubbe, J.H.; Triemstra, A.H.M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Public reporting on health care performances has become an important quality-improvement instrument. In the Netherlands, consumer quality index (CQI) questionnaires are currently being used to assess patients’ experiences with various domains of the health care system. An important quest

  12. School Psychologists as Mental Health Providers: The Impact of Staffing Ratios and Medicaid on Service Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Meyer, Lauren; Way, Samara; Mclean, Deija

    2017-01-01

    As one out of five children in the United States demonstrate some type of mental or behavioral health concern warranting additional intervention, federal policies have emphasized the need for school-based mental health (SBMH) services and an expansion of Medicaid reimbursement for eligible children and families. Most youth access mental health…

  13. Which providers can bridge the health literacy gap in lifestyle risk factor modification education: a systematic review and narrative synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Sarah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with low health literacy may not have the capacity to self-manage their health and prevent the development of chronic disease through lifestyle risk factor modification. The aim of this narrative synthesis is to determine the effectiveness of primary healthcare providers in developing health literacy of patients to make SNAPW (smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and weight lifestyle changes. Methods Studies were identified by searching Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Joanna Briggs Institute, Psychinfo, Web of Science, Scopus, APAIS, Australian Medical Index, Community of Science and Google Scholar from 1 January 1985 to 30 April 2009. Health literacy and related concepts are poorly indexed in the databases so a list of text words were developed and tested for use. Hand searches were also conducted of four key journals. Studies published in English and included males and females aged 18 years and over with at least one SNAPW risk factor for the development of a chronic disease. The interventions had to be implemented within primary health care, with an aim to influence the health literacy of patients to make SNAPW lifestyle changes. The studies had to report an outcome measure associated with health literacy (knowledge, skills, attitudes, self efficacy, stages of change, motivation and patient activation and SNAPW risk factor. The definition of health literacy in terms of functional, communicative and critical health literacy provided the guiding framework for the review. Results 52 papers were included that described interventions to address health literacy and lifestyle risk factor modification provided by different health professionals. Most of the studies (71%, 37/52 demonstrated an improvement in health literacy, in particular interventions of a moderate to high intensity. Non medical health care providers were effective in improving health literacy. However this was confounded by intensity of

  14. Assessing adaptation to the health risks of climate change: what guidance can existing frameworks provide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füssel, Hans-Martin

    2008-02-01

    Climate change adaptation assessments aim at assisting policy-makers in reducing the health risks associated with climate change and variability. This paper identifies key characteristics of the climate-health relationship and of the adaptation decision problem that require consideration in climate change adaptation assessments. It then analyzes whether these characteristics are appropriately considered in existing guidelines for climate impact and adaptation assessment and in pertinent conceptual models from environmental epidemiology. The review finds three assessment guidelines based on a generalized risk management framework to be most useful for guiding adaptation assessments of human health. Since none of them adequately addresses all key challenges of the adaptation decision problem, actual adaptation assessments need to combine elements from different guidelines. Established conceptual models from environmental epidemiology are found to be of limited relevance for assessing and planning adaptation to climate change since the prevailing toxicological model of environmental health is not applicable to many climate-sensitive health risks.

  15. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  16. Perceptions of vaginal microbicides as an HIV prevention method among health care providers in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantell Joanne E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The promise of microbicides as an HIV prevention method will not be realized if not supported by health care providers. They are the primary source of sexual health information for potential users, in both the public and private health sectors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine perceptions of vaginal microbicides as a potential HIV prevention method among health care providers in Durban and Hlabisa, South Africa, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. Results During 2004, semi structured interviews with 149 health care providers were conducted. Fifty seven percent of hospital managers, 40% of pharmacists and 35% of nurses possessed some basic knowledge of microbicides, such as the product being used intra-vaginally before sex to prevent HIV infection. The majority of them were positive about microbicides and were willing to counsel users regarding potential use. Providers from both public and private sectors felt that an effective microbicide should be available to all people, regardless of HIV status. Providers felt that the product should be accessed over-the-counter in pharmacies and in retail stores. They also felt a need for potential microbicides to be available free of charge, and packaged with clear instructions. The media was seen by health care providers as being an effective strategy for promoting microbicides. Conclusion Overall, health care providers were very positive about the possible introduction of an effective microbicide for HIV prevention. The findings generated by this study illustrated the need for training health care providers prior to making the product accessible, as well as the importance of addressing the potential barriers to use of the product by women. These are important concerns in the health care community, and this study also served to educate them for the day when research becomes reality.

  17. Errorless learning for training individuals with schizophrenia at a community mental health setting providing work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Robert S; Liberman, Robert P; Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Green, Michael F

    2009-07-01

    The effects of errorless learning (EL) on work performance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with conventional job training in a community mental health fellowship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job tasks based on principles of EL, such as error reduction and automation of task performance. CI participants received training common to other community-based entry-level jobs that included verbal instruction, a visual demonstration, independent practice, and corrective feedback. Participants were scheduled to work 2 hours per week for 12 weeks. For both groups, job training occurred during the first 2 weeks at the worksite. Work performance (assessed using the Work Behavior Inventory, WBI) and personal well-being (self-esteem, job satisfaction, and work stress) were assessed at weeks 2, 4, and 12. Job tenure was defined as the number of weeks on the job or total number of hours worked prior to quitting or study end. The EL group performed better than the CI group on the Work Quality Scale from the WBI, and the group differences were relatively consistent over time. Results from the survival analyses of job tenure revealed a non-significant trend favoring EL. There were no group differences on self-esteem, job satisfaction, or work stress. The findings provide modest support for the extensions of EL to community settings for enhancing work performance.

