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Sample records for alleviating atopic dermatitis-like

  1. Effect of German chamomile oil application on alleviating atopic dermatitis-like immune alterations in mice

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    Lee, Soon-Hee; Heo, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Historically, German chamomile (GC) oil has been used for treatment of skin disorders. BALB/c mice were sensitized twice a week with 100 µL of 1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and challenged twice the following week with 100 µL of 0.2% DNCB for atopic dermatitis induction. Thereafter, 3% GC oil was applied daily (70 µL, 6 times week) on the dorsal skin for 4 weeks. Saline or jojoba oil was used for the control mice. Blood was collected after second DNCB challenge, and at 2 and 4 weeks after initiating oil application. Serum IgE levels were significantly lowered in the GC oil application group at the end of the 4-week application period. The GC oil application for 4 weeks resulted in reduction in serum IgG1 level compared with that after 2-week application. The GC oil application group showed a significantly lower serum histamine level than the control group 2 weeks after oil application. Scratching frequency of the GC oil application group was significantly lower than either control groups. This study is to demonstrate GC oil's immunoregulatory potential for alleviating atopic dermatitis through influencing of Th2 cell activation. PMID:20195063

  2. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Alleviate House Dust Mite-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions by the CD206 Mannose Receptor.

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    Shin, Dasom; Choi, Won; Bae, Hyunsu

    2018-04-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by highly pruritic, erythematous, and eczematous skin plaques. We previously reported that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) derived from bee venom alleviates AD-like skin lesions induced by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and house dust mite extract ( Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) in a murine model. However, the underlying mechanisms of PLA2 action in actopic dermatitis remain unclear. In this study, we showed that PLA2 treatment inhibited epidermal thickness, serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and cytokine levels, macrophage and mast cell infiltration in the ear of an AD model induced by DFE and DNCB. In contrast, these effects were abrogated in CD206 mannose receptor-deficient mice exposed to DFE and DNCB in the ear. These data suggest that bvPLA2 alleviates atopic skin inflammation via interaction with CD206.

  3. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Alleviate House Dust Mite-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions by the CD206 Mannose Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Dasom Shin; Won Choi; Hyunsu Bae

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by highly pruritic, erythematous, and eczematous skin plaques. We previously reported that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) derived from bee venom alleviates AD-like skin lesions induced by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) in a murine model. However, the underlying mechanisms of PLA2 action in actopic dermatitis remain unclear. In this study, we showed that PLA...

  4. Diospyros lotus leaf and grapefruit stem extract synergistically ameliorate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion in mice by suppressing infiltration of mast cells in skin lesions.

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    Cho, Byoung Ok; Che, Denis Nchang; Yin, Hong Hua; Shin, Jae Young; Jang, Seon Il

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing and pruritic inflammation of the skin also thought to be involved in, or caused by immune system destruction is an upsetting health problem due to its continuously increasing incidence especially in developed countries. Mast cell infiltration in atopic dermatitis skin lesions and its IgE-mediated activation releases various cytokines and chemokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This study was aimed at investigating synergistic anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic and anti-atopic dermatitis effects of Diospyros lotus leaf extract (DLE) and Muscat bailey A grapefruit stem extract (GFSE) in atopic dermatitis-like induced skin lesions in mice. Combinations of DLE and GFSE inhibited TNF-α and IL-6 production more than DLE or GFSE in PMA plus calcium ionophore A23187-activated HMC-1 cells. DLE and GFSE synergistically inhibited compound 48/80-induced dermal infiltration of mast cells and reduced scratching behavior than DLE or GFSE. Furthermore, DLE and GFSE synergistically showed a stronger ameliorative effect in skin lesions by reducing clinical scores; dermal infiltration of mast cells; ear and dorsal skin thickness; serum IgE and IL-4 production in atopic dermatitis-like mice. Collectively, these results suggest that DLE and GFSE synergistically exhibit anti-atopic dermatitis effects in atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Resveratrol ameliorates 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like lesions through effects on the epithelium

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    Sule Caglayan Sozmen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol that exhibits anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol treatment on epithelium-derived cytokines and epithelial apoptosis in a murine model of atopic dermatitis-like lesions. Material and Methods. Atopic dermatitis-like lesions were induced in BALB/c mice by repeated application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene to shaved dorsal skin. Twenty-one BALB/c mice were divided into three groups: group I (control, group II (vehicle control, and group III (resveratrol. Systemic resveratrol (30 mg/kg/day was administered repeatedly during the 6th week of the experiment. After the mice had been sacrificed, skin tissues were examined histologically for epithelial thickness. Epithelial apoptosis (caspase-3 and epithelium-derived cytokines [interleukin (IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP] were evaluated immunohistochemically. Results. Epithelial thickness and the numbers of IL-25, IL-33, TSLP and caspase-3-positive cells were significantly higher in group II compared to group I mice. There was significant improvement in epithelial thickness in group III compared with group II mice (p < 0.05. The numbers of IL-25, IL-33, and TSLP-positive cells in the epithelium were lower in group III than in group II mice (p < 0.05. The number of caspase-3-positive cells, as an indicator of apoptosis, in the epithelium was significantly lower in group III than in group II mice (p < 0.05. Conclusion. Treatment with resveratrol was effective at ameliorating histological changes and inflammation by acting on epithelium-derived cytokines and epithelial apoptosis.

  6. Vitamin E improves biochemical indices associated with symptoms of atopic dermatitis-like inflammation in NC/Nga mice.

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    Hayashi, Daisuke; Sugaya, Hotaka; Ohkoshi, Takayuki; Sekizawa, Kaori; Takatsu, Hirokatsu; Shinkai, Tadashi; Urano, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to define whether vitamin E improves biochemical indices associated with symptoms of atopic dermatitis-like inflammation in NC/Nga mice. After picryl chloride (PC) application to their backs, changes in the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and vitamin E, as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and catalase) were analyzed in the serum and skin of NC/Nga mice during a symptomatic cycle. The levels of inflammatory factors were also assessed, including IgE, cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). When allergic dermatitis was induced by the application of PC to the skin of the mice, skin inflammation appeared 2 wk after PC application, with the peak severity of inflammation observed 5 wk after PC application. Subsequently, the animals recovered from the inflammation by 9 wk after PC application. The TBARS content in the skin and serum increased markedly when the symptoms were the most severe, and decreased to levels near those in control mice by 9 wk after PC application. The activities of SOD and GSHPx in the skin and serum were also positively correlated with symptomatic changes; however, no change in catalase activity was observed 5 wk after PC application. Conversely, vitamin E content decreased at the stage of peak severity. The levels of all inflammatory factors analyzed in this study were altered in a manner similar to other indices. Additionally, vitamin E treatment markedly inhibited these PC-induced alterations. On the basis of these results, it is expected that the observed alterations in biochemical indices, which reflect the symptomatic cycle, may be applicable to objective diagnosis and treatment for atopic dermatitis, and that vitamin E may improve the symptoms of AD.

  7. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Ameliorates House Dust Mite Extract Induced Atopic Dermatitis Like Skin Lesions in Mice

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    Kyung-Hwa Jung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a biphasic inflammatory skin disease that is provoked by epidermal barrier defects, immune dysregulation, and increased skin infections. Previously, we have demonstrated that bvPLA2 evoked immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg, and thus alleviated Th2 dominant allergic asthma in mice. Here, we would like to determine whether treatment with bvPLA2 exacerbates the AD-like allergic inflammations induced by house dust mite extract (DFE in a murine model. Epidermal thickness, immune cell infiltration, serum immunoglobulin, and cytokines were measured. Ear swelling, skin lesions, and the levels of total serum IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokines were elevated in DFE/DNCB-induced AD mice. Topical application of bvPLA2 elicited significant suppression of the increased AD symptoms, including ear thickness, serum IgE concentration, inflammatory cytokines, and histological changes. Furthermore, bvPLA2 treatment inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear. On the other hand, Treg cell depletion abolished the anti-atopic effects of bvPLA2, suggesting that the effects of bvPLA2 depend on the existence of Tregs. Taken together, the results revealed that topical exposure to bvPLA2 aggravated atopic skin inflammation, suggesting that bvPLA2 might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  8. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Ameliorates House Dust Mite Extract Induced Atopic Dermatitis Like Skin Lesions in Mice.

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    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Baek, Hyunjung; Kang, Manho; Kim, Namsik; Lee, Seung Young; Bae, Hyunsu

    2017-02-18

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a biphasic inflammatory skin disease that is provoked by epidermal barrier defects, immune dysregulation, and increased skin infections. Previously, we have demonstrated that bvPLA2 evoked immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and thus alleviated Th2 dominant allergic asthma in mice. Here, we would like to determine whether treatment with bvPLA2 exacerbates the AD-like allergic inflammations induced by house dust mite extract (DFE) in a murine model. Epidermal thickness, immune cell infiltration, serum immunoglobulin, and cytokines were measured. Ear swelling, skin lesions, and the levels of total serum IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokines were elevated in DFE/DNCB-induced AD mice. Topical application of bvPLA2 elicited significant suppression of the increased AD symptoms, including ear thickness, serum IgE concentration, inflammatory cytokines, and histological changes. Furthermore, bvPLA2 treatment inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear. On the other hand, Treg cell depletion abolished the anti-atopic effects of bvPLA2, suggesting that the effects of bvPLA2 depend on the existence of Tregs. Taken together, the results revealed that topical exposure to bvPLA2 aggravated atopic skin inflammation, suggesting that bvPLA2 might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Valencene on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

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    In Jun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valencene (VAL isolated from Cyperus rotundus possesses various biological effects such as antiallergic and antimelanogenesis activity. We investigated the effect of VAL on atopic dermatitis (AD skin lesions and their molecular mechanisms. We topically applied VAL to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB sensitized NC/Nga mice. Modified scoring atopic dermatitis index, scratching behavior, and histological/immunohistochemical staining were used to monitor disease severity. RT-PCR, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the level of IgE, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines production, and skin barrier proteins expression. Topical application of VAL significantly reduced AD-like symptoms and recovered decreased expression of filaggrin in DNCB-sensitized NC/Nga mice. The levels of serum IgE, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-13 in skin/splenic tissue were reduced. In vitro studies using TNF-α and IFN-γ treated HaCaT cells revealed that VAL inhibited the exaggerated expression of Th2 chemokines including TARC/CCL17, MDC/CCL22, and proinflammatory chemokines such as CXCL8, GM-CSF, and I-CAM through blockade of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, expression of the skin barrier protein, involucrin, was also increased by VAL treatment. VAL inhibited the production and expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that VAL may serve as a potential therapeutic option for AD.

  10. Fluoxetine ameliorates atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in BALB/c mice through reducing psychological stress and inflammatory response

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    Yanxi Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder, and patients with AD suffer from severe psychological stress, which markedly increases the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety disorders in later life. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has recently been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. However, it is unclear whether fluoxetine is effective in the treatment of AD through reducing psychological stress and inflammatory reaction. Here, we reported that a BALB/c mouse model of AD was induced by application of 2,4‑dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB onto hairless dorsal skin. Chronic fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg per day, i.p. significantly attenuated AD-like symptoms, as reflected by a dramatic decrease in scratching bouts, as well as a decrease in anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Furthermore, these behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in epidermal thickness, the number of mast cells in skin tissue, mRNA levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and IL-13 in the spleen, as well as serum immunoglobulin E (IgE in the DNCB-treated mice by treatment with fluoxetine. Taken together, these results indicate that fluoxetine may suppress psychological stress and inflammatory response during AD development, and subsequently ameliorate AD symptoms, suggesting that fluoxetine may be a potential therapeutic agent against AD in clinic.

  11. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice

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    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD. PMID:26404252

  12. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice

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    Heerim Kang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE. CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD.

  13. Immunosuppressive effects of fisetin against dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice.

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    Kim, Gun-Dong; Lee, Seung Eun; Park, Yong Seek; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Park, Gwi Gun; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2014-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial chronic skin disorder that is increasing in prevalence globally. In NC/Nga mice, repetitive epicutaneous applications of 2-4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) induces AD-like clinical symptoms. Bioflanonol fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) is a dietary component found in plants, fruits and vegetables. Fisetin has various physiological effects that include anti-oxidation, anti-angiogenesis, anti-carcinogenesis and anti-inflammation. In this study, we investigated whether fisetin relieves AD-like clinical symptoms induced by repeated DNFB treatment in NC/Nga mice. Fisetin significantly inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, mast cells and CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells, and suppressed the expressions of cytokines and chemokines associated with dermal infiltrates in AD-like skin lesions. Total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels and the ratio of phospho-NF-κB p65 to total NF-κB p65 were markedly reduced by fisetin. Fisetin also reduced the production of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 by activated CD4(+) T cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 was increased. These results implicate fisetin as a potential therapeutic for AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Aspartame Attenuates 2, 4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Clinical Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

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    Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Yong Seek; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Cho, Jeong-Je; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common multifactorial chronic skin disease that has a multiple and complex pathogenesis. AD is gradually increasing in prevalence globally. In NC/Nga mice, repetitive applications of 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) evoke AD-like clinical symptoms similar to human AD. Aspartame (N-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester) is a methyl ester of a dipeptide, which is used as an artificial non-nutritive sweetener. Aspartame has analgesic and anti-inflammatory functions that are similar to the function of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin. We investigated whether aspartame can relieve AD-like clinical symptoms induced by DNFB treatment in NC/Nga mice. Sucrose did not relieve AD-like symptoms, whereas aspartame at doses of 0.5 μg kg(-1) and 0.5 mg kg(-1) inhibited ear swelling and relieved AD-like clinical symptoms. Aspartame inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, mast cells, and CD4(+) T cells, and suppressed the expression of cytokines including IL-4 and IFN-γ, and total serum IgE levels. Aspartame may have therapeutic value in the treatment of AD.

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pentaherbs Formula, Berberine, Gallic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid in Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Inflammation.

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    Tsang, Miranda S M; Jiao, Delong; Chan, Ben C L; Hon, Kam-Lun; Leung, Ping C; Lau, Clara B S; Wong, Eric C W; Cheng, Ling; Chan, Carmen K M; Lam, Christopher W K; Wong, Chun K

    2016-04-20

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common allergic skin disease, characterized by dryness, itchiness, thickening and inflammation of the skin. Infiltration of eosinophils into the dermal layer and presence of edema are typical characteristics in the skin biopsy of AD patients. Previous in vitro and clinical studies showed that the Pentaherbs formula (PHF) consisting of five traditional Chinese herbal medicines, Flos Lonicerae, Herba Menthae, Cortex Phellodendri, Cortex Moutan and Rhizoma Atractylodis at w/w ratio of 2:1:2:2:2 exhibited therapeutic potential in treating AD. In this study, an in vivo murine model with oxazolone (OXA)-mediated dermatitis was used to elucidate the efficacy of PHF. Active ingredients of PHF water extract were also identified and quantified, and their in vitro anti-inflammatory activities on pruritogenic cytokine IL-31- and alarmin IL-33-activated human eosinophils and dermal fibroblasts were evaluated. Ear swelling, epidermis thickening and eosinophils infiltration in epidermal and dermal layers, and the release of serum IL-12 of the murine OXA-mediated dermatitis were significantly reduced upon oral or topical treatment with PHF (all p Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid and berberine contents (w/w) in PHF were found to be 0.479%, 1.201% and 0.022%, respectively. Gallic acid and chlorogenic acid could suppress the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and chemokine CCL7 and CXCL8, respectively, in IL-31- and IL-33-treated eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture; while berberine could suppress the release of IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2 and CCL7 in the eosinophil culture and eosinophils-dermal fibroblasts co-culture (all p < 0.05). These findings suggest that PHF can ameliorate allergic inflammation and attenuate the activation of eosinophils.

  16. Effect of Acer tegmentosum bark on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

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    Yang, Gabsik; An, Duckgun; Lee, Mi-Hwa; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Bumjung; Suman, Chinannai Khanita; Ham, Inhye; Choi, Ho-Young

    2016-01-11

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and relapsing inflammatory condition characterized by pruritic and eczematous skin lesions that requires safe and effective pharmacological therapy. The bark of Acer tegmentosum Maxim trees has been used in Korean folk and traditional medicine to treat abscesses, surgical bleeding, liver diseases, and AD. To investigate the therapeutic effect of A. tegmentosum, on a mouse model of Dermatophagoides farinae (Df)-induced AD. Development of AD-like skin lesions was induced by repetitive skin contact with barrier-disrupted backs of NC/Nga mice with Df body ointment, and the effects of A. tegmentosum were evaluated on the basis of histopathological skin assessment results, ear swelling, and cytokine production in the dorsal skin. The component of A. tegmentosum, salidroside, inhibited the production of TSLP in KCMH-1 cells, which indicated that its production could be pharmacologically regulated. Topical application of A. tegmentosum for 1 week after Df body ointment challenge significantly reduced ear swelling and improved dorsal skin lesions. Suppression of dermatitis by combined therapy was accompanied by a decrease in the skin level of Th2 cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, plasma levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, and IgE. Induction of thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which leads to a systemic Th2 response, was also reduced in in vivo and in vitro by A. tegmentosum and salidroside. Our findings suggest that A. tegmentosum treatment has a significant therapeutic effect on Df-induced AD-like skin lesions on NC/Nga mice through inhibition of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and IgE via a mechanism that may inhibit Th2-mediated immune responses. These results suggest that A. tegmentosum and salidroside may be useful tools for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Atopic dermatitis-like disease and associated lethal myeloproliferative disorder arise from loss of Notch signaling in the murine skin.

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    Alexis Dumortier

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Notch pathway is essential for proper epidermal differentiation during embryonic skin development. Moreover, skin specific loss of Notch signaling in the embryo results in skin barrier defects accompanied by a B-lymphoproliferative disease. However, much less is known about the consequences of loss of Notch signaling after birth.To study the function of Notch signaling in the skin of adult mice, we made use of a series of conditional gene targeted mice that allow inactivation of several components of the Notch signaling pathway specifically in the skin. We demonstrate that skin-specific inactivation of Notch1 and Notch2 simultaneously, or RBP-J, induces the development of a severe form of atopic dermatitis (AD, characterized by acanthosis, spongiosis and hyperkeratosis, as well as a massive dermal infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells. Likewise, patients suffering from AD, but not psoriasis or lichen planus, have a marked reduction of Notch receptor expression in the skin. Loss of Notch in keratinocytes induces the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a cytokine deeply implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. The AD-like associated inflammation is accompanied by a myeloproliferative disorder (MPD characterized by an increase in immature myeloid populations in the bone marrow and spleen. Transplantation studies revealed that the MPD is cell non-autonomous and caused by dramatic microenvironmental alterations. Genetic studies demontrated that G-CSF mediates the MPD as well as changes in the bone marrow microenvironment leading to osteopenia.Our data demonstrate a critical role for Notch in repressing TSLP production in keratinocytes, thereby maintaining integrity of the skin and the hematopoietic system.

  18. Theobroma cacao extract attenuates the development of Dermatophagoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice.

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    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Son, Myoung-Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2017-02-01

    Cacao beans from Theobroma cacao are an abundant source of polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. Previous studies demonstrated that cacao flavanols decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in the alleviation of allergic symptoms. We sought to investigate the effects of cacao extract (CE) on Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like symptoms. CE attenuated DFE-induced AD-like symptoms as assessed by skin lesion analyses, dermatitis score, and skin thickness. Histopathological analysis revealed that CE suppressed DFE-induced immune cell infiltration into the skin. These observations occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of inflammatory markers including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E, chemokine; thymus and activation-regulated chemokine and macrophage-derived chemokine as well as the skin-derived cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and interferon-γ. CE also significantly alleviated transepidermal water loss and increased skin hydration. These results suggest that CE, a natural phytochemical-rich food, has potential therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. The inhibitory effect of Duchesnea chrysantha extract on the development of atopic dermatitis-like lesions by regulating IgE and cytokine production in Nc/Nga mice.

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    Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, In Sik; Ryu, Ji-Sun; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yun, Chi-Young

    2012-02-01

    Duchesnea chrysantha belongs to the Rosaceae family and has been used traditionally for the treatment of various diseases in Korea and other parts of East Asia. This study examined the antiinflammatory effect of Duchesnea chrysantha extract (DcE) on atopic dermatitis in vitro and in vivo. DcE inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 in THP-1 cells and the release of IL-6 and MCP-1 in EoL-1 cells after treatment with house dust mite extract. In the in vivo experiment, Nc/Nga mice were sensitized to DNCB and then orally and dorsally administered DcE (50 mg/kg in PBS) for 3 weeks. The DcE administration significantly reduced the skin severity score when compared with the control group and inhibited the thickening of the epidermis and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the dermis. In addition, the serum IgE levels decreased markedly in the DcE-treated mice when compared with the control group. The synthesis of IL-5, IL-13, MCP-1 and eotaxin was also decreased in splenocytes of the DcE-treated group, while IFN-γ was increased in the Dc-administered group. These results may indicate that DcE attenuates the development of atopic dermatitis-like lesions by lowering the IgE and inflammatory cytokine levels, and that it is useful in drug development for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Effect of the topical application of an ethanol extract of quince seeds on the development of atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice.

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    Kawahara, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Kanako; Nakanishi, Eri; Inoue, Toshifumi; Hamauzu, Yasunori

    2017-01-31

    Quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) is a deciduous shrub belonging to the Rosaceae family. Quince seed extract has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient for its moisturizing effect. However, little is known about whether quince seed extract has therapeutic effects on keratinocyte-associated skin inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the topical application of ethanol extract of quince seeds (QSEtE) on atopic dermatitis (AD) symptoms in NC/Nga mice. The direct effect of QSEtE on keratinocytes was evaluated using the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The preliminary application of QSEtE markedly reduced house dust mite allergen-induced skin lesions. The expression of thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) in dorsal skin was downregulated. QSEtE directly suppressed the expression and production of TARC in HaCaT cells. The results suggest that the topical application of QSEtE is effective in preventing the onset of and ameliorating the atopic symptoms of keratinocyte-associated skin inflammation by suppressing TARC production in keratinocytes.

  1. Spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like symptoms in a/a ma ft/ma ft/J flaky tail mice appear early after birth.

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    Magdalini Kypriotou

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in human profilaggrin gene have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris (IV, and as a major predisposition factor for atopic dermatitis (AD. Similarly, flaky tail (a/a ma ft/ma ft/J mice were described as a model for IV, and shown to be predisposed to eczema. The aim of this study was to correlate the flaky tail mouse phenotype with human IV and AD, in order to dissect early molecular events leading to atopic dermatitis in mice and men, suffering from filaggrin deficiency. Thus, 5-days old flaky tail pups were analyzed histologically, expression of cytokines was measured in skin and signaling pathways were investigated by protein analysis. Human biopsies of IV and AD patients were analyzed histologically and by real time PCR assays. Our data show acanthosis and hyperproliferation in flaky tail epidermis, associated with increased IL1β and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP expression, and Th2-polarization. Consequently, NFκB and Stat pathways were activated, and IL6 mRNA levels were increased. Further, quantitative analysis of late epidermal differentiation markers revealed increased Small proline-rich protein 2A (Sprr2a synthesis. Th2-polarization and Sprr2a increase may result from high TSLP expression, as shown after analysis of 5-days old K14-TSLP tg mouse skin biopsies. Our findings in the flaky tail mouse correlate with data obtained from patient biopsies of AD, but not IV. We propose that proinflammatory cytokines are responsible for acanthosis in flaky tail epidermis, and together with the Th2-derived cytokines lead to morphological changes. Accordingly, the a/a ma ft/ma ft/J mouse model can be used as an appropriate model to study early AD onset associated with profilaggrin deficiency.

  2. Bathing Effects of Various Seawaters on Allergic (Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions Induced by 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene in Hairless Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong Gon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the preventive effects of four types of seawater collected in Republic of Korea on hairless mice with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB- induced allergic/atopic dermatitis (AD. The anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated by measuring tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α and interleukins (ILs. Glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide anion, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS were measured to evaluate the antioxidant effects. Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP were observed to measure the antiapoptotic effects; matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 levels were also evaluated. Mice with AD had markedly higher clinical skin severity scores and scratching behaviors; higher TNF-α and ILs (1β, 10, 4, 5, and 13 levels; higher MDA, superoxide anion, caspase-3, PARP, and MMP-9 levels; and greater iNOS activity. However, the severity of AD was significantly decreased by bathing in seawaters, but it did not influence the dermal collagen depositions and skin tissue antioxidant defense systems. These results suggest that bathing in all four seawaters has protective effects against DNCB-induced AD through their favorable systemic and local immunomodulatory effects, active cytoprotective antiapoptotic effects, inhibitory effects of MMP activity and anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects.

  3. Ethanol Extract of Sanguisorbae Radix Inhibits Mast Cell Degranulation and Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hye Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanguisorbae Radix (SR is well known as herbal medicine named “Zi-Yu” in Korea, which is the dried roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. (Rosacease. We investigated the underlying mechanism on the inhibition of atopic dermatitis (AD of an ethanol extract of SR (ESR using 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB- induced AD mice model. Oral administration of ESR significantly suppressed DNCB-induced AD-like symptoms such as scratching behavior, ear thickness, epidermal thickness, and IgE levels. To investigate the effects of ESR treatment on degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs, we measured the release of β-hexosaminidase (β-HEX, degranulation marker. ESR decreased the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells into the AD skin lesions. Furthermore, ESR significantly inhibited degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated BMMCs. We have demonstrated that ESR decreased AD symptoms in mice and inhibits degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mast cells. Our study suggests that ESR may serve as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD symptoms.

  4. Pseudolaric acid B extracted from the Chinese medicinal herb Cortex Pseudolaricis ameliorates DNFB-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Teng Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pseudolaric acid B (PB is a newly identified diterpenoid isolated from Tujinpi (Cortex Pseudolaricis. In the present study, we aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory effects of PB on atopic dermatitis (AD, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects. Methods: BALB/c mice treated with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene were orally administered with PB (10 mg∙kg-1∙d-1. After evaluating the AD score, serum levels of IgE and the mRNA expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β were measured by ELISA and qRT-PCR respectively. Results: The results showed that PB treatment significantly ameliorated the development of AD-like clinical symptoms and effectively suppressed the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, PB inhibited the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β in skin lesions, and downregulated serum IgE levels. Conclusion: The anti-inflammatory properties of PB were demonstrated using the 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced mouse model of AD-like skin lesions. Our study highlighted the potential use of PB as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammation-associated skin diseases.

  5. NOD2 and TLR2 ligands trigger the activation of basophils and eosinophils by interacting with dermal fibroblasts in atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Delong; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Qiu, Huai-Na; Dong, Jie; Cai, Zhe; Chu, Man; Hon, Kam-Lun; Tsang, Miranda Sin-Man; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei

    2016-01-01

    The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) has a unique predisposition for colonization by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), which contributes to the inflammation and grim prognosis of AD. Although the mechanism underlying the S. aureus-induced exacerbation of AD remains unclear, recent studies have found a pivotal role for pattern recognition receptors in regulating the inflammatory responses in S. aureus infection. In the present study, we used a typical mouse model of AD-like skin inflammation and found that S. aureus-associated nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligands exacerbated AD-like symptoms, which were further deteriorated by the in vivo expansion of basophils and eosinophils. Subsequent histological analyses revealed that dermal fibroblasts were pervasive in the AD-like skin lesions. Co-culture of human dermal fibroblasts with basophils and eosinophils resulted in a vigorous cytokine/chemokine response to the NOD2/TLR2 ligands and the enhanced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on the dermal fibroblasts. Basophils and eosinophils were primarily responsible for the AD-related cytokine/chemokine expression in the co-cultures. Direct intercellular contact was necessary for the crosstalk between basophils and dermal fibroblasts, while soluble mediators were sufficient to mediate the eosinophil–fibroblast interactions. Moreover, the intracellular p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathways were essential for NOD2/TLR2 ligand-mediated activation of basophils, eosinophils, and dermal fibroblasts in AD-related inflammation. This study provides the evidence of NOD2/TLR2-mediated exacerbation of AD through activation of innate immune cells and therefore sheds light on a novel mechanistic pathway by which S. aureus contributes to the pathophysiology of AD. PMID:26388234

  6. 6-Shogaol, an active compound of ginger, alleviates allergic dermatitis-like skin lesions via cytokine inhibition by activating the Nrf2 pathway

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    Park, Gunhyuk, E-mail: uranos5@kiom.re.kr [The K-herb Research Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 1672 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34054 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Dal-Seok [The K-herb Research Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 1672 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34054 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi Gi; Lee, Chang Eon [Major in Cosmeceutical Science, Division of Bio-technology and Convergence, Daegu Haany University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-ung, E-mail: ykim@dhu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Biomedical Science, Daegu Haany University (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Allergic dermatitis (AD) clinically presents with skin erythematous plaques, eruption, and elevated serum IgE, and T helper cell type 2 and 1 (Th2 and Th1) cytokine levels. 6-Shogaol [1-(4-hydroxy-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-one], a pungent compound isolated from ginger, has shown anti-inflammatory effects, but its inhibitory effects on AD are unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether 6-shogaol inhibits AD-like skin lesions and their underlying mechanism in vivo and in vitro. An AD-like response was induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) + IFN-γ in human keratinocytes or by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in mice. In vivo, 6-shogaol inhibited the development of DNCB-induced AD-like skin lesions and scratching behavior, and showed significant reduction in Th2/1-mediated inflammatory cytokines, IgE, TNF-α, IFN-γ, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, IL-1, 4, 12, and 13, cyclooxygenase-2, and nitric oxide synthase levels. In vitro, 6-shogaol inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling, and increased the levels of total glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and quinone 1 via nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation. 6-Shogaol can alleviate AD-like skin lesions by inhibiting immune mediators via regulating the ROS/MAPKs/Nrf2 signaling pathway, and may be an effective alternative therapy for AD. - Highlights: • 6-Shogaol inhibited Th2/1-mediated inflammatory mediators in vitro and in vivo. • 6-Shogaol regulated ROS/MAPKs/Nrf2 signaling pathway. • 6-Shogaol can protect against the development of AD-like skin lesions.

  7. 6-Shogaol, an active compound of ginger, alleviates allergic dermatitis-like skin lesions via cytokine inhibition by activating the Nrf2 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gunhyuk; Oh, Dal-Seok; Lee, Mi Gi; Lee, Chang Eon; Kim, Yong-ung

    2016-01-01

    Allergic dermatitis (AD) clinically presents with skin erythematous plaques, eruption, and elevated serum IgE, and T helper cell type 2 and 1 (Th2 and Th1) cytokine levels. 6-Shogaol [1-(4-hydroxy-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-one], a pungent compound isolated from ginger, has shown anti-inflammatory effects, but its inhibitory effects on AD are unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether 6-shogaol inhibits AD-like skin lesions and their underlying mechanism in vivo and in vitro. An AD-like response was induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) + IFN-γ in human keratinocytes or by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in mice. In vivo, 6-shogaol inhibited the development of DNCB-induced AD-like skin lesions and scratching behavior, and showed significant reduction in Th2/1-mediated inflammatory cytokines, IgE, TNF-α, IFN-γ, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, IL-1, 4, 12, and 13, cyclooxygenase-2, and nitric oxide synthase levels. In vitro, 6-shogaol inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling, and increased the levels of total glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and quinone 1 via nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation. 6-Shogaol can alleviate AD-like skin lesions by inhibiting immune mediators via regulating the ROS/MAPKs/Nrf2 signaling pathway, and may be an effective alternative therapy for AD. - Highlights: • 6-Shogaol inhibited Th2/1-mediated inflammatory mediators in vitro and in vivo. • 6-Shogaol regulated ROS/MAPKs/Nrf2 signaling pathway. • 6-Shogaol can protect against the development of AD-like skin lesions.

  8. Alleviation of atopic dermatitis-related symptoms by Perilla frutescens Britton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jin-Chul; Nam, Dong-Yoon; Seo, Myung Sun; Lee, Sang-Han

    2011-11-01

    To ascertain whether an aqueous fraction of Perilla frutescens Britton (PfB/af) has advantageous anti-atopic dermatitis activity, we used a 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced animal model of atopic dermatitis symptoms to investigate the effects of the extract. We performed an ear swelling assay by comparing thickness of the DNFB-induced ear, and measured the numbers of eosinophils as well as total immune cells. We analyzed the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, interleukin (IL)-31 and of the T-bet transcription factor. The results revealed that PfB/af (100 µg/ml) exhibited strong anti-atopic dermatitis activity, interceding drastic reduction (35%) of the immune response, as measured by the thickness of ear epidermis swelling, and resulting in decreased eosinophil levels (73.7%) in adjacent skin tissues. Collectively, the present results suggest that PfB/af has potential for mitigation of atopic dermatitis-like symptoms induced by DNFB in the mouse.

  9. Andrographolide suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin in phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187-activated mast cells and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like mice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CX

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chun-xiao Li,* Hua-guo Li,* Hui Zhang,* Ru-hong Cheng, Ming Li, Jian-ying Liang, Yan Gu, Bo Ling, Zhi-rong Yao, Hong Yu Department of Dermatology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP has been demonstrated to be an important immunologic factor in the pathogenesis of AD. The production of TSLP can be induced by a high level of intracellular calcium concentration and activation of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway. Andrographolide (ANDRO, a natural bicyclic diterpenoid lactone, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects in gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders through suppressing the NF-κB pathway. Objective: To explore the effect of ANDRO on the production of TSLP in human mast cells and AD mice model. Methods: We utilized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining assay to investigate the effects of ANDRO on AD. Results: ANDRO ameliorated the increase in the intracellular calcium, protein, and messenger RNA levels of TSLP induced by phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187, through the blocking of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway in human mast cell line 1 cells. ANDRO, via oral or local administration, also attenuated clinical symptoms in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced AD mice model and suppressed the levels of TSLP in lesional skin. Conclusion: Taken together, ANDRO may be a potential therapeutic agent for AD through suppressing the expression of TSLP. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, andrographolide, human mast cell

  10. Oral administration of Uncariae rhynchophylla inhibits the development of DNFB-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions via IFN-gamma down-regulation in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Young; Jung, Jung-A; Kim, Tae-Ho; Seo, Sang-Wan; Jung, Sung-Ki; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2009-04-21

    Uncariae rhynchophylla (UR) is an herb which has blood pressure lowering and anti-inflammatory effects and has been prescribed traditionally to treat stroke and vascular dementia. In the present study, we examined whether UR suppress Atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice treated with 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) under SPF conditions. The effect of UR in DNFB- treated NC/Nga mice was determined by measuring the skin symptom severity, levels of serum IgE, and of the amounts of IL-4 and IFN-gamma secreted by activated T cells in draining lymph nodes. Oral administration of UR to DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice was found to inhibit ear thickness increases and the skin lesions induced by DNFB. IFN-gamma production by CD4+ T cells from the lymph nodes of DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice was significantly inhibited by UR treatment, although levels of IL-4 and total IgE in serum were not. UR may suppress the development of AD-like dermatitis in DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice by reducing IFN-gamma production.

  11. Atopic dermatitis-like pre-Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Baranska-Rybak, Wioletta; Cegielska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    histology without presence of atypical cells). In our patients, overt Sézary syndrome developed after immunosuppressive treatment (including cyclosporine). These cases support the validity of the concept of pre-Sézary syndrome, which is a long-lasting, pre-malignant condition, and which may develop to true...

  12. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Fonacier, Luz; Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis.

  13. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed...... opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor...... atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis...

  14. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood...... may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural history, clinical features, and treatment of atopic dermatitis....

  15. Atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with atopic dermatitis often have asthma or seasonal allergies. There is often a family history of ... and solvents Sudden changes in body temperature and stress, which may ... your skin to water for as short a time as possible. Short, ...

  16. Atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Wade

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic skin disorder that can significantly impact the quality of life of affected individuals as well as their families. Although the pathogenesis of the disorder is not completely understood, it appears to result from the complex interplay between defects in skin barrier function, environmental and infectious agents, and immune abnormalities. There are no specific diagnostic tests for AD; therefore, the diagnosis is based on specific clinical criteria that take into account the patient’s history and clinical manifestations. Successful management of the disorder requires a multifaceted approach that involves education, optimal skin care practices, anti-inflammatory treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs, the use of first-generation antihistamines to help manage sleep disturbances, and the treatment of skin infections. Systemic corticosteroids may also be used, but are generally reserved for the acute treatment of severe flare-ups. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line pharmacologic treatments for AD, and evidence suggests that these agents may also be beneficial for the prophylaxis of disease flare-ups. Although the prognosis for patients with AD is generally favourable, those patients with severe, widespread disease and concomitant atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis, are likely to experience poorer outcomes.

  17. Atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidinger, Stephan; Novak, Natalija

    2016-03-12

    Atopic dermatitis (also known as atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is characterised by intense itching and recurrent eczematous lesions. Although it most often starts in infancy and affects two of ten children, it is also highly prevalent in adults. It is the leading non-fatal health burden attributable to skin diseases, inflicts a substantial psychosocial burden on patients and their relatives, and increases the risk of food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and mental health disorders. Originally regarded as a childhood disorder mediated by an imbalance towards a T-helper-2 response and exaggerated IgE responses to allergens, it is now recognised as a lifelong disposition with variable clinical manifestations and expressivity, in which defects of the epidermal barrier are central. Present prevention and treatment focus on restoration of epidermal barrier function, which is best achieved through the use of emollients. Topical corticosteroids are still the first-line therapy for acute flares, but they are also used proactively along with topical calcineurin inhibitors to maintain remission. Non-specific immunosuppressive drugs are used in severe refractory cases, but targeted disease-modifying drugs are being developed. We need to improve understanding of the heterogeneity of the disease and its subtypes, the role of atopy and autoimmunity, the mechanisms behind disease-associated itch, and the comparative effectiveness and safety of therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  19. Morus alba L. suppresses the development of atopic dermatitis induced by the house dust mite in NC/Nga mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Morus alba, a medicinal plant in Asia, has been used traditionally to treat diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia. However, the effects of M. alba extract (MAE) on atopic dermatitis have not been verified scientifically. We investigated the effects of MAE on atopic dermatitis through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods We evaluated the effects of MAE on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7, as well as thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) in HaCaT cells. In an in vivo experiment, atopic dermatitis was induced by topical application of house dust mites for four weeks, and the protective effects of MAE were investigated by measuring the severity of the skin reaction on the back and ears, the plasma levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and histamine, and histopathological changes in the skin on the back and ears. Results MAE suppressed the production of NO and PGE2 in RAW 264.7 cells, as well as TARC in HaCaT cells, in a dose-dependent manner. MAE treatment of NC/Nga mice reduced the severity of dermatitis and the plasma levels of IgE and histamine. MAE also reduced the histological manifestations of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions such as erosion, hyperplasia of the epidermis and dermis, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the skin on the back and ears. Conclusion Our results suggest that MAE has potent inhibitory effects on atopic dermatitis-like lesion and may be a beneficial natural resource for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. PMID:24755250

  20. Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, or Atopic Eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuai; Thyssen, Jacob P; Paller, Amy S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates challenges for scientific communication, patient education, and advocacy. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the relative popularity of the terms eczema, AD, and atopic eczema (AE) using global search engine volumes...

  1. Comorbidities of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review article, we summarize the current evidence about atopic dermatitis (AD)-associated comorbidities, beyond the traditional atopic and allergic conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Patients with AD may have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, certain malignancies...

  2. Atopic dermatitis 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    No, Daniel J; Amin, Mina; Egeberg, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago.......Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago....

  3. Hypereosinophilic Atopic Transverse Myelitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-06-11

    4 days ago ... Atopic transverse myelitis is a rare disorder that is defined as a ... was commenced on prednisolone and had good response to treatment. .... Atopic myelitis is more common in male sex such as .... their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed. ... useful diagnostic clue in surgical neuropathology.

  4. Stressors in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Steven; Felix, Kayla; Jorizzo, Joseph L

    2017-01-01

    As with other inflammatory skin disorders, atopic dermatitis has a tendency to cause stress and also be exacerbated by it. Patients with atopic dermatitis have several disease-associated stressors, some of which include physical discomfort due to itching and altered appearance due to flare-ups. These stressors have been shown to effect patients psychosocially by altering sleep patterns, decreasing self-esteem and interfering with interpersonal relationships. In combination with its direct effect on patients, atopic dermatitis also causes stress for parents and caregivers. Studies suggest that atopic dermatitis is strongly correlated with co-sleeping habits, which can negatively impact the health and mood of parents or caregivers. It has also been reported to interfere with the formation of a strong mother-child relationship. In order to optimize treatment for patients with atopic dermatitis, it is important to note the impact that it has on quality of life. By implementing patient counseling, sleep-targeted therapies, and the use of quality of life (QoL) indices, atopic dermatitis patients and caregivers have the potential to experience greater satisfaction with treatment.

  5. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Joong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA- induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC- γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK. These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis.

  6. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a ... in mice suggests that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type ...

  7. [Atopic dermatitis physiopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waton, J

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis has much improved over the recent years. Epidermal barrier alterations are integrated into 2 theories called inside out and outside in. They are related to complex immune abnormalities. Understanding their mechanism makes it possible to foresee new therapeutics. Moreover, environmental biodiversity, the diversity of cutaneous microbiota and genetic predispositions in atopic dermatitis lead to a new, more comprehensive theory, « the biodiversity theory », integrating epigenetics. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  8. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2011-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2009 (ADGL2009” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle.

  9. Omalizumab for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper Grønlund; Agner, Tove; Sand, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE, registered for the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria and severe allergic asthma. We present a case series of nine patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated off-label with omalizumab...

  10. Effect of probiotics on gastrointestinal symptoms and small intestinal permeability in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Benfeldt, Eva; Valerius, Niels Henrik

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether probiotic lactobacilli may alleviate small intestinal inflammation and strengthen the intestinal barrier function in children with atopic dermatitis. STUDY DESIGN: In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, probiotic lactobacilli (Lactobacillus...... placebo and r=0.53, P=.05 after active treatment). After probiotic treatment, the lactulose to mannitol ratio was lower (0.073) than after placebo (0.110, P=.001). CONCLUSIONS: Impairment of the intestinal mucosal barrier appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The study suggests...... that probiotic supplementation may stabilize the intestinal barrier function and decrease gastrointestinal symptoms in children with atopic dermatitis....

  11. Evaluation of FITC-induced atopic dermatitis-like disease in NC/Nga mice and BALB/c mice using computer-assisted stereological toolbox, a computer-aided morphometric system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Malene; Jensen, Helene Kofoed; Deleuran, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Stereological Toolbox as a stereological method, the mice were sensitized to FITC and the histological efficiency of disease induction with regard to inflammation and CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, in addition to mast cells, was evaluated. The method was validated by comparison to a conventional semiquantitative...

  12. Comorbidity in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L

    2012-03-01

    The negative impact of atopic dermatitis (AD) often extends beyond the skin. Children with AD experience increased rates of infectious, mental health, and allergic diseases compared to their non-atopic peers. The mechanisms underlying these associations remain elusive. New insights from genetic and epidermal research pinpoint the skin barrier as a primary initiator of AD. Epicutaneous sensitization represents an intriguing new model which links a disrupted skin barrier to the later development of IgE-mediated diseases in patients with AD. Recent epidemiological studies have identified new comorbidities linked to AD as well, including several mental health disorders and obesity. This manuscript reviews the recent literature regarding both classic and newly described AD comorbidities.

  13. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1992-01-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer score...

  14. Can atopic dermatitis be prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de la Fuente, E

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis has become a health problem in our setting due to its rising prevalence, impact on quality of life, associated costs, and role in the progression to other atopic diseases. Furthermore, atopic dermatitis has no definitive cure and therefore preventive measures are important. In this article, we review the latest advances in both primary prevention (reduction of the incidence of atopic dermatitis) and secondary prevention (reduction of associated morbidity and reduction of the atopic march). We analyze the different preventive strategies available, including modification of the immune system through microbial exposure, induction of immune tolerance through antigen exposure, and restoration of skin barrier function to halt the atopic march. Dermatologists need to be familiar with these strategies in order to apply them where necessary and to accurately inform patients and their relatives to prevent misguided or inappropriate actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1992-06-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer scores, and the probability of this occurring by chance in one or more patients out of 12 was 0.46. In this sample we were unable to confirm intolerance to tartrazine in 11 out of 12 patients.

  16. Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize...

  17. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1992-01-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer scores, and the probability of this occurring by chance in one or more patients out of 12 was 0.46. In this sample we were unable to confirm intolerance to tartrazine in 11 out of 12 patients. PMID:1626990

  18. [Atopic dermatitis and domestic animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M

    2000-09-01

    Several arguments are raised attributing to aeroallergens an important role in atopic dermatitis. The aeroallergens that penetrate the epidermis could be fixed by IgE on the Langerhans cells and then induce a cellular mediator reaction comparable to that of allergic contact eczema. Patch tests have been developed to evaluate the role of aeroallergens (dust mites, animal dander, etc.). Preventive anti-dust mites measures in the home of atopic patients are recommended. Eviction of domestic animals (cat, dog, etc.) or avoidance measures for animal dander in the home can produce improvement in atopic dermatitis. Oral specific immunotherapy is being validated as a treatment for this disease.

  19. Atopic dermatitis -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Evolution of conventional therapy in atopic dermatitis. Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America . 2010;30( ... D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Eczema Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  20. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Darsow (U.); A. Wollenberg (A.); D. Simon; A. Taieb; T. Werfel; A.P. Oranje (Arnold); C. Gelmetti (C.); Ã. Svensson (Ãke); M. Deleuran (M.); A.M. Calza; F. Giusti; J. Lübbe (Jann); S. Seidenari (Stefania); J. Ring (J.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDifficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for

  1. Atopic dermatitis in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Ricci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that typically occurs during childhood especially in the first year of life, with a variable frequency from 10% to 30%. Recent studies have shown that in Europe among 10-20% of children with AD suffer from this disorder also in adolescence. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a typical onset in the first years of life and with a 10- 30% prevalence among young children. AD prevalence in adolescence has been estimated around 5-15% in European countries. AD persists from childhood through adolescence in around 40% of cases and some risk factors have been identified: female sex, sensitization to inhalant and food allergens, allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, the practice of certain jobs. During adolescence, AD mainly appears on the face and neck, often associated with overinfection by Malassezia, and on the palms and soles. AD persistence during adolescence is correlated with psychological diseases such as anxiety; moreover, adolescents affected by AD might have problems in the relationship with their peers. Stress and the psychological problems represent a serious burden for adolescents with AD and cause a significant worsening of the patients’ quality of life (QoL. The pharmacological treatment is similar to other age groups. Educational and psychological approaches should be considered in the most severe cases.

  2. Qualitative vs. quantitative atopic dermatitis criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, R M; Thyssen, J P; Maibach, H I

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based on the imp...

  3. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema): An Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Arthur L.

    1962-01-01

    Atopic (spontaneous) allergies and nonatopic (induced) allergies are often confused. The meaning of these terms is definite, but the occurrence of either (in a given individual) may depend upon his autonomic nervous system control. The evidence that allergens produce the cutaneous changes in atopic dermatitis is flimsy, and neurodermatitis would be a more appropriate term since the entity falls into that pattern of skin changes. Treatment carried out, from infancy sometimes to old age, consists of careful management of the patient in the physical and emotional spheres, avoidance of external irritation and the use of a multiplicity of anti-pruritic, anti-inflammatory and sedative agents. PMID:13955448

  4. Psychological interventions in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Jan P. C.

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease that places a large burden on patients and their families. It is characterized as a chronic inflammatory disease that most commonly begins in early childhood. Prevalence is high, especially in children, and increases in western countries. Originally,

  5. The history of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Owen N; Strom, Mark A; Ladizinski, Barry; Lio, Peter A

    Fred Wise (1881-1950) and Marion Sulzberger (1895-1983) are often credited with introducing the term atopic dermatitis to dermatology in 1933. This definition was based on atopy, a term first created by Arthur Coca (1875-1959) and Robert Cooke (1880-1960) in 1923, when they recognized an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma. Despite its recent introduction into our medical lexicon, historical precursors of atopic dermatitis date back to at least as early as 69-140 ce. In this contribution, we highlight both the prominent individuals credited with shaping the disorder into our current interpretation and the suspected historical precursors of this disease and reported treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Childhood Atopic Dermatitis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Jen Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD appears to have increased dramatically over the past decades. It is generally believed that such rapid increase in prevalence cannot be explained fully by genetic factors. Environmental factors might play a role in such an increment. Children with AD are most likely to suffer considerable school absences, family stress, and health care expenditures. Because the onset of AD occurs relatively early in life, identification of early life risk factors and early management for AD to prevent the development of atopic march are of critical importance. However, there is still no consensus on coordinated prevention and management for AD in Taiwan. In this review, we discuss the specific risk factors of AD and important results of recent articles on AD from Taiwan. The management and prevention strategies of AD for Asian skin are also discussed.

  7. First observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measurement of B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$±\\atop{s}$K)/Br($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→; D$+\\atop{s}$ π-)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelmenstaedt, Johannes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measure the relative branching fraction of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K to $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-. The measurement of the relative branching fraction is performed by applying a fit in invariant mass and specific ionization to 1.2 fb-1 of Ds(φπ)X data collected with the CDF II detector in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We measure B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D± s K∓¢/B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-) = 0.107±0.019(stat)±0.008(sys). The statistical significance of the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K signal is 7.9σ. To cross-check our analysis method, we also measure B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+π-) and B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+π-) and verify that our results are in agreement with the world average.

  8. Epidemiology and natural history of atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    The atopic diseases - atopic dermatitis, asthma, and hay fever - pose a great burden to the individual and society, not least, since these diseases have reached epidemic proportions during the past decades in industrialized and, more recently, in developing countries. Whereas the prevalence...... of the atopic diseases now seems to have reached a plateau in many Western countries, they are still on the increase in the developing world. This emphasizes continuing research aimed at identifying the causes, risk factors, and natural history of these diseases. Herein, the fundamental aspects of the natural...... history and epidemiology of the atopic diseases are reviewed....

  9. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2017-04-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the “Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016” together with those for other allergic diseases.

