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Sample records for allergic rhinitis clinical

  1. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Michael D; Gurgel, Richard K; Lin, Sandra Y; Schwartz, Seth R; Baroody, Fuad M; Bonner, James R; Dawson, Douglas E; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hackell, Jesse M; Han, Joseph K; Ishman, Stacey L; Krouse, Helene J; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Mims, James Whit W; Omole, Folashade S; Reddy, William D; Wallace, Dana V; Walsh, Sandra A; Warren, Barbara E; Wilson, Meghan N; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common diseases affecting adults. It is the most common chronic disease in children in the United States today and the fifth most common chronic disease in the United States overall. AR is estimated to affect nearly 1 in every 6 Americans and generates $2 to $5 billion in direct health expenditures annually. It can impair quality of life and, through loss of work and school attendance, is responsible for as much as $2 to $4 billion in lost productivity annually. Not surprisingly, myriad diagnostic tests and treatments are used in managing this disorder, yet there is considerable variation in their use. This clinical practice guideline was undertaken to optimize the care of patients with AR by addressing quality improvement opportunities through an evaluation of the available evidence and an assessment of the harm-benefit balance of various diagnostic and management options. The primary purpose of this guideline is to address quality improvement opportunities for all clinicians, in any setting, who are likely to manage patients with AR as well as to optimize patient care, promote effective diagnosis and therapy, and reduce harmful or unnecessary variations in care. The guideline is intended to be applicable for both pediatric and adult patients with AR. Children under the age of 2 years were excluded from the clinical practice guideline because rhinitis in this population may be different than in older patients and is not informed by the same evidence base. The guideline is intended to focus on a limited number of quality improvement opportunities deemed most important by the working group and is not intended to be a comprehensive reference for diagnosing and managing AR. The recommendations outlined in the guideline are not intended to represent the standard of care for patient management, nor are the recommendations intended to limit treatment or care provided to individual patients. The development group made a strong

  2. Allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Alexander N; Hellings, Peter W; Rotiroti, Guiseppina; Scadding, Glenis K

    2011-12-17

    Allergic rhinitis is a very common disorder that affects people of all ages, peaking in the teenage years. It is frequently ignored, underdiagnosed, misdiagnosed, and mistreated, which not only is detrimental to health but also has societal costs. Although allergic rhinitis is not a serious illness, it is clinically relevant because it underlies many complications, is a major risk factor for poor asthma control, and affects quality of life and productivity at work or school. Management of allergic rhinitis is best when directed by guidelines. A diagnostic trial of a pharmacotherapeutic agent could be started in people with clinically identified allergic rhinitis; however, to confirm the diagnosis, specific IgE reactivity needs to be recorded. Documented IgE reactivity has the added benefit of guiding implementation of environmental controls, which could substantially ameliorate symptoms of allergic rhinitis and might prevent development of asthma, especially in an occupational setting. Many classes of drug are available, effective, and safe. In meta-analyses, intranasal corticosteroids are superior to other treatments, have a good safety profile, and treat all symptoms of allergic rhinitis effectively. First-generation antihistamines are associated with sedation, psychomotor retardation, and reduced academic performance. Only immunotherapy with individually targeted allergens has the potential to alter the natural history of allergic rhinitis. Patients' education is a vital component of treatment. Even with the best pharmacotherapy, one in five affected individuals remains highly symptomatic, and further research is needed in this area. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Definition and clinic of the allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielhaupter, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The allergic rhinitis is the most common immune disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 24% and one of the most common chronic diseases at all--with tendency to rise. It occurs in childhood and influences the patients' social life, school performance and labour productivity. Furthermore the allergic rhinitis is accompanied by a lot of comorbidities, including conjunctivitis, asthma bronchiale, food allergy, neurodermatitis and sinusitis. For example the risk for asthma is 3.2-fold higher for adults with allergic rhinitis than for healthy people.

  4. Clinical characteristics of children with non-allergic rhinitis vs with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichyanond, Pakit; Suratannon, Chanthana; Lertbunnaphong, Piyarat; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong

    2010-12-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) are major causes of chronic rhinitis. Knowledge about children with non-allergic rhinitis is limited. To study clinical characteristics differentiating NAR and AR among children with chronic rhinitis. This is a retrospective, descriptive study of 302 children (with ages of 14 years or less) with chronic rhinitis evaluated at the pediatric allergy clinic, Siriraj Hospital between January and December 2006. Based on the results of skin prick test (SPT), they were classified into 2 groups, i.e., AR and NAR. Their medical records were reviewed with respect to clinical data on rhinitis and related symptoms. There were 222 patients with AR and 80 with NAR (73.5% and 26.5%). Median age of onset of the disease among patients with NAR was younger than AR (p = 0.04) while the duration of disease among AR cases was longer than in NAR (p rhinitis, based on Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), was not different between the two groups. Nasal pruritus, sneezing and eye symptoms were more commonly observed in AR than in NAR (p < 0.01), whereas snoring and sinusitis were more common in NAR than in AR (p < 0.01). The presence of nasal pruritus, sneezing and eye symptoms strongly suggested AR (adjusted OR 2.73, 2.96, 1.49) while snoring was a risk factor for NAR (adjusted OR = 3.11). Presence of nasal pruritus, sneezing and eye symptoms suggests AR. Sinusitis and upper airway obstruction are more common among patients with NAR.

  5. Allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greiner, Alexander N.; Hellings, Peter W.; Rotiroti, Guiseppina; Scadding, Glenis K.

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a very common disorder that affects people of all ages, peaking in the teenage years. It is frequently ignored, underdiagnosed, misdiagnosed, and mistreated, which not only is detrimental to health but also has societal costs. Although allergic rhinitis is not a serious illness,

  6. Allergic Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dust mites, are in dust. Dust mites are tiny living creatures found in bedding, mattresses, carpeting, and upholstered furniture. They live on dead skin cells and other things found in house dust. How is allergic rhinitis diagnosed? If your ...

  7. Non-allergic rhinitis in children: Epidemiological aspects, pathological features, diagnostic methodology and clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Gelardi, Matteo; Licari, Amelia; del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinitis is a very common disease, as the prevalence in the general population resulted to be 40%. Allergic rhinitis has been considered to be the most frequent form of chronic rhinitis, as non-allergic rhinitis has been estimated to account for 25%. However, several evidences suggested that non-allergic rhinitis have been underrated, especially in children. In pediatrics, the diagnostic definition of non-allergic rhinitis has been often limited to the exclusion of an allergic sensitization. Actually, local allergic rhinitis has been often misdiagnosed as well as mixed rhinitis has not been recognized in most cases. Nasal cytology is a diagnostic procedure being suitable for routine clinical practice with children and could be a very useful tool to characterize and diagnose non-allergic rhinitis, providing important clues for epidemiological analysis and clinical management. PMID:28074172

  8. Non-allergic rhinitis in children: Epidemiological aspects, pathological features, diagnostic methodology and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Gelardi, Matteo; Licari, Amelia; Del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-12-26

    Chronic rhinitis is a very common disease, as the prevalence in the general population resulted to be 40%. Allergic rhinitis has been considered to be the most frequent form of chronic rhinitis, as non-allergic rhinitis has been estimated to account for 25%. However, several evidences suggested that non-allergic rhinitis have been underrated, especially in children. In pediatrics, the diagnostic definition of non-allergic rhinitis has been often limited to the exclusion of an allergic sensitization. Actually, local allergic rhinitis has been often misdiagnosed as well as mixed rhinitis has not been recognized in most cases. Nasal cytology is a diagnostic procedure being suitable for routine clinical practice with children and could be a very useful tool to characterize and diagnose non-allergic rhinitis, providing important clues for epidemiological analysis and clinical management.

  9. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-02-08

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient's daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness.

  10. Food-induced Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Bemanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is estimated about 8% in children. The relationship between food and manifestation of allergy symptoms and its confirmation for accurate diagnosis is very important. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with a prevalence of 40% among different societies. The prevalence of food-induced allergic rhinitis appears to be less than 1 percent. Food reactions often lead to rhinitis symptoms at a no immunologic nature. Although the role of food and fruits in developing allergic rhinitis is not clearly identified, in a very small percentage of patients, rhinitis is the clinical manifestation of food allergy.

  11. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient’s daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure...

  12. Management of Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sausen, Verra O.; Marks, Katherine E.; Sausen, Kenneth P.; Self, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common chronic childhood disease. Reduced quality of life is frequently caused by this IgE-mediated disease, including sleep disturbance with subsequent decreased school performance. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchospasm are commonly seen concurrently with allergic rhinitis, and poorly controlled allergic rhinitis negatively affects asthma outcomes. Nonsedating antihistamines or intranasal azelastine are effective agents to manage allergic rhinitis, often in c...

  13. Allergic Rhinitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, β2 agonists can resolve asthma attacks but they have no effect on rhinitis. On the contrary, H1 receptor antago- nists treat rhinitis symptoms, but they are quite ineffective on broncho.constriction. However, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated for antihistamines in association with antileukot- rienes.

  14. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient’s daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness. PMID:26862501

  15. Medications for Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditi, Rachel E; Ishman, Stacey; Lee, Stella; Lin, Sandra; Shin, Jennifer J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Adherence to the allergic rhinitis clinical practice guideline is being considered as a potential focus for national performance metrics. To help inform this discussion, we assessed patient- and clinician-reported medication administration among nationally representative populations of patients with allergic rhinitis. Study Design Cross-sectional analyses. Setting and Subjects Home health assessments, ambulatory visits. Methods Participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey / National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were assessed. The primary outcomes were the percentage of patients reporting receipt of antihistamines and/or nasal steroids among those with allergy-related symptoms and the percentage for whom a clinician administered these medications when diagnosing allergic rhinitis. Secondary outcomes included assessments of those with worse quality of life, confirmatory allergy testing, and leukotriene receptor antagonist use. Results Within the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, an estimated 29.2 million patients were diagnosed with "hay fever," while 92.2 million were diagnosed with "allergies." Patients with symptoms of allergic rhinitis reported that antihistamines or nasal steroids were prescribed in 21.1% to 24.0% of cases. Leukotriene receptor antagonists were given to 1.7% of those without asthma or use of other allergy medications. Within the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey / National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, observations representing 149.5 million visits for allergic rhinitis demonstrated that nasal steroids were administered in 29.6% of cases, while nonsedating and sedating antihistamines were given in 22.4% and 17.2%, respectively. Conclusions Despite a high prevalence of allergic rhinitis, per patient report and clinician entry, a substantial number of affected patients do not receive antihistamines and nasal steroids.

  16. Clinical features of allergic rhinitis in children of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S; Li, Y J; Chen, J

    2016-05-09

    The aims of the current study were to assess the clinical features of allergic rhinitis (AR) in children in Shanghai. Serum-specific IgE (sIgE) tests were performed on samples from patients with AR symptoms from January 2011 to December 2014. A disease-related questionnaire was completed after AR diagnosis. The allergen profile and clinical features of AR were analyzed. In total, 2713 AR patients were enrolled in this study. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was found to be the most common offending allergen in the study population. With increasing age, the prevalence of sIgE against inhalant allergens was significantly increased; however, the opposite trend was observed for food allergens. Additionally, the proportion of children with high levels of sIgE against D. pteronyssinus increased with age. Of the AR cases, 8.6% were classified as intermittent mild, 4.2% as persistent mild, 40.5% as intermittent moderate-severe, and 46.7% as persistent moderate-severe. A family history of allergies and a patient history of allergies within 6 months of birth were significantly associated with the duration and severity of AR symptoms. The occurrence of co-morbidities, such as allergic conjunctivitis, cough, and asthma, gradually increased from intermittent mild, persistent mild, and intermittent moderate-severe to persistent moderate-severe. The most frequently used drugs were topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines, which were used by 86.7 and 79.0% of patients, respectively. These results confirm the adequacy of the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines for classifying AR patients, and advance the understanding of clinical features of AR in children in Shanghai, China.

  17. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Survey on clinical characteristics of pediatric allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Ji-Chao; Zhu, Dong-Dong; Dong, Zhen; Jiang, Xiao-Dan; Li, Lin; Zhu, Xue-Wei; Cui, Na; Wang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the clinical symptom, precipitating factor, associated symptom, family history and life quality of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis, and to analyze the characteristic of clinical symptoms. A questionnaire survey on pediatric AR patients since June 2008 to June 2010, one hundred and forty-eight pediatric AR patients were divided into 2 groups, group A (n = 43) included children aged from 3.2 to 6.0, group B (n = 105) included children aged from 6.1 to 14.8. The severity degree of clinical symptom was assessed by visual analogue scale. Preschool age children had more severe rhinocleisis, more severe cough and less rhinorrhea than school age children (χ(2) value were 29.194, 12.277 and 16.904, respectively, P allergic disease history was 11.5% (17/148). Quality of sleep that 66.2% (98/148) were upset and 62.2% (92/148) had no cathexis. The preschool children have different clinical symptom characteristic from the school age children, and we got some clinical data of pediatric AR patients, those were beneficial to the diagnose and therapy of pediatric AR. The clinical data obtained in this study from pediatric AR patients are beneficial to the diagnosis and therapy of pediatric AR.

  19. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G Walter; Casale, Thomas B; Chavannes, Niels H; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry; Cruz, Alvaro A; Dahl, Ronald; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Phillipe; Dray, Gérard; Fletcher, Monica; Fokkens, Wytske J; Fonseca, Joao; Gonzalez-Diaz, Sandra N; Grouse, Lawrence; Keil, Thomas; Kuna, Piotr; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Jaoquim; Muraro, Antonella; Naclerio, Robert N; Palkonen, Susanna; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Scadding, Glenis K; Sheikh, Aziz; Spertini, François; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Walker, Samantha; Wickman, Magnus; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten; Smit, HA

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical

  20. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J.; Hellings, Peter W.; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G. Walter; Casale, Thomas B.; Chavannes, Niels H.; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry; Cruz, Alvaro A.; Dahl, Ronald; de Carlo, Giuseppe; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Phillipe; Dray, Gérard; Fletcher, Monica; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Fonseca, Joao; Gonzalez-Diaz, Sandra N.; Grouse, Lawrence; Keil, Thomas; Kuna, Piotr; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C.; Meltzer, Eli O.; Mullol, Jaoquim; Muraro, Antonella; Naclerio, Robert N.; Palkonen, Susanna; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Scadding, Glenis K.; Sheikh, Aziz; Spertini, François; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Walker, Samantha; Wickman, Magnus; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten; Aberer, Werner; Adachi, Mitsuru; Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi; Akdis, Mubeccel; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Ansotegui, Ignacio J.; Anto, Josep M.; Arshad, S. Hasan; Baiardini, Ilaria; Baigenzhin, Abay K.; Barbara, Cristina; Bateman, Eric D.; Beghé, Bianca; Bel, Elisabeth H.; Ben Kheder, Ali; Bennoor, Kazi S.; Benson, Michael; Bernstein, David; Michael, Bewick; Thomas, Bieber; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Bjermer, Leif; Blain, Hubert; Boner, Attilio; Bonini, Matteo; Bonini, Sergio; Bosse, Isabelle; Bouchard, Jacques; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Bourret, Rodolphe A.; Bousquet, Philippe J.; Braido, Fulvio; Briggs, Andrew H.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Buhl, Roland; Burney, Peter; Bush, Andrew; Caballero-Fonseca, Fernando; Caimmi, Davide P.; Camargos, Paulo; Camuzat, Thierry; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Carr, Warner; Sarabia, Alfonso Cepeda; Chatzi, Leda; Chen, Yuzhi; Chiron, Raphaël; Chkhartishvili, Ekaterine; Chuchalin, Alexander; Ciprandi, Georgio; Cirule, Ieva; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Costa, David; Crooks, George; Custovic, Adnan; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Darsow, Ulf; de Blay, Frédéric; de Manuel Keenoy, Esteban; Dedeu, Tony; Deleanu, Diana; Denburg, Judah; Didier, Alain; Dinh-Xuan, Anh-Tuan; Dokic, Dejan; Douagui, Habib B.; Dubakiene, Ruta; Durham, Stephen; Dykewicz, Mark; El-Gamal, Yehia; Emuzyte, Regina; Fink-Wagner, Antje; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Forastiere, Francesco; Gamkrelidze, Amiran; Gemicioğlu, Bilun; Gereda, Jose E.; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Gotua, Maia; Grisle, Ineta; Guzmán, M. Antonieta; Heinrich, Joachim; Hellquist-Dahl, Birthe; Horak, Friedrich; Howarth, Peter H.; Humbert, Marc; Hyland, Michael; Ivancevich, Juan-Carlos; Jares, Edgardo J.; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Jonquet, Olivier; Joos, Guy; Jung, Ki-Suck; Just, Jocelyne; Jutel, Marek; Kaidashev, Igor P.; Khaitov, Musa; Kalayci, Omer; Kalyoncu, Fuat; Keith, Paul; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Kleine-Tebbe, Jorg; Klimek, Ludger; N'Goran, Bernard Koffi; Kolek, Vitezlav; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Kowalski, Marek; Kull, Inger; Kvedariene, Violeta; Lambrecht, Bart; Lau, Susanne; Laune, Daniel; Le Thi Tuyet, Lan; Li, Jing; Lieberman, Phillipe; Lipworth, Brian J.; Renaud, Louis; Magard, Yves; Magnan, Antoine; Mahboub, Bassam; Majer, Ivan; Makela, Mika; Manning, Peter J.; Masjedi, Mohamad R.; Maurer, Marcus; Mavale-Manuel, Sandra; Melén, Erik; Melo-Gomes, Elisabete; Mercier, Jacques; Merk, Hans; Miculinic, Neven; Mihaltan, Florin; Milenkovic, Branislava; Mohammad, Yousser; Molimard, Mathieu; Momas, Isabelle; Montilla-Santana, Anna; Morais-Almeida, Mario; Mösges, Ralph; Nadif, Rachel; Namazova-Baranova, Leyla; Neffen, Hugo; Nekam, Kristof; Neou, Angelos; Niggemann, Bodo; Nyembue, Dieudonné; O'Hehir, Robyn; Ohta, Ken; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Okubo, Kim; Ouedraogo, Solange; Paggiaro, Pier-Luigi; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Palmer, Stephen; Panzner, Petr; Papi, Alberto; Park, Hae-Sim; Pavord, Ian; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; Picard, Robert; Pigearias, Bernard; Pin, Isabelle; Plavec, Davor; Pohl, Wolfgang; Popov, Todor; Postma, Dirkje S.; Potter, Paul; Poulsen, Lars K.; Rabe, Klaus F.; Raciborski, Filip; Pontal, Françoise Radier; Reitamo, Sakari; Repka-Ramirez, Maria-Susana; Robalo-Cordeiro, Carlos; Roberts, Graham; Rodenas, Francisco; Rolland, Christine; Rodriguez, Miguel Roman; Romano, Antonino; Rosado-Pinto, José; Rosario, Nelson A.; Rosenwasser, Larry; Rottem, Menachem; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Sastre-Dominguez, Joaquim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Serrano, Eli; Simons, F. Estelle R.; Sisul, Juan-Carlos; Skrindo, Ingebjorg; Smit, Henriette A.; Solé, Dirceu; Sooronbaev, Talant; Spranger, Otto; Stelmach, Rafael; Strandberg, Timo; Sunyer, Jordi; Thijs, Carel; Todo-Bom, Ana-Maria; Triggiani, Massimo; Valenta, Rudolf; Valero, Antonio L.; van Hage, Marianne; Vandenplas, Olivier; Vezzani, Giorgio; Vichyanond, Pakit; Viegi, Giovanni; Wagenmann, Martin; Wahn, Ulrich; de Yun, Wang; Williams, Denis; Wright, John; Yawn, Barbara P.; Yiallouros, Panayiotis; Yusuf, Osman M.; Zar, Heather J.; Zernotti, Mario; Zhang, Luo; Zhong, Nanshan; Zidarn, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical

  1. Immunotherapy in Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Anil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is an immunologic disorder that develops in individuals who have produced allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in response to environmental exposures (most commonly to pollens, animal dander, insect debris, and molds. For patients with a severe allergy that is not responsive to environmental controls and pharmacotherapy or for those who do not wish to use medication for a lifetime, immunotherapy may be offered. Specific immunotherapy as practiced since hundred years in Western Europe and the USA. Different routes for specific immunotherapy have been evaluated, such as the subcutaneous, sublingual, oral, nasal, bronchial, and intra-lymphatic, the first 2 of these routes being the most commonly used today in clinical practice. In this article, subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis is reviewed.

  2. Immunopathogenesis of allergic rhinitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    markers such as the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Chemoattractants including eotaxin,. IL-5, and RANTES lead to the characteristic infiltration by eosinophils, basophils, Th2 lymphocytes, and mast cells in chronic allergic rhinitis.15. Figure 2. Cell and mediator pathways underlying the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis.