  18. The use of interest rate swaps by nonprofit organizations: evidence from nonprofit health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Louis J; Trussel, John

    2006-01-01

    Although the use of derivatives, particularly interest rate swaps, has grown explosively over the past decade, derivative financial instrument use by nonprofits has received only limited attention in the research literature. Because little is known about the risk management activities of nonprofits, the impact of these instruments on the ability of nonprofits to raise capital may have significant public policy implications. The primary motivation of this study is to determine the types of derivatives used by nonprofits and estimate the frequency of their use among these organizations. Our study also extends contemporary finance theory by an empirical examination of the motivation for interest rate swap usage among nonprofits. Our empirical data came from 193 large nonprofit health care providers that issued debt to the public between 2000 and 2003. We used a univariate analysis and a multivariate analysis relying on logistic regression models to test alternative explanations of interest rate swaps usage by nonprofits, finding that more than 45 percent of our sample, 88 organizations, used interest rate swaps with an aggregate notional value in excess of $8.3 billion. Our empirical tests indicate the primary motive for nonprofits to use interest rate derivatives is to hedge their exposure to interest rate risk. Although these derivatives are a useful risk management tool, under conditions of falling bond market interest rates these derivatives may also expose a nonprofit swap user to the risk of a material unscheduled termination payment. Finally, we found considerable diversity in the informativeness of footnote disclosure among sample organizations that used interest rate swaps. Many nonprofits did not disclose these risks in their financial statements. In conclusion, we find financial managers in large nonprofits commonly use derivative financial instruments as risk management tools, but the use of interest rate swaps by nonprofits may expose them to other risks

  19. What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know About Measles and Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sonja A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2015-07-01

    From January 1 to April 3, 2015, 159 people from 18 states and the District of Columbia were reported as having measles. Most cases are part of an outbreak linked to a California amusement park. Because measles was eliminated in the United States in 2000, most U.S. clinicians are unfamiliar with the condition. We reviewed information on the current outbreak, measles manifestations, diagnostic methods, treatment, and infection-control recommendations. To identify information on measles and pregnancy, we reviewed reports with 20 or more measles cases during pregnancy that included data on effects on pregnant women or pregnancy outcomes. These reports were identified through MEDLINE from inception through February 2015 using the following strategy: (((pregnan*) AND measles) AND English[Language]) NOT review[Publication Type]. Reference lists also were reviewed to identify additional articles. Pregnant women infected with measles are more likely to be hospitalized, develop pneumonia, and die than nonpregnant women. Adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pregnancy loss, preterm birth, and low birth weight, are associated with maternal measles; however, the risk of congenital defects does not appear to be increased. No antiviral therapy is available; treatment is supportive. Early identification of possible cases is needed so that appropriate infection control can be instituted promptly. The recent measles outbreak highlights the role that obstetric health care providers play in vaccine-preventable illnesses; obstetrician-gynecologists should ensure that patients are up to date on all vaccines, including measles-containing vaccines, and should recommend and ideally offer a measles-containing vaccine to women without evidence of measles immunity before or after pregnancy.

  20. Carers of Mentally Ill People in Queensland: Their Perceived Relationships with Professional Mental Health Service Providers: Report on a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Orme; King, Robert; Leggatt, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Explores the relationships of caregivers of mentally ill people with professional mental health providers since the introduction of community-based services. Respondents perceived mental health workers to be professional, friendly, respectful and positive in outlook. However they indicated dissatisfaction with accessibility, communication about…

  1. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Payment of SMI Benefits § 410.170 Payment for home health... furnished in accordance with a written plan prepared and periodically reviewed by a team that includes...

  2. Dental Provider Attitudes Are a Barrier to Expanded Oral Health Care for Children ≤3 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Clark MPH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the perspectives of general dentists regarding oral health care for children ≤3 years. Methods. Mailed survey of 444 general dentists in Michigan. Results. Although most dentists were aware of recommendations for early dental visits, only 36% recommended their own patients begin dental visits by 1 year of age. Only 37% dentists felt that screening for oral health problems can be done by medical providers, whereas 34% agreed administration of fluoride varnish by medical providers would be effective in preventing dental problems in young children. Conclusions. Dentists’ failure to recommend 1-year dental visits is due neither to lack of awareness nor to capacity problems. The limited enthusiasm for involving children’s medical providers in oral health promotion signals attitudinal barriers that must be overcome to improve children’s oral health. Primary care providers should identify and refer to dentists in their community who are willing to see young children.

  3. Health Care Providers' Knowledge and Practice Gap towards Joint Zoonotic Disease Surveillance System: Challenges and Opportunities, Gomma District, Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemeda, Desta Hiko; Sime, Abiot Girma; Hajito, Kifle Woldemichael; Gelalacha, Benti Deresa; Tafese, Wubit; Gebrehiwot, Tsegaye Tewelde

    2016-01-01

    Background. Health care providers play a crucial role for realization of joint zoonotic diseases surveillance by human and animal health sectors, yet there is limited evidence. Hence, this study aimed to determine knowledge and practice gap of health care providers towards the approach for Rabies and Anthrax in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from December 16, 2014, to January 14, 2015. Eligible health care providers were considered for the study. Data were entered in to Epi-data version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. A total of 323 (92.02%) health care providers participated in the study. Three hundred sixteen (97.8%) of participants reported that both human and animal health sectors can work together for zoonotic diseases while 96.9% of them replied that both sectors can jointly conduct surveillance. One hundred seventeen (36.2%) of them reported that their respective sectors had conducted joint surveillance for zoonotic diseases. Their involvement was, however, limited to joint outbreak response. Conclusion. There is good opportunity in health care providers' knowledge even though the practice was unacceptably low and did not address all surveillance components. Therefore, formal joint surveillance structure should be in place for optimal implementation of surveillance.

  4. Providing health messages to Hispanics/Latinos: understanding the importance of language, trust in health information sources, and media use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Marla L; Manganello, Jennifer A; Viswanath, K; Hesse, Bradford W; Arora, Neeraj K

    2010-01-01

    Health communication is critical to promoting healthy lifestyles and preventing unhealthy behaviors. However, populations may differ in terms of their trust in and use of health information sources, including mass media, the Internet, and interpersonal channels. We used the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to test the hypothesis that Hispanics who are less comfortable speaking English would differ from Hispanics who are comfortable speaking English with respect to trust in health information sources and media use. Hispanics/Latinos comprised 9% of the 2005 HINTS sample (n = 496). Respondents not born in the United States regardless of race/ethnicity and all Hispanics were asked, "How comfortable do you feel speaking English?" Responses of "completely," "very," or "native speaker" were combined into "comfortable speaking English": all other responses were categorized as "less comfortable speaking English." Those comfortable speaking English reported higher trust for health information from newspapers (p radio and watching television (both p < .05) and days per week reading newspapers (p < .05). Hispanics comfortable speaking English reported much higher levels of Internet use (54% versus 14%, p < .0001). Hispanics who are not comfortable speaking English may be difficult to reach, not only because of language barriers and lower trust in media, but also because they report relatively little use of various media channels. These findings have important implications for health communications toward non-native speakers of English in general and Hispanics in particular.