  10. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2014-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  11. Allergic contact dermatitis: A comparison between atopic and non-atopic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, Z.; Hussain, I.; Haroon, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of ACD in atopics in comparison to non-atopics in our community. Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Departments of Dermatology, King Edward Medical College/Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 1998 to July 1999. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred and fifty patients, 34 with past or present atopic dermatitis (Group I), 88 with personal or familial atopy (Group II) and 128 non-atopic with contact dermatitis (Group III) were subjected to patch testing with European standard series. The results were interpreted according to International Contact Dermatitis Research Group guidelines. Results: Positive reactions were seen in 50%, 70.4% and 67.8% of patients in the respective groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our results suggest that atopics are equally affected with contact dermatitis as compared with non-atopics and recalcitrant cases of atopic dermatitis should be patch tested to find out aggravating factors. (author)

  12. Gene-environment interaction in atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahr, Niklas; Naeser, Vibeke; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The development of atopic diseases early in life suggests an important role of perinatal risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To study whether early-life exposures modify the genetic influence on atopic diseases in a twin population. METHODS: Questionnaire data on atopic diseases from 850....... Significant predictors of atopic diseases were identified with logistic regression and subsequently tested for genetic effect modification using variance components analysis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, prematurity (gestational age below 32 weeks) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, confidence interval (CI...... stratified by exposure status showed no significant change in the heritability of asthma according to the identified risk factors. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of children, there was no evidence of genetic effect modification of atopic diseases by several identified early-life risk factors...

  13. Contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A B; Johansen, J D; Deleuran, M

    2017-01-01

    The importance of contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis is frequently debated. Previously, patients with atopic dermatitis were believed to have a reduced ability to produce a type IV immunological response. However, this belief has been challenged and authors have highlighted the risk...... of underestimating and overlooking allergic contact dermatitis in children with atopic dermatitis. Several studies have been published aiming to shed light on this important question but results are contradictory. To provide an overview of the existing knowledge, we systematically reviewed studies that report...... frequencies of positive patch test reactions in children with atopic dermatitis. We identified 436 manuscripts of which 31 met the inclusion criteria. Although the literature is conflicting, it is evident that contact allergy is a common problem in children with atopic dermatitis....

  14. First measurement of the B$0\\atop{2}$ semileptonic branching ratio to an orbitally excited d$**\\atop{s}$ state, Br(B$0\\atop{2}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, Jason [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2007-12-08

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536)has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.5(syst) MeV/c2 via the decay mode B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX followed by D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536) → DK$0\\atop{S}$. By normalizing to the known branching ratio Br($\\bar{b}$ → D*- μ+vX) and to the number of reconstructed D* mesons with an associated identified muon, a first-ever measurement is made of the product branching ratio ($\\bar{b}$ →} D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) • Br(D$-\\atop{s1}$ → D*-K$0\\atop{S}$). Assuming that D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B$0\\atop{s}$, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) is made. Comparisons are made with theoretical expectations.

  15. Use of textiles in atopic dermatitis: care of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Patrizi, A; Bellini, F; Medri, M

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease which usually starts during the first years of life. In the management of AD, the correct approach requires a combination of multiple treatments to identify and eliminate trigger factors, and to improve the alteration of the skin barrier. In this article we try to explain the importance of skin care in the management of AD in relation to the use of textiles: they may be useful to improve disrupted skin but they are also a possible cause of triggering or worsening the lesions. Garments are in direct contact with the skin all day long, and for this reason it is important to carefully choose suitable fabrics in atopic subjects who have disrupted skin. Owing to their hygienic properties fabrics produced from natural fibres are preferential. Wool fibres are frequently used in human clothes but are irritant in direct contact with the skin. Wool fibre has frequently been shown to be irritant to the skin of atopic patients, and for this reason wool intolerance was included as a minor criterion in the diagnostic criteria of AD by Hanifin and Rajka in 1980. Cotton is the most commonly used textile for patients with AD; it has wide acceptability as clothing material because of its natural abundance and inherent properties like good folding endurance, better conduction of heat, easy dyeability and excellent moisture absorption. Silk fabrics help to maintain the body temperature by reducing the excessive sweating and moisture loss that can worsen xerosis. However, the type of silk fabric generally used for clothes is not particularly useful in the care and dressing of children with AD since it reduces transpiration and may cause discomfort when in direct contact with the skin. A new type of silk fabric made of transpiring and slightly elastic woven silk is now commercially available (Microair Dermasilk) and may be used for the skin care of children with AD. The presence of increased bacterial colonization

  16. Maternal mental health and social support: effect on childhood atopic and non-atopic asthma symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques dos Santos, Letícia; Neves dos Santos, Darci; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2012-11-01

    Atopic and non-atopic asthma have distinct risk factors and immunological mechanisms, and few studies differentiate between the impacts of psychosocial factors on the prevalence of these disease phenotypes. The authors aimed to identify whether the effect of maternal mental health on prevalence of asthma symptoms differs between atopic and non-atopic children, taking into account family social support. This is a cross-sectional study of 1013 children participating in the Social Change Allergy and Asthma in Latin America project. Psychosocial data were collected through a household survey utilising Self-Reporting Questionnaire and Medical Outcome Study Social Support Scale. Socioeconomic and wheezing information was obtained through the questionnaire of the International Study of Allergy and Asthma in Childhood, and level of allergen-specific IgE was measured to identify atopy. Polytomous logistic regression was used to estimate the association between maternal mental health, social support and atopic and non-atopic wheezing. Effect modification was evaluated through stratified polytomous regression according to social support level. Maternal mental disorder had the same impact on atopic and non-atopic wheezing, even after adjusting for confounding variables. Affective, material and informational supports had protective effects on non-atopic asthma, and there is some evidence that social supports may act as a buffer for the impact of maternal mental disorder on non-atopic wheezing. Poor maternal mental health is positively associated with wheezing, independent of whether asthma is atopic or non-atopic, but perception of high levels of social support appears to buffer this relationship in non-atopic wheezers only.

  17. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection contribute to disease exacerbation and thus justify additional antimicrobial / antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) may relieve pruritus but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength. “Eczema school” educational programs have been proven to be helpful. PMID:23663504

  18. Defining intrinsic vs. extrinsic atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-06-16

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition characterized by eczematous lesions, i.e. ill-demarcated erythematous patches and plaques. AD is commonly associated with elevated immunoglobulin E (IgE) and atopic disorders, such as asthma, hay fever, and food allergies. Rackemann and Mallory were some of the first to distinguish between asthma based on the presence ("extrinsic") or absence ("intrinsic") of allergy. This distinction has subsequently been applied to AD based on the presence ("extrinsic") or absence ("intrinsic") of increased IgE and atopic disease. Although the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic AD is widely used, it remains controversial.

  19. Management of Children with Atopic Dermatitis: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Golpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing skin disorder that affects all ages including infancy and childhood. There are many proved and unproved treatments for atopic dermatitis. Evidence Acquisition Data sources of this narrative review included studies about pediatric atopic dermatitis with the following keywords, pediatric, atopic dermatitis, immunity, acute, chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin disorder, infancy, childhood, diagnosis, management and treatment. All of the articles were written in English language with full text on management or treatment. Results Innate and adaptive immune system involved atopic dermatitis. Major characteristics of atopic dermatitis include pruritus, chronic or relapsing lesions and personal or family history of atopic disease. There is no specific treatment for atopic dermatitis. The treatment included rehydration, emollients, topical steroid, calcineurin inhibitors and immunosuppressant. Crisaborole topical ointment, a PDE4 anti-inflammatory topical agent (phase three of the research could be effective in atopic dermatitis. Conclusions Avoidance from trigger factors and emollients are basic treatments of atopic dermatitis.

  20. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  1. Atopic dermatitis: tacrolimus vs. topical corticosteroid use

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease that is characterised .... effective in the treatment of AD.5. Although ..... original steroid preparations,20 the cost-effectiveness of ... Topical corticosteroids [homepage on the Internet]. c2010.

  2. Atopic eczema and the filaggrin story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sara J; Irvine, Alan D

    2008-06-01

    The discovery that null mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are associated with atopic eczema represents the single most significant breakthrough in understanding the genetic basis of this complex disorder. The association has been replicated in multiple independent studies during the past 2 years with the use of various methodologies, from populations in Europe, the United States, and Japan. Filaggrin plays a key role in epidermal barrier function, and its association with atopic eczema emphasizes the importance of barrier dysfunction in eczema pathogenesis. This review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the role of FLG mutations in ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic eczema, and other skin disorders, with an emphasis on potential clinical applications. Further research is needed to clarify the precise role of filaggrin in skin and systemic atopic disease, to pave the way for novel therapeutic interventions.

  3. Current understanding in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess McPherson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been advances in our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of atopic eczema over the past few decades. This article examines the multiple factors which are implicated in this process.

  4. ATOPIC DERMATITIS: NEW ASPECTS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease, which demands a prolonged treatment. A modern views on the main approaches to treatment of atopic dermatitis in children and adults are analyzed in this article. The treatment is based on the permanent use of emollients in order to achieve an anti-inflammatory effect — topical calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, and short courses (5 days of topical corticosteroids during relapses. For the 10-year period of topical calcineurin inhibitors usage in treatment of atopic dermatitis a great amount of experimental and clinical data have been accumulated. Two the most important changes and additions in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in recent times were related to a new hypothesis of proactive therapy with the use of topical tacrolimus and closing of «black box» warnings, associated to malignization risk due to the long-term usage of topical calcineurin inhibitors. Since atopic dermatitis is characterized by relapsing course, nowadays topical tacrolimus should be considered the most appropriate treatment approach, both in adults and children. The results of investigations confirmed more than 6-times decrease in relapse rate, as well as the significant improvement of quality of life, when the above-mentioned treatment scheme is used, both in children and adults.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, emollients, treatment, tacrolimus.

  5. Probiotics and infantile atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akelma AZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Zülfikar Akelma,1 Aziz Alper Biten2 1Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Unit, Ankara Kecioren Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 2General Directorate of Management Services, Republic of Turkey Ministry of Health, Ankara, Turkey Abstract: Pediatric eczema is a common disease which causes economic and social burden. Its incidence differs among the societies, with an incidence reported to reach up to 20% in developed countries. Eczema is the first allergic disease seen in the childhood, and it is recognized as a precursor for the development of atopic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy in the forthcoming years of children. Increased incidence of eczema in recent years has led to new research in epidemiology, prevention, and intervention of this disease. It is no doubt important to treat itching, rash, and excoriation of the skin; however, treatment of pediatric eczema should not be considered only as a treatment of skin lesions. Considering skin treatment as the tip of the iceberg, proper management of the allergic processes can be accepted as the rest of the iceberg. The role of probiotics in the prevention of atopic eczema is yet to be clarified. Evidence presented by existing studies suggesting that probiotics may prevent pediatric eczema is not strong enough. A positive effect, if any, may be related with onset time, dose, duration, and use of specific probiotics. To date, there is no strong evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of eczema; however, administration of probiotics in breast-feeding mothers in the prenatal period and in infants in the postnatal period can be accepted as a safe and helpful option in the prevention of eczema. Nevertheless, there are still questions to be answered in the future about probiotic administration for eczema. Clinical use of probiotics will gradually become more widespread when these questions are answered. Based on current information, the administration

  6. Chemokine RANTES in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, J; Rogala, B

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines play a key role in inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate chemokine RANTES in the sera of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to analyze the correlation between RANTES serum level and the immunological and clinical parameters of the disease. Serum levels of RANTES (ELISA; R&D Systems), total IgE and specific IgE (FEIA; Pharmacia CAP System) were estimated in 24 patients with AD, 28 patients with pollinosis (PL) and 22 healthy nonatopic subjects (HC). The division of the AD group into a pure AD (pAD) subgroup, without a coexisting respiratory allergy, and a subgroup of patients with AD and a respiratory allergy (AD+AO) was done according to Wütrich. Levels of RANTES were higher in the AD group than in the HC group and the PL group. RANTES levels did not differ among subgroups with various clinical scores and between the pAD and AD+AO subgroups. There were no correlations between levels of RANTES and total IgE. Significant positive correlations between serum levels of RANTES and Dermatophagoides farinae and cat dander-specific IgE were found in the AD group. We conclude that the serum level of chemokine RANTES differs patients with AD from patients with PL. The increase of RANTES concentration in the serum of patients with AD depends neither on a clinical picture nor an IgE system.

  7. Topical tacrolimus for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury Martins, Jade; Martins, Ciro; Aoki, Valeria; Gois, Aecio F T; Ishii, Henrique A; da Silva, Edina M K

    2015-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) (or atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects children and adults and has an important impact on quality of life. Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are the first-line therapy for this condition; however, they can be associated with significant adverse effects when used chronically. Tacrolimus ointment (in its 2 manufactured strengths of 0.1% and 0.03%) might be an alternative treatment. Tacrolimus, together with pimecrolimus, are drugs called topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs). To assess the efficacy and safety of topical tacrolimus for moderate and severe atopic dermatitis compared with other active treatments. We searched the following databases up to 3 June 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library (Issue 5, 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), and the Global Resource of Eczema Trials (GREAT database). We searched six trials registers and checked the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We contacted specialists in the field for unpublished data.A separate search for adverse effects of topical tacrolimus was undertaken in MEDLINE and EMBASE on 30 July 2013. We also scrutinised the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) websites for adverse effects information. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (both children and adults) using topical tacrolimus at any dose, course duration, and follow-up time compared with other active treatments. Two authors independently screened and examined the full text of selected studies for compliance with eligibility criteria, risk of bias, and data extraction. Our three prespecified primary outcomes were physician's assessment, participant's self-assessment of improvement, and adverse effects. Our secondary outcomes included assessment of improvement of the disease by validated or objective measures, such as

  8. Mixing and CP violation in the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson system at CDF; Mélange et violation de CP dans le système des mésons B$0\\atop{s}$ à CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero [Univ. of Paris VI-VII (France)

    2008-01-01

    The two analyses presented in the thesis, the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ angular analysis, share most of the technical implementations and features. Thus, my choice was to pursue in parallel the common aspects of the analyses, avoiding, whenever possible, repetitions. Each Chapter is split in two parts, the first one dedicated to the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the second one describing the angular analysis on the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode. They are organized as follows. In Chapter 1 we present the theoretical framework of the B$0\\atop{s}$ neutral mesons system. After a general introduction on the Standard Model, we focus on the quantities which are relevant to the Δms measurement and the CP violation phenomena, underlying the details concerning the study of pseudo-scalar to vector vector decays, P → VV, which allow to carry out an angular analysis. A discussion on the implication of the measurements performed in the search of physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. The accelerator facilities and the CDF-II detector are reported in Chapter 2. While describing the detector, more emphasis is given to the components fundamental to perform B physics analyses at CDF. The Chapter 3 is focused on the reconstruction and selection of the data samples. The Chapter starts with a description of the on-line trigger requirements, according to the B$0\\atop{s}$ sample considered, followed by the offline selection criteria implemented to reconstruct B$0\\atop{s}$ semileptonic and hadronic decays, fully and partially reconstructed, for the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis, as well as the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode for the angular analysis. The subsequent Chapter 4 is dedicated to the revision of the technical ingredients needed in the final analyses. The B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing elements are firstly described. The methodology historically used in the oscillation searches, the 'amplitude scan', is here

  9. Advances in pediatric asthma and atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Shabnam; Thyagarajan, Ananth; Stone, Kelly D

    2005-10-01

    Allergic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, food allergy, and urticaria are common in general pediatric practice. This review highlights several significant advances in pediatric allergy over the past year, focusing on asthma and atopic dermatitis. With increasing options for the treatment of allergic diseases, much work is now focused on methods for individualizing treatments to a patient's phenotype and genotype. Progress over the past year includes the characterization of effects of regular albuterol use in patients with genetic variations in the beta-adrenergic receptor. Maintenance asthma regimens for children in the first years of life are also an ongoing focus. The relation between upper airway allergic inflammation and asthma has continued to accumulate support and now extends to the middle ear. Environmental influences on asthma and interventions have been described, including environmental controls for asthma and the role of air pollution on lung development in children. Finally, concerns have been raised regarding the use of topical immunomodulators in young children with atopic dermatitis. Progress continues in the care of children with atopic diseases. Attention to treatment with appropriate medications, patient-individualized environmental controls, and extensive education are the keys to successfully treating atopic children. This review highlights several recent advances but is not intended to be a comprehensive review.

  10. Risk factors for atopic and non-atopic asthma in a rural area of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Ana Lucia; Vaca, Maritza; Oviedo, Gisela; Erazo, Silvia; Quinzo, Isabel; Fiaccone, Rosemeire L; Chico, Martha E; Barreto, Mauricio L; Cooper, Philip J

    2010-05-01

    BACKGROUND Asthma has emerged as an important public health problem of urban populations in Latin America. Epidemiological data suggest that a minority of asthma cases in Latin America may be associated with allergic sensitisation and that other mechanisms causing asthma have been overlooked. The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for atopic and non-atopic asthma in school-age children. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted among 3960 children aged 6-16 years living in Afro-Ecuadorian rural communities in Esmeraldas province in Ecuador. Allergic diseases and risk factors were assessed by questionnaire and allergic sensitisation by allergen skin prick reactivity. RESULTS A total of 390 (10.5%) children had wheeze within the previous 12 months, of whom 14.4% had at least one positive skin test. The population-attributable fraction for recent wheeze associated with atopy was 2.4%. Heavy Trichuris trichiura infections were strongly inversely associated with atopic wheeze. Non-atopic wheeze was positively associated with maternal allergic symptoms and sedentarism (watching television (>3 h/day)) but inversely associated with age and birth order. CONCLUSIONS The present study showed a predominance of non-atopic compared with atopic wheeze among schoolchildren living in a poor rural region of tropical Latin America. Distinct risk factors were associated with the two wheeze phenotypes and may indicate different causal mechanisms. Future preventive strategies in such populations may need to be targeted at the causes of non-atopic wheeze.

  11. Systematic review of treatments for atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, C; Li Wan Po, A; Williams, H

    2000-01-01

    Atopic eczema is the commonest inflammatory skin disease of childhood, affecting 15-20% of children in the UK at any one time. Adults make up about one-third of all community cases. Moderate-to-severe atopic eczema can have a profound effect on the quality of life for both sufferers and their families. In addition to the effects of intractable itching, skin damage, soreness, sleep loss and the social stigma of a visible skin disease, other factors such as frequent visits to doctors, special clothing and¿the need to constantly apply messy topical applications all add to the burden of disease. The cause of atopic eczema is unknown, though a genetic pre-disposition and a combination of allergic and non-allergic factors appear to be important in determining disease expression. Treatment of atopic eczema in the UK is characterised by a profusion of treatments aimed at disease control. The evidential basis of these treatments is often unclear. Most people with atopic eczema are managed in primary care where the least research has been done. The objectives of this scoping review are two-fold. To produce an up-to-date coverage 'map' of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of treatments of atopic eczema. To assist in making treatment recommendations by summarising the available RCT evidence using qualitative and quantitative methods. Data sources included electronic searching of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register, the Cochrane Skin Group specialised register of trials, hand-searching of atopic eczema conference proceedings, follow-up of references in retrieved articles, contact with leading researchers and requests to relevant pharmaceutical companies. Only RCTs of therapeutic agents used in the prevention and treatment of people with atopic eczema of any age were considered for inclusion. Only studies where a physician diagnosed atopic eczema or atopic dermatitis were included. Data extraction was conducted by two observers onto abstraction

  12. Probiotic bacteria for prevention of atopic diseases: design and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, L.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic diseases such as (atopic) eczema, food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis are common diseases. The cumulative incidence during childhood is estimated to be 20 to 30%. In countries with a so called ‘’Western lifestyle’’ an increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases has been observed

  13. Topical cyclosporine for atopic keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, Julio J; López-Alcalde, Jesús; Morcillo Laiz, Rafael; Fernández Buenaga, Roberto; Rebolleda Fernández, Gema

    2012-09-12

    Atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) is a chronic ocular surface non-infectious inflammatory condition that atopic dermatitis patients may suffer at any time point in the course of their dermatologic disease and is independent of its degree of severity. AKC is usually not self resolving and it poses a higher risk of corneal injuries and severe sequelae. Management of AKC should prevent or treat corneal damage. Although topical corticosteroids remain the standard treatment for patients with AKC, prolonged use may lead to complications. Topical cyclosporine A (CsA) may improve AKC signs and symptoms, and be used as a corticosteroid sparing agent. To determine the efficacy and gather evidence on safety from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of topical CsA in patients with AKC. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 6), MEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2012), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (January 1937 to July 2012), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en), the IFPMA Clinical Trials Portal (http://clinicaltrials.ifpma.org/no_cache/en/myportal/index.htm) and Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 9 July 2012. We also handsearched the following conference proceedings: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, International Council of Opthalmology and Societas

  14. Association of atopic dermatitis with smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, Robert; Kim, Ashley; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco exposure might be a modifiable risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: We examine the association between AD and exposure to tobacco smoke. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies (n = 86) in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus...

  15. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M.F.; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods Nationwide health registers were...

  16. Novel investigational therapies for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, Kristina Sophie; Jemec, Gregor Be

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease. Although most patients are well served by existing therapies, a subset of patients with severe AD are still not adequately treated. An improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms behind the disease has led to the development...

  17. Use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drucker, A M; Eyerich, K; de Bruin-Weller, M S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines discourage the use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis (AD), but their use remains widespread. OBJECTIVES: To reach consensus among an international group of AD experts on the use of systemic corticosteroids for AD. METHODS: A survey consisting of statements...

  18. Is atopic dermatitis associated with obesity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte; Agner, Tove

    2018-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with atopic dermatitis (AD), however the results have been conflicting. Our aim was to provide an update on current knowledge from observational studies addressing the possible association between obesity and AD. Systematic literature review was performed by identifying...

  19. A study of atopic diseases in Basrah

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... The patients were divided into three age stages as shown in. Table 1. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. From 174 patients 68 (39.08%) patients suffer with atopic dermatitis followed by bronchial asthma with 59 cases. (33.90%) and allergic rhinitis with 47 cases (27.01%). (Table 2). Table 3 shows that more ...

  20. [Allergy testing in atopic dermatitis: often unnecessary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J.L.; Damoiseaux, R.A.; Lucassen, P.L.; Pasmans, S.G.; Bruin-Weller, M. de; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease from which many children and adults suffer. In the Netherlands, the majority of patients with AD are treated in the primary health care setting. There is no clear consensus about whether or not to conduct allergy testing in patients with

  1. Lithosphere erosion atop mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.

    2012-12-01

    rejuvenation of the lithosphere. The onset time and the vigor of SSC and, hence, the new equilibrium thermal state of the lithosphere atop the plume wake depends on the Rayleigh number (Ra) in the unstable layer at the base of the lithosphere, which is controlled by the temperature anomaly and rheology in the plume-fed layer. For vigorous, hot plumes, SSC onset times do not depend on plate velocity. For more sluggish plumes, SSC onset times decrease with increasing plate velocity. This behavior is explained by differences in the thermal structure of the lithosphere, due to variations in the spreading behavior of the plume material at the lithosphere base. Reduction of the viscosity in partial molten areas and decrease in density of the depleted residuum enhance the vigor of small-scale convection in the plume-fed low-viscosity layer at the lithosphere base, leading to more effective erosion of the base of the lithosphere.

  2. Alleviating energy poverty: Indian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Garima

    2010-09-15

    Energy services play an important role in human welfare. India faces acute energy poverty indicating lack of access of clean energy fuels. Access to electricity is limited to 56% households in India and about 89% of rural households depend on polluting energy sources. Energy poverty impacts income poverty as poor find it difficult to acquire high priced cleaner fuels. It also adversely impacts the socio economic conditions of women. The paper highlights the linkage of energy poverty with income poverty and gender inequality. It analyses measures taken to alleviate energy poverty and recommends regulatory and policy measures as way forward.

  3. Recent studies of cutaneous nociception in atopic and non-atopic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, G R; Hornstein, O P

    1999-02-01

    Itching reflects a distinct quality of cutaneous nociception elicited by chemical or other stimuli to neuronal receptors at the superficial layers of the skin and muco-cutaneous orifices. Although recent experimental studies of the conduction and perception of itch have yielded deeper insight into the physiology of this sensory quality, little is known about the neuromechanisms involved in pruritus accompanying many inflammatory skin diseases, in particular, in atopic eczema. Previous case-control studies of our research group with patients suffering from atopic eczema (AE) revealed significantly diminished itch perception after iontophoretic application of different doses of histamine as well as substance P (i.c. injected). Further experiments using acetylcholine (ACh, i.c.) clearly demonstrated that ACh elicits pruritus instead of pain in patients with AE. The first part of the present review deals with the results of our most recent case-control studies on histamine-induced itch perception in atopics devoid of eczema as well as in patients with urticaria or psoriasis compared to atopics with or without manifest eczema. We demonstrated that both focal itch and perifocal alloknesis (i.e., itch elicited by a slight mechanical, otherwise non-itching stimulus) were significantly reduced in eczema-free atopics yet were normal in non-atopics suffering from urticaria or psoriasis. In further studies using ACh i.c. injected into the uninvolved skin of patients with AE, lichen ruber, psoriasis, type IV contact eczema, or non-specific nummular eczema (n = 10/each group), all the atopics and 6/10 psoriatics felt itch instead of burning pain, but none of the others did. Different doses of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) i.c. applied to the controls and the atopics with or without eczema did not markedly increase the intensity of nociceptive sensations. However, ACh induced pain in the controls, pure pruritus in the atopics with acute eczema, and a 'mixture' of pain and

  4. First observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K and measurement of the relative branching fraction B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$±\\atop{s}$ K)/B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$+\\atop{s}$ π-).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelmenstaedt, Johannes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ and measure the relative branching fraction of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ to $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-. The measurement of the relative branching fraction is performed by applying a fit in invariant mass and specific ionization to 1.2 fb-1 of Ds(φπ)X data collected with the CDF II detector in pp collisions at √ s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We measure B $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ /B $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π- = 0.107±0.019(stat)±0.008(sys). The statistical significance of the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K signal is 7.9σ. To cross-check our analysis method, we also measure B $\\bar{B0}$→ D+K- /B $\\bar{B0}$ → D+π- and B $\\bar{B0}$ → D+*K- /B $\\bar{B0}$ → D*+π- and verify that our results are in agreement with the world average.

  5. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2012-01-01

    Jäderberg I, Thomsen SF, Kyvik KO, Skytthe A, Backer V. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2012; 26: 140-145. We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted...... reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression...... and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0...

  6. Current management of atopic dermatitis and interruption of the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguniewicz, Mark; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Hultsch, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    Treatment of atopic dermatitis requires a comprehensive approach that includes evaluation of potential triggers and education of the patient and family regarding proper avoidance measures. Hydration of the skin and maintenance of an intact skin barrier remain integral to proper management. Although topical corticosteroids have been a mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy, the newer topical calcineurin inhibitors offer advantages for treatment of this chronic, relapsing disease. Studies aimed at defining optimal combination therapy and early intervention might change the treatment paradigm for atopic dermatitis.

  7. Poverty Alleviation Programmes in Nigeria: Reflections on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In it, we have argued that past poverty alleviation policies and programmes have been elitist and non-participatory, especially by the target population. In most cases the designs for poverty alleviations are characterized by improper conceptualization, grandiosity and lack of social justice even in implementation. Based on ...

  8. Gentle cleansing and moisturizing for patients with atopic dermatitis and sensitive skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Wai Kwong

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common condition characterized by pruritus, inflammation, and dryness of the skin. Inflammation disrupts the barrier function of the stratum corneum, predisposing the skin to be dry, and increases susceptibility to irritants and secondary bacterial infection. Sensitive skin is common, reported by 40-50% of women and 30% of men in the US, Europe, and Japan. Basic requirements in managing eczema and sensitive skin include effective cleansers that do not compromise skin barrier integrity, alleviation of skin dryness, and restoration of skin barrier function through the use of therapeutic moisturizers. The selection of a skin cleanser is therefore an important part of managing these conditions. Studies have reported clinical improvement with the use of soap-free cleansers in combination with topical treatments. While topical corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents are mainstays of treatment for atopic dermatitis, therapeutic moisturizers are important adjuncts. Moisturizers improve skin hydration, reduce susceptibility to irritation, restore the integrity of the stratum corneum, and enhance the efficacy of topical corticosteroids.

  9. Homeopathy in paediatric atopic diseases: long-term results in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elio; Bartoli, Paola; Bianchi, Alba; Da Frè, Monica

    2012-01-01

    To study the socio-demographic features, the prescribed remedies and the outcome of atopic diseases in children treated with homeopathy at the Homeopathic Clinic of Lucca (Italy), and the long-term outcome of children suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) after an approximate 8-year period (range 5-10 years). Our data derive from an observational longitudinal study carried out on 213 children (38.6%) with atopic diseases out of 551 children consecutively examined from September 1998 to December 2008. We used the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital Outcome Score to evaluate the results that were classified on the basis of a Likert scale. Eighty-three (39%) children were affected by asthma, 51 (24%) by allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, 76 (36%) by AD and 3 (1%) by food intolerance. Follow-up patients were 104 (48.8%), and 65 (62.5%) of them reported a major improvement or resolution. The parents of paediatric patients suffering from AD, who had started homeopathic treatment at homeopathy in atopic children. Furthermore, according to the data from the literature paediatric patients treated with homeopathy seem to show a reduced tendency to maintain AD and develop asthma (and allergic rhinitis) in adult age. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HSP: bystander antigen in atopic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost A Aalberse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years insight in the complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity in the regulation of an inflammatory response has increased enormously. This has revived the interest in stress proteins; proteins that are expressed during cell stress. As these proteins can attract and trigger an immunological response they can act as important mediators in this interaction. In this respect, of special interest are proteins that may act as modulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are stress proteins that have these, and more, characteristics. More than two decades of studies on HSPs has revealed that they are part of intrinsic, natural mechanisms that steer inflammation. This has provoked comprehensive explorations of the role of HSPs in various human inflammatory diseases.Most studies have focused on classical autoimmune diseases. This has led to the development of clinical studies with HSPs that have shown promise in Phase II/III clinical trials. Remarkably, only very little is yet known of the role of HSPs in atopic diseases. In allergic disease a number of studies have investigated the possibility that allergen-specific regulatory T cell (Treg function is defective in individuals with allergic diseases. This raises the question whether methods can be identified to improve the Treg repertoire. Studies from other inflammatory diseases have suggested HSPs may have such a beneficial effect on the T cell repertoire. Based on the immune mechanisms of atopic diseases, in this review we will argue that, as in other human inflammatory conditions, understanding immunity to HSPs is likely also relevant for atopic diseases. Specifically, we will discuss why certain HSPs such as HSP60 connect the immune response to environmental antigens with regulation of the inflammatory response.Thus they provide a molecular link that may eventually even help to better understand the immune pathological basis of the hygiene

  11. Harnessing motivation to alleviate neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eRussell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of spatial neglect results from the combination of a number of deficits in attention, with patients demonstrating both spatially lateralised and non-lateralised impairments. Previous reports have hinted that there may be a motivational component to neglect and that modulating this might alleviate some of the debilitating symptoms. Additionally, recent work on the effects of reward on attention in healthy participants has revealed improvements across a number of paradigms. As the primary deficit in neglect has been associated with attention, this evidence for reward’s effects is potentially important. However, until very recently there have been few empirical studies addressing this potential therapeutic avenue. Here we review the growing body of evidence that attentional impairments in neglect can be reduced by motivation, for example in the form of preferred music or anticipated monetary reward, and discuss the implications of this for treatments for these patients. Crucially these effects of positive motivation are not observed in all patients with neglect, suggesting that the consequences of motivation may relate to individual lesion anatomy. Given the key role of dopaminergic systems in motivational processes, we suggest that motivational stimulation might act as a surrogate for dopaminergic stimulation. In addition, we consider the relationship between clinical post stroke apathy and lack of response to motivation.

  12. Atopic and Contact Dermatitis of the Vulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita

    2017-09-01

    Pruritus, or itch, is a common vulvar complaint that is often treated empirically as a yeast infection; however, yeast infections are just one of the many conditions that can cause vulvar itch. Ignoring other conditions can prolong pruritus unnecessarily. Atopic dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, and allergic contact dermatitis are extremely common noninfectious causes of vulvar itch that are often underdiagnosed by nondermatologists. Identifying these conditions and treating them appropriately can significantly improve a patient's quality of life and appropriately decrease health care expenditures by preventing unnecessary additional referrals or follow-up visits and decreasing pharmaceutical costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan; Egeberg, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have an altered prevalence or risk for contact sensitization. Increased exposure to chemicals in topical products together with impaired skin barrier function suggest a higher risk, whereas the immune profile suggests a lower...... contact dermatitis is suspected....... risk. OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between AD and contact sensitization. METHODS: The PubMed/Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for articles that reported on contact sensitization in individuals with and without AD. RESULTS...

  14. Daily intake of Jeju groundwater improves the skin condition of the model mouse for human atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akane; Jung, Kyungsook; Matsuda, Akira; Jang, Hyosun; Kajiwara, Naoki; Amagai, Yosuke; Oida, Kumiko; Ahn, Ginnae; Ohmori, Keitaro; Kang, Kyung-goo; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    Drinking water is an important nutrient for human health. The mineral ingredients included in drinking water may affect the physical condition of people. Various kinds of natural water are in circulation as bottled water in developed countries; however, its influence on clinical conditions of patients with certain diseases has not been fully evaluated. In this study, effects of the natural groundwater from Jeju Island on clinical symptoms and skin barrier function in atopic dermatitis (AD) were evaluated. NC/Tnd mice, a model for human AD, with moderate to severe dermatitis were used. Mice were given different natural groundwater or tap water for 8 weeks from 4 weeks of age. Clinical skin severity scores were recorded every week. Scratching analysis and measurement of transepidermal water loss were performed every other week. The pathological condition of the dorsal skin was evaluated histologically. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed for cytokine expression in the affected skin. The epidermal hyperplasia and allergic inflammation were reduced in atopic mice supplied with Jeju groundwater when compared to those supplied with tap water or other kinds of natural groundwater. The increase in scratching behavior with the aggravation of clinical severity of dermatitis was favorably controlled. Moreover, transepidermal water loss that reflects skin barrier function was recovered. The early inflammation and hypersensitivity in the atopic skin was alleviated in mice supplied with Jeju groundwater, suggesting its profitable potential on the daily care of patients with skin troubles including AD. © 2013 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. In vivo evaluation of therapeutic options in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldhoff, Jantje Maria

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD, or atopic eczema) is an inflammatory itchy skin disease. AD patients often have high serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, T-cell activation and eosinophilia in peripheral blood. The dermal infiltrate of AD contains mainly T-cells, eosinophils and dendritic cells. Epicutaneous

  16. Investigations on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosje, Pieternella Janna

    2002-01-01

    The term atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly used in cats. At present, however, there is little known about the pathogenesis of feline AD. The aim was to investigate various aspects of the immunopathogenesis in a defined group of cats with signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis and compare our

  17. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C

    2015-01-01

    allergic rhinitis and hand eczema. A close association was also found with allergic contact dermatitis and increased specific IgE to Malassezia furfur, but not with filaggrin gene defect. CONCLUSION: Persistence of atopic dermatitis in adulthood is common and affects quality of life. Persistent atopic...

  18. Atopic diseases and the risk of developing ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azim, Samman; Hak, Eelko; Bos, Jens H.J.; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although auto-immune diseases and atopic diseases seem to be caused by different malfunctions in the immunological pathways, there is an increasing body of evidence for cross regulation between the two pathways. Research showed that patients suffering from atopic diseases are at greater

  19. Treating pediatric atopic dermatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriades VR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Victoria R Dimitriades, Elizabeth Wisner Division of Allergy/Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Children's Hospital of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition which affects millions of people worldwide. It is most commonly seen in children but may also progress into adulthood. Management of this complex disease requires a multi-pronged approach which can address the myriad of issues which underscore its development. Avoidance of triggering factors is imperative in establishing consistent control of skin irritation while daily moisturization can be very effective in skin barrier repair and maintenance. Judicious use of anti-inflammatory medications has been shown to make a significant impact on both treatment as well as prevention of disease. Unfortunately, pruritus, a key feature of AD, has proven much harder to control. Finally, awareness of the risks of colonization and infection in patients with AD should be incorporated into their surveillance and management plans. While our understanding has progressed greatly regarding this disease, further research is still needed regarding future directions for both treatment and prevention. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, eczema, treatment, corticosteroids, antipruritic

  20. Topical steroid addiction in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukaya M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mototsugu Fukaya,1 Kenji Sato,2 Mitsuko Sato,3 Hajime Kimata,4 Shigeki Fujisawa,5 Haruhiko Dozono,6 Jun Yoshizawa,7 Satoko Minaguchi8 1Tsurumai Kouen Clinic, Nagoya, 2Department of Dermatology, Hannan Chuo Hospital, Osaka, 3Sato Pediatric Clinic, Osaka, 4Kimata Hajime Clinic, Osaka, 5Fujisawa Dermatology Clinic, Tokyo, 6Dozono Medical House, Kagoshima, 7Yoshizawa Dermatology Clinic, Yokohama, 8Department of Dermatology, Kounosu Kyousei Hospital, Saitama, Japan Abstract: The American Academy of Dermatology published a new guideline regarding topical therapy in atopic dermatitis in May 2014. Although topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome had been mentioned as possible side effects of topical steroids in a 2006 review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, no statement was made regarding this illness in the new guidelines. This suggests that there are still controversies regarding this illness. Here, we describe the clinical features of topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome, based on the treatment of many cases of the illness. Because there have been few articles in the medical literature regarding this illness, the description in this article will be of some benefit to better understand the illness and to spur discussion regarding topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome. Keywords: topical steroid addiction, atopic dermatitis, red burning skin syndrome, rebound, corticosteroid, eczema

  1. Phenotypic analysis of perennial airborne allergen-specific CD4+ T cells in atopic and non-atopic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crack, L R; Chan, H W; McPherson, T; Ogg, G S

    2011-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD); yet, little is known of the differentiation status of CD4+ T cells specific for common environmental allergens, such as the major cat allergen, Fel d 1. To determine the frequency, differentiation phenotype and function of circulating Fel d 1-specific CD4+ T cells in adult individuals with severe persistent AD in comparison with healthy controls. Using HLA class II tetrameric complexes based on a HLA-DPB1*0401-restricted Fel d 1 epitope, ex vivo and cultured T cell frequency and phenotype were analysed in individuals with AD and healthy controls. Cytokine secretion was measured by ex vivo and cultured IL-4 and IFN-γ ELISpots. Ex vivo Fel d 1-specific DPB1*0401-restricted CD4+ T cells in both atopics and non-atopics express high levels of CCR7, CD62L, CD27 and CD28, placing the cells largely within the central memory subgroup. However, the functional phenotype was distinct, with greater IL-4 production from the cells derived from atopics, which correlated with disease severity. Circulating Fel d 1-specific DPB1*0401-restricted CD4+ T cells in both atopic and non-atopic donors maintain a central memory phenotype; however in atopics, the cells had greater Th2 effector function, compatible with a disease model of altered antigen delivery in atopic individuals. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Measurement of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$π- branching ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Yi [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$π- branching ratio in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 65 pb-1 data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).

  3. Poverty Alleviation Programmes and Economic Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poverty Alleviation Programmes and Economic Development in Nigeria: A Comparative Assessment of Asa and Ilorin West Local ... Journal Home > Vol 3, No 4 (2009) > ... and worst hit income inequality group with about 84percent of total

  4. Exercise alleviates depression related systemic inflammation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exercise alleviates depression related systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. ... African Health Sciences ... Currently, physical activity is an important lifestyle factor that has the potential to modify inflammatory ...

  5. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke

    2012-03-01

    We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0.773 respectively) compared with children born after spontaneous conception. Assisted reproduction did not modify the heritability of atopic diseases. This study does not support an association between assisted reproduction and development of atopic diseases. This result must be confirmed in subsequent studies, preferably of singleton populations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Plasma and skin vitamin E concentrations in canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevnik Kapun, Alja; Salobir, Janez; Levart, Alenka; Tavčar Kalcher, Gabrijela; Nemec Svete, Alenka; Kotnik, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Altered homeostasis of vitamin E has been demonstrated in human atopic dermatitis. Data on plasma and skin vitamin E concentrations in canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) are not available. To determine vitamin E concentrations in plasma and skin of atopic dogs. Vitamin E concentrations in plasma and full-thickness skin biopsies of 15 atopic dogs were related to CAD extent and severity index (CADESI-03) scores and compared to the equivalent concentrations in 17 healthy dogs. Statistically significant differences of measured parameters between the two groups were determined by the nonparametric Mann Whitney U test and correlations between CADESI-03 scores and vitamin E concentrations were evaluated by the Spearman rank test. A value of P vitamin E were significantly lower in atopic dogs than in healthy dogs, with median values of 29.8 and 52.9 μmol/L, respectively. Skin vitamin E values did not differ significantly between patients and healthy controls. The median concentration of skin vitamin E in atopic dogs was higher than that in healthy dogs. No significant correlations were found between CADESI-03 score and plasma vitamin E or skin vitamin E concentrations. Significantly lower plasma vitamin E concentrations in atopic dogs than in healthy controls indicate altered homeostasis of vitamin E in CAD. Further investigation into vitamin E supplementation in CAD is warranted.

  7. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Gelbard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Gelbard1, Adelaide A Hebert1,21Departments of Dermatology; 2Pediatrics, University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids are first-line treatment for atopic dermatitis, and recent advances in vehicle technologies have resulted in improved patient tolerability and compliance. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are also safe and effective topical treatments for atopic dermatitis, and provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with this disease. Systemic immunomodulators are used in the treatment of severe refractory disease. Cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and interferon gamma have been used in the management of severe atopic dermatitis. This review highlights the current and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IFN-γ

  8. Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Gyohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the industrialized world and has multiple causes. Over the past decade, data from both experimental models and patients have highlighted the primary pathogenic role of skin barrier deficiency in patients with AD. Increased access of environmental agents into the skin results in chronic inflammation and contributes to the systemic "atopic (allergic) march." In addition, persistent skin inflammation further attenuates skin barrier function, resulting in a positive feedback loop between the skin epithelium and the immune system that drives pathology. Understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier maintenance is essential for improving management of AD and limiting downstream atopic manifestations. In this article we review the latest developments in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of skin barrier deficiency, with a particular focus on the formation of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, which contributes significantly to skin barrier function. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, Eric L; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Flohr, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    -specific literature review, referred to guidelines when available, and provided interpretation and expert opinion. RESULTS: We recommend a systematic and holistic approach to assess patients with severe signs and symptoms of AD and impact on quality of life before systemic therapy. Steps taken before commencing......BACKGROUND: Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To guide those considering use of systemic...... therapy in AD and provide a framework for evaluation before making this therapeutic decision with the patient. METHODS: A subgroup of the International Eczema Council determined aspects to consider before prescribing systemic therapy. Topics were assigned to expert reviewers who performed a topic...

  10. Complementary and alternative interventions in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohee; Bielory, Leonard

    2010-08-01

    The burden of atopic diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD), is significant and far-reaching. In addition to cost of care and therapies, it affects the quality of life for those affected as well as their caretakers. Complementary and alternative therapies are commonly used because of concerns about potential adverse effects of conventional therapies and frustration with the lack of response to prescribed medications, be it due to the severity of the AD or the lack of appropriate regular use. Despite the promising results reported with various herbal medicines and biologic products, the clinical efficacy of such alternative therapies remains to be determined. Physicians need to be educated about alternative therapies and discuss benefits and potential adverse effects or limitations with patients. A systematic approach and awareness of reputable and easily accessible resources are helpful in dealing with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of CAM interventions is common among individuals with AD. Epidemiologic data have been a motivating drive for better elucidation of the efficacy of CAM interventions for allergic disease. Herbal medicines and biologics for AD treatment and, more recently, prevention comprise a major area of clinical investigation. Potential mechanisms of therapeutic effect elucidated by animal models and human clinical studies implicate modulation of TH2-type allergic inflammation and induction of immune tolerance. Population-based research regarding the use of CAM for allergic diseases underscores the increasing challenge for care providers with respect to identifying CAM use and ensuring safe use of allopathic and complementary medicines in disease management. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Investigations on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Roosje, Pieternella Janna

    2002-01-01

    The term atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly used in cats. At present, however, there is little known about the pathogenesis of feline AD. The aim was to investigate various aspects of the immunopathogenesis in a defined group of cats with signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis and compare our findings with the immunoregulation of atopic dermatitis in humans. The presence of antigen-specific IgE in serum of AD cats was investigated by means of the Prausnitz-Küstner (PK) test and the passive c...

  12. RESULTS OF APPLYING POLYVITAMIN COMPLEX FOR CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Ivanova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents findings of applying vitamin-and-mineral complex (VMC for children frequently suffering from diseases and children with atopic dermatitis. It shows that usage of VMC within a complex therapy promotes regression of subnormal vitamin provision symptoms, as well as symptoms of the core disease. This happens against heightened vitamin content in child's organism — which was proven with the test of A and E vitamins content in blood. The research has demonstrated a quite good tolerance of VMC by children suffering from atopic dermatitis.Key words: children frequently suffering from diseases, atopic dermatitis, vitamins, treatment.

  13. [The role of the innate immune system in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, T; Kaesler, S; Skabytska, Y; Biedermann, T

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms how the innate immune system detects microbes and mounts a rapid immune response have been more and more elucidated in the past years. Subsequently it has been shown that innate immunity also shapes adaptive immune responses and determines their quality that can be either inflammatory or tolerogenic. As atopic dermatitis is characterized by disturbances of innate and adaptive immune responses, colonization with pathogens and defects in skin barrier function, insight into mechanisms of innate immunity has helped to understand the vicious circle of ongoing skin inflammation seen in atopic dermatitis patients. Elucidating general mechanisms of the innate immune system and its functions in atopic dermatitis paves the way for developing new therapies. Especially the novel insights into the human microbiome and potential functional consequences make the innate immune system a very fundamental and promising target. As a result atopic dermatitis manifestations can be attenuated or even resolved. These currently developed strategies will be introduced in the current review.

  14. ENTEROSORBENTS AS A PART OF COMPLEX THERAPY OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Alexeeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common allergic diseases in children which is assuming ever greater medical and social importance. Risk factors of AD include gastro-intestinal tract disturbances, especially intestinal dysbiosis, which is revealed in 89–94,1% of children with atopic dermatitis. Both correlation of the dysbiosis and AD manifestations severity and increase of underlying disease treatment efficacy as a result of target influence on intestinal microflora confirm that. For many decades guidelines of atopic dermatitis treatment in children along with elimination diet, antihistamine drugs and topic medicines include enterosorbents. The most effective drugs are those ones, consisting of prebiotics and sorbents. The wide experience of prebiotic drug with sorbent action (Lactofiltrum in complex therapy of atopic dermatitis in children is reviewed in this article.

  15. Incidence of allergy and atopic disorders and hygiene hypothesis.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bencko, V.; Šíma, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2, 6 March (2017), č. článku 1244. ISSN 2474-1663 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : allergy disorders * atopic disorders * hygiene hypothesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology

  16. Evidence-based treatment of atopic eczema in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    The exact cause is unknown but a ... Scratching may result in secondary infec- tion and associated ... general practice. Atopic eczema is a common chronic condition ... There was either insufficient or no .... itch and indirectly improving sleep.

  17. Apgar score is related to development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeser, Vibeke; Kahr, Niklas; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2013-01-01

    . We cross-linked with data from the Danish National Birth Registry and performed cotwin control analysis in order to test the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis. Results. Apgar score, OR (per unit) = 1.23 (1.06-1.44), P = 0.008, and female sex, OR = 1.31 (1.06-1.61), P...... = 0.012, were risk factors for atopic dermatitis in cotwin control analysis, whereas birth anthropometric factors were not significantly related to disease development. Risk estimates in monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different for the identified risk factors. Conclusions......Aim. To study the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis in a twin population. Methods. In a population-based questionnaire study of 10,809 twins, 3-9 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we identified 907 twin pairs discordant for parent-reported atopic dermatitis...

  18. Allergenic food introduction and risk of childhood atopic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Elbert (Niels); J.C. Kiefte-de Jong (Jessica); R.G. Voortman (Trudy); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar); N.W. de Jong (Nicolette); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); Duijts, L. (Liesbeth); S.G.M.A. Pasmans (Suzanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The role of timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction in the development of childhood allergic sensitization and atopic diseases is controversial. Objective: To examine whether timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction are associated with allergic

  19. Vitamin D in Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma and Allergic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Searing, Daniel A; Leung, Donald YM

    2010-01-01

    This review examines the scientific evidence behind the hypothesis that vitamin D plays a role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases, with a particular focus on emerging data regarding vitamin D and atopic dermatitis. Both elucidated molecular interactions of vitamin D with components of the immune system, as well as clinical data regarding vitamin D deficiency and atopic diseases are discussed. The rationale behind the “sunshine hypothesis,” laboratory evidence supporting links between vi...

  20. Neuroticism, anxiety, and depression in Egyptian atopic bronchial asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Amal Fathy; Taha t Abd Algawad; Eman O. Arram; Hala Elboraei; Manal S. Arafat; Sherin S. Elmetwaly

    2014-01-01

    The association between allergic and psychological disorders had been reported, but whether the key mediating ingredients are predominantly biological, psychological, or mere artifacts remains unknown. We aim to examine the relationship between objectively measured atopic status and anxiety, depression, and neuroticism. Methods: This randomized case controlled trial was conducted on 50 atopic patients and 50 healthy controls. Atopy was determined by skin prick test and allergy related symp...

  1. Optimizing treatment of atopic dermatitis in infants using ursodeoxycholic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Shadrin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied the rational for including of ursodeoxycholic acid suspension in complex therapy of atopic dermatitis for infants. The indication of ursodeoxycholic acid suspension for 25 infants with atopic dermatitis resulted in positive clinical dynamics of both dermic and gastrointestinal signs, that manifested as reduction of area of impaired skin, intensity of itch, sleep normalization and regression of pain abdominal syndrome, regurgitation.

  2. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Adults With Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter R; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with psoriasis have increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but data on atopic dermatitis (AD) are less clear-cut. However, it is well-established that erectile dysfunction (ED) can serve as a risk marker for coronary disease. AIM: To investigate the incidence, prevalence...... population for men with AD. Egeberg A, Hansen PR, Gislason GH, et al. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Adults With Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis. J Sex Med 2017;14:380-386....

  3. Intraocular lens subluxation in a patient with facial atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, S; Nakamura, K; Kurosaka, D

    2001-02-01

    A 66-year-old Japanese man presented with subluxation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) caused by a rupture of part of Zinn's zonule but no retinal break 2 years after phacoemulsification with IOL implantation. He had a history of atopic dermatitis since infancy. This case presents a rare ocular complication of scratching and rubbing the face and eyelids because of itching related to atopic dermatitis.