  3. Epidemiology of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, James W

    2014-09-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the archetypal allergic disease otolaryngologists encounter. Epidemiologic studies inform providers of the association of rhinitis symptoms and allergy test results in the broader population. Understanding the epidemiological characteristics of AR is important for interpreting both rhinitis symptoms and allergy tests. Articles were selected based on literature review through PubMed and personal knowledge of the author. The largest and highest-quality studies were included. The search selection was not standardized. Epidemiological studies demonstrate marked variability globally in the prevalence of both rhinitis symptoms and allergy tests. Self-reported seasonal or perennial rhinitis symptoms significantly overestimate the prevalence of AR defined by a positive history and positive allergy tests. Positive allergy tests are also common in those without self-reported rhinitis symptoms. Interpreting rhinitis symptoms and allergy testing is enhanced by an understanding of the epidemiology of AR. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  4. A clinical decision support system for diagnosis of Allergic Rhinitis based on intradermal skin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabez Christopher, J; Khanna Nehemiah, H; Kannan, A

    2015-10-01

    Allergic Rhinitis is a universal common disease, especially in populated cities and urban areas. Diagnosis and treatment of Allergic Rhinitis will improve the quality of life of allergic patients. Though skin tests remain the gold standard test for diagnosis of allergic disorders, clinical experts are required for accurate interpretation of test outcomes. This work presents a clinical decision support system (CDSS) to assist junior clinicians in the diagnosis of Allergic Rhinitis. Intradermal Skin tests were performed on patients who had plausible allergic symptoms. Based on patient׳s history, 40 clinically relevant allergens were tested. 872 patients who had allergic symptoms were considered for this study. The rule based classification approach and the clinical test results were used to develop and validate the CDSS. Clinical relevance of the CDSS was compared with the Score for Allergic Rhinitis (SFAR). Tests were conducted for junior clinicians to assess their diagnostic capability in the absence of an expert. The class based Association rule generation approach provides a concise set of rules that is further validated by clinical experts. The interpretations of the experts are considered as the gold standard. The CDSS diagnoses the presence or absence of rhinitis with an accuracy of 88.31%. The allergy specialist and the junior clinicians prefer the rule based approach for its comprehendible knowledge model. The Clinical Decision Support Systems with rule based classification approach assists junior doctors and clinicians in the diagnosis of Allergic Rhinitis to make reliable decisions based on the reports of intradermal skin tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical utility and patient adherence with ebastine for allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Ciprandi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio CiprandiDepartment of Internal Medicine, San Martino Hospital, Genoa, ItalyAbstract: Allergic rhinitis (AR is a high prevalence disease, affecting 10%–20% of the general population. AR is sustained by an IgE-mediated reaction, and by a complex inflammatory network of cells, mediators, and cytokines, becoming chronic when exposure to allergen persists. A Th2-biased immune response is the basis for the allergic inflammation. Histamine plays a relevant role in symptom occurrence. Therefore, antihistamine use represents a cornerstone in AR management. Ebastine, a novel antihistamine, is effective overall in controlling symptoms, and its safety profile is good. Recently, a new formulation has been developed, ie, a fast-dissolving tablet. Several studies have demonstrated its favorable characteristics. In conclusion, ebastine is an effective and well tolerated antihistamine that may be prescribed for the treatment of AR. The fast-dissolving tablet formulation provides a new option which may be particularly convenient for the patient.Keywords: allergic rhinitis, histamine, antihistamines, ebastine, tablets

  6. Diagnosing Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scadding, Glenis K; Scadding, Guy W

    2016-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common immunologic disease in industrialized societies and has a significant impact on quality of life. Most asthmatics also have rhinitis. AR may present with comorbidities, including chronic otitis media with effusion, cough, and pollen-food cross-reactivity. AR may occur in isolation or be part of a mixed rhinitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Allergic Rhinitis Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the best strategy for managing allergic rhinitis? Avoidance Antihistamines or nasal corticosteroid sprays Immunotherapy (allergy shots) It ... pollen or pet dander isn't always feasible. Antihistamines often help for short-term relief of symptoms. ...

  8. Pediatric allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharpe, Chet A; Kemp, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common pediatric problem with significant comorbidities and potential complications. This article is an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and current therapeutic strategies. Allergic rhinitis management in a specific child is age dependent and influenced by the severity and frequency of the symptoms and the presence of any concurrent conditions. Current strategies permit symptomatic control and improved quality of life for most patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Allergic rhinitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Darko

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent form of chronic rhinitis in children. It is driven by allergic inflammation and is commonly associated with other atopic diseases such as asthma and atopic eczema. The main allergens are primarily aeroallergens: house dust mite, and tree, grass and weed pollen. It is, however, not exceptional to experience symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in conjunction with food allergy and oral food allergy syndrome, especially in infants and toddlers. Allergic rhinitis is often associated with allergic asthma, either preceding it, or developing later and making it more difficult to treat. The mainstay of treatment is exposure prophylaxis, antihistamines, leukotriene antagonists and intranasal corticosteroids. Allergic rhinitis is one of the prime indications for specific allergen immunotherapy, which may have a preventive effect on the development of asthma. Allergic rhinitis associated with intermittent or mild persistent asthma may be a good indication for concomitant combination treatment with antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. Intranasal corticosteroids should not be withheld in more severe forms. Shortterm (up to 3 months) use of intranasal corticosteroids has not been associated with any significant local or systemic side effects.

  10. Sibship Characteristics and Risk of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Tine; Rostgaard, Klaus; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2005-01-01

    asthma; birth order; hypersensitivity; rhinitis; allergic; perennial; rhinitis; allergic; seasonal; risk factors; siblings......asthma; birth order; hypersensitivity; rhinitis; allergic; perennial; rhinitis; allergic; seasonal; risk factors; siblings...

  11. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Local Allergic Rhinitis to House Dust Mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Gyu; Lee, Ji Ho; Ban, Ga Young; Park, Hae Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2017-09-01

    Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is a localized nasal allergic response in the absence of systemic atopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of LAR in Korean rhinitis patients compared to allergic rhinitis (AR) and non-allergic rhinitis (NAR). A total of 304 rhinitis patients were enrolled from November 2014 to March 2016. A skin prick test, serum total and specific immunoglobulin E, and a nasal provocation test (NPT) with house dust mite (HDM) were performed on all patients. Subjects also documented changes in rhinitis symptoms before and after NPT. Seventy-four patients with nasal hyper-reactivity and 80 patients with subclinical allergy were excluded. AR was diagnosed in 69 (46.0%) patients, NAR in 75 (50.0%) patients, and LAR to HDM in 6 (4.0%) patients. The average medication score and disease duration of each group were 14.5 points and 77.6 months in AR, 12.1 point and 51.1 months in NAR, and 17.7 point and 106.0 months in LAR, respectively. There were no significant differences in the baseline nasal symptom score of the three groups. However, after NPT with HDM, the score of rhinitis, itching, and obstructive were 4.83±1.47 vs. 1.95±2.53, 3.00±2.10 vs. 1.45±2.06, and 5.50±1.38 vs. 2.57±2.84 in LAR and NAR, respectively (p<0.05). LAR patients had longer duration of disease and tended to be older and have higher medication score than other rhinitis patients. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017.

  12. [Non-allergic chronic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacre Hazouri, José Antonio

    2010-01-01

    To review the existent literature regarding non-allergic rhinitis. PubMed search was performed using the key words: non-allergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis, irritant rhinitis, idiopathic rhinitis, chronic rhinopathy, nociceptive dysfunction, capsaicin, entopy. Articles were selected based on their relevance to this review. Chronic rhinitis affects up to 20% of the general population. The term rhinitis (inflammation of the nasal mucosal membrane) is used in daily practice for nasal dysfunction causing symptoms like nasal itching, sneezing, rhinorrhea, and or nasal blockage. When allergy, mechanical obstruction, and infections have been excluded as the cause of rhinitis, a number of poorly defined nasal conditions of partly unknown etiology and pathophysiology remain. The differential diagnosis of non-allergic noninfectious rhinitis is extensive. If the pathophysiology is unknown, the term idiopathic rhinitis is used as well as vasomotor rhinitis. This term has been recently questioned and the term non-allergic rhinopathy has been proposed with the subsequent definition and inclusion criteria delineated; other forms include irritative-toxic (occupational) rhinitis, hormonal rhinitis, drug-induced rhinitis, non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome, rhinitis due to physical and chemical factors, food-induced rhinitis, emotion-induced rhinitis, atrophic rhinitis. The number of patients with non-allergic, non-infectious rhinitis as a known cause or precipitant factor has increased in the last years. Nevertheless, 50% of the patients have to be classified as non-allergic rhinitis, known today as non-allergic rhinopathy. It's important for this group of patients to be evaluated by an expert in Rhinology and Allergy to determine the best possible treatment.

  13. Allergen immunotherapy for house dust mite: clinical efficacy and immunological mechanisms in allergic rhinitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifan, Aarif O; Calderon, Moises A; Durham, Stephen R

    2013-11-01

    There is an increasing prevalence of atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma with house dust mite (HDM) being the common allergen that is highly associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. Allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy are part of treatment but it has proved difficult to change the course of HDM-related allergic diseases. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been in use for the past century and has been shown to be effective in the treatment of allergic respiratory disease. This review exclusively focuses on HDM-AIT and discusses the differences in clinical efficacy and safety, long-term effect after discontinuation and immunological changes observed in both HDM-subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and HDM-sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma in both pediatric and adult populations. The majority of studies involved small numbers of patients, variable doses of major allergens and are of variable quality. There is good evidence for HDM-SCIT efficacy and its long-term effect in adults and children, whereas at the present time, evidence for HDM-SLIT is unconvincing, particularly in children. In carefully selected patients, HDM-SCIT is effective and safe. More definitive trials are needed before HDM-SLIT can be recommended in routine practice for rhinitis and/or asthma.

  14. Food-induced Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hasan Bemanian; Saba Arshi; Mohammad Nabavi

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy is estimated about 8% in children. The relationship between food and manifestation of allergy symptoms and its confirmation for accurate diagnosis is very important. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with a prevalence of 40% among different societies. The prevalence of food-induced allergic rhinitis appears to be less than 1 percent. Food reactions often lead to rhinitis symptoms at a no immunologic nature. Although the role of food and fruits in developing allergic rhinitis ...

  15. Allergic rhinitis in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and is also associated with co-morbidities such as sinusitis, otitis media ... nose, chronic infective sinusitis and nasal polyps may mimic the signs .... fungal spores. Gauteng. Add: tree pollen (cypress). Farming areas. Add: Zea mays, horse, Blomia tropicalis. Table ii. Effect of medications on symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

  16. Japanese guidelines for allergic rhinitis 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Kimihiro; Kurono, Yuichi; Ichimura, Keiichi; Enomoto, Tadao; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Suzaki, Harumi; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Masuyama, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    Like asthma and atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis is an allergic disease, but of the three, it is the only type I allergic disease. Allergic rhinitis includes pollinosis, which is intractable and reduces quality of life (QOL) when it becomes severe. A guideline is needed to understand allergic rhinitis and to use this knowledge to develop a treatment plan. In Japan, the first guideline was prepared after a symposium held by the Japanese Society of Allergology in 1993. The current 8th edition was published in 2016, and is widely used today. To incorporate evidence based medicine (EBM) introduced from abroad, the most recent collection of evidence/literature was supplemented to the Practical Guideline for the Management of Allergic Rhinitis in Japan 2016. The revised guideline includes assessment of diagnosis/treatment and prescriptions for children and pregnant women, for broad clinical applications. An evidence-based step-by-step strategy for treatment is also described. In addition, the QOL concept and cost benefit analyses are also addressed. Along with Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact of Asthma (ARIA), this guideline is widely used for various clinical purposes, such as measures for patients with sinusitis, childhood allergic rhinitis, oral allergy syndrome, and anaphylaxis and for pregnant women. A Q&A section regarding allergic rhinitis in Japan was added to the end of this guideline. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Allergic rhinitis - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay fever - self-care; Seasonal rhinitis - self-care; Allergies - allergic rhinitis - self-care ... in a row. Talk to your child's health care provider before giving your child decongestants. Nasal corticosteroid ...

  18. Immunotherapy in Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hulya Anil; Koray Harmanci

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an immunologic disorder that develops in individuals who have produced allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in response to environmental exposures (most commonly to pollens, animal dander, insect debris, and molds). For patients with a severe allergy that is not responsive to environmental controls and pharmacotherapy or for those who do not wish to use medication for a lifetime, immunotherapy may be offered. Specific immunotherapy as practiced since hundred years in Wester...

  19. Allergic Rhinitis in Children: Principles of Early Diagnosis and Effective Therapy. Overview of Clinical Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Baranov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly summarizes the key provisions of the clinical recommendations on medical care delivery for children with allergic rhinitis: modern approaches to diagnosis and therapy. The current document was developed by the professional association of pediatric specialists —the Union of Pediatricians of Russia — together with the leading experts of the Russian Association of Allergists and Clinical Immunologists. The recommendations are regularly updated due to the latest evidence-based results of effectiveness and safety of various medical interventions. The article presents information on the epidemiology of allergic rhinitis in children, specific diagnostic features which provide the opportunity for the timely and correct diagnosis and an effective therapy with personal approach.

  20. Autonomic dysfunction and clinical severity of disease in children with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, Ozkaya; Esra, Gursoy; Ufuk, Erenberk; Demiri, Aysegül; Ayhan, Sogut; Rusen, Dundaroz M

    2012-08-01

    The involvement of autonomic imbalance has been reported in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. To investigate the association between the clinical severity of childhood allergic rhinitis and autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, to define whether the severity of disease correlates with ANS activity. In this cross-sectional, case-control study, we evaluated the ANS testing by measuring sympathetic skin response (SRR) and heart rate (R-R) interval variation (RRIV) in 55 children with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR), aged 7-12 yrs without any chronic co-morbidity, and the results were compared with 40 sex- and age-matched control subjects. The patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of allergic rhinitis. There were significant increase in calculated RRIV variables during at rest and deep breathing in children with PAR compared to controls, which reflect parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity (p0.05). Lower RRIV and the prolonged SSR latencies in children with AR were closely correlated with disease severity (r=-0.65, p<0.05, and r=-0.59, p<0.05 respectively). Combined use of these two tests, allows separate testing of PNS and SNS function, and are very sensitive methods in assessing of severity of disease in children with PAR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical evaluation of sublingual administration of dust mite drops in the treatment of allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, G-Q; Jiang, W-H; Wu, P-Q; He, C-H; Chen, R-S; Deng, L

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on evaluating the clinical effects of sublingual dust mite drops for the treatment of allergic asthma in children. 156 pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma were randomly divided into control and observation groups (78 cases each). For the control group the standard global initiative for asthma (GINA) asthma control scheme was adopted; meanwhile, the observation group patients received the standard GINA combined with sublingual administration of dust mite drops, once per day, gradually increasing the dose to reach a high maintenance level. After six months the sublingual drops were stopped and then the effects of the treatments on both groups of patients were compared. The symptoms of asthma and rhinitis in the daytime and nighttime for both groups decreased gradually with time. However, the observation group's outcome at the 6th, 12th and 24th month were significantly better than those of the control group (p 0.05). But at the 24th month, the observation group had significantly higher rates of complete and good control (p 0.05); however, the levels of IL-2 increased gradually and improved more in the observation group (p allergic rhinitis and asthma can improve clinical symptoms, increase the efficiency rate and increase the serum IL-2 level, and does not cause an increase in adverse reactions or IgE levels in treated children.

  2. Prevalence of Aeroallergens in Allergic Rhinitis in Shiraz

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Kashef; Mohammad Amin Kashef; Fardin Eghtedari

    2003-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an extremely common disease worldwide. Aeroallergens are very often involved in allergic rhinitis and their prevalence may vary in differ¬ent regions. The causative allergens of allergic rhinitis in our area are unknown.The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of skin reactivity to different aeroallergens in patients with allergic rhinitis in the city of Shiraz, Iran.A total of 212 patients who were referred to Motahari Allergy Clinic with chronic rhi...

  3. SQ house dust mite (HDM) SLIT-tablet provides clinical improvement in HDM-induced allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimek, Ludger; Mosbech, Holger; Zieglmayer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergy represents a highly prevalent inhalant allergy, and exposure to HDM allergens results in allergic rhinitis with persistent symptoms that may not be adequately controlled with available allergy pharmacotherapy. Allergy immunotherapy constitutes a complementary treatme...... provide a review of the clinical data behind the SQ HDM SLIT-tablet, which was recently approved for the treatment of HDM-induced allergic rhinitis by regulatory authorities in Europe and Japan....

  4. The Clinical Observations of 2 case of Allergic Rhinitis treated with Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and acupuncture therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae-Hong

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Obejective : This is a clinical report about allergic rhinitis patients. Method : The two patients were treated by Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and needle acupuncture together from June 2007 to September 2007. Result : As using these treatments, all patients decreased in sneezing, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion notably. And further, all patients had no side effects. Conclusion : The results suggest that Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture and needle acupuncture have an useful effect on allergic rhinitis patients.

  5. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Local Allergic Rhinitis in Children Sensitized to House Dust Mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Eun Kyo; Na, Min Sun; Lee, Shinhae; Baek, Heysung; Lee, Seung Jin; Sheen, Youn Ho; Jung, Young-Ho; Lee, Kyung Suk; Kim, Mi Ae; Jee, Hye Mi; Han, Man Yong

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of local allergic rhinitis (LAR) in nonatopic children remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and severity of LAR in children in comparison to classical allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). A total of 145 children (aged 1-18 years) were enrolled and classified into 3 groups (AR, NAR, and LAR) based on a skin prick test (SPT) and a nasal provocation test (NPT) with house dust mite, i.e., Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. NPT positivity was defined as a symptom score ≥2 standard deviations (SDs) above the healthy control score. Eighty-one children had AR (55.9%), and 64 (44.1%) had symptoms of rhinitis with negative SPT; 59 NAR (40.7%) and 5 LAR (3.4%) children were identified. The κ score for agreement between the SPT and the NPT results was 0.778 (95% CI 0.726-0.830, p LAR > NAR, p = 0.003). Despite the evidence to support the existence of LAR in pediatric populations, we found that its prevalence was relatively low, possibly due to the high rate of agreement between SPT and NPT. Further investigations are needed to identify immunological as well as clinical implications of LAR. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Clinical Question: Nasal saline or intranasal corticosteroids to treat allergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Stefani; Brown, Elizabeth Aubrey; Franklin, Rachel; Wickersham, Elizabeth A; McCarthy, Laine H

    2016-01-01

    In pediatric populations, is nasal saline irrigation as effective as intranasal corticosteroids at relieving allergic rhinitis symptoms? No. Intranasal steroids are more effective than nasal saline alone to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR) in children. Combination therapy further improves symptom reduction. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE FOR THE ANSWER: B SEARCH TERMS: Allergic Rhinitis, Nasal Saline, Nasal corticosteroids, children younger than age 18. DATE SEARCH WAS CONDUCTED: August and September 2014, October 2015. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohort studies, nasal spray, hypertonic saline solution, nasal lavage, rhinitis, intranasal administration, nasal saline, human, English language. Antihistamines, Adults, Articles older than 2008.

  7. Association of Allergic Rhinitis and Sinusitis with Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakkannan, Selva Kumar; Singh, Meenu; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Mathew, Joseph L; Saxena, Akshay Kumar

    2017-01-15

    To study the point prevalence of allergic rhinitis and sinusitis in childhood asthma and to examine the relationship among them. In 250 children (age allergic rhinitis was diagnosed by clinical plus nasal eosinophilia criteria, and sinusitis was diagnosed clinically plus confirmation by computerized tomography scan. The point prevalence of allergic rhinitis was 13.6%, and of sinusitis was 2%. On multivariate analysis, allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, and family history were significantly associated with asthma severity. Allergic rhinitis is common in childhood asthama, but sinusitis is rare.

  8. [Allergic rhinitis and food allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Mieczysława; Brazowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Atopic diseases are a serious problem of current medicine due to epidemiological range. It also concerns allergic rhinitis and food allergy. Associations between allergic rhinitis and food allergy is still a developing subject and literature concerning its relationship is not to numerous. A short literature review of studies and reviews concerning the above subject was performed. Differences of epidemiological data concerning the association between allergic rhinitis and food allergy were presented and pathophysiology of this correlation is not precisely known. Nevertheless conclusion can be made that in cases of allergic rhinitis with diagnostic difficulties, food allergens can be taken into consideration as possible etiologic factors. Problem of correlation between allergic rhinitis and food allergy is an open subject and there is a need for further studies.

  9. Local cytokines and clinical symptoms in children with allergic rhinitis after different treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesmar RS Segundo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Gesmar RS Segundo1, Fabíola A Gomes2, Karla P Fernandes1, Ronaldo Alves3, Deise AO Silva3, Ernesto A Taketomi31Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Nursery, 3Laboratory of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Uberlandia, BrazilBackground: Therapy for allergic rhinitis aims to control symptoms and improve the quality of life. The treatment of allergic rhinitis includes allergen avoidance, environmental controls, pharmacologic treatment, and specific immunotherapy.Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical changes and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin-5 (IL-5 in nasal lavage fluid from children with allergic rhinitis after different types of pharmacologic treatment (mometasone, montelukast, or desloratadine.Methods: Twenty-four children aged from six to 12 years with moderate persistent allergic rhinitis were randomized into three groups receiving monotherapy treatment over four weeks: nasal corticosteroid (mometasone, leukotriene modifier (montelukast, or antihistamine (desloratadine. The perception of symptom improvement during the medication use was evaluated at the end of the treatment. Samples of nasal lavage fluid were collected before and after treatment for measuring IFN-γ and IL-5 cytokines by ELISA.Results: All parents perceived an improvement in symptoms. Significant enhancement was seen in the mometasone group compared to those with montelukast (P = 0.01 and desloratadine (P = 0.02. No significant differences were found among the three groups in the levels of IL-5 and IFN-γ in nasal fluid at baseline or after treatment. Only the group treated with mometasone showed a slight but significant reduction in IL-5 levels after the treatment period as compared with levels before the treatment (P = 0.0469.Conclusion: The group treated with mometasone showed better improvement of clinical symptoms and a slight reduction in IL-5 levels in the nasal fluid. This may

  10. Japanese guidelines for allergic rhinitis 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Okubo

    2017-04-01

    To incorporate evidence based medicine (EBM introduced from abroad, the most recent collection of evidence/literature was supplemented to the Practical Guideline for the Management of Allergic Rhinitis in Japan 2016. The revised guideline includes assessment of diagnosis/treatment and prescriptions for children and pregnant women, for broad clinical applications. An evidence-based step-by-step strategy for treatment is also described. In addition, the QOL concept and cost benefit analyses are also addressed. Along with Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact of Asthma (ARIA, this guideline is widely used for various clinical purposes, such as measures for patients with sinusitis, childhood allergic rhinitis, oral allergy syndrome, and anaphylaxis and for pregnant women. A Q&A section regarding allergic rhinitis in Japan was added to the end of this guideline.

  11. Clinical manifestations of allergic rhinitis in children at Denpasar Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Adhianto

    2001-06-01

    (12%.. Four children had history of atopic dermatitis, 1 food allergy, 10 asthma, 3 urticaria, 2 drug allaaaergy, 4 h-ad history of both atopic dermatitis and urticaria, 13 both asthma and urticaria, 2 both asthma and drug allergy and 6 children had no history of allergic diseases. Thirty three (60% one of the parents and 12 (21.8% both parents ever had allergic diseases. According to SPT, 27 (55.1% of this children had positive reaction to inhalant allergen, 13 (26.5% to food allergen and 13 (26.5% had negative reaction.

  12. Study of Allergic Rhinitis in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Balatsouras, Dimitrios G.; Koukoutsis, George; Ganelis, Panayotis; Fassolis, Alexandros; Korres, George S.; Kaberos, Antonis

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is common among children and quite often represents a stage of the atopic march. Although sensitization to food and airborne allergens may appear in infancy and early childhood, symptoms of the disease are usually present after age 3. The aim of this study was to determine the most frequent food and indoor and outdoor respiratory allergens involved in allergic rhinitis in children in the region of Piraeus. The study was performed in the outpatient clinic of otolaryngologic a...