  5. Use of a Tablet-Based Risk Assessment Program to Improve Health Counseling and Patient-Provider Relationships in a Federally Qualified Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Vanessa A; Mainous, Arch G; Gavin, Jennifer K; Player, Marty S; Wright, Robert U

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluates the impact of an interactive, tablet-based lifestyle behavior questionnaire prior to a patient's primary care visit on counseling for health behaviors and patient-provider relationships. Using a quasi-experimental design at 2 federally qualified health centers, adults aged 18 to 35 years were asked to complete a tablet-based assessment about nutrition, physical activity, weight, smoking status, and alcohol use to identify unhealthy behaviors and their desire to discuss them with their provider. In the intervention group, participants were more likely to trust their providers (83% vs 71%, P = .0427) and feel that their provider cared about their health (80% vs 68%, P = .0468). Overweight/obese individuals were more likely to discuss weight loss with their doctor (59% vs 33%, P = .0088). Integrating information technology into primary care to encourage providers to discuss lifestyle issues and promote a positive patient-provider relationship may help improve the health promotion in primary care practices.

  6. Usual Primary Care Provider Characteristics of a Patient-Centered Medical Home and Mental Health Service Use

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, AL; Cochran, SD; Leibowitz, A.; Wells, KB; Kominski, G; Mays, VM

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society of General Internal Medicine BACKGROUND: The benefits of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) over and above that of a usual source of medical care have yet to be determined, particularly for adults with mental health disorders. OBJECTIVE: To examine qualities of a usual provider that align with PCMH goals of access, comprehensiveness, and patient-centered care, and to determine whether PCMH qualities in a usual provider are associated with the use of mental health services...

  7. Examining Health Care Costs: Opportunities to Provide Value in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Beverly; Lorenzo, Javier; Macario, Alex

    2015-12-01

    As health care costs threaten the economic stability of American society, increasing pressures to focus on value-based health care have led to the development of protocols for fast-track cardiac surgery and for delirium management. Critical care services can be led by anesthesiologists with the goal of improving ICU outcomes and at the same time decreasing the rising cost of ICU medicine.

  8. Health and climate related ecosystem services provided by street trees in the urban environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Salmond, JA; Tadaki, M; Vardoulakis, S; Arbuthnott, K; Coutts, A; Demuzere, M; Dirks, KN; Heaviside, C; Lim, S; Macintyre, H; McInnes, RN; Wheeler, BW

    2016-01-01

    Urban tree planting initiatives are being actively promoted as a planning tool to enable urban areas to adapt to and mitigate against climate change, enhance urban sustainability and improve human health and well-being. However, opportunities for creating new areas of green space within cities are often limited and tree planting initiatives may be constrained to kerbside locations. At this scale, the net impact of trees on human health and the local environment is less clear, and generalised ...

  9. Identifying existing health care services that do not provide value for money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshaug, Adam G; Moss, John R; Littlejohns, Peter; Karnon, Jonathan; Merlin, Tracy L; Hiller, Janet E

    2009-03-02

    Health systems can be improved appreciably by making them more efficient and accountable, and enhancing the quality of care, without necessarily requiring additional resources. Australia, like other nations, cannot escape making difficult health care choices in the context of resource scarcity, and the challenge of delivering quality care, informed by best available evidence, to an ageing population with multiple comorbidities. An opportunity exists for a cost-saving or cost-neutral agenda of reallocation of resources within the existing health budget, through reducing the use of existing health care interventions that offer little or no benefit relative to the cost of their public subsidy. This would allow reallocation of funding towards interventions that are more cost-effective, maximising health gain. Criteria based on those developed for health technology assessment (HTA) might facilitate the systematic and transparent identification of existing, potentially ineffective practices on which to prioritise candidates for assessment as to their cost-effectiveness. The process could be jointly funded by all relevant stakeholders but centrally administered, with HTA groups resourced to undertake identification and assessment and to liaise with clinicians, consumers and funding stakeholders.

  10. Prevention of unintended pregnancy and HIV/STIs among Latinos in rural communities: perspectives of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Meredith; Harvey, S Marie; Zukoski, Ann P; Warren, Jocelyn

    2010-08-01

    Latino women in the United States are disproportionately at risk for unintended pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We conducted nine focus groups with health care practitioners who provide reproductive health care to Latinos in rural areas of the Northwest. From the practitioner perspective, we explored barriers and facilitators to the acquisition and use of contraceptives and to the prevention of HIV/STIs among rural Latinos. Suggestions for improving reproductive health care included Spanish-language resources/materials and convenient contraceptive methods. Findings provide context to the complex issues related to unintended pregnancy and disease prevention among Latinos residing in rural communities.

  11. The Cost analysis of cervical cancer screening services provided by Damavand health center in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Chouhdari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, the health sector in many countries is facing with severe resource constraints; hence it is absolutely necessary that cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness assessment have a major role in design of health services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-benefit and effectiveness of cervical cancer screening service (Pap smear test done by the health centers in Damavand County in 2013.  Methods: This is a descriptive study with cross-sectional method. All data was extracted from existing documents in Damavand health network.Cost of service screening for doing Pap smear test (manpower costs of performing the service, the cost of transferring samples, water, electricity, telephone and gas was estimated in all health centers then results, were compared with the incomes of this service.  Results: Screening program coverage was 22.3%, 6.9% and 6.05% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 respectively. All costs and incomes of units performing Pap smear screening test were calculated. Entire costs and incomes of this service during 2013 were respectively 303,009,000 and 11,640,000 RLS equal $12,227 and $496.73. Therefore, the cost-benefit ratio of this screening test was approximately 0.040.  Conclusion: The costs of units performing cervical cancer screening test in Damavand Health Center were much more than this benefit and because of a none-positive Pap smear test in spite of high cost, performing this test in Damavand health centers was not cost effective.

  12. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Detection from the Hands of Jatinangor Community Health Center’s Health Care Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevanisha Patmanathan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterium that is resistance towards β-lactam antibiotics, and it seems to be one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Hands of the health care workers are said to be the main source for the nosocomial transmission. Thus, the study aims to determine methicillin-resistant S. aureus from the hands of Jatinangor Community Health Center’s health care workers. Methods: Samples were taken from the hands of 30 Jatinangor Community Health Center’s staffs, including medical and paramedical; from October 2012 to November 2012. Then, these samples underwent further laboratory examinations, starting from culture, identification and susceptibility test towards cefoxitin, in identifying methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Results: Out of the 30 samples taken, 6 samples (20% were positive for S. aureus isolates. In which, 4 (13.33% of the samples were positive for methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Conclusions: Since, health care workers are the main people in contact with patients and maintaining proper hand hygiene makes a huge difference; hand hygiene should be given adequate attention for the benefit of all.