  4. Parents' reported preference scores for childhood atopic dermatitis disease states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Emmanuel B

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to elicit preference weights from parents for health states corresponding to children with various levels of severity of atopic dermatitis. We also evaluated the hypothesis that parents with children who had been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis would assign different preferences to the health state scenarios compared with parents who did not have a child with atopic dermatitis. Methods Subjects were parents of children aged 3 months to 18 years. The sample was derived from the General Panel, Mommies Sub-Panel, and Chronic Illness Sub-Panel of Harris Interactive. Participants rated health scenarios for atopic dermatitis, asthma, and eyeglasses on a visual analog scale, imagining a child was experiencing the described state. Results A total of 3539 parents completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent had a child with a history of atopic dermatitis. Mean preference scores for atopic dermatitis were as follows: mild, 91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 91.5; mild/moderate, 84 (95%CI, 83.5 to 84.4; moderate, 73 (95%CI, 72.5 to 73.6; moderate/severe, 61 (95%CI, 60.6 to 61.8; severe, 49 (95% CI, 48.7 to 50.1; asthma, 58 (95%CI, 57.4 to 58.8; and eyeglasses, 87(95%CI, 86.3 to 87.4. Conclusions Parents perceive that atopic dermatitis has a negative effect on quality of life that increases with disease severity. Estimates of parents' preferences can provide physicians with insight into the value that parents place on their children's treatment and can be used to evaluate new medical therapies for atopic dermatitis.

  5. SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF TREATMENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes modern data on risk factors of severe course of atopic dermatitis in children: the role of alimentary and inhalant allergens, cutaneous infections, allergic reactions to drugs used in the treatment of disease. The most important questions of differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis in children and the distinctive features of the illness, which may be mistaken for atopic dermatitis (primary immunodeficiencies, keratosis pilaris, psoriasis, enteropatic acrodermatitis; cutaneous bacterial and fungal infections, and drug-induced contact dermatitis to topical creams and ointments are discussed. Treatment of atopic dermatitis is based on modern approaches and includes recommendations on the use of emolents, anti-inflammatory drugs (topical glucocorticoids and calcineurin inhibitors. The article provides indications and contraindications to the administration of anti-inflammatory drugs. Special recommendations for use of cleansers and emolents at all degrees of severity of atopic dermatitis, which helps reduce the risk of side effects of topical corticosteroids, complications such as cutaneous infections and helps to maintain remission of disease are given. The importance of training programs patients is emphasized. Compliance of patients and/or their parents contributes to the achievement of the desired effect of the treatment of atopic dermatitis, which will improve the patients’ quality of life.

  6. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...... yielded the following results: (1) in atopic dermatitis lesional skin an increased number of mast cell profiles was found as compared with nonlesional skin, (2) comparing atopic dermatitis skin with normal skin, a significantly increased number of mast cell profiles per millimetre squared was found...

  7. A short-term trial of tacrolimus ointment for atopic dermatitis. European Tacrolimus Multicenter Atopic Dermatitis Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruzicka, T.; Bieber, T.; Schöpf, E.; Rubins, A.; Dobozy, A.; Bos, J. D.; Jablonska, S.; Ahmed, I.; Thestrup-Pedersen, K.; Daniel, F.; Finzi, A.; Reitamo, S.

    1997-01-01

    Tacrolimus (FK 506) is an effective immunosuppressant drug for the prevention of rejection after organ transplantation, and preliminary studies suggest that topical application of tacrolimus is effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. We conducted a randomized, doubleblind, multicenter study

  8. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  9. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan A. Rather

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, recurrent, chronic inflammatory skin disease that is a cause of considerable economic and social burden. Its prevalence varies substantially among different countries with an incidence rate proclaimed to reach up to 20% of children in developed countries and continues to escalate in developing nations. This increased rate of incidence has changed the focus of research on AD toward epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. The effects of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of AD remain elusive. However, evidence from different research groups show that probiotics could have positive effect on AD treatment, if any, that depend on multiple factors, such as specific probiotic strains, time of administration (onset time, duration of exposure, and dosage. However, till date we still lack strong evidence to advocate the use of probiotics in the treatment of AD, and questions remain to be answered considering its clinical use in future. Based on updated information, the processes that facilitate the development of AD and the topic of the administration of probiotics are addressed in this review.

  10. Management of Atopic Dermatitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hidehisa

    2017-01-01

    The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) issued by the Japanese Dermatological Association (JDA), which are basically designed for dermatologists, were first prepared in 2000 and revised in 2016. The guidelines for AD of the Japanese Society of Allergology (JSA), which are basically designed for allergologists, including internists, otorhinolaryngologists, ophthalmologists, and dermatologists, were first prepared in 2009 and revised in 2014. In this article, I review the definition, pathophysiology, etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, severity classification, examination for diagnosis and severity assessment, and treatments for AD in Japan according to these two guidelines for AD (JDA and JSA). Based on the definition and diagnostic criteria for AD of the JDA, patients meeting three basic criteria, 1) pruritus, 2) typical morphology and distribution of the eczema, and 3) chronic or chronically relapsing course, are regarded as having AD. Treatment measures for AD basically consist of drug therapy, skin care, and elimination of exacerbating factors. Drugs that potently reduce AD-related inflammation in the skin are topical corticosteroids and tacrolimus. It is most important to promptly and accurately reduce inflammation related to AD by using these topical anti-inflammatory drugs. Proactive therapy refers to a treatment method in which, after inducing remission, a topical corticosteroid or tacrolimus ointment is intermittently applied to the skin in addition to skin care with moisturizers in order to maintain remission.

  11. Alleviating gizzard erosion with Hepasan ® - Provisional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Alleviating gizzard erosion with Hepasan® - Provisional Communication. K Boa-Amponsem, A Osei-Somuah. Full Text:.

  12. Alleviating Poverty Through Vocational Education: The Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper concludes that well-articulated vocational education policy and programmes will assist in employment generations and poverty reduction in Nigeria. Keywords: Alleviating Poverty, Vocational Education, Nigerian Experience Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria Vol. 10 (2) 2005: pp. 10-14 ...

  13. Chinese herbal medicine alleviating hyperandrogenism of PCOS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women hence Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been chosen by many clinicians and patients as alternative treatment for PCOS. The present study was to explore the effects of CHM in alleviating hyperandrogenism of PCOS ...

  14. GLP-1 nanomedicine alleviates gut inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Thaqi, Mentor; Priyamvada, Shubha; Jayawardena, Dulari; Kumar, Anoop; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Chatterjee, Ishita; Mugarza, Edurne; Saksena, Seema; Onyuksel, Hayat; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2017-02-01

    The gut hormone, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts anti-inflammatory effects. However, its clinical use is limited by its short half-life. Previously, we have shown that GLP-1 as a nanomedicine (GLP-1 in sterically stabilized phospholipid micelles, GLP-1-SSM) has increased in vivo stability. The current study was aimed at testing the efficacy of this GLP-1 nanomedicine in alleviating colonic inflammation and associated diarrhea in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced mouse colitis model. Our results show that GLP-1-SSM treatment markedly alleviated the colitis phenotype by reducing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, increasing goblet cells and preserving intestinal epithelial architecture in colitis model. Further, GLP-1-SSM alleviated diarrhea (as assessed by luminal fluid) by increasing protein expression of intestinal chloride transporter DRA (down regulated in adenoma). Our results indicate that GLP-1 nanomedicine may act as a novel therapeutic tool in alleviating gut inflammation and associated diarrhea in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, or Atopic Eczema: Analysis of Global Search Engine Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Thyssen, Jacob P; Paller, Amy S; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates challenges for scientific communication, patient education, and advocacy. We sought to determine the relative popularity of the terms eczema, AD, and atopic eczema (AE) using global search engine volumes. A retrospective analysis of average monthly search volumes from 2014 to 2016 of Google, Bing/Yahoo, and Baidu was performed for eczema, AD, and AE in English and 37 other languages. Google Trends was used to determine the relative search popularity of each term from 2006 to 2016 in English and the top foreign languages, German, Turkish, Russian, and Japanese. Overall, eczema accounted for 1.5 million monthly searches (84%) compared with 247 000 searches for AD (14%) and 44 000 searches for AE (2%). For English language, eczema accounted for 93% of searches compared with 6% for AD and 1% for AE. Search popularity for eczema increased from 2006 to 2016 but remained stable for AD and AE. Given the ambiguity of the term eczema, we recommend the universal use of the next most popular term, AD.

  16. Atopic dermatitis and the hygiene hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, Carsten; Yeo, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    We published a systematic review on atopic dermatitis (AD) and the hygiene hypothesis in 2005. Since then, the body of literature has grown significantly. We therefore repeated our systematic review to examine the evidence from population-based studies for an association between AD risk and specific infections, childhood immunizations, the use of antibiotics and environmental exposures that lead to a change in microbial burden. Medline was searched from 1966 until June 2010 to identify relevant studies. We found an additional 49 papers suitable for inclusion. There is evidence to support an inverse relationship between AD and endotoxin, early day care, farm animal and dog exposure in early life. Cat exposure in the presence of skin barrier impairment is positively associated with AD. Helminth infection at least partially protects against AD. This is not the case for viral and bacterial infections, but consumption of unpasteurized farm milk seems protective. Routine childhood vaccinations have no effect on AD risk. The positive association between viral infections and AD found in some studies appears confounded by antibiotic prescription, which has been consistently associated with an increase in AD risk. There is convincing evidence for an inverse relationship between helminth infections and AD but no other pathogens. The protective effect seen with early day care, endotoxin, unpasteurized farm milk and animal exposure is likely to be due to a general increase in exposure to non-pathogenic microbes. This would also explain the risk increase associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Future studies should assess skin barrier gene mutation carriage and phenotypic skin barrier impairment, as gene-environment interactions are likely to impact on AD risk. Copyright © 041_ S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The role of antiseptic agents in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Melissa; Van Bever, Hugo

    2014-10-01

    The skin of individuals with atopic dermatitis has a susceptibility to be colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. This has been associated with increased frequency and severity of exacerbations of atopic dermatitis. Therefore, there is a growing interest in the use of antiseptic agents to target primary bacterial colonization and infection. Antiseptic agents have been found to be better tolerated and less likely to induce bacterial resistance as compared to antibiotics. There is also a wide variety of antiseptic agents available. The efficacy of antiseptic agents has yet to be established as the studies reviewed previously have been small and of suboptimal quality. This review discusses the rationale behind targeting S. aureus with antiseptic agents and presents findings from a review of studies assessing the efficacy of antiseptics in atopic dermatitis in the last five years. Four studies were found, including a bleach bath study which has already been reviewed elsewhere. The remaining 3 studies assessed the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite containing cleansing body wash, sodium hypochlorite baths and 1% triclosan in leave on emollient. These studies suggested some benefit for the inclusion of antiseptic use with the mainstay management of atopic dermatitis, including a potential steroid sparring effect. However, there are many limitations to these studies which therefore warrant further investigation on the impact of antiseptic use in atopic dermatitis.

  18. From consumerism to active dependence: Patterns of medicines use and treatment decisions among patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørreslet, M; Bissell, P; Traulsen, J M

    2010-01-01

    In this article, findings from in-depth interviews with 12 people diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD) are described. The findings describe the range of strategies used to manage atopic dermatitis, including use of conventional medicines. A strong theme identified in informants' accounts centred on concerns about the risks of illness and long-term use of conventional medicines, which acted as a strong incentive for patients to seek alternatives to conventional treatments. However, despite their significant efforts to do so, patients were eventually forced to return to and rely on conventional medicines because of their efficacy in alleviating and treating symptoms. These findings are discussed in relation to the sociological literature on consumerism, risk and reflexivity in health. We argue that our findings exemplify how living with and managing a chronic illness may not be straightforward and the choices of treatment at hand may be limited. Consequently, this may limit the potential opportunities accruing from adopting a reflexive or consumerist approach to managing illness.

  19. Vitamin D in atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searing, Daniel A; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-08-01

    This review examines the scientific evidence behind the hypothesis that vitamin D plays a role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases, along with a focus on emerging data regarding vitamin D and atopic dermatitis. Elucidated molecular interactions of vitamin D with components of the immune system and clinical data regarding vitamin D deficiency and atopic diseases are discussed. The rationale behind the sunshine hypothesis, laboratory evidence supporting links between vitamin D deficiency and allergic diseases, the clinical evidence for and against vitamin D playing a role in allergic diseases, and the emerging evidence regarding the potential use of vitamin D to augment the innate immune response in atopic dermatitis are reviewed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and filaggrin mutations in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G.; Thuesen, Betina H.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    in the general population, especially among individuals with a history of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis were associated with particularly high risk of disability pension among FLG mutation carriers [odds ratio (OR) 4.02 and 95% confidence interval (CI): 1...... with a genetically impaired skin barrier, were associated with disability pension, suggesting that FLG mutations carriers with a history of atopic dermatitis and hand eczema could benefit from early attention with respect to choice of occupation....... a questionnaire about skin symptoms and hand eczema. Socioeconomic variables, including disability pension, and information on work in risk occupations were retrieved from national registries. The reasons for granting disability pension were unknown. Results: Disability pension was associated with hand eczema...

  1. Adverse reactions to food additives in children with atopic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G; Madsen, G; Halken, S

    1994-01-01

    In a multicenter study conducted at four Danish hospital pediatric departments, the parents of 472 consecutive children were informed of this project to determine the incidence of intolerance of food additives among children referred to an allergy clinic with symptoms of asthma, atopic dermatitis......, rhinitis, or urticaria. After a 2-week period on an additive-free diet, the children were challenged with the eliminated additives. The food additives investigated were coloring agents, preservatives, citric acid, and flavoring agents. Carbonated "lemonade" containing the dissolved additives was used...... dermatitis, asthma, urticaria, gastrointestinal symptoms), and citric acid (atopic dermatitis, gastrointestinal symptoms). The incidence of intolerance of food additives was 2% (6/335), as based on the double-blind challenge, and 7% (23/335), as based on the open challenge with lemonade. Children with atopic...

  2. Atopic dermatitis is associated with a fivefold increased risk of polysensitisation in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, Suzanne; Brand, Paulus

    Aim: It has been hypothesised that in atopic dermatitis, the dysfunctional skin barrier facilitates the transcutaneous presentation of allergens to the immune system. This study examined whether atopic dermatitis increased the likelihood of polysensitisation, namely sensitisation to five or more

  3. [A guide for education programs in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarot, S; Gagnayre, R; Bernier, C; Chavigny, J-M; Chiaverini, C; Lacour, J-P; Dupre-Goetghebeur, D; Misery, L; Piram, M; Cuny, J-F; Dega, H; Stalder, J-F

    2007-02-01

    Education about therapy applies to many chronic diseases. The aim is to improve patient management through the development of certain skills by patients themselves. Atopic dermatitis is an area amenable to the development of therapeutic education. The purpose of this study was to define the skills required for management of atopic dermatitis suitable for therapeutic education and to bring together these skills in a handbook suitable for use. Thirty caregivers were involved in the drafting of the handbook (dermatologists, a doctor specialising in therapeutic education, a psychologist and nurses), each of whom has experience of therapeutic education in atopic dermatitis. Four age groups were selected (under 5 years, 6 to 10 years, pre-teens/adults, parents of children aged under 5 years). For each age group, different levels of skill were identified for patients or parents of children and suitable learning methods were selected. Skills were classed according to 3 levels: (i) knowledge about the disease, treatments, triggering factors, (ii) knowledge about provision of care by patients or their parents, (iii) knowledge in terms of explaining the disease and treatment methods to family, and knowing who to contact and when. Finally, a 10-question evaluation guide was drawn up. In this paper we report the method of production and content of the handbook of skills for atopic dermatitis patients. The aim is not to impose all skills listed in this work on patients but rather to provide caregivers with a complete handbook covering therapeutic education. The book is intended for patients with moderate to severe forms of atopic dermatitis currently in therapeutic failure. It may be used by anyone treating such patients, whether doctors, nurses or psychologists, depending on the items chosen. It is intended for use as a support for the elaboration, diffusion and evaluation of a therapeutic education programme for atopic dermatitis.

  4. Integration of family planning with poverty alleviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, P

    1996-12-01

    The Chinese Communist Central Committee and the State Council aim to solve food and clothing problems among impoverished rural people by the year 2000. This goal was a priority on the agenda of the recent October 1996 National Conference on Poverty Alleviation and Development and the 1996 National Conference of the State Family Planning Commission. Poverty is attributed to rapid population growth and underdevelopment. Poverty is concentrated in parts of 18 large provinces. These provinces are characterized by Family Planning Minister Peng as having high birth rates, early marriage and childbearing, unplanned births, and multiple births. Overpopulation is tied to overconsumption, depletion of resources, deforestation, soil erosion, pollution, shortages of water, decreases in shares of cultivated land, degraded grasslands, and general destruction of the environment. Illiteracy in poor areas is over 20%, compared to the national average of 15%. Mortality and morbidity are higher. Family planning is harder to enforce in poor areas. Pilot programs in Sichuan and Guizhou provinces are promoting integration of family planning with poverty alleviation. Several conferences have addressed the integrated program strategies. Experience has shown that poverty alleviation occurs by controlled population growth and improved quality of life. Departments should "consolidate" their development efforts under Communist Party leadership at all levels. Approaches should emphasize self-reliance and public mobilization. The emphasis should be on women's participation in development. Women's income should be increased. Family planning networks at the grassroots level need to be strengthened simultaneously with increased poverty alleviation and development. The government strategy is to strengthen leadership, mobilize the public, and implement integrated programs.

  5. Adverse reactions to food additives in children with atopic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G; Madsen, G; Halken, S

    1994-01-01

    , rhinitis, or urticaria. After a 2-week period on an additive-free diet, the children were challenged with the eliminated additives. The food additives investigated were coloring agents, preservatives, citric acid, and flavoring agents. Carbonated "lemonade" containing the dissolved additives was used...... dermatitis, asthma, urticaria, gastrointestinal symptoms), and citric acid (atopic dermatitis, gastrointestinal symptoms). The incidence of intolerance of food additives was 2% (6/335), as based on the double-blind challenge, and 7% (23/335), as based on the open challenge with lemonade. Children with atopic...

  6. USAGE OF DIOCTAHEDRAL SMECTITE IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Botkina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of enter sorbent — dioctahedral Smectite (Neosmektin — usage as part of complex therapy of children with atopic dermatitis (ATD. It is shown that the administration of Smectite favored better efficacy of baseline treatment of ATD, more express and quick regression of skin manifestations of the disease, decrease in number of children with eosinophilia. High efficacy of ATD treatment with Smectite indicates the pathogenetic justification of efferent therapy of the disease. Observation results witness the good tolerability of Smectite: side effects related to the treatment were only observed in 14 percent of children.Key words: children, atopic dermatits, smectite, treatment.

  7. Classification of atopic hand eczema and the filaggrin mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, C.; Lerbaek, A.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease with various risk factors of which atopic dermatitis is known to be one of the most important. Recently, two mutations in the gene coding for filaggrin, a protein important for the skin barrier, have repeatedly been shown to be associated with atopic dermatitis...... mutations. We believe this will increase the possibility of subgrouping this otherwise heterogenic disease and thereby enable a better phenotype-genotype characterization of hand eczema. This could improve the preventive initiatives, secure better information of patients about the prognosis...

  8. Surfactant protein D in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwy, Thomas; Otkjaer, Kristian; Madsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    was examined using immunohistochemistry on skin biopsies from patients with the two major dermatologic diseases, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. SP-D was located in the stratum basale of all biopsies with similar intense staining in both diseased and normal skin. Differences were detected in stratum spinosum......, no substantial up-regulation of SP-D mRNA was detected in lesional psoriatic skin, and a comparison of serum levels of SP-D between patients with atopic dermatitis or psoriasis and a group of age matched healthy controls did not show significant differences. In conclusion SP-D was significantly more abundant...

  9. Some aspects of hadron-hadron collisions in high energy interactions (B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing oscillations in semileptonic decay at D0 experiment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we report the study on one such particle called the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson made up of a bottom and a strange quark. B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons are currently produced in a great numbers only at the Tevatron and we report a study done to measure the mixing parameter Δms between the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson and its anti-particle $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$. Mixing is the ability of a very few neutral mesons to change from their particle to their antiparticle and vice versa. Until recently there existed only a lower limit on this measurement, here we report an upper bound and a most probable value for the mixing parameter. In the following chapter, we discuss the theoretical motivation behind this study. The measurement technique and the different factors that effect the measurement are also given. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the experimental setup needed to perform the study. In Chapter 4, we present a new initial state flavor tagging algorithm using electrons and measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing parameter Δmd with the new technique. Details of the combined initial state tagging used in the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing study are also given. A detailed description of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the results are covered in Chapter 5. And finally the results from all the three channels and a bound on the mixing parameter are presented in Chapter 6.

  10. Poverty alleviation in Uganda: the case for a viable optimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poverty alleviation is a long and painstaking process. It involves knowing what poverty is, its causes and means of alleviating it. Poverty is one of the scourges including disease and ignorance a combination of which deprives humanity of the basic needs for living. Among the strategies to alleviate poverty is effective ...

  11. Rural tourism development: a viable formula for poverty alleviation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of rural tourism and community development has been made in general terms with less focus on poverty alleviation and more emphasis on economic modernisation. Recently, a link between rural tourism and poverty alleviation has been emphasised in the contemporary tourism and poverty alleviation literature.

  12. Reduced occurrence of early atopic dermatitis because of immunoactive prebiotics among low-atopy-risk infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grueber, Christoph; van Stuijvenberg, Margriet; Mosca, Fabio; Moro, Guido; Chirico, Gaetano; Braegger, Christian P.; Riedler, Josef; Boehm, Guenther; Wahn, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most infants developing atopic dermatitis have a low risk for atopy. Primary prevention of atopic dermatitis is difficult. Objective: To assess the effect of supplementation of an infant and follow-on formula with prebiotic and immunoactive oligosaccharides on the occurrence of atopic

  13. Association between parental socioeconomic position and prevalence of asthma, atopic eczema and hay fever in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    with a decreased risk of atopic eczema and eczema symptoms. There was no independent association between household income and any of the outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of asthma and hay fever, but not atopic eczema, increased with increasing age. Atopic eczema was associated with high parental educational...

  14. Effects of Acupuncture on 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeun Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though the effects of acupuncture in atopic dermatitis have been proven in clinical studies, its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of action for acupuncture treatment on the LI11 meridian point for treatment of allergic contact dermatitis. BALB/c mice received 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB application to induce skin inflammation. Acupuncture treatment on LI11 significantly inhibited cutaneous hyperplasia, serum IgE levels, and expression of proinflammatory cytokine (IL-4, IL-8, and TNF-α mRNA and NF-κB, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 proteins. Acupuncture treatment of local points also inhibited cutaneous hyperplasia and serum IgE levels; however, it was not effective in regulating proinflammatory cytokines and proteins. In addition, LI11 treatment is more effective at reducing serum IgE levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins than local point treatment. These results suggest that acupuncture treatment is effective in alleviating allergic contact dermatitis by reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins.

  15. Acquisition of vernal and atopic keratoconjunctivitis after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F; Nassar, Amr; Ahmed, Syed Osman; Al Mohareb, Fahad; Aljurf, Mahmoud

    2008-09-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) result from genetic and environmental factors. We present patients who had no history of atopic disorders before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and who seem to have acquired VKC or AKC from their donors, who had atopic disorders. Observational case series. The patients in this study were part of a cohort of patients who had undergone allogeneic hemapoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from January 1997 through December 2007. Of 621 HSCT recipients, four recipients who were free of allergic disorders acquired VKC or AKC from their afflicted donors after HSCT. Each patient underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, determination of the total serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E, and conjunctival scrapings. Four (0.64%) of 621 patients who had undergone HSCT acquired VKC or AKC after BMT. The donors had VKC or atopic dermatitis. In addition, in two of these four patients, asthma developed. One patient had elevated total serum IgE. Conjunctival scrapings of all four patients revealed the presence of eosinophils. One patient had concurrent graft-versus-host disease. VKC and AKC are systemic allergic disorders characterized by local ocular manifestations. This report suggests the possibility of the acquisition of VKC or AKC after BMT by adoptive transfer.

  16. Evaluation of severity and therapy in children with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wolkerstorfer (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAtopic dennatitis (AD) is a conUllon chronically relapsing skin disorder affecting 9-20% of those born after 1970 [Schultz Larsen 1993]. TI,e aetiology is still not entirely elucidated and research is complicated by the multifactorial nature of the disease. Both genetical

  17. Affordable moisturisers are effective in atopic eczema: A randomised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Many patients depend on moisturisers issued by public health services in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). Methods. In a randomised controlled trial of patients with mild to moderate AD, aged 1 - 12 years, study 1 compared aqueous cream v. liquid paraffin (fragrance-free baby oil) as a soap substitute ...

  18. Regulatory natural killer cell expression in atopic childhood asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Different subsets of natural killer (NK) cells were found to play a role in pathogenesis of allergy. We sought to investigate the expression of regulatory NK cells (CD56+CD16+CD158+) in atopic children with bronchial asthma in order to outline the value of these cells as biomarkers of disease severity and/or ...

  19. Atopic dermatitis of the face, scalp, and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Jarolim, E; Poulsen, L K; With, H

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that a lipophilic yeast, Pityrosporum ovale (P. ovale) produced a high frequency of positive skin prick tests and in vitro histamine-release (HR) tests in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) of the face, scalp, and neck. In the present study, our aim was to ...

  20. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...

  1. An overview of topical treatment for atopic eczema | Motswaledi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... on the elbows and knees in younger children, and the cubital and popliteal fossae in older children and adults. Treatment modalities include emollients, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, phototherapy and immunosuppressive therapy. This article provides a brief overview of topical treatments for atopic eczema.

  2. The association between atopic dermatitis and hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruff, S M D; Engebretsen, K A; Zachariae, C

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and hand eczema (HE) are common chronic and relapsing inflammatory skin conditions that often co-occur. While several studies have addressed their relationship, the exact association estimate is unknown. We systematically reviewed published literature on the association bet...

  3. Tacrolimus treatment of atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thestrup-Pedersen, Kristian

    2003-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is today the most common chronic disease of children in Europe, the US and Japan. The 'golden standard' of therapy is topical glucocorticosteroids and emollients. The steroids have been on the market for four decades, are efficacious, but only advised for short-term treatment due to their risks of side effects. More than 16,000 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis have been enrolled in clinical studies of tacrolimus. One third of patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis experience over 90% improvement in their disease over a 12-week treatment period and up to 70% of patients have over 50% improvement. A 1-year treatment leads to more than 90% improvement in 75% of patients. The most pronounced side effect is a burning sensation occurring in up to 60% of patients. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin disease leading to a demand for long-term treatment control. Such treatment options have not previously been available--except for emollients which are not efficacious for controlling skin inflammation. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are new treatment options, free from the potential side effects of topical steroids, which are known for their efficacy in short-term treatment. The new treatment modalities prevent the eczema from relapsing and at the same time they control active eczema. The future will see a shift towards the long-term use of tacrolimus which is able to control the skin inflammation and, hopefully, shorten the course of the eczema.

  4. Prevalence and features of canine atopic dermatitis in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpataki, Noémi; Pápa, Kinga; Reiczigel, J; Vajdovich, P; Vörösi, K

    2006-09-01

    Medical records of 600 dogs diagnosed with atopic dermatitis were reviewed and evaluated with reference to history, geographical distribution, breed predilection, clinical signs and positive reactions to allergens as determined by intradermal skin testing (IDT) manufactured by Artuvetrin Laboratories. In 66.6% of dogs, the age of onset of atopic dermatitis was between 4 months and 3 years. Dogs living in the garden suburb of Budapest were more sensitive to house dust mites, fleas and moulds, and dogs from the western part of Hungary were more sensitive to weeds than to other allergens (p French bulldog, Doberman Pinscher and Bobtail which were over-represented among atopic dogs compared to the breed distribution of the general dog population of a large city in Hungary. Breeds with verified adverse reaction to food were Cocker spaniels, French bulldogs, Bullmastiffs, Bull terriers, St. Bernards, Tervurens, West Highland White terriers and American Staffordshire terriers (p < 0.05). The clinical signs of atopic dermatitis and their occurrence are in accordance with the data described in the literature.

  5. Adverse effects of ultraviolet irradiation in atopic dermatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, O.

    2010-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate adverse effects of ultraviolet irradiation (UV) in atopic dermatitis (AD). We focused on the two important adverse effects of UV: photosensitivity and skin cancer risk associated with calcineurin inhibitor treatment. In chapter 2 and 3 we found that

  6. Impact of adult atopic dermatitis on topical drug penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Ortiz, Patricia; Hansen, Steen H; Shah, Vinod P

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate methodologies for the determination of drug penetration in diseased skin have not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a metronidazole cream formulation in atopic dermatitis, employing dermal microdialysis and tape strip sampling...

  7. Primary health care management challenges for childhood atopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kaarina Frieda Meintjes

    primary health care (PHC) management of their children's atopic eczema in a Gauteng district. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, contextual embedded single case study design ... direct observation until saturation occurred; analysed according to Tesch's ..... needed, it was provided by the researcher as part of the pro-.

  8. Effect of probiotic Lactobacillus strains in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that oral bacteriotherapy with probiotics might be useful in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical and anti-inflammatory effect of probiotic supplementation in children with AD. METHOD...

  9. Respiratory comorbidity in South African children with atopic dermatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an early and important step in the propagation of the allergic march, enhancing food and respiratory allergies via epicutaneous sensitisation to allergens. Objectives. To determine the prevalence and patterns of aeroallergen sensitisation, asthma and allergic rhinitis in South African ...

  10. Topical effects of N-acetyl-L-hydroxyproline on ceramide synthesis and alleviation of pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashizume E

    2013-02-01

    forearm. Pruritus intensity declined in the AHYP-treated forearms between 0 and 4 weeks (P < 0.05, but there was no change in the control-treated forearms.Conclusion: AHYP increased ceramide synthesis by upregulating SPTLC1 in a three-dimensional cultured skin model, and it prevented TEWL increase and alleviated pruritus in human subjects with slight atopic dermatitis.Keywords: skin barrier, ceramide, pruritus, N-acetyl-l-hydroxyproline, amino acids

  11. The association of intrafamilial violence against children with symptoms of atopic and non-atopic asthma: A cross-sectional study in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Camila Barreto; dos Santos, Darci Neves; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to describe the types of intrafamilial violence perpetrated against children according to living conditions, family factors, and child characteristics, and to identify the association between types of intrafamilial violence and asthma symptoms in atopic and non-atopic children. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 1,370 caregivers as part of the Social Changes, Asthma and Allergy in Latin America (SCAALA) study, conducted in 2006 in Brazil. The study population was selected by random sampling. The main outcome measures were atopic and non-atopic asthma. We investigate the association between intrafamilial violence and asthma symptoms in atopic and non-atopic children. A backward multivariate logistic polytomous regression was performed to verify the main association. Nonviolent discipline (NVD) and maltreatment nonviolent discipline (MNVD) were positively associated with non-atopic asthma symptoms (NVD: odds ratio (OR)=1.95/95% confidence interval (CI)=1.17-3.25; MNVD: OR=1.95/95% CI=1.19-3.20). However, for the most severe intrafamilial violence, this association was not found after control of potential confounders. This study demonstrates the effect of types of intrafamilial violence on non-atopic asthma. Intrafamilial violence against children represents one more component in the determination of non-atopic asthma in Latin America. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychosocial adjustment in preschool children with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, L R; Garralda, M E; David, T J

    1993-12-01

    Atopic eczema is a chronic skin disorder that is most common in early childhood, an important stage in the child's social and emotional development. The psychiatric adjustment and mother-child attachment in 30 preschool children with severe atopic eczema was compared with 20 matched controls. Patients with eczema had a significant increase in behaviour symptoms, 7/30 (23%) v 1/20 (5%); with significant excess of dependency/clinginess, 15/30 (50%) v 2/20 (10%); fearfulness, 12/30 (40%) v 2/20 (10%); and sleep difficulty, 19/30 (63%) v 9/20 (45%), but there was no significant difference between the two groups in the security of attachments, 25/29 (86%) v 14/20 (70%). Significantly fewer mothers of children with atopic eczema were in outside employment, 8/29 (27%) v 13/20 (65%), or felt supported socially, 10/29 (34%) v 13/20 (65%). Significantly more of them, 9/30 (30%) v 1/20 (5%), felt particularly stressed in relation to their parenting and less efficient in their disciplining of the affected child. In spite of this and at variance with earlier reports in the literature, they did not display negative attitudes towards their child. On the contrary mothers had a positive empathic attitude towards the child, 7/14 (50%) v 2/16 (12%). Child behaviour problems, 7/14 (50%) v 2/16 (12%), and maternal distress, 12/14 (85%) v 5/16 (31%), were significantly more common in the more severely affected children. Minor behaviour problems and parenting distress are important features of severe atopic eczema in early childhood but atopic eczema does not lead to insecurity of the mother-child attachment.

  13. Reciprocal patterns of allergen-induced GATA-3 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from atopics vs. non-atopics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaubas, C; Lee, P T; Smallacombe, T B; Holt, B J; Wee, C; Sly, P D; Holt, P G

    2002-01-01

    T helper (Th)2 cytokines are considered to play a central role in the induction and expression of allergic disease. However, the relative importance of individual cytokines is unclear, and overall disease pathogenesis appears to involve the coordinate activities of a range of Th2 cytokines acting in sequence or in parallel. The present study examines an alternative approach to the study of cytokine gene function in atopy, focusing instead upon T cell transcription factors (TFs) which play a role in the regulation of multiple cytokine genes. To investigate the allergen-induced expression of the TF GATA-3 and c-Maf in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in cytokine-driven Th polarization. PBMC from house dust mite (HDM)-atopic and non-atopics were stimulated in vitro with allergen or anti-CD3/IL-2. TF expression was analysed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and major findings were validated by real-time PCR. Cell separations were performed to analyse the contribution of CD45RO+ cells. CD4+ cord blood cells were Th1 or Th2 polarized in vitro by exogenous cytokines and TF expression analysed by Northern blot and real-time PCR. Results We demonstrate for the first time that during differentiation of CD4+ CD45RA+ naïve human T cells towards Th2 commitment, and during allergen-specific reactivation of peripheral CD4+ CD45RO+ Th2 memory cells in established atopics, expression of the Th2-associated TF GATA-3 is rapidly up-regulated, whereas T cells from non-atopics display equally rapid GATA-3 down-regulation under identical conditions of allergen stimulation. These findings identify Th2-associated TFs as key determinants of the atopic phenotype, suggesting their unique potential as therapeutic targets for disease control.

  14. IMMUNOLOGICAL MARKERS OF UNCONTROLLED ATOPIC BRONCHIAL ASTHMA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Smolnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a prevalent chronic allergic disease of lungs at early ages. A priority  task in allergology  is to search  biological  markers  related  to uncontrolled atopic  bronchial asthma. Cytokines fulfill their distinct function in pathogenesis of atopic  bronchial asthma, participating at the initiation, development and persistence of allergic inflammation in airways, causing different  variations of clinical course of the disease (with  respect  to its acuteness, severity, frequency of exacerbations. The  present  work has studied  indices  of cellular  and  humoral links of immunity, as well as levels of some  pro and  anti-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood serum (IL-4, IL-10, IL-2 and TNFα, aiming to determine potential markers of uncontrolled atopic bronchial asthma in children. A group of Caucasian (European children was involved into the research: Cohort 1, moderate atopic  bronchial asthma with controlled course during the last 3 months (n = 59; Cohort 2, severe/moderate-severe atopic bronchial asthma with uncontrolled course of the disease within last 3 months (n = 51,  Cohort 3 – control, practically healthy  children without signs of atopy  (n = 33. All the  children included in the group with atopic  bronchial asthma underwent regular mono/combined basic therapy  at high/ intermediate therapeutic doses.  We performed a comparative analysis  of cell  population indices  reflecting certain cellular  immunity links,  and  determined significantly  lower  levels of CD3+   lymphocytes, as well as decrease in relative  and  absolute  contents of CD4+  and  CD8+  cells in the  cohort with  uncontrolled course of atopic  bronchial asthma, as compared with controlled-course cohort. When  evaluating concentrations  of cytokines in peripheral blood serum of the patients with controlled and uncontrolled atopic  bronchial asthma, we revealed  significantly  higher

  15. B Flavor Tagging Calibration and Search for B$0\\atop{s}$ Oscillations in Semileptonic Decays with the CDF Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giurgiu, Gavril A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2005-09-01

    In this thesis we present a search for oscillations of B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons using semileptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ℓ+v decays. Data were collected with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDFII) from events produced in collisions of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons accelerated in the Tevatron ring. The total proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy is 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is the unique source in the world for B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons, to be joined by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN after 2007. We establish a lower limit on the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms > 7.7 ps-1 at 95% Confidence Level. We also present a multivariate tagging algorithm that identifies semileptonic B → μX decays of the other B mesons in the event. Using this muon tagging algorithm as well as opposite side electron and jet charge tagging algorithms, we infer the B$0\\atop{s}$ flavor at production. The tagging algorithms are calibrated using high statistics samples of B0 and B+ semileptonic B0/+ → Dℓv decays. The oscillation frequency Δmd in semileptonic B0 → Dℓv decays is measured to be Δmd = (0.501 ± 0.029(stat.) ± 0.017(syst.)) ps-1.

  16. Does IFN-γ play a role on the pathogenesis of non-atopic asthma in Latin America children?

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo Camila Alexandrina; Rodrigues Laura Cunha; Alcantara-Neves Neuza Maria; Cooper Philip J; Amorim Leila Denise; Silva Nivea Bispo; Cruz Alvaro A; Barreto Mauricio Lima

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this work we explore differences in blood cells and cytokine profiles in children according to atopic status and asthma (atopic or non-atopic). The study involved measurement of Th1(IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-5 and IL-13) cytokines in Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes, blood cell count, skin prick test and specific IgE against common aeroallergens. Atopic status was associated with eosinophilia and production of Th2 type cytokines. Atopic asthma was a...

  17. Alcohol Intake During Pregnancy and Offspring's Atopic Eczema Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keiko; Konishi, Kie; Tamura, Takashi; Shiraki, Makoto; Iwasa, Shinichi; Nagata, Chisato

    2016-05-01

    Although alcohol consumption has been suggested to have an effect on the immune system, it is unknown whether alcohol consumption has a role in developing allergic diseases. We aimed to examine the associations of total alcohol intake during pregnancy with the risks of childhood asthma and atopic eczema in a birth cohort in Japan. Pregnant women were recruited at a maternal clinic from May 2000 to October 2001. The children who were born to these mothers were followed until November 2007. Total alcohol intake, including alcohol as a cooking ingredient, was assessed using 5-day dietary records. Mother reports of physician-diagnosed asthma and atopic eczema were annually obtained from the questionnaires. Asthma assessed by the American Thoracic Society Division of Lung Diseases questionnaire and atopic eczema assessed by International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questions were also obtained in 2007. A total of 350 children participated in the follow-up survey. Maternal total alcohol intake during pregnancy was associated with increased risks of atopic eczema before age 3. The positive association with atopic eczema was also observed when it was defined as before age 5. In the high versus the low tertile of maternal total alcohol intake, the estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of child's eczema were 1.90 (95% CI: 0.96 to 3.76) before age 3 and 1.74 (95% CI: 0.93 to 3.24) before age 5, respectively. The estimated HRs of child's asthma before age 3 was 1.61 (95% CI: 0.70 to 3.69) in the high versus the low of maternal total alcohol intake and 2.11 (95% CI: 0.93 to 4.81) among children having drinking mothers versus nondrinking mothers in pregnancy, although maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy was not significantly associated with the risk of asthma before age 5. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy might have an effect on developing atopic eczema in offspring. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. Satisfaction with treatment of atopic dermatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Maciejewska-Franczak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Atopic dermatitis is a frequent chronic skin disease in children. The major clinical manifestations include itching and dryness of the skin. The pathomechanism of skin changes results from an interaction of genetic and environmental factors as well as impairments of skin barrier function and immune response. Despite chronic treatment the disease is characterized by exacerbation and remission periods and lowers the quality of life of patients and their families. Objective. To evaluate treatment satisfaction in children with atopic dermatitis, identify components of medical care which contribute to treatment satisfaction, and evaluate the relationship between satisfaction and adherence to a doctor’s recommendations. Material and methods. One hundred and nineteen children (6 months to 12 years old, mean age 4.9 years with atopic dermatitis were enrolled in the study. The doctor performed physical examinations and history taking and filled in questionnaires evaluating the course and exacerbation of the disease, the type of administered therapy and diagnostics. The patients’ parents completed two questionnaires: a questionnaire assessing satisfaction with the therapy (the type of recommended therapy, adherence to recommendations, contact with the doctor, obtained information, degree of psychological support, role of parents in taking decisions regarding the therapy and a quality of life questionnaire. Results. The authors observed that 56% of parents were dissatisfied with the administered treatment, and 40% failed to adhere to at least one therapeutic recommendation. Parents of children with mild atopic dermatitis significantly more often stop using emollients. It was also observed that lack of treatment satisfaction in children with severe atopic dermatitis whose parents are insufficiently educated contributes to decreased adherence. The authors identified independent factors of lack of treatment satisfaction: failure to obtain

  19. Poverty, dirt, infections and non-atopic wheezing in children from a Brazilian urban center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Mauricio L; Cunha, Sergio S; Fiaccone, Rosemeire; Esquivel, Renata; Amorim, Leila D; Alvim, Sheila; Prado, Matildes; Cruz, Alvaro A; Cooper, Philip J; Santos, Darci N; Strina, Agostino; Alcantara-Neves, Neuza; Rodrigues, Laura C

    2010-12-01

    The causation of asthma is poorly understood. Risk factors for atopic and non-atopic asthma may be different. This study aimed to analyze the associations between markers of poverty, dirt and infections and wheezing in atopic and non-atopic children. 1445 children were recruited from a population-based cohort in Salvador, Brazil. Wheezing was assessed using the ISAAC questionnaire and atopy defined as allergen-specific IgE ≥ 0.70 kU/L. Relevant social factors, environmental exposures and serological markers for childhood infections were investigated as risk factors using multivariate multinomial logistic regression. Common risk factors for wheezing in atopic and non-atopic children, respectively, were parental asthma and respiratory infection in early childhood. No other factor was associated with wheezing in atopic children. Factors associated with wheezing in non-atopics were low maternal educational level (OR 1.49, 95% CI 0.98-2.38), low frequency of room cleaning (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.27-4.90), presence of rodents in the house (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.06-2.09), and day care attendance (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.01-2.29). Non-atopic wheezing was associated with risk factors indicative of poverty, dirt and infections. Further research is required to more precisely define the mediating exposures and the mechanisms by which they may cause non-atopic wheeze.

  20. Bovine beta-lactoglobulin in human milk from atopic and non-atopic mothers. Relationship to maternal intake of homogenized and unhomogenized milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A; Husby, S; Hansen, L G

    1990-01-01

    . Detectable amounts of BLG (0.9-150 micrograms/l, median value 4.2 micrograms/l) were measured in 19/20 of the mothers (95%), in 9 of 10 atopic mothers and in all 10 of 10 non-atopic mothers. No correlation was found between the type of milk preparation (homogenized or unhomogenized) and the presence of BLG...

  1. Rainwater harvesting for drought disaster alleviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widodo, B.; Prinzand, D.; Malik, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Too little water and too much water can be as devastating as well. Drought usually does not show up instantly like flood, but it creeps slowly. Drought that is less popular than flood has impact more serious than flood. It is difficult to be identified when it comes and when it goes away. However, it is suddenly understood when water becomes scare, or no more water is available in wells, rivers and reservoirs. Managing flood and drought has to be at an integrated basis. Rainwater harvesting (RWH) combined with water conservation methods can be developed to alleviate drought disaster as well as flood disaster in the same time. RWH and water conservation must be an integral part of integrated water resources management. Preventing drought could be automatically reducing the extent of flood that means preventing people and the environment from the disasters. (author)

  2. Alleviate Cellular Congestion Through Opportunistic Trough Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichuan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cellular data service has been skyrocketing since the debut of data-intensive smart phones and touchpads. However, not all data are created equal. Many popular applications on mobile devices, such as email synchronization and social network updates, are delay tolerant. In addition, cellular load varies significantly in both large and small time scales. To alleviate network congestion and improve network performance, we present a set of opportunistic trough filling schemes that leverage the time-variation of network congestion and delay-tolerance of certain traffic in this paper. We consider average delay, deadline, and clearance time as the performance metrics. Simulation results show promising performance improvement over the standard schemes. The work shed lights on addressing the pressing issue of cellular overload.

  3. Adverse reactions to food additives in children with atopic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Halken, S.

    1994-01-01

    and 335 were subjected to open challenge. A total of 23 children developed positive reactions after the open challenge. Sixteen of these patients accepted the double-blind challenge, and six showed a positive reaction to preservatives (atopic dermatitis, asthma, rhinitis), coloring agents (atopic......, rhinitis, or urticaria. After a 2-week period on an additive-free diet, the children were challenged with the eliminated additives. The food additives investigated were coloring agents, preservatives, citric acid, and flavoring agents. Carbonated ''lemonade'' containing the dissolved additives was used...... for the open challenge. Two doses were used: a low dose and a 10-fold higher dose. Gelatin capsules were used for a double-blind challenge. The children were 4-15 years old, and they were attending an outpatient pediatric clinic for the first time. Of the 379 patients who entered the study, 44 were excluded...

  4. New insights in the pathogenesis of atopic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, John G

    2009-01-01

    A causal link between the increasing environmental pollution and the fast spreading of allergic diseases is currently discussed. The exogenic and endogenic noxious agents contributing to the total environmental load are primarily acting through immunotoxic, sensitizing and neurotoxic mechanisms in animal experiments and in humans. Beside classic allergic-triggering factors (allergen potency, intermittent exposure to different allergen concentrations, presence of microbial bodies and sensitizing phenols), the adjuvant role of environmental pollutants gains increasing importance in allergy induction. Our therapy experience with more than 18.000 atopic eczema patients shows that beside allergic reactions pseudoallergic mechanisms through toxic environmental agents (formaldehyde, industrial and traffic smog, wood preservatives, microbial toxins, additive-rich food, nicotine, alcohol, pesticides, solvents, amalgam-heavy metals) are increasingly incriminated as causal factors for the complex symptomatology. The avoidance and elimination of such triggering factors before and during pregnancy and in early childhood may result in a significant decrease of the incidence of atopic diseases.

  5. The role of vitamin D in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębińska, Anna; Sikorska-Szaflik, Hanna; Urbanik, Magdalena; Boznański, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D has been suggested to have an important impact on a much wider aspects on human health than calcium homeostasis and mineral metabolism, specifically in the field of human immunology. It has been reported that vitamin D influences the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems, which makes the association between vitamin D and allergic diseases a field of interest. Although many studies have sought to determine whether vitamin D has an influence on progression of allergic disease, the impact of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis development and severity remains unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies relating vitamin D to atopic dermatitis and discuss its possible role in the pathogenesis of allergic skin diseases, emphasizing the need for well-designed, prospective trials on vitamin D supplementation in the context of prevention and treatment for allergic conditions.

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hidehisa; Nakahara, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akio; Kabashima, Kenji; Sugaya, Makoto; Murota, Hiroyuki; Ebihara, Tamotsu; Kataoka, Yoko; Aihara, Michiko; Etoh, Takafumi; Katoh, Norito

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a disease characterized by relapsing eczema with pruritus as a primary lesion. Most patients have an atopic predisposition. The definitive diagnosis of AD requires the presence of all three features: (i) pruritus; (ii) typical morphology and distribution of the eczema; and (iii) chronic and chronically relapsing course. The current strategies to treat AD in Japan from the perspective of evidence-based medicine consist of three primary measures: (i) the use of topical corticosteroids and tacrolimus ointment as the main treatment for the inflammation; (ii) topical application of emollients to treat the cutaneous barrier dysfunction; and (iii) avoidance of apparent exacerbating factors, psychological counseling and advice about daily life. The guidelines present recommendations to review clinical research articles, evaluate the balance between the advantages and disadvantages of medical activities, and optimize medical activity-related patient outcomes with respect to several important points requiring decision-making in clinical practice. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  7. The impact of atopic dermatitis on work life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørreslet, L B; Ebbehøj, N E; Bonde, J P Ellekilde

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) has considerable multidimensional personal and societal costs. However, the extent to which the patient's work life is affected due to AD is more sparsely described in the literature. OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact on work life for patients with AD......, with a specific focus on choice of education and occupation, sick leave, social compensations and change of job due to AD. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science up to 7(th) February 2017 for articles on the impact on work life for patients with atopic...... pensions found AD to have a negative impact. Studies of change or loss of job and AD showed more diverse results, as not all studies documented a negative effect of AD on work life. CONCLUSIONS: AD imposes a burden extending beyond personal, emotional and financial costs. This review strongly implies...

  8. [Hypnotherapy of atopic dermatitis in an adult. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perczel, Kristóf; Gál, János

    2016-01-17

    Hypnosis is well known for its modulatory effects on immune and inflammatory processes, and it is a therapeutic option for certain diseases of such pathogenesis. The authors report treatment of an adult patient with extensive atopic dermatitis, who was only minimally responsive to conservative treatment. In a 15 session hypnotherapy the authors combined the use of direct, symptom-oriented suggestive techniques with hypnotic procedures to identify and modify comorbid psychological issues. To monitor the effect of the treatment, patient diaries (quality and quantity of sleep, intensity of pain and itch) and repeated psychometric tests were used. At the end of treatment there were improvements in all measured dimensions (itch, pain, insomnia, activity, anxiety and emotional state) both clinically and psychometrically. The authors conclude, that hypnosis can be an effective adjunctive therapy in atopic dermatitis, and in certain severe cases may constitute a salvage therapy.

  9. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction.

  10. NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN DRUG TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU. N. Perlamutrov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Actuality. High incidence of atopic dermatitis and its association with systemic pathology determine the need of broad treatment options on the base of the modern data on pathophysiology of the disease. Aim of the study. Analysis of the clinical efficacy of the complex therapy with application drug Kestine® and probiotic FlorOK. Materials and Methods of the study. 55 patients with atopic dermatitis with mild and medium severity stages were examined and treated. The SCORAD Index and the Prurindex were used for assessment of AD severity; H2- test was used for evaluation of the digestive system function. Study results. It was stated high clinical efficacy of the complex therapy with application drug Kestine® and probiotic FlorOK accompanied by fast arrest of the itch.