  13. Remission of allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Linneberg, Allan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis (AR) and sensitization are considered chronic conditions. However, few studies have reported remission rates in adults. OBJECTIVE: We sought to estimate the incidence of remission of AR during an 8-year period. METHODS: Participants in a population-based study of 15......- to 69-year-old patients in 1990 were invited to a follow-up in 1998. Questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and serum for specific IgE (s-IgE) analyses were collected at both visits in 734 subjects (69% of those invited). Pollen AR was defined as rhinitis symptoms on pollen exposure within the last 12...... months and s-IgE levels of class 2 or greater against pollen (birch, grass, or mugwort). This was similar for AR to animals (cat or dog) or house dust mites (HDMs). Remission of AR was defined as AR at baseline but no rhinitis symptoms at follow-up and sensitization (s-IgE level class > or =2 at baseline...

  14. The incidence of Common Allergens in Patients with Allergic Rhinitis Referred to Shahid Mofatteh Clinic, Yasuj, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Nabavizadeh

    2013-12-01

    Background & Aim: Allergic diseases are one of the most common diseases which are more prevalent in certain seasons. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory and food allergies to common allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 184 patients including 120 males and 64 females referred to the Shahid Mofatteh Clinic with the respiratory allergy symptoms including rhinitis, sneezing and coughing during 2012-2013. Data collection, checklist registered, including demographic information and data associated with sensitivity of skin prick test of 21 allergens were selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical. Results: A number of 153 patients (83.2% were allergic to one or more of the 21 allergens tested, whereas 31 patients (16.8 of them showed no sensitivity. The most common allergic reactions to insect allergens were 73 cases (47.7%, grass and turf 58 cases (37.9% percent, Beetle 55 cases (35.9%, wheat flour, 51 (33.3% walnuts, 37 (24.4% and cat fur 36 (5/23.5% respectively.. Conclusion: Susceptibility to insects, beetles and grass had the highest prevalence in patients with allergic rhinitis referred to Super Specialized clinic in Yasuj. Because susceptibility to allergens depends on the environment, therefore, being aware of them can lead to avoidance and control allergic reactions. Key words: Allergic Disease, Skin Prick Test, Rhinitis

  15. Allergic rhinitis and asthma: the link further unraveled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunstahl, Gert-Jan; Hellings, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    Allergic asthma and rhinitis are manifestations of the atopic syndrome. Although the diseases commonly occur together, it is still unclear why some allergic patients develop only asthma and others only rhinitis. The reason for the variety in clinical expression of allergic airway disease is not

  16. Cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli Del Giudice, Alessandro; Barbara, Michele; Russo, Giuseppe Maria; Fiocca Matthews, Emily; Cassano, Michele

    2012-12-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis is a heterogeneous disease whose etiology is largely unknown. Nasal cytology only allows us to recognize different non-allergic rhinitis forms on the basis of the prevalent inflammatory cell infiltrate: non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils, with neutrophils, with mast-cells and with both eosinophils and mast-cells. The aim of this study is to define the incidence, clinical features and comorbidity of the different types of cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in a pediatric age group. One hundred and fourteen non-allergic children with chronic nasal obstruction and associated symptoms (rhinorrhea, sneezing and nasal itchiness) were retrospectively selected. All patients had been submitted to a clinical history, pediatric evaluation, anterior rhinoscopy and fiberendoscopy, rhinomanometry and nasal cytology. Non-allergic rhinitis with neutrophils was present in 46 (40.4%) children, non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in 53 (46.5%), non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells in 12 (10.5%) and non-allergic rhinitis with both eosinophils and mast-cells in 3 (2.6%). Nasal obstruction was prevalent in non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils and in non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells patients (Pallergic rhinitis with eosinophils group showed a higher probability of asthma (Ppediatric age group the most frequent forms of non-allergic rhinitis are those with eosinophils or with neutrophils. A diagnosis of non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in children presumes more severe symptoms and a higher incidence of pulmonary disease and roncopathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Clinical and Immunological Responses: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study in Children with Allergic Rhinitis due to House Dust Mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, H.; van Wijk, R.G.; Hendriks, R.W.; van der Wouden, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Allergic rhinitis is a disease with polarization towards Thand a defect of regulatory T cells. Immunological changes have been reported after immunotherapy treatment. However, there is not much known about the natural course of allergic rhinitis with respect to clinical manifestation and

  18. Allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: relationship with nasal polyposis, asthma and family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Tafuri, S; Passalacqua, G; Quaranta, N

    2014-02-01

    Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (with/without polyposis), either allergic or non-allergic, represent a major medical problem. Their associated comorbidities and relationship with family history have so far been poorly investigated. We assessed these aspects in a large population of patients suffering from rhinosinusal diseases. Clinical history, nasal cytology, allergy testing and direct nasal examination were performed in all patients referred for rhinitis/rhinosinusitis. Fibre optic nasal endoscopy, CT scan and nasal challenge were used for diagnosis, when indicated. A total of 455 patients (60.7% male, age range 4-84 years) were studied; 108 (23.7%) had allergic rhinitis, 128 (28.1%) rhinosinusitis with polyposis, 107 (23.5%) non-allergic rhinitis (negative skin test); 112 patients had associated allergic and non-allergic rhinitis, the majority with eosinophilia. There was a significant association between non-allergic rhinitis and family history of nasal polyposis (OR = 4.45; 95%CI = 1.70-11.61; p = 0.0019), whereas this association was no longer present when allergic rhinitis was also included. Asthma was equally frequent in non-allergic and allergic rhinitis, but more frequent in patients with polyposis. Aspirin sensitivity was more frequent in nasal polyposis, independent of the allergic (p = 0.03) or non-allergic (p = 0.01) nature of rhinitis. Nasal polyposis is significantly associated with asthma and positive family history of asthma, partially independent of the allergic aetiology of rhinitis.

  19. A prospective, clinical study on asymptomatic sensitisation and development of allergic rhinitis: high negative predictive value of allergological testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodtger, Uffe; Assing, Kristian; Poulsen, Lars K

    2011-01-01

    performed a prospective, clinical, non-interventional, 2-year follow-up study on subjects (identified by population screening) with seasonal allergic birch or grass pollen rhinitis (n = 52), asymptomatic sensitisation to grass or birch (AS, n = 52) or non-atopic, healthy control subjects (n = 39...

  20. Multi-morbidities of allergic rhinitis in adults: European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cingi, C.; Gevaert, P.; Mösges, R.; Rondon, C.; Hox, V.; Rudenko, M.; Muluk, N. B.; Scadding, G.; Manole, F.; Hupin, C.; Fokkens, W. J.; Akdis, C.; Bachert, C.; Demoly, P.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Pawankar, R.; Rombaux, P.; Toskala, E.; Kalogjera, L.; Prokopakis, E.; Hellings, P. W.; Bousquet, J.

    2017-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force on Allergic Rhinitis (AR) comorbidities. The aim of this multidisciplinary European consensus document is to highlight the role of multimorbidities in the definition, classification, mechanisms,

  1. Evaluation of olfactory function in children with allergic rhinitis and nonallergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlug, Seyhan; Gunbey, Emre; Sogut, Ayhan; Celiksoy, Mehmet Halil; Kardas, Semsettin; Yildirim, Ugur; Karli, Rifat; Murat, Naci; Sancak, Recep

    2016-07-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) occurs when the symptoms of rhinitis arise as a result of allergen-induced nasal mucosal inflammation. In the presence of rhinitis symptoms without infection or an allergic reaction in the nose, non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) is considered. Adults with these diseases have increased frequency of olfactory dysfunction. The aim of the present study is to assess olfactory function in children with AR and NAR. A total of 77 children (aged six to 18 years) with AR and NAR were included in the study. The control group consisted of 45 healthy children. Sniffin' Sticks test was applied to both groups. The association between odor scores and demographic, clinical, and laboratory results was investigated. Forty two patients had allergic rhinitis. No significant difference was observed between patients with rhinitis and healthy controls with respect to odor scores. No association was observed between odor scores and the severity of rhinitis and the laboratory results of the patient groups. Odor identification and total odor scores of the patients with rhinitis lasting for longer than three years were significantly lower than those in the patient group with rhinitis lasting for one to three years. In the AR and control groups, the odor scores were found to increase with age. When compared with healthy children, children with allergic rhinitis and non-allergic rhinitis were not found to have reduced olfactory function. The duration of rhinitis may be associated with the olfactory dysfunction in children with rhinitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Clinical analysis of allergic rhinitis in children between 1 and 3 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei-li; Zhang, Jie; Pan, Yue-song; Chen, Min; Zhang, Ya-mei

    2011-11-01

    To study the atopy spectrum and its related factors in 1 to 3 years old children with allergic rhinitis. Ninety-six children with allergic rhinitis, aged between 1 and 3 years old, referred to ENT department of Beijing Children's Hospital between August 2009 and November 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were recorded for patients' age, age stratification, sex, the age of first symptom, the duration of history, and the allergic history of children, the allergic history of parents. The screening tests on inhalant and food allergens were conducted by immunoblot assay using the Allergy Screen system. The total serum IgE level was also measured. The distribution of the inhalant and food allergens was summarized. The influence of the clinical characteristics was analyzed according to the age subgroup determined by month, allergen category and positiveness of eczema or asthma. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship of clinical characteristics and allergen spectrum. The total positive rates of allergic screening test rate were 81.3%. The inhalant and food allergens were 62.5% and 53.1% respectively. The commonest allergy was mixed fungal (50.0%), followed by milk (34.4%), lamb (31.3%), beef (26.0%), dust mite (21.0%), wheat (18.8%), mugwort (12.5%), egg white or egg yolk (11.5%).62.5% of patients could be diagnosed as AR, the remaining could be diagnosed temporarily as non-allergic rhinitis temporarily. Single factor analysis of clinical characteristics in different subgroup determined by month showed that: inhalant allergen (positive/negative) (χ2=13.699, P=0.001), father suffered from AR (χ2=14.060, P=0.001), and father or mother suffered from AR (χ2=7.396, P=0.025) were statistically significant at three monthly age groups. The personal history of eczema (OR=3.143, P=0.034) might increase the possibility of sensitization to allergens. The personal history of eczema (OR=3.125, P=0.015) and the total serum IgE level>200 IU/ml (OR=3.119, P=0

  3. Environmental allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M.S.; Bokhari, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to find out the common environmental allergens responsible for sensitivity in patients with allergic rhinitis. Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: A local allergy clinic in an urban area of Lahore during the year 2000-2001. Subjects and Methods: Eighty patients with allergic rhinitis irrespective of age and sex were studied. These cases were selected on the basis of symptoms like sneezing, itching, watery nasal discharge and eosinophilia in nasal secretions. Forty matched healthy subjects as controls were also studied. Allergy test was performed on all the subjects by skin prick test to determine sensitivity to common environmental allergens using Bencard (England) allergy kit. Results: common environmental allergens responsible for sensitivity in allergic rhinitis patients were house dust (82.5 %), house dust mites (73.7%), mixed threshing (80%), straw dust (58.7%, hay dust (63.7%), mixed feathers (45%), cat fur (57.5%), cotton flock (56.2%), tree pollens (45%) and grass pollens (48.7%). Sensitivity to these allergens was observed in significantly higher (P<0.01) percentage of allergic rhinitis patients as compared with control subjects. Sensitivity to house dust, house dust mites and cat fur was of severe degree in majority of allergic rhinitis patients. While sensitivity to mixed threshing, straw dust, hay dust and mixed feathers was of moderate to severe degree in majority of these patients. Conclusion: Skin prick tests provide an effective and definitive mean to find out sensitivity to different allergens in cases with allergic rhinitis. Based on these findings, the physician can manage these patients in better way. (author)

  4. Allergic Rhinitis in Preschool Children and the Clinical Utility of FeNO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jisun; Choi, Yean Jung; Lee, Eun; Cho, Hyun Ju; Yang, Song I; Kim, Young Ho; Jung, Young Ho; Seo, Ju Hee; Kwon, Ji Won; Kim, Hyo Bin; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Bong Seong; Shim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, Joo Shil; Hong, Soo Jong

    2017-07-01

    The nature of allergic rhinitis (AR) in preschool aged children remains incompletely characterized. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of AR and its associated risk factors in preschool-aged children and to assess the clinical utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). This general population-based, cross-sectional survey included 933 preschool-aged (3- to 7-year-old) children from Korea. Current AR was defined as having nasal symptoms within the last 12 months and physician-diagnosed AR. The prevalence of current AR in preschool children was 17.0% (156/919). Mold exposure (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-2.43) and the use of antibiotics (aOR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.33-2.90) during infancy were associated with an increased risk of current AR, whereas having an older sibling (aOR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.35-0.75) reduced the risk. Children with current atopic AR had significantly higher geometric mean levels of FeNO compared to those with non-atopic rhinitis (12.43; range of 1standard deviation [SD], 7.31-21.14 vs 8.25; range of 1SD, 5.62-12.10, P=0.001) or non-atopic healthy children (8.58; range of 1SD, 5.51-13.38, Ppreschool children.

  5. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo

    2011-01-01

    understood and there is a paucity of data objectivizing this association in young children. The aim of this thesis was to describe pathology in the upper and lower airways in young children from the COPSAC birth cohort with investigator-diagnosed allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis. Nasal congestion is a key...... nasal eosinophilia albeit less than children with allergic rhinitis. These findings suggest different pathology in allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis which may have important clinical implications for early pharmacological treatment of rhinitis in young children. In paper II, we utilized the nasal...

  6. Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients with Allergic Rhinitis treated at the Medical Clinic of Integrated Education – Unisul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekanski, Mariana; Marcelino, Taíse de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction  Allergic rhinitis is a common disease among children and adolescents, reaching up to 40% of the population. During childhood, it is usually underdiagnosed because it has nonspecific symptoms. It has a negative impact on quality of life and may predispose to comorbidities. The diagnosis is clinical and treatment aims prevention. Objective  The objective of this study is to evaluate the quality of life in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods This is an observational study with cross-sectional design. The population consisted of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis treated at the Medical Clinic of Integrated Education (MCIE) – Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina - Unisul, Tubarão, SC, Brazil. We collected data from March to June 2016 through the application of the Sociodemographic and Health Questionnaire, rhinitis module of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Questionnaire and the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire Modified. Results  Out of the 69 respondents, 52.2% were boys with a mean age of 10.13 years old. The predominant education level of parents/guardians was incomplete second grade and average income level was two minimum wages. 81.2% said they had previous treatment for AR, 30.4% had asthma and 7.2% eczema. Incidence of patients smoking was absent and family (parents/guardians) smoking was 17.4%. March to July were the months of highest symptom occurrence, slightly disturbing daily activities. The mean value of severity was 51.9, nasal symptoms were the most uncomfortable, and nasal itchiness was the most cited. Conclusion  Our results highlight that allergic symptoms negatively impact the life of people with allergic rhinitis, with a predominance of nasal symptoms, especially nasal itchy, representing a poor quality of life of the interviewed. PMID:29018501

  7. Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients with Allergic Rhinitis treated at the Medical Clinic of Integrated Education - Unisul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekanski, Mariana; Marcelino, Taíse de Freitas

    2017-10-01

    Introduction  Allergic rhinitis is a common disease among children and adolescents, reaching up to 40% of the population. During childhood, it is usually underdiagnosed because it has nonspecific symptoms. It has a negative impact on quality of life and may predispose to comorbidities. The diagnosis is clinical and treatment aims prevention. Objective  The objective of this study is to evaluate the quality of life in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods This is an observational study with cross-sectional design. The population consisted of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis treated at the Medical Clinic of Integrated Education (MCIE) - Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina - Unisul, Tubarão, SC, Brazil. We collected data from March to June 2016 through the application of the Sociodemographic and Health Questionnaire, rhinitis module of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Questionnaire and the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire Modified. Results  Out of the 69 respondents, 52.2% were boys with a mean age of 10.13 years old. The predominant education level of parents/guardians was incomplete second grade and average income level was two minimum wages. 81.2% said they had previous treatment for AR, 30.4% had asthma and 7.2% eczema. Incidence of patients smoking was absent and family (parents/guardians) smoking was 17.4%. March to July were the months of highest symptom occurrence, slightly disturbing daily activities. The mean value of severity was 51.9, nasal symptoms were the most uncomfortable, and nasal itchiness was the most cited. Conclusion  Our results highlight that allergic symptoms negatively impact the life of people with allergic rhinitis, with a predominance of nasal symptoms, especially nasal itchy, representing a poor quality of life of the interviewed.

  8. Demographics and clinical features predictive of allergic versus non-allergic rhinitis in children aged 6-18 years: A single-center experience of 1535 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mantia, Ignazio; Andaloro, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    Chronic rhinitis (CR) is one of the most common causes accounting for lost-school days, absenteeism and resource utilization in pediatric patients. Distinction between common causes of CR, allergic (AR)and non-allergic rhinitis (NAR), based upon clinical features is critical, especially in primary care settings or facilities with lack of allergen sensitivity testing, as management strategies differ considerably. The current study elucidates clinical factors, particularly facial features associated with AR and NAR using a large cohort. In a retrospective cohort analysis of pediatric patients aged 6-18 years, we assessed patient demographics, clinical symptoms, and signs associated with allergic rhinitis using multivariable regression techniques. Overall, 1490 patients (mean age: 10.11 ± 3.31 years; 48% female; 69% AR and 31% NAR) were included in the study. In multivariable regression analysis, major clinical features associated with AR were: sneezing (OR: 3.53; 95% CI: 2.35-5.32; p rhinitis, facial hallmarks serve as an adjunct to sensitivity testing in establishing a diagnosis as well as differentiating between NAR from AR, albeit individualized upon patient history and clinical features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rhinophototherapy in persistent allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Zsolt; Kiricsi, Ágnes; Viharosné, Éva Dósa-Rácz; Dallos, Attila; Perényi, Ádám; Kiss, Mária; Koreck, Andrea; Kemény, Lajos; Jóri, József; Rovó, László; Kadocsa, Edit

    2017-03-01

    Previous published results have revealed that Rhinolight ® intranasal phototherapy is safe and effective in intermittent allergic rhinitis. The present objective was to assess whether phototherapy is also safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis. Thirty-four patients with persistent allergic rhinitis were randomized into two groups; twenty-five subjects completed the study. The Rhinolight ® group was treated with a combination of UV-B, UV-A, and high-intensity visible light, while the placebo group received low-intensity visible white light intranasal phototherapy on a total of 13 occasions in 6 weeks. The assessment was based on the diary of symptoms, nasal inspiratory peak flow, quantitative smell threshold, mucociliary transport function, and ICAM-1 expression of the epithelial cells. All nasal symptom scores and nasal inspiratory peak flow measurements improved significantly in the Rhinolight ® group relative to the placebo group and this finding persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. The smell and mucociliary functions did not change significantly in either group. The number of ICAM-1 positive cells decreased non-significantly in the Rhinolight ® group. No severe side-effects were reported during the treatment period. These results suggest that Rhinolight ® treatment is safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis.

  10. Vitamin D serum levels in allergic rhinitis: any difference from normal population?

    OpenAIRE

    Arshi, Saba; Ghalehbaghi, Babak; Kamrava, Seyyed-Kamran; Aminlou, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently it has been suggested that, the worldwide increase in allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy is associated with low vitamin D intake. Objective This study measured the vitamin D levels in patients with allergic rhinitis and compared the results with the general population. Methods Vitamin D levels were assessed in 50 patients with allergic rhinitis diagnosed clinically by Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma 2008 criteria and the result ...

  11. Nasal hyperreactivity and inflammation in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Garrelds

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of allergic disease goes back to 1819, when Bostock described his own ‘periodical affection of the eyes and chest’, which he called ‘summer catarrh’. Since they thought it was produced by the effluvium of new hay, this condition was also called hay fever. Later, in 1873, Blackley established that pollen played an important role in the causation of hay fever. Nowadays, the definition of allergy is ‘An untoward physiologic event mediated by a variety of different immunologic reactions’. In this review, the term allergy will be restricted to the IgE-dependent reactions. The most important clinical manifestations of IgE-dependent reactions are allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, this review will be restricted to allergic rhinitis. The histopathological features of allergic inflammation involve an increase in blood flow and vascular permeability, leading to plasma exudation and the formation of oedema. In addition, a cascade of events occurs which involves a variety of inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells migrate under the influence of chemotactic agents to the site of injury and induce the process of repair. Several types of inflammatory cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. After specific or nonspecific stimuli, inflammatory mediators are generated from cells normally found in the nose, such as mast cells, antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells (primary effector cells and from cells recruited into the nose, such as basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, platelets and neutrophils (secondary effector cells. This review describes the identification of each of the inflammatory cells and their mediators which play a role in the perennial allergic processes in the nose of rhinitis patients.

  12. The link between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Henrik Nielsen, N; Frølund, L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma are manifestations of the same disease entity. We aimed to investigate the relationship between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. METHODS: Participants in a population-based study of 15-69-year-olds in 1990 were ...

  13. Pollen food syndrome amongst children with seasonal allergic rhinitis attending allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludman, Sian; Jafari-Mamaghani, Mehrdad; Ebling, Rosemary; Fox, Adam T; Lack, Gideon; Du Toit, George

    2016-03-01

    There is limited information regarding the onset and sensitization patterns of pollen food syndrome (PFS) in children. The aim was to explore this within children referred to a specialist allergy clinic at a London Tertiary Hospital. A total of 54 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) were enrolled in equal numbers in three age groups; 0-5, 6-10, 11-15 years. Families completed a questionnaire on rhinitis, food symptoms and quality of life. Children underwent skin prick testing (SPT) to fresh fruits, nuts and a blood test for microarray analysis. Clinical diagnosis of PFS was made in 26/54 (48%), increasing with age (group 1 = 3 (17%), group 2 = 9 (50%), group 3 = 14 (78%) (p = 0.03)). Microarray demonstrates children aged 2.8 years sensitized to pan-allergens and 4.5 years symptomatic to pan-allergens. Peach, cherry, carrot and strawberry SPT had the highest sensitivity and NPV at 100%. The sensitivity of PR10 molecules on microarray was 92%, PPV 62% and NPV 87%. Microarray confirmed 69% of allergens on clinical history compared to 61% by SPT. Microarray and SPT had a 19% false-negative rate. The quality-of-life data showed moderate impact across all domains, and patients with PFS were significantly more likely to have increased anxiety over time spent preparing food (p = 0.029). We demonstrate that SAR occurs in children from 1.4 years and PFS from 4.5 years with a changing pattern of pan-allergen sensitization. Microarray and SPT have moderate concordance in confirming allergens. PFS impacts negatively on quality of life and should be assessed in all paediatric allergy patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. STUDY OF PREVALENCE OF EOSINOPHILIA IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis is a common condition, though not life threatening, causes significant morbidity in terms of quality of life. Confirmation of allergen as etiological agent is cumbersome. Hence need for a simple test is vital and eosinophil parameters were looked at to answer the quest. AIM: To find out the prevalence of e osinophilia in Allergic rhinitis . To assess the value of nasal cytogram as an alternative investigation in diagnosing allergic rhinitis . MATERIALS & METHODS: Prospective study of 200 cases divided into two groups of 100 each was done. One group clinically with allergic rhinitis and other without. All cases had clinical examination after history was taken, Blood Absolute eosinophil count, Nasal smear for eosinophils done and assessed. RESULTS: Of the 200 patients examined in two groups of 100 each, mean age of allergic rhinitis patients was 26.22 years . Allergic rhinitis was more common in males than females. Prevalence of nasal eosinophilia was 61%.and blood eosinophilia was 57% in allergic rhinitis patients. Nasal smear sensitivity was 61% and specificity w as 87% . CONCLUSION: Nasal smear eosinophilia is a valid test, can be quickly and easily performed and read. Being an in - expensive test can be used to screen the patients of allergic rhinitis

  15. Air pollution exposure and daily clinical visits for allergic rhinitis in a subtropical city: Taipei, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between air pollutant level exposure and daily clinic visits for allergic rhinitis (AR) in Taipei, Taiwan. Daily clinic visits for AR and ambient air pollution data for Taipei were obtained for the period of 2006-2011. The relative risk for clinic visits for AR was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. In the single-pollutant models, on warm days (>23ºC) significant positive associations were found for increased rate of AR occurrence and ambient levels of particulate matter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O3). On cool days (<23ºC), all air pollutants were significantly associated with elevated number of AR visits except SO2. For the two-pollutant models, PM10, O3, and NO2 were significantly associated with higher rate of AR visits in combination with each of the other four pollutants on cool days. On warm days, CO levels remained significantly related with increased AR visits in all two-pollutant models. This study provides evidence that higher levels of ambient air contaminants enhance the risk of elevated frequency of clinic visits for AR.