  13. Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Ha, Wi-Ho; Jin, Young-Woo; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv MBq(-1) s(-1)) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15 year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1 year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events.

  14. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  15. Trends in traumatic limb amputation in Allied Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Background: Limb amputation has been a common injury occurring in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Compared to other injuries, less attention has been given to this serious, disabling wound. Purpose: The article describes the Allied military experience of traumatic limb amputation in Iraq and Afghanistan. It intends to inform health care personnel involved in the care of serving military personnel and veterans about the scale of these casualties. Methods: A literature se...

  16. Patient Perceptions of Prejudice and Discrimination by Health Care Providers and its Relationship with Mental Disorders: Results from the 2012 Canadian Community Health-Mental Health Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Kirsten; Palis, Heather; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia

    2016-04-01

    Using data from a nationally representative survey, the Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health, this secondary analysis aimed to determine the prevalence of perceived prejudice by health care providers (HCPs) and its relationship with mental disorders. Respondents accessing HCPs in the prior year were asked if they experienced HCP prejudice. A hypothesis driven multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between type of mental disorders and HCP prejudice. Among the 3006 respondents, 10.9 % perceived HCP prejudice, 62.4 % of whom reported a mental disorder. The adjusted odds of prejudice was highest for respondents with anxiety (OR 3.12; 95 % CI 1.60, 6.07), concurrent mood or anxiety and substance disorders (OR 3.08; 95 % CI 1.59, 5.95) and co-occurring mood and anxiety disorders (OR 2.89; 95 % CI 1.68, 4.97) compared to respondents without any mental disorders. These findings are timely for informing discussions regarding policies to address HCP prejudice towards people with mental disorders.

  17. Queer & Ally Youth Involvement in the Fair Wisconsin Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegler, Sam

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the role and experience of queer youth and allies in the Fair Wisconsin campaign that fought against the marriage amendment to that state's constitution. It illustrates how LGBT and ally youth involvement can be incorporated into other organizations. Following an explanation of the campaign, are narratives of two…

  18. Theatre of Presence - Antero Alli's Paratheatrical ReSearch Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    the oppression, decadence and corruption that has crucified and buried the poetic Imagination" (Antero Alli) This paper will try to unveil one of Antero Alli's paratheatrical experiments in overcoming the death of ritual in theatre. Orphans of Delirium is an intense, living ritual experience, "fluid" in its...

  19. Non-starter lactic acid bacteria used to improve cheese quality and provide health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settanni, Luca; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2010-09-01

    Non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) dominate cheese microbiota during ripening. They tolerate the hostile environment well and strongly influence the biochemistry of curd maturation, contributing to the development of the final characteristics of cheese. Several NSLAB are selected on the basis of their health benefits (enhancement of intestinal probiosis, production of bioactive peptides, generation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and inactivation of antigenotoxins) and are employed in cheese-making. This review describes the ecology of NSLAB, and focuses on their application as adjunct cultures, in order to drive the ripening process and promote health advantages. The scopes of future directions of research are summarised.

  20. Preferred providers and the credible commitment problem in health insurance: first experiences with the implementation of managed competition in the Dutch health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Lieke H H M; Schut, Frederik T

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the impact of the transition towards managed competition in the Dutch health care system on health insurers' contracting behaviour. Specifically, we examine whether insurers have been able to take up their role as prudent buyers of care and examine consumers' attitudes towards insurers' new role. Health insurers' contracting behaviour is investigated by an extensive analysis of available information on purchasing practices by health insurers and by interviews with directors of health care purchasing of the four major health insurers, accounting for 90% of the market. Consumer attitudes towards insurers' new role are investigated by surveys among a representative sample of enrollees over the period 2005-2009. During the first four years of the reform, health insurers were very reluctant to engage in selective contracting and preferred to use 'soft' positive incentives to encourage preferred provider choice rather than engaging in restrictive managed care activities. Consumer attitudes towards channelling vary considerably by type of provider but generally became more negative in the first two years after the reform. Insurers' reluctance to use selective contracting can be at least partly explained by the presence of a credible-commitment problem. Consumers do not trust that insurers with restrictive networks are committed to provide good quality care. The credible-commitment problem seems to be particularly relevant to the Netherlands, since Dutch enrollees are not used to restrictions on provider choice. Since consumers are quite sensitive to differences in provider quality, more reliable information about provider quality is required to reduce the credible-commitment problem.

  1. Creating a “Wellness Pathway” between health care providers and community-based organizations to improve the health of older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Han, MD, MSHPM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To effectively manage the health of older high-risk patients, health care organizations need to adopt strategies that go beyond the doctor's office and into patients' homes and communities. Community-based organizations (CBOs are important underutilized partners in activating and providing the resources necessary to deliver coordinated, culturally-tailored services to older individuals. This paper describes the process and preliminary results of creating and implementing a “Wellness Pathway” to improve the health of older individuals by coordinating care between health care providers and CBOs, such as senior centers. The Wellness Pathway provides a mechanism whereby health care providers refer patients to programs at the senior center, and senior center staff members refer patients for urgent or primary care services at the health care provider organization. The aim of the project was to determine whether the creation of the Wellness Pathway through the health care provider and CBO education and engagement is feasible and to identify challenges in scalability. During the 6 month study period, 25 patients were referred through the Wellness Pathway, and six patients acted on the referral. Stakeholders at both organizations were interviewed to obtain detailed information regarding their experiences with, and perceptions of, the Wellness Pathway. Patients and providers who participated in the pilot believe that it has the potential to positively impact the health of older patients and is worth continuing. The primary challenges that arose in the implementation of the Wellness Pathway resulted from inadequate levels of health care provider and staff engagement and from lagging patient recruitment.

  2. U.S. Geological Survey environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2013-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, quality of life, and economic prosperity lead to environmental change. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will compound the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, synthetic chemicals and substances, natural earth materials, toxins, and other biogenic compounds.

  3. The Relation between Adolescent Self Assessment of Health and Risk Behaviours: Could a Global Measure of Health Provide Indications of Health Risk Exposures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah-Amankra, Stephen; Walker, Ashley Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Self-rated health (SRH) has become a key organizing construct for assessing multiple dimensions of populations' physical and psychosocial health functioning. However, it is unclear how adolescents' subjective self assessment of health reflects health risk exposures, co-occurring health risks (problem behaviours) and other pre-existing…

  4. Online encyclopedia provides free health info for all. Interview by Fiona Fleck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, James

    2013-01-01

    Within a decade, Wikipedia has become one of the most popular health-content web sites in the world. James Heilman talks to Fiona Fleck about how the once free-wheeling website is moving closer to a formal publication model.