  11. Selected aspects of quality of life in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kasznia-Kocot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic dermatological disease of multifactorial pathogenesis with persistent pruritus and extreme skin dryness including typical skin changes caused by many interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The study aims to evaluate the selected aspects of quality of life in AD. Material and methods. To what extent does the disease affect the daily practice of the patient and their family, what are their expenditures in connection with the treatment, and also how they perceive themselves and emotional, sexual, social behavior. 71 adult subjects 48(68% women and 23 (32% men were selected from the allergology clinics in the region of Silesia for this questionnaire based study. Results. Pruritus was felt by everyone, skin pain by 69%, and skin burning by 86%. The great majority of subjects had some constrains in doing housework due to skin complaints. The disease also affected professional work and school achievements. Almost everyone agreed that money spent on medication purchase and skin care agents impacted on financial resources. Atopic dermatitis affected 75% in social functioning, leisure time, sports practicing. The disease affected self-esteem level and confidence. Half of the examined subjects experienced bad feelings in contact with a partner, or felt stigmatized by negative reactions of the environment because of the skin appearance. Often atopic dermatitis caused problems with sound sleep (65% various emotional disorders and also disorders in the sexual sphere (32%. Every fourth subject felt depressed and every seventh thought of suicide. Conclusions. Atopic dermatitis is a disease which adversely influences many aspects of life and undoubtedly impairs the quality of life in a serious and distressing way. Therefore its treatment should be supported by psychotherapy.

  12. The role of melatonin in autoimmune and atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Calvo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the main secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during the night. Melatonin is a pleitropic molecule with a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms and has a great functional versatility, including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses the capacity to modulate immune responses by regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance and cytokine production. Immune system eradicates infecting organisms without serious injury to host tissues, but sometimes these responses are inadequately controlled, giving rise to called hypersensitivity diseases, or inappropriately targeted to host tissues, causing the autoimmune diseases. In clinical medicine, the hypersensitivity diseases include the allergic or atopic diseases and the hallmarks of these diseases are the activation of TH2 cells and the production of IgE antibody. Regarding autoimmunity, at the present time we know that the key events in the development of autoimmunity are a failure or breakdown of the mechanisms normally responsible for maintaining self-tolerance in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both, the recognition of self-antigens by autoreactive lymphocytes, the activation of these cells to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells, and the tissue injury caused by the effector cells and their products. Melatonin treatment has been investigated in atopic diseases, in several animal models of autoimmune diseases, and has been also evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the role of melatonin in atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis and asthma and in several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis rheumatoid, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) utility library software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Dickson, Richard W.; Wolverton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The individual software processes used in the flight computers on-board the Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) aircraft have many common functional elements. A library of commonly used software modules was created for general uses among the processes. The library includes modules for mathematical computations, data formatting, system database interfacing, and condition handling. The modules available in the library and their associated calling requirements are described.

  14. Quality of Life of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Marciniak; Adam Reich; Jacek C. Szepietowski

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic dermatitis in children. The influence of AD on quality of life of parents of children with AD was studied using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI). Fifty children with AD were included in the study (age range 2–24 months) together with their parents. Children’s AD was found to influence the quality of life of both parents; however, it had a more significant influence on quality of life of moth...

  15. Maternal sensitivity and social support protect against childhood atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Letourneau, Nicole L.; Kozyrskyj, Anita L.; Cosic, Nela; Ntanda, Henry N.; Anis, Lubna; Hart, Martha J.; Campbell, Tavis S.; Giesbrecht, Gerald F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Many studies have identified associations between qualities of maternal?child relationships and childhood asthma, but few have examined associations with childhood atopic dermatitis (AD), a common precursor to asthma. Moreover, maternal psychological distress, including prenatal and postnatal depression, anxiety and stress, may increase risk, while social support from partners may reduce risk for childhood AD. We sought to uncover the association between maternal?infant relationshi...

  16. Emollient treatment of atopic dermatitis: latest evidence and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review current classes of emollients in the market, their clinical efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD and considerations for choice of an emollient. Methods: PubMed Clinical Queries under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow and Systematic Reviews were used as the search engine. Keywords of ‘emollient or moisturizer’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’ were used. Overview of findings: Using the keywords of ‘emollient’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’, there were 105 and 36 hits under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow and Systematic Reviews, respectively. Plant-derived products, animal products and special ingredients were discussed. Selected proprietary products were tabulated. Conclusions: A number of proprietary emollients have undergone trials with clinical data available on PubMed-indexed journals. Most moisturizers showed some beneficial effects, but there was generally no evidence that one moisturizer is superior to another. Choosing an appropriate emollient for AD patients would improve acceptability and adherence for emollient treatment. Physician’s recommendation is the primary consideration for patients when selecting a moisturizer/ emollient; therefore, doctors should provide evidence-based information about these emollients.

  17. OMALIZUMAB: EXPANDED OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE ATOPIC DISEASES TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Kulichenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The review highlights experience and administration perspectives of the immunobiological medication Omalizumab in allergy. Omalizumab is the anti'IgE monoclonal antibody. Growing successful experience of anti'IgE application confirms the assumption that treatment by Omalizumab may modify the course of bronchial asthma, by preventing the remodeling processes in the respiratory tracts and reducing hyperactivity of bronchi. Today, it is widely discussed what other possible areas of anti'IgE therapy there might be. Omalizumab might be very important in treatment of different potentially IgE'dependent diseases, among which there is urticaria and angioneurotic edema, allergic rhinitis, nasal polyposis and severe forms of allergic conjunctivitis. Besides, Omalizumab, as part of the allergen specific immunotherapy protocol, may also provide sizable advantages. The author reveals potential role of Omalizumab in treatment of other atopic diseases, such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy.Key words: Omalizumab, anti'IgE therapy, biological agents, IgЕ, bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, idiopathic urticaria fever, treatment, children.

  18. Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Atopic Patients Exposed to Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, N.K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease that arises most commonly during early infancy, and is characterized by severe pruritus, age-dependant skin manifestations, and a fluctuating clinical course. Hereditary, environmental and immunological factors are involved in the aetiopathogenesis of AD. Also the differentiation of helper T- cells, local cytokine profile, IgE, infectious agents and superantigens are factors identified as being involved in the pathogenesis of AD. One hundred patients with AD were selected from the outpatient clinic of the National Center for Radiation Research and Technology in Cairo, Egypt. They were divided into 2 groups; group 1 included radiation workers in the Hall of gamma irradiation unit and group 2 included workers outside controlled area and not exposed to radiation with comparable age and sex. The severity of the disease was evaluated according to the grade of atopic dermatitis. Total and specific serum IgE was measured and Complete Blood Count was also carried out. Four Malassezia species were isolated from AD patients M. globosa, M. furfur, M. sympodialis and M. obtusa. The clinical isolates consisted of two bacterial strains, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The significant increase of AD severity seems to be more closely related to the prevalence of S. aureus and Malassezia on the skin of radiation workers. This was proved by the presence of high IgE and eosinophils in radiation workers. So, the interactions of low gamma radiation and skin seems to further complicate the risk of assessments of atopic dermatitis

  19. CYCLOSPORINE IN TREATMENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Alekseeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AtD is one of the most widespread types of allergic lesions of skin in children. Increase of severe types of AtD with lesion of big parts of skin, high frequency of exacerbations, presence of concomitant atopic diseases, and inefficiency of standard therapeutic approaches, torpid clinical course and early development of disability, causes an anxiety. Present standard approaches can be ineffective in children with severe clinical course of AtD and they are not able to prevent progression of disease, development of severe exacerbations and child’s disability. One of therapeutic alternatives for these patients is treatment with immunosuppressive agents. The article describes questions of treatment with cyclosporine in systemic therapy of severe resistant forms of AtD in children. Author discusses effectiveness and safety of a drug, formulated rules of treatment of severe AtD with cyclosporine. Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, cyclosporine, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:117-120

  20. Pro-inflammatory interleukins in middle ear effusions from atopic and non-atopic children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Stankiewicz-Szymczak, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    Chronic otitis media with effusion (OME) is associated with irreversible changes in the middle ear, sometimes leading to hearing loss and abnormal language development in children. While the pathogenesis of OME is not fully understood, inflammatory and allergic factors are thought to be involved. The study aimed to investigate the role of cytokines in the local development of chronic OME, and assess differences in the cytokine profiles between atopic and non-atopic children. 84 atopic and non-atopic children with chronic OME (mean age of 6 years 7 months) were studied. Age-matched children with hypertrophy of the adenoids and Eustachian tube dysfunction served as the control group. The number of past acute otitis media (AOM) episodes, their age, and the type of effusion were recorded for all children. Pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8) were determined and the presence of pathogenic bacteria in the patients' effusions was examined. High concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were found in the effusions in all children with chronic OME, with the highest levels observed in the non-atopic group. The atopic group showed persistently high IL-1β levels, while in the non-atopic children, IL-1β and TNF-α levels positively correlated with the patient's age and the number of past AOM episodes. Pathogenic bacteria were more frequently isolated from effusions in non-atopic children. In both atopic and non-atopic children, pro-inflammatory cytokines are found at high concentrations. This argues in favor of instituting anti-inflammatory management for treating OME, regardless of atopy.

  1. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...... at the site of each biopsy. After fixation and plastic embedding, the biopsies were cut into 2 microns serial sections. Ten sections, 30 microns apart, from each biopsy were examined and stained alternately with either toluidine blue or Giemsa stain and mast cell profile numbers were determined. The study...

  2. The Association Between Bathing Habits and Severity of Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroulis, Ioannis; Pyle, Tia; Kopylov, David; Little, Anthony; Gaughan, John; Kratimenos, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that frequently affects children. The current recommendations on management using lifestyle modification are highly variable, leading to confusion and uncertainty among patients. To determine current bathing behaviors and the subsequent impact on disease severity. This was an observational cross-sectional study conducted at an urban pediatric emergency department. Parents were asked to fill out a questionnaire concerning the patient's bathing habits. The results were correlated with the atopic dermatitis severity determined by the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) tool. No difference between variables was found to be significant for bathing frequency, time spent bathing, or use of moisturizers. Multivariate analysis showed that atopic dermatitis severity increased with age greater than 2 years (P = .0004) and with greater bathing duration (P = .001). Atopic dermatitis severity may be associated with a longer duration of bathing. The frequency of bathing does not appear to affect atopic dermatitis severity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Management of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: The Role of Emollient Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Catherine Mack Correa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disorder that afflicts a growing number of young children. Genetic, immune, and environmental factors interact in a complex fashion to contribute to disease expression. The compromised stratum corneum found in atopic dermatitis leads to skin barrier dysfunction, which results in aggravation of symptoms by aeroallergens, microbes, and other insults. Infants—whose immune system and epidermal barrier are still developing—display a higher frequency of atopic dermatitis. Management of patients with atopic dermatitis includes maintaining optimal skin care, avoiding allergic triggers, and routinely using emollients to maintain a hydrated stratum corneum and to improve barrier function. Flares of atopic dermatitis are often managed with courses of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. This paper discusses the role of emollients in the management of atopic dermatitis, with particular emphasis on infants and young children.

  4. Regulation of T cell immunity in atopic dermatitis by microbes: The Yin and Yang of cutaneous inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo eBiedermann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease predominantly mediated by T helper cells. While numerous adaptive immune mechanisms in AD pathophysiology have been elucidated in detail, deciphering the impact of innate immunity in AD pathogenesis has made substantial progress in recent years and is currently a fast evolving field. As innate and adaptive immunity are intimately linked cross-talks between these two branches of the immune system are critically influencing the resulting immune response and disease. Innate immune recognition of the cutaneous microbiota was identified to substantially contribute to immune homeostasis and shaping of protective adaptive immunity in the absence of inflammation. Disturbances in the composition of the skin microbiome with reduced microbial diversity and overabundance of Staphylococcus spp. have been shown to be associated with AD inflammation. Distinct S. aureus associated microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs binding to TLR2 heterodimers could be identified to initiate long lasting cutaneous inflammation driven by T helper cells and consecutively local immune suppression by induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC further favoring secondary skin infections as often seen in AD patients. Moreover dissecting cellular and molecular mechanisms in cutaneous innate immune sensing in AD pathogenesis paved the way for exploiting regulatory and anti-inflammatory pathways to attenuate skin inflammation. Activation of the innate immune system by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria on AD skin alleviated cutaneous inflammation. The induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells, Interleukin-10 expression and regulatory Tr1 cells were shown to mediate this beneficial effect. Thus, activation of innate immunity by MAMPs of non-pathogenic bacteria for induction of regulatory T cell phenotypes seems to be a promising strategy for treatment of inflammatory skin disorders as atopic dermatitis. These

  5. Research statistics in Atopic Eczema: what disease is this?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon Kam-Lun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic eczema is a common and distressing disease. This study aims to review PubMed indexed research statistics on atopic eczema over a-10 year period to investigate the clinical relevance and research interest about this disease. Methods PubMed (a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched for the terms “atopic dermatitis” and “eczema”, with limits activated (Humans, Clinical Trial, Meta-Analysis, Randomized Controlled Trial, English, published in the last 10 years, and editorials, letters, practice guidelines, reviews, and animal studies excluded. Journal impact factor (IF is in accordance with Journal Citation Report (JCR 2009, a product of Thomson ISI (Institute for Scientific Information. Results A total of 890 articles were retrieved. Taking out publications that were irrelevant and those without an impact factor, 729 articles were obtained. These articles were grouped into dermatology (n = 337, mean IF: 3.01, allergy/immunology (n = 215, mean IF: 4.89, pediatrics (n = 118, mean IF: 2.53 and miscellaneous subject categories (n = 142, mean IF: 5.10. The impact factors were highest in the miscellaneous category (p = 0.0001, which includes such prestigious journals as the New England journal of Medicine (n = 1, IF: 47.05, the Lancet (n = 4, IF: 30.76 and BMJ (n = 6, IF: 13.66. There was no publication in any family medicine or general practice journal. The British Journal of Dermatology (n = 78, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (n = 49 and Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (n = 46 had the highest number of publications on the subject. Atopic eczema ranked higher in impact factors in allergy/immunology although more publications appeared in the dermatology category. Conclusions Atopic eczema is a multidisciplinary disease. Its clinical relevance and research interests are definitely beyond that of a mere cutaneous disease. Investigators may

  6. The effect of a homoeopathic complex on atopic dermatitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Tech. (Homoeopathy) Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a chronic, relapsing, allergic inflammatory skin disease (Hauk, 2008). The prevalence of atopic dermatitis has increased significantly over the past few decades, with highest rates of 45 – 64% occurring amongst preschool children (Butler, 2009), and 40% amongst older children and adults (Manjra, 2005). This increase in prevalence is attributed to environmental factors such as microbial exposure and poor nutrition, which can all lea...

  7. Development of atopic dermatitis and its association with prenatal and early life exposures

    OpenAIRE

    Roduit, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Over 20% of children in industrialized countries are affected by atopic dermatitis. From epidemiological studies, it is quite obvious that the worldwide prevalence of atopic dermatitis has considerably increased over the past decades and constitutes a major public health problem. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that occurs in very early life and frequently precedes the development of asthma and allergic rhinitis during the first several years of life. Although a large...

  8. Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine as a clinical biomarker in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Yoko

    2014-03-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) is a member of the T-helper 2 chemokine family. In Japan, serum TARC level has been commercially measured since 2008. After years of experience, we realized that TARC is an extremely useful clinical biomarker for atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment. Usually, physicians conduct a visual examination to determine whether their treatment has been successful; however, the visual examination results may not always be accurate; in such cases, serum TARC levels should be measured to eliminate any ambiguity regarding the treatment outcome. When the waning and waxing of eczema and fluctuations in the serum TARC levels were considered, we frequently found that AD does not follow a natural course but follows non-regulated inflammatory floating caused by insufficient intermittent topical treatment. Serum TARC is a promising biomarker for remission and can be used for accurately monitoring proactive treatment for long-term control. Abnormally high serum TARC levels indicate accelerated pathogenesis of cutaneous inflammation. Rapid normalization and maintaining normal serum TARC levels using appropriate topical treatment is a reasonable strategy for alleviating inflammation without upregulating cytokine expression. Observing serum TARC levels during early intervention for severe infantile AD is worthwhile to determine initial disease activity and evaluate treatment efficacy. Appropriate control of severe early-onset infantile AD is important for improving prognosis of eczema and for preventing food allergies. Additionally, this biomarker is useful for improving patient adherence. Dermatologists will be able to make great progress in treating AD by adopting biomarkers such as TARC for accurately assessing non-visible subclinical disorders. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  9. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson R. Meda

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.Foram conduzidos experimentos de laboratórios para avaliar os efeitos de extratos de plantas solúveis em água na acidez do solo. Os materiais de plantas foram: aveia preta, nabo, tremoço branco e azul, mucuna cinza e anã, Crotalaria spectabilis e C. breviflora, milheto, guandu, grama estrela, grama mato grosso, folhas de café, folhas de cana-de-açúcar, palhada de arroz e palhada de trigo. Foi utilizado o seguinte procedimento para o extrato da planta solúvel em água: pesar 3g de material de planta, adicionar 150 ml de água, agitar por 8h e filtrar. Os extratos de plantas foram adicionados na superfície do solo em uma coluna de PVC (1 ml min-1. Após, adicionou-se água deionizada em quantidade equivalente a três volumes de poros. Os extratos de plantas aumentaram o pH, Ca e K trocável e diminuíram Al. Nabo, aveia preta e tremoço azul foram os melhores e milheto o pior material para amenizar a acidez do solo. Nabo aumentou Al na água de drenagem. As altera

  10. Impact of government poverty alleviation programmes on the socio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite these programmes, poverty still exists among Nigerians especially the youth. This study therefore examines the impact of government poverty alleviation programmes on the youth. The population of the study comprised of all youths who have benefited from government poverty alleviation programmes. The Random ...

  11. Sensitization patterns in Compositae-allergic patients with current or past atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2013-01-01

    Background. An association between Compositae sensitization and atopic dermatitis has been suggested on the basis of case reports and clinical studies. Objectives. To describe the characteristics of sensitization in Compositae-allergic patients with current and/or past atopic dermatitis. Patients/materials......-atopics, except that dandelion was an important allergen in children. Cobalt allergy was the most frequent other contact allergy, occurring in 37%. Conclusions. Persons with current or past atopic dermatitis may become sensitized to Compositae at any age, both occupationally and non-occupationally. They should...

  12. Early-life risk factors for occurrence of atopic dermatitis during the first year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Mikio; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Mizuno, Takahisa; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Tokuyama, Kenichi; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2007-03-01

    In a prospective birth cohort study, we sought to identify perinatal predictors of the occurrence of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. Associations of family history, infection during pregnancy, cord blood cytokine concentrations, and skin function parameters with atopic dermatitis were analyzed. Stratum corneum hydration was measured with an impedance meter until 5 days after delivery and again at 1 month. Complete data were obtained for 213 infants, including 27 diagnosed by a physician as having atopic dermatitis during their first year and 26 diagnosed as having infantile eczema during their first month. The risk of atopic dermatitis during the first year of life was related to maternal atopic dermatitis, lower concentrations of macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta in cord blood, and greater skin moisture in the surface and stratum corneum of the forehead and cheek at 1 month of age but not to viral or bacterial infection during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Paternal hay fever was associated negatively with the development of atopic dermatitis. High concentrations of interleukin-5, interleukin-17, and macrophage chemotactic protein-1 and only surface moisture in the cheek were associated with greater risk of infantile eczema in the first month. The association of atopic dermatitis in infancy with reduced neonatal macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta levels suggests a link with immature immune responses at birth. Stratum corneum barrier disruption in atopic dermatitis may involve impairment of cutaneous adaptation to extrauterine life. The majority of risk factors had different effects on infant eczema and atopic dermatitis, indicating different causes.

  13. Risk factors for non-atopic asthma/wheeze in children and adolescents: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Strina, Agostino; Barreto, Mauricio L; Cooper, Philip J; Rodrigues, Laura C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The study of non-atopic asthma/wheeze in children separately from atopic asthma is relatively recent. Studies have focused on single risk factors and had inconsistent findings.\\ud \\ud OBJECTIVE: To review evidence on factors associated with non-atopic asthma/wheeze in children and adolescents.\\ud \\ud METHODS: A review of studies of risk factors for non-atopic asthma/wheeze which had a non-asthmatic comparison group, and assessed atopy by skin-prick test or allergen-specific IgE.\\u...

  14. Domestic dog exposure at birth reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, S; Thyssen, J P; Stokholm, J

    2016-01-01

    without atopic disease (adjusted HR = 0.92 [0.49-1.73], P = 0.79). Paternal atopic status did not affect the risk of atopic dermatitis. We found no significant interaction between the CD14 T/T genotype and domestic dog exposure in either cohort (COPSAC2000 , P = 0.36; and COPSAC2010 cohort, P = 0...... (COPSAC2010 ) were analyzed following the same protocols at the same research site. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed prospectively according to the Hanifin-Rajka criteria. Parental history of asthma, eczema, or rhinitis was defined by self-reported physician diagnosis. In the COPSAC2000 , maternal specific...

  15. Thymus is enlarged in children with current atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Braae; Andersen, Gratien; Jeppesen, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder of unknown aetiology with peak incidence in early childhood. The disease is associated with peripheral T-cell accumulation in the skin. The thymus is a key organ of the cellular immune response early in life. We hypothesized that atopic dermatitis...... is associated with an unbalanced establishment of the peripheral T-lymphocyte system. This cross-sectional study was performed to compare thymus sizes in patients with atopic dermatitis and healthy controls. Thirty-seven children with current atopic dermatitis were enrolled and compared with 29 healthy controls...... of thymus is compatible with increased thymic activity and emission of T lymphocytes....

  16. Sensor comparison study for load alleviating wind turbine pitch control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Knud Abildgaard; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    2014-01-01

    As the size of wind turbines increases, the load alleviating capabilities of the turbine controller are becoming increasingly important. Load alleviating control schemes have traditionally been based on feedback from load sensor; however, recent developments of measurement technologies have enabled...... control on the basis of preview measurements of the inflow acquired using, e.g., light detection and ranging. The potential of alleviating load variations that are caused by mean wind speed changes through feed-forward control have been demonstrated through both experiments and simulations in several...... studies, whereas the potential of preview control for alleviating the load variations caused by azimuth dependent inflow variations is less described. Individual or cyclic pitch is required to alleviate azimuth dependent load variations and is traditionally applied through feedback control of the blade...

  17. Alleviating energy poverty for the world's poor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Ambuj D.

    2005-01-01

    Improving energy services for poor households in developing countries remains one of the most pressing challenges facing the development community. The dependence of these households on traditional forms of energy leads to significant health impacts as well as other major disbenefits, yet there has been little progress in meeting this challenge. This viewpoint argues for an 'energy-poverty alleviation' fund to help provide modern energy services to these households. It also proposes an approach through which to create such a fund, namely by introducing an incremental levy on petroleum. Notably, this scheme does not need a global agreement since a levy could be introduced by major oil-exporting countries. The implementation of this mechanism would result in a climate-friendly outcome (even before taking into account the elimination of products of incomplete combustion resulting from the traditional household use of biomass-based fuels) while providing immense socio-economic benefits to the world's poor. Such an approach would allow significant progress on the sustainable development front while reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, and therefore is very much consistent with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  19. Atopic dermatitis in children: prospects of using innovation products as an external therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Tlish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the research: to determine the efficacy of a new line of Atopic cosmetic products for skin care in children suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and methods: The study involved three groups of 15 children aged 3-12 suffering from atopic dermatitis in each group. Subjects from Group 1 were treated with Atopic Soothing Cream, from Group 2 with Atopic Soothing Stick Cream and from Group 3 with Atopic Everyday Care Cream. Different inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed for each group, and the algorithm for the product application and efficacy criteria were determined. According to recommendations, Atopic Soothing Cream and Atopic Soothing Stick Cream were applied to clean and dry skin in the morning and in the evening for the study period of 14 days. The patients’ skin condition was assessed prior to the study and on Day 14 of the therapy; the assessment covered parameters necessary for calculating the SCORAD Index. Atopic Everyday Care Cream was applied to clean and dry skin in the morning and in the evening for 28 days. The patients’ skin condition was assessed prior to the study and on Days 14 and 28 of the therapy including the SCORAD Index and assessments of the skin hydration level of the epidermal corneous layer and transepidermal waster loss (TEWL using the DermaLabCombo CORTEX device. According to the study results, the line of Atopic cosmetic products fully complies with the properties specified by the manufacturer, reliably improves the skin condition in children suffering from atopic dermatitis, has no irritant or sensitizing effect, and can be recommended for the complex treatment and rehabilitation of patients suffering from the pathology.

  20. Why may allopregnanolone help alleviate loneliness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, S; Cacioppo, J T

    2015-12-01

    Impaired biosynthesis of Allopregnanolone (ALLO), a brain endogenous neurosteroid, has been associated with numerous behavioral dysfunctions, which range from anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors to aggressive behavior and changes in responses to contextual fear conditioning in rodent models of emotional dysfunction. Recent animal research also demonstrates a critical role of ALLO in social isolation. Although there are likely aspects of perceived social isolation that are uniquely human, there is also continuity across species. Both human and animal research show that perceived social isolation (which can be defined behaviorally in animals and humans) has detrimental effects on physical health, such as increased hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, and increased depressive behavior. The similarities between animal and human research suggest that perceived social isolation (loneliness) may also be associated with a reduction in the synthesis of ALLO, potentially by reducing BDNF regulation and increasing HPA activity through the hippocampus, amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), especially during social threat processing. Accordingly, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursor, such as pregnenolone), in humans may help alleviate loneliness. Congruent with our hypothesis, exogenous administration of ALLO (or ALLO precursors) in humans has been shown to improve various stress-related disorders that show similarities between animals and humans i.e., post-traumatic stress disorders, traumatic brain injuries. Because a growing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of ALLO in socially isolated animals, we believe our ALLO hypothesis can be applied to loneliness in humans, as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Arctigenin alleviates ER stress via activating AMPK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Sun, Xiao-xiao; Ye, Ji-ming; He, Li; Yan, Shou-sheng; Zhang, Hao-hao; Hu, Li-hong; Yuan, Jun-ying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effects of arctigenin (ATG), a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan from Arctium lappa L (Compositae), against ER stress in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: A cell-based screening assay for ER stress regulators was established. Cell viability was measured using MTT assay. PCR and Western blotting were used to analyze gene and protein expression. Silencing of the CaMKKβ, LKB1, and AMPKα1 genes was achieved by RNA interference (RNAi). An ATP bioluminescent assay kit was employed to measure the intracellular ATP levels. Results: ATG (2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/L) inhibited cell death and unfolded protein response (UPR) in a concentration-dependent manner in cells treated with the ER stress inducer brefeldin A (100 nmol/L). ATG (1, 5 and 10 μmol/L) significantly attenuated protein synthesis in cells through inhibiting mTOR-p70S6K signaling and eEF2 activity, which were partially reversed by silencing AMPKα1 with RNAi. ATG (1-50 μmol/L) reduced intracellular ATP level and activated AMPK through inhibiting complex I-mediated respiration. Pretreatment of cells with the AMPK inhibitor compound C (25 μmol/L) rescued the inhibitory effects of ATG on ER stress. Furthermore, ATG (2.5 and 5 μmol/L) efficiently activated AMPK and reduced the ER stress and cell death induced by palmitate (2 mmol/L) in INS-1 β cells. Conclusion: ATG is an effective ER stress alleviator, which protects cells against ER stress through activating AMPK, thus attenuating protein translation and reducing ER load. PMID:22705729

  2. Distinct molecular signatures of mild extrinsic and intrinsic atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta Cathrina; Litman, Thomas; Hald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with underlying defects in epidermal function and immune responses. In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate differences in gene expression in lesional skin from patients with mild extrinsic or intrinsic AD compared...... with mild extrinsic and intrinsic AD similar to previous reports for severe AD. Interestingly, expression of genes involved in inflammatory responses in intrinsic AD resembled that of psoriasis more than that of extrinsic AD. Overall, differences in expression of inflammation-associated genes found among...... patients with mild intrinsic and extrinsic AD correlated with previous findings for patients with severe intrinsic and extrinsic AD....

  3. GUIDELINES OF CARE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Tom, Wynnis L.; Chamlin, Sarah L.; Feldman, Steven R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Simpson, Eric L.; Berger, Timothy G.; Bergman, James N.; Cohen, David E.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Cordoro, Kelly M.; Davis, Dawn M.; Krol, Alfons; Margolis, David J.; Paller, Amy S.; Schwarzenberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Robert A.; Williams, Hywel C.; Elmets, Craig A.; Block, Julie; Harrod, Christopher G.; Begolka, Wendy Smith; Sidbury, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory dermatosis that affects up to 25% of children and 2–3% of adults. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in AD management and care, providing updated and expanded recommendations based on the available evidence. In this first of four sections, methods for diagnosis and monitoring of disease, outcomes measures for assessment and common clinical associations that affect patients with AD are discussed. Known risk factors for the development of disease are also reviewed. PMID:24290431

  4. A comparison between criteria for diagnosing atopic eczema in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøhnke, H; Vach, W; Norberg, L A

    2005-01-01

    Research Centre (DARC) criteria developed for this study and doctor-diagnosed visible eczema with typical morphology and atopic distribution. Additionally, the U.K. diagnostic criteria based on a questionnaire were used at 1 year of age. Agreement between the four criteria was analysed at each time point...... the four criteria demonstrated that cumulative incidences showed better agreement than point prevalence values. CONCLUSIONS: Agreement between different criteria for diagnosing AE was acceptable, but the mild cases constituted a diagnostic problem, although they were in the minority. Repeated examinations...

  5. Features of atopic dermatitis in children with oxalic acid dysmetabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Stoieva

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the features of atopic dermatitis in children with concomitant metabolic disturbances of oxalic acid. The influence of metabolic shifts was evaluated by clinical presentation, morphofunctional parameters of the skin and the features of oxalic acid metabolites excretion. In this study, a high incidence of dysmetabolic changes was identified, their significance was determined by the involvement of different systems for oxalic acid products excretion. The increased concentration of oxalate in the urine and in the exhaled air condensate had irritant effect and is associated with the hereditary metabolic disorders, early manifestation of atopy symptoms and the intensity of skin itching, with moderate increase of immunoglobulin E level.

  6. Climate change and atopic dermatitis: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang Huong; Andersen, Louise Kronborg; Davis, Mark Denis P

    2018-06-05

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease with a growing health concern, because of its high prevalence and associated low quality of life. The etiology of AD is multifactorial with interaction between various factors such as genetic predisposition, immune, and importantly, environmental factors. Since climate change is associated with a profound shift in environmental factors, we suggest that AD is being influenced by climate change. This review highlights the effects of ultraviolet light, temperature, humidity, pollens, air pollutants, and their interaction between them contributing to the epidemiology and pathophysiology of AD. © 2018 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  8. Evaluation Of Prick Test In Atopic Dermatitis And Chronic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available “Prick test” was carried out in 15 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and 10 patients with chronic urticaria (CU. Of the various aeroallergens tested, house dust mite (HDM, pollens, aspergillus furnigatus and insects were found to be most commonly positive. The common food allergens showing prick test positivity were egg white, fish, milk, brinjal, dal, groundnut and banana. Use of nasal filters showed 10-20% improvement in AD and 5 â€" 10% improvement in urticaria. Withdrawal of the responsible food article(s showed 20-30% improvement in patients with AD and urticaria.

  9. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  10. Geographical variations in the prevalence of atopic sensitization in six study sites across Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan-Yeung, M; Anthonisen, N R; Becklake, M R

    2010-01-01

    Geographical variations in atopic sensitization in Canada have not been described previously. This study used the standardized protocol of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey-1 (ECRHS-1) to investigate the distribution and predictors of atopic sensitization in six sites across Canada...

  11. Soaps and cleansers for atopic eczema, friends or foes? What every ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Knowledge of the pH level of soaps and cleansers used by patients with atopic eczema and sensitive skin is crucial, as high-alkalinity products are irritants and impair the normal skin barrier, so interfering with the adequate control of atopic eczema. Objectives. The aim of this study was to assess the pH of ...

  12. Analysis of food allergy in atopic dermatitis patients - association with concomitant allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Celakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few reports demonstrate the comorbidity of food allergy and allergic march in adult patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate, if there is some relation in atopic dermatitis patients at the age 14 years and older who suffer from food allergy to common food allergens to other allergic diseases and parameters as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed; these parameters were examined: food allergy (to wheat flour, cow milk, egg, peanuts and soy, the occurrence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. The statistical evaluation of the relations among individual parameters monitored was performed. Results: Food allergy was altogether confirmed in 65 patients (29% and these patients suffer significantly more often from bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. Persistent atopic dermatitis lesions and positive data in family history about atopy are recorded significantly more often in patients with confirmed food allergy to examined foods as well. On the other hand, the onset of atopic dermatitis under 5 year of age is not recorded significantly more often in patients suffering from allergy to examined foods. Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis patients suffering from food allergy suffer significantly more often from allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, persistent eczematous lesions and have positive data about atopy in their family history.

  13. A measurement of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime at the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewin, Marcus Philip [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the lifetime of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ baryon, performed using data from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ-$\\bar{v}$μX was reconstructed in approximately 1.3 fbμ-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A signal of 4437 ± 329 Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ- pairs was obtained, and the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime was measured using a binned X2 fit, which gives a value {tau}(Λ$0\\atop{b}$) = 1.290$+0.091\\atop{-1.110}$(stat)$+0.085\\atop{-0.091}$(syst) ps. This result is consistent with the world average and is one of the most precise measurements of this quantity.

  14. Prebiotics and probiotics: the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolad, N; Armstrong, A W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify whether supplementation with prebiotics and/or probiotics help prevent the development or reduce the severity of atopic dermatitis in children less than three years of age. Since 1997, immunostimulatory supplements, such as prebiotics and probiotics, have been investigated. Various supplementations include probiotics (single strain or mix), probiotics with formula, probiotics mix with prebiotics, and prebiotics. In this narrative review, we examined 13 key articles on prebiotics and/or probiotics, and their effects on infant atopic dermatitis. Among the selected studies, a total of 3,023 participants received supplements or placebo. Eight out of the 13 (61.5%) studies reported a significant effect on the prevention of atopic dermatitis after supplementation with probiotics and/or prebiotics. Five out of the 13 (38.5%) studies indicated significant reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis after supplementation. Based on the available studies, supplementation with certain probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) appears to be an effective approach for the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis. A mix of specific probiotic strains prevented atopic dermatitis among infants. Based on studies with prebiotics, there was a long-term reduction in the incidence of atopic dermatitis. Supplementation with prebiotics and probiotics appears useful for the reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis. Additional interventional studies exploring prebiotics and probiotics are imperative before recommendations can be made.

  15. Diagnostic Work-up and Treatment of Severe and/or Refractory Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.A. Devillers (Arjan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAtopic dermatitis (AD) or atopic eczema , is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by dry skin, itching and recurrent red and scaly skin lesions. It is a relatively common skin disease with an estimated prevalence of 10-20%. The majority of patients show their first clinical

  16. Towards global consensus on outcome measures for atopic eczema research: results of the HOME II meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis; Boers, Maarten; Thomas, Kim; Chalmers, Joanne; Roekevisch, Evelien; Schram, Mandy; Allsopp, Richard; Aoki, Valeria; Apfelbacher, Christian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Charman, Carolyn; Cohen, Arnon; Dohil, Magdalene; Flohr, Carsten; Furue, Masutaka; Gieler, Uwe; Hooft, Lotty; Humphreys, Rosemary; Ishii, Henrique Akira; Katayama, Ichiro; Kouwenhoven, Willem; Langan, Sinéad; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Merhand, Stephanie; Murota, Hiroyuki; Murrell, Dedee F; Nankervis, Helen; Ohya, Yukihiro; Oranje, Arnold; Otsuka, Hiromi; Paul, Carle; Rosenbluth, Yael; Saeki, Hidehisa; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Svensson, Ake; Takaoka, Roberto; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Weidinger, Stephan; Wollenberg, Andreas; Williams, Hywel

    2012-09-01

    The use of nonstandardized and inadequately validated outcome measures in atopic eczema trials is a major obstacle to practising evidence-based dermatology. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative is an international multiprofessional group dedicated to atopic eczema outcomes research. In June 2011, the HOME initiative conducted a consensus study involving 43 individuals from 10 countries, representing different stakeholders (patients, clinicians, methodologists, pharmaceutical industry) to determine core outcome domains for atopic eczema trials, to define quality criteria for atopic eczema outcome measures and to prioritize topics for atopic eczema outcomes research. Delegates were given evidence-based information, followed by structured group discussion and anonymous consensus voting. Consensus was achieved to include clinical signs, symptoms, long-term control of flares and quality of life into the core set of outcome domains for atopic eczema trials. The HOME initiative strongly recommends including and reporting these core outcome domains as primary or secondary endpoints in all future atopic eczema trials. Measures of these core outcome domains need to be valid, sensitive to change and feasible. Prioritized topics of the HOME initiative are the identification/development of the most appropriate instruments for the four core outcome domains. HOME is open to anyone with an interest in atopic eczema outcomes research. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Towards global consensus on outcome measures for atopic eczema research: results of the HOME II meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis; Boers, Maarten; Thomas, Kim; Chalmers, Joanne; Roekevisch, Evelien; Schram, Mandy; Allsopp, Richard; Aoki, Valeria; Apfelbacher, Christian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Charman, Carolyn; Cohen, Arnon; Dohil, Magdalene; Flohr, Carsten; Furue, Masutaka; Gieler, Uwe; Hooft, Lotty; Humphreys, Rosemary; Ishii, Henrique Akira; Katayama, Ichiro; Kouwenhoven, Willem; Langan, Sinéad; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Merhand, Stephanie; Murota, Hiroyuki; Murrell, Dedee F.; Nankervis, Helen; Ohya, Yukihiro; Oranje, Arnold; Otsuka, Hiromi; Paul, Carle; Rosenbluth, Yael; Saeki, Hidehisa; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Svensson, Ake; Takaoka, Roberto; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Weidinger, Stephan; Wollenberg, Andreas; Williams, Hywel

    2012-01-01

    The use of nonstandardized and inadequately validated outcome measures in atopic eczema trials is a major obstacle to practising evidence-based dermatology. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative is an international multiprofessional group dedicated to atopic eczema outcomes

  18. Contact sensitization in Dutch children and adolescents with and without atopic dermatitis - a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbes, Stefanie; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Smitt, Johannes H. Sillevis; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; Middelkamp-Hup, Maritza A

    Background. Allergic contact dermatitis is known to occur in children with and without atopic dermatitis, but more data are needed on contact sensitization profiles in these two groups. Objectives. To identify frequent allergens in children with and without atopic dermatitis suspected of having

  19. Risk factors for atopic dermatitis in infants at high risk of allergy : the PIAMA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M; Koopman, LP; van Strien, RT; Wijga, A; Smit, HA; Aalberse, RC; Neijens, HJ; Brunekreef, B; Postma, DS; Gerritsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the period immediately after birth is a sensitive period for the development of atopic disease. Objective We investigated whether birth characteristics and environmental factors are associated with the development of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life.

  20. Risk factors for atopic dermatitis in infants at high risk of allergy: the PIAMA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, M.; Koopman, L. P.; van Strien, R. T.; Wijga, A.; Smit, H. A.; Aalberse, R. C.; Neijens, H. J.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D. S.; Gerritsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that the period immediately after birth is a sensitive period for the development of atopic disease. We investigated whether birth characteristics and environmental factors are associated with the development of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. Seventy-six children

  1. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Nermes, M.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Satokari, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were

  2. Early-life rotavirus and norovirus infections in relation to development of atopic manifestation in infants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimerink, J.; Stelma, F.F.; Rockx, B.; Brouwer, D.; Stobberingh, E.E.; Ree, R. van; Dompeling, E.; Mommers, M.; Thijs, C.; Koopmans, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increase in incidence of atopic diseases (ADs) in the developed world over the past decades has been associated with reduced exposure of childhood infections. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between early intestinal viral infections in relation to the development of atopic

  3. Towards global consensus on outcome measures for atopic eczema research : Results of the HOME II meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis; Boers, Maarten; Thomas, Kim; Chalmers, Joanne; Roekevisch, Evelien; Schram, Mandy; Allsopp, Richard; Aoki, Valeria; Apfelbacher, Christian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Charman, Carolyn; Cohen, Arnon; Dohil, Magdalene; Flohr, Carsten; Furue, Masutaka; Gieler, Uwe; Hooft, Lotty; Humphreys, Rosemary; Ishii, Henrique Akira; Katayama, Ichiro; Kouwenhoven, Willem; Langan, Sinéad; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Merhand, Stephanie; Murota, Hiroyuki; Murrell, Dedee F; Nankervis, Helen; Ohya, Yukihiro; Oranje, Arnold; Otsuka, Hiromi; Paul, Carle; Rosenbluth, Yael; Saeki, Hidehisa; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Svensson, Ake; Takaoka, Roberto; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Weidinger, Stephan; Wollenberg, Andreas; Williams, Hywel

    The use of nonstandardized and inadequately validated outcome measures in atopic eczema trials is a major obstacle to practising evidence-based dermatology. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative is an international multiprofessional group dedicated to atopic eczema outcomes

  4. Recall Bias in Childhood Atopic Diseases Among Adults in The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, Charlotte G; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease in childhood and an important risk factor for the later development of other atopic diseases. Many publications on childhood AD use questionnaires based on information obtained in adulthood, which introduce the possibility of recall bias. In a prospectiv...

  5. The association of intrafamilial violence against children with symptoms of atopic and non-atopic asthma: A cross-sectional study in Salvador, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Bonfim, Camila Barreto; dos Santos, Darci Neves; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe the types of intrafamilial violence perpetrated against children according to living conditions, family factors, and child characteristics, and to identify the association between types of intrafamilial violence and asthma symptoms in atopic and non-atopic children. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 1,370 caregivers as part of the Social Changes, Asthma and Allergy in Latin America (SCAALA) study, conducted in 2006 in Brazil. The study population was sel...

  6. Children with atopic dermatitis may have unacknowledged contact allergies contributing to their skin symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A B; Johansen, J D; Deleuran, M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether children with atopic dermatitis have an altered risk of contact allergy than children without atopic dermatitis is frequently debated and studies have been conflicting. Theoretically, the impaired skin barrier in AD facilitates the penetration of potential allergens and several...... authors have highlighted the risk of underestimating and overlooking contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of contact allergy in Danish children with atopic dermatitis and explore the problem of unacknowledged allergies maintaining or aggravating...... one contact allergy that was relevant to the current skin symptoms. The risk of contact allergy was significantly correlated to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Metals and components of topical skin care products were the most frequent sensitizers. CONCLUSION: Patch testing is relevant...

  7. Neonatal BCG vaccination and atopic dermatitis before 13 months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøstesen, Lisbeth Marianne; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pihl, Gitte Thybo

    2018-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination may reduce the risk of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis. The Danish Calmette Study was conducted 2012-2015. Within 7 days of birth new-borns were randomised 1:1 to BCG or no BCG. Exclusion criteria were gestational...... in the control group (RR=0.90 (95% confidence intervals 0.80 to 1.00)). The effect of neonatal BCG vaccination differed significantly between children with atopic predisposition (RR 0.84 (0.74 to 0.95)) and children without atopic predisposition (RR 1.09 (0.88 to 1.37)) (test of no interaction, p=0.04). Among...... children with atopic predisposition, the number-needed-to-treat with BCG to prevent one case of atopic dermatitis was 21 (12 to 76). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  8. Neonatal BCG-vaccination and atopic dermatitis before 13 months of age. A randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøstesen, Lisbeth Marianne; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pihl, Gitte Thybo

    2017-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination may reduce the risk of allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis. The Danish Calmette Study was conducted 2012-2015. Within 7 days of birth new-borns were randomised 1:1 to BCG or no BCG. Exclusion criteria were gestational...... in the control group (RR=0.90 (95% confidence intervals 0.80 to 1.00)). The effect of neonatal BCG vaccination differed significantly between children with atopic predisposition (RR 0.84 (0.74 to 0.95)) and children without atopic predisposition (RR 1.09 (0.88 to 1.37)) (test of no interaction, p=0.04). Among...... children with atopic predisposition, the number-needed-to-treat with BCG to prevent one case of atopic dermatitis was 21 (12 to 76). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  9. Th17-cells in atopic dermatitis stimulate orthodontic root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, K; Yamaguchi, M; Asano, M; Fujita, S; Kobayashi, R; Kasai, K

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how atopic dermatitis (AD) contributes to root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. Atopic dermatitis model mice and wild-type mice were subjected to an excessive orthodontic force (OF) to induce movement of the upper first molars. The expression levels of the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), IL-17, IL-6, and RANKL proteins were determined in the periodontal ligament (PDL) by an immunohistochemical analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the compression force on co-cultures of CD4(+) cells from AD patients or healthy individuals and human PDL cells were investigated with regard to the levels of secretion and mRNA expression of IL-17, IL-6, RANKL, and osteoprotegerin. The immunoreactivities for TRAP, IL-17, IL-6, and RANKL in the AD group were found to be significantly increased. The double immunofluorescence analysis for IL-17/CD4 detected immunoreaction. The secretion of IL-17, IL-6, and RANKL, and the mRNA levels of IL-6 and RANKL in the AD patients were increased compared with those in healthy individuals. Th17 cells may therefore be associated with the deterioration of root resorption of AD mice, and may explain why AD patients are more susceptible to root resorption than healthy individuals when an excessive OF is applied. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. What Should General Practice Trainees Learn about Atopic Eczema?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepani Munidasa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective atopic eczema (AE control not only improves quality of life but may also prevent the atopic march. The Royal College of General Practitioners’ (RCGP curriculum does not currently provide specific learning outcomes on AE management. We aimed to gain consensus on learning outcomes to inform curriculum development. A modified Delphi method was used with questionnaires distributed to gather the views of a range of health care professionals (HCPs including general practitioners (GPs, dermatologists, dermatology nurses and parents of children with AE attending a dedicated paediatric dermatology clinic. Ninety-one questionnaires were distributed to 61 HCPs and 30 parents; 81 were returned. All agreed that learning should focus on the common clinical features, complications and management of AE and the need to appreciate its psychosocial impact. Areas of divergence included knowledge of alternative therapies. Parents felt GPs should better understand how to identify, manage and refer severe AD and recognized the value of the specialist eczema nurse. Dermatologists and parents highlighted inconsistencies in advice regarding topical steroids. This study identifies important areas for inclusion as learning outcomes on AE management in the RCGP curriculum and highlights the importance of patients and parents as a valuable resource in the development of medical education.

  11. Can Earth Sciences Help Alleviate Global Poverty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    essential and could hold the key to making gains toward alleviating the burden of global poverty.

  12. Effect of Dry Season Tomato Farming on Poverty Alleviation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Dry Season Tomato Farming on Poverty Alleviation among Women ... their major sources of resources for tomato farming, marketing and marketing ... and the effect of dry season tomato farming as strategy for poverty reduction; ...

  13. Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdarrifa calyx alleviates anemia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdarrifa calyx alleviates anemia and organ damage in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats. IA Umar, E Daikwo, NG Maryoms, A Gidado, LB Buratai, FS Saka, MA Ibrahim ...

  14. Phosphorus and humic acid application alleviate salinity stress of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phosphorus and humic acid application alleviate salinity stress of pepper seedling. ... It consequently affects plant growth and yield and ameliorates the deleterious effects of salt stress. The objective of the study ... from 32 Countries: Algeria (5) ...

  15. Is Patch Testing with Food Additives Useful in Children with Atopic Eczema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catli, Gonul; Bostanci, Ilknur; Ozmen, Serap; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Duman, Handan; Ertan, Ulker

    2015-01-01

    Atopy patch testing is a useful way to determine delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to foods and aeroallergens. Although food additives have been accused of worsening atopic eczema symptoms, according to recent studies the role of food additives in atopic eczema remains unclear. The purpose of our study was to investigate food additive hypersensitivity in a group of children with atopic eczema by using standardized atopy patch testing and to determine the role of food additive hypersensitivity in atopic eczema. Thirty-four children with atopic eczema and 33 healthy children were enrolled in the study. Children who consumed foods containing additives and did not use either antihistamines or local or systemic corticosteroids for at least 7 days prior to admission were enrolled in the study. All children were subjected to atopy patch testing and after 48 and 72 hours their skin reactions were evaluated by using the guidelines. Positive atopy patch test results were significantly higher in the atopic eczema group. Forty-one percent of the atopic eczema group (n = 14) and 15.2% (n = 5) of the control group had positive atopy patch test results with food additives (p = 0.036) (estimated relative risk 1.68, case odds 0.7, control odds 0.17). Carmine hypersensitivity and the consumption of foods containing carmine, such as gumdrops, salami, and sausage, were significantly higher in the children with atopic eczema. This is the first study investigating hypersensitivity to food additives in children with atopic eczema. Our results indicate that carmine may play a role in atopic eczema. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Breastfeeding and atopic eczema in Japanese infants: The Osaka Maternal and Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Kiyohara, Chikako; Ohya, Yukihiro; Fukushima, Wakaba; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Hirota, Yoshio

    2009-05-01

    Epidemiological studies associated with breastfeeding have provided conflicting results about whether it is preventive or a risk factor for atopic eczema in children. The current prospective study investigated the relationship between breastfeeding and the risk of atopic eczema in Japan. A birth cohort of 763 infants was followed. The first survey during pregnancy and the second survey between 2 and 9 months postpartum collected information on potential confounding factors and atopic eczema status. Data on breastfeeding and symptoms of atopic eczema were obtained from questionnaires in the third survey from 16 to 24 months postpartum. The following variables were a priori selected as potential confounders: maternal age, maternal and paternal history of asthma, atopic eczema, and allergic rhinitis, indoor domestic pets (cats, dogs, birds, or hamsters), family income, maternal and paternal education, maternal smoking during pregnancy, baby's sex, baby's birth weight, baby's older siblings, household smoking in the same room as the infant, and time of delivery before the third survey. In the third survey, 142 infants (18.6%) were revealed to have developed atopic eczema based on criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. In an overall analysis, neither exclusive nor partial breastfeeding was significantly related to the risk of atopic eczema. After excluding 64 infants identified with suspected atopic eczema in the second survey, both exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months or more and partial breastfeeding for 6 months or more were independently associated with an increased risk of atopic eczema only among infants with no parental history of allergic disorders [multivariate odds ratios were 2.41 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-5.55) and 3.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-12.36), respectively]. The authors found that, overall, neither exclusive nor partial breastfeeding had a strong impact on the risk of atopic eczema. However, a parental

  17. Atopic dermatitis and concomitant disease patterns in children up to two years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Maria; Lannerö, Eva; Wickman, Magnus; Nordvall, S Lennart; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    There are few prospective studies of atopic dermatitis and co-existing diseases such as respiratory infections in children up to 2 years of age. Using annual questionnaires, we studied the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis and concomitant symptoms indicating other atopic diseases and respiratory infections in 0-2-year-old children in a prospective birth cohort of 4089 children. We found associations between atopic dermatitis and asthma (ratio of proportion 1.45, 95% CI 1.16-1.80), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (RP 2.25, CI 1.77-2.85), adverse reactions to foods (RP 3.20, CI 2.83-3.62), urticaria (RP 2.04, CI 1.80-2.31), acute otitis media (RP 1.13, CI 1.05-1.21), more than one pneumonia during the first and/or second year of life (RP 2.17, CI 1.14-4.15), and use of antibiotics at least twice yearly (RP 1.29, CI 1.07-1.56). The association between atopic dermatitis and respiratory infections persisted after stratification for asthma. There was a higher proportion of atopic disease manifestations, but not respiratory infections, in children with onset of atopic dermatitis during the first year of life than during the second. The study shows that during the first 2 years of life there is a significant association not only between atopic dermatitis and other atopic disease manifestations, but also between atopic dermatitis and respiratory infections manifested in an increased rate of acute otitis media, pneumonia and use of antibiotics.