  16. Characteristics, clinical effect profile and tolerability of a nasal spray preparation of Artemisia abrotanum L. for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remberg, P; Björk, L; Hedner, T; Sterner, O

    2004-01-01

    A nasal spray formulation containing an extract of Artemisia abrotanum L. was developed for therapeutic use in patients with allergic rhinitis and other upper airway disorders. The nasal spray preparation used contains a mixture of essential oils (4 mg/ml) and flavonols (2.5 microg/ml), of which some components have been shown to possess antiinflammatory, expectorant, spasmolytic as well as antiseptic and antimicrobial activities. The most important constituents in the essential oil fraction of the preparation are 1,8-cineole, linalool and davanone, while the flavonol fraction contains centauredin, casticin and quercetin dimethyl-ethers. No trace of thujon was observed in the essential oil of the Artemisia abrotanum L. genotype "Tycho" used for the manufacture of the nasal spray preparation. In 12 patients with diagnoses of allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis and/or bronchial obstructive disease, the nasal spray was given immediately after the appearance of characteristic allergic nasal symptoms. In 10 of the 12 patients, allergic rhinitis with nasal congestion, sneezing and rhinorrhea was dominant. After administration of the nasal spray, all patients experienced a rapid and significant symptom relief of nasal symptoms, comparable to the effect of antihistamine and chromoglicate preparations which several of the patients had used previously. The effect was present within 5 minutes after the administration and lasted for several hours. In 7 of the 10 rhinitis patients with concomitant symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis, a significant subjective relief of eye symptoms was also experienced. In 3 of the 6 patients who had a history of characteristic symptoms of endogenous, exogenous or exercise induced bronchial obstructive disease, there was a bronchial symptom relief by the nasal spray preparation which was experienced as rapid and clinically significant. It is concluded from the present proof of concept study, that a nasal spray formulation containing an

  17. IV Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis - an update on allergic rhinitis,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulalia Sakano

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The guidelines on allergic rhinitis aim to update knowledge about the disease and care for affected patients. The initiative called "Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma", initially published in 2001 and updated in 2008 and 2010, has been very successful in disseminating information and evidence, as well as providing a classification of severity and proposing a systemized treatment protocol. In order to include the participation of other medical professionals in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, it is important to develop algorithms that accurately indicate what should and can be done regionally. Objective To update the III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis - 2012, with the creation of an algorithm for allergic rhinitis management. Methods We invited 24 experts nominated by the Brazilian Association of Allergy and Immunology, Brazilian Association of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery and Brazilian Society of Pediatrics to update the 2012 document. Results The update of the last Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis incorporated and adapted the relevant information published in all "Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma" Initiative documents to the Brazilian scenario, bringing new concepts such as local allergic rhinitis, new drugs and treatment evaluation methods. Conclusion A flowchart for allergic rhinitis treatment has been proposed.

  18. IV Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis - an update on allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Eulalia; Sarinho, Emanuel S C; Cruz, Alvaro A; Pastorino, Antonio C; Tamashiro, Edwin; Kuschnir, Fábio; Castro, Fábio F M; Romano, Fabrizio R; Wandalsen, Gustavo F; Chong-Neto, Herberto J; Mello, João F de; Silva, Luciana R; Rizzo, Maria Cândida; Miyake, Mônica A M; Rosário Filho, Nelson A; Rubini, Norma de Paula M; Mion, Olavo; Camargos, Paulo A; Roithmann, Renato; Godinho, Ricardo N; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue N; Sih, Tania; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T; Solé, Dirceu

    2017-11-02

    The guidelines on allergic rhinitis aim to update knowledge about the disease and care for affected patients. The initiative called "Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma", initially published in 2001 and updated in 2008 and 2010, has been very successful in disseminating information and evidence, as well as providing a classification of severity and proposing a systemized treatment protocol. In order to include the participation of other medical professionals in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, it is important to develop algorithms that accurately indicate what should and can be done regionally. To update the III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis - 2012, with the creation of an algorithm for allergic rhinitis management. We invited 24 experts nominated by the Brazilian Association of Allergy and Immunology, Brazilian Association of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery and Brazilian Society of Pediatrics to update the 2012 document. The update of the last Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis incorporated and adapted the relevant information published in all "Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma" Initiative documents to the Brazilian scenario, bringing new concepts such as local allergic rhinitis, new drugs and treatment evaluation methods. A flowchart for allergic rhinitis treatment has been proposed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  19. PECULIARITIES OF CLINICAL COURSE AND TREATMENT OF ALLERGIC RHINITIS ASSOCIATED WITH CANDIDA IN SCHOOLCHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Malanicheva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 60 children 7–15 years old with year-round allergic rhinitis (AR and colonization of mucous tunic with Candida and Staphylococcus aureus were observed. At the first stage main group (35 children was treated with antibiotic fusafungine — Bioparox which is active against Candida and Staphylococcus aureus in dosage 4 inhalations 4 times daily during 7–10 days combined with antihistamine drugs. At the second stage patients received anti-allergic treatment of year-round AR with cromones, topical corticosteroids and antihistamine drugs according to the severity of a disease. The second group (25 children was treated according to the traditional anti-allergicь scheme of therapy. Complex treatment with fusafungine resulted in beneficial therapeutic effect in 77 % patients. Exacerbation period decreased 1.8 times lower and remission was 2.7 times longer. Cultural mycological and bacteriological analyses were negative in most patients with AR.

  20. Prevalence and treatment of allergic rhinitis in Italian conscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Ignazio; Vizzaccaro, Andrea; Tosca, Maria Angela; Milanese, Manlio; Ciprandi, Giorgio

    2003-06-01

    Previous surveys on Italian conscripts showed a low prevalence of allergic rhinitis. This study investigated the prevalence and the treatment of allergic rhinitis in the "conscript model" during a four-year period (1999-2002). 28,327 18-year old males were screened and referred to La Spezia Military Navy Hospital for call-up visit. Detailed history, clinical examination, skin prick test, spirometry, and metacholine challenge were performed in subjects with suspected diagnosis of respiratory allergy. Allergic rhinitis was diagnosed in 2,876 conscripts (10.15%). Most of them showed an association with asthma (67.2%). Prevalence of allergic rhinitis increased five-fold in comparison with a previous survey. Sneezing was the most common nasal symptom. The use of antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids increased significantly. However, about one third of the rhinitis subjects did not receive any treatment at all. Prevalence of allergic rhinitis in Italian conscripts has increased. Treatment of allergic rhinitis was correctly based on antihistamines and corticosteroids, but many rhinitis subjects remained still untreated.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid leak mimicking allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketti, Anthony J; Cleri, Dennis J; Porwancher, Richard B; Panesar, Mandip; Villota, Francisco J; Seelagy, Marc M

    2005-01-01

    Rhinitis and rhinorrhea are common clinical complaints that may be allergic or nonallergic in etiology. Distinguishing between allergic and nonallergic etiologies can be difficult but necessary for treatment. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old woman with > 20 years of rhinorrhea before a diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leak and a life-threatening complication occurred. It is essential that no symptom, especially that which persists and resists treatment, is trivialized. Here, we establish how a careful history and evaluation will direct the clinician to the correct diagnosis.

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorate acute allergic rhinitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlei; Fu, Yanxia; Wang, Yinyin; Kong, Yanhua; Li, Mengdi; Ma, Danhui; Zhai, Wanli; Wang, Hao; Lin, Yuting; Liu, Sihan; Ren, Fangli; Li, Jun; Wang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively investigated as a potential antiinflammatory treatment in many inflammatory-related diseases; however, it remains unclear whether MSCs could be used to treat acute allergic rhinitis. A rat model of allergic rhinitis was treated with MSCs. The effect of MSCs on the inflammation of allergic rhinitis was evaluated by sneezing, nose rubbing, the pathology of the nasal mucosa, and the expression of interleukin 4, tumour necrosis factor alpha, and immunoglobulin E in the serum of rats. Also, the population of MSCs isolated from umbilical cords of humans was evaluated to determine if they could inhibit the symptoms and inflammation of acute allergic rhinitis in a rat model. We observed that this population of cells inhibited sneezing, nose rubbing, and changes in the pathology of the nasal mucosa. Intriguingly, we observed that MSCs reduced the expression of interleukin 4, tumour necrosis factor alpha, and immunoglobulin E in the serum. Furthermore, MSCs reduced the expression of histamine and the recruitment of macrophages in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis rats. We reasoned that the effect of MSCs on allergic rhinitis might be through its regulation of the secretion of related cytokines from macrophages during the process of acute allergic rhinitis. This work suggested that MSCs from the umbilical cords of humans could be used as a positive clinical therapy for the human disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Cell Biochemistry & Function Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Current management of allergic rhinitis in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgalas, Christos; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Fokkens, Wytske

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis, including the discovery of new inflammatory mediators, the link between asthma and allergic rhinitis ('one airway-one disease' concept) and the introduction of novel

  4. Nasobronchial interaction in allergic rhinitis and asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Braunstahl (Gert-Jan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe key to the diagnosis lies in taking a good medical history. This rule especially applies to allergic rhinitis and asthma. Both diseases have in common that they are often underdiagnosedl and lack proper treatment. Allergic rhinitis and asthma frequently occur together. Almost 40 % of

  5. Evidence-based treatment of allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawankar, R.; Fokkens, W.

    2001-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an extremely common disease worldwide, affecting 10% to 50% of the population. An increasing prevalence of allergic rhinitis over the past decades and its frequent association with asthma have raised concerns about treating the disease appropriately. New knowledge of the

  6. Sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Röder (Esther)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAllergic rhinitis is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in Europe. Besides nose symptoms such as sneezing and a blocked nose, patients also suffer from general complaints like fatigue, sleeping problems and difficulty concentrating. Allergic rhinitis can have a serious impact on

  7. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovic, Suzana; Calderon, Moises A; Wilson, Duncan; Durham, Stephen

    2010-12-08

    This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 2, 2003.Allergic rhinitis is a common condition which can significantly impair quality of life. Immunotherapy by injection can significantly reduce symptoms and medication use but its use is limited by the possibility of severe systemic adverse reactions. Immunotherapy by the sublingual route is therefore of considerable interest. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis in adults and children. We searched the Cochrane ENT Group Trials Register; CENTRAL (2010, Issue 3); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; mRCT and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the most recent search was 14 August 2009. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of sublingual immunotherapy in adults or children. Primary outcome measures were symptom and medication scores. We also collected adverse event data. Two independent authors selected studies and assessed risk of bias. One author extracted data which was rechecked by two other authors. We used the standardised mean difference (SMD) with a random-effects model to combine data. We included a total of 60 randomised controlled trials in the review. Forty-nine were suitable for pooling in meta-analyses (2333 SLIT, 2256 placebo participants). Overall, we found a significant reduction in symptoms (SMD -0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.64 to -0.34, P sublingual immunotherapy compared to placebo. None of the trials included in this review reported severe systemic reactions or anaphylaxis, and none of the systemic reactions reported required the use of adrenaline. This updated review reinforces the conclusion of the original 2003 Cochrane Review that sublingual immunotherapy is effective for allergic rhinitis and has been proven to be a safe route of administration.

  8. Effect of Nepeta bracteata Benth. on allergic rhinitis symptoms: A randomized double-blind clinical trial

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    Mohammad Reza Hajiheydari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR is one of the health problems in the world. It is necessary to develop new treatment procedure for control of this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Zofa (Nepeta bracteata Benth on AR patients. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial study, 71 patients (37 patients in treatment and 34 in placebo group participated. In treatment group, N. bracteata syrup (NBS was used for 4 weeks as three times a day. The efficacy of the drug regarding AR symptoms (rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal obstruction, itchy nose, and ocular symptoms were evaluated through a visual analog scale (VAS by 0–10 before administration and at the end of the whole treatment period. The collected information was entered in the SPSS software (version 18 and was analyzed using the Fisher's exact test, Chi-square test, independent sample t-test, and paired sample test. Results: The improvement of AR symptoms in the group receiving NBS was significantly higher compared to control group (4.73 ± 1.84 vs. 0.38 ± 2.06; P < 0.0001. Furthermore, the mean of total VAS before and after the treatment (in case group was 7.10 ± 1.92 and 2.37 ± 1.76, respectively (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that N. bracteata has significant effects on improving the symptoms of AR. Hence, it can be a good alternative to AR symptoms relief.

  9. [Non-allergic Rhinitis: Epidemiology, Diagnostic and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, A; Küster, I; Beule, A G

    2015-12-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis is a heterogenous group of medical diseases without an IgE-mediated pathophysiology. In this review, typical subgroups are presented with data regarding their frequency, clinical symptoms and recommendations for an effective and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic approach are indicated. The most common subtype is the non-allergic rhinopathy, also known as idiopathic or vasomotoric rhinitis. Because medication induced rhinitis is still a frequent clinical problem, a step wise approach to wean the patient is presented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Number of siblings and allergic rhinitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Soewira Sastra; Lily Irsa; Mohammad Sjabaroeddin Loebis; Rita Evalina

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Recent studies have suggested that having fewer siblings was associated with allergic rhinitis and atopic diseases in children. Previous studies also indicated that older siblings was associated with higher incidence of allergic rhinitis. Objectives To assess for a possible association between number of siblings and allergic rhinitis and to assess for an effect of birth order on allergic rhinitis in chil...

  11. Number of siblings and allergic rhinitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Soewira Sastra; Lily Irsa; Muhammad Sjabaroeddin Loebis; Rita Evalina

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Recent studies have suggested that having fewer siblings was associated with allergic rhinitis and atopic diseases in children. Previous studies also indicated that older siblings was associated with higher incidence of allergic rhinitis. Objectives To assess for a possible association between number of siblings and allergic rhinitis and to assess for an effect of birth order on allergic rhinitis in child...

  12. Comparison of intranasal corticosteroids and antihistamines in allergic rhinitis: a review of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lars P; Dahl, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    For several years there has been discussion of whether first-line pharmacological treatment of allergic rhinitis should be antihistamines or intranasal corticosteroids. No well documented, clinically relevant differences seem to exist for individual nonsedating antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Likewise, the current body of literature does not seem to favor any specific intranasal corticosteroid. When comparing efficacy of antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids in allergic rhinitis, present data favor intranasal corticosteroids. Interestingly, data do not support antihistamines as superior in treating conjunctivitis associated with allergic rhinitis. Safety data from comparative studies in allergic rhinitis do not indicate differences between antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids. Combining antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids in the treatment of allergic rhinitis does not provide additional beneficial effects to intranasal corticosteroids alone. Considering present data, intranasal corticosteroids seem to offer superior relief in allergic rhinitis, when compared with antihistamines.

  13. Heart Rate Variability Analysis in Patients with Allergic Rhinitis

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    Ming-Ying Lan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Very few studies investigate the role of the autonomic nervous system in allergic rhinitis. In this study, we evaluated the autonomic nervous system in allergic rhinitis patients using heart rate variability (HRV analysis. Methods. Eleven patients with allergic rhinitis and 13 healthy controls, aged between 19 and 40 years old, were enrolled in the study. Diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was based on clinical history, symptoms, and positive Phadiatop test. Electrocardiographic recordings on the sitting and supine positions were obtained for HRV analysis. Results. In the supine position, there were no significant statistical differences in very-low-frequency power (VLF, ≤0.04 Hz, low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz, high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz, and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF between the patient and control groups. The mean RR intervals significantly increased, while LF% and LF/HF significantly decreased in the patient group in the sitting position. Moreover, mean RR intervals, LF, and LF/HF, which were significantly different between the two positions in the control group, did not show a significant change with the posture change in the patient group. Conclusion. These suggest that patients with allergic rhinitis may have poor sympathetic modulation in the sitting position. Autonomic dysfunction may therefore play a role in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis.

  14. Skin Testing for Allergic Rhinitis: A Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergy worldwide. The accuracy of skin testing for allergic rhinitis is still debated. This health technology assessment had two objectives: to determine the diagnostic accuracy of skin-prick and intradermal testing in patients with suspected allergic rhinitis and to estimate the costs to the Ontario health system of skin testing for allergic rhinitis. We searched All Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, CRD Health Technology Assessment Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database for studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of skin-prick and intradermal testing for allergic rhinitis using nasal provocation as the reference standard. For the clinical evidence review, data extraction and quality assessment were performed using the QUADAS-2 tool. We used the bivariate random-effects model for meta-analysis. For the economic evidence review, we assessed studies using a modified checklist developed by the (United Kingdom) National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. We estimated the annual cost of skin testing for allergic rhinitis in Ontario for 2015 to 2017 using provincial data on testing volumes and costs. We meta-analyzed seven studies with a total of 430 patients that assessed the accuracy of skin-prick testing. The pooled pair of sensitivity and specificity for skin-prick testing was 85% and 77%, respectively. We did not perform a meta-analysis for the diagnostic accuracy of intradermal testing due to the small number of studies (n = 4). Of these, two evaluated the accuracy of intradermal testing in confirming negative skin-prick testing results, with sensitivity ranging from 27% to 50% and specificity ranging from 60% to 100%. The other two studies evaluated the accuracy of intradermal testing as a stand-alone tool for diagnosing allergic rhinitis, with sensitivity ranging from 60

  15. Skin Testing for Allergic Rhinitis: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabali, Conrad; Chan, Brian; Higgins, Caroline; Holubowich, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergy worldwide. The accuracy of skin testing for allergic rhinitis is still debated. This health technology assessment had two objectives: to determine the diagnostic accuracy of skin-prick and intradermal testing in patients with suspected allergic rhinitis and to estimate the costs to the Ontario health system of skin testing for allergic rhinitis. Methods We searched All Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, CRD Health Technology Assessment Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database for studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of skin-prick and intradermal testing for allergic rhinitis using nasal provocation as the reference standard. For the clinical evidence review, data extraction and quality assessment were performed using the QUADAS-2 tool. We used the bivariate random-effects model for meta-analysis. For the economic evidence review, we assessed studies using a modified checklist developed by the (United Kingdom) National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. We estimated the annual cost of skin testing for allergic rhinitis in Ontario for 2015 to 2017 using provincial data on testing volumes and costs. Results We meta-analyzed seven studies with a total of 430 patients that assessed the accuracy of skin-prick testing. The pooled pair of sensitivity and specificity for skin-prick testing was 85% and 77%, respectively. We did not perform a meta-analysis for the diagnostic accuracy of intradermal testing due to the small number of studies (n = 4). Of these, two evaluated the accuracy of intradermal testing in confirming negative skin-prick testing results, with sensitivity ranging from 27% to 50% and specificity ranging from 60% to 100%. The other two studies evaluated the accuracy of intradermal testing as a stand-alone tool for diagnosing allergic rhinitis, with

  16. Clinical and immunological effects of vitamin D supplementation during the pollen season in children with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerzyńska, Joanna; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Rychlik, Błażej; Majak, Paweł; Podlecka, Daniela; Woicka-Kolejwa, Katarzyna; Stelmach, Iwona

    2018-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been proposed as a potential contributing factor in patients with allergic diseases. We compared the clinical and immunological effects of vitamin D supplementation to placebo during the pollen season in children with allergic rhinitis. Thirty-eight children aged 5-12, sensitive to grass pollen, participated in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Children received either vitamin D 1000 IU daily supplementation or placebo. We studied symptoms/medication score, lung function, exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FENO), methacholine bronchial provocation test and serum level of 25(OH)D, as well as; CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, TLR4, IL-1, IL-6, TNF and the IL-10 and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) levels in cell culture supernatants. Vitamin D therapy was effective in reduction of the symptoms/medication score ( p = 0.0371). In vitamin D group an increase in the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells (7.06 vs. 10.5%; p = 0.0013) and serum 25(OH)D concentration (49.6 vs. 96.6 ng/ml; p = 0.0001) and in control group an increase in FENO (15.6 vs. 21 ppb; p = 0.0331) and serum 25(OH)D level were observed (82.9 vs. 100.3 ng/ml; p = 0.0003).We revealed a higher increase from baseline in the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells in the vitamin D group compared to the control group ( p = 0.0058). A significant correlation between CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cell induction and FENO reduction in the vitamin D group was observed ( p = 0.0217). Vitamin D 1000 IU as a supplementary treatment of grass pollen allergy in children with allergic rhinitis during the pollen season significantly reduced the symptoms/medication score. The study revealed an immunological effect of vitamin D.

  17. Non-allergic rhinitis: Position paper of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, P. W.; Klimek, L.; Cingi, C.; Agache, I.; Akdis, C.; Bachert, C.; Bousquet, J.; Demoly, P.; Gevaert, P.; Hox, V.; Hupin, C.; Kalogjera, L.; Manole, F.; Mösges, R.; Mullol, J.; Muluk, N. B.; Muraro, A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Pawankar, R.; Rondon, C.; Rundenko, M.; Seys, S. F.; Toskala, E.; van Gerven, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, N.; Fokkens, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    This EAACI position paper aims at providing a state-of-the-art overview on nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). A significant number of patients suffering from persistent rhinitis are defined as nonallergic noninfectious rhinitis (NANIR) patients, often denominated in short as having NAR. NAR is defined as a

  18. [Allergic inflamation of the lower airways in patients with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Lj; Balaban, J; Stosović, R; Mitrović, N; Djurasinović, M; Tanurdzić, S

    1994-01-01

    Reporting two of our cases we wanted to point to a great dilemma related to the final diagnosis. Recently, such cases have been more frewuently seen, since in all patients with allergic rhinitis conditions of the lower airways is examined before the administration of the specific immunotherapy. Therefore, we may see patients who are still free of pulmonary sings, despite of positive specific and/or non specific bronchoprovocative tests. The presented cases with evidenced allergic rhinitis are probably in the phase of development of allergic bronchial asthma, the phase of "allergic inflammation" of the lower airways, not clinically manifested yet.