  5. GramHealth: a bottom-up approach to provide preventive healthcare services for unreached community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashir; Kabir, Lutfe; Kai, Eiko; Inoue, Sozo

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient healthcare facilities and unavailability of medical experts in rural areas are the two major reasons that kept the people unreached to healthcare services. Recent penetration of mobile phone and the demand to basic healthcare services, remote health consultancy over mobile phone became popular in developing countries. In this paper, we introduce two such representative initiatives from Bangladesh and discuss the technical challenges they face to serve a remote patient. To solve these issues, we have prototyped a box with necessary diagnostic tools, we call it a "portable clinic" and a software tool, "GramHealth" for managing the patient information. We carried out experiments in three villages in Bangladesh to observe the usability of the portable clinic and verify the functionality of "GramHealth". We display the qualitative analysis of the results obtained from the experiment. GramHealth DB has a unique combination of structured, semi-structured and un-structured data. We are currently looking at these data to see whether these can be treated as BigData and if yes, how to analyze the data and what to expect from these data to make a better clinical decision support.

  6. SEAFOODplus - how to provide health promoting, safe seafood of high eating quality to consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Torger

    2008-01-01

    in the diet to diminish the increased incidences of e.g. cardiovascular, cancer and inflammatory diseases is being assessed by performing dietary intervention and epidemiological studies. Other focus areas are health of young populations, to treat overweight, to prevent osteoporosis and postpartum depression...

  7. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.M.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them.

  8. Ten Things Gay Men Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments for that infection. 4. Fitness (Diet and Exercise) Problems with body image are more common among gay men, and gay men are much more likely to experience an eating disorder such as bulimia or anorexia nervosa. While regular exercise is very good for your health too much ...

  9. Genetic education and nongenetic health professionals: educational providers and curricula in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Challen, K.; Harris, H.J.; Julian-Reynier, C.; Kate, L.P. ten; Kristoffersson, U.; Nippert, I.; Schmidtke, J.; Benjamin, C.; Harris, R

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Advances in and diffusion of genetic technology mean that nongeneticist health professionals have an increasing need to develop and maintain genetic competencies. This has been recognized by patient support groups and the European Commission. As the first phase of the GenEd (Genetic Educati

  10. Gaps in understanding health and engagement with healthcare providers across common long-term conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Karina; Lasgaard, Mathias; Osborne, Richard H;

    2016-01-01

    Dette studie har undersøgt, hvordan borgere i region Midtjylland oplever sundhedsinformation og interaktion med sundhedsprofessionelle (dimensioner af health literacy), og om der er forskelle på borgere med forskellige kroniske sygdomme. Studiet bygger på data fra Region Midtjyllands sundhedsprof...

  11. Substance Abuse, Published in Not Provided, Indiana State Department of Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Substance Abuse dataset as of Not Provided. Data by this publisher are often provided in UTM coordinate system; in a Transverse Mercator projection; The extent...

  12. Assisted Living Facilities, Published in Not Provided, Indiana State Department of Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Assisted Living Facilities dataset as of Not Provided. Data by this publisher are often provided in UTM coordinate system; in a Transverse Mercator projection;...

  13. Blood Banks, Published in Not Provided, Indiana State Department of Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Blood Banks dataset as of Not Provided. Data by this publisher are often provided in UTM coordinate system; in a Transverse Mercator projection; The extent of...

  14. Doctor Offices, Published in Not Provided, Indiana State Department of Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Doctor Offices dataset as of Not Provided. Data by this publisher are often provided in UTM coordinate system; in a Transverse Mercator projection; The extent...

  15. Association between change of health care providers and pregnancy exposure to FDA category C, D and X drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jianzhou; Xie Rihua; Daniel Krewski; Wang Yongjin; Mark Walker; Cao Wenjun; Shi Wu Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background Changing health care providers frequently breaks the continuity of care,which is associated with many health care problems.The purpose of this study was to examine the association between a change of health care providers and pregnancy exposure to FDA category C,D and X drugs.Methods A 50% random sample of women who gave a birth in Saskatchewan between January 1,1997 and December 31,2000 were chosen for this study.The association between the number of changes in health care providers and with pregnancy exposure to category C,D,and X drugs for those women with and without chronic diseases were evaluated using multiple logistical regression,with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and its 95% confidence intervals (C/s) as the association measures.Results A total of 18 568 women were included in this study.Rates of FDA C,D,and X drug uses were 14.35%,17.07%,21.72%,and 31.14%,in women with no change of provider,1-2 changes,3-5 changes,and more than 5 changes of health care providers.An association between the number of changes of health care providers and pregnancy exposure to FDA C,D,and X drugs existed in women without chronic diseases but not in women with chronic disease.Conclusion Change of health care providers is associated with pregnancy exposure to FDA category C,D and X drugs in women without chronic diseases.

  16. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  17. Newcomers health in Brantford and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk: perspectives of newcomers and service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Bharati

    2013-10-01

    The Canadian government's plan to support a balanced distribution of immigrants throughout the nation has contributed to newcomers' dispersion to small town communities and rural areas. However, very little work has examined the health experiences of immigrants settling in smaller urban and rural regions. Even less literature exists on the perspectives of service providers working with newcomers in Canada's urban-rural communities. This paper focuses on a part of a larger Community-based study on 'Newcomer Settlement and Integration in Education, Training, Employment, Health and Social Support' in Brantford--a middle-sized urban/rural region in Ontario, Canada--and discusses the findings in the health domain. Data were generated from 212 service providers and 237 newcomers using both qualitative and quantitative research tools. Newcomers identified several barriers in accessing mental and/or physical health services including lack of culturally appropriate services and discrimination. The striking differences between newcomers' and service providers' responses to the survey questionnaires bring to light cultural variations between the newcomers' and the service providers' perceptions of 'health'. The findings reinforce the need for including newcomers in developing more inclusive and culturally-appropriate health services and programs.

  18. Evaluation of child maltreatment in the emergency department setting: an overview for behavioral health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetch, Aaron N; Leipsic, John; Woolridge, Dale P

    2015-01-01

    Emergency providers are confronted with medical, social, and legal dilemmas with each case of possible child maltreatment. Keeping a high clinical suspicion is key to diagnosing latent abuse. Child abuse, especially sexual abuse, is best handled by a multidisciplinary team including emergency providers, nurses, social workers, and law enforcement trained in caring for victims and handling forensic evidence. The role of the emergency provider in such cases is to identify abuse, facilitate a thorough investigation, treat medical needs, protect the patient, provide an unbiased medical consultation to law enforcement, and provide an ethical testimony if called to court.