  18. Evaluation of self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İjlal Erturan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by itchy skin lesions. Since adolescents are intensely interested in their physical appearance, chronic skin diseases in this period can adversely affect the development of self esteem. Atopic dermatitis is a skin disease that affects the appearance and there is an heightened attention to the body image in adolescence which is an important period of time in the development of self-esteem. Therefore, we aimed to investigate self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with atopic dermatitis and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. The Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI were used for determining self-esteem and quality of life. The Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD Index was used to assess the severity of atopic dermatitis. Results: It was found that patient group had lower self-esteem than healthy controls according to the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale. A statistically significant difference was observed in happiness/satisfaction and anxiety subscale scores between the patients and healthy controls while there was no significant difference between the other sub-scale scores. Mean value of dermatological quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than in healthy controls. A moderate negative correlation was found between self-esteem and CDLQI scores among adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Discussion: This study results have shown that self-esteem and dermatological quality of life were adversely affected in adolescents with atopic dermatitis irrespective of gender. These patients should be examined psychiatrically besides dermatological examination and treatment. We suggest that improvement will be observed in self-esteem and quality of

  19. Management of atopic dermatitis: safety and efficacy of phototherapy

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    Patrizi A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Annalisa Patrizi, Beatrice Raone, Giulia Maria RavaioliDepartment of Specialized, Diagnostic and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease that can affect all age groups. It is characterized by a relapsing course and a dramatic impact on quality of life for patients. Environmental interventions together with topical devices represent the mainstay of treatment for AD, in particular emollients, corticosteroids, and calcineurin inhibitors. Systemic treatments are reserved for severe cases. Phototherapy represents a valid second-line intervention in those cases where non-pharmacological and topical measures have failed. Different forms of light therapy are available, and have showed varying degrees of beneficial effect against AD: natural sunlight, narrowband (NB-UVB, broadband (BB-UVB, UVA, UVA1, cold-light UVA1, UVA and UVB (UVAB, full-spectrum light (including UVA, infrared and visible light, saltwater bath plus UVB (balneophototherapy, Goeckerman therapy (coal tar plus UVB radiation, psoralen plus UVA (PUVA, and other forms of phototherapy. In particular, UVA1 and NB-UVB have gained importance in recent years. This review illustrates the main trials comparing the efficacy and safety of the different forms of phototherapy. No sufficiently large randomized controlled studies have been performed as yet, and no light modality has been defined as superior to all. Parameters and dosing protocols may vary, although clinicians mainly refer to the indications included in the American Academy of Dermatology psoriasis guidelines devised by Menter et al in 2010. The efficacy of phototherapy (considering all forms in AD has been established in adults and children, as well as for acute (UVA1 and chronic (NB-UVB cases. Its use is suggested with strength of recommendation B and level of evidence II. Home phototherapy can also be performed

  20. The role of interleukin-1ß and interleukin-33 in atopic dermatitis

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    Rania M. Abdel Hay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Interleukin-1 super family is a group of cytokines that play a role in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Interleukin-33 is a member of this family and is known to induce expression of the T helper2 cytokines that are important players in atopic dermatitis. Aim: To evaluate the expression of interleukins-1ß and 33 as T helper2 cytokines inducers in patients with atopic dermatitis. Materials andMethods: This study included 20 atopic patients and 20 apparently healthy individuals serving as controls. Skin biopsies from all participants will be examined for detection of interleukins-1ß and 33 by ELISA technique.Results: Both interleukins were statistically higher (P<0.001 in patients than in controls. A statistically significant (P=0.011 highest levels of interleukin-33 was detected in severe cases of atopics when compared to mild and moderate cases. A significant correlation (r=0.632, P=0.003 between both interleukins was detected in atopics.Conclusions: This is the first study to evaluate both interleukin-1ß and33 together in atopic patients. Both interleukins could play a role in the recruitment of lymphocytes during the inflammatory reaction in atopic dermatitis and could be targeted in the treatment of resistant cases.

  1. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2007-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who wer...... dermatitis both in male and female patients (p = 0.98). The estimates were adjusted for age. The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis is attributable to mainly genetic differences between people. However, differences in environmental exposures also are of importance......The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were...... with a threefold increased risk among cotwins of an affected fraternal twin, relative to the general population. Genes accounted for 82% and nonshared environmental factors accounted for 18% of the individual susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to atopic...

  2. Atopic conditions and mental health problems: a 3-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Lars; Green, Kristian; Thoresen, Magne; Bjertness, Espen

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that atopic conditions at 15/16 years of age affect both internalized and externalized mental health problems 3 years later. Combined school and postal survey was conducted in urban and rural settings. A total of 3,674 adolescents (70.1% response rate) were followed at two time points and interviewed with similar questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-10) was used to assess internalized problems, and two subscales (conduct problems and hyperactivity) from the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire to measure externalized mental health problems. The atopic conditions investigated were asthma, hay fever and eczema by asking the adolescents whether these conditions were present or not. There was an increase in the prevalence of internalized mental health problems from about 17-25% and a decrease in externalized mental health problems and number of atopic conditions in the follow-up period. Of the atopic conditions, hay fever was most prevalent with about 34% at 15 years of age and 20% at 18. The asthma prevalence was at 10 and 5% and eczema at 25 and 10%, respectively. Internalized mental health problems among girls were significantly associated with atopic conditions 3 years earlier, also after controlling for confounding variables. To live with atopic conditions seem to affect the mood and level of anxiety among adolescent girls. This should be kept in mind by health professionals treating young girls with atopic conditions.

  3. Respiratory infections in adults with atopic disease and IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens.

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    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis and asthma, are common diseases with a prevalence of 30-40% worldwide and are thus of great global public health importance. Allergic inflammation may influence the immunity against infections, so atopic individuals could be susceptible to respiratory infections. No previous population-based study has addressed the relation between atopy and respiratory infections in adulthood. We assessed the relation between atopic disease, specific IgE antibodies and the occurrence of upper and lower respiratory infections in the past 12 months among working-aged adults. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A population-based cross-sectional study of 1008 atopic and non-atopic adults 21-63 years old was conducted. Information on atopic diseases, allergy tests and respiratory infections was collected by a questionnaire. Specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens were measured in serum. Adults with atopic disease had a significantly increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI; including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted risk ratio (RR 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43, 3.52 and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI; including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted RR 1.55 (1.14, 2.10. The risk of LRTIs increased with increasing level of specific IgE (linear trend P = 0.059. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new evidence that working-aged adults with atopic disease experience significantly more LRTIs and URTIs than non-atopics. The occurrence of respiratory infections increased with increasing levels of specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens, showing a dose-response pattern with LRTIs. From the clinical point of view it is important to recognize that those with atopies are a risk group for respiratory infections, including more severe LRTIs.

  4. Maternal stress and psychological distress preconception: association with offspring atopic eczema at age 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Heis, S; Crozier, S R; Healy, E; Robinson, S M; Harvey, N C; Cooper, C; Inskip, H M; Baird, J; Godfrey, K M

    2017-06-01

    Perinatal maternal stress and low mood have been linked to offspring atopic eczema. To examine the relation of maternal stress/mood with atopic eczema in the offspring, focusing particularly on stress/psychological distress preconception. At recruitment in the UK Southampton Women's Survey, preconception maternal reports of perceived stress in daily living and the effect of stress on health were recorded; in a subsample, psychological distress was assessed (12-item General Health Questionnaire). Infants were followed up at ages 6 (n = 2956) and 12 (n = 2872) months and atopic eczema ascertained (based on UK Working Party Criteria for the Definition of Atopic Dermatitis). At 6 months post-partum, mothers were asked if they had experienced symptoms of low mood since childbirth and completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Preconception perceived stress affecting health [OR 1.21 (95% CI 1.08-1.35), P = 0.001] and stress in daily living [OR 1.16 (1.03-1.30), P = 0.014] were associated with an increased risk of offspring atopic eczema at age 12 months but not at 6 months, robust to adjustment for potentially confounding variables. Findings were similar for maternal psychological distress preconception. Low maternal mood between delivery and 6 months post-partum was associated with an increased risk of infantile atopic eczema at age 12 months, but no significant association between post-natal mood and atopic eczema was seen after taking account of preconception stress. Our data provide novel evidence linking maternal stress at preconception to atopic eczema risk, supporting a developmental contribution to the aetiology of atopic eczema and pointing to potentially modifiable influences. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Autoimmune and Atopic Disorders and Risk of Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollander, Peter; Rostgaard, Klaus; Smedby, Karin E

    2015-01-01

    reactivity. Tumor Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status was determined for 498 patients. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression analysis. Rheumatoid arthritis was associated with a higher risk of HL (odds ratio (OR) = 2.63; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47, 4......Results from previous investigations have shown associations between the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and a history of autoimmune and atopic diseases, but it remains unknown whether these associations apply to all types of HL or only to specific subtypes. We investigated immune diseases...... and the risk of classical HL in a population-based case-control study that included 585 patients and 3,187 controls recruited from October 1999 through August 2002. We collected information on immune diseases through telephone interviews and performed serological analyses of specific immunoglobulin E...

  6. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Clinical Features, Pathophysiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jonathan J.; Milner, Joshua D.; Stone, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia and other allergic diseases. Staphylococcus aureus colonization is common and may contribute to disease progression and severity. Targeted therapies to restore both impaired skin barrier and control inflammation are required for optimal outcomes for patients with moderate to severe disease. Pruritus is universal among patients with AD and has a dominant impact on diminishing quality of life. Medications such as anti-histamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. PMID:25459583

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Cutaneous Inflammatory Disorder: Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Jong Sic; Cho, Dae Ho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease resulting from interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. The pathogenesis of AD is poorly understood, and the treatment of recalcitrant AD is still challenging. There is accumulating evidence for new gene polymorphisms related to the epidermal barrier function and innate and adaptive immunity in patients with AD. Newly-found T cells and dendritic cell subsets, cytokines, chemokines and signaling pathways have extended our understanding of the molecular pathomechanism underlying AD. Genetic changes caused by environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. We herein present a review of the genetics, epigenetics, barrier dysfunction and immunological abnormalities in AD with a focus on updated molecular biology. PMID:27483258

  8. The role of the skin microbiome in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, R. D.; Bandier, J.; Skov, L.

    2017-01-01

    Dysbiosis is a hallmark of atopic dermatitis (AD). The composition of skin microbiome communities and the causality of dysbiosis in eczema have not been well established. The objective of this review is to describe the skin microbiome profile in AD and address whether there is a causal relationship...... between dysbiosis and AD. The protocol is registered in PROSPERO (CRD42016035813). We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ClinicalTrials.gov for primary research studies applying culture-independent analysis on the microbiome on AD skin of humans and animal models. Two authors independently screened...... of dysbiosis in eczema in mice should encourage future studies to investigate if this also applies to humans. Other important aspects are temporal dynamics and the influence of methodology on microbiome data....

  9. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...... during pregnancy on the incidence of AD in the offspring. METHODS: A total of 24 341 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed prospectively. Information about alcohol consumption was obtained by interview at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Information about symptoms......, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60...

  10. Alcohol during pregnacu and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, a; Petersen, Janne; Grønbæk, M

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...... during pregnancy on the incidence of AD in the offspring. METHODS: A total of 24 341 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed prospectively. Information about alcohol consumption was obtained by interview at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Information about symptoms......, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60...

  11. Atopic Dermatitis: Drug Delivery Approaches in Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalan, Manisha; Baweja, Jitendra; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe the very basic of atopic dermatitis (AD), the established management strategies, and the advances in drug delivery approaches for successful therapeutic outcomes. The multifactorial pathophysiology of AD has given rise to the clinician's paradigm of topical and systemic therapy and potential combinations. However, incomplete remission of skin disorders like AD is a major challenge to be overcome. Recurrence is thought to be due to genetic and immunological etiologies and shortcomings in drug delivery. This difficulty has sparked research in nanocarrier-based delivery approaches as well as molecular biology-inspired stratagems to deal with the immunological imbalance and to address insufficiencies of delivery propositions. In this review, we assess various novel drug delivery strategies in terms of their success and utility. We present a brief compilation and assessment of management modalities to sensitize the readers to therapeutic scenario in AD.

  12. Atopic dermatitis: recent insight on pathogenesis and novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Enza; Banderali, Giuseppe; Barberi, Salvatore; Gualandri, Lorenzo; Pietra, Benedetta; Riva, Enrica; Cerri, Amilcare

    2016-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease. It affects infancy, but it is also highly prevalent in adults and it is one of the disease burdens for the patients and their families. Nowadays, AD is recognized as a heterogenous disease with different subtypes with variable clinical manifestations which is affected by the impairments of the skin barrier. The severity of AD dictates the level of treatment. Current AD treatment focuses on restoration of the barrier function, mainly through the use of moisturizers and corticosteroids to control the inflammation, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and immunosuppresive drugs in the most severe cases. However, targeted disease-modifying therapies are under investigation. The most recent findings on the skin microbial dysbiosis is a promising future direction for the development of new treatments. We need to improve the understanding of the complex microbiome-host interactions, the role of autoimmunity, the comparative effectiveness of therapies and the ways to appropriately implement the educational strategies.

  13. Skin pH, Atopic Dermatitis, and Filaggrin Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Josefine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2014-01-01

    mutations may influence skin pH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the epidermal pH in different groups stratified by filaggrin mutations and atopic dermatitis. Further, we investigated the changes in pH according to severity of mutational status among patients with dermatitis, irrespective of skin condition....... METHODS: pH was measured with a multiprobe system pH probe (PH 905), and the study population was composed of 67 individuals, who had all been genotyped for 3 filaggrin mutations (R501X, 2282del4, R2447X). RESULTS: We found no clear pattern in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status. Individuals...... with wild-type filaggrin displayed both the most acidic and most alkaline values independent of concomitant skin disease; however, no statistical differences between the groups were found. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of significant diversity in skin pH in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status suggests...

  14. Association Between Atopic Disease and Anemia in US Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Kerry E; Schaeffer, Matt; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-01-01

    Atopic disease is associated with chronic inflammation, food allergen avoidance, and use of systemic immunosuppressant medications. All these factors have been shown to be associated with anemia. To investigate whether atopic disease is associated with increased risk of childhood anemia. A cross-sectional survey and laboratory assessment were conducted using data from the 1997-2013 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) that included 207,007 children and adolescents and the 1999-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) that included 30,673 children and adolescents. Analysis of the data was conducted between August 1, 2014, and August 28, 2015. Caregiver-reported history of eczema, asthma, hay fever, and/or food allergy. Anemia was defined by caregiver report in the NHIS and by hemoglobin levels for age and sex in the NHANES. Data were collected on 207,007 children and adolescents from NHIS, representing all pediatric age, sex, racial/ethnic, household educational level, and income groups. The US prevalence was 9.5% (95% CI, 9.4%-9.7%) from all years of the NHIS for health care-diagnosed eczema, 12.8% (95% CI, 12.6%-13.0%) for asthma, 17.1% (95% CI, 16.9%-17.3%) for hay fever, 4.2% (95% CI, 4.1%-4.3%) for food allergy, and 1.1% (95% CI, 1.1%-1.2%) for anemia. In multivariable logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, highest educational level in the family, insurance coverage, number of persons in the household, birthplace in the United States, and history of asthma, hay fever, and food allergy, anemia was associated with eczema in 14 of 17 studies, asthma in 11, hay fever in 12, and food allergy in 12. In multivariable analysis across the NHIS (with results reported as adjusted odds ratios [95% CIs]), children with any eczema (1.83; 1.58-2.13), asthma (1.31; 1.14-1.51), hay fever (1.57; 1.36-1.81), and food allergy (2.08; 1.71-2.52) had higher odds of anemia (P < .001 for all). In the

  15. In vivo expression of antimicrobial peptides in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present findings on expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin, focusing only on in vivo studies, and to discuss differences in results obtained using various skin sampling techniques and different methodology for analysis of AMPs....... The review also includes a discussion of the effect of frequently used treatments on AMP expression. Many studies have shown a reduced level of AMPs in lesional AD skin when compared to psoriatic skin, explaining the high frequency of AD-related infections. Interestingly, however, non-lesional AD skin has...... shown the same upregulation of AMPs after barrier disruption as non-lesional psoriatic skin. Various methods have been used to analyse AMP expression in the skin, and when comparing these methods, differences are revealed in AMP expression depending on the method used for sampling and analysis...

  16. Does IFN-γ play a role on the pathogenesis of non-atopic asthma in Latin America children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo Camila Alexandrina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work we explore differences in blood cells and cytokine profiles in children according to atopic status and asthma (atopic or non-atopic. The study involved measurement of Th1(IFN-γ and Th2 (IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines in Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes, blood cell count, skin prick test and specific IgE against common aeroallergens. Atopic status was associated with eosinophilia and production of Th2 type cytokines. Atopic asthma was associated with eosinophilia and non-atopic asthma was associated with IFN-γ and elevated monocytes in blood. IFN-γ and monocytes might play a role in immunopathology of non-atopic asthma in Latin American children.

  17. Does IFN-γ play a role on the pathogenesis of non-atopic asthma in Latin America children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Camila Alexandrina; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Alcantara-Neves, Neuza Maria; Cooper, Philip J; Amorim, Leila Denise; Silva, Nivea Bispo; Cruz, Alvaro A; Barreto, Mauricio Lima

    2012-12-19

    In this work we explore differences in blood cells and cytokine profiles in children according to atopic status and asthma (atopic or non-atopic). The study involved measurement of Th1(IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-5 and IL-13) cytokines in Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes, blood cell count, skin prick test and specific IgE against common aeroallergens. Atopic status was associated with eosinophilia and production of Th2 type cytokines. Atopic asthma was associated with eosinophilia and non-atopic asthma was associated with IFN-γ and elevated monocytes in blood. IFN-γ and monocytes might play a role in immunopathology of non-atopic asthma in Latin American children.

  18. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Machura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim: We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods : Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results: The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions : An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation.

  19. Stigmatization and self-perception in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshov PV

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pavel V Chernyshov Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common skin diseases. Prevalence of AD is highest in childhood. Because of chronicity and often visible lesions, AD may lead to stigmatization and problems with self-perception. However, problems of self-perception and stigmatization in AD children are poorly studied. Literature data on general tendencies of children’s development, clinical course, and epidemiologic tendencies of AD in different age groups make it possible to highlight three main periods in the formation of self-perception and stigmatization. The first period is from early infancy till 3 years of age. The child’s problems in this period depend on parental exhaustion, emotional distress, and security of the mother–child attachment. The child’s AD may form a kind of vicious circle in which severe AD causes parental distress and exhaustion that in turn lead to exacerbation of AD and psychological problems in children. The second period is from 3 till 10 years of age. During this period, development of AD children may be influenced by teasing, bullying, and avoiding by their peers. However, the majority of children in this age group are very optimistic. The third period is from 10 years till adulthood. Problems related to low self-esteem are characteristic during this period. It is important to identify children with AD and their parents who need psychological help and provide them with needs-based consultation and care. Appropriate treatment, medical consultations, and educational programs may help to reduce emotional problems in AD children and their parents. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, stigmatization, self-perception, quality of life, children, pediatric dermatology, skin disease

  20. Life quality assessment among patients with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, E A; Wulf, H C; Stegmann, H; Jemec, G B E

    2006-04-01

    Quantification of quality of life (QoL) related to disease severity is important in patients with atopic eczema (AE), because the assessment provides additional information to the traditional objective clinical scoring systems. To measure health-related QoL (HRQoL) in patients with AE; to analyse discriminant, divergent and convergent validity by examining the association between various QoL methods; and to examine the association between disease severity assessed by an objective Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) and QoL. HRQoL was assessed at two visits at a 6-monthly interval in 101 patients with AE and 30 controls with one dermatology-specific questionnaire [Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) or Children's DLQI (CDLQI)], one generic instrument (SF-36) and three visual analogue scales (VASs) of severity and pruritus. Objective SCORAD was used to measure disease severity. Patients with AE had significantly lower QoL than healthy controls and the general population. DLQI /CDLQI, pruritus, and patient and investigator overall assessment of eczema severity were significantly (P mental component score of SF-36 (P = 0.019). AE has an impact on HRQoL. Patients' mental health, social functioning and role emotional functioning seem to be more affected than physical functioning. A simple VAS score of patients' assessment of disease severity showed the highest and most significant correlations with most of the HRQoL methods used. There is evidence to support the ability of patients with AE to make an accurate determination of their disease severity and QoL.

  1. Infected Atopic Dermatitis Lesions Contain Pharmacologic Amounts of Lipoteichoic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jeffrey B.; Kozman, Amal; Mousdicas, Nico; Saha, Chandan; Landis, Megan; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Weiguo; Yao, Yongxue; Hyatt, Ann-Marie; Sheehan, Michael P.; Haggstrom, Anita N.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial infection with Staphylococcus aureus is a known trigger for worsening of atopic dermatitis (AD); the exact mechanisms by which bacterial infection worsens dermatitis are unknown. Objective We sought to characterize the amounts of the biologically active bacterial lipoprotein lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in infected AD lesions. Methods Eighty-nine children with clinically impetiginized lesions of AD were enrolled in this study. A lesion was graded clinically using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI), and then wash fluid obtained from the lesion for quantitative bacterial culture, and measurement of LTA and cytokines. The staphylococcal isolate was tested for antibiotic susceptibilities. The patients were treated with a regimen that included topical corticosteroids and systemic antibiotics and the lesion was re-analyzed after two weeks. Results S. aureus was identified in 79 of 89 children enrolled in the study. The bacterial CFU correlated with the EASI lesional score (p = 0.04). LTA levels up to 9.8 μg/ml were measured in the wash fluid samples and the amounts correlated with the lesional EASI scores (p = 0.01) and S. aureus CFU (p < 0.001). Approximately 30% of clinically impetiginized AD lesions contained greater than 1 μg/ml LTA, amounts that exert effects on various cell types in vitro. Moreover, injection of skin tissue ex vivo with amounts of LTA found in AD lesions resulted in epidermal cytokine gene expression. Conclusions Pharmacologic levels of LTA are found in many infected atopic dermatitis lesions. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that staphylococcal LTA could be an important mediator of the increased skin inflammation associated with infected AD. Capsule Summary These studies demonstrate high levels of staphylococcal LTA are found on impetiginized AD lesions. Moreover, subjects harboring MRSA exhibited greater total body involvement of AD. PMID:19962742

  2. THE ROLE OF EPIDERMAL BARRIER IMPAIRMENTS IN ATOPIC DERMATITIS: MODERN CONCEPTS OF DISEASE PATHOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay N. Murashkin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by a recurring course and progressive decrease in the quality of life. Recent studies in this area demonstrate the multifaceted pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Interaction of such factors as epidermal dysfunction, immune system disorders, and the consequences of genetic mutations contributes not only to the development of the disease but also to its progression and chronic course. The article presents various components of the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, describes the role of lipids, thereby the new therapeutic targets are revealed to specialists.

  3. Experience of vitamin D3 combined therapy in atopic dermatitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Selska Z.V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy of vitamin D3 in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in children. Materials and methods. We examined 42 children with atopic dermatitis. In 7 (16.7±5.8%) children had mild atopic dermatitis, 22 (52.4±7.7%) children had moderate severity of the disease, and 13 (31.0±7.1%) children diagnosed with severe degree of illness. Patients were aged 3 to 16 years. Definition 25(OH)D was performed using elektrochemiluminestsencysi method. Results. Average indicat...

  4. Search for Decays of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ Baryon with the D0 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, Enrique [The Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Inst., Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-25

    This thesis presents work I performed within the D0 Collaboration to make the measurement of the Branching Ratio of Λ$0\\atop{b}$ baryon in the channel Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → J/ΨΛ0 . The b-hadron such as the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ are currently the subject of much research in both the theorical and experimental particle physics communities. Measurements of the production and decays of b-hadrons can improve the understanding of the electroweak and strong interactions described by the Standard Model of particle physics, as well as proving opportunities to search for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  5. Managing atopic eczema in childhood: the health visitor and school nurse role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jean

    2008-06-01

    Atopic eczema affects up to 20% of children in the UK. It is a disease of varying severity, and health visitors and school nurses have a vital role in educating and supporting children and their parents and carers in its management. Diagnosis and assessment needs to consider atopic eczema severity, effect on quality of life and contributing trigger factors. Treatment should be tailored to the individual child and should include education on emollient therapy, the use of topical corticosteroids and other measures. A case study is included to highlight practical issues and the support of the child and family in coping with atopic eczema at home and in school.

  6. THE CASE OF HERPETIC ECZEMA IN A CHILD WITH CONGENITAL ICHTHYOSIS AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Stadnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of the development of herpetic eczema (Kaposi's eczema is presented against the background of congenital ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. It has been shown that the presence of atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and pollinosis, sensitization to many common allergens, and a positive family history of atopic dermatitis are factors of a more severe course of Kaposi's eczema. The presented clinical observation of the child with Kaposi's eczema showed that early diagnosis and timely initiated complex  therapy are the determining factors of a favorable prognosis of the disease.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  8. Strategic plant choices can alleviate climate change impacts: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Erin K; Kettenring, Karin M

    2018-06-01

    Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) uses biodiversity and ecosystem services to reduce climate change impacts to local communities. Because plants can alleviate the abiotic and biotic stresses of climate change, purposeful plant choices could improve adaptation. However, there has been no systematic review of how plants can be applied to alleviate effects of climate change. Here we describe how plants can modify climate change effects by altering biological and physical processes. Plant effects range from increasing soil stabilization to reducing the impact of flooding and storm surges. Given the global scale of plant-related activities such as farming, landscaping, forestry, conservation, and restoration, plants can be selected strategically-i.e., planting and maintaining particular species with desired impacts-to simultaneously restore degraded ecosystems, conserve ecosystem function, and help alleviate effects of climate change. Plants are a tool for EbA that should be more broadly and strategically utilized. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Study of Driving Fatigue Alleviation by Transcutaneous Acupoints Electrical Stimulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuwang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Driving fatigue is more likely to bring serious safety trouble to traffic. Therefore, accurately and rapidly detecting driving fatigue state and alleviating fatigue are particularly important. In the present work, the electrical stimulation method stimulating the Láogóng point (劳宫PC8 of human body is proposed, which is used to alleviate the mental fatigue of drivers. The wavelet packet decomposition (WPD is used to extract θ, α, and β subbands of drivers’ electroencephalogram (EEG signals. Performances of the two algorithms (θ+α/(α+β and θ/β are also assessed as possible indicators for fatigue detection. Finally, the differences between the drivers with electrical stimulation and normal driving are discussed. It is shown that stimulating the Láogóng point (劳宫PC8 using electrical stimulation method can alleviate driver fatigue effectively during longtime driving.

  10. Lack of association between the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism and atopic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Betina Heinsbaek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Fenger, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    -tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)-gene, a well-known marker of impaired folate metabolism. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism and different outcome variables of asthma and atopic disease. METHODS: This study was a population-based study of 1189...... and symptoms of allergy and asthma. In addition, participants were genotyped for the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism. RESULTS: None of the examined outcomes were significantly associated with the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study using detailed objective markers of atopic disease do......BACKGROUND: Impaired folate metabolism has been suggested as a potential risk factor for the development of asthma and atopic disease. However, there have been conflicting reports on the potential association between atopic disease and a common polymorphism of the methylene...

  11. Risk factors for the development of atopic disease in infancy and early childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.P. Koopman (Laurens)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of allergic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, is multifactorial, involving interaction of both genetic and environmental factors [1]. The prevalence of allergic diseases has doubled in the last 3 decades. especially in Western

  12. The prevalence of atopic diseases and the patterns of sensitization in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth Soegaard; Fomsgaard Kjær, Henrik; Eller, Esben

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are among the most common chronic diseases in adolescents, and it is uncertain whether the prevalence of atopic diseases has reached a plateau or is still increasing. The use of the ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood) questionnaire has provided......: The children were examined eight times from birth to 14 years. Visits included questionnaire-based interviews, clinical examination, skin prick test, and specific IgE. RESULTS: Follow-up rate at 14 years was 66.2%. The 12-month prevalence of any atopic disease was high (40.3%) mostly due to a high prevalence...... comparable prevalence rates from many countries, whereas studies including clinical examinations and strict diagnostic criteria are scarce. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of atopic diseases, the pattern of sensitization, and comorbidities at 14 years in a prospective birth cohort. METHODS...

  13. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. Methods: The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital...... contacts and/or filled prescriptions of disease-specific medication. Confirmative answers to questions about physician-diagnosed atopic disease were used as the gold standard for the comparison with the algorithms, resulting in sensitivities and specificities and 95% confidence intervals. The interviews...... with the caretaker of the included 454 Danish children born 1997-2003 were carried out May-September 2015; the mean age of the children at the time of the interview being 15.2 years (standard deviation 1.3 years). Results: For the algorithm capturing children with atopic dermatitis, the sensitivity was 74.1% (95...

  14. Decreased Sudomotor Function is Involved in the Formation of Atopic Eczema in the Cubital Fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Takahashi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: These results suggest that decreased sweating is a major source of water in the stratum corneum, and decreased sudomotor function may be involved in both the cause and aggravation of representative atopic eczema in the cubital fossa.

  15. Atopic Dermatitis in Animals and People: An Update and Comparative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Marsella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding the complex pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and the identification of new treatments. As we learn more about it, we appreciate the striking similarities that exist in the clinical manifestations of this disease across species. Both in animals and people, atopic disease is becoming increasingly common and important similarities exist in terms of immunologic aberrations and the propensity for allergic sensitization. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most recent views on atopic dermatitis in both domestic species and in people emphasizing the similarities and the differences. A comparative approach can be beneficial in understanding the natural course of this disease and the variable response to existing therapies.

  16. Atopic Dermatitis in Animals and People: An Update and Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Rosanna; De Benedetto, Anna

    2017-07-26

    Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common, pruritic, and frustrating disease to treat in both people and animals. Atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and results from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Much progress has been done in recent years in terms of understanding the complex pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and the identification of new treatments. As we learn more about it, we appreciate the striking similarities that exist in the clinical manifestations of this disease across species. Both in animals and people, atopic disease is becoming increasingly common and important similarities exist in terms of immunologic aberrations and the propensity for allergic sensitization. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most recent views on atopic dermatitis in both domestic species and in people emphasizing the similarities and the differences. A comparative approach can be beneficial in understanding the natural course of this disease and the variable response to existing therapies.

  17. Low basal serum cortisol in patients with severe atopic dermatitis : potent topical corticosteroids wrongfully accused

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeck, I.M.; Timmer-de Mik, L.; Lentjes, E.G.; Buskens, E.; Hijnen, D.J.; Guikers, C.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; de Bruin-Weller, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical corticosteroids are used extensively to treat inflammatory skin disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD). Several studies have described temporary reversible suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function. However, sound evidence of permanent disturbance of adrenal

  18. Diagnostic utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in prolonged and chronic cough according to atopic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamitsu Asano

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Although high FeNO levels suggested the existence of AC, lower FeNO levels had limited diagnostic significance. Atopic status affects the utility of FeNO levels in the differential diagnosis of prolonged and chronic cough.

  19. Non-steroidal topical immunomodulators provide skin-selective, self-limiting treatment in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jan D.

    2003-01-01

    Topical corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for atopic dermatitis; however, their clinical utility is limited by potential side effects. Recently, the steroid-free topical immunomodulators; tacrolimus ointment and pimecrolimus cream have become available. These agents provide effective

  20. Extract of Polygala tenuifolia Alleviates Stress-Exacerbated Atopy-Like Skin Dermatitis through the Modulation of Protein Kinase A and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongjun Sur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD and stress create a vicious cycle: stress exacerbates atopic symptoms, and atopic disease elicits stress and anxiety. Targeting multiple pathways including stress and allergic inflammation is, therefore, important for treating AD. In this study, we investigated the remedial value of Polygala tenuifolia Willd. (PTW for treating immobilization (IMO stress-exacerbated atopy-like skin dermatitis and its underlying mechanism. Trimellitic anhydride (TMA was applied to dorsal skin for sensitization and subsequently both ears for eliciting T-cell-dependent contact hypersensitivity in mice, which underwent 2 h-IMO stress and PTW administration for the latter 6 and 9 days in the ear exposure period of TMA, respectively. To elicit in vitro degranulation of human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1, 10 µM substance P (SP and 200 nM corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF were sequentially added with 48 h-interval. PTW extract (500 µg/mL was added 30 min before CRF treatment. IMO stress exacerbated TMA-induced scratching behavior by 252%, and increased their blood corticosterone levels by two-fold. Treatment with 250 mg/kg PTW significantly restored IMO stress-exacerbated scratching behavior and other indicators such as skin inflammation and water content, lymph node weights, and serum histamine and immunoglobulin E (lgE levels. Furthermore, it also reversed TMA-stimulated expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-4 mRNAs in ear tissues. PTW significantly inhibited SP/CRF-stimulated degranulation of HMC-1 cells, subsequent tryptase secretion, and protein kinase A (PKA activity. PTW also selectively inhibited p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphorylation in SP/CRF-treated HMC-1 cells. PTW significantly inhibited HMC-1 cell degranulation and alleviated IMO stress-exacerbated atopic dermatitis symptoms by modulating the PKA/p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  1. IMMUNOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF BREAST MILK IN WOMEN, WHO HAVE CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Yu. Belitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 100 mothers and children in couple were observed in this trial. All children had atopic dermatitis, developed against breast feeding. Analysis of immunologic characteristics of breast milk in 53 women showed a presence of allergencpecific Ide and Igg antybodies and common Ige in it. The level of those characteristics was lower if mothers were consistent with diet with goat's milk «amaltea».Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, breast feeding, dietotherapy.

  2. Optimizing the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in Infants Using Ursodeoxycholic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Shadrin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the advisability of including a suspension of ursodeoxycholic acid into the treatment of atopic dermatitis in infants. It is proved that taking a suspension of ursodeoxycholic acid in 25 infants with atopic dermatitis leads to a positive clinical dynamics of both skin and gastrointestinal manifestations that resulted in a decrease in the area of skin lesions, intensity of itching, sleep normalization and regression of abdominal pain syndrome, possetings.

  3. Optimizing the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in Infants Using Ursodeoxycholic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Shadrin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Expediency of including the suspension of ursodeoxycholic acid into the combination therapy of atopic dermatitis in infants was investigated. It is proved that administration of the suspension of ursodeoxycholic acid in 25 infants with atopic results has caused a positive clinical dynamics of both dermic and gastrointestinal symptoms that manifested by a reduction in the area of skin lesion, intensity of itching, normalization of dream and regression of pain abdominal syndrome, vomiting.

  4. Efalizumab for severe refractory atopic eczema: retrospective study on 11 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K; Dam, Hans Thorhauge; Gniadecki, R

    2010-01-01

    Efalizumab is a recombinant humanized murine monoclonal antibody against CD11a, approved for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. However, recent reports suggest that it also may be effective in the treatment of severe atopic dermatitis (AD).......Efalizumab is a recombinant humanized murine monoclonal antibody against CD11a, approved for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. However, recent reports suggest that it also may be effective in the treatment of severe atopic dermatitis (AD)....

  5. Factors That Predict Remission of Infant Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review.

    OpenAIRE

    von Kobyletzki, Laura; Svensson, Åke; Apfelbacher, Christian; Schmitt, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The individual prognosis of infants with atopic dermatitis (AD) is important for parents, healthcare professionals, and society. The aim of this study was to investigate predictors for remission of infant AD until school age. A systematic review was carried out of clinical and epidemiological studies investigating the effect of filaggrin gene (FLG) loss-of-function mutations, sex, exposure to pets, topical anti-inflammatory treatment, disease severity, and atopic sensitization during infancy ...

  6. The relationships between environment, diet, transcriptome and atopic dermatitis in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Anturaniemi, Johanna

    2018-01-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a multifactorial disease including genetic predisposition and other predisposing factors like living environment and diet. There is no known cure for this disease. The right and functional treatment can be hard to find, and more effort should be put into the prevention. The aim of this thesis was to find environmental factors and breeds associated with allergic skin symptoms and atopic dermatitis in pet dogs. In addition, the effect of a raw diet on gene expr...

  7. Atopic dermatitis is associated with active and passive cigarette smoking in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available The relationship between passive smoking and atopic dermatitis has previously been reported, but few studies have simultaneously evaluated the association of atopic dermatitis with active and passive smoking.The relationships between atopic dermatitis and active and passive smoking were evaluated in Korean adolescents. We used a large, representative, population-based survey (The Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey conducted in 2011 and 2012. Active smoking was classified into 3 groups (0 days, 1-19 days, and ≥ 20 days/month. Passive smoking was categorized into 3 groups (0 days, 1-4 days, and ≥ 5 days/week. Atopic dermatitis diagnosed by a medical doctor either during the past 1 month or during the participant's lifetime was surveyed. Age, sex, obesity status, region of residence, economic level, and parental educational level of the participants were adjusted as confounders. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling.A total of 6.8% (10,020/135,682 of the participants reported atopic dermatitis during the last 12 months. Active smoking was significantly associated with atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 20 days/month = 1.18 [1.07-1.29]; 1-19 days/month = 1.11 [0.99-1.23], P = 0.002. Passive smoking was also related to atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 5 days/week = 1.12 [1.05-1.20]; 1-4 days/week = 1.08 [1.03-1.13], P < 0.001.Atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with active and passive smoking in Korean adolescents.

  8. Burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adults: Analysis of data from the 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Kazuhiko; Gupta, Shaloo; Gadkari, Abhijit; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kono, Takeshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Demiya, Sven; Eckert, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. The objective of this study was to characterize the burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adult patients relative to the general population. Japanese adults (≥18 years) with a self-reported diagnosis of atopic dermatitis and adult controls without atopic dermatitis/eczema/dermatitis were identified from the 2013 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey. Atopic dermatitis patients were propensity-score matched with non-atopic dermatitis controls (1:2 ratio) on demographic variables. Patient-reported outcome data on comorbidities, mood and sleep disorders, health-related quality of life, work productivity and activity impairment, and health-care resource utilization were analyzed in atopic dermatitis patients and matched controls. A total of 638 Japanese adult patients with atopic dermatitis were identified, of whom 290 (45.5%) rated their disease as "moderate/severe" and 348 (54.5%) as "mild". The analysis cohort comprised 634 atopic dermatitis patients and 1268 matched controls. Atopic dermatitis patients reported a significantly higher prevalence of arthritis, asthma, nasal allergies/hay fever, anxiety, depression and sleep disorders compared with controls (all P Atopic dermatitis patients also reported a significantly poorer health-related quality of life, higher overall work and activity impairment, and higher health-care resource utilization (all P atopic dermatitis reported a substantial disease burden relative to adults without atopic dermatitis, suggesting an unmet need for effective strategies targeting disease management. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  9. Childhood atopic dermatitis: a cross-sectional study of relationships between child and parent factors, atopic dermatitis management, and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amy E; Fraser, Jennifer A; Ramsbotham, Joanne; Morawska, Alina; Yates, Patsy

    2015-01-01

    Successful management of atopic dermatitis poses a significant and ongoing challenge to parents of affected children. Despite frequent reports of child behaviour problems and parenting difficulties, there is a paucity of literature examining relationships between child behaviour and parents' confidence and competence with treatment. To examine relationships between child, parent, and family variables, parents' self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis, self-reported performance of management tasks, observed competence with providing treatment, and atopic dermatitis severity. Cross-sectional study design. Participants A sample of 64 parent-child dyads was recruited from the dermatology clinic of a paediatric tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Parents completed self-report questionnaires examining child behaviour, parents' adjustment, parenting conflict, parents' relationship satisfaction, and parents' self-efficacy and self-reported performance of key management tasks. Severity of atopic dermatitis was assessed using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index. A routine home treatment session was observed, and parents' competence in carrying out the child's treatment assessed. Pearson's and Spearman's correlations identified significant relationships (pconflict, and relationship satisfaction. There were also significant relationships between each of these variables and parents' self-reported performance of management tasks. More profound child behaviour difficulties were associated with more severe atopic dermatitis and greater parent stress. Using multiple linear regressions, significant proportions of variation in parents' self-efficacy and self-reported task performance were explained by child behaviour difficulties and parents' formal education. Self-efficacy emerged as a likely mediator for relationships between both child behaviour and parents' education, and self-reported task performance. Direct observation of treatment sessions revealed strong

  10. London-born black Caribbean children are at increased risk of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H C; Pembroke, A C; Forsdyke, H; Boodoo, G; Hay, R J; Burney, P G

    1995-02-01

    Previous reports suggest that atopic dermatitis is more common in black Caribbean children born in the United Kingdom than in white children. It is unclear whether these differences are caused by selection bias or variations in the use of the word "eczema" in the groups studied. Our objective was to explore ethnic group differences in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis in London schoolchildren. A cross-sectional prevalence survey of 693 junior school children in three schools was performed. Atopic dermatitis was defined in three ways: (1) by a dermatologist, (2) by visible flexural dermatitis as recorded by an independent observer, and (3) by a history of flexural dermatitis according to the child's parents. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis according to examination by a dermatologist was 16.3% in black Caribbean children and 8.7% in white children. This increased risk was present for different methods of defining of a atopic dermatitis and persisted after adjustment for potential confounders. London-born black Caribbean children appear to be at an increased risk of having atopic dermatitis.

  11. Prenatal maternal stress and atopic diseases in the child: a systematic review of observational human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, N W; Hansen, M V; Larsen, A D; Hougaard, K S; Kolstad, H A; Schlünssen, V

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that maternal stress during pregnancy promotes atopic disorders in the offspring. This is the first systematic review to address prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) and the subsequent risk of atopy-related outcomes in the child. The review was performed in accordance to the PRISMA criteria. We searched and selected studies in PubMed, Scopus, Embase and PsychINFO until November 2014. Sixteen (with 25 analyses) of 426 identified articles met the review criteria. Five main PNMS exposures (negative life events, anxiety/depression, bereavement, distress and job strain) and five main atopic outcomes (asthma, wheeze, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and IgE) were assessed across the studies. Overall, 21 of the 25 analyses suggested a positive association between PNMS and atopic outcomes. Of the 11 exposure-response analyses reported, six found statistically significant trends. This systematic review suggests a relationship between maternal stress during pregnancy and atopic disorders in the child. However, the existing studies are of diverse quality. The wide definitions of often self-reported stress exposures imply a substantial risk for information bias and false-positive results. Research comparing objective and subjective measures of PNMS exposure as well as objective measures for atopic outcome is needed. © 2015 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Atopic Eczema and Stress among Single Parents and Families: An Empirical Study of 96 Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieler, Uwe; Schoof, Stefanie; Gieler, Tanja; Scheewe, Sibylle; Schut, Christina; Kupfer, Jörg

    2017-01-04

    This study investigated the extent to which single mothers of children with atopic eczema experience disease-related stress. A total of 96 mothers were divided into 4 groups: mothers living with a partner, who had or did not have a child with atopic eczema, and single mothers, who had or did not have a child with atopic eczema. The following questionnaires were used to assess psychological burden: Short Stress Questionnaire (Kurzer Fragebogen zur Erfassung von Belastung; KFB), Satisfaction with Life Questionnaire (Fragebogen zur Lebenszufriedenheit; FLZ), General Depression Scale (Allgemeine Depressions-Skala; ADS), and the Questionnaire for Parents of Children with Atopic Eczema (Fragebogen für Eltern von Neurodermitis kranken Kindern; FEN). Single mothers had higher levels of helplessness and aggression due to their child's scratching behaviour than did mothers living with a partner and a child with atopic eczema. Single mothers of children with atopic eczema had the highest scores regarding experienced stress in the family and the lowest scores concerning general life satisfaction. Special care should be provided for single mothers with higher stress, in order to teach them how to deal with the scratching behaviour of their children.

  13. Early childhood environment related to microbial exposure and the occurrence of atopic disease at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meer, G; Janssen, N A H; Brunekreef, B

    2005-05-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that the early childhood environment with respect to day care attendance, older siblings, pet ownership, and early life airway infections may protect from developing atopic disease. Few studies have distinguished between atopic sensitization and symptoms, and none have evaluated independent contributions for all of these different environmental conditions. Examine independent effects on atopic sensitization and symptoms of day care attendance, older siblings, pet ownership, and early infancy's airway disease. A cross-sectional survey among 8-13-year-old school children with complete data for 1555 children. After adjustment for confounders, atopic sensitization occurred less frequently in children that had attended a day care centre (OR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.55-0.98) or had a cat or dog before 2 years of age (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61-0.99). Having older siblings yielded a nonsignificant trend towards protection (OR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.70-1.11). For symptoms, there was no relation with having older sibs, day care attendance and pet ownership, although there was a trend towards protection for the combination of atopy and symptoms. In contrast, children with doctors' treated airway disease before age 2, more frequently reported recent symptoms of wheeze, asthma, rhinitis, or dermatitis (all P atopic sensitization. Protection against symptoms only occurred if atopic sensitization was present as well.

  14. GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURES OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS INCIDENCE IN THE CHILD POPULATION OF THE GRODNO REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokha R. N.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Research objective. To estimate a geographical variation of the indicator of the incidence of atopic dermatitis among the child population of the Grodno region. Material and methods. The data of the official statistical reports of the Grodno Regional Department of Statistics, the annual report forms «Form 1 – children» of the medical statistics office of the Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital for the period of 1999-2016 years were analyzed. Territorial differentiation of the indicator of disease incidence was carried out by the method of cluster analysis (k-means clustering. Results. The geographical characteristic of the indicator of the incidence of atopic dermatitis among the child population of the Grodno region aged 0–14 years during 1999-2016 years has been given. Low, below the average, above the average, average and high values of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence have been established. The cartogram of territorial distribution of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence among the child population has been made. Conclusion. The established features, various intensity of the degree of a geographical variation of the indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence reflect the influence of a set of various factors determining an indicator of diseases incidence in various territories of the region and confirm the need to analyze the cause-and-effect relationships in the system «medium-indicator of atopic dermatitis incidence among the child population».