  19. Allergic rhinitis caused by food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingi, Cemal; Demirbas, Duygu; Songu, Murat

    2010-09-01

    Food allergies occur in 1-2% of adults and in 8% of children under 6 years of age. Food-induced allergies are immunological reactions that cause a variety of symptoms affecting the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory tract. The reactions are mediated by both IgE- and non-IgE-dependent (cellular) mechanisms. Isolated food-induced allergic rhinitis is not common as it frequently occurs together with other food allergy symptoms such as asthma, eczema, oral allergic manifestations, urticaria, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The present paper provides an overview of food allergies and food-induced allergic rhinitis.

  20. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawes, Bo L K

    2011-05-01

    of the nasal mucosa in children already at age 6 years. Non-allergic rhinitis exhibited no change in the nasal airway patency, but some nasal eosinophilia albeit less than children with allergic rhinitis. These findings suggest different pathology in allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis which may have important clinical implications for early pharmacological treatment of rhinitis in young children. In paper II, we utilized the nasal airway patency end-points derived from paper I to examine whether upper and lower airway patency are associated. Upper airway patency was assessed by acoustic rhinometry before and after intranasal α-agonist and lower airway patency by spirometry before and after inhaled β2-agonist. Upper and lower airway patencies were strongly associated and independent of body size, rhinitis and asthma. The association was consistent for both baseline values and for decongested nasal airway patency and post-β2 FEV1. Blood and nasal eosinophilia were also associated with nasal airway obstruction. This suggests generalized diminished airway dimensions as a novel susceptibility factor for concurrent symptoms of asthma and rhinitis in early childhood and supports the notion of a common pathophysiology in asthma and rhinitis. The clinical interpretation of these findings is that all children presenting either rhinitis or asthma should be considered inflamed in the entire respiratory tract. In paper III, we aimed to describe asthma and intermediary asthma end-points associated with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis in preschool-aged children. At age 7 years, we evaluated prevalence of asthma, eczema, food sensitization, and filaggrin mutations; levels of total IgE, FeNO, and blood-eosinophils; lung function and bronchial responsiveness to cold dry air. We found that asthma was similarly associated with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis suggesting a link between upper and lower airway diseases beyond an allergy associated inflammation. Only children

  1. Temporal relationship of allergic rhinitis with asthma and other co-morbidities in a Mediterranean country: a retrospective study in a tertiary reference allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, M; Koulouris, S; Koti, I; Aggelides, X; Sideri, K; Chliva, C; Vassilatou, E; Kalogeromitros, D

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a global health problem which causes major illness and represents a risk factor for asthma. The primary aim of the study was to record the clinical pattern of allergic rhinitis and its temporal relation with asthma in a Greek population. Three-hundred and sixteen subjects with documented diagnosis of allergic rhinitis in a two-year period were included in this study. All participants completed a standardised questionnaire with full retrospective epidemiological data for rhinitis; in addition, serum IgE measurement and skin prick tests with 22 common inhalant allergens were carried out, while spirometry was performed in subjects with self-reported or doctor-diagnosed asthma. All subjects with at least one positive skin test were included in study analysis. One-hundred and sixty five out of 316 patients (49.1%) stated self reported-asthma while in 63/316 (19.9%) asthma was documented with spirometry. One hundred out of 165 (60.6%) had rhinitis as first clinical manifestation while in 24/165 (14.5%) asthma symptoms appeared first; the remaining 31/165 (24.9%) reported simultaneous onset of upper and lower airways' symptoms. About 68.5% were sensitised to seasonal allergens exclusively, while 50% were sensitised to ≥ 1 of Parietaria, grasses sp., Olea eur. The duration of rhinitis in the subpopulation of patients with self-reported asthma (n=165) was significantly higher compared with non-asthmatics (mean=3.22 years, p<0.001). Survival analysis for the estimation of asthma onset showed that the mean time interval with rhinitis only is 16.6 years (median 12 years, incidence 0.0596). The unique environmental conditions and the aerobiology of each area clearly affect the clinical features of respiratory allergy. Copyright © 2009 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. The burden of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Although formerly regarded as a nuisance disease, allergic rhinitis (AR) has a considerable effect on quality of life and can have significant consequences if left untreated. The total burden of this disease lies not only in impaired physical and social functioning but also in a financial burden made greater when considering evidence that AR is a possible causal factor in comorbid diseases such as asthma or sinusitis. Compared with matched controls, patients with AR have an approximate twofold increase in medication costs and 1.8-fold the number of visits to health practitioners. Hidden direct costs include the treatment of comorbid asthma, chronic sinusitis, otitis media, upper respiratory infection, and nasal polyposis. Nasal congestion, the most prominent symptom in AR, is associated with sleep-disordered breathing, a condition that can have a profound effect on mental health, including increased psychiatric disorders, depression, anxiety, and alcohol abuse. Furthermore, sleep-disordered breathing in childhood and adolescence is associated with increased disorders of learning performance, behavior, and attention. In the United States, AR results in 3.5 million lost workdays and 2 million lost schooldays annually. Patients struggle to alleviate their misery, frequently self-adjusting their treatment regimen of over-the-counter and prescription medications because of lack of efficacy, deterioration of efficacy, lack of 24-hour relief, and bothersome side effects. Ironically, health care providers overestimate patient satisfaction with therapy. Therefore, improvement in patient-practitioner communication may enhance patient adherence with prescribed regimens.

  3. Can curcumin modulate allergic rhinitis in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, M; Muluk, N Bayar; Yigitaslan, S; Cengiz, B P; Shojaolsadati, P; Karimkhani, H; Ada, S; Berkoz, M; Cingi, C

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of curcumin on experimental allergic rhinitis in rats. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups: a control group; a group in which allergic rhinitis was induced and no treatment given; a group in which allergic rhinitis was induced followed by treatment with azelastine hydrochloride on days 21-28; and a group in which allergic rhinitis was induced followed by treatment with curcumin on days 21-28. Allergy symptoms and histopathological features of the nasal mucosa were examined. The sneezing and nasal congestion scores were higher in the azelastine and curcumin treatment groups than in the control group. Histopathological examination showed focal goblet cell metaplasia on the epithelial surface in the azelastine group. In the curcumin group, there was a decrease in goblet cell metaplasia in the epithelium, decreased inflammatory cell infiltration and vascular proliferation in the lamina propria. Curcumin is an effective treatment for experimentally induced allergic rhinitis in rats.

  4. [Efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hang; Che, Shuyu; Lin, Rongjun; Li, Na

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with dermatophagoides farina drops on children with allergic rhinitis. This was retrospective study analyzing the efficacy of dermatophaguides farinae drops SLIT in 110 patients (aged 4-14 years old) with house dust mites induced allergic rhinitis (without asthma). All the patients were divided into the SLIT group (n = 60) and drug group (n = 50). Patients in SLIT group received sublingual immunotherapy combined with symptomatic medication, and patients in drug group only received symptomatic medication. We recorded and evaluated the total nasal symptom scores (TNSS), total medication scores (TMS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) of the 2 groups at three time points, before the treatment, and the treatment for 1-year and 2-year. After 1-year and 2-year treatment, compared with drug group, TMS, TNSS and VAS in SLIT group decreased significantly (P Sublingual immunotherapy with Dermatophagoides farinae drops showed significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis comparing with pharmacotherapy.

  5. Clinical effect of catgut implantation at acupoints for allergic rhinitis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinrong; Zhang, Qinxiu; Jiang, Luyun; Li, Tao; Liu, Min; Liu, Huanxing; Wang, Xiaopei; Zhang, Fubing

    2013-01-10

    Catgut implantation at acupoints has been used in China to treat allergic rhinitis (AR) for a long time. However, its efficacy and safety in the treatment of AR is controversial due to the poor quality of the clinical trial of this therapy. This study aims to identify whether catgut implantation at acupoints is indeed an effective and safe treatment for patients with persistent or intermittent allergic rhinitis (PER or IAR) by comparing with sham catgut implantation treatment. This study compares real versus sham catgut implantation at acupoints in 242 patients with a history of PER or IAR and with a positive skin prick test (SPT). The trial will be conducted in the Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. In the study, patients will be randomly assigned by computer-generated randomization list into two groups and assessed prior to treatment. Then, they will receive two sessions of treatments (once per 2 weeks) for 4 consecutive weeks and have a follow-up phase of 12 weeks. The administration of catgut implantation (or sham-control) at acupoints follows the guidelines for clinical research on acupuncture (WHO Regional Publication, Western Pacific Series No.15, 1995), and is performed double-blindly by a well-trained physician in acupuncture. The main outcome measures include the primary and secondary indicators. Primary indicators are subjective symptoms scores evaluated by visual analogue scales (VAS) and Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaires (RQLQ). The secondary indicators are the results of laboratory examinations, such as serum allergen-specific IgE, nasal inflammatory cells counts (mast cells, eosinophils, and T cells) and nitric oxide concentration in nasal excretion. The use of anti-allergic medication will also be recorded as one of the secondary indicators. Furthermore, adverse events will be recorded and analyzed. If any participants withdraw from the trial, intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) and per

  6. Aetiology of allergic rhinitis in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W.K. Lam

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In a 1993 survey, allergic rhinitis was identified as the most common allergic disease in Hong Kong, affecting 29.1% of schoolchildren. Recently (1995, the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC also reported 44.5% current rhinitis among Hong Kong teenagers. Our objective was to study the aetiology of allergic rhinitis in Hong Kong using serological tests of allergen sensitization. In 57 allergic rhinitis patients and in the same number of age- and sex-matched controls the following were measured: serum total IgE, mixed aeroallergen IgE (Phadiatop™ and specific IgE versus house dust mite (HDM, cockroach, cat and dog dander, mould mixture (Penicillium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus and Alternaria species and four local pollens (Bermuda grass, Timothy, ragweed and mugwort. Compared with controls, allergic rhinitis patients (26 males, 31 females; mean (± SD age 25 ±11 years had a significantly elevated serum total IgE concentration (mean ± SEM: 496 ± 88 vs 179 ± 38 kU/L and an increased proportion of positive Phadiatop (95 vs 33% and specific IgE tests versus HDM (90 vs 44% and cockroach (42 vs 9%; Mann-Whitney U-test and χ2 tests all P < 0.005. There was no significant difference in sensitization to other allergens tested. House dust mite and cockroach are ubiquitous in Hong Kong with a warm, humid climate and crowded living conditions. Their identification as aetiological agents of allergic rhinitis should help in the development of environmental strategies for reducing the inhalant allergen load to prevent and control this prevalent and costly health problem in our community.

  7. Allergic rhinitis and CXCR3 chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzi, V; Fallahi, P

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of allergic rhinitis involves IgE antibodies attaching to the allergen and causing the release of inflammatory chemicals such as histamine from mast cells. Cytokines are very important in this process. Many data suggest a systemic shift to more intensely type 1-dominated immune responses in non-allergic individuals and, conversely, to more type 2-dominated responses in allergic individuals upon natural re-exposure to grass pollen. However other studies have found that chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10/ interferon (IFN)-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10) and CXCL9/monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG) concentrations are elevated in nasal lavages from allergic patients suggesting that these chemokines may play a role in chronic allergic inflammation. Several studies have also evaluated the effect of different immune-modulating drugs in allergic rhinitis showing local and peripheral increase of IFN-γ and IP-10, associated with a reduction of symptoms. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of T helper (Th)1 chemokines in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis, and to evaluate their role as biomarkers of disease and of response to treatments.

  8. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Schunemann, H J; Fonseca, J

    2015-01-01

    ) and are available in many languages. An e-CRF and an e-learning tool complete MASK. MASK is flexible and other tools can be added. It appears to be an advanced, global and integrated ICT answer for many unmet needs in allergic diseases which will improve policies and standards....... empowerment. MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) is a simple system centred around the patient which was devised to fill many of these gaps using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) tools and a clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on the most widely used...

  9. International Consensus Statement on Allergy and Rhinology: Allergic Rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Sarah K.; Lin, Sandra Y.; Toskala, Elina; Orlandi, Richard R.; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Alt, Jeremiah A.; Azar, Antoine; Baroody, Fuad M.; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, G. Walter; Chacko, Thomas; Cingi, Cemal; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Corey, Jacquelynne; Cox, Linda S.; Creticos, Peter Socrates; Custovic, Adnan; Damask, Cecelia; DeConde, Adam; DelGaudio, John M.; Ebert, Charles S.; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Flanagan, Carrie E.; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Franzese, Christine; Gosepath, Jan; Halderman, Ashleigh; Hamilton, Robert G.; Hoffman, Hans Jürgen; Hohlfeld, Jens M.; Houser, Steven M.; Hwang, Peter H.; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Jarvis, Deborah; Khalid, Ayesha N.; Kilpeläinen, Maritta; Kingdom, Todd T.; Krouse, Helene; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree; Laury, Adrienne M.; Lee, Stella E.; Levy, Joshua M.; Luong, Amber U.; Marple, Bradley F.; McCoul, Edward D.; McMains, K. Christopher; Melén, Erik; Mims, James W.; Moscato, Gianna; Mullol, Joaquim; Nelson, Harold S.; Patadia, Monica; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; Platt, Michael P.; Reisacher, William; Rondón, Carmen; Rudmik, Luke; Ryan, Matthew; Sastre, Joaquin; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Settipane, Russell A.; Sharma, Hemant P.; Sheikh, Aziz; Smith, Timothy L.; Tantilipikorn, Pongsakorn; Tversky, Jody R.; Veling, Maria C.; Wang, De Yun; Westman, Marit; Wickman, Magnus; Zacharek, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Critical examination of the quality and validity of available allergic rhinitis (AR) literature is necessary to improve understanding and to appropriately translate this knowledge to clinical care of the AR patient. To evaluate the existing AR literature, international multidisciplinary experts with

  10. Advances in pharmacotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Bernstein, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Effective pharmacologic treatment exists for most patients suffering from allergic rhinitis (AR). However, both in clinical trials and in real-life studies, many patients are dissatisfied with treatment. Physicians often use multiple therapies, in an attempt to improve symptom contr...

  11. Acoustic rhinometry versus rhinomanometry meassurements in patients with allergic rhinitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčařová, B.; Lebedová, J.; Klusáčková, P.; Kotasová, I.; Dlouhá, B.; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 83 (2007), s. 228-229 ISSN 0108-1675. [Congress of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology /26./. 09.06.2007-13.06.2007, Göteborg] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : rhinometry * rhinomanometry * allergic rhinitis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  12. Allergic Rhinitis | Sommers | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... but the antihistamines are less effective for nasal congestion and minimally address the problem of inflammation. Immune-based specifically targeted molecules, such as the cloned humanised monoclonal antibody-inhibiting human IgE omalizumab, are presently being studied in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis.

  13. Allergic rhinitis management pocket reference 2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Reid, J.; Weel, C. van; Cagnani, C. Baena; Canonica, G.W.; Demoly, P.; Denburg, J.; Fokkens, W.J.; Grouse, L.; Mullol, K.; Ohta, K.; Schermer, T.; Valovirta, E.; Zhong, N.; Zuberbier, T.

    2008-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a major chronic respiratory disease because of its prevalence, impacts on quality of life and work/school performance, economic burden, and links with asthma. Family doctors (also known as 'primary care physicians' or 'general practitioners') play a major role in the management

  14. Allergic rhinitis management pocket reference 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Reid, J.; van Weel, C.; Baena Cagnani, C.; Canonica, G. W.; Demoly, P.; Denburg, J.; Fokkens, W. J.; Grouse, L.; Mullol, K.; Ohta, K.; Schermer, T.; Valovirta, E.; Zhong, N.; Zuberbier, T.

    2008-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a major chronic respiratory disease because of its prevalence, impacts on quality of life and work/school performance, economic burden, and links with asthma. Family doctors (also known as 'primary care physicians' or 'general practitioners') play a major role in the management

  15. Immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis and lower airway outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, V; Luengo, O; Labrador-Horrillo, M

    2017-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma constitute two clinical expressions of a single-condition, respiratory allergy. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a form of treatment specifically aimed at modifying the response to sensitizing allergens. The inherent potential benefit of AIT is the simultaneous treatment of all clinical expressions of respiratory allergy. Current data support the effectiveness of subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy in rhinitis. Studies also provide proof for a beneficial effect in allergic asthma. Even more, substantial evidence points to the preventive effect on the progression from rhinitis to asthma. Despite the current knowledge on the basic mechanisms underlying the immunological effect of AIT is vast, the specific mechanisms for the preventive effect of primary sensitization or new sensitizations are poorly understood. This review aimed to provide a critical overview of the current knowledge on the effectiveness of AIT and its potential role in secondary prevention of respiratory allergy progression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identification and Prevalence of Allergic, Nonallergic, and Local Allergic Rhinitis Patients in Western Area, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hatem S; Hussein, Ahmed; Salah, Mohamad; Lotfi, Wassim T

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic yield of skin prick test (SPT) and serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies level in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and the role of nasal provocation test (NPT) for the determination of local allergic rhinitis (LAR) in patients with nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). This multi-center study included 1230 patients with clinical manifestations for ≥2 years. Patients were classified according to the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and scored according to the quantitative Score for Allergic Rhinitis (SFAR). The SPT and total IgE antibody levels were done for all patients. Patients gave negative SPT underwent NPT, and its result was interpreted using Lebel Symptom Score Scale. The SPT was positive in 77.8% of patients, mostly for grass pollen and dust mites. All patients were sensitive to multiple allergens. Median serum IgE antibody level for total study population was 162 IU/ml. Forty-two patients (3.4%) with negative SPT showed a weak response to NPT, while 231 patients (18.7%) with negative SPT had a high response to NPT and were considered to have LAR. The SPT could discriminate between AR and NAR patients. The NPT could identify LAR in 84.6% of patients with rhinitis among those considered as NAR. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Nasal saline or intranasal corticosteroids to treat allergic rhinitis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Stefani; Brown, Elizabeth Aubrey; Franklin, Rachel; Wickersham, Elizabeth A.; McCarthy, Laine H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Question In pediatric populations, is nasal saline irrigation as effective as intranasal corticosteroids at relieving allergic rhinitis symptoms? Answer No. Intranasal steroids are more effective than nasal saline alone to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR) in children. Combination therapy further improves symptom reduction. Level of Evidence for the Answer B Search Terms Allergic Rhinitis, Nasal Saline, Nasal corticosteroids, children younger than age 18. Date Search Was Conducted August and September 2014, October 2015. Inclusion Criteria Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohort studies, nasal spray, hypertonic saline solution, nasal lavage, rhinitis, intranasal administration, nasal saline, human, English language. Exclusion Criteria Antihistamines, Adults, Articles older than 2008 PMID:27328556

  18. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Schünemann, H J; Samolinski, B

    2012-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma represent global health problems for all age groups. Asthma and rhinitis frequently coexist in the same subjects. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) was initiated during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999 (published in 2001). ARIA has rec...