  19. Marketing guidelines for providers of mental health and chemical dependency services--responding to changes in the packaging and purchase of behavioral health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oss, M E

    1993-01-01

    In summary, the mental health and chemical dependency market has changed to the point that providers and programs of any type can no longer survey financially without well-developed marketing strategies--including a conscious decision about target markets and niches within those markets. Behavioral health providers and programs need to thoroughly evaluate their internal resources, along with possible market niches, in order to develop these strategies.

  20. Improving sexual health for HIV patients by providing a combination of integrated public health and hospital care services; a one-group pre- and post test intervention comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukers-Muijrers Nicole HTM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital HIV care and public sexual health care (a Sexual Health Care Centre services were integrated to provide sexual health counselling and sexually transmitted infections (STIs testing and treatment (sexual health care to larger numbers of HIV patients. Services, need and usage were assessed using a patient perspective, which is a key factor for the success of service integration. Methods The study design was a one-group pre-test and post-test comparison of 447 HIV-infected heterosexual individuals and men who have sex with men (MSM attending a hospital-based HIV centre serving the southern region of the Netherlands. The intervention offered comprehensive sexual health care using an integrated care approach. The main outcomes were intervention uptake, patients’ pre-test care needs (n=254, and quality rating. Results Pre intervention, 43% of the patients wanted to discuss sexual health (51% MSM; 30% heterosexuals. Of these patients, 12% to 35% reported regular coverage, and up to 25% never discussed sexual health topics at their HIV care visits. Of the patients, 24% used our intervention. Usage was higher among patients who previously expressed a need to discuss sexual health. Most patients who used the integrated services were new users of public health services. STIs were detected in 13% of MSM and in none of the heterosexuals. The quality of care was rated good. Conclusions The HIV patients in our study generally considered sexual health important, but the regular counselling and testing at the HIV care visit was insufficient. The integration of public health and hospital services benefited both care sectors and their patients by addressing sexual health questions, detecting STIs, and conducting partner notification. Successful sexual health care uptake requires increased awareness among patients about their care options as well as a cultural shift among care providers.

  1. An e-health driven laboratory information system to support HIV treatment in Peru: E-quity for laboratory personnel, health providers and people living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caballero N Patricia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peru has a concentrated HIV epidemic with an estimated 76,000 people living with HIV (PLHIV. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART expanded between 2004-2006 and the Peruvian National Institute of Health was named by the Ministry of Health as the institution responsible for carrying out testing to monitor the effectiveness of HAART. However, a national public health laboratory information system did not exist. We describe the design and implementation of an e-health driven, web-based laboratory information system - NETLAB - to communicate laboratory results for monitoring HAART to laboratory personnel, health providers and PLHIV. Methods We carried out a needs assessment of the existing public health laboratory system, which included the generation and subsequent review of flowcharts of laboratory testing processes to generate better, more efficient streamlined processes, improving them and eliminating duplications. Next, we designed NETLAB as a modular system, integrating key security functions. The system was implemented and evaluated. Results The three main components of the NETLAB system, registration, reporting and education, began operating in early 2007. The number of PLHIV with recorded CD4 counts and viral loads increased by 1.5 times, to reach 18,907. Publication of test results with NETLAB took an average of 1 day, compared to a pre-NETLAB average of 60 days. NETLAB reached 2,037 users, including 944 PLHIV and 1,093 health providers, during its first year and a half. The percentage of overall PLHIV and health providers who were aware of NETLAB and had a NETLAB password has also increased substantially. Conclusion NETLAB is an effective laboratory management tool since it is directly integrated into the national laboratory system and streamlined existing processes at the local, regional and national levels. The system also represents the best possible source of timely laboratory information for

  2. Applications of Latent Growth Mixture Modeling and allied methods to posttraumatic stress response data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac R. Galatzer-Levy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scientific research into mental health outcomes following trauma is undergoing a revolution as scientists refocus their efforts to identify underlying dimensions of health and psychopathology. This effort is in stark contrast to the previous focus which was to characterize individuals based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM diagnostic status (Insel et al., 2010. A significant unresolved issue underlying this shift is how to characterize clinically relevant populations without reliance on the categorical definitions provided by the DSM. Classifying individuals based on their pattern of stress adaptation over time holds significant promise for capturing inherent inter-individual heterogeneity as responses including chronicity, recovery, delayed onset, and resilience can only be determined longitudinally (Galatzer-Levy & Bryant, 2013 and then characterizing these patterns for future research (Depaoli, Van de Schoot, Van Loey, & Sijbrandij, 2015. Such an approach allows for the identification of phenominologically similar patterns of response to diverse extreme environmental stressors (Bonanno, Kennedy, Galatzer-Levy, Lude, & Elfstom, 2012; Galatzer-Levy & Bonanno, 2012; Galatzer-Levy, Brown, et al., 2013; Galatzer-Levy, Burton, & Bonanno, 2012 including translational animal models of stress adaptation (Galatzer-Levy, Bonanno, Bush, & LeDoux, 2013; Galatzer-Levy, Moscarello, et al., 2014. The empirical identification of heterogeneous stress response patterns can increase the identification of mechanisms (Galatzer-Levy, Steenkamp, et al., 2014, consequences (Galatzer-Levy & Bonanno, 2014, treatment effects (Galatzer-Levy, Ankri, et al., 2013, and prediction (Galatzer-Levy, Karstoft, Statnikov, & Shalev, 2014 of individual differences in response to trauma. Method: Methodological and theoretical considerations for the application of Latent Growth Mixture Modeling (LGMM and allied methods such as Latent Class

  3. Non-adherence in adolescent transplant recipients: the role of uncertainty in health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujoulat, Isabelle; Deccache, Alain; Charles, Anne-Sophie; Janssen, Magda; Struyf, Catherine; Pélicand, Julie; Ciccarelli, Olga; Dobbels, Fabienne; Reding, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    To optimize self-management and adherence in adolescent patients, HCPs need to discuss not only medical and treatment-related issues, but also general health and psychosocial concerns. Our study aimed to explore how the members of the paediatric team in our programme understand NA in adolescents, and how they define their own role regarding self-management education. We used a sequential mixed methods design and conducted a qualitative observational and in-depth interview study (n=22) and a quantitative descriptive study through self-administered questionnaires (n=31). Our results show a discrepancy between the HCPs' understanding of the complex psychosocial factors impacting on long-term adherence, and their current limited practice of patient education. A number of uncertainties were found to explain the HCPs' perceived difficulty to engage in comprehensive patient education activities: uncertainty regarding (i) the health status of transplant recipients; (ii) a shared operational definition of adherence and the cause of organ rejection in some cases; (iii) the extent to which adherence is a shared responsibility which involves the HCPs as patient educators; (iv) the long-term impact of a LRD. To avoid the risk of conveying incongruent messages, multidisciplinary health care teams need to explicitly acknowledge and discuss the various areas of uncertainty, some of which are inherent to transplantation.