  15. Infant feeding and the development of food allergies and atopic eczema: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboni, Sarah E; Allen, Katrina J; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2013-05-01

    There is an increasing awareness of food allergies in the community. Dermatologists frequently see patients with atopic eczema, where parents are extremely concerned about the role of food allergy. Advice given to parents regarding the timing of introduction of solid foods has changed markedly over the past decade. Whereas previous advice advocated delaying the introduction of solid foods until the infant's gastrointestinal system had matured, recent studies suggest that the introduction of solids from around 4 to 6 months may actually prevent the development of allergies. Studies on maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy and lactation have led researchers to believe that antigen avoidance does not play a significant role in the prevention of atopic disease. Breastfeeding exclusively for 4 to 6 months has multiple benefits for mother and child, however, it does not convincingly prevent food allergies or decrease atopic eczema. New evidence suggests that the use of hydrolysed formulas does not delay or prevent atopic eczema or food allergy. This article aims to highlight current evidence and provide an update for dermatologists on the role of food exposure in the development of atopic disease, namely atopic eczema. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  16. Malassezia Yeast and Cytokine Gene Polymorphism in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Charu; Das, Shukla; Ramachandran, V G; Saha, Rumpa; Bhattacharya, S N; Dar, Sajad

    2017-03-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent chronic condition associated with microorganism and their interaction with the susceptible host. Malassezia yeast is a known commensal which is thought to provoke the recurrent episodes of symptoms in atopic dermatitis patients. Malassezia immunomodulatory properties along with defective skin barrier in such host, results in disease manifestation. Here, we studied Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) in IL10 and IFN γ genes of the host and its relation with susceptibility to Malassezia infection. To isolate Malassezia yeast from AD patients and compare the genetic susceptibility of the host by correlating the cytokine gene polymorphism with the control subjects. Study was conducted from January 2012 to January 2013. It was a prospective observational study done in Department of Microbiology and Department of Dermatology and Venereology in University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Delhi. Sample size comprised of 38 cases each of AD. Skin scrapings were used for fungal culture on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) and Modified Dixon Agar (MDA) and isolated were identified as per conventional phenotypic methods. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from all study subjects. Cytokine genotyping was carried out by Amplification Refractory Mutations System- Polymerase Chain Reaction (ARMS-PCR) with sequence specific primers. Three SNPs (IL10-1082A/G; IL10-819/592C/T; IFN-γ+874A/T) in two cytokine genes were assessed in all the patients and healthy controls. Chi-Square Test or Fisher's-Exact Test and Bonferroni's correction. In AD group, Malassezia yeasts were cultured in 24 out of 38 samples and thus the identification rate was 63.1 percent as compared to healthy group, 52.6 percent (20/38). Significant difference in allele, or genotype distribution were observed in IL10-819/592C/T and IFN-γ+874A/T gene polymorphism in AD group. Higher isolation rate in cases as compared to control group highlights the

  17. An update on the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsella R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosanna MarsellaDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Remarkable progress has been made in recent years concerning our understanding of the pathogenesis of canine atopic dermatitis (AD. As our understanding improves, the therapeutic approach evolves. Of utmost importance is the documentation of skin barrier impairment in canine AD: ceramides deficiency leads to increased permeability and increased allergen penetration and sensitization. It is currently unknown whether this dysfunction is primary and genetically inherited or secondary to inflammation but it is accepted that skin barrier deficiency plays an important role in either starting or minimally exacerbating canine AD. Thus, the therapeutic approach has changed from focusing on the control of the inflammation to a combined approach that includes therapies aimed at skin barrier repair. The issue of skin barrier repair has been addressed both with oral administration of essential fatty acids and the topical application of products containing a combination of ceramides and fatty acids. These strategies are most helpful as adjunctive treatments and would be best used in young patients that have not developed chronic skin changes. Importantly, treatment for canine AD is multimodal and tailored to the individual patient, the age, and the duration of the disease. Client education plays an important role in explaining the importance of a long-term approach to minimize flare-ups and, in this context, topical therapy to correct skin barrier can be of great benefit. This is an area still in infancy and much work is needed to identify the best formulation. In human medicine, long-term use of moisturizers can have a profound effect on skin barrier and gene expression of proteins involved in skin barrier. This effect is variable depending on the formulation used. It is reasonable to speculate that the same may be

  18. Serum Vitamin D Levels Not Associated with Atopic Dermatitis Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Renata; Uber, Marjorie; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Lima, Monica Nunes; Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and the severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) in a Brazilian population. This was a cross-sectional study of patients younger than 14 years of age seen from April to November 2013. All patients fulfilled the Hanifin and Rajka Diagnostic Criteria for AD diagnosis. Disease severity was determined using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index and classified as mild (50). Serum vitamin D levels were classified as sufficient (≥30 ng/mL), insufficient (29-21 ng/mL), or deficient (≤20 ng/mL). A total of 105 patients met the inclusion criteria. Mild AD was diagnosed in 58 (55.2%) children, moderate in 24 (22.8%), and severe in 23 (21.9%). Vitamin D deficiency was observed in 45 individuals (42.9%). Of these, 24 (53.3%) had mild AD, 13 (28.9%) moderate, and 8 (17.7%) severe. Insufficient vitamin D levels were found in 45 (42.9%) individuals; 24 (53.3%) had mild AD, 9 (20.0%) moderate, and 12 (26.7%) severe. Of the 15 individuals (14.2%) with sufficient vitamin D levels, 10 (60.7%) had mild AD, 2 (13.3%) moderate, and 3 (20.0%) severe. The mean vitamin D level was 22.1 ± 7.3 ng/mL in individuals with mild AD, 20.8 ± 6.5 ng/mL in those with moderate AD, and 21.9 ± 9.3 ng/mL in those with severe AD. Variables such as sex, age, skin phototype, season of the year, and bacterial infection were not significantly associated with vitamin D levels. Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were deficient or insufficient in 85% of the children, but serum vitamin D concentrations were not significantly related to AD severity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Clinical Signs, Staphylococcus and Atopic Eczema-Related Seromarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Childhood eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD is a distressing disease associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance, impaired quality of life and Staphylococcus aureus isolation. The pathophysiology of AD is complex and various seromarkers of immunity are involved. We investigated if anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin IgE (anti-SE, selected seromarkers of T regulatory (Treg, T helper (Th and antigen-presenting cells (APC are associated with clinical signs of disease severity and quality of life. Disease severity was assessed with the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD index, and quality of life with the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI in AD patients ≤18 years old. Concentrations of anti-staphylococcus enterotoxin A and B immunoglobulin E (anti-SEA and anti-SEB, selected Treg/Th/APC chemokines, skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL were measured in these patients. Forty patients with AD [median (interquartile range age of 13.1 (7.9 years were recruited. Backward stepwise linear regression (controlling for age, personal allergic rhinitis and asthma, and other blood markers showed the serum anti-SEB level was positively associated with S. aureus and S. epidermidis isolations, objective SCORAD, clinical signs and CDLQI. TNF-α (a Th1 cytokine was positively associated with objective SCORAD (B = 4.935, p = 0.010, TGF-β (a Treg cytokine negatively with disease extent (B = −0.015, p = 0.001, IL-18 (an APC cytokine positively with disease extent (B = 0.438, p = 0.001 and with TEWL (B = 0.040, p = 0.010, and IL-23 (an APC cytokine negatively with disease extent (B = −2.812, p = 0.006 and positively with pruritus (B = 0.387, p = 0.007. Conclusions: Blood levels of anti-SEB, Th1, Treg and APC cytokines are correlated with various clinical signs of AD. AD is a systemic immunologic disease involving Staphylococcus aureus, cellular, humoral, cytokine and chemokine pathophysiology.

  20. Ganokendra: An Innovative Model for Poverty Alleviation in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Kazi Rafiqul

    2006-01-01

    Ganokendras (people's learning centers) employ a literacy-based approach to alleviating poverty in Bangladesh. They give special attention to empowering rural women, among whom poverty is widespread. The present study reviews the Ganokendra-approach to facilitating increased political and economic awareness and improving community conditions in…

  1. 283 Poverty Alleviation Programmes and Economic Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    poverty alleviation on the inhabitants of Nigeria with special reference to. Asa and Ilorin West Local ... poverty is defined as a state of deprivation in terms of both economic and social indicators such as income ..... Source Book. The World Bank ...

  2. Role of Zakah and Awqaf in poverty Alleviation (Occasional Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Habib

    2004-01-01

    The occasional paper studies the role of zakat and awqaf in mitigating poverty in Muslim communities. The study addresses the issue by studying the institutional set-up and mechanisms of using zakat and awqaf for poverty alleviation. It discusses how these institutions can be implemented successfully to achieve the results in contemporary times using theoretical arguments and empirical support.

  3. Youth Empowerment and Poverty Alleviation: The Experience in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It will help the planners and the policy makers to determine the best methods to tackle poverty in order to alleviate youth employment. The study made use of descriptive research design for the investigation. All the local government in Ogun State constitutes the population for the study. Out of these, two local governments ...

  4. Urban agriculture and urban poverty alleviation: South African debates

    OpenAIRE

    Rogerson, Christian M.

    1998-01-01

    Growing international attention has focussed on the potential role of urban agriculture in poverty alleviation. The aim in this paper is to analyse the existing challenge of urban poverty in South Africa and examine the potential role of urban agriculture as a component of a pro-poor urban development strategy.

  5. Alleviating poverty and hunger in Nigeria: Lessons from the United ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is facing serious poverty and hunger despite her enormous resources. Recent statistics reveal that poverty and hunger are increasing despite successive governments and non–governmental organizations alleviation programmes. Unless, these twin problems are tacked urgently, they are likely to undermine the ...

  6. Resilience offers escape from trapped thinking on poverty alleviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Steven J; Haider, L Jamila; Engström, Gustav; Schlüter, Maja

    2017-05-01

    The poverty trap concept strongly influences current research and policy on poverty alleviation. Financial or technological inputs intended to "push" the rural poor out of a poverty trap have had many successes but have also failed unexpectedly with serious ecological and social consequences that can reinforce poverty. Resilience thinking can help to (i) understand how these failures emerge from the complex relationships between humans and the ecosystems on which they depend and (ii) navigate diverse poverty alleviation strategies, such as transformative change, that may instead be required. First, we review commonly observed or assumed social-ecological relationships in rural development contexts, focusing on economic, biophysical, and cultural aspects of poverty. Second, we develop a classification of poverty alleviation strategies using insights from resilience research on social-ecological change. Last, we use these advances to develop stylized, multidimensional poverty trap models. The models show that (i) interventions that ignore nature and culture can reinforce poverty (particularly in agrobiodiverse landscapes), (ii) transformative change can instead open new pathways for poverty alleviation, and (iii) asset inputs may be effective in other contexts (for example, where resource degradation and poverty are tightly interlinked). Our model-based approach and insights offer a systematic way to review the consequences of the causal mechanisms that characterize poverty traps in different agricultural contexts and identify appropriate strategies for rural development challenges.

  7. Contribution of food security projects on poverty alleviation to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite South Africa's economic growth having been accelerated considerably in the country, poverty levels have not decreased as one would have experienced. Food Security Projects initiated by the government of South Africa in order to help alleviate poverty within Limpopo Province have proved unsustainable and ...

  8. Wealth Creation and Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria: The Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the Role of Information Technology (IT) in thecreation of wealth and poverty alleviation in Nigeria. The design of the studywas a descriptive survey, carried out at Nwafor Orizu College of Education,Nsugbe in Anambra State of Nigeria. One hundred and ninety three (193)respondents formed the ...

  9. Resilience offers escape from trapped thinking on poverty alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Steven J.; Haider, L. Jamila; Engström, Gustav; Schlüter, Maja

    2017-01-01

    The poverty trap concept strongly influences current research and policy on poverty alleviation. Financial or technological inputs intended to “push” the rural poor out of a poverty trap have had many successes but have also failed unexpectedly with serious ecological and social consequences that can reinforce poverty. Resilience thinking can help to (i) understand how these failures emerge from the complex relationships between humans and the ecosystems on which they depend and (ii) navigate diverse poverty alleviation strategies, such as transformative change, that may instead be required. First, we review commonly observed or assumed social-ecological relationships in rural development contexts, focusing on economic, biophysical, and cultural aspects of poverty. Second, we develop a classification of poverty alleviation strategies using insights from resilience research on social-ecological change. Last, we use these advances to develop stylized, multidimensional poverty trap models. The models show that (i) interventions that ignore nature and culture can reinforce poverty (particularly in agrobiodiverse landscapes), (ii) transformative change can instead open new pathways for poverty alleviation, and (iii) asset inputs may be effective in other contexts (for example, where resource degradation and poverty are tightly interlinked). Our model-based approach and insights offer a systematic way to review the consequences of the causal mechanisms that characterize poverty traps in different agricultural contexts and identify appropriate strategies for rural development challenges. PMID:28508077

  10. Enabling Bio-Innovation for Poverty Alleviation in Asia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    At first glance, Asia seems to have all the organizations, skills, policies and facilities essential for bio-innovation. However, these are not generally put to the service of the millions of poor who lack access to technology. This project aims to stimulate research on bio-innovation for poverty alleviation, sustainable employment ...

  11. Poverty alleviation with economic growth strategy: Prospects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prospects and challenges of this strategy in the context of the Nigerian situation are articulated and the conclusion of the paper is that poverty alleviation in contemporary Nigeria requires both economic policy and educational reforms. To enhance the human capital of the poor in particular, the priorities for educational ...

  12. Causes and Alleviation of Occupational Stress in Child Care Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenburger, Karola

    2004-01-01

    Occupational stress in not a new phenomenon in the working population. However, in the helping professions it has only recently attracted attention. The survey reported here was carried out in order to assess the extent of occupational stress, identify its causes, and suggest ways in which occupational stress can be alleviated. Field social…

  13. Food and food additives in severe atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bever, H P; Docx, M; Stevens, W J

    1989-11-01

    In this study the role of food additives, tyramine and acetylsalicylic acid, was investigated by double-blind placebo-controlled challenges (DBPCC) in 25 children with severe atopic dermatitis (AD). All children challenged with foods (n = 24), except one, showed one or more positive reactions to the DBPCC with foods. Positive reactions presented as different combinations of flares of skin symptoms, intestinal symptoms and respiratory symptoms. Seventeen children (70.8%) showed a positive challenge to egg, 12 to wheat (50%), eight to milk (33.3%) and eight to soya (33.3%). Six children underwent DBPCC with food additives, tyramine and acetylsalicylic acid. All were found to demonstrate positive skin and/or intestinal reactions to at least one of the food additives. Two children reacted to tartrazine, three to sodium benzoate, two to sodium glutamate, two to sodium metabisulfite, four to acetylsalicylic acid and one to tyramine. It is concluded that some foods, food additives, tyramine and acetylsalicylic acid, can cause positive DBPCC in children with severe AD.

  14. [Professor CHEN Xiuhua's experience in the treatment of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiaohong; Li, Shuqian; Li, Ying

    2017-03-12

    Professor CHEN Xiuhua 's clinical experiences were introduced in the intervention on atopic dermatitis with external therapies of TCM acupuncture. On the basis of the theory as cultivating the earth and clearing the heart from professor CHEN Dacan and in terms of the disease stages and skin lesion characteristics, as well as in consideration of syndrome differen-tiation, the acupoints for strengthening the spleen and clearing heart fire are selected, such as Zhongwan (CV 12), Daheng (SP 15), Shuifen (CV 9), Tianshu (ST 25), Neiguan (PC 6) and Quchi (LI 11). For the repair of skin lesion, the integration of Chinese and western medicine is used, with the internal application and external use of Chinese herbal medicines involved. The topical ointments are selected rationally. The self-blood therapy is used with acupuncture, bleeding therapy and acupoint injection applied in combination on the basis of the theory of TCM zangfu organs and modern immunological mechanism, which stimulates the nonspecific immune response in the body and strengthens acupoint stimulus effects. Medical thread therapy of Guangxi Zhuang medicine is used in moxibustion for skin damage, which effectively stops itching and promotes wound healing and skin repair.

  15. Lack of Association Between Dust Mite Sensitivity and Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan Ian; Hanifin, Jon M; Law, Sandra; White, Kevin; Storrs, Frances J

    2016-01-01

    Dust mites (DMs) play a role in type I respiratory allergy. Studies relating to DM irritant versus immune reactions are somewhat conflicting in atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic use of patch testing to DM in patients with AD and other dermatitides. We performed a prospective study of 323 adults recruited in a patch testing clinic. Patch testing antigens were DM extract (0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, 10%, and 20% in petrolatum; Chemotechnique) and/or 200 index of reactivity in petrolatum (Stallergenes). Patches were placed and read at 48 hours with delayed readings after 72 to 168 hours. There was no association of DM positivity with AD, asthma, hay fever, or demographic factors. There was no association of DM positivity with the clinical diagnosis or phenotype. The number of positive (+, ++, and +++) and doubtful reactions to Chemotechnique DM extract increased with higher concentrations. Positive reactions to DM had a morphological appearance characterized by numerous discrete erythematous papules and, rarely, papulovesicles. Positive reactions to Stallergenes DM 200 IR were infrequent and all weak reactions, similar to DM 0.01%. Patch testing to DM does not seem to have clinical use for determining the etiology of dermatitis.

  16. The future of immunotherapy for canine atopic dermatitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Douglas J

    2017-02-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT) is a foundation treatment for canine atopic dermatitis (CAD), though few critical studies have documented its effectiveness as a disease-modifying treatment in dogs. The mechanisms by which ASIT works in dogs have not been elucidated, although they are likely to parallel those known for humans. Current ASIT approaches in CAD focus on either subcutaneous or sublingual administration. Greater knowledge of major allergens in dogs, ideal dosage regimes and details of allergen admixture are likely to lead to better efficacy in CAD. Evaluation of biomarkers for successful therapy may also be of benefit. Potentially important advances in human medicine, that have yet to be explored in dogs, include use of modified allergen preparations such as allergoids, recombinant major allergens or allergen peptides; modification with adjuvants; or packaging of the above in virus-like particles. Co-administration of immunomodulators such as CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or specific monoclonal antibodies might direct the immune response in the desired direction while calming the "cytokine storm" of active disease. Initial trials of alternative routes of administration such as intralymphatic immunotherapy have yielded exciting results in humans, and continuing study in dogs is underway. Progress in ASIT of human food allergy may provide clues that will assist with improved diagnosis and patient management of CAD. Importantly, further study must be undertaken to clarify the conditions under which ASIT is a valuable treatment modality for dogs. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  17. Online education improves pediatric residents' understanding of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Megan F; Blondin, Heather M; Youssef, Molly J; Tollefson, Megha M; Hill, Lauren F; Hanson, Janice L; Bruckner, Anna L

    2018-01-01

    Pediatricians manage skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis (AD) but report that their dermatologic training is inadequate. Online modules may enhance medical education when sufficient didactic or clinical teaching experiences are lacking. We assessed whether an online module about AD improved pediatric residents' knowledge and changed their clinical management of AD. Target and control cohorts of pediatric residents from two institutions were recruited. Target subjects took a 30-question test about AD early in their residency, reviewed the online module, and repeated the test 6 months and 1 year later. The control subjects, who had 1 year of clinical experience but had not reviewed the online module, also took the test. The mean percentage of correct answers was calculated and compared using two-sided, two-sample independent t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. For a subset of participants, clinical documentation from AD encounters was reviewed and 13 practice behaviors were compared using the Fisher exact test. Twenty-five subjects in the target cohort and 29 subjects in the control cohort completed the study. The target cohort improved from 18.0 ± 3.2 to 23.4 ± 3.4 correctly answered questions over 1 year (P online module about AD demonstrated statistically significant improvement in disease-specific knowledge over time and had statistically significantly higher scores than controls. Online dermatology education may effectively supplement traditional clinical teaching. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Therapeutic patient education in atopic dermatitis: worldwide experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Claire; Ball, Alan; De Raeve, Linda; Gieler, Uwe; Deleuran, Mette; Marcoux, Danielle; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Lio, Peter; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Gelmetti, Carlo; Takaoka, Roberto; Chiaverini, Christine; Misery, Laurent; Barbarot, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic patient education (TPE) has proven effective in increasing treatment adherence and improving quality of life (QoL) for patients with numerous chronic diseases, especially atopic dermatitis (AD). This study was undertaken to identify worldwide TPE experiences in AD treatment. Experts from 23 hospitals, located in 11 countries, responded to a questionnaire on 10 major items. Patients in TPE programs were mainly children and adolescents with moderate to severe AD or markedly affected QoL. Individual and collective approaches were used. Depending on the center, the number of sessions varied from one to six (corresponding to 2 to 12 hours of education), and 20 to 200 patients were followed each year. Each center's education team comprised multidisciplinary professionals (e.g., doctors, nurses, psychologists). Evaluations were based on clinical assessment, QoL, a satisfaction index, or some combination of the three. When funding was obtained, it came from regional health authorities (France), insurance companies (Germany), donations (United States), or pharmaceutical firms (Japan, Italy). The role of patient associations was always highlighted, but their involvement in the TPE process varied from one country to another. Despite the nonexhaustive approach, our findings demonstrate the increasing interest in TPE for managing individuals with AD. In spite of the cultural and financial differences between countries, there is a consensus among experts to integrate education into the treatment of eczema. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Inpatient Financial Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narla, Shanthi; Hsu, Derek Y; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the inpatient burden of atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to determine the risk factors and financial burden of hospitalizations for AD in the United States. Data were analyzed from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample, including a 20% representative sample of all...... hospitalizations in the United States. Hospitalization rates for AD or eczema were highest in the northeast during the winter and south during the summer. Geometric mean cost of care (95% confidence interval) was lower for a primary diagnosis of AD or eczema versus no AD or eczema in adults ($3,502 [$3......,360-$3,651] vs. $6,849 [$6,775-$6,925]; P = 0.0004) and children ($2,716 [$2,542-$2,903] vs. $4,488 [$4,302-$4,682]; P = 0.0004). However, the high prevalence of hospitalization resulted in total inpatient costs of $8,288,083 per year for adults and $3,333,868 per year for children. In conclusion...

  20. The role of air pollutants in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kangmo

    2014-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease and a growing health concern, especially in children, because of its high prevalence and associated low quality of life. Genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, or interactions between them contribute to the pathophysiology of AD. Therefore, it is very important to identify and control risk factors from the environment in susceptible subjects for successful treatment and prevention. Both indoor and outdoor air pollution, which are of increasing concern with urbanization, are well-known environmental risk factors for asthma, whereas there is relatively little evidence in AD. This review highlights epidemiologic and experimental data on the role of air pollution in patients with AD. Recent evidence suggests that a variety of air pollutants, such as environmental tobacco smoke, volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde, toluene, nitrogen dioxide, and particulate matter, act as risk factors for the development or aggravation of AD. These air pollutants probably induce oxidative stress in the skin, leading to skin barrier dysfunction or immune dysregulation. However, these results are still controversial because of the low number of studies, limitations in study design, inaccurate assessment of exposure and absorption, and many other issues. Further research about the adverse effects of air pollution on AD will help to expand our understanding and to establish a better strategy for the prevention and management of AD. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Specific allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Herman; Calderon, Moises A; Manikam, Logan; Nankervis, Helen; García Núñez, Ignacio; Williams, Hywel C; Durham, Stephen; Boyle, Robert J

    2016-02-12

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT) is a treatment that may improve disease severity in people with atopic eczema (AE) by inducing immune tolerance to the relevant allergen. A high quality systematic review has not previously assessed the efficacy and safety of this treatment. To assess the effects of specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT), including subcutaneous, sublingual, intradermal, and oral routes, compared with placebo or a standard treatment in people with atopic eczema. We searched the following databases up to July 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library (Issue 7, 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), Web of Science™ (from 2005), the Global Resource of EczemA Trials (GREAT database), and five trials databases. We searched abstracts from recent European and North American allergy meetings and checked the references of included studies and review articles for further references to relevant trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of specific allergen immunotherapy that used standardised allergen extracts in people with AE. Two authors independently undertook study selection, data extraction (including adverse effects), assessment of risk of bias, and analyses. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We identified 12 RCTs for inclusion in this review; the total number of participants was 733. The interventions included SIT in children and adults allergic to either house dust mite (10 trials), grass pollen, or other inhalant allergens (two trials). They were administered subcutaneously (six trials), sublingually (four trials), orally, or intradermally (two trials). Overall, the risk of bias was moderate, with high loss to follow up and lack of blinding as the main methodological concern.Our primary outcomes were 'Participant- or parent-reported global assessment of disease severity at the end of treatment'; 'Participant- or parent-reported specific

  2. Features of Atopic Reactivity in Schoolchildren with Severe Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.I. Marusyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The study involved 30 students with severe bronchial asthma and 30 children with moderate to severe course. Patients with severe bronchial asthma revealed a clear tendency to increase the relative content of interleukin 4 in peripheral blood, which indirectly indicates the severity of inflammation in the bronchi. Almost every second child suffering from severe bronchial asthma reported an increase in the concentration of immunoglobulin E (more than 545.3 IU/ml, and the odds ratio was 1.9 (95% CI 1.1–3.4. In the group of patients with severe bronchial asthma, cases of increased skin sensitivity to household allergens were significantly more frequent compared to the second group. Thus, the size of hyperemia over 15.0 mm was recorded in 81.5 % of children of the first group and only in 51.9 % of persons (Pϕ < 0.05 in the second one. Clinical and epidemiological risk and diagnostic value of individual indicators of atopic reactivity were determined to verify the phenotype of severe bronchial asthma.

  3. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  4. Quality of Life of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Joanna; Reich, Adam; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2017-06-09

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic dermatitis in children. The influence of AD on quality of life of parents of children with AD was studied using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI). Fifty children with AD were included in the study (age range 2-24 months) together with their parents. Children's AD was found to influence the quality of life of both parents; however, it had a more significant influence on quality of life of mothers than that of fathers (mean FDLQI: 17.1 ± 5.3 vs. 14.7 ± 5.8 points; p children's AD, mothers spent more time caring for them and carried out more household duties. Childhood AD had a greater impact on quality of life of fathers through influence on their work or education. The influence of AD on the quality of life of family members is significant, and this should be taken into account in the therapeutic process.

  5. Topical tofacitinib for atopic dermatitis: a phase IIa randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonnette, R; Papp, K A; Poulin, Y; Gooderham, M; Raman, M; Mallbris, L; Wang, C; Purohit, V; Mamolo, C; Papacharalambous, J; Ports, W C

    2016-11-01

    Despite unmet need, 15 years have passed since a topical therapy with a new mechanism of action for atopic dermatitis (AD) has been approved. Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor treatment effect via topical application in patients with AD is unknown. Tofacitinib, a small-molecule JAK inhibitor, was investigated for the topical treatment of AD. In this 4-week, phase IIa, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study (NCT02001181), 69 adults with mild-to-moderate AD were randomized 1:1 to 2% tofacitinib or vehicle ointment twice daily. Percentage change from baseline (CFB) in Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) score at week 4 was the primary end point. Secondary efficacy end points included percentage CFB in body surface area (BSA), CFB in EASI Clinical Signs Severity Sum Score, proportion of patients with Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) response and CFB in patient-reported pruritus. Safety, local tolerability and pharmacokinetics were monitored. The mean percentage CFB at week 4 in EASI score was significantly greater (P tofacitinib (-81·7%) vs. vehicle (-29·9%). Patients treated with tofacitinib showed significant (P tofacitinib. Tofacitinib ointment showed significantly greater efficacy vs. vehicle across end points, with early onset of effect and comparable safety/local tolerability to vehicle. JAK inhibition through topical delivery is potentially a promising therapeutic target for AD. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Lack of antinuclear antibody in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, S; Kanwar, A J; Deodhar, S D

    1997-01-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) was assayed in 76 children with atopic dermatitis (AD) of which 46 were males and 30 females. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 12 years (mean 3.4 years). Age at onset of AD ranged from 2 months to 5.5 years (mean 1.9 years) and its duration ranged from 4 months to 4 years (mean 1.2 years). While facial lesions were present in 56 (73.3%) patients, 49 (64.5%) patients had predominant involvement of extensors. As per severity score designed by Rajka and Langerland, 31 (40.8%), 42 (55.3%) and 3 (3.9%) patients had mild, moderate and severe diseases respectively. History of photosensitivity was present in 6 (7.9%) patients. Serum samples were positive for ANA in a very low titre (1:20) in 2/6 patients with facial lesions. However LE cell, rheumatoid factor and C-reactive proteins were negative and serum complement levels were within normal limits.

  7. The atopic dog: a model for food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermel, R W; Kock, M; Griffey, S M; Reinhart, G A; Frick, O L

    1997-02-01

    The renewed interest in food allergy and its investigation has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model with similar comparative aspects of form and function relative to humans. Therefore we have been characterizing an inbred colony of high immunoglobulin E-producing dogs that were immunized subcutaneously with food antigen extracts in alum and that developed clinical manifestations of food allergy after oral challenges with food antigen. These dogs had appreciably high IgE antibody titer to specific food antigens, as measured by an enzyme-labeled immunodot assay. Skin test results for the food antigens were consistently positive, as evidenced by a wheal-and-flare reaction. Gastroscopic food sensitivity was tested through an endoscope by injecting allergenic food extracts into the gastric mucosa after intravenous injection of Evans blue dye. Mucosal changes included swelling and erythema, some petechiae and blue patching, and in some instances generalized gastric erythema and hyperperistalsis. Examination of immediate-reaction biopsy specimens revealed edema and few inflammatory cells. Examination of late-reaction biopsy specimens revealed increased eosinophil and mononuclear cell infiltrations typical of late-phase allergic inflammatory responses. Direct mucosal challenge with food extracts confirmed the clinical and immunologic evidence of food allergy in these immunized dogs and suggests the usefulness of the atopic dog as a model for food allergy. This model might also be useful in detecting hidden food allergies in unexplained inflammatory gastrointestinal tract diseases.

  8. What Does Tympanostomy Tube Placement in Children Teach Us About the Association Between Atopic Conditions and Otitis Media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhn, Young J.; Wi, Chung-Il

    2014-01-01

    Otitis media is the most common infection second only to viral upper respiratory infection in the outpatient setting. Tympanostomy tube insertion (TTI) is the most common ambulatory surgical procedure in the United States. While many risk factors for otitis media have been identified, atopic conditions have been under-recognized as risk factors for recurrent and persistent otitis media. Given that asthma and other atopic conditions are the most common chronic conditions during childhood, it is worth examining the association between atopic conditions and risk of otitis media, which can provide insight into how atopic conditions influence the risk of microbial infections. This paper focuses its discussion on otitis media, however it is important that the association between atopic conditions and risk of otitis media be interpreted in the context of the association of atopic conditions with increased risks of various microbial infections. PMID:24816652

  9. Family interaction and a supportive social network as salutogenic factors in childhood atopic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Per A; Kjellman, N-I Max; Björkstén, Bengt

    2002-02-01

    The role of psycho-social factors in the development of allergy was studied prospectively in 82 infants with a family history of atopy. The family participated in a standardized family test when the children were 18 months old. The ability to adjust to demands of the situation ('adaptability'), and the balance between emotional closeness and distance ('cohesion'), were assessed from videotapes by independent raters. Families rated as functional in both of these aspects were classified as 'functional', otherwise as 'dysfunctional'. The social network, life events, atopic symptoms (based on postal inquiries regarding symptoms answered by the parents, and on physical examinations), psychiatric symptoms, and socio-economic circumstances of the families were evaluated when the children were 18 months and 3 years of age. The children were classified as atopic (asthmatic symptoms or eczema) or as non-atopic. All but two children with atopic disease at 3 years of age had atopic disease before 18 months of age, while 32 of 60 children with atopic disease at 18 months of age had no problems by 3 years of age. An unbalanced family interplay at 18 months was associated with a relative risk (RR) of 1.99 for continuing atopic illness at 3 years of age (1.18 eczema on three or more localizations (RR reduced by 4.5%), and the amount of cat allergen in household dust (RR reduced by 3%). Recovery from atopic illness between 18 months and 3 years of age was four times as probable in families with functional interaction and a good social supportive network when children were 18 months of age, than in dysfunctional families with a poor social network (74% versus 20% p emotional distress than did healthy children (p = 0.02). Dysfunctional family interaction patterns were more commonly observed in families of children who at 3 years of age still had atopic symptoms, than in children who had recovered. The patterns included expression of emotion and reaction to the needs of others

  10. Risk of developing major depression and bipolar disorder among adolescents with atopic diseases: A nationwide longitudinal study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Han-Ting; Lan, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Su, Tung-Ping; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Bai, Ya-Mei; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have found an increased prevalence of atopic diseases among patients with major depression and bipolar disorder. But the temporal association between atopic diseases in adolescence and the subsequent risk of developing mood disorders has been rarely investigated. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Databases, 5075 adolescents with atopic diseases (atopic cohort) and 44,729 without (non-atopic cohort) aged between 10 and 17 in 2000 were enrolled into our study and followed to the end of 2010. Subjects who developed major depression or bipolar disorder during the follow-up were identified. The atopic cohort had an increased risk of developing major depression (HR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.93~3.11) and bipolar disorder (HR: 2.51, 95% CI: 1.71~3.67) compared to the non-atopic cohort, with a dose-dependent relationship between having a greater number of atopic comorbidities and a greater likelihood of major depression (1 atopic disease: HR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.29~2.50; 2 atopic comorbidities: HR: 2.42, 95% CI: 1.93~3.04;≥3 atopic comorbidities: HR: 3.79, 95% CI: 3.05~4.72) and bipolar disorder (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 0.57~3.44; HR: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.68~4.68; HR: 3.02, 95% CI: 1.69~5.38). Having atopic diseases in adolescence increased the risk of developing major depression and bipolar disorder in later life. Further studies may be required to clarify the underlying mechanism between atopy and mood disorders, and to investigate whether prompt intervention may decrease the risk of subsequent mood disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in preschool children with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, F; Topal, E; Soylu, N; Ozel Ozcan, O; Celiksoy, M H; Babayiğit, A; Karakoç, H T E; Erge, D; Sancak, R

    2016-01-01

    To compare with a control group the frequency of psychiatric disorders and severity of psychiatric symptoms in preschool children with atopic eczema. The study included children between the ages of 3-5 who were diagnosed to have atopic eczema. The parents of the children with atopic eczema were interviewed in person and were asked to fill in "The Early Childhood Inventory-4" form. This form assesses the psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in children between the ages of 3-5. The atopic eczema group included 80 patients (38 male, 42 female) with a mean age of 48.4 ± 15.7 months and the control group included 74 patients (41 male, 33 female) with a mean age of 49.9 ± 15.19 months. It was established that 68.8% of the group with atopic eczema received at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Between the psychiatric disorders, ADHD (Odds ratio: 2.57, 95% CI: 1.049-6.298, p=0.035), enuresis and encopresis (Odds ratio: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.121-5.097, p=0.022) and attachment disorder (Odds ratio: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.046-3.953, p=0.035) were found to be significantly higher when compared with the healthy control group. When the groups were compared in terms of psychiatric symptom severity scores calculated by using ECI-4, ADHD severity (p=0.043), conduct disorder severity (p=0.001), anxiety disorders severity (p<0.001), eating disorders severity (p=0.011) and tic disorder severity (p=0.01) were found to be higher in the atopic eczema group. Psychiatric illnesses are frequent in preschool children with atopic eczema. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation between atopic manifestation and lung toxicity following chest irradiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Kubota, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the impact of atopic manifestations on the occurrence of the lung toxicity following chest irradiation for breast cancer. Collection of 1,173 patients who had undergone radiotherapy on their 1,177 chest walls or postsurgical mammary glands at 9 institutions including ours. They received treatment consecutively from December 1980 through October 2005, with which we formed the basis of this analysis. Patients with any of the following medical history were defined as having atopic manifestations (n=111): asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and allergy to food or drug. Of them, patients who were observed for at least 6 months or who suffered from lung toxicity at any time, were classified as Group A (n=85). On the other hand, patients in our institute who were observed for at least 6 months or who suffered from lung toxicity at any time regardless of atopic manifestations, were classified as Group B (n=113), and patients without any atopic manifestation were classified as Group C (n=92). Grade 3 or higher lung toxicity in National Cancer Institute, Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) (v 3.0), occurred in 8.2%, id est (i.e.) 7 cases, of Group A, 2.7% of Group B, and 1.1% of Group C (p=0.0293 Group C against Group A). Three cases were classified as classical pneumonitis, and the other 4 sporadic pneumonitis such as Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia and Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia. Both of the histologically proven COP and CEP patients showed atopic manifestations in our institute. The detail clinical features are described in the main text. Having atopic manifestations suggests that there may be risk of lung toxicity following chest irradiation for breast cancer. (author)

  13. [Efficacy of sweat-antigen-inactivating skin care products on itching of patients with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Hajime; Takahagi, Shunsuke; Mihara, Shoji; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Ishii, Kaori; Hide, Michihiro; Suzuki, Shigeru; Kanatani, Hirotoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2011-01-01

    Many patients with atopic dermatitis showed immediate-type hypersensitivity against sweat antigen. Therefore, to deal with sweating is important to prevent itching and aggravations of dermatitis of patient with atopic dermatitis. We had searched a substance that inactivated sweat antigen adopting histamine release test. And we found that tannic acid which selected by screening various natural products inactivated sweat antigen. We evaluate skin care products (spray, after-bathing water and aerosol-spray) containing tannic acid for patients with atopic dermatitis. We administered in a tannic acid-containing spray and after-bathing water on 17 patients with atopic dermatitis. After treatment, total clinical assessment score and itching in the afternoon had significantly decreased from that on day 0. To evaluate the effect of tannic acid containing-aerosol spray on itching of patients with AD, we assessed symptoms of atopic dermatitis patients who used a tannic acid containing-aerosol spray every day for 4 weeks in a cross-over, double-blind study. Clinical severity of atopic dermatitis and degrees of itching in daily life of patients were evaluated by physicians and patients themselves, respectively. Degrees of itching in morning and those at night were significantly more largely improved by the use of tannic acid-containing aerosol spray than those by the use of placebo control aerosol spray. The overall efficacy of tannic acid-containing aerosol sprays was also significantly higher than those of tannic acid free spray. Sweat antigen inactivating skin care products may be effective to reduce itching of patients with atopic dermatitis.

  14. Potential role of reduced environmental UV exposure as a driver of the current epidemic of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Zirwas, Matthew J; Elias, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The basis for the sudden and dramatic increase in atopic dermatitis (AD) and related atopic diseases in the second half of the 20th century is unclear. The hygiene hypothesis proposes that the transition from rural to urban living leads to reduced childhood exposure to pathogenic microorganisms....... Hence instead of having the normal TH1 bias and immune tolerance because of repeated exposure to pathogens, urban dwellers have TH2 cell immune activity and atopic disease in a more sterile environment. Various other environmental exposures have been implicated in the explosion of AD (and atopic...

  15. Distinct molecular signatures of mild extrinsic and intrinsic atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Britta C; Litman, Thomas; Hald, Andreas; Norsgaard, Hanne; Lovato, Paola; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Skov, Lone; Thestrup-Pedersen, Kristian; Skov, Søren; Skak, Kresten; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease with underlying defects in epidermal function and immune responses. In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate differences in gene expression in lesional skin from patients with mild extrinsic or intrinsic AD compared to skin from healthy controls and from lesional psoriasis skin. The primary aim was to identify differentially expressed genes involved in skin barrier formation and inflammation, and to compare our results with those reported for patients with moderate and severe AD. In contrast to severe AD, expression of the majority of genes associated with skin barrier formation was unchanged or upregulated in patients with mild AD compared to normal healthy skin. Among these, no significant differences in the expression of filaggrin (FLG) and loricrin at both mRNA and protein level were found in lesional skin from patients with mild AD, despite the presence of heterozygous FLG mutations in the majority of patients with mild extrinsic AD. Several inflammation-associated genes such as S100A9, MMP12, CXCL10 and CCL18 were highly expressed in lesional skin from patients with mild psoriasis and were also increased in patients with mild extrinsic and intrinsic AD similar to previous reports for severe AD. Interestingly, expression of genes involved in inflammatory responses in intrinsic AD resembled that of psoriasis more than that of extrinsic AD. Overall, differences in expression of inflammation-associated genes found among patients with mild intrinsic and extrinsic AD correlated with previous findings for patients with severe intrinsic and extrinsic AD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Allergenic food introduction and risk of childhood atopic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J Elbert

    Full Text Available The role of timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction in the development of childhood allergic sensitization and atopic diseases is controversial.To examine whether timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction are associated with allergic sensitization, allergy and eczema in children until age 10 years.This study among 5,202 children was performed in a population-based prospective cohort. Timing (age ≤6 months vs. >6 months and diversity (0, 1, 2 and ≥3 foods of allergenic food (cow's milk, hen's egg, peanut, tree nuts, soy and gluten introduction were assessed by questionnaires at ages 6 and 12 months. At age 10 years, inhalant and food allergic sensitization were measured by skin prick tests, and physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergy by questionnaire. Data on parental-reported physician-diagnosed eczema were obtained from birth until age 10 years.Children introduced to gluten at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of eczema (aOR (95% CI: 0.84 (0.72, 0.99, compared with children introduced to gluten at age >6 months. However, timing of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization or physician-diagnosed allergy. Children introduced to ≥3 allergenic foods at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of physician-diagnosed inhalant allergy (0.64 (0.42, 0.98, compared with children not introduced to any allergenic food at age ≤6 months. However, diversity of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization, physician-diagnosed food allergy or eczema.Neither timing nor diversity of allergenic food introduction was consistently associated with childhood allergic sensitization, allergy or eczema.

  17. Ocular abnormalities in atopic dermatitis in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaujalgi Radhika

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common skin disease. Long-standing, severe AD with repeated scratching and rubbing of the face, which requires continuous dermatologic care, predisposes the patient to various ocular complications. The knowledge of the frequency and significance of these ocular complications may allow their early diagnosis and treatment. The present study assesses the ocular complications in Indian children suffering from AD. Methods: In order to study the ocular complications in AD, 100 patients (61 male and 39 female between the ages of 1 and 14 years were recruited. All the patients had complete dilated fundus examination with indirect ophthalmoscopy. The lid, conjunctiva and cornea were examined. Also, any evidence of cataract formation and retinal disorders were recorded. Results: The mean age of the children was 5.4 years. Forty-three (43.0% AD patients showed ocular abnormalities in the form of lid and conjunctival changes. Of these, 18 (41.9% patients showed only lid involvement, 16 (37.2% only conjunctival involvement and both conjunctival and lid changes were seen in nine (20.9% patients. Conjunctival changes were mostly in the form of a cobblestone appearance of the papillae, with mild to moderate papillary reaction and papillary hypertrophy. Variables observed to have a significant impact on the development of ocular abnormalities were age more than 5 years, duration of illness> 12 months, positive family history of atopy, presence of palmar hyperlinearity and a combination of both xerosis and Dennie-Morgan fold. Conclusions: The present study is the first of its kind from India to document an association between AD in children and various ocular manifestations. The ocular manifestations observed in our cohort were not associated with significant ocular morbidity or visual impairment possibly because of a less-severe disease in Indians.

  18. Maternal sensitivity and social support protect against childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Nicole L; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Cosic, Nela; Ntanda, Henry N; Anis, Lubna; Hart, Martha J; Campbell, Tavis S; Giesbrecht, Gerald F

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have identified associations between qualities of maternal-child relationships and childhood asthma, but few have examined associations with childhood atopic dermatitis (AD), a common precursor to asthma. Moreover, maternal psychological distress, including prenatal and postnatal depression, anxiety and stress, may increase risk, while social support from partners may reduce risk for childhood AD. We sought to uncover the association between maternal-infant relationship qualities (maternal sensitivity towards infant behavioral signals, controlling behavior, and unresponsiveness) and child AD after accounting for risk (i.e., prenatal and postnatal maternal depression, anxiety and stress) and protective (i.e., social support) factors. We conducted a secondary analysis of data collected on a subsample of 242 women and their infants enrolled during pregnancy in the ongoing Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition cohort study. Inclusion criteria required mothers to be >16 years of age, English speaking and depression, anxiety and stress in the prenatal and postnatal periods and physician diagnosis of childhood AD at 18 months were gathered via maternal report. Maternal sensitivity, unresponsiveness and controlling behaviours were assessed via videotaped observations using the Child-Adult Relationship Experimental (CARE)-Index at 6 months of infant age. Higher maternal sensitivity, or the inability of the mother to appropriately understand and respond to infant needs based on behavioral signals, predicted reduced odds of AD independent of and in combination with low prenatal and postnatal anxiety and high paternal support. After adjustment, higher maternal controlling behaviours and unresponsiveness also predicted greater odds of AD. Low maternal sensitivity is a risk factor for childhood AD, independently and in combination with perinatal anxiety and low social support. Thus, interventions that improve maternal-infant relationship quality, especially

  19. Clinical study of Atopic Dermatitis patient treated with Poison Extraction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chi-young

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study is desinged in order to evaluate the Poison extraction method for the Atopic dermatitis. Methods : The authors observed the two cases of Atopic dermatitis patients who previously used steroid-based ointment. for treating the Poison Extraction Method. Conclusions : 1. In case 1, the patient with mild case of Atopic dermatitis in face is treated with the Poison extraction method. Rash symptoms intensed for first few days. As sweating appeared in the local area from the seventh day, all the symptoms was disappeared rapidly. No recurrence was found. 2. In case 2, the patient with severe case of Atopic dermatitis in whole body is treated with the Poison extraction method. The symptoms intensed after two months and all the symptoms of itchiness, rash, scaly letter dissapeared in the third and fourth months. No recurrence was found. 3. In both cases of mild and severe cases of Atopic dermatitis. all the symptoms were disappeared and no recurrence was found with the Poison Extraction Method.

  20. Immunomodulatory Effects of Deokgu Thermomineral Water Balneotherapy on Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sae Mi; Lee, Kyung Ho; Han, Hyung Jin; Yu, Dong Soo; Woo, So Youn; Yun, Seong Taek; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Kim, Hong Jig; Kim, Jin-Wou

    2016-04-01

    Although the therapeutic mechanism of balneotherapy for atopic dermatitis has not been clarified, many atopic patients who visit thermomineral springs have shown clinical improvements. This study was aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of thermomineral water balneotherapy on the atopic dermatitis murine model. The oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of balneotherapy with Deokgu thermomineral water compared with distilled water. Histologic evaluation and confocal microscopic imaging were performed to analyze the lesional expression of cluster-of-differentiation (CD)4 and forkhead box p3 (Foxp3). Lesional mRNA expression of interleukin (IL) 33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and Foxp3 was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the distilled water bath group, confocal microscopic evaluation of CD4 and Foxp3 merged images showed increased expression of regulatory T cells in the thermomineral balneotherapy group. The lesional mRNA level of IL-33 showed a reduced trend in the thermomineral balneotherapy group, whereas the level of mRNA of Foxp3 was increased. TSLP showed a decreased trend in both distilled water and thermomineral water bath groups. There was a trend of reduced expression in lesional IL-33 mRNA but increased cell count of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in thermomineral balneotherapy compared with distilled water bath. Therefore, thermomineral balneotherapy can be an effective and safe adjuvant therapeutic option for atopic dermatitis.

  1. Randomized controlled trial using vitamins E and D supplementation in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanbakht, Mohammad Hassan; Keshavarz, Seyed Ali; Djalali, Mahmoud; Siassi, Fereydoun; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Firooz, Alireza; Seirafi, Hassan; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Chamari, Maryam; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2011-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronically relapsing, highly pruritic and inflammatory skin disease. This study was done to assess the effects of vitamins D and E supplementation on the clinical manifestation of atopic dermatitis. Forty-five atopic dermatitis patients were included in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. They were randomly divided into four groups and treated for 60 days: group P (n = 11), vitamins D and E placebos; group D (n = 12), 1600 IU vitamin D(3) plus vitamin E placebo; group E (n = 11), 600 IU synthetic all-rac-α-tocopherol plus vitamin D placebo; and group DE (n = 11), 1600 IU vitamin D(3) plus 600 IU synthetic all-rac-α-tocopherol. Serum 25(OH) vitamin D and plasma α-tocopherol were determined before and after the trial. The clinical improvement was evaluated with SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD). Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis tests. SCORAD was reduced after 60 days in groups D, E and DE by 34.8%, 35.7% and 64.3%, respectively (p = 0.004). Objective SCORAD also showed significant improvement. There was a positive correlation between SCORAD and intensity, objective, subjective and extent (p vitamins D and E in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  2. The Effect of Hypoallergenic Diagnostic Diet in Adolescents and Adult Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Celakovská

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of a diagnostic hypoallergenic diet on the severity of atopic dermatitis in patients over 14 years of age. Materials and Methods: The diagnostic hypoallergenic diet was recommended to patients suffering from atopic dermatitis for a period of 3 weeks. The severity of atopic dermatitis was evaluated at the beginning and at the end of this diet (SCORAD I, SCORAD II and the difference in the SCORAD over this period was statistically evaluated. Results: One hundred and forty-nine patients suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: 108 women and 41 men. The average age of the subjects was 26.03 (SD: 9.6 years, with the ages ranging from a minimum of 14 years to a maximum of 63 years. The mean SCORAD at the beginning of the study (SCORAD I was 32.9 points (SD: 14.1 and the mean SCORAD at the end of the diet (SCORAD II was 25.2 points (SD: 9.99. The difference between SCORAD I and SCORAD II was evaluated with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The average decrease of SCORAD was 7.7 points, which was statistically significant (P=.00000. Conclusion: Introduction of the diagnostic hypoallergenic diet may serve as a temporary medical solution" in patients suffering from moderate or severe forms of atopic dermatitis. It is recommended that this diet be used in the diagnostic workup of food allergy.

  3. Psychological disturbance in atopic eczema: the extent of the problem in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absolon, C M; Cottrell, D; Eldridge, S M; Glover, M T

    1997-08-01

    Although psychological factors are widely considered to be important in atopic eczema, there have been few controlled studies to assess the extent of disturbance in affected children and the problems experienced by their parents. This study was designed to find out the degree of psychological difficulty experienced by children with atopic eczema, whether their mothers show higher levels of mental distress than a comparison group, and whether the families of children with atopic eczema have less social support than the comparison group. We investigated 30 school-aged children with atopic eczema for psychological problems using the Rutter parent scale and compared them with 30 children with relatively minor skin lesions such as viral warts. Mental distress in mothers was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire. The Family Support Scale was used to get a measure of the social support experienced by the families. We found twice the rate of psychological disturbance in children in the eczema group compared with the control group. This difference was statistically significant for children with moderately severe eczema and severe eczema, but not for children with very mild eczema. Levels of mental distress were no greater in mothers of children with eczema than in parents of the control group and there was no difference in the degree of social support experienced by their families. These findings indicate that school-aged children with moderate and severe atopic eczema are at high risk of developing psychological difficulties, which may have implications for their academic and social development.

  4. Load alleviation of wind turbines by yaw misalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Knud Abildgaard; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Vertical wind shear is one of the dominating causes of load variations on the blades of a horizontal axis wind turbine. To alleviate the varying loads, wind turbine control systems have been augmented with sensors and actuators for individual pitch control. However, the loads caused by a vertical...... wind shear can also be affected through yaw misalignment. Recent studies of yaw control have been focused on improving the yaw alignment to increase the power capture at below rated wind speeds. In this study, the potential of alleviating blade load variations induced by the wind shear through yaw...... misalignment is assessed. The study is performed through simulations of a reference turbine. The study shows that optimal yaw misalignment angles for minimizing the blade load variations can be identified for both deterministic and turbulent inflows. It is shown that the optimal yaw misalignment angles can...

  5. FISHERMEN ALLEVIATION POVERTY MODEL IN THE NORTH COASTAL EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roziana Ainul Hidayati

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Poverty is a multidimensional problem that the approach to eradicate poverty must also be multidimensional. The study aims to formulate a model of poverty alleviation in coastal fishing in the North Coast of East Java. Grounded research approach used to determine the causes, impacts and implications of poverty fishermen. The results showed that the main cause of poverty that occurred in the three districts in East Java's north coast is different from one another. In Gresik district, the major cause of poverty is law enforcements that do not support fishermen and overfishing. While Lamongan more due to low fish prices and capital problems. While in Tuban fishermen due to limited infrastructure and lazy and extravagant lifestyle of the fishermen. These differences lead to different coping strategies so that later can form a concept model of poverty alleviation North Coast fishermen in East Java.

  6. Islamic Microfinance: an Interest free Microfinance Model for Poverty Alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Chakrabarty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical paper deals with Islamic microfinance and its rationality in Indian context as a panacea of Muslim poverty. Conventional microfinance system is very effective to alleviate poverty of developing countries. But it could not touch all community of people because of ‘interest’ component in debt and high degree of interest. Muslims dislike that microfinance which is based on ‘interest’ as it is strictly prohibited in Islam. Therefore the motto of financial inclusion is out of reach through conventional microfinance. An alternative interest free microfinance model has been developed in some part of world to include all Muslim poor people within the banking system. India is yet to adopt Islamic microfinance though 20% of total population is Muslim. The author strongly opines that India should adopt Islamic microfinance as a tool for poverty alleviation of Muslims as well as other communities.

  7. Elevatated CO2 alleviates heat stress tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva S. K.; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-01-01

    Title: The alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on heat stress susceptibility of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars Session: Plant response and adaptation to abiotic stress Sindhuja Shanmugam1, Katrine Heinsvig Kjaer2*, Carl-Otto Ottosen2, Eva Rosenqvist3, Dew Kumari Sharma3 and Bernd...... Wollenweber4 1Department of Bioenergy, Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. 2Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Årslev, Denmark 3Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Hojbakkegaard Allé 9, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark 4......Institute for Agroecology, Aarhus University, Forsøgsvej 1, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark *Presenting author This study analysed the alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on stress-induced decreases in photosynthesis and changes in carbohydrate metabolism in two wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) of different...