  19. The impact of allergic rhinitis and asthma on human nasal and bronchial epithelial gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane H Wagener

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The link between upper and lower airways in patients with both asthma and allergic rhinitis is still poorly understood. As the biological complexity of these disorders can be captured by gene expression profiling we hypothesized that the clinical expression of rhinitis and/or asthma is related to differential gene expression between upper and lower airways epithelium. OBJECTIVE: Defining gene expression profiles of primary nasal and bronchial epithelial cells from the same individuals and examining the impact of allergic rhinitis with and without concomitant allergic asthma on expression profiles. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 18 subjects (6 allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis; 6 allergic rhinitis; 6 healthy controls. The estimated false discovery rate comparing 6 subjects per group was approximately 5%. RNA was extracted from isolated and cultured epithelial cells from bronchial brushings and nasal biopsies, and analyzed by microarray (Affymetrix U133+ PM Genechip Array. Data were analysed using R and Bioconductor Limma package. For gene ontology GeneSpring GX12 was used. RESULTS: The study was successfully completed by 17 subjects (6 allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis; 5 allergic rhinitis; 6 healthy controls. Using correction for multiple testing, 1988 genes were differentially expressed between healthy lower and upper airway epithelium, whereas in allergic rhinitis with or without asthma this was only 40 and 301 genes, respectively. Genes influenced by allergic rhinitis with or without asthma were linked to lung development, remodeling, regulation of peptidases and normal epithelial barrier functions. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in epithelial gene expression between the upper and lower airway epithelium, as observed in healthy subjects, largely disappear in patients with allergic rhinitis with or without asthma, whilst new differences emerge. The present data identify several pathways and genes that might be

  20. The Impact of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma on Human Nasal and Bronchial Epithelial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Ariane H.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Luiten, Silvia; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Bel, Elisabeth H.; Sterk, Peter J.; van Drunen, Cornelis M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The link between upper and lower airways in patients with both asthma and allergic rhinitis is still poorly understood. As the biological complexity of these disorders can be captured by gene expression profiling we hypothesized that the clinical expression of rhinitis and/or asthma is related to differential gene expression between upper and lower airways epithelium. Objective Defining gene expression profiles of primary nasal and bronchial epithelial cells from the same individuals and examining the impact of allergic rhinitis with and without concomitant allergic asthma on expression profiles. Methods This cross-sectional study included 18 subjects (6 allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis; 6 allergic rhinitis; 6 healthy controls). The estimated false discovery rate comparing 6 subjects per group was approximately 5%. RNA was extracted from isolated and cultured epithelial cells from bronchial brushings and nasal biopsies, and analyzed by microarray (Affymetrix U133+ PM Genechip Array). Data were analysed using R and Bioconductor Limma package. For gene ontology GeneSpring GX12 was used. Results The study was successfully completed by 17 subjects (6 allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis; 5 allergic rhinitis; 6 healthy controls). Using correction for multiple testing, 1988 genes were differentially expressed between healthy lower and upper airway epithelium, whereas in allergic rhinitis with or without asthma this was only 40 and 301 genes, respectively. Genes influenced by allergic rhinitis with or without asthma were linked to lung development, remodeling, regulation of peptidases and normal epithelial barrier functions. Conclusions Differences in epithelial gene expression between the upper and lower airway epithelium, as observed in healthy subjects, largely disappear in patients with allergic rhinitis with or without asthma, whilst new differences emerge. The present data identify several pathways and genes that might be potential targets for

  1. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis): the new generation guideline implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Schunemann, H. J.; Fonseca, J.; Samolinski, B.; Bachert, C.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T.; Cruz, A. A.; Demoly, P.; Hellings, P.; Valiulis, A.; Wickman, M.; Zuberbier, T.; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bedbrook, A.; Bergmann, K. C.; Caimmi, D.; Dahl, R.; Fokkens, W. J.; Grisle, I.; Lodrup Carlsen, K.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Palkonen, S.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Ryan, D.; Valovirta, E.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Aberer, W.; Agache, I.; Adachi, M.; Akdis, C. A.; Akdis, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Arshad, H.; Baiardini, I.; Baigenzhin, A. K.; Barbara, C.; Bateman, E. D.; Beghé, B.; Bel, E. H.; Ben Kheder, A.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bewick, M.; Bieber, T.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bjermer, L.; Blain, H.; Boner, A. L.; Boulet, L. P.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Bosse, I.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Braido, F.; Briggs, A. H.; Brightling, C. E.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Burney, P. G.; Bush, A.; Caballero-Fonseca, F.; Calderon, M. A.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Camuzat, T.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chatzi, L.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Ciprandi, G.; Cirule, I.; Correia de Sousa, J.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Costa, D. J.; Custovic, A.; Dahlen, S. E.; Darsow, U.; de Carlo, G.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J. A.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Dykewicz, M. S.; El-Gamal, Y.; Emuzyte, R.; Fink Wagner, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fiocchi, A.; Forastiere, F.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gemicioğlu, B.; Gereda, J. E.; González Diaz, S.; Gotua, M.; Grouse, L.; Guzmán, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Heinrich, J.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O. 'b; Howarth, P.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M. E.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jares, E. J.; Johnston, S. L.; Joos, G.; Jonquet, O.; Jung, K. S.; Just, J.; Kaidashev, I.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keil, T.; Keith, P. K.; Khaltaev, N.; Klimek, L.; Koffi N'goran, B.; Kolek, V.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Lambrecht, B.; Lau, S.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Le, L. T. T.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Li, J.; Louis, R.; Magard, Y.; Magnan, A.; Mahboub, B.; Majer, I.; Makela, M. J.; Manning, P.; de Manuel Keenoy, E.; Marshall, G. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Melén, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Merk, H.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Mohammad, Y.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mösges, R.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Naclerio, R.; Neou, A.; Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; Niggemann, B.; Nyembue, T. D.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Ouedraogo, S.; Paggiaro, P.; Pali-Schöll, I.; Palmer, S.; Panzner, P.; Papi, A.; Park, H. S.; Pavord, I.; Pawankar, R.; Pfaar, O.; Picard, R.; Pigearias, B.; Pin, I.; Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Portejoie, F.; Postma, D.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Raciborski, F.; Radier Pontal, F.; Repka-Ramirez, S.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Reitamo, S.; Rodenas, F.; Roman Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A.; Rosario, N.; Rosenwasser, L.; Rottem, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G. K.; Serrano, E.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Sheikh, A.; Simons, F. E. R.; Sisul, J. C.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Solé, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spranger, O.; Stelmach, R.; Strandberg, T.; Sunyer, J.; Thijs, C.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; van Hage, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Vezzani, G.; Vichyanond, P.; Viegi, G.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U.; Williams, D. M.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Mercier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patient

  2. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis) : the new generation guideline implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Schunemann, H. J.; Fonseca, J.; Samolinski, B.; Bachert, C.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T.; Cruz, A. A.; Demoly, P.; Hellings, P.; Valiulis, A.; Wickman, M.; Zuberbier, T.; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bedbrook, A.; Bergmann, K. C.; Caimmi, D.; Dahl, R.; Fokkens, W. J.; Grisle, I.; Lodrup Carlsen, K.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Palkonen, S.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Ryan, D.; Valovirta, E.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Aberer, W.; Agache, I.; Adachi, M.; Akdis, C. A.; Akdis, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Arshad, H.; Baiardini, I.; Baigenzhin, A. K.; Barbara, C.; Bateman, E. D.; Beghe, B.; Bel, E. H.; Ben Kheder, A.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bewick, M.; Bieber, T.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bjermer, L.; Blain, H.; Boner, A. L.; Boulet, L. P.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Bosse, I.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Braido, F.; Briggs, A. H.; Brightling, C. E.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Burney, P. G.; Bush, A.; Caballero-Fonseca, F.; Calderon, M. A.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Camuzat, T.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Sarabia, A. M. Cepeda; Chavannes, N. H.; Chatzi, L.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Ciprandi, G.; Cirule, I.; Correia de Sousa, J.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Costa, D. J.; Custovic, A.; Dahlen, S. E.; Darsow, U.; De Carlo, G.; De Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J. A.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Dykewicz, M. S.; El-Gamal, Y.; Emuzyte, R.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fletcher, M.; Fiocchi, A.; Forastiere, F.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gemicioglu, B.; Gereda, J. E.; Gonzalez Diaz, S.; Gotua, M.; Grouse, L.; Guzman, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Heinrich, J.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O. B.; Howarth, P.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M. E.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jares, E. J.; Johnston, S. L.; Joos, G.; Jonquet, O.; Jung, K. S.; Just, J.; Kaidashev, I.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keil, T.; Keith, P. K.; Khaltaev, N.; Klimek, L.; N'Goran, B. Koffi; Kolek, V.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Lambrecht, B.; Lau, S.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Le, L. T. T.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Li, J.; Louis, R.; Magard, Y.; Magnan, A.; Mahboub, B.; Majer, I.; Makela, M. J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; Marshall, G. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Melen, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Merk, H.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Mohammad, Y.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Moesges, R.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Naclerio, R.; Neou, A.; Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; Niggemann, B.; Nyembue, T. D.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Ouedraogo, S.; Paggiaro, P.; Pali-Schoell, I.; Palmer, S.; Panzner, P.; Papi, A.; Park, H. S.; Pavord, I.; Pawankar, R.; Pfaar, O.; Picard, R.; Pigearias, B.; Pin, I.; Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Portejoie, F.; Postma, D.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Raciborski, F.; Pontal, F. Radier; Repka-Ramirez, S.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Reitamo, S.; Rodenas, F.; Roman Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A.; Rosario, N.; Rosenwasser, L.; Rottem, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G. K.; Serrano, E.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Sheikh, A.; Simons, F. E. R.; Sisul, J. C.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Sole, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spranger, O.; Stelmach, R.; Strandberg, T.; Sunyer, J.; Thijs, C.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; van Hage, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Vezzani, G.; Vichyanond, P.; Viegi, G.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U.; Williams, D. M.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Mercier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patient

  3. Role of leukotriene antagonists and antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobanoğlu, Bengü; Toskala, Elina; Ural, Ahmet; Cingi, Cemal

    2013-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common atopic disorder seen in ENT clinics. It is diagnosed by history, physical exam and objective testing. Patient education, environmental control measures, pharmacotherapy, and allergen-specific immunotherapy are the cornerstones of allergic rhinitis treatment and can significantly reduce the burden of disease. Current treatment guidelines include antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, oral and intranasal decongestants, intranasal anticholinergics, intranasal cromolyn, and leukotriene receptor antagonists. In the mechanism of allergic rhinitis, histamine is responsible for major allergic rhinitis symptoms such as rhinorrhea, nasal itching and sneezing. Its effect on nasal congestion is less evident. In contrast, leukotrienes result in increase in nasal airway resistance and vascular permeability. Antihistamines and leukotriene receptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The published literature about combined antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists in mono- or combination therapy is reviewed and presented.

  4. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis): the new generation guideline implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Schunemann, H J; Fonseca, J; Samolinski, B; Bachert, C; Canonica, G W; Casale, T; Cruz, A A; Demoly, P; Hellings, P; Valiulis, A; Wickman, M; Zuberbier, T; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Bedbrook, A; Bergmann, K C; Caimmi, D; Dahl, R; Fokkens, W J; Grisle, I; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Palkonen, S; Papadopoulos, N; Passalacqua, G; Ryan, D; Valovirta, E; Yorgancioglu, A; Aberer, W; Agache, I; Adachi, M; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Baiardini, I; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Bel, E H; Ben Kheder, A; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bewick, M; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Boner, A L; Boulet, L P; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosse, I; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Calderon, M A; Camargos, P A M; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chavannes, N H; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Correia de Sousa, J; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Forastiere, F; Gamkrelidze, A; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grouse, L; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Heinrich, J; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O 'b; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Ivancevich, J C; Jares, E J; Johnston, S L; Joos, G; Jonquet, O; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Khaltaev, N; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Louis, R; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Merk, H; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Mösges, R; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Palmer, S; Panzner, P; Papi, A; Park, H S; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Postma, D; Potter, P; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Reitamo, S; Rodenas, F; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Sheikh, A; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Strandberg, T; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Wagenmann, M; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Williams, D M; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2015-11-01

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patient empowerment. MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) is a simple system centred around the patient which was devised to fill many of these gaps using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) tools and a clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on the most widely used guideline in allergic rhinitis and its asthma comorbidity (ARIA 2015 revision). It is one of the implementation systems of Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA). Three tools are used for the electronic monitoring of allergic diseases: a cell phone-based daily visual analogue scale (VAS) assessment of disease control, CARAT (Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test) and e-Allergy screening (premedical system of early diagnosis of allergy and asthma based on online tools). These tools are combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS) and are available in many languages. An e-CRF and an e-learning tool complete MASK. MASK is flexible and other tools can be added. It appears to be an advanced, global and integrated ICT answer for many unmet needs in allergic diseases which will improve policies and standards. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Role of Predatory Mites in Persistent Nonoccupational Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Poza Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mites can sensitize and induce atopic disease in predisposed individuals and are an important deteriorating factor in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. Although Pyroglyphidae mites have been extensively studied, very scarce reports are available on Cheyletidae spp. especially regarding human respiratory pathology. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the clinical role of this predator mite (Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory antigen in a selected sensitized human population. Fifty-two adult patients were recruited from the outpatient allergy clinic to assess their eligibility for the study. The thirty-seven subjects with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR who fulfilled the ARIA criteria had a positive IgE response confirmed by skin prick test (SPT to C. eruditus. Only those individuals (37/47 with a positive SPT to C. eruditus showed a positive nasal provocation test (NPT, while 10 patients with nonallergic mild-to-moderate persistent rhinitis, control group, had a negative NPT with C. eruditus. The present paper describes a new role for the predator mite Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory allergen in a selected subset of patients in a subtropical environment afflicted with persistent nonoccupational allergic rhinitis.

  6. ALLERGIC RHINITIS: MODERN APPROACHES OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G. Levina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis (AR is global problem of world health care system. Last 50 years the prevalence of AR increased. AR influences social life, sleeping, school progress and capacity for work. AR is frequently combined with bronchial asthma; it is able to induce exacerbation of asthma. The treatment of AR should be directed to the control of symptoms, prophylaxis of complications, improvement of sleeping and quality of life of patients and their parents. Intranasal corticosteroids are the drugs of choice in treatment of children with AR, these medications stop all symptoms of the disease including eyes symptoms.Key words: children, allergic rhinitis, intranasal corticosteroids, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(6:45-51

  7. Association between desloratadine and prednisolone in the treatment of children with acute symptoms of allergic rhinitis: a double-blind, randomized and controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo F. Wandalsen

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: A combination of antihistamines and oral corticosteroids is often used to treat acute symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Objective: To evaluate safety and efficacy of desloratadine plus prednisolone in the treatment of acute symptoms of children (2-12 years with allergic rhinitis, and to compare it to dexchlorpheniramine plus betamethasone. Methods: Children with moderate/severe persistent allergic rhinitis and symptomatic (nasal symptoms score [0-12] ≥ 6 were allocated in a double-blind, randomized fashion to receive dexchlorpheniramine plus betamethasone (n = 105; three daily doses or desloratadine plus prednisolone (n = 105; single dose followed by two of placebo for 7 days. At the beginning and end of the evaluation, the following were obtained: nasal symptoms score, extra nasal symptoms score, peak nasal inspiratory flow, blood biochemistry, and electrocardiogram. Ninety-six children of the dexchlorpheniramine plus betamethasone group and 98 of the desloratadine plus prednisolone group completed the protocol. Results: The two groups were similar regarding initial and final nasal symptoms scores, extra nasal symptoms scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow. A drop of 76.4% and 79.1% for nasal symptoms score, 86.0% and 79.2% for extra nasal symptoms score, as well as an increase of 25.2% and 24.3% for peak nasal inspiratory flow occurred for those treated with desloratadine plus prednisolone and dexchlorpheniramine plus betamethasone, respectively. There were no significant changes in blood chemistry. Sinus tachycardia was the most frequent electrocardiogram change, but with no clinical significance. Drowsiness was reported significantly more often among those of dexchlorpheniramine plus betamethasone group (17.14% × 8.57%, respectively. Conclusion: The desloratadine plus prednisolone combination was able to effectively control acute symptoms of rhinitis in children, improving symptoms and nasal function. Compared to the

  8. Steroids vs immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Backer, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for seasonal allergic rhinitis induced by airborne allergens can be divided into two major groups: symptom-dampening drugs, such as antihistamines and corticosteroids, and disease-modifying drugs in the form of immunotherapy. It has been speculated that depot-injection corticosteroids...... given once or twice a year are a safe and patient-friendly alternative to the time-consuming immunotherapy. Our data indicate otherwise....

  9. Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) in Allergic Rhinitis: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or Anchor-Based Thresholds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eli O; Wallace, Dana; Dykewicz, Mark; Shneyer, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) recommended that allergic rhinitis (AR) studies calculate a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) based on an estimated threshold equal to 30% of the maximum total nasal symptom score. Applying this threshold, their data showed no differences between well-established treatments, and a subsequent analysis using prescribing information found no differences between active treatments and placebo controls. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the application of an evidence-based model to determine MCIDs for AR studies, with an absolute value for an anchor-based threshold and validated methods for calculating distribution-based thresholds. Using the same studies as the AHRQ report, anchor- and distribution-based MCID thresholds were determined for 3 clinical comparisons identified by the AHRQ: (1) oral antihistamine+intranasal corticosteroid (INCS) versus INCS, (2) montelukast versus INCS, and (3) intranasal antihistamine+INCS in a single device versus the monotherapies. The outcomes were compared with those reported using the AHRQ threshold. No treatment comparison met the AHRQ-defined MCID threshold; all treatments were determined to be equivalent for all 3 queries. In contrast, the evidence-based model revealed some differences between treatments: INCS > montelukast; intranasal antihistamine+INCS > either monotherapy. No clinically relevant benefit was observed for adding an oral antihistamine to INCS, but some studies were not optimal choices for quantitative determination of MCIDs. Updating the literature search revealed no additional studies that met the AHRQ inclusion criteria. The evidence-based threshold for MCID determination for AR studies should supersede the threshold recommended in the AHRQ report. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Twenty-four-hour duration of effect of intranasal corticosteroids for seasonal allergic rhinitis symptoms: clinical evidence and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBuske, Lawrence M

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) symptoms are often most severe and/or disruptive during overnight and morning hours, resulting in cognitive/performance impairments and reduced quality of life throughout the following day. Surveys of allergy patients and health care practitioners reveal a common perception that intranasal steroids (INSs), many of which are dosed q.d., fail to adequately relieve symptoms for a full 24 hours. This review assessed whether perceptions of the 24-hour duration of action of INSs correspond with duration of action documented in clinical literature. SAR clinical trial literature of the last 5 years was reviewed to identify studies of INSs incorporating morning instantaneous (A.M. NOW) or instantaneous assessments of 24-hour duration of action. In numerous placebo-controlled trials of INSs in patients with SAR, treatment was associated with significantly greater improvements in A.M. NOW symptoms from baseline versus placebo. For congestion, this is noteworthy, because patients often cite this symptom, especially in the morning, as the most bothersome symptom. Comparison of A.M. NOW and daily scores suggests minimal drop in efficacy at 24 hours postdose. In several studies, INS treatment was found superior to intranasal or oral antihistamines in A.M. NOW symptom improvement. Once-daily INSs have potential for effective 24-hour symptom relief; however, there is an apparent disconnect between these findings and patient/physician perceptions. This discrepancy may be explained, in part, by less-than-ideal treatment adherence among "real-world" patients versus subjects treated in clinical trials. Proactive counseling can encourage proper INS use and help maximize treatment benefits.

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase gene polymorphism in children with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, M; Aydin, H; Aktas, A; Cırık, A A

    2015-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms by impairing folate metabolism may influence the development of allergic diseases. The results of studies evaluating the relationship between MTHFR polymorphisms and atopic disease are controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the polymorphisms of C677T and A1298C for MTHFR gene and allergic rhinitis (AR) in children. Ninety patients followed up with diagnosis of allergic rhinitis in our clinic and 30 children with no allergic diseases were included in the study. All participants were genotyped for the MTHFR (C677T) and (A1298C) polymorphisms. Vitamin b12, folate and homocysteine levels were measured. The mean age of patients was 9.2±2.9 years; 66.7% of the patients were male. There was no significant difference between patient and control groups regarding gender, age and atopy history of the family (p>0.05). The frequency of homozygotes for MTHFR C677T polymorphism in the patient and control groups was 3.3% and 10%, respectively. The frequency of homozygotes for MTHFR A1298C polymorphism among groups was 26.7% and 16.7%, respectively. The association between allergic rhinitis and polymorphisms of C677T and A1298C for MTHFR gene was not statistically significant in patients compared with controls (p>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the patients and the control group in terms of serum vitamin b12, folate and homocysteine levels (p>0.05). We found no evidence for an association between allergic rhinitis and polymorphisms of C677T and A1298C for MTHFR gene in children. Further studies investigating the relationship between MTHFR polymorphism and AR are required. Copyright © 2014 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Does treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease with omeprazole decrease allergic rhinitis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Shirkani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergic disease among population. Its accurate treatment is very important for cutting of allergic march. On the other hand, gasteroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal problems among allergic patients mainly asthmatic cases. It might conflict treatment. Despite of asthma, a few studies have been conducted on the impact of GERD treatment on allergic rhinitis symptoms. In this study, we assessed GERD treatment and its effects on improving of allergic rhinitis patients with GERD. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional study, March - September 2012, 103 consecutive patients with persistent moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis enrolled. For allergic rhinitis patients with GERD 20 mg omeperazole once daily for 6 weeks prescribed, empirically. Conventional allergy treatment continued and finally the allergic rhinitis symptoms were assessed clinically and recorded before, 5th, 10th and 30th days of omeprazole treatment period. Results: Our study included 103 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis who were divided into GERD (n=33, 38% and non-GERD (n=70, 68% groups with the mean age 28 and 25.7 years, respectively. The first group developed significant improvement for GERD symptoms on days 5, 10 and 30 after beginning of therapy (P=0.03. No association was found between GERD treatment and relief of allergic symptoms or TNSS improvement (P>0.05. Data analyzed by Epi info (ver 7 and SPSS software (ver 11.5, and by Chi squeare test and paired T test. P lower than 0.05 was considered as significant. Conclusion: This study showed no significant association between empirical treatment of GERD and improvement of allergic symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis. However, further studies with a larger sample size might be needed.

  13. Comparison of Loratadine and Cetirizine in Perennial Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eftekharian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR represents a global health problem, affecting 5-50% of the population worldwide and numerous classes of pharmacological agents are available for its treatment. Two more popular of these drugs are Loratadine and Cetirizine. There are few direct comparator studies between these two drugs with inconsistent results.Materials and Methods: A randomized, double-blind study for comparison the therapeutic effects of Loratadine and Cetirizine was conducted in an otolaryngologic clinic of a general hospital. Eighty patients with perennial allergic rhinitis were divided into two equal groups. One group received Loratadine 10 mg daily for two weeks and the other group Cetirizine 10 mg daily also for two weeks. Alterations of the allergic rhinitis symptoms including rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal itching and nasal obstruction were compared between the two groups.Results: Severity of all four studied symptoms was reduced by both drugs. Although Cetirizine had a little more efficacy, their difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05. These two medications were most effective in reducing the sneezing and least effective on the nasal obstruction.Conclusion: Loratadine and Cetirizine can reduce symptoms of the perennialallergic rhinitis but their difference is not statistically significant.

  14. Children with allergic and nonallergic rhinitis have a similar risk of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2010-01-01

    Both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis have been associated with increased prevalence of asthma.......Both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis have been associated with increased prevalence of asthma....

  15. The need for patient-focused therapy for children and teenagers with allergic rhinitis: a case-based review of current European practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, AF; Borrego, LM; Rotiroti, G; Scadding, G; Roberts, G

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence, with a negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The treatment modalities for allergic rhinitis include allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory symptomatic treatment and allergen specific immunotherapy. In this review, four cases of children with allergic rhinitis are presented to illustrate how the recently published EAACI Guidelines on Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis can be implemented in clinical pra...

  16. A Retrospective Study of Clinical Response Predictors in Subcutaneous Allergen Immunotherapy With House Dust Mites for Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Ho; Kim, Su Chin; Choi, Hyunna; Jung, Chang Gyu; Ban, Ga Young; Shin, Yoo Seob; Nahm, Dong Ho; Park, Hae Sim; Ye, Young Min

    2018-01-01

    House dust mites (HDM) are major allergens that cause allergic rhinitis (AR). Allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been shown to be clinically beneficial in many clinical trials. Such trials, however, are not reflective of all patient populations. The aim of this study was to describe the efficacy and safety of SCIT in routine clinical practice in Korean adults with AR sensitized to HDM. We reviewed medical records of 304 patients with AR treated at an allergy clinic of a tertiary hospital using SCIT with aluminum hydroxide-adsorbed allergen extract targeting HDM alone or with pollens for at least 1 year from 2000 to 2012. Patients with asthma were excluded. Rates of remission, defined as no further requirement of maintenance medication, over time were determined by means of life tables and extension of survival analysis. Specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels to HDM were categorized into 6 classes. The mean time until achieving remission was 4.9±0.1 years, and the cumulative incidence of remission from AR was 76.6%. Severe AR (odds ratio [OR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-0.69; P=0.001), specific IgE levels to HDM ≥17.5 kU/L (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.01-3.37; P=0.045), and duration of immunotherapy ≥3 years (OR, 7.37; 95% CI, 3.50-15.51; P<0.001) were identified as significant predictors of clinical remission during SCIT for patients with AR sensitized to HDM. Overall, 73 patients (24.0%) experienced adverse reactions to SCIT, and only 1 case of anaphylaxis (0.3%) developed. SCIT with HDM was found to be effective and safe for patients with AR. Specific IgE levels to HDM and a duration of SCIT ≥3 years may be predictors of clinical responses to SCIT in AR patients. Copyright © 2018 The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology · The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease

  17. Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sheryl

    2014-03-01

    Rhinitis is caused by a variety of allergic and nonallergic mechanisms. Mild disease can usually be managed with avoidance measures alone. Allergen removal can also improve the severity of allergic rhinitis and can reduce the need for medications. Allergic rhinitis is represented by sneezing, nasal congestion, nasal pruritus, and rhinorrhea. Oral antihistamines should be used to treat patients with mild or occasional seasonal allergic rhinitis. Because of the variance in causes of nonallergic rhinitis, treatments also vary. Irrigation and debridement are the standard treatment of atrophic rhinitis. For gustatory rhinitis, pretreatment with ipratropium bromide can be used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnosing allergic rhinitis – is there a need?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These allergic diseases or syndromes are common and include eczema, asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, food allergies and others. Rhinitis is the commonest manifestation, with a prevalence rate of between 4.5% and 38%. In South Africa the prevalence rate in teenagers is 28%.1. It is accepted that both asthma and rhinitis ...