  4. An Analysis of the Allocation of Funds for the Direct Health Care Provider Program (DHCPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-26

    RENEWAL 15 __ OPTOMET 16 __ PREVMED 25 -REQ_$ 17 __ PA $ (000) 18 __ ENLISTED 26 --- REQ_$/WY $ (000) 27 _%_WORK 28 _AMEPFUND $ (000) 29 __ FY88 Other...Nutrition Care Provider NUTRI .5329 .0154 Optometry Provider OPTOMET .3439 .0544 Preventive Med. Provider PREVMED .33/2 .0024 z Physician Assistant Prov...RAD) + .6419 (PHYSMED) + .4350 (FAMPRAC) + .3190 (SOCIAL) + .4789 (PHARM) + .5329 (NUTRI) + .3439 ( OPTOMET ) + .3372 (PREVMED) + .3758 (PA) + .3331

  5. Coverage and quality of antenatal care provided at primary health care facilities in the 'Punjab' province of 'Pakistan'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ashraf Majrooh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antenatal care is a very important component of maternal health services. It provides the opportunity to learn about risks associated with pregnancy and guides to plan the place of deliveries thereby preventing maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In 'Pakistan' antenatal services to rural population are being provided through a network of primary health care facilities designated as 'Basic Health Units and Rural Health Centers. Pakistan is a developing country, consisting of four provinces and federally administered areas. Each province is administratively subdivided in to 'Divisions' and 'Districts'. By population 'Punjab' is the largest province of Pakistan having 36 districts. This study was conducted to assess the coverage and quality antenatal care in the primary health care facilities in 'Punjab' province of 'Pakistan'. METHODS: Quantitative and Qualitative methods were used to collect data. Using multistage sampling technique nine out of thirty six districts were selected and 19 primary health care facilities of public sector (seventeen Basic Health Units and two Rural Health Centers were randomly selected from each district. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with clients, providers and health managers. RESULTS: The overall enrollment for antenatal checkup was 55.9% and drop out was 32.9% in subsequent visits. The quality of services regarding assessment, treatment and counseling was extremely poor. The reasons for low coverage and quality were the distant location of facilities, deficiency of facility resources, indifferent attitude and non availability of the staff. Moreover, lack of client awareness about importance of antenatal care and self empowerment for decision making to seek care were also responsible for low coverage. CONCLUSION: The coverage and quality of the antenatal care services in 'Punjab' are extremely compromised. Only half of the expected pregnancies are enrolled and

  6. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Shaibu, Sheila; Matshediso, Ellah; Sabone, Motshedisi; Ntsayagae, Esther; Nicholas, Patrice K; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory O; Webel, Allison; Cuca, Yvette; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Nokes, Kathleen; Reyes, Darcel; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reid, Paula; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Lindgren, Teri; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs), and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs). SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV.

  7. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitshokile Dintle Mogobe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs, and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs. SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV.

  8. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  9. Provision of contraceptive services to homeless women: results of a survey of health care for the homeless providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Barry G; Weinreb, Linda; Gelberg, Lillian; Zerger, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Homeless women have both a higher rate of pregnancy and a higher proportion of unintended pregnancies than other American women. The authors sought to learn about contraception services offered by providers of health care to homeless women and barriers to provision of long-acting, reversible contraception in these settings. A survey of the 31 member organizations in the national Health Care for the Homeless Practice-Based Research Network was conducted, inquiring about services provided and barriers to service provision. Among the 20 responding organizations (65% response rate), 17 directly provided contraceptive services; two referred patients elsewhere, and one provided no contraceptive services. All 17 that provided such services provided condoms; 15 provided oral contraceptives; 14 provided injectable contraception; 6 provided intrauterine devices, and 2 provided contraceptive implants. Barriers to providing the last two methods included lack of provider training, lack of resources for placement, costs, and concerns about complications. The present survey results suggested very limited access for homeless women across the country to the two most effective means of long-acting, reversible contraception. Modest investments of resources could reduce a number of barriers to providing these services.

  10. Information, education, and communication services in MCH care provided at an urban health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Bratati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular IEC programs during antenatal and intranatal period, through individual or group approach, brings desirable changes in health practices of people, resulting in a healthy mother and a healthy baby. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to assess the level of IEC services regarding pregnancy and child care, received by the women at an MCH clinic of an urban health center, where the study subjects comprised 400 antenatal (AN and postnatal (PN women and mothers of children under five years. Results: Warning signs of danger was explained to only 10% of the AN and PN women. Advice regarding family planning appeared to be the most frequently covered, though that too was explained to less than half of the subjects. About one third of the women were advised on breast feeding. Only 8% of the mothers had been told about all issues regarding pregnancy and child care. Breast feeding and weaning was properly explained to 85.7 and 81.1% of the total mothers of U5 children. Advice regarding subsequent nutrition was given to 60.9% of mothers. About only a quarter of the total mothers were advised on home management of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. Very few mothers were counseled about the growth pattern of the children and none were shown the growth chart. Only 12.9% of the mothers were informed about all issues. Conclusion: IEC regarding maternal and child care other than feeding practices is a neglected service in the health facility where the study was conducted.

  11. Nursing care provided to young people in two health centers compared with Watson Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Pichardo Meza

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article has as objective to present the analysis of the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital, related to Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal. The study corresponds to a joint research of parallel type with concurrent triangulation. The study populations were made up by twenty-six young adult people (who face morbid process health or chronic pain condition and four nursing professionals who worked in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital. A self-executed questionnaire and a semi-structured interview were used to collect the information, which was analyzed using the “SPSS” program and the qualitative categories, respectively. Results: The ten elements of the “Human Care Theory” can be included in the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population who faces morbid process health or chronic pain condition. The nursing care mainly focuses on the young adult population quality of life throughout education and pain management. The young adult population perceives a warm, pleasant and human nursing care. Conclusion: Nursing personnel put into practice elements of the Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal even when they do not know it.