  8. The Role of Forests in Poverty Alleviation: Dealing with Multiple Millennium Development Goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersum, K.F.; Ros-Tonen, Mirjam A.F.

    2005-01-01

    This policy brief summarises the present state of scientific understanding of the potential contribution of tropical forests to poverty alleviation and highlights the implications of this knowledge for forest-based poverty alleviation policies

  9. Macroeconomic Policies and their Impact on Poverty Alleviation in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid Amjad; A.R. Kemal

    1997-01-01

    The paper provides a consistent time-series of poverty estimates for the period 1963- 64 to 1992-93 for both the rural as well as the urban areas, examines the influence of macroeconomic policies on the poverty levels, analyses the impact of Structural Adjustment Programmes on the levels of poverty, and suggests a strategy for poverty alleviation in Pakistan. The paper explores in particular the influence on poverty of such factors as economic growth, agricultural growth, terms of trade for t...

  10. Effectiveness of microcredit for poverty alleviation: evidence from Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Arp, Frithjof; Ardisa, Alvin

    2016-01-01

    Debate persists about the effectiveness of microcredit for poverty alleviation. We argue that much of this debate is due to discipline-specific research approaches and methodological complexities obscuring fundamental issues. Microfinance organisations do not operate in a vacuum: other forms of collateral-free lending must be taken into account. We illustrate our argument with a study of formal and informal collateral-free lending in the Yogyakarta region of Indonesia. Focused on the fundame...

  11. A study of helicopter gust response alleviation by automatic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S.

    1983-01-01

    Two control schemes designed to alleviate gust-induced vibration are analytically investigated for a helicopter with four articulated blades. One is an individual blade pitch control scheme. The other is an adaptive blade pitch control algorithm based on linear optimal control theory. In both controllers, control inputs to alleviate gust response are superimposed on the conventional control inputs required to maintain the trim condition. A sinusoidal vertical gust model and a step gust model are used. The individual blade pitch control, in this research, is composed of sensors and a pitch control actuator for each blade. Each sensor can detect flapwise (or lead-lag or torsionwise) deflection of the respective blade. The acturator controls the blade pitch angle for gust alleviation. Theoretical calculations to predict the performance of this feedback system have been conducted by means of the harmonic method. The adaptive blade pitch control system is composed of a set of measurements (oscillatory hub forces and moments), an identification system using a Kalman filter, and a control system based on the minimization of the quadratic performance function.

  12. Factors Influencing Poverty Alleviation amongst Microfinance Adopting Households in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavhungu Abel Mafukata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the factors having the most influence on the alleviation of poverty amongst the households adopting microfinance in Zambia. Ninety nine (n=99 respondents were randomly and purposively selected from amongst 340 microfinance adopters of the so-called Micro Bankers Trust programme operating a microfinance business in the Makululu Compound of Kabwe, Zambia. Socio-demographic primary data were collected through face-to-face interviews based on a semi-structured questionnaire instrument. The data were entered into an excel spreadsheet for analysis. The descriptive data were thereafter exported and fitted to an empirical model. The descriptive results revealed that the majority of the respondents were married, unemployed, fairly educated younger women from larger-sized poor households who drew their household income mainly from microfinance activities. The majority of the respondents thought microfinance had improved their well-being in some crucial areas. The results of the empirical model found that some respondents were indeed alleviated from poverty through microfinance. Conclusion drawn in this paper is that microfinance does alleviate poverty of the poor.

  13. EFFECTS OF SILICON ON ALLEVIATING ARSENIC TOXICITY IN MAIZE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airon José da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a metalloid highly toxic to plants and animals, causing reduced plant growth and various health problems for humans and animals. Silicon, however, has excelled in alleviating stress caused by toxic elements in plants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Si in alleviating As stress in maize plants grown in a nutrient solution and evaluate the potential of the spectral emission parameters and the red fluorescence (Fr and far-red fluorescence (FFr ratio obtained in analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence in determination of this interaction. An experiment was carried out in a nutrient solution containing a toxic rate of As (68 μmol L-1 and six increasing rates of Si (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mmol L-1. Dry matter production and concentrations of As, Si, and photosynthetic pigments were then evaluated. Chlorophyll fluorescence was also measured throughout plant growth. Si has positive effects in alleviating As stress in maize plants, evidenced by the increase in photosynthetic pigments. Silicon application resulted in higher As levels in plant tissue; therefore, using Si for soil phytoremediation may be a promising choice. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis proved to be a sensitive tool, and it can be successfully used in the study of the ameliorating effects of Si in plant protection, with the Fr/FFr ratio as the variable recommended for identification of temporal changes in plants.

  14. Coherent Lidar Turbulence Measurement for Gust Load Alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. J.; Soreide, David; Bagley, Hal

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence adversely affects operation of commercial and military aircraft and is a design constraint. The airplane structure must be designed to survive the loads imposed by turbulence. Reducing these loads allows the airplane structure to be lighter, a substantial advantage for a commercial airplane. Gust alleviation systems based on accelerometers mounted in the airplane can reduce the maximum gust loads by a small fraction. These systems still represent an economic advantage. The ability to reduce the gust load increases tremendously if the turbulent gust can be measured before the airplane encounters it. A lidar system can make measurements of turbulent gusts ahead of the airplane, and the NASA Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) program is developing such a lidar. The ACLAIM program is intended to develop a prototype lidar system for use in feasibility testing of gust load alleviation systems and other airborne lidar applications, to define applications of lidar with the potential for improving airplane performance, and to determine the feasibility and benefits of these applications. This paper gives an overview of the ACLAIM program, describes the lidar architecture for a gust alleviation system, and describes the prototype ACLAIM lidar system.

  15. Poverty alleviation programmes in India: a social audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Yesudian, C A

    2007-10-01

    The review highlights the poverty alleviation programmes of the government in the post-economic reform era to evaluate the contribution of these programmes towards reducing poverty in the country. The poverty alleviation programmes are classified into (i) self-employment programmes; (ii) wage employment programmes; (iii) food security programmes; (iv) social security programmes; and (v) urban poverty alleviation programmes. The parameter used for evaluation included utilization of allocated funds, change in poverty level, employment generation and number or proportion of beneficiaries. The paper attempts to go beyond the economic benefit of the programmes and analyzes the social impact of these programmes on the communities where the poor live, and concludes that too much of government involvement is actually an impediment. On the other hand, involvement of the community, especially the poor has led to better achievement of the goals of the programmes. Such endeavours not only reduced poverty but also empowered the poor to find their own solutions to their economic problems. There is a need for decentralization of the programmes by strengthening the panchayat raj institutions as poverty is not merely economic deprivation but also social marginalization that affects the poor most.

  16. Environmental stresses can alleviate the average deleterious effect of mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leibler Stanislas

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fundamental questions in evolutionary genetics, including the possible advantage of sexual reproduction, depend critically on the effects of deleterious mutations on fitness. Limited existing experimental evidence suggests that, on average, such effects tend to be aggravated under environmental stresses, consistent with the perception that stress diminishes the organism's ability to tolerate deleterious mutations. Here, we ask whether there are also stresses with the opposite influence, under which the organism becomes more tolerant to mutations. Results We developed a technique, based on bioluminescence, which allows accurate automated measurements of bacterial growth rates at very low cell densities. Using this system, we measured growth rates of Escherichia coli mutants under a diverse set of environmental stresses. In contrast to the perception that stress always reduces the organism's ability to tolerate mutations, our measurements identified stresses that do the opposite – that is, despite decreasing wild-type growth, they alleviate, on average, the effect of deleterious mutations. Conclusions Our results show a qualitative difference between various environmental stresses ranging from alleviation to aggravation of the average effect of mutations. We further show how the existence of stresses that are biased towards alleviation of the effects of mutations may imply the existence of average epistatic interactions between mutations. The results thus offer a connection between the two main factors controlling the effects of deleterious mutations: environmental conditions and epistatic interactions.

  17. Foods provoking and alleviating symptoms in gastroparesis: patient experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wytiaz, Victoria; Homko, Carol; Duffy, Frank; Schey, Ron; Parkman, Henry P

    2015-04-01

    Nutritional counseling for gastroparesis focuses on reduction of meal size, fiber, and fat to control symptoms. The tolerance of gastroparesis patients for particular foods is largely anecdotal. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize foods provoking or alleviating gastroparesis symptoms. Gastroparesis patients completed: (1) Demographic Questionnaire; (2) Patient Assessment of Upper GI Symptoms; (3) Food Toleration and Aversion survey asking patients about experiences when eating certain foods utilizing a scale from -3 (greatly worsening symptoms) to +3 (greatly improving symptoms). Descriptive qualities (acidic, fatty, spicy, roughage-based, bitter, salty, bland, and sweet) were assigned to foods. Forty-five gastroparesis patients participated (39 idiopathic gastroparesis). Foods worsening symptoms included: orange juice, fried chicken, cabbage, oranges, sausage, pizza, peppers, onions, tomato juice, lettuce, coffee, salsa, broccoli, bacon, and roast beef. Saltine crackers, jello, and graham crackers moderately improved symptoms. Twelve additional foods were tolerated by patients (not provoking symptoms): ginger ale, gluten-free foods, tea, sweet potatoes, pretzels, white fish, clear soup, salmon, potatoes, white rice, popsicles, and applesauce. Foods provoking symptoms were generally fatty, acidic, spicy, and roughage-based. The foods shown to be tolerable were generally bland, sweet, salty, and starchy. This study identified specific foods that worsen as well as foods that may help alleviate symptoms of gastroparesis. Foods that provoked symptoms differed in quality from foods that alleviated symptoms or were tolerable. The results of this study illustrate specific examples of foods that aggravate or improve symptoms and provide suggestions for a gastroparesis diet.

  18. The Asian atopic dermatitis phenotype combines features of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis with increased TH17 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Shinji; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Ungar, Benjamin; Kim, Soo Jung; de Guzman Strong, Cristina; Xu, Hui; Peng, Xiangyu; Estrada, Yeriel D; Nakajima, Saeko; Honda, Tetsuya; Shin, Jung U; Lee, Hemin; Krueger, James G; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Kabashima, Kenji; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) shows very high prevalence in Asia, with a large unmet need for effective therapeutics. Direct comparisons between European American (EA) and Asian patients with AD are unavailable, but earlier blood studies detected increased IL-17(+)-producing cell counts in Asian patients with AD. We sought to characterize the Asian AD skin phenotype and compare it with the EA AD skin phenotype. We performed genomic profiling (real-time PCR) and immunohistochemistry on lesional and nonlesional biopsy specimens from 52 patients with AD (25 EAs and 27 Asians), 10 patients with psoriasis (all EAs), and 27 healthy subjects (12 EAs and 15 Asians). Although disease severity/SCORAD scores were similar between the AD groups (58.0 vs 56.7, P = .77), greater acanthosis, higher Ki67 counts, and frequent parakeratosis were characteristics of lesional epidermis from Asian patients with AD (P Asian patients had high IgE levels. A principal component analysis using real-time PCR data clustered the Asian AD phenotype between the EA AD and psoriasis phenotypes. TH2 skewing characterized both Asian and EA patients with AD but not patients with psoriasis. Significantly higher TH17 and TH22 (IL17A, IL19, and S100A12 in lesional and IL-22 in nonlesional skin; P Asian patients. The Asian AD phenotype presents (even in the presence of increased IgE levels) a blended phenotype between that of EA patients with AD and those with psoriasis, including increased hyperplasia, parakeratosis, higher TH17 activation, and a strong TH2 component. The relative pathogenic contributions of the TH17 and TH2 axes in creating the Asian AD phenotype need to be tested in future clinical trials with appropriate targeted therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacoeconomic efficacy of complex medical and climatic treatment of atopic asthma in Teberda resort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkenova Z.T.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 120 patients with atopic asthma have been divided into two groups: the control group (60 patients - has been treated with budesonide and formoterol combination (Cymbicort Turbuhaler in individual doses; the main group (60 patients additionally has being taken a course of climatic therapy in Teberda resort for 21 days. Common pharmacoeconomic analysis has been carried out with study of «expenses-efficiency» balance. Statistic results have been processed with Statistica 6,0 program. Complex of medical and climatic treatment of atopic asthma in Teberda resort promoted twice reduction of Cymbicort Turbuhaler dosage in 63,33% of patients while holding asthma control. Main group patients significantly rarely asked for stationary, out-patient or emergency aid; so it helped to reduce yearly expenses for 1 patient treatment to 51, 69%. Complex medical and climatic treatment of atopic asthma in Teberda resort allows to reduce pharmacoeconomic expenses significantly and to improve disease course

  20. Lactoferricin/verbascoside topical emulsion: a possible alternative treatment for atopic dermatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasibetti, Elena; Bruni, Natascia; Bigliati, Mauro; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2017-08-28

    Atopic dermatitis affects 3-15% of the general dog population and it has been diagnosed by veterinarians up to 58% of dogs affected with skin disease. It is usually a life-long pathology which can be controlled, but it can be seldom cured. The present investigation describes a case study in which lactoferricin and verbascoside are part of a formulation to obtain a dermatological lotion for canine dermatitis treatment. The study was an open-label trial design of two-week treatment. Thirty-eight dogs (23 females and 15 males), with atopic dermatitis and secondary bacterial or yeast overgrowth have been included. During treatment period the total clinical score progressively decreased associated with an improvement in clinical signs. No adverse effects were reported in any of the treated dogs. The present research suggests that daily applications of tested emulsion are effective in reducing bacterial overgrowth and clinical signs in skin folds and atopic dermatitis.

  1. Development of atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt; Loland, Lotte; Buchvald, Frederik F

    2006-01-01

    , followed up for 3 years with scheduled visits every 6 months as well as visits for onset or acute exacerbations of skin symptoms. SETTING: The cohort was recruited from greater Copenhagen, Denmark, and followed up at a clinical research unit, which controlled all diagnoses and treatment of skin diseases....... PARTICIPANTS: A total of 411 infants were enrolled in the cohort; 55 had incomplete follow-up and were excluded from certain analyses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Atopic dermatitis was defined based on the criteria of Hanifin and Rajka, and severity was assessed by the SCORAD (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) index...... predicted AD at age 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Atopic dermatitis begins at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern. Eczema at the arms and joints provides the highest predictive value for the development of AD at age 3 years. This may be used for early prediction and intervention of AD....

  2. Skin symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis using enzyme-containing detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Hundevadt; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Mosbech, H

    1998-01-01

    Detergent enzymes may cause skin irritation and occasionally hypersensitivity reactions. The potential hazards of these enzymes have led some physicians to advise atopic dermatitis patients against the use of enzyme-enriched detergents. A three-phased randomised, double-blind, cross-over experiment...... was designed to question this recommendation. Each period was of 1 month's duration.In the first phase patients continued using their normal washing detergent. In phase II patients used trial detergent with or without added enzymes, and during phase III patients were given the opposite trial detergent. A total...... differences in any of the primary or secondary parameters comparing treatment and placebo periods. Our data therefore seem to exclude that atopic dermatitis may exacerbate during 1 month's exposure to enzyme-enriched detergents. Since no significant irritant capacity was detected in atopic dermatitis patients...

  3. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFICACY OF INOSINE PRANOBEX FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of atopic asthma in children remains high. One of the reasons for lack of control over asthma symptoms is repeated infection. The article describes results from the study of immunomodulating medication inosine pranobex used in treatment of acute respiratory infections in children with atopic asthma. The results obtained prove the efficacy and safety of this medication. The use of this immunomodifier with antiviral activity during the period of acute respiratory infection in children with atopic asthma contributes to shortening of intoxication and catarrhal signs duration, elimination of viral agents. Key words: asthma, acute respiratory infections, immunomodifiers, inosine pranobex, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:98-105

  4. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma and Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Stokholm, Lonny; Linder, Marie

    2017-01-01

    -mediated diseases atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis after palivizumab exposure. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in childhood. METHODS: This was a cross-national population......, and children with hemodynamic significant heart disease were defined. RESULTS: Of the 1,351,265 children included, 1192 (0.09%) were exposed to palivizumab. An increased risk of asthma after palivizumab exposure was observed in the total birth cohort (hazard ratio [HR] 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.......32-1.68) and in the sub-cohort of preterm children (HR 1.24; 95% CI 1.07-1.44). However, post hoc analyses using the propensity score to balance confounding factors found no increased risk of asthma in preterm children (HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.56-1.48). No increased risks of atopic dermatitis (HR 1.18; 95% CI 0...

  5. Emotion with tears decreases allergic responses to latex in atopic eczema patients with latex allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2006-07-01

    Allergic responses are enhanced by stress, whereas they are reduced by laughter in atopic eczema patients. Emotion with tears decreases plasma IL-6 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, the effect of emotion with tears on allergic responses in patients with atopic eczema was studied. Sixty patients with atopic eczema having latex allergy viewed both the weather information video and the heart-warming movie, Kramer vs. Kramer. Just before and immediately after viewing each video, allergic responses to latex were measured. Viewing the weather information video did not cause emotion with tears in any patients, and it failed to modulate allergic responses. In contrast, viewing Kramer vs. Kramer caused emotion with tears in 44 of 60 patients, and it reduced allergic skin wheal responses to latex and latex-specific IgE production in them. Emotion with tears reduced allergic responses, and it may be useful in the treatment of allergic diseases.

  6. Cesarean section delivery and development of food allergy and atopic dermatitis in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathoma, Evangelia; Triga, Maria; Fouzas, Sotirios; Dimitriou, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Delivery by Cesarean section (CS) may predispose to allergic disorders, presumably due to alterations in the establishment of normal gut microbiota in early infancy. In this study, we sought to investigate the association between CS and physician-diagnosed food allergy and atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life, using data from a homogeneous, population-based, birth cohort. A total of 459 children born and cared for in the same tertiary maternity unit were examined at birth and followed up at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months of age. Participants with symptoms suggestive of food allergy or atopic dermatitis were evaluated by a pediatric allergy specialist to confirm the diagnosis based on well-defined criteria. The rate of CS was 50.8% (n = 233). Food allergy was diagnosed in 24 participants (5.2%) while atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 62 children (13.5%). Cesarean section (OR 3.15; 95% CI 1.14-8.70), atopic dermatitis of the child (OR 3.01; 95% CI 1.18-7.80), parental atopy (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.73-12.1), and gestational age (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.07-2.37) were significant and independent predictors of food allergy. Children with at least one allergic parent delivered by CS had higher probability of developing food allergy compared with vaginally delivered children of non-allergic parents (OR 10.0; 95% CI 3.06-32.7). Conversely, the effect of CS on atopic dermatitis was not significant (OR 1.35; 95% CI 0.74-2.47). Delivery by CS predisposes to the development of food allergy but not atopic dermatitis in early childhood. Cesarean section delivery seems to upregulate the immune response to food allergens, especially in children with allergic predisposition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Impairment of T-regulatory cells in cord blood of atopic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Bianca; Liu, Jing; Höppler, Sabine; Haug, Severine; Sattler, Christine; Lluis, Anna; Illi, Sabina; von Mutius, Erika

    2008-06-01

    Maternal atopy is a strong predictor for the development of childhood allergic diseases. The underlying mechanisms are ill defined, yet regulatory T (Treg) and T(H)17 cells may play a key role potentially shaping the early immune system toward a proallergic or antiallergic immune regulation. We examined T(H)1/T(H)2, Treg, and T(H)17 cell responses to innate (lipid A/peptidoglycan) and mitogen/adaptive (phytohemagglutinin/Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 1) immune stimulation in cord blood from offspring of atopic/nonatopic mothers. Cord blood mononuclear cells from 161 healthy neonates (59% nonatopic, 41% atopic mothers) were investigated regarding Treg and T(H)17 cells (mRNA/surface markers), suppressive function, and proliferation/cytokine secretion. Cord blood from offspring of atopic mothers showed fewer innate-induced Treg cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)high), lower mRNA expression of associated markers (glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein/lymphocyte activation gene 3; P cell function was impaired in mitogen-induced suppression of T effector cells in cord blood of offspring from atopic mothers (P = .03). Furthermore, IL-10 and IFN-gamma secretion were decreased in innate-stimulated cord blood of offspring from atopic mothers (P = .04/.05). Innate-induced IL-17 was independent of maternal atopy and highly correlated with IL-13 secretion. In offspring of atopic mothers, Treg cell numbers, expression, and function were impaired at birth. T(H)17 cells were correlated with T(H)2 cells, independently of maternal atopy.

  8. Nasal hyperresponders and atopic subjects report different symptom intensity to air quality: a climate chamber study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, L; Andersson, K; Bønløkke, J H; Mølhave, L; Kjaergaard, S K; Stridh, G; Juto, J-E; Sigsgaard, T

    2009-06-01

    Short-term exposure to dust and dust added with beta-(1,3)-d-glucan or aldehydes may cause sensory reactions. In random order, we exposed 36 volunteers in a climate chamber to clean air, office dust, dust with glucan, and dust with aldehydes. Three groups of subjects were exposed, eleven were non-atopic with nasal histamine hyperreactivity, 13 were non-atopic, and 12 were atopic. Subjective ratings of symptoms and general health were registered four times during four 6-h exposure sessions. Six symptom intensity indices were constructed. The nasal hyperreactive group had a high and time-dependent increase of mucous membrane irritations, whereas the atopic group had a low and stable rate of irritations with exposure time, close to the reference group (P = 0.02 for differences between the groups with respect to time under exposure for Weak Inflammatory Responses and P = 0.05 for Irritative Body Perception, significance mainly because of the nasal hyperreactive group). Exposure to dust, with or without glucan or aldehydes, showed increased discomfort measured by the index for Constant Indoor Climate, and dust with glucan had a similar effect for the index for Lower Respiratory Effects. For Psychological and Neurological Effects these were dependent on group affiliation, thus preventing a uniform statement of exposure effects for all three investigated groups. Opportunities for identifying persons with high or low sensitivity to low-level exposures are important in preventive medicine and will reduce intra-group variability and thus increase the power of experimental and epidemiological studies searching for correlations between exposures and health effects. The contrast between nasal hyperreactive on one side and atopic and reference subjects on the other side is particularly important. The atopic group indicated a non-homogenous reaction depending on their hyperreactive status, a finding that could be important but needs further confirmation.

  9. Esculetin from Fraxinus rhynchophylla attenuates atopic skin inflammation by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Na-Hee; Yang, Eun-Ju; Jin, Meiling; Lee, Jong Yeong; Choi, Young-Ae; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sun-Uk; Shin, Tae-Yong; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Jang, Yong Hyun; Song, Kyung-Sik; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2018-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder afflicting from infancy to adults with itching, scratching, and lichenification. We aimed to investigate the effects of esculetin from Fraxinus rhynchophylla on atopic skin inflammation. For induction of atopic skin inflammation, we exposed the ears of female BALB/c mice to house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) for 4 weeks. Oral administration of esculetin reduced the symptoms of DFE/DNCB-induced atopic skin inflammation, which were evaluated based on ear swelling and number of scratch bouts. The immunoglobulin (Ig) E, IgG2a, and histamine levels in serum were decreased and inflammatory cell infiltration in skin tissue was reduced by the esculetin. It suppressed production of Th1, Th2 and Th17-related cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, IL-31 and IL-17 in the ear tissue. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of esculetin on activated keratinocytes, which are representative cells used for studying the pathogenesis of acute and chronic atopic skin inflammation. As results, esculetin suppressed gene expression of Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines and the activation of nuclear factor-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in TNF-α/IFN-γ-stimulated keratinocytes. Taken together, these results imply that esculetin attenuated atopic skin inflammation, suggesting that esculetin could be a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The impact Atopic dermatitis on the life quality of childrens 1-6 year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Shariati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most prevalent skin diseases in the world. Although, the disorder is not fatal, it can cause life quality reduction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of atopic dermatitis on life quality of 1-6-year-old children. Materials and Methods: The current study is a descriptive and analytical one designed to assess quality of life (QOL in 1-6-year-old children with atopic dermatitis in Kurdistan province (West of Iran. All the children who attended skin clinic of Besat Hospital, Sanandaj- Iran, during 2014 and 2016, participated in the study. Quality of life questionnaires were used to obtain data. Parents of the participating children were asked to complete the questionnaire. Index of Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD was used to determine the severity of the disease. The study data were analysis using Stata-12 software. Results: During the study, 53 children with atopic dermatitis were identified and 66.04% were male. According to the classification of SCORAD index, 54.36% of the children (19 subjects were included in the moderate group (SCORAD 14-40 and 63.46% (33 persons in the severe group (SCORAD> 40. Mean of life quality score was 9.24 ± 10.48 (range 0-30 and there was no statistically significant difference between the genders (P >0.05. Conclusion: There was a positive correlation between the quality of life and pain severity in AD children; and children with atopic dermatitis had low quality of life and itching, wound, discomfort and sleep disorder, were the factors that mainly impact on their life quality.

  11. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16...

  13. An Improved Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis and Suppression of Skin Lesions by an Inhibitor of Tec Family Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kawakami

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: We established a highly efficient, highly reproducible protocol to induce skin lesions in NC/Nga mice and successfully applied it to show the efficacy of terreic acid in treating skin lesions. This mouse model of atopic dermatitis will be useful to study the pathogenetic processes of atopic dermatitis and to evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates.

  14. Association of atopic diseases and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder : A systematic review and meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, Jurjen; Cicek, Rukiye; de Vries, Tjalling W.; Hak, Eelko; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    Over the last decades, the hypothesis has been raised that an atopic response could lead to the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study systematically reviews the observational cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that assessed the association between atopic

  15. Cost of care of atopic dermatitis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common dermatologic condition with a prevalence varying from 5% to 15%, and it has been rising over time. Several studies from developed countries have revealed the substantial economic burden of AD on health care budgets. There has been no research however on the cost of care of AD from India a country where health care is self-funded with no health insurance or social security provided by the government. Aim: The aim of our study was to assess prospectively the cost of care of AD in children in an outpatient hospital setting in India. Methods: A total of 40 children with AD, <10 years of age, registered in the pediatric dermatology clinic at our institute were enrolled for the study. All patients were followed-up for 6 months. Demographic information, clinical profile, severity, and the extent of AD were recorded in predesigned performa. Caregivers were asked to fill up a cost assessment questionnaire specially designed for the study. It had a provision for measuring direct, indirect, and provider costs. Results: Of the 40 patients, 37 completed the study. Mean total cost for AD was Rs. 6235.00 ± 3514.00. Direct caregiver cost was Rs. 3022.00 ± 1620.00 of which treatment cost constituted 77.2 ± 11.1%. The total provider cost (cost of consultation, nursing/paramedical staff and infrastructure was Rs. 948.00, which was 15.2% of the total cost of care and the mean indirect cost calculated by adding loss of earnings of parents due to hospital visits was Rs. 2264.00 ± 2392.00 (range: 0-13,332. The mean total cost depending on the severity of AD was Rs. 3579.00 ± 948.00, Rs. 6806.00 ± 3676.00 and Rs. 8991.00 ± 3129.00 for mild, moderate and severe disease, respectively. Conclusions: AD causes a considerable drain on the financial resources of families in India since the treatment is mostly self-funded. Cost of care of AD is high and comparable to those of chronic physical illness, such as diabetes

  16. Parental knowledge, attitude, and behavior toward children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reljić, Vesna; Gazibara, Tatjana; Nikolić, Miloš; Zarić, Milica; Maksimović, Nataša

    2017-03-01

    Successful control of atopic dermatitis (AD) in children depends on parents' knowledge on the disease and attitude toward ill child, but there is a lack studies exploring parental knowledge, attitude, and behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate parents' knowledge, attitude, and behavior toward AD. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, between February 2015 and March 2016. Parents of children with AD were invited to complete the questionnaire, which was comprised of five parts: parental sociodemographic characteristics, demographic and clinical characteristics of children, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. To assess factors associated with a higher knowledge level on AD, stronger positive attitude, and more supportive behavior, we performed two multiple linear regression models. The average parental knowledge score was 9.5 ± 1.9 out of 12. The level of knowledge did not correlate with parental conviction that they were well-informed on AD (ρ = -0.121; P = 0.319). Older (β = 0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00-0.16, P = 0.040), married/partnered parents (β = -2.14, 95% CI -3.55 to 0.72, P = 0.004), and those who have had AD themselves were more likely to be more knowledgeable on AD. Older (β = 0.18, 95% CI 0.01-0.34, P = 0.036) and employed (β = 3.99, 95% CI 1.59-6.38, P = 0.002) parents had stronger positive attitudes toward their children with AD. More supportive behavior of parents of children with AD was associated with being older (β = 0.24, 95% CI 0.04-0.45, P = 0.020) and less educated (β = -0.76, 95% CI -1.24 to 0.28, P = 0.003). The importance of understanding AD and accounting for attitudes by family members is obvious for successful control of the disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  17. Perceived stress and risk of adult-onset asthma and other atopic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, N H; Kristensen, T S; Lange, Peter

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychological stress can affect airway inflammatory response to irritants and allergens, but the importance of stress in the etiology of adult-onset respiratory and dermatologic allergic disorders remains unclear. We aim to address the relationship between perceived stress and the risk...... of adult-onset asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma/bronchitis medication. METHODS: Participants (n = 9785) from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark, free of atopic disorders at baseline in 1981-1983 were asked questions on stress intensity and frequency. They were followed...

  18. COMPARISON OF CLINICAL ACTIVITY OF PIMECROLIMUS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH MILD AND MODERATE ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Deeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (ad is prevalent disease in younger children. Calcium inhibitor pimecrolimus (elidel, cream 1% is the latest anti-inflammatory drug offered for management of ad. The activity of pimecrolimus was evaluated in open, prospective, randomized, comparison trial, on 60 children (age from 3 months to 7 years with mild and moderate ad. Pimecrolimus was more effective in management of mild ad on the assumption of regular use of drug (TIS < 17, and topical corticosteroids were effective in patients with moderate ad.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, pimecrolimus, topical corticosteroids, management.

  19. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Current Clinical Guidelines for Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic multifactorial skin disease that is common enough in childhood. The article presents the current data on epidemiology and dynamics of incidence of pathological symptoms, pathogenesis basics, and key factors of the disease development, shows the current classification of the disease. The authors consider in detail the key principles of the diagnosis and peculiarities of a clinical aspect depending on age. Algorithms of a therapeutic approach, as well as basics of an individual hypoallergenic diet are proposed. General recommendations and possible prognosis for pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis are given.

  20. NONSTEROIDAL TOPICAL MEDICATION IN THE THERAPY OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Namazova-Baranova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to atopic dermatitis (AD in children. The high prevalence of this pathology and significant social and economic burden are responsible for the relevance of search for new medications for the treatment of AD, which will accelerate the achievement of remission. Inclusion of emollient in basic therapy for patients with atopic dermatitis of any severity is necessary element of improvement treatment efficacy, shorten duration of steroid consumption, lengthen the period of remission and reduce the number of exacerbations. 

  1. EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF HYPOALLERGENIC COMPOUND, ENRICHED WITH PREBIOTICS, FOR THE PROPHYLACTICS OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Dzhumagaziyev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a study of prophylactic effectiveness of hypoallergenic compound «Nutrilon Hypoallergenic 1», fortified with prebiotics «IMMUNOFORTIS», in children from group of risk of development of atopic dermatitis. Anthropometric rates of children after 8 weeks of observation corresponded with average age rates; their physical development was estimated as harmonious. The compound was well-tolerated. Its use resulted in increase of bifido- and lactobacteria of intestinal micro flora and decrease of acute respiratory infections in infants.Key words: infants, alimentary allergy, atopic dermatitis, artificial feeding, prebiotics, hypoallergenic compound.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:37-43

  2. Antipruritic application of ovocystatin in atopic dermatitis in dogs - preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popiel Jarosław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was an attempt to determine the possibilities of using ovocystatin, a component of a new generation product of natural origin, in local therapy of atopic dermatitis in dogs by suppressing pruritus during illness. Chicken egg cystatin was used locally in the interdigital spaces of forelimbs of dogs used in the experiment. The degree of pruritus and clinical changes in the animals were defined using CADESI-03 scale before and after the beginning of the experiment. The results obtained proved that ovocystatin may be used as a substance suppressing pruritus in atopic dermatitis.

  3. Acute sacroiliac joint infection in a rugby player with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tadashi; Nisimatsu, Hidekazu

    2012-11-01

    In athletes, acute bacterial infection is an unusual cause of pain in the sacroiliac joint. Although an entry site for infection is not always evident, the present case of a 15-year-old rugby player suggests the association between right sacroiliac joint infection and skin lesion of atopic dermatitis (AD) infected with group A streptococcus. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed inflammation around the sacroiliac joint with abscess formation. The infection resolved after a course of antibiotics. Because atopic skin lesion is a potential portal of bacteria, treatment for AD is essential for the prevention of pyogenic arthritis in athletes.

  4. Risk assessment of bronchial asthma development in children with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vуsotska, Olena V.; Klymenko, Viktoriia A.; Trubitcin, Alexei A.; Pecherska, Anna I.; Savchuk, Tamara O.; Kolimoldayev, Maksat; Wójcik, Waldemar; Szatkowska, Małgorzata; Burlibay, Aron

    2017-08-01

    This article offers a risk assessment of bronchial asthma development in children with atopic dermatitis by applying fuzzy-set theory to accumulated statistical data. It is shown that with a view to executing the said task one should exercise a complex approach involving factors such as "IgE level", "existence of obstructions" and "burdened bronchial asthma heredity of immediate relatives". The obtained results will assist in making adequate and well-informed medical decisions as well as facilitate the decrease of the risk of developing bronchial asthma in children with atopic dermatitis.

  5. The T Cell Response to Major Grass Allergens Is Regulated and Includes IL-10 Production in Atopic but Not in Non-Atopic Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domdey, A.; Liu, A.; Millner, A.

    2010-01-01

    in allergen-specific responses. The aim was to determine whether major grass allergens induce production of suppressive cytokines in allergic and healthy subjects and to examine the inhibitory effect of these cytokines on allergic responses. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated...... from healthy and grass-allergic donors and stimulated with the major grass allergens Phl p 1 or Phl p 5. The effects of endogenous IL-10 and/or TGF-beta on proliferation and cytokine production were determined by use of blocking antibodies. In addition, the number of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells...... in PBMCs in the two groups, but fewer cells from atopic donors were CD4(+)CD25(+)CCR4(+) and more cells were CD4(+)CD25(+)CLA(+) compared to healthy donors. Conclusion: Allergen-specific responses of grass allergic patients but not in non-atopic subjects are influenced by regulatory cytokines produced...

  6. A study of B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ in the D0 experiment and an example of HEP technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniela Ursula [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-08-01

    After years of preparation, data taking with the upgraded D0 detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider has begun. The large amount of data produced in a p$\\bar{p}$-collider requires sophisticated triggers to filter out the interesting events. Described in this thesis is the development of trigger software for the newly implemented Silicon Microstrip Tracker. D0 is a multi-purpose detector with a broad physics program. one area being studied at D0 is B mesons. An algorithm for reconstructing the B$0\\atop{s}$ and B$0\\atop{d}$ mesons and for measuring their lifetimes has been developed and is described in this thesis. The results suggest that an improvement of the current lifetime measurements can be achieved within the next two years. The reconstruction of a J/Ψ meson forms the basis for a wide range of b-physics. Data taken with the muon system during the commissioning period of the detector has been analyzed and a signal for the J/Ψ meson has been found. Systematic transfer of HEP technologies into other areas and their commercial exploitation plays an important role in the future of particle physics. An area of particular interest is DNA sequencing as shown by the recent completion of the sequencing of the human genome. The final part of this thesis details the development of a simulation for a high throughput sequencing device which is currently being developed at Imperial College.

  7. Intrinsic atopic dermatitis shows similar TH2 and higher TH17 immune activation compared with extrinsic atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Dhingra, Nikhil; Gittler, Julia; Shemer, Avner; Cardinale, Irma; de Guzman Strong, Cristina; Krueger, James G; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2013-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is classified as extrinsic and intrinsic, representing approximately 80% and 20% of patients with the disease, respectively. Although sharing a similar clinical phenotype, only extrinsic AD is characterized by high serum IgE levels. Because most patients with AD exhibit high IgE levels, an "allergic"/IgE-mediated disease pathogenesis was hypothesized. However, current models associate AD with T-cell activation, particularly TH2/TH22 polarization, and epidermal barrier defects. We sought to define whether both variants share a common pathogenesis. We stratified 51 patients with severe AD into extrinsic AD (n = 42) and intrinsic AD (n = 9) groups (with similar mean disease activity/SCORAD scores) and analyzed the molecular and cellular skin pathology of lesional and nonlesional intrinsic AD and extrinsic AD by using gene expression (real-time PCR) and immunohistochemistry. A significant correlation between IgE levels and SCORAD scores (r = 0.76, P extrinsic AD. Marked infiltrates of T cells and dendritic cells and corresponding epidermal alterations (keratin 16, Mki67, and S100A7/A8/A9) defined lesional skin of patients with both variants. However, higher activation of all inflammatory axes (including TH2) was detected in patients with intrinsic AD, particularly TH17 and TH22 cytokines. Positive correlations between TH17-related molecules and SCORAD scores were only found in patients with intrinsic AD, whereas only patients with extrinsic AD showed positive correlations between SCORAD scores and TH2 cytokine (IL-4 and IL-5) levels and negative correlations with differentiation products (loricrin and periplakin). Although differences in TH17 and TH22 activation exist between patients with intrinsic AD and those with extrinsic AD, we identified common disease-defining features of T-cell activation, production of polarized cytokines, and keratinocyte responses to immune products. Our data indicate that a TH2 bias is not the sole cause of high Ig

  8. Quality of health care of atopic eczema in Germany: results of the national health care study AtopicHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbruch, A; Radtke, M; Franzke, N; Ring, J; Foelster-Holst, R; Augustin, M

    2014-06-01

    The successful treatment of atopic eczema (AE) should result in the improvement of both physical symptoms and patient's quality of life (QoL). This study was conducted using a sample of dermatologists throughout Germany. This is due to dermatologists being the main health care providers of AE. Obtaining reliable data on quality of care of AE from both the patient's and the physician's perspective. This cross-sectional study assessed: the individual clinical history; dermatology-specific QoL (DLQI); state of health (EQ-5d-VAS); treatments; burden caused by disease and treatment; patient-defined treatment benefit (PBI). Data from 1678 adult patients (60.5% female, mean age: 38.4 ± 15.9) were analysed. The most frequently used treatments during the last five years were emollients (90.4%) and topical corticosteroids (85.5%). In this study, 75.8% of the patients felt only moderately or not at all impaired by their treatment. The mean DLQI (0 = minimum-30 = maximum QoL impairment) was 8.5 ± 6.5. The EQ-5d-VAS (100 = best possible) was 63.6 ± 22.0 on average. 26.6% reported suffering 'often' or 'every night' from sleeplessness due to severe itching. Mean PBI was 2.4 ± 1.1 (4 = maximum benefit). This study provides first data on the health care of adults with AE in Germany at a national level and reveals the need for a more effective care. Whereas most patients consider their treatment-related burden as low, the daily burden of the disease seems to be high: one third reports sleeplessness due to itching which indicates insufficient therapeutic regimes in these cases. A better implementation of the German national guideline for AE and a systematic analysis of the difficulties causing its limited effects is needed. © 2013 The Authors Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. Parallel Mitogenome Sequencing Alleviates Random Rooting Effect in Phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Shotaro; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Nishida, Mutsumi; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-04-28

    Reliably rooted phylogenetic trees play irreplaceable roles in clarifying diversification in the patterns of species and populations. However, such trees are often unavailable in phylogeographic studies, particularly when the focus is on rapidly expanded populations that exhibit star-like trees. A fundamental bottleneck is known as the random rooting effect, where a distant outgroup tends to root an unrooted tree "randomly." We investigated whether parallel mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequencing alleviates this effect in phylogeography using a case study on the Sea of Japan lineage of the intertidal goby Chaenogobius annularis Eighty-three C. annularis individuals were collected and their mitogenomes were determined by high-throughput and low-cost parallel sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of these mitogenome sequences was conducted to root the Sea of Japan lineage, which has a star-like phylogeny and had not been reliably rooted. The topologies of the bootstrap trees were investigated to determine whether the use of mitogenomes alleviated the random rooting effect. The mitogenome data successfully rooted the Sea of Japan lineage by alleviating the effect, which hindered phylogenetic analysis that used specific gene sequences. The reliable rooting of the lineage led to the discovery of a novel, northern lineage that expanded during an interglacial period with high bootstrap support. Furthermore, the finding of this lineage suggested the existence of additional glacial refugia and provided a new recent calibration point that revised the divergence time estimation between the Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean lineages. This study illustrates the effectiveness of parallel mitogenome sequencing for solving the random rooting problem in phylogeographic studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Methylphenidate alleviates manganese-induced impulsivity but not distractibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Stephane A.; Strupp, Barbara J.; Uribe, Walter; Ysais, Lauren; Strawderman, Myla; Smith, Donald R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies from our lab have demonstrated that postnatal manganese (Mn) exposure in a rodent model can cause lasting impairments in fine motor control and attention, and that oral methylphenidate (MPH) treatment can effectively treat the dysfunction in fine motor control. However, it is unknown whether MPH treatment can alleviate the impairments in attention produced by Mn exposure. Here we used a rodent model of postnatal Mn exposure to determine whether (1) oral MPH alleviates attention and impulse control deficits caused by postnatal Mn exposure, using attention tasks that are variants of the 5-choice serial reaction time task, and (2) whether these treatments affected neuronal dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal striatum. Male Long-Evans rats were exposed orally to 0 or 50 mg Mn/kg/d throughout life starting on PND 1, and tested as young adults (PND 107 – 115) on an attention task that specifically tapped selective attention and impulse control. Animals were treated with oral MPH (2.5 mg/kg/d) throughout testing on the attention task. Our findings show that lifelong postnatal Mn exposure impaired impulse control and selective attention in young adulthood, and that a therapeutically relevant oral MPH regimen alleviated the Mn-induced dysfunction in impulse control, but not selective attention, and actually impaired focused attention in the Mn group. In addition, the effect of MPH was qualitatively different for the Mn-exposed versus control animals across a range of behavioral measures of inhibitory control and attention, as well as dendritic spine density in the mPFC, suggesting that postnatal Mn exposure alters catecholaminergic systems modulating these behaviors. Collectively these findings suggest that MPH may hold promise for treating the behavioral dysfunction caused by developmental Mn exposure, although further research is needed with multiple MPH doses to determine whether a dose can be identified that

  11. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis symptoms alleviated by renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Melchior

    2011-01-01

    are limited. Anecdotal reports have shown partial or complete resolution of NSF following successful renal transplantation early in the course of NSF. In this report, we describe alleviation of NSF symptoms in two women following successful renal transplantation more than 3 years after onset of NSF.......Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a rare, serious, and life-threatening disease of patients with severe renal impairment. Gadolinium-containing contrast agents have been shown to be the crucial trigger. There is no proven medical cure for the disease, and symptomatic treatment options...

  12. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic March

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Marenholz (Ingo); J. Esparza-Gordillo (Jorge); F. Rüschendorf (Franz); A. Bauerfeind (Anja); D.P. Strachan (David P.); B.D. Spycher (Ben D.); H. Baurecht (Hansjörg); P. Margaritte-Jeannin (Patricia); A. Sääf (Annika); M. Kerkhof (Marjan); M. Ege (Markus); S. Baltic (Svetlana); J. Matheson; J. Li (Jin); S. Michel (Sven); W.Q. Ang (Wei Q.); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A. Arnold (Andreas); G. Homuth (Georg); F. Demenais (Florence); E. Bouzigon (Emmanuelle); C. Söderhäll (Cilla); G. Pershagen (Göran); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C. Braun-Fahrländer (Charlotte); E. Horak (Elisabeth); L.M. Ogorodova (Ludmila M.); V.P. Puzyrev (Valery P.); E.Y. Bragina (Elena Yu); T.J. Hudson (Thomas); C. Morin (Charles); D.L. Duffy (David); G.B. Marks (Guy B.); C. Robertson; G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A.W. Musk (Arthur); P.J. Thompson (Philip); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A.L. James (Alan); P.M.A. Sleiman (Patrick); E. Toskala (Elina); P.M. Rodríguez; R. Fölster-Holst (R.); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Heinzmann (Andrea); E. Rietschel (Ernst); M. Keil (Mark); S. Cichon (Sven); M.M. Nöthen (Markus M.); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D. Sly; C.O. Schmidt (Carsten Oliver); A. Matanovic (Anja); V. Schneider (Valentin); M. Heinig (Matthias); N. Hübner (Norbert); P.G. Holt (Patrick); S. Lau (Susanne); M. Kabesch (Michael); S. Weidinger (Stefan); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); M.A. Ferreira (Manuel); C. Laprise (Catherine); M.B. Freidin (M.); J. Genuneit (Jon); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); E. Melén (Erik); M.-H. Dizier; A.J. Henderson (A. John); Y.-A. Lee (Young-Ae)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the a 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12

  13. Coal tar induces AHR-dependent skin barrier repair in atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaard, E.H. van den; Bergboer, J.G.M.; Vonk-Bergers, M.; Vlijmen-Willems, I.M. van; Hato, S.V.; Valk, P.G. van der; Schroder, J.M.; Joosten, I.; Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Topical application of coal tar is one of the oldest therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD), a T helper 2 (Th2) lymphocyte-mediated skin disease associated with loss-of-function mutations in the skin barrier gene, filaggrin (FLG). Despite its longstanding clinical use and efficacy, the molecular

  14. A prosposed mechanism for the inactivation of atopic allergens in dilute solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    A study has been made of the ultra-violet absorption spectra of purified atopic allergens at pH 2 and pH 12. The colour change of atopen solutions from deep brown in alakali to light brown or yellow in acid is reflected in the spectra by considerably higher extinction coefficients in alkali. By

  15. Increased frequencies of IL-31-producing T cells are found in chronic atopic dermatitis skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szegedi, Krisztina; Kremer, Andreas E.; Kezic, Sanja; Teunissen, Marcel B. M.; Bos, Jan D.; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Res, Pieter C.; Middelkamp-Hup, Maritza A.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-31 has been associated with pruritus, a characteristic feature of atopic dermatitis (AD). Local T cell responses may be responsible for the increased level of IL-31 mRNA observed in AD. We investigated the frequency of IL-31-producing T cells in AD lesions, as well as their cytokine

  16. Contact allergy in children with and without atopic dermatitis; which are the frequent allergens?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbes, S.; Rustemeyer, T.; Schuttelaar, M.L.A.; Sillevis Smitt, J.H.; Middelkamp-Hup, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on contact allergies in children are conflicting. This study aims to identify frequent contact allergens and their relevance in children with and without atopic dermatitis (AD). This will allow better identification of potential sensitizers and improve patients' care in children.

  17. Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms and Quality of Life in mothers of Children With Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, S; Usak, E; Ozen, S; Gorpelioglu, C

    2017-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children and it can negatively affect both children and their families. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of atopic dermatitis on quality of life related to maternal health and maternal obsessive compulsive symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the pediatric and dermatology polyclinics. The SCORAD index was used for determining the severity of disease, and the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (MOCI) and SF-36 form were applied to the participants' mothers. A total of 120 children and their mothers participated the study. Comparing the atopic dermatitis group and the healthy control group, no statistically significant differences were seen in terms of MOCI and SF-36 scores, except for the physical functioning subscore. The results showed that having a child with atopic dermatitis and the severity of the disease do not influence their mothers in terms of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and health-related quality of life, except for physical functioning scores. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Heritability of hand eczema is not explained by comorbidity with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Mortensen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Genetic factors have been shown to influence the risk of hand eczema, and may theoretically influence the frequency of eruptions as well as age at onset of the disease. However, the result may be confounded by atopic dermatitis, which is a major risk factor for development of hand eczema and is k...

  19. Moving toward endotypes in atopic dermatitis : Identification of patient clusters based on serum biomarker analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Judith L.; Strickland, Ian; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.F.M.; Nierkens, Stefan; Giovannone, Barbara; Csomor, Eszter; Sellman, Bret R.; Mustelin, Tomas; Sleeman, Matthew A.; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S.; Herath, Athula; Drylewicz, Julia; May, Richard D.; Hijnen, Dirk Jan

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex, chronic, inflammatory skin disease with a diverse clinical presentation. However, it is unclear whether this diversity exists at a biological level. Objective: We sought to test the hypothesis that AD is heterogeneous at the biological level of

  20. APPLICATION EXPERIENCE OF GOAT'S MILK BASED PRODUCTS AMONG CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.G. Malanicheva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to study the efficiency of the diet therapy against atopic dermatitis by means of the goat's milk based products among children at different age. The researchers observed 188 children aged between 3 months and 18 years, suffering from atopic dermatitis aggravated by the mycotic infection. Patients of the main group (102 children under 3 received goat's milk based products within the hypo allergic diet — «Nanny» and «Nanny — Zolotaya Kozochka» adapted milk formulas, while children over 3 received «Amal Tea» instant goat's milk. The research findings have showed that the introduction of the goat's milk based products into the food ration leads not only to the positive short term results — achievement of the clinical remission on 12th–20th day from the moment the therapy starts, but also to the positive long term effect — remission extension, reduction of the disease recurrences, reduction of the general IgE level in blood serum and offending IgE allergens to the cow milk proteins and casein. Thus, the replacement of the cow milk based products within the ration of patients for «Nanny» and «Nanny — Zolotaya Kozochka» adapted milk formulas and «Amal Tea» instant goat's milk allows for optimization of the atopic dermatitis diet therapy among children at different age.Key words: atopic dermatitis, diet therapy, goat's milk.

  1. New-onset inflammatory bowel disease in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Wienholtz, N; Gislason, G H

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic and remitting inflammatory skin disease that affects children and adults. While some studies have reported an increased risk of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis (UC), others have associated both conditions with AD. Notably, most studies...