  19. Trichuris suis ova therapy for allergic rhinitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Arnved, John; Rønborg, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections can protect against allergic airway inflammation in experimental models and have been associated with a reduced risk of atopy and a reduced course of asthma in some observational studies. Although no clinical evidence exists to support the use of helminth therapy...... for allergic disease, the helminth Trichuris suis has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease....

  20. Extranasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis are difficult to treat and affect quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeravich Jaruvongvanich

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Extranasal symptom scores correlated well with physical health and mental health in allergic rhinitis patients. Assessment of extranasal symptoms should be included to evaluate disease severity and assess therapeutic outcomes. Clinical trial NCT02000648, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  1. [Analysis of food allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis in Guangzhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiwen; Chen, Fei fei; Li, Jing

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the distribution of multiple food allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis in Guangzhou area. Skin prick tests were performed in 1529 patients with allergic rhinitis. The result was discussed by the age of patients, the types of allergens and the response intensity. Five hundred and eighty-seven cases were positive. The most important food allergens were crab (25.6%), prawn (19.4%). There were statistical differences of positive reactions among three age groups (P food allergen was seafood. Crab and prawn are the main food allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis in Guangzhou. It is helpful for clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Objective assessments of allergic and nonallergic rhinitis in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, B L K; Kreiner-Møller, E; Bisgaard, H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic and nonallergic rhinitis are common childhood disorders. OBJECTIVE: To study nasal eosinophilia and nasal airway patency in young children with allergic and nonallergic rhinitis to assess the pathology behind such diagnoses. METHODS: We investigated 255 children at six years...

  3. Expression of Pendrin Periostin in Allergic Rhinitis Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Ishida

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: : Production of pendrin and periostin is upregulated in allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, and aspirin-induced asthma. These findings suggest that pendrin can induce mucus production and that periostin can induce tissue fibrosis and remodeling in the nasal mucosa. Therefore, these mediators may be therapeutic target candidates for allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, and aspirin- induced asthma.

  4. Differential diagnosis of allergic rhinitis and sinusitis an expert system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creider, R.D.; Sundar Singh, P.S. [Texas A& M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Nasal congestion is a common problem for many people. It is a symptom of chronic sinusitis and also a characteristic of allergic rhinitis. Individuals frequently confuse sinusitis and allergic rhinitis. The expert system described below will diagnose the problem to be either rhinitis or sinusitis. In this paper we describe the expert system, the need for such an expert system and the process of developing the system.

  5. High incidence of sensitization to ornamental plants in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahillon, V; Saussez, S; Michel, O

    2006-09-01

    A few indoor plants have been described as potential allergens, in single case reports of allergic rhinitis. There is no data evaluating the prevalence of allergic sensitization to these plants. The relationship between owning indoor ornamental plants with the risk to be sensitized has been evaluated in atopic rhinitis. A group of 59 patients with allergic rhinitis were submitted to skin prick tests (SPT) using both the leafs of their own plant and commercial extracts of the most frequent airborne allergens. A control group of 15 healthy subjects was tested with the same allergens. While no subject from the control group developed a significant SPT to any of the tested plants, 78% of allergic rhinitis had positive SPT to at least one plant, the most frequent sensitization being Ficus benjamina, yucca, ivy and palm tree. In allergic rhinitis, indoor plants should be considered as potential allergens.

  6. Antioxidant activities of curcumin in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıntoprak, Niyazi; Kar, Murat; Acar, Mustafa; Berkoz, Mehmet; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the antioxidant effects of curcumin in an experimental rat model of allergic rhinitis (AR). Female Wistar albino rats (n = 34) were divided randomly into four groups: healthy rats (control group, n = 8), AR with no treatment (AR + NoTr group, n = 10), AR with azelastine HCl treatment (AR + Aze group, n = 8), and AR with curcumin treatment (AR + Curc group, n = 8). On day 28, total blood IgE levels were measured. For measurement of antioxidant activity, the glutathione (GSH) level and catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were measured in both inferior turbinate tissue and serum. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured only in inferior turbinate tissue, and paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) activities were measured only in serum. Statistically significant differences were found for all antioxidant measurements (GSH levels and CAT, SOD, GSH-Px activities in the serum and tissue, MDA levels in the tissue, and PON and ARE activities in the serum) between the four groups. In the curcumin group, serum SOD, ARE, and PON and tissue GSH values were higher than the control group. Moreover, tissue GSH levels and serum GSH-Px activities in the curcumin group were higher than in the AR + NoTr group. In the azelastine group, except MDA, antioxidant measurement values were lower than in the other groups. Curcumin may help to increase antioxidant enzymes and decrease oxidative stress in allergic rhinitis. We recommend curcumin to decrease oxidative stress in allergic rhinitis.

  7. Management of Allergic Rhinitis: A Review for the Community Pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J Russell; Dolen, William K

    2017-12-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a highly prevalent disease affecting the quality of life of millions of North Americans. The management of allergic rhinitis includes allergen avoidance, pharmacotherapy, and immunotherapy. Current pharmacologic options include oral and intranasal antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, oral and intranasal decongestants, oral and intranasal anticholinergics, and leukotriene receptor antagonists. Second-generation oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids are the mainstays of treatment, with practice guidelines recommending intranasal corticosteroids as first-line treatment for moderate to severe allergic rhinitis. Clinical trials studying a widely used intranasal corticosteroid, fluticasone propionate, in comparison with second-generation oral antihistamines, cetirizine, loratadine, or montelukast, were selected to support the comparative review of the efficacy and tolerability of these 2 classes of medications. Studies evaluating the combination of fluticasone propionate with an oral antihistamine were also included to review the efficacy and tolerability of combination therapy to treat allergic rhinitis. Studies comparing fluticasone propionate with cetirizine had mixed findings; fluticasone propionate was found to have equal or greater efficacy in reducing nasal symptom scores. Combination therapy of fluticasone propionate and the oral antihistamine, loratadine, was found to have efficacy comparable with that of intranasal corticosteroid alone. Many of these medications are available over the counter in the pharmacy, and the community pharmacist plays an important role as part of the patient's health care team in managing this disease. Pharmacotherapy is patient-specific, based on type, duration, and severity of symptoms, comorbidities, prior treatment, and patient preference. This article aims to provide an overview of the pathophysiology, available treatment options, guideline recommendations, and role of the pharmacist for

  8. The impact of allergic rhinitis and asthma on human nasal and bronchial epithelial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, Ariane H.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Luiten, Silvia; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Bel, Elisabeth H.; Sterk, Peter J.; van Drunen, Cornelis M.

    2013-01-01

    The link between upper and lower airways in patients with both asthma and allergic rhinitis is still poorly understood. As the biological complexity of these disorders can be captured by gene expression profiling we hypothesized that the clinical expression of rhinitis and/or asthma is related to

  9. [Aeroallergens becoming more significant for allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudack, C; Sachse, F; Jörg, S

    2003-09-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a very common disease with an increasing prevalence to 10-20% over the last 40 years. These studies propose different reasons for this increase. An increasing exposure to outdoor allergens is shown in different geographical and climatic areas, like the rising frequency of reactions to cockroaches in Europe or to mites in tropical areas. New aero-allergens have appeared in the animal and vegetable realms, both in home and professional environments. Respiratory allergy to Ficus benjamina inaugurated a new type of allergy caused by airborne allergens from non-pollinating plants. This is specially important because of the cross-reactions to latex. The immunochemical structures of airborne allergens are now better known, and the homologous structures of different allergens largely explain certain cross-reactions. In the future, recombinant allergens will probably lead to better understanding of the role of allergens in inducing and maintaining the allergic reaction and should promote our approach to diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Capsaicin for non-allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, Artur; Segboer, Christine; Gorissen, Rob; van Drunen, Cornelis M; Fokkens, Wytske

    2015-07-14

    There are many forms of rhinitis. Patients are diagnosed with non-allergic rhinitis when anatomic, infectious and allergic aetiologies have been excluded. The symptoms, including nasal congestion, blockage or obstruction, clear rhinorrhoea, sneezing and, less frequently, nasal itching, can range from mild to debilitating. It affects between 25% and 50% of patients with rhinitis. Several medications are widely used in the treatment of non-allergic rhinitis, including oral and topical nasal antihistamines, intranasal and (rarely) systemic corticosteroids, and anticholinergics. Capsaicin, the active component of chili peppers, delivered intranasally, is considered a treatment option for non-allergic rhinitis. To assess the effectiveness of capsaicin in the management of non-allergic rhinitis compared with no therapy, placebo or other topical or systemic medications, or two or more of the above therapies in combination, or different capsaicin regimens. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 5); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 June 2015. Randomised controlled trials in adult patients with non-allergic rhinitis comparing intranasal capsaicin with no therapy, placebo or other topical or systemic medications, or their combinations. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included four studies (five publications) involving 302 participants with idiopathic non-allergic rhinitis. All the included studies described patients with moderately severe, idiopathic non-allergic rhinitis who were between the ages of 16 and 65. Studies had follow-up periods ranging from four to 38 weeks. The overall risk of bias in the studies was either high or unclear (two studies had overall high risk of

  11. Efficacy of Sublingual Immunotherapy with Dermatophagoides farinae Extract in Monosensitized and Polysensitized Patients with Allergic Rhinitis: Clinical Observation and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Xia Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate differences in the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with Dermatophagoides farinae drops in monosensitized and polysensitized allergic rhinitis patients. Methods. The patients enrolled in the study were treated for more than one year by sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT using Dermatophagoides farinae drops and were divided into a monosensitized group (n=20 and a polysensitized group (n=30. Total nasal symptom scores of patients before and after SLIT were analyzed to evaluate the curative effect. The phylogenetic tree of dust mite allergens as well as other allergens that were tested by skin prick test was constructed to help the analysis. Results. There was no significant difference in the efficacy of SLIT between dust mite monosensitized and polysensitized patients. Conclusions. Both dust mite monosensitized and polysensitized patients could be cured by SLIT using Dermatophagoides farinae drops. This study provides a reference for the selection of allergens to be used in immunotherapy for polysensitized AR patients.

  12. Follow-up study in local allergic rhinitis shows a consistent entity not evolving to systemic allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, Carmen; Campo, Paloma; Zambonino, Maria Angeles; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Torres, Maria J; Melendez, Lidia; Herrera, Rocio; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Canto, Gabriela; Blanca, Miguel

    2014-04-01

    Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is a common disease that affects 25.7% of the rhinitis population and more than 47% of patients previously diagnosed with nonallergic rhinitis. Whether LAR is the first step in the natural history of allergic rhinitis (AR) with systemic atopy or a consistent entity is unknown. The aim was to evaluate the natural history of a population with LAR of recent onset and the development of AR and asthma. A prospective 10-year follow-up study with initial cohorts of 194 patients with LAR of recent onset and 130 healthy controls is being undertaken. A clinical-demographic questionnaire, spirometry, skin prick test, and specific IgE to aeroallergens were done yearly. Nasal allergen provocation tests with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Alternaria alternata, Olea europea, and a mix of grass pollen were performed at baseline and after 5 years. At disease onset, most of the patients with LAR had moderate-to-severe persistent-perennial rhinitis; conjunctivitis and asthma were the main comorbidities (51.1% and 18.8%, respectively), and D pteronyssinus was the most relevant aeroallergen (51.1%). After 5 years of follow-up, a worsening of rhinitis was detected in 26.2%, with an increase in symptom persistence and severity, and new associations with conjunctivitis and asthma. Atopy was detected by skin prick test and/or serum specific-IgE in patients with LAR (6.81%) and in controls (4.5%). This study shows a similar rate of development of systemic atopy in LAR and controls, which suggests that LAR is an entity well differentiated from AR. To determine the natural course of LAR more precisely, this study is in progress to complete 10 years of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of persistent allergic rhinitis via acupuncture at the sphenopalatine acupoint: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mi, Jiaoping; Chen, Xinye; Lin, Xiaoyan; Guo, Jianling; Chen, Hongtao; Wei, Liao; Hong, Haiyu

    2018-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a common respiratory disease. Acupuncture is used to treat it in traditional Chinese medicine, and generally, the L120, ST2 and ST36 acupoints are selected in clinical practice. We report a new method of acupuncture at the sphenopalatine acupoint (SPA) for treatment of persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR). The effect of this treatment was investigated using two different needling depths. The efficacy of this treatment was associated with accurate stimulation of t...

  14. Allergic rhinitis in children: incidence and treatment in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bot, Cindy M A; Moed, Heleen; Schellevis, François G; de Groot, Hans; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; van der Wouden, Johannes C

    2009-09-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0-17 yr in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establish whether changes have occurred. A comparison was made with data from the first (1987) and second (2001) Dutch national surveys of general practice on children aged 0-17 yr. Incidence rates were compared by age, sex, level of urbanization and season. The management of the general practitioner was assessed regarding drug prescriptions and referrals to medical specialists, and compared with the clinical guideline issued in 1996. The incidence rate of allergic rhinitis increased from 6.6 (1987) to 9.2 (2001) per 1000 person-years. We found a male predominance with a switch in adolescence to a female predominance at both time points. The increase in incidence was the highest in rural (allergic rhinitis compared to 1987. In 1987, prescribed medication consisted mainly of nasal corticosteroids (36%) and in 2001 of oral antihistamines (45%). Although a clinical guideline was not issued until 1996, overall, the treatment of allergic rhinitis by general practitioners was in both years in accordance with the current clinical guideline, but with a stronger adherence in 2001. The results show an increased incidence in the past decades of allergic rhinitis in children in Dutch general practice. The shift to a smaller spectrum of prescriptions in 2001 may be a result of the 1996 clinical guideline.

  15. Rupatadine: a new selective histamine H1 receptor and platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist. A review of pharmacological profile and clinical management of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Iñaki; Merlos, Manuel; García-Rafanell, Julián

    2003-06-01

    Rupatadine is a new agent for the management of diseases with allergic inflammatory conditions, such as seasonal and perennial rhinitis. The pharmacological profile of rupatadine offers particular benefits in terms of a strong antagonist activity towards both histamine H1 receptors and platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptors. Rupatadine has a rapid onset of action, and its long-lasting effect (>24 h) permits once-daily dosing. Rupatadine should not be used in combination with the cytochrome P450 inhibitors, such as erythromycin or ketoconazole, due to an increase in AUC and Cmax for rupatadine, although no clinically relevant adverse events have been reported. In addition, rupatadine, at the recommended dose of 10 mg, has been shown to be free of sedative effects and not to cause significant changes in the corrected QT interval in special populations, including the elderly, nor when coadministered with erythromycin or ketoconazole. Preclinical data have also shown that rupatadine and its main active metabolites did not interfere with cloned human HERG channel and did not affect in vitro isolated dog Purkinje fibers at concentrations at least 2000 times greater than those obtained with therapeutic doses in humans. Rupatadine is clinically effective in relieving symptoms in patients with seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis. Newly published data on its efficacy and safety suggest that this compound may improve the nasal and non-nasal symptoms in comparison to other currently available second generation H1 receptor antihistamines. 2003 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor gene and the association with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Inhong; Oh, Yeon-Kyun; Lee, Sang Heon; Jung, Ha Min; Chae, Soo-Cheon; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2010-03-01

    The TLRs gene encodes the principal innate immunity receptor in humans. The TLR2 Arg753Gln and Arg677Trp polymorphisms have been associated with a reduced response of monocytes and cell lines to challenge with mycobacteria. The TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms have been associated with a reduction in the inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide in humans. It has been suggested that TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms may be associated with allergic responses; thus, we hypothesized that TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms may modify the relative risk for development of allergic rhinitis. The Taqman assay and high-resolution melt (HRM) were used for genotyping. We analyzed two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 597T>C and 1350T>C) in the TLR2 gene and 1 SNP (4216G>C) in the TLR4 gene. We compared the genotype of these SNPs in patients with allergic rhinitis and controls without allergic rhinitis. We also estimated the haplotype frequencies between the two groups. The genotype and allele frequencies of the 597T>C and 1350T>C SNPs in the TLR2 gene were not significantly different between the patients with allergic rhinitis and controls (P > 0.05). The genotype and allele frequencies of 4216G>C in the TLR4 gene were not significantly different between the patients with allergic rhinitis and controls (P > 0.05). Haplotype analysis of the following two different (597)-(1350) major haplotypes (frequency >0.05) were present in the TLR2 gene: T-C and C-C. The C-C haplotype was positively associated with allergic rhinitis (P = 0.048). Our study suggests that the TLR2 gene polymorphisms might be susceptible to the development of allergic rhinitis. Further functional studies of TLR2 genetics in light of the associations with allergic rhinitis inflammation would help clarify the role of TLR2 genetics in clinical evaluations.

  17. Characteristics and predictors of allergic rhinitis undertreatment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinozzi, F; Murgia, N; Baldacci, S; Maio, S; Pala, A P; Casciari, C; dell'Omo, M; Viegi, G

    2016-03-01

    Although allergic rhinitis is considered a raising medical problem in many countries it is often undertreated. The reasons for this phenomenon are not completely clear.The aim of this study is to evaluate factors associated with allergic rhinitis under-/no treatment.A sample of 518 allergic rhinitis patients recruited by their primary care physicians, as a part of the ARGA study, were invited to fill in a specific questionnaire regarding rhinitis symptoms, treatment, and rhinitis-related work/social disability. Chi-square test and logistic regression were performed to assess risk factors for allergic rhinitis under-/no treatment.Over one out of four patients had no treatment despite the symptoms and 13.5% were inadequately treated. Participants with asthma (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.30-0.75) and conjunctivitis (0.44, 95% CI 0.27-0.71) were at lower risk of allergic rhinitis under-/no treatment: in asthmatics this reduction was related mainly to the concomitant asthma treatment (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.10-0.37).Asthmatics with under-/not treated rhinitis had the highest prevalence of rhinitis-related quality of life impairment.Under-/no treatment for allergic rhinitis is still rather frequent despite the relevance of this disease. The simultaneous presence of asthma and an anti-asthmatic therapy are able to influence positively the treatment. Targeted interventions toward a better characterization and a tight follow-up of rhinitis patient without asthma are needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. A review of clinical efficacy, safety, new developments and adherence to allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis caused by allergy to ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkalj M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mirjana Turkalj,1,2 Ivana Banic,1 Srdjan Ante Anzic1 1Children’s Hospital Srebrnjak, Zagreb, 2Faculty of Medicine, JJ Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia Abstract: Allergic rhinitis is a common health problem in both children and adults. The number of patients allergic to ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia is on the rise throughout Europe, having a significant negative impact on the patients’ and their family’s quality of life. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT has disease-modifying effects and can induce immune tolerance to allergens. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy with ragweed extracts/preparations have clear positive clinical efficacy, especially over pharmacological treatment, even years after the treatment has ended. AIT also has very good safety profiles with extremely rare side effects, and the extracts/preparations used in AIT are commonly well tolerated by patients. However, patient adherence to treatment with AIT seems to be quite low, mostly due to the fact that treatment with AIT is relatively time-demanding and, moreover, due to patients not receiving adequate information and education about the treatment before it starts. AIT is undergoing innovations and improvements in clinical efficacy, safety and patient adherence, especially with new approaches using new adjuvants, recombinant or modified allergens, synthetic peptides, novel routes of administration (epidermal or intralymphatic, and new protocols, which might make AIT more acceptable for a wider range of patients and novel indications. Patient education and support (eg, recall systems is one of the most important goals for AIT in the future, to further enhance treatment success. Keywords: allergic rhinitis, allergy, ragweed, allergen-specific immunotherapy, Ambrosia artemisiifolia

  19. Is neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio associated with the severity of allergic rhinitis in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, Mahmut; Evcimik, Muhammed Fatih; Cirik, Ahmet Adnan

    2016-10-01

    Neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) could be an important measure of systemic inflammation. There is a lack of knowledge about the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in rhinitis. We aimed to determine the relationship between the clinical parameters of allergic rhinitis and NLR in children. 438 children who were diagnosed with allergic rhinitis and followed up in our hospital were included in the study. The control group included 180 control children with no evidence of allergic disease. The immunoglobulin E levels, skin prick tests and complete blood count were measured. Mean NLR was 1.77 ± 1.67 in the study group and 1.70 ± 1.65 in the control group. Mean NLR was significantly higher in children with allergic rhinitis compared to controls (p allergic rhinitis were grouped according to the severity of AR as Group I (mild group) and Group II (moderate/severe group). No statistically significant difference was present between groups in terms of gender, age, familial atopy, exposure to smoke, the presence of asthma and/or eczema, the percentage of eosinophil, serum IgE levels, number of positive sensitivity, and sensitivity to allergens (p > 0.05). However, NLR was significantly higher in the moderate/severe AR compared to mild AR (p allergic rhinitis compared to the control group. In addition, elevated ratio is associated with the severity of allergic rhinitis in children. Neutrophil-lymphocyte can be used as an indicator of inflammation in allergic rhinitis. But further studies are needed in this issue.

  20. Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis Is Associated with Improved Attention Performance in Children: The Allergic Rhinitis Cohort Study for Kids (ARCO-Kids)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Rhee, Chae Seo; Han, Doo Hee; Won, Tae-Bin; Kim, Dong-Young; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been well known that pediatric allergic rhinitis was associated with poor performance at school due to attention deficit. However, there were no cohort studies for the effect of treatment of allergic rhinitis on attention performance in pediatric population. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether attention performance was improved after treatment in children with allergic rhinitis. METHODS: In this ARCO-Kids (Allergic Rhinitis Cohort Study for Kids), consecu...

  1. Trichuris suis ova therapy for allergic rhinitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Arnved, John; Rønborg, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections can protect against allergic airway inflammation in experimental models and have been associated with a reduced risk of atopy and a reduced course of asthma in some observational studies. Although no clinical evidence exists to support the use of helminth therapy for...

  2. Allergic rhinitis: more than just a stuffy nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borres, Magnus P

    2009-07-01

    Allergic rhinitis is more than just sneezing and an itchy nose. Complications of this disease are numerous and can have a significant impact, both mentally and physically. That is why it is important not only to detect, investigate and treat allergic rhinitis but also to actively identify potential complications. Mental functions such as learning, sleep and activity levels can deteriorate, and the eustachian tubes, sinuses and airway functions can be affected. Otitis, sinusitis and asthma are overrepresented among individuals who suffer from allergic rhinitis. This article highlights how allergic rhinitis can affect cognitive functions, and what consequences this can have on school performance, work and quality of life. Health professionals and school personnel need to increase their awareness of the ramifications of this disease and actively work to prevent deterioration in both academic achievement and workplace productivity.

  3. Allergic rhinitis - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 143. Read More Allergen Allergic rhinitis Allergies - overview Allergy testing - skin Asthma and allergy - ...

  4. Up-date on neuro-immune mechanisms involved in allergic and non-allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerven, L.; Boeckxstaens, G.; Hellings, P.

    2012-01-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) is a common disorder, which can be defined as chronic nasal inflammation, independent of systemic IgE-mediated mechanisms. Symptoms of NAR patients mimic those of allergic rhinitis (AR) patients. However, AR patients can easily be diagnosed with skin prick test or

  5. Local Nasal Specific Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passalacqua Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The possibility of producing local hyposensitization by administering allergens via mucosal routes was envisaged at the beginning of 1900, and local nasal immunotherapy has been extensively studied since the 1970s. Presently, there are 21 randomized controlled trials being conducted with the most common allergens, consistently showing the clinical efficacy of local nasal immunotherapy for rhinitis. Other advantages are that it has an optimal safety profile and can be self-administered at home by the patient. Moreover, there are several data from animal models and from humans that confirm the immunomodulatory effect of intranasally administered antigens. On the other hand, local nasal immunotherapy seems to be effective only on rhinitis symptoms and requires a particular technique of administration. For these reasons, its clinical use is progressively declining in favour of the sublingual route although nasal immunotherapy is validated in official documents and remains a viable alternative to injection.

  6. Homeopathy for allergic rhinitis: protocol for a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a global health problem that is often treated with homeopathy. The objective of this review will be to evaluate the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment of allergic rhinitis. Methods/Design The authors will conduct a systematic review. We will search Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, CAM-Quest, Google Scholar and reference lists of identified studies up to December 2013. The review will include randomized controlled trials that evaluate homeopathic treatment of allergic rhinitis. Studies with participants of all ages, with acute or chronic comorbidities will be included. Patients with immunodeficiency will not be included. The diagnosis will be based on the published guidelines of diagnosis and classification. Studies of all homeopathy modalities (clinical, complex and classical homeopathy, and isopathy) will be included. We will include trials with both active controls (conventional therapy, standard care) and placebo controls. The primary outcomes are: an improvement of global symptoms recorded in validated daily or weekly diaries and any scores from validated visual analogue scales; the total Quality of Life Score (such as the Juniper RQLQ);individual symptoms scores which include any appropriate measures of nasal obstruction, runny nose, sneezing, itching, and eye symptoms; and number of days requiring medication. Secondary outcomes selected will include serum immunoglobin E (IgE) levels, individual ocular symptoms, adverse events, and the use of rescue medication. Treatment effects will be measured by calculating the mean difference and the standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous data. Risk ratio or, if feasible, odds ratio will be calculated with 95% CI for dichotomous data. After assessing clinical and statistical heterogeneity, meta-analysis will be performed, if appropriate. The individual participant will be the unit of analysis. Descriptive information on missing data will be

  7. Treating allergic rhinitis by sublingual immunotherapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoforo Incorvaia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Allergic rhinitis (AR is a disease with high and increasing prevalence. The management of AR includes allergen avoidance, anti-allergic drugs, and allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT, but only the latter works on the causes of allergy and, due to its mechanisms of action, modifies the natural history of the disease. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was proposed in the 1990s as an option to traditional, subcutaneous immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed all the available controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of SLIT. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Thus far, more than 60 trials, globally evaluated in 6 meta-analyses, showed that SLIT is an effective and safe treatment for AR. However, it must be noted that to expect clinical efficacy in the current practice SLIT has to be performed following the indications from controlled trials, that is, sufficiently high doses to be regularly administered for at least 3 consecutive years.

  8. The link between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma: a prospective population-based study. The Copenhagen Allergy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linneberg, A; Henrik Nielsen, N; Frølund, L; Madsen, F; Dirksen, A; Jørgensen, T

    2002-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma are manifestations of the same disease entity. We aimed to investigate the relationship between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. Participants in a population-based study of 15-69-year-olds in 1990 were invited to a follow-up in 1998. A total of 734 subjects were examined on two occasions eight years apart. Allergic rhinitis to pollen was defined as a history of nasal symptoms on exposure to pollens and IgE specific to pollen. Allergic asthma to pollen was defined as a history of lower airway symptoms on exposure to pollens and IgE specific to pollen. Similarly, diagnoses of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma to animals or mite were defined. At follow-up, all subjects with allergic asthma to pollen (n = 52) had in addition allergic rhinitis to pollen. In the longitudinal analysis, there were a total of 28 new (incident) cases of allergic asthma to pollen. They all had allergic rhinitis to pollen at baseline, or had developed allergic rhinitis to pollen at follow-up. Accordingly, allergic rhinitis to animals and mite were ubiquitous in subjects with allergic asthma to animals and mite, respectively. The results support the hypothesis that allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma are manifestations of the same disease entity.

  9. Allergic Sensitization, Rhinitis and Tobacco Smoke Exposure in US Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargorodsky, Josef; Garcia-Esquinas, Esther; Galán, Iñaki; Navas-Acien, Ana; Lin, Sandra Y

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco exposure has been linked with sinonasal pathology and may be associated with allergic sensitization. This study evaluates the association between exposure to active smoking or secondhand smoke (SHS) and the prevalence of rhinitis and allergic sensitization in the US adult population. Cross-sectional study in 4,339 adults aged 20-85 in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2006. Never smoking was defined as reported lifetime smoking less than 100 cigarettes and serum cotinine levels 10 ng/mL. Self-reported rhinitis was based on symptoms during the past 12 months, and allergen sensitization was defined as a positive response to any of the 19 specific IgE antigens tested. Almost half of the population (43%) had detectable levels of IgE specific to at least one inhaled allergen and 32% reported a history of rhinitis. After multivariate adjustment, there was a statistically significant association between the highest serum cotinine tertile and rhinitis in active smokers (OR 1.42; 95%CI 1.00-2.00). The association between active smoking and rhinitis was stronger in individuals without allergic sensitization (OR 2.47; 95%CI 1.44-4.23). There was a statistically significant association between increasing cotinine tertiles and decreased odds of inhaled allergen sensitization (p-trend rhinitis symptoms, but not with allergic sensitization. The results indicate that the relationship between tobacco smoke exposure and sinonasal pathology in adults may be independent of allergic sensitization.

  10. 241 Nasal Cytology is Important in the Classification of Patients with Allergic and Non-Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mion, Olavo; Salgado, Daniel; Carvalho, Thiago; Mello, Joao

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study is the classification and clinical characterization of patients with allergic rhinitis and non-allergic and differentiate the presence of eosinophils and neutrophils in nasal cytology. Methods Prospective study of 405 patients with chronic symptoms of sneezes, pruritus, nasal congestion and rhinorrhea were evaluated by clinical examination, skin prick test and nasal cytology. Patients with diseases and/or treatments that could alter the outcome of these tes...

  11. Extranasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis are difficult to treat and affect quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Mongkolpathumrat, Pungjai; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong

    2016-04-01

    Total nasal symptom score is widely used to evaluate the severity of allergic rhinitis, but the clinical significance of extranasal symptoms is largely unknown. We wished to analyze the presenting symptoms in allergic rhinitis, as well as their relationship with quality of life (QoL) and therapeutic outcomes. Presenting symptoms and QoL were assessed using the Optum™ SF-12v2(®) Health Survey in 260 patients with allergic rhinitis. Clinical response at 3 months after treatment was measured. Ten most common symptoms presenting with at least moderate severity in allergic rhinitis were: blocked nose (82.7%), rhinorrhea (75.0%), sneeze (70.9%), itchy nose (68.5%), fatigue (63.6%), mouth breathing (61.1%), daytime somnolence (52.7%), postnasal drip (49.1%), itchy eyes (47.3%), and dry mouth (46.3%). Severity of sneeze was correlated with physical component summary (PCS) whereas postnasal drip and daytime somnolence were correlated with mental component summary (MCS). Severity of dry mouth was correlated with PCS and MCS. The symptoms with the highest severity scores after treatment were blocked nose, postnasal drip, fatigue, and dry mouth, respectively. Extranasal symptom scores correlated well with physical health and mental health in allergic rhinitis patients. Assessment of extranasal symptoms should be included to evaluate disease severity and assess therapeutic outcomes. Clinical trial NCT02000648, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Natural course and comorbidities of allergic and nonallergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Marit; Stjärne, Pär; Asarnoj, Anna; Kull, Inger; van Hage, Marianne; Wickman, Magnus; Toskala, Elina

    2012-02-01

    Not much data are available from large, unselected, birth cohort studies on the natural course and comorbidities of rhinitis in children. To study phenotypes of rhinitis in relation to the natural course and comorbidities of allergic diseases in preschool-age and early school-age children. We analyzed data from a birth cohort of 2024 children, for whom information on IgEs against 8 common inhaled allergens was available, collected at age 4 and 8 years. The children were assigned to groups of allergic rhinitis (rhinitis with sensitization to allergens), nonallergic rhinitis (rhinitis without sensitization), allergic sensitization but no rhinitis, or neither rhinitis nor sensitization. The proportion of children with allergic rhinitis increased from 5% to 14% from age 4 to 8 years, whereas the proportion of children with nonallergic rhinitis decreased slightly over the same period of development, from 8% to 6%. Of the children with allergic rhinitis when they were 4 years old, 12% underwent remission by the time they were 8 years old; of the children with nonallergic rhinitis, 73% underwent remission during this period of development. Among 4-year-olds without rhinitis who were sensitized to allergen, 56% had allergic rhinitis when they were 8 years old. Among 4- and 8-year-olds, allergic rhinitis and nonallergic rhinitis were associated with asthma, eczema, and food hypersensitivity. Twenty-five percent of 8-year-olds with allergic rhinitis also had oral allergy syndrome. Fewer preschool-age children with allergic rhinitis undergo remission than do those with nonallergic rhinitis. Sensitization to inhaled allergens at an early age (4 years) precedes the development of allergic rhinitis, whereas symptoms of rhinitis do not. Oral allergy syndrome is common among 8-year-olds with allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Allergic Rhinitis: A neglected disease — A community based assessment among adults in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, B; Vibha; Singla, R; Chowdhury, R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Allergic Rhinitis is rather erroneously viewed as a trivial disease. It is important in that it can significantly affect quality of life. There is paucity of community based prevalence studies on the disease in India. This study was planned to assess the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in adults, the proportion of asthmatics among them, risk factors associated and treatment seeking behaviour among the patients. Materials and Methods: A community based cross sectional study was conducted in Mehrauli, South Delhi among 1200 adults, aged 30 years and over selected by systematic random sampling from two randomly selected wards. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect information regarding symptoms, risk factors and treatment seeking behaviour. Allergic Rhinitis was diagnosed as per ARIA guidelines. Spirometry was done to diagnose asthma among them. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done to find the association of risk factors with disease. Results: The prevalence of Allergic Rhinitis was found to be 11% (132 subjects) and 33.3% (44 patients) among them also had asthma. Overcrowding (aOR = 6.4), absence of cross-ventilation (aOR = 2.5), occupational exposure to dust/smoke (aOR = 2.1), tobacco smoking (aOR = 2.1), family history of allergic diseases (aOR = 2.7) and clinical allergy (aOR = 10.2) were found to be independent risk factors associated with Rhinitis. More patients of Rhinitis with asthma (75%) took treatment, relative to those without asthma (40%) who, mostly relied on home remedies (42%) or, did not seek any treatment (18%) (P = 0.031). Interpretations and Conclusion: The burden of Allergic Rhinitis is high with a considerable overlap with asthma. These allergic diseases and emphasize the importance of early and regular treatment. PMID:26119436

  14. Association of Estrogen-Related Traits with Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliś, Katarzyna; Wronka, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen's role in allergic diseases has recently been of considerable interest. The present article seeks to determine the relationship between estrogen-dependent traits and allergic rhinitis. The following traits were considered: digit ratio, age at menarche, regularity of menstrual cycles, and the waist to hip ratio. The study consisted of surveys and measurement data collected from 768 female university undergraduates. One hundred and sixty eight undergraduates (21.9%) had been diagnosed with allergic rhinitis. The results of logistic regression show that in women with a high digit ratio, indicating exposure to a higher estrogen level in the prenatal period, the risk of allergic rhinitis was almost twice as high as that in those with an average value of the ratio. The difference in the digit ratio was greater for the right than left hand. A significantly higher risk of allergic rhinitis was also observed in women who experienced first menstruation at a younger age. No differences in risk of allergic rhinitis were noted due to general obesity, abdominal obesity, or irregularity of menstrual cycles. We conclude that a higher digit ratio is suggestive of a propensity to allergies in adulthood plausibly having to do with greater exposure to estrogen at early stages of ontogenetic development.

  15. Emerging drugs for the treatment of perennial allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Amelia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; Bottino, Chiara; Marseglia, Alessia; Marseglia, GianLuigi; Ciprandi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a worldwide health problem, currently affecting up to 40% of the general population, and characterized by the following symptoms in a variable degree of severity and duration: nasal congestion/obstruction, rhinorrhea, itchy nose and/or eyes, and/or sneezing. General symptoms like fatigue, reduced quality of sleep, impaired concentration and reduced productivity, if left untreated, may significantly affect quality of life. In addition, of being associated to various comorbidities, allergic rhinitis is also an independent risk factor for the development and worsening of asthma. Perennial allergic rhinitis is caused by allergens present around the year. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines currently recommend a stepwise therapeutic approach that combines patient education with specific allergen avoidance, symptomatic pharmacotherapy and allergen immunotherapy. The available treatment strategies provide suboptimal symptom relief in patients with moderate-to-severe disease who continue to experience symptoms while treated, even on multiple therapies. New insights into current therapy have been provided with the development of new symptomatic drugs with improved pharmacokinetics and safety. However, the ultimate research goal is beyond symptomatic treatment, and is mainly directed at modifying the immune response to allergens and prevent the progression of allergic rhinitis towards asthma. In this direction, promising advances are expected in the fields of allergen immunotherapy and biological drugs, such as omalizumab. Finally, significant research efforts are also focused on the growing number of new specific molecular targets involved in the Th2 pathway inflammation of allergic diseases.

  16. Validation of the MASK-rhinitis visual analogue scale on smartphone screens to assess allergic rhinitis control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caimmi, D.; Baiz, N.; Tanno, L. K.; Demoly, P.; Arnavielhe, S.; Murray, R.; Bedbrook, A.; Bergmann, K. C.; de Vries, G.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Haahtela, T.; Keil, T.; Kuna, P.; Mullol, J.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Samolinski, B.; Tomazic, P. V.; Valiulis, A.; van Eerd, M.; Wickman, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Bousquet, J.; Agache, I.; Angles, R.; Anto, J. M.; Asayag, E.; Bacci, E.; Bachert, C.; Baroni, I.; Barreto, B. A.; Bedolla-Barajas, M.; Bertorello, L.; Bewick, M.; Bieber, T.; Birov, S.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blua, A.; Bochenska Marciniak, M.; Bogus-Buczynska, I.; Bosnic-Ancevich, S.; Bosse, I.; Bourret, R.; Bucca, C.; Buonaiuto, R.; Caiazza, D.; Caillot, D.; Caimmi, D. P.; Camargos, P.; Canfora, G.; Cardona, V.; Carriazo, A. M.; Cartier, C.; Castellano, G.; Chavannes, N. H.; Ciaravolo, M. M.; Cingi, C.; Ciceran, A.; Colas, L.; Colgan, E.; Coll, J.; Conforti, D.; Correira de Sousa, J.; Cortés-Grimaldo, R. M.; Corti, F.; Costa, E.; Courbis, A. L.; Cruz, A.; Custovic, A.; Dario, C.; da Silva, M.; Dauvilliers, Y.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; de Feo, G.; de Martino, B.; Di Capua, S.; Di Carluccio, N.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Eller, E.; Emuzyte, R.; Espinoza-Contreras, J. M.; Estrada-Cardona, A.; Farrell, J.; Ferrero, J.; Fontaine, J. F.; Forti, S.; Gálvez-Romero, J. L.; Garcia Cruz, M. H.; García-Cobas, C. I.; Gemicioğlu, B.; Gerth van Wijck, R.; Guidacci, M.; Gómez-Vera, J.; Guldemond, N. A.; Gutter, Z.; Hajjam, J.; Hellings, P.; Hernández-Velázquez, L.; Illario, M.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jares, E.; Joos, G.; Just, J.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Karjalainen, J.; Khaltaev, N.; Klimek, L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, T. P.; Kvedariene, V.; Kolek, V.; Krzych-Fałta, E.; Kupczyk, M.; Lacwik, P.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Lauri, D.; Lavrut, J.; Lessa, M.; Levato, G.; Lewis, L.; Lieten, I.; Lipiec, A.; Louis, R.; Luna-Pech, J. A.; Magnan, A.; Malva, J.; Maspero, J. F.; Mayora, O.; Medina-Ávalos, M. A.; Melen, E.; Menditto, E.; Millot-Keurinck, J.; Moda, G.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mösges, R.; Mota-Pinto, A.; Muraro, A.; Noguès, M.; Nalin, M.; Napoli, L.; Neffen, H.; O'Hehir, R.; Olivé Elias, M.; Onorato, G.; Palkonen, S.; Pépin, J. L.; Pereira, A. M.; Persico, M.; Pfaar, O.; Pozzi, A. C.; Prokopakis, E. P.; Raciborski, F.; Rizzo, J. A.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodríguez-González, M.; Rolla, G.; Roller-Wirnsberger, R. E.; Romano, A.; Romano, M.; Salimäki, J.; Serpa, F. S.; Shamai, S.; Sierra, M.; Sova, M.; Sorlini, M.; Stellato, C.; Stelmach, R.; Strandberg, T.; Stroetman, V.; Stukas, R.; Szylling, A.; Tibaldi, V.; Todo-Bom, A.; Toppila-Salmi, S.; Tomazic, P.; Trama, U.; Triggiani, M.; Valero, A.; Valovirta, E.; Vasankari, T.; Vatrella, A.; Ventura, M. T.; Verissimo, M. T.; Viart, F.; Williams, S.; Wagenmann, M.; Wanscher, C.; Westman, M.; Young, I.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zernotti, E.; Zurbierber, T.; Zurkuhlen, A.; de Oliviera, B.; Senn, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) is a validated tool to assess control in allergic rhinitis patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to validate the use of VAS in the MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) app (Allergy Diary) on smartphones screens to

  17. ROLE OF ISOTONIC SALINE NASAL IRRIGATION IN SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingaiah Jadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Allergic rhinitis is IgE-mediated nasal mucosal hypersensitivity reaction after exposure to the offending allergen. Treatment options for allergic rhinitis includes allergen avoidance, immunotherapy, local/systemic antihistamines and steroids. Nasal saline irrigation is a possible potential treatment or adjunct to pharmacological treatment. It produces improvement in nasal symptoms, reduction in medicine consumption, by acceleration of mucociliary clearance time and thus improvement in quality of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS Our prospective study was performed with 52 patients in between the ages of 20-60 years who presented with recurrent (more than 1 year symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Isotonic saline nasal irrigation was added for a period of 8 weeks along with other measures of allergic rhinitis treatment such as allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy and quality of life was assessed by the severity of symptoms. RESULTS This study was designed to evaluate the reduction in symptom score with the use of isotonic saline nasal irrigation given twice daily for 8 weeks in seasonal allergic rhinitis along with the standard treatment i.e. antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroid spray. Total of 52 patients were studied. The usage of isotonic saline nasal irrigation improved the quality of life in terms of reduction in the severity, frequency and duration of symptoms compared to the relief he had in the previous years when he used only intranasal steroids. CONCLUSION Nasal irrigation with isotonic saline is a safe, inexpensive, easy to use and effective adjunctive therapy in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis to alleviate the symptoms of allergic rhinitis. It resulted in significant improvement in the quality of life.

  18. CORRECTION OF COGNITIVE DISORDERS AMONG THE CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC RHINITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Tomilova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the status of the cognitive sphere among the children with the lengthy run of the perennial allergic rhinitis and elaborate the therapeutic tactics for the correction of the revealed disc orders, the researchers have examined 108 children aged between 14 and 15 years old. The research included patients with the exacerbation of the moderately severe or severe run of the perennial allergic rhinitis and length of the disease for no less than 3 years. As the basic therapy, the researchers prescribed mometasone nasal spray to all the children (Nasonex, Scheringcplough, USA. Before, in the course of and immediately right after the treatment, all the patients underwent the evaluation of the cognitive functions with the aid of the «binatest» and «mnemotest» test computer systems. The researchers determined the oxygen concentration in blood with handy pulse oximetry OXY 9. The research findings showed that 95,3% of the examined children suffered from the disorders of the cognitive functions. The application of the adequate anti-inflammatory therapy of the perennial allergic rhinitis effectively corrected the changes in the cognitive sphere of the children, suffering from the perennial allergic rhinitis. The oxygen concentration in blood of the children with the perennial allergic rhinitis remained normal at different stages of the disease. Thus, children, persistently suffering from the perennial allergic rhinitis, are recommended to undergo monitoring of the cognitive functions and prompt prescription of the adequate anti-inflammatory therapy of the disease.Key words: children, perennial allergic rhinitis, cognitive functions, treatment, mometasone.

  19. Rhinitis in children: common clinical presentations and differential diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotiroti, G; Roberts, G; Scadding, G K

    2015-03-01

    Rhinitis is a common presentation in childhood. Acute virally induced rhinitis is generally self-limiting and usually does not require medical attention. Whilst allergic rhinitis is the focus of the paediatric allergist, the presentation of other diseases or comorbidities that can complicate or mimic allergic rhinitis needs to be considered. Effects on the child's quality of life also need to be addressed. Rhinitis can be associated with asthma and other significant comorbidities: importantly, non-allergic rhinitis can sometimes be a consequence of systemic immune impairment. The diagnosis of rhinitis is based on clinical findings with directed investigations. Nasal nitric