  12. Patterns of salivary analytes provide diagnostic capacity for distinguishing chronic adult periodontitis from health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Schuster, Julie L; Stevens, Jason; Dawson, Dolph; Kryscio, Richard J; Lin, Yushin; Thomas, Mark V; Miller, Craig S

    2013-01-01

    Salivary biomarker discovery requires identification of analytes with high discriminatory capacity to distinguish disease from health, including day-to-day variations that occur in analyte levels. In this study, seven biomarkers associated with inflammatory and tissue destructive processes of periodontal disease were investigated. In a prospective cohort study design, analyte expression levels were determined in unstimulated whole saliva samples collected on multiple occasions from 30 healthy adults (i.e., orally and systemically) and 50 chronic adult periodontitis patients. Salivary levels of IL-1β, IL-6, MMP-8, and albumin were significantly elevated (5.4 to 12.6X) and levels of IFNα were consistently lower (8.7X) in periodontitis patients compared with the daily variation observed in healthy adults. ROC analyses of IL-1β, IL-6 and MMP-8 yielded areas under the curves of 0.963-0.984 for discriminating periodontitis from health. These results demonstrate that levels of salivary bioanalytes of patients who have periodontitis are uniquely different from normal levels found in healthy subjects, and a panel consisting of IL-1β, MMP-8 and IL-6 shows particular diagnostic potential.

  13. Communication practices about HPV testing among providers in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Lin

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: As HPV testing plays a more prominent role in cervical cancer screening, more attention should be given to communications between providers and patients about the benefits and harms of different screening options.

  14. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Provider: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  15. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  16. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with your Health Care Provider: A workbook and tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  17. Malaria-related health-seeking behaviour and challenges for care providers in rural Ethiopia: implications for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deressa, Wakgari; Ali, Ahmed; Hailemariam, Damen

    2008-01-01

    A range of activities are currently underway to improve access to malaria prevention and control interventions. As disease control strategies change over time, it is crucial to understand the health-seeking behaviour and the local socio-cultural context in which the changes in interventions operate. This paper reflects on how people in an area of seasonal malaria perceive the causes and transmission of the disease, and what prevention and treatment measures they practise to cope with the disease. It also highlights some of the challenges of malaria treatment for health care providers. The study was undertaken in 2003 in Adami Tulu District in south-central Ethiopia, where malaria is a major health problem. Pre-tested structured questionnaires and focus group discussions were conducted among men and women. Malaria, locally known as busa, was perceived as the most important cause of ill health in the area. Respondent's perception and knowledge about the cause and transmission of the disease were relatively high. The newly introduced insecticide-treated nets were not popular in the area, and only 6.4% of households possessed at least one. The results showed that patients use multiple sources of health care for malaria treatment. Public health facilities, private clinics and community health workers were the main providers of malaria treatment. Despite higher treatment costs, people preferred to use private health care providers for malaria treatment due to the higher perceived quality of care they offer. In conclusion, effort in the prevention and control of malaria should be intensified through addressing not only public facilities, but also the private sector and community-based control interventions. Appropriate and relevant information on malaria should be disseminated to the local community. The authors propose the provision of effective antimalarial drugs and malaria prevention tools such as subsidized or free insecticide-treated nets.

  18. An agent-based simulation model of patient choice of health care providers in accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrahim, Abdullah; Wu, Shinyi

    2016-10-04

    Accountable care organizations (ACO) in the United States show promise in controlling health care costs while preserving patients' choice of providers. Understanding the effects of patient choice is critical in novel payment and delivery models like ACO that depend on continuity of care and accountability. The financial, utilization, and behavioral implications associated with a patient's decision to forego local health care providers for more distant ones to access higher quality care remain unknown. To study this question, we used an agent-based simulation model of a health care market composed of providers able to form ACO serving patients and embedded it in a conditional logit decision model to examine patients capable of choosing their care providers. This simulation focuses on Medicare beneficiaries and their congestive heart failure (CHF) outcomes. We place the patient agents in an ACO delivery system model in which provider agents decide if they remain in an ACO and perform a quality improving CHF disease management intervention. Illustrative results show that allowing patients to choose their providers reduces the yearly payment per CHF patient by $320, reduces mortality rates by 0.12 percentage points and hospitalization rates by 0.44 percentage points, and marginally increases provider participation in ACO. This study demonstrates a model capable of quantifying the effects of patient choice in a theoretical ACO system and provides a potential tool for policymakers to understand implications of patient choice and assess potential policy controls.

  19. Maintenance of health care providers clinical proficiency: Transdisciplinary analysis, modeling and intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Aids and Performance Support Systems  Visual aids – such as posters in exam rooms, checklists/flowcharts  Computerized clinical decision support...manikin  Scenario-based live exercises  Life- size immersive 3D visualization  Live demonstrations JOB AIDS AND PERFORMANCE SUPPORT SYSTEMS In...used during the actual performance of the task. A job aid provides a visual cue to provide concise, relevant information at the point of care to augment

  20. Patient and provider perspectives on quality and health system effectiveness in a transition economy: evidence from Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J; Peabody, J W; DeMaria, L M; Alvarado, C S; Menon, R

    2014-08-01

    Facing a severe population health crisis due to noncommunicable diseases, Ukraine and other former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries have a pressing need for more effective health systems. Policies to enhance health system effectiveness should consider the perspectives of different stakeholder groups, including providers as well as patients. In addition, policies that directly target the quality of clinical care should be based on objective performance measures. In 2009 and 2010 we conducted a coordinated series of household and facility-level surveys to capture the perspectives of Ukrainian household members, outpatient clinic patients, and physicians regarding the country's health system overall, as well as the quality, access, and affordability of health care. We objectively measured the quality of care for heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using CPV(®) vignettes. There was broad agreement among household respondents (79%) and physicians (95%) that Ukraine's health system should be reformed. CPV(®) results indicate that the quality of care for common noncommunicable diseases is poor in all regions of the country and in hospitals as well as polyclinics. However, perspectives about the quality of care differ, with household respondents seeing quality as a serious concern, clinic patients having more positive perceptions, and physicians not viewing quality as a reform priority. All stakeholder groups viewed affordability as a problem. These findings have several implications for policies to enhance health system effectiveness. The shared desire for health system reform among all stakeholder groups provides a basis for action in Ukraine. Improving quality, strengthening primary care, and enhancing affordability should be major goals of new health policies. Policies to improve quality directly, such as pay-for-performance, would be mutually reinforcing with purchasing reforms such as transparent payment mechanisms. Such policies