  2. Face-masks for facial atopic eczema: consider a hydrocolloid dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Marius

    2013-08-01

    Facial involvement of atopic eczema in young children can be difficult to manage. Chronic scratching and rubbing, combined with parental reluctance to use topical corticosteroids on the face, often results in recalcitrant facial eczema. While wet wraps are a useful management option for moderate/severe atopic eczema involving the trunk and limbs they are difficult to use on the face. We describe the use of a face-mask using a widely available adhesive hydrocolloid dressing (DuoDerm extra thin) in three children with recalcitrant facial atopic eczema. Symptomatic control of itch or soreness was obtained within hours and the facial atopic eczema was markedly improved by 7 days. The face-masks were easy to apply, each lasting 1-4 days. One patient had a single adjuvant application of a potent topical corticosteroid under the hydrocolloid dressing. All three patients had long remissions (greater than 3 months) of their facial eczema, although all continued to have significant eczema involving their trunk and limbs. Face-masks made from hydrocolloid dressings, with or without topical corticosteroids, are worth considering in children with recalcitrant facial eczema. © 2012 The Author. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  3. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation

  4. Modern aspects of external anti'inflammatory therapy of atopic dermatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhotnikova O.M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of combined use of creams Prednicarbum and synthetic tannin (phenol-methanal-of urea-polycondensate in the treatment of exacerbation of atopic dermatitis in children. Material and methods: 50 children, 1 to 12 years, with atopic dermatitis with the exacerbation of the skin process different degrees of severity. Results: In children with mild localized form of atopic dermatitis after the monotherapy whith cream synthetic tannin, noted a marked clinical improvement up to 7 days of treatment. The noted expressive positive dynamics of the skin process and reduction of objective symptoms during the first days after of combination treatment with Prednicarbatet cream and synthetic tannin, also after combination therapy Prednicarbate and moisturizing cream in mode of step therapy. Conclusions: The combined application of Prednicarbate cream and phenol-methanal-of urea-polycondensate increases the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory treatment of atopic dermatitis, which can reduce the duration of use of topical corticosteroids and reduce the risk of adverse reactions in children with moderate and severe course skin process.

  5. Association of serum carotenoids and tocopherols with atopic diseases in Japanese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Masayuki; Bando, Noriko; Terao, Junji; Sasaki, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Shinichi; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Hobara, Tatsuya

    2010-06-01

    The present study assessed whether serum carotenoids and tocopherols are associated with atopic diseases (eczema and asthma) in 10- and 13-yr-olds in a Japanese community. Of 2796 students attending schools in Shunan, Japan, in 2006, 396 students were randomly selected for this study using nested case-control design. Atopic diseases and dietary food intake were assessed using self-administered questionnaires, and serum antioxidants were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. We found no associations between serum carotenoids and atopic diseases. However, odds ratios (OR)s for the third and fourth quartiles of serum alpha-tocopherol with atopic eczema were 0.33 (95% confidence interval: 0.15-0.73) and 0.36 (0.14-0.89), respectively, and the trend was negatively significant (P(trend) = 0.048). We did not find a significant association for asthma. In conclusion, serum alpha-tocopherol was negatively associated with the prevalence of eczema. Serum carotenoids did not show definitive protective effects in Japanese youth.

  6. Allergic disease and atopic sensitization in children in relation to measles vaccination and measles infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenlund, H.; Bergstrom, A.; Alm, J.; Swartz, J.; Scheynius, A.; van Hage, M.; Johansen, K.; Brunekreef, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; von Mutius, E.; Ege, M.; Riedler, J.; Braun-Fahrlander, C.; Waser, M.; Pershagen, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS: A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in

  7. Allergic Disease and Atopic Sensitization in Children in Relation to Measles Vaccination and Measles Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenlund, Helen; Bergstrom, Anna; Alm, Johan S.; Swartz, Jackie; Scheynius, Annika; van Hage, Marianne; Johansen, Kari; Brunekreef, Bert; von Mutius, Erika; Ege, Markus J.; Riedler, Josef; Braun-Fahrlaender, Charlotte; Waser, Marco; Pershagen, Goran

    OBJECTIVE. Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS. A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in

  8. Reporting of symptoms in randomized controlled trials of atopic eczema treatments: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens, L. A. A.; Chalmers, J. R.; Rogers, N. K.; Nankervis, H.; Spuls, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    'Symptoms' is a core outcome domain for atopic eczema (AE) trials, agreed by consensus as part of the Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative. To standardize and validate the core domain symptoms and symptom instruments for AE trials the HOME roadmap is followed. Its first step is

  9. Clinical significance of FLG gene mutations in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Varlamov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin barrier dysfunction due to deficiency of the skin protein filaggrin is one of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Objective: to determine the clinical significance of 2282 del CAGT, R501X, R2447X, and S3247X mutations in the FLG gene in children with atopic dermatitis. The investigation included 58 children with atopic dermatitis. A molecular genetic analysis of the four mutations in the FLG gene was done in all the children. In the patients with FLG gene mutations, there was a tendency towards a higher frequency of sensitization to house dust allergens, significantly more often sensitization to cat epidermal allergen, and significantly higher levels of specific IgE to the cat epidermis. Conclusion. Mutations in the FLG gene encoding the protein filaggrin raise the risk for sensitization to domestic and epidermal allergens and, in case of already existing sensitization to the cat epidermis, the patients are found with a high degree of probability to have the high concentration of specific IgE to this allergen. The above fact justifies the need to place special emphasis on measures to eliminate house dust allergens, and cat epidermis allergen in particular, and to personalize approaches to therapy and prevention of atopic dermatitis in children. 

  10. Influence of weather and climate on subjective symptom intensity in atopic eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocks, E.; Busch, R.; Fröhlich, C.; Borelli, S.; Mayer, H.; Ring, J.

    The frequent clinical observation that the course of atopic eczema, a skin disease involving a disturbed cutaneous barrier function, is influenced by climate and weather motivated us to analyse these relationships biometrically. In the Swiss high-mountain area of Davos the intensity of itching experienced by patients with atopic eczema was evaluated and compared to 15 single meteorological variables recorded daily during an entire 7-year observation period. By means of univariate analyses and multiple regressions, itch intensity was found to be correlated with some meteorological variables. A clear-cut inverse correlation exists with air temperature (coefficient of correlation: -0.235, P<0.001), but the effects of water vapour pressure, air pressure and hours of sunshine are less pronounced. The results show that itching in atopic eczema is significantly dependent on meteorological conditions. The data suggest that, in patients with atopic eczema, a certain range of thermo-hygric atmospheric conditions with a balance of heat and water loss on the skin surface is essential for the skin to feel comfortable.

  11. Biomarkers for atopic dermatitis : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Judith; Krastev, Todor; Weidinger, Stephan; Buckens, Constantinus F; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Flohr, Carsten; Hijnen, DirkJan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A large number of studies investigating the correlation between severity of atopic dermatitis and various biomarkers have been published over the past decades. The aim of this review was to identify, evaluate and synthesize the evidence examining the correlation of biomarkers with

  12. Rush allergen specific immunotherapy protocol in feline atopic dermatitis: a pilot study of four cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmer, Ann M; Griffin, Craig E; Boord, Mona J; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S

    2005-10-01

    Rush immunotherapy has been shown to be as safe as conventional immunotherapy in canine atopic patients. Rush immunotherapy has not been reported in the feline atopic patient. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine a safe protocol for rush immunotherapy in feline atopic patients. Four atopic cats diagnosed by history, physical examination and exclusion of appropriate differential diagnoses were included in the study. Allergens were identified via liquid phase immunoenzymatic testing (VARL: Veterinary Allergy Reference Labs, Pasadena, CA). Cats were premedicated with 1.5 mg triamcinolone orally 24 and 2 h prior to first injection and 10 mg hydroxyzine PO 24, 12 and 2 h prior to first injection. An intravenous catheter was placed prior to first injection. Allergen extracts (Greer Laboratories, Lenoir, North Carolina) were all administered subcutaneously at increasing protein nitrogen units (pnu) every 30 minutes for 5 h to maintenance dose of 15,000 pnus ml-1. Vital signs were assessed every 15 minutes. Two cats developed mild pruritus and the subsequent injection was delayed 30 minutes. No changes in either cat's vital signs were noted, nor was there any further pruritus. All four cats successfully completed rush immunotherapy. Two cats developed a dermal swelling on the dorsal neck one week later. In these four cats, this protocol appeared to be a safe regimen to reach maintenance therapy. A larger sample of feline patients is needed to determine the incidence of adverse reactions and to follow the success of ASIT based upon this method of induction.

  13. Assessment of clinical signs of atopic dermatitis: A systematic review and recommendation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Langan, Sinéad; Deckert, Stefanie; Svensson, Ake; von Kobyletzki, Laura; Thomas, Kim; Spuls, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Clinical signs are a core outcome domain for atopic dermatitis (AD) trials. The current lack of standardization of outcome measures in AD trials hampers evidence-based communication. We sought to provide evidence-based recommendations for the measurement of clinical signs in AD trials and to inform

  14. Lack of efficacy of topical cyclosporin A in atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rie, M. A.; Meinardi, M. M.; Bos, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Since oral cyclosporin A (CsA) has demonstrated its effectiveness in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, efforts have been made to develop a topical CsA formulation, thus avoiding systemic adverse events. A limited number of publications are available on the use of topical CsA in allergic contact

  15. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations, atopic dermatitis and risk of actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Y M F; Egeberg, A; Balslev, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG) represent a strong genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Homozygous mutation carriers typically display ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and many have concomitant AD. Previously, homozygous, but not heterozygous, filaggrin ge...

  16. Cyclosporine and Extracorporeal Photopheresis are Equipotent in Treating Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Poulsen, Johan; Grunnet, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent and debilitating disease often requiring systemic immunosuppressive treatment. The efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) is well proven but potential side effects are concerning. Several reports point at extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) as an ...

  17. Is the Atopy Patch Test Reliable in the Evaluation of Food Allergy-Related Atopic Dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Mahboubeh; Rafiee, Elham; Darougar, Sepideh; Mesdaghi, Mehrnaz; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra

    2018-01-01

    Aeroallergens and food allergens are found to be relevant in atopic dermatitis. The atopy patch test (APT) can help to detect food allergies in children with atopic dermatitis. This study evaluates if the APT is a valuable tool in the diagnostic workup of children with food allergy-related atopic dermatitis. 42 children between 6 months and 12 years of age were selected at the Mofid Children Hospital. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed, and the severity of the disease was determined. At the test visit, the patients underwent a skin prick test (SPT), APT, and serum IgE level measurement for cow's milk, egg yolk, egg white, wheat, and soy. We found a sensitivity of 91.7%, a specificity of 72.7%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 88%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 80%, and an accuracy of 85.7% for APT performed for cow's milk. APT performed for egg yolk had a sensitivity and a NPV of 100%, while the same parameters obtained with egg white were 84.2 and 75%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and NPV of the APT for wheat were 100, 75, and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity, PPV, and NPV of the APT for soy were 87.5, 70, and 87.5%, respectively. Our data demonstrate that the APT is a reliable diagnostic tool to evaluate suspected food allergy-related skin symptoms in childhood and infancy. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Early-life rotavirus and norovirus infections in relation to development of atopic manifestation in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimerink, J.; Stelma, F.; Rockx, B.; Brouwer, D.; Stobberingh, E.; van Ree, R.; Dompeling, E.; Mommers, M.; Thijs, C.; Koopmans, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The increase in incidence of atopic diseases (ADs) in the developed world over the past decades has been associated with reduced exposure of childhood infections. Objective To investigate the relation between early intestinal viral infections in relation to the development of

  19. Quantitative assessment of combination bathing and moisturizing regimens on skin hydration in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Charles; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2009-01-01

    Standard recommendations for skin care for patients with atopic dermatitis stress the importance of skin hydration and the application of moisturizers. However, objective data to guide recommendations regarding the optimal practice methods of bathing and emollient application are scarce. This study quantified cutaneous hydration status after various combination bathing and moisturizing regimens. Four bathing/moisturizer regimens were evaluated in 10 subjects, five pediatric subjects with atopic dermatitis and five subjects with healthy skin. The regimens consisted of bathing alone without emollient application, bathing and immediate emollient application, bathing and delayed application, and emollient application alone. Each regimen was evaluated in all subjects, utilizing a crossover design. Skin hydration was assessed with standard capacitance measurements. In atopic dermatitis subjects, emollient alone yielded a significantly (p hydration over 90 minutes (206.2% baseline hydration) than bathing with immediate emollient (141.6%), bathing and delayed emollient (141%), and bathing alone (91.4%). The combination bathing and emollient application regimens demonstrated hydration values at 90 minutes not significantly greater than baseline. Atopic dermatitis subjects had a decreased mean hydration benefit compared with normal skin subjects. Bathing without moisturizer may compromise skin hydration. Bathing followed by moisturizer application provides modest hydration benefits, though less than that of simply applying moisturizer alone.

  20. Children and adolescents living with atopic eczema: an interpretive phenomenological study with Chinese mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Winnie K H; Lee, Regina L T

    2012-10-01

    This article is a report on a phenomenological study of Chinese mothers' experiences of caring for their children who were living with atopic eczema. A mother's attitude and personality may have a direct influence on her child's adherence to treatment for atopic eczema. Thus, good communication between healthcare professionals and the mother is essential. Treatment and care should also be culturally appropriate. Using an interpretive phenomenological method, 14 interviews were conducted in Hong Kong, China from September 2007 to August 2008, with nine mothers caring for their children who were living with atopic eczema. Crist and Tanner's circular process of hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology was chosen to guide the data analysis. Mothers' coping patterns involved persistently dealing with enduring demands and seeking alternative therapies that were aimed at curing the disease. Four themes finally emerged from the data: (1) dealing with extra mothering, (2) giving up their life, (3) becoming an expert and (4) living with blame and worry. Mothers' coping patterns involved persistently finding ways to relieve their children's suffering with the aim of curing the disease and dealing with their own emotions related to the frustration resulting from giving up their life and living with blame and worry. The study findings provide nurses with an empathic insight into mothers' feelings and the enduring demands of caring for children with atopic eczema, and help nurses to develop culturally sensitive interventions, reinforce positive coping strategies, increase family function and improve health outcomes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Food hypersensitivity in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Čelakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. Results: A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5 years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%, no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%. Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients, tomatoes (in 20%, and kiwi (in 17, 5%, apples and spices (in 16%, tangerines and oranges (in 15%, capsicum (in 13%, fishes (in 12%, celery (in 9%, and chocolate (in 7%. Conclusion: Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen-associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  2. Food hypersensitivity in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celakovská, Jarmila; Ettler, K; Ettlerová, K; Vaněčková, J

    2014-05-01

    Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5) years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%), no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%). Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients), tomatoes (in 20%), and kiwi (in 17, 5%), apples and spices (in 16%), tangerines and oranges (in 15%), capsicum (in 13%), fishes (in 12%), celery (in 9%), and chocolate (in 7%). Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen-associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  3. House dust mites on skin, clothes, and bedding of atopic dermatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitsky, Valery; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; Babai, Ilan; Dalal, Ilan; Cohen, Rifka; Tanay, Amir

    2008-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common allergic condition in children, often associated with a positive skin reaction to house dust mite allergens. To determine the presence of house dust mites on the skin, clothes, and bedding of patients with atopic dermatitis. Nineteen patients with atopic dermatitis were examined during a 2-year period. Samples from affected and healthy skin surfaces were obtained with adhesive tape, and dust samples from bedding and clothes were collected with a vacuum cleaner at the start of the study and 3-6 weeks later, and examined for the presence of house dust mites. The findings were compared with those of 21 healthy controls. The most common mite species on skin were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae, which were found in nine patients and three controls. The patient group showed a significantly larger percentage of samples with mites than did the control group (34.9% and 7.9%, respectively) (P bedding of patients, or between patients and controls with regard to the number of mites on the clothes and bedding. Patients with atopic dermatitis showed a higher prevalence of mites on their skin than did healthy individuals, which could be involved in allergic sensitization and disease exacerbation.

  4. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas; Haerskjold, Ann; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Simonsen, Jacob

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has been increasing. Register-based studies are essential for research in subpopulations with specific diseases and facilitate epidemiological studies to identify causes and evaluate interventions. Algorithms have been developed to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using register information on disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication and hospital contacts, but the validity of the algorithms has not been evaluated. This study validated the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital contacts and/or filled prescriptions of disease-specific medication. Confirmative answers to questions about physician-diagnosed atopic disease were used as the gold standard for the comparison with the algorithms, resulting in sensitivities and specificities and 95% confidence intervals. The interviews with the caretaker of the included 454 Danish children born 1997-2003 were carried out May-September 2015; the mean age of the children at the time of the interview being 15.2 years (standard deviation 1.3 years). For the algorithm capturing children with atopic dermatitis, the sensitivity was 74.1% (95% confidence interval: 66.9%-80.2%) and the specificity 73.0% (67.3%-78.0%). For the algorithm capturing children with asthma, both the sensitivity of 84.1% (78.0%-88.8%) and the specificity of 81.6% (76.5%-85.8%) were high compared with physician-diagnosed asthmatic bronchitis (recurrent wheezing). The sensitivity remained high when capturing physician-diagnosed asthma: 83.3% (74.3%-89.6%); however, the specificity declined to 66.0% (60.9%-70.8%). For allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, the sensitivity

  5. Puerarin Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4–100 nM for 7 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models puerarin inhibited the activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal dorsal horn. Puerarin also reduced the upregulated levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. In summary, puerarin alleviated CCI- and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. The anti-inflammation effect of puerarin might be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines upregulation. We conclude that puerarin has a significant effect on alleviating neuropathic pain and thus may serve as a therapeutic approach for neuropathic pain.

  6. Resource Assessment for Afghanistan and Alleviation of Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, J. F.

    2002-05-01

    Mineral and water resources in Afghanistan may be the best means by which redevelopment of the country can be used to alleviate future terrorism. Remote-sensing analysis of snow, ice, resources, and topography in Afghanistan, and development of digital elevation models with ASTER imagery and previously classified, large scale topographic maps from the Department of Defense enable better assessment and forecasting resources in the country. Adequate resource assessment and planning is viewed as critical to alleviation of one cause of the problems associated with the fertilization of terrorism in Afghanistan. Long-term diminution of meltwater resources in Afghanistan is exemplified by the disastrous and famine-inducing droughts of the present time and three decades prior, as well as by the early Landsat assessment of glacier resources sponsored by USGS and now brought up-to-date with current imagery. Extensive cold-war projects undertaken by both the USSR and USA generated plentiful essential mineral, hydrocarbon, hydrogeological, and hydrological data, including an extensive stream gauging and vital irrigation network now adversly affected or destroyed entirely by decades of war. Analysis, measurement, prediction, rehabilitation, and reconstruction of critical resource projects are regarded as most critical elements in the war on terrorism in this portion of the world. The GLIMS (Global Land Ice Measurements from Space) Project, initially sponsored by USGS, has established our group as the Regional Center for Afghanistan and Pakistan, in which the above concepts serve as guiding research precepts.

  7. Alleviating cancer patients' suffering: whose responsibility is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Jorge

    2009-07-01

    In medicine, we have historically been better at learning about the body and disease than we have at understanding the human beings who come to us with the ailments. We have acted to relieve pain, consoling patients and families as a complement, but done little to understand and alleviate suffering as a fundamental part of our practice. In fact, only in more recent decades has "suffering" been conceptualized as something apart from pain, associated with distress and its causes. It was Eric T. Cassell, in his ground-breaking work in the 1980s, who posed the need to consider alleviation of suffering and treatment of illness as twin-and equally important-obligations of the medical profession. Suffering is defined as a negative, complex emotional and cognitive state, characterized by feeling under constant threat and powerless to confront it, having drained the physical and psycho-social resources that might have made resistance possible. This unique depletion of personal resources is key to understanding suffering.

  8. Puerarin alleviates neuropathic pain by inhibiting neuroinflammation in spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Liao, Kaijun; Yu, Changxi; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Suhuan; Yang, Shuyu

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI) and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4-100 nM) for 7 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models puerarin inhibited the activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal dorsal horn. Puerarin also reduced the upregulated levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. In summary, puerarin alleviated CCI- and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. The anti-inflammation effect of puerarin might be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines upregulation. We conclude that puerarin has a significant effect on alleviating neuropathic pain and thus may serve as a therapeutic approach for neuropathic pain.

  9. Contact sensitization in Dutch children and adolescents with and without atopic dermatitis - a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbes, Stefanie; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Sillevis Smitt, Johannes H; Schuttelaar, Marie Louise; Middelkamp-Hup, Maritza A

    2017-03-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is known to occur in children with and without atopic dermatitis, but more data are needed on contact sensitization profiles in these two groups. To identify frequent allergens in children with and without atopic dermatitis suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis. A retrospective analysis of children aged 0-17 years patch tested between 1996 and 2013 was performed. Of all 1012 children tested because of suspected contact dermatitis, 46% developed one or more positive reactions, the proportions for children with (n = 526) and without (n = 395) atopic dermatitis being 48% and 47%, respectively. Children with atopic dermatitis reacted more often to lanolin alcohol (30% pet., p = 0.030), Amerchol L-101 (p = 0.030), and fragrances [fragrance mix I (p = 0.048) and Myroxylon pereirae (p = 0.005)]. Allergens outside the European baseline series that frequently gave positive reactions in these groups included cocamidopropyl betaine and Amerchol L-101. Reactivity to these allergens was significantly more common in atopic dermatitis children. Sensitization prevalences in children with and without atopic dermatitis were similar, but children with atopic dermatitis reacted significantly more often to lanolin alcohol and fragrances. Testing with additional series besides the European baseline series may be necessary, as reactions to, for example, cocamidopropyl betaine and Amerchol L-101 may otherwise be missed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Comparing high altitude treatment with current best care in Dutch children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (and asthma): Study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (DAVOS trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Fieten (Karin); W.T. Zijlstra (Wieneke); H. van Os-Medendorp (Harmieke); Y. Meijer (Yolanda); M.U. Venema (Monica); L. Rijssenbeek-Nouwens (Lous); M.P. l' Hoir (Monique); C.A. Bruijnzeel-Koomen; S.G.M.A. Pasmans (Suzanne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: About 10 to 20% of children in West European countries have atopic dermatitis (AD), often as part of the atopic syndrome. The full atopic syndrome also consists of allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy. Treatment approaches for atopic dermatitis and asthma

  11. Comparing high altitude treatment with current best care in Dutch children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (and asthma): Study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (DAVOS trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fieten, K.B.; Zijlstra, W.T.; Os-Medendorp, H. van; Meijer, Y.; Venema, M.U.; Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, L.; Hoir, M.P. l; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; Pasmans, S.G.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: About 10 to 20% of children in West European countries have atopic dermatitis (AD), often as part of the atopic syndrome. The full atopic syndrome also consists of allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy. Treatment approaches for atopic dermatitis and asthma include

  12. Prenatal animal contact and gene expression of innate immunity receptors at birth are associated with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roduit, Caroline; Wohlgensinger, Johanna; Frei, Remo; Bitter, Sondhja; Bieli, Christian; Loeliger, Susanne; Büchele, Gisela; Riedler, Josef; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Remes, Sami; Roponen, Marjut; Pekkanen, Juha; Kabesch, Michael; Schaub, Bianca; von Mutius, Erika; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Lauener, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have suggested that prenatal farm exposures might protect against allergic disease and increase the expression of receptors of the innate immune system. However, epidemiologic evidence supporting the association with atopic dermatitis remains inconsistent. To study the association between prenatal farm-related exposures and atopic dermatitis in a prospective study. We further analyzed the association between the expression of innate immune genes at birth and atopic dermatitis. A total of 1063 children who participated in a birth cohort study, Protection against Allergy-Study in Rural Environments, were included in this study. Doctor diagnosis of atopic dermatitis was reported by the parents from 1 to 2 years of age by questionnaire. Gene expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and CD14 was assessed in cord blood leukocytes by quantitative PCR. Maternal contact with farm animals and cats during pregnancy had a significantly protective effect on atopic dermatitis in the first 2 years of life. The risk of atopic dermatitis was reduced by more than half among children with mothers having contact with 3 or more farm animal species during pregnancy compared with children with mothers without contact (adjusted odds ratio, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.19-0.97). Elevated expression of TLR5 and TLR9 in cord blood was associated with decreased doctor diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. A significant interaction between polymorphism in TLR2 and prenatal cat exposure was observed in atopic dermatitis. Maternal contact with farm animals and cats during pregnancy has a protective effect on the development of atopic dermatitis in early life, which is associated with a lower expression of innate immune receptors at birth. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, Michael Joseph [Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (Italy)

    2007-12-19

    The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → H+h'- decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit

  14. INFLUENCE OF THE BRONCHIAL ASTHMA, ALLERGIC RHINITIS AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS ON THE QUALITY OF THE CHILDREN'S LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Dzhumagaziev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the study of the life quality of the children, suffering from bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. The authors identified that children with atopic dermatitis have the lowest level of the life quality, while children, suffering from allergic rhinitis, have the highest values of the given property. It is typical that children and their parents evaluate the life at school extremely low against rather high figures of the physical and emotional functioning.Key words: bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, children, life quality.

  15. Methylphenidate alleviates manganese-induced impulsivity but not distractibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Stephane A; Strupp, Barbara J; Uribe, Walter; Ysais, Lauren; Strawderman, Myla; Smith, Donald R

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies from our lab have demonstrated that postnatal manganese (Mn) exposure in a rodent model can cause lasting impairments in fine motor control and attention, and that oral methylphenidate (MPH) treatment can effectively treat the dysfunction in fine motor control. However, it is unknown whether MPH treatment can alleviate the impairments in attention produced by Mn exposure. Here we used a rodent model of postnatal Mn exposure to determine whether (1) oral MPH alleviates attention and impulse control deficits caused by postnatal Mn exposure, using attention tasks that are variants of the 5-choice serial reaction time task, and (2) whether these treatments affected neuronal dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal striatum. Male Long-Evans rats were exposed orally to 0 or 50Mn/kg/d throughout life starting on PND 1, and tested as young adults (PND 107-115) on an attention task that specifically tapped selective attention and impulse control. Animals were treated with oral MPH (2.5mg/kg/d) throughout testing on the attention task. Our findings show that lifelong postnatal Mn exposure impaired impulse control and selective attention in young adulthood, and that a therapeutically relevant oral MPH regimen alleviated the Mn-induced dysfunction in impulse control, but not selective attention, and actually impaired focused attention in the Mn group. In addition, the effect of MPH was qualitatively different for the Mn-exposed versus control animals across a range of behavioral measures of inhibitory control and attention, as well as dendritic spine density in the mPFC, suggesting that postnatal Mn exposure alters catecholaminergic systems modulating these behaviors. Collectively these findings suggest that MPH may hold promise for treating the behavioral dysfunction caused by developmental Mn exposure, although further research is needed with multiple MPH doses to determine whether a dose can be identified that ameliorates the

  16. Skin microbiome before development of atopic dermatitis: Early colonization with commensal staphylococci at 2 months is associated with a lower risk of atopic dermatitis at 1 year.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Disease flares of established atopic dermatitis (AD) are generally associated with a low-diversity skin microbiota and Staphylococcus aureus dominance. The temporal transition of the skin microbiome between early infancy and the dysbiosis of established AD is unknown.

  17. Personality and Coping in Peruvian volunteers for poverty alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Gastelumendi Gonçalves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between coping styles and strategies, and personality styles in a sample of 41 young volunteers of an institution that alleviates poverty in Lima. Peruvian adaptations of COPE and MIPS scales were administered. The results show that volunteers have higher scores on adaptive coping strategies. High scores in some particular personality styles were reported, which allowed to establish a personality profile of this group. According with theoretical framework, most coping strategies correlated with most personality styles, revealing four particular tendencies in these volunteers: they wish to have contact with other people, they usually see positive aspects of situations, they look forward for challenges, and they developed adaptive coping strategies.

  18. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration.

  19. Non-pharmacological approaches to alleviate distress in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gary; Agnelli, Joanne

    2015-11-25

    Distress is one of the most common clinical manifestations associated with dementia. Pharmacological intervention may be appropriate in managing distress in some people. However, best practice guidelines advocate non-pharmacological interventions as the preferred first-line treatment. The use of non-pharmacological interventions encourages healthcare professionals to be more person-centred in their approach, while considering the causes of distress. This article provides healthcare professionals with an overview of some of the non-pharmacological approaches that can assist in alleviating distress for people living with dementia including: reminiscence therapy, reality orientation, validation therapy, music therapy, horticultural therapy, doll therapy and pet therapy. It provides a summary of their use in clinical practice and links to the relevant literature.

  20. Alleviation of acute radiation damages by post-irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, A.; Ono, T.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages in mice were tried to alleviate experimentally by post-treatment. Combined treatment of OK-432 and aztreonam clearly prevented the radiation induced sepsis and elevated the survival rate in mice; the survival was 80% in the OK-432 plus aztreonam group while it was 55% in the group treated with OK-432 alone and 0% with saline. Irsogladine maleate, an anti-ulcer drug, increased the survival rate of jejunal crypt stem cells with a clear dose-related trend. The D 0 for irsogladine maleate was 2.8 Gy although it was 2.3 Gy for saline, These findings suggest that some conventional drugs are effective for radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages and the possibility that they can be applied for people exposed to radiation accidentally. (author)

  1. Aliskiren targets multiple systems to alleviate cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoyi; Guo, Dunwei; Wang, Qiang; You, Song; Qiao, Zhongpeng; Liu, Yong; Dai, Hang; Tang, Hua

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effects of aliskiren, a small-molecule renin inhibitor, on cancer cachexia and to explore the underlying mechanisms. A cancer cachexia model was established by subcutaneously injecting C26 mouse colon carcinoma cells into isogenic BALB/c mice. Aliskiren was administered intragastrically [10 mg/kg body weight (BW)] on day 5 (as a preventive strategy, AP group) or on day 12 (as a therapeutic strategy, AT group) after C26 injection. Mice that received no C26 injection (healthy controls, HC group) or only C26 injection but not aliskiren (cancer, CA group) were used as controls. BW, tumor growth, whole body functions, and survival were monitored daily in half of the mice in each group, whereas serum, tumors, and gastrocnemius muscles were harvested from the other mice after sacrifice on day 20 for further analysis. Aliskiren significantly alleviated multiple cachexia‑associated symptoms, including BW loss, tumor burden, muscle wasting, muscular dysfunction, and shortened survival. On the molecular level, aliskiren antagonized cachexia‑induced activation of the renin‑angiotensin system (RAS), systematic and muscular inflammation, oxidative stress, and autophagy‑lysosome as well as ubiquitin‑proteasome stimulation. In addition, early administration of aliskiren before cachexia development (AP group) resulted in more robust effects in alleviating cachexia or targeting underlying mechanisms than administration after cachexia development (AT group). Aliskiren exhibited potent anti‑cachexia activities. These activities were achieved through the targeting of at least four mechanisms underlying cachexia development: RAS activation, increase in systematic inflammation, upregulation of oxidative stress, and stimulation of autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP).

  2. Hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and filaggrin mutations in adult Danes: a registry-based study assessing risk of disability pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heede, Nina G; Thuesen, Betina H; Thyssen, Jacob P; Linneberg, Allan; Szecsi, Pal B; Stender, Steen; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis and hand eczema often impair the ability of people to work. Only a few studies have investigated whether individuals with loss-of-function filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, who often have severe and early onset of dermatitis, experience occupational consequences. To investigate the personal consequences of having atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema and FLG mutations. Adult Danes from the general population (n = 3247) and patients with atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema (n = 496) were genotyped for common FLG mutations, and completed a questionnaire about skin symptoms and hand eczema. Socioeconomic variables, including disability pension, and information on work in risk occupations were retrieved from national registries. The reasons for granting disability pension were unknown. Disability pension was associated with hand eczema in the general population, especially among individuals with a history of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis were associated with particularly high risk of disability pension among FLG mutation carriers [odds ratio (OR) 4.02 and 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-14.11; and OR 6.01 and 95%CI: 2.37-15.34, respectively]. Furthermore, 60% of the FLG mutation carriers with atopic dermatitis who developed hand eczema had experienced symptoms before adulthood. In the general population, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis, particularly in individuals with a genetically impaired skin barrier, were associated with disability pension, suggesting that FLG mutations carriers with a history of atopic dermatitis and hand eczema could benefit from early attention with respect to choice of occupation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparison of serum concentrations of environmental allergen-specific IgE in atopic and healthy (nonatopic) horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkołek, P; Sitkowski, W; Szczepanik, M; Adamek, Ł; Pluta, M; Taszkun, I; Gołyński, M; Malinowska, A

    2017-12-01

    Allergic responses in humans, horses and other species are mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. Serum testing to detect allergen-specific IgE antibodies has been developed for dogs, cats and horses; this allows for the identification of allergens and determination of appropriate allergen- specific immunotherapies. This study compared serum allergen-specific IgE concentrations in atopic and healthy horses. The study was performed on Malopolski breed atopic (n=21) and nonatopic (n=21) clinically healthy horses. Allergen-specific IgE serum concentrations were measured in summer seasons of 2008-2015 using a monoclonal anti-IgE antibody. A Northern and Central European allergen panel containing mite, insect, mould and plant pollen allergens, including 15 tests of individual allergens and 5 tests of allergen mixtures was used. The mean allergen-specific IgE concentrations in the atopic and normal horse populations were compared. Among the atopic horses, the strongest positive reactions occurred against the storage mites Tyrophagus putrescentiae and the domestic mite Dermatophagoides farinae. The atopic horses also demonstrated high IgE concentrations against insects, particularly Tabanus sp., the plant pollens colza, cultivated rye and the mould pollen mixture Aspergillus/Penicillium. No horses in the atopic group were IgE-negative. Among all mite, insect, mould and some plant allergen groups the differences in mean specific IgE concentrations between allergic and healthy horses were significant. The mean IgE concentrations for most allergen groups were significantly higher in the atopic horses than in the healthy animals. However, a high incidence of positive reactions was observed in both healthy and allergic horses. Our results showed a high frequency of polysensitization in atopic horses. Copyright© by the Polish Academy of Sciences.

  4. Pattern of airway inflammation and remodelling in mild persistent atopic asthma and in mild persistent asthma related to gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, R W; Guerriero, M; Micheletto, C

    2012-12-01

    The increase of basement membrane thickness (BMAT) represents a structural feature described as commonly characterizing airway remodelling in asthma, even if the non-atopic condition had been investigated only episodically from this point of view. Gastrooesophageal-reflux is a pathological condition which can frequently cause and/or sustain asthma in non-atopic individuals. The aim of the study was to measure BMT; some inflammatory mediators in BAL; cys-leucotrienes (LTE4) in urine; e-NO, and BHR to Methacholine (MCh) in mild atopic and in mild non-atopic, GER-related asthma. After their informed consent, 25 mild atopic (40.9 years +/- 13.1 sd, FEV1 = 95.9% pred. +/- 12.9 sd) and 39 non-atopic, GER-related asthmatics (57.3 years +/- 14.2 ds, FEVY1 = 101.3% pred. +/- 12.2 sd), nonsmoker and of a comparable asthma duration, underwent measurements of basal lung function and bronchial response to MCh (PD20 FEV1); endobronchial biopsies and BAL (in the right middle lobe), and a 24-h gastroesophageal pHmetry. Atopic GER-related asthma showed two distinct patterns of airway inflammation. The eosinophilic contribution to airway inflammation was systematically prevailing in the former group, such as: EOS = 10.7% +/- 13.4 sd vs 2.0% +/- 2.8 sd, p = 0.001; ECP = 344.9 mcg/l +/- 635.9 sd vs 59.2 mcg/l +/- 75.1 sd, p = 0.001. Data from the present study are suggesting that persistent mild atopic and mild GER-related asthma seem to represent two distinct phenotypes of asthma in terms of airway remodelling, and in particular of BMT involvement.

  5. Patterns of sensitization in infants and its relation to atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøhnke, Hanne; Norberg, Lene Annette; Vach, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal studies in infant populations using validated diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis and sensitization are rarely reported, and disease definitions, testing procedures, age of study population and evaluation of objective markers vary between countries and studies. The objectives...... of this prospective birth cohort study were to investigate: (i) the prevalence, the cumulative incidence and the pattern of transient and persistent sensitization to common food- and aeroallergens in unselected infants, (ii) the association between sensitization and the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) and (iii......) the association between selected perinatal risk factors with respect to AD and post-natal sensitization. During a one-year period a cohort of 562 unselected newborns was established and followed up at the age of 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18 months of age. At all time points infants were examined clinically and by histamine...

  6. Topical therapy of atopic dermatitis: controversies from Hippocrates to topical immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilles, Gérard; Wallach, Daniel; Taïeb, Alain

    2007-02-01

    Although atopic dermatitis can be treated efficiently, there is still much controversy about the risk/benefit ratio of both topical corticosteroids and topical immunomodulators. Conflicting data may be found about the usefulness of bathing, diet regulation, and other therapeutic interventions. These controversies result in part from the persistence of Hippocratic doctrines in modern medical thinking. Humoralist and diathetic doctrines, as they pertain to eczema, are reviewed. The paradoxical worsening of oozing and the deadly hazards of hospitalization before the era of antibiotics are brought to mind. We hope that this historical review will improve the understanding of current controversies and help dermatologists to manage patients with atopic dermatitis and other chronic skin diseases.

  7. Preparation of hydrogels for atopic dermatitis containing natural herbal extracts by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; An, Sung-Jun; Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Kim, Yun-Hye; Youn, Min-Ho; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Shin, Junhwa; Nho, Young-Chang

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a familial and chronic inflammatory pruritic skin disease that affects a large number of children and adults in industrialized countries. It is known that one of the prominent features of AD and chronic pruritus is partially due to the histamine released from mast cell. In this work, hydrogel patches with natural herbal extracts were prepared by 'freezing and thawing', and a gamma irradiation. It showed eminent healing results as a consequence of long-term moisturizing effects and natural herbal extracts on atopic wounds. Besides its non-toxicity and human harmlessness, it can be easily attached to or detached from the skin without any trace and help patients to feel refreshment when attached. Based on this work, the hydrogel patches we made can be potentially used as an alternative remedy for not only pruritus in AD, but other dermatitis.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema......, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens...

  9. The contribution of twin studies to the understanding of the aetiology of asthma and atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma and other atopic diseases has increased markedly during the past decades and the reasons for this are not fully understood. Asthma is still increasing in many parts of the world, notably in developing countries, and this emphasizes the importance of continuing research...... aimed at studying the aetiological factors of the disease and the causes of its increase in prevalence. Twin studies enable investigations into the genetic and environmental causes of individual variation in multifactorial diseases such as asthma. Thorough insight into these causes is important...... as this will ultimately guide the development of preventive strategies and targeted therapies. This review explores the contribution of twin studies to the understanding of the aetiology of asthma and atopic diseases....

  10. Psychological evaluation of children atopic dermatitis by Düss test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Polo Gascon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Atopic Dermatitis is a skin inflammatory disease, chronic and recurrent, characterized by intense itching and skin lesions with typical distribution. Besides the hereditary character, this disease can be influenced by environmental and psychological factors. The objective of this study was to discuss the use of the Fable of Duss test as a projective and psychodiagnostic instrument for children with AD, in order to understand the psychodinamic aspects. We evaluated 33 patients with atopic dermatitis on regular attendance at the Allergic Clinic of Dermatology Department of University Hospital, between 5 and 10 years of both sexes. Based on the results, it was possible to verify that the Fable of Duss test technique for expression emotional conflicts and discovery of the psychic functioning of these patients.

  11. Atopic dermatitis results in intrinsic barrier and immune abnormalities: Implications for contact dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittler, Julia K.; Krueger, James G.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), as well as irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), are common skin diseases. These diseases are characterized by skin inflammation mediated by activated innate immunity or acquired immune mechanisms. Although AD, ICD, and ACD can be encountered in pure forms by allergists and dermatologists, patients with AD often present with increased frequency of ICD and ACD. Although a disturbed barrier alone could potentiate immune reactivity in patients with AD through increased antigen penetration, additional immune mechanisms might explain the increased susceptibility of atopic patients to ICD and ACD. This review discusses cellular pathways associated with increased skin inflammation in all 3 conditions and presents mechanisms that might contribute to the increased rate of ICD and ACD in patients with AD. PMID:22939651

  12. Preparation of hydrogels for atopic dermatitis containing natural herbal extracts by gamma-ray irradiation

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    Lim, Youn-Mook; An, Sung-Jun; Kim, Hae-Kyoung [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Hye [AMOTECH Co., Ltd., Kimpo-City, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Min-Ho; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Shin, Junhwa [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Young-Chang [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ycnho@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a familial and chronic inflammatory pruritic skin disease that affects a large number of children and adults in industrialized countries. It is known that one of the prominent features of AD and chronic pruritus is partially due to the histamine released from mast cell. In this work, hydrogel patches with natural herbal extracts were prepared by 'freezing and thawing', and a gamma irradiation. It showed eminent healing results as a consequence of long-term moisturizing effects and natural herbal extracts on atopic wounds. Besides its non-toxicity and human harmlessness, it can be easily attached to or detached from the skin without any trace and help patients to feel refreshment when attached. Based on this work, the hydrogel patches we made can be potentially used as an alternative remedy for not only pruritus in AD, but other dermatitis.

  13. Evaluation of the concentration of allergens from mites in fur and households dust of dogs with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dévaki L. de Assunção

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the concentration of Der p 1, Der f 1 and Blo t 5 in the fur and households of 20 dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD and 20 healthy dogs. The diagnosis of AD was clinical based on Favrot’s criteria. Dust samples were collected with a domestic vacuum cleaner. For each site, 1m2 was vacuumed for 2 min. The samples were collected in separate filters, transferred into plastic containers, sealed and kept frozen until ELISA analysis. In the fur of atopic dogs the average concentration of Der p 1 was 0.25μg/g compared to 0.03μg/g in healthy dogs. In households with atopic dogs the highest concentrations of Der p 1 were found in carpets (2.18μg/g, followed by couches (1.53μg/g, beds (1.14μg/g, dogs’ bed linen (0.64μg/g and floors (0.14μg/g. The concentrations of Der p 1 on carpets, couches and beds were significantly higher than in atopic dogs’ fur (p0.05. The concentrations of Der p 1, Der f 1 and Blo t 5 were equivalent in atopic and non-atopic dog’s households. Among the allergens studied, Der p 1 was the most commonly found, predominantly in carpets and couches.

  14. Correlation of the severity of atopic dermatitis with absolute eosinophil counts in peripheral blood and serum IgE levels

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    Dhar Sandipan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a number of epidemiological studies, showing incidence and prevalence of atopic dermatitis, were available, scant attention has been paid to the correlation between the parameters of the disease like severity, absolute eosinophil count and IgE level, which has been known to be associated inconsistently. Hence this study was undertaken. METHODS: A total of 102 patients of atopic dermatitis, both children and adults, and 107 age matched controls were studied at the Pediatric Dermatology clinic, Institute of Child Health and department of Dermatology, AMRI-Apollo hospitals, Kolkata. RESULTS: The average age of onset of atopic dermatitis was observed to be 4.55 years. Both the average absolute eosinophil count and IgE levels in patients of atopic dermatitis were significantly higher than that of the controls. Each of these parameters showed significant correlation with severity of the disease and showed a nonhomogeneous distribution reflected by significant association with personal history of bronchial asthma and family history of atopy, when both parents were atopic. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that clinical activity of the disease as recorded by the "SCORAD" index can be used as an indicator of the hematological abnormalities as well as to some extent as a prognostic indicator. Family history of atopy correlates with the hematological abnormalities only if both parents are involved and bronchial asthma is the only associated atopic condition which correlates with the parameters of the disease .

  15. Evaluation of out-in skin transparency using a colorimeter and food dye in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, H; Tadaki, H; Takami, S; Muramatsu, R; Hagiwara, S; Mizuno, T; Arakawa, H

    2009-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disease of skin barrier dysfunction and outside stimuli can cross the skin barrier. To examine a new method for evaluating the outside to inside skin transparency with a colorimeter and yellow dyes. In study 1, a total of 28 volunteer subjects (24 normal and four with atopic dermatitis) participated. After provocation with yellow dye, the skin colour of all the subjects was measured using a colorimeter. The skin transparency index was calculated by the changes of the skin colour to yellow. Other variables of skin function, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration, were also measured. In study 2, the skin transparency index was evaluated for a cohort of 38 patients with atopic dermatitis, 27 subjects with dry skin and 29 healthy controls. In study 1, the measurement of skin colour (b*) using tartrazine showed good results. There was a significant relationship between the skin transparency index with tartrazine and the atopic dermatitis score (P = 0.014). No other measurements of skin function, including the TEWL, were correlated. In study 2, the skin transparency index score obtained with tartrazine in the patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly higher than that of the controls and those with dry skin (P colorimeter and food dye, is noninvasive, safe and reliable for the evaluation of out-in skin transparency and can demonstrate the characteristic dysfunction in the skin barrier in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  16. Diet Quality throughout Early Life in Relation to Allergic Sensitization and Atopic Diseases in Childhood

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    Anh N. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Early-life nutrition is an important modifiable determinant in the development of a child’s immune system, and may thereby influence the risk of allergic sensitization and atopic diseases. However, associations between overall dietary patterns and atopic diseases in childhood remain unclear. We examined associations of diet quality in early life with allergic sensitization, self-reported physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergies, eczema, and asthma among 5225 children participating in a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Diet was assessed during pregnancy, infancy, and childhood using validated food-frequency questionnaires. We calculated food-based diet quality scores (0–10 or 0–15, reflecting adherence to dietary guidelines. At age 10 years, allergic sensitization was assessed with skin prick tests. Information on physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergies, eczema, and asthma was obtained with questionnaires. We observed no associations between diet quality during pregnancy and allergic sensitization (odds ratio (OR = 1.05 per point in the diet score, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.99, 1.13, allergies (0.96, 95% CI: 0.88, 1.04, eczema (0.99, 95% CI: 0.93, 1.06, or asthma (0.93, 95% CI: 0.85, 1.03 in childhood. Also, diet quality in infancy or childhood were not associated with atopic outcomes in childhood. Our findings do not support our hypothesis that a healthy dietary pattern in early life is associated with a lower risk of allergic sensitization or atopic diseases in childhood.

  17. Cord serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of early childhood transient wheezing and atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baïz, Nour; Dargent-Molina, Patricia; Wark, John D; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of the effect of maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy on the risk of asthma and allergic outcomes in offspring. However, studies on the relationship between cord levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and asthma and allergic diseases are very few. Our aim was to investigate the associations between cord serum 25(OH)D levels and asthma, wheezing, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis in the offspring from birth to 5 years. Cord blood samples were collected at birth and analyzed for 25(OH)D levels in 239 newborns from the Etude des Déterminants pré et post natals du développement et de la santé de l'Enfant (EDEN) birth cohort. The children were followed up until age 5 years by using International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood-based symptom questionnaires. The median cord serum level of 25(OH)D was 17.8 ng/mL (interquartile range, 15.1 ng/mL). By using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models, a significant inverse association was observed between cord serum 25(OH)D levels and risk of transient early wheezing and early- and late-onset atopic dermatitis, as well as atopic dermatitis, by the ages of 1, 2, 3, and 5 years. We found no association between cord serum 25(OH)D levels and asthma and allergic rhinitis at age 5 years. Cord serum 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with the risk of transient early wheezing and atopic dermatitis by the age of 5 years, but no association was found with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HPLC Analysis of nine corticosteroids in “natural creams” for atopic eczema

    OpenAIRE

    Ameti, Agim; Poposka, Zaklina; Memeti, Shaban; Shishovska, Maja; Mustafa, Zana; Starkoska, Katerina; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to determine whether “natural creams” sold for treatment of childhood atopic eczema illegally contain corticosteroids with a newly developed rapid and simple HPLC analysis with UV detection. Material and Methods: HPLC analysis was performed using a Schimadzu LC-2010 chromatographic system (Schimadzu, Kyoto, Japan) consisting of a LC-20AT Prominence liquid chromatography pump with DGU-20A5 Prominence degasser, a SPD-M20A Prominence Diode Array Detector, and...

  19. Decolonization of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with atopic dermatitis: a reason for increasing resistance to antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Błażewicz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Exacerbation of atopic dermatitis can be associated with bacterial infection. The skin of patients is colonized with Staphylococcus aureus in 90% of cases. An attempt has been made to demonstrate that eradication significantly reduces the severity of the disease. Studies indicate the efficacy of topical antibiotics, topical corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. Due to increasing resistance to drugs and the defective antimicrobial peptide profile, decolonization is virtually impossible. Aim : To determine the prevalence of S. aureus colonization among patients with atopic dermatitis and to assess antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated strains to antibiotics, especially fusidic acid and mupirocin. Material and methods : One hundred patients with atopic dermatitis and 50 healthy subjects were microbiologically assessed for the carriage of S. aureus . Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using the broth-microdilution method for antibiotics: ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, daptomycin, erythromycin, fusidic acid, linezolid, lincomycin, mupirocin, tetracycline and vancomycin. Results : Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated from the majority of our patients, either from the skin (71% or the anterior nares (67%. In the present study, 10% of isolations represented methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Antibiotics exhibited diverse activities against clinical isolates of S. aureus . Among those tested, the highest rates of resistance were shown for ampicillin – 58.5%, lincomycin – 37.5% and erythromycin – 31.0%. Enhanced resistance levels were expressed to mupirocin (17.5% and fusidic acid (15.5%. Conclusions : According to the increasing rate of resistance and quick recolonization after discontinuation of the treatment, chronic use of topical antibiotics is not recommended and should be limited to exacerbation of atopic dermatitis with clinical signs of bacterial infection.

  20. [Written personalized action plan for atopic dermatitis: a patient education tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabeff, R; Assathiany, R; Barbarot, S; Salinier, C; Stalder, J-F

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most frequent children's chronic skin disease. Management of AD can be difficult because local treatments must be adapted to the skin's condition. Between consultations, sudden changes in the state of the disease can make it difficult to manage local treatment. Parents and children need information that will help them adapt their treatment to the course of their disease. Aiming to enable parents to better treat their atopic child by themselves, we have developed a personalized action plan in order to simplify, personalize, and adapt the medical prescription to the state of the disease. The Personalized Written Action Plan for Atopics (PA2P) is based on the model used in the treatment of asthma, with integrated specificities for AD in children. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and pertinence of the PA2P for pediatricians to use in private practice. A total of 479 pediatricians answered a questionnaire sent by e-mail. The vast majority of the respondents gave positive reviews of the tool: 99% of the pediatricians declared the tool to be pertinent, qualifying it as clear and logical. The PA2P appeared to be appropriate for the atopic patient because it improves the families' involvement in the application of local treatment by offering personalized care and by simplifying the doctor's prescription. Finally, 72% of doctors responding to the questionnaire were willing to take part in future studies involving parents. More than a gadget, the PA2P could become a useful tool for therapeutic patient education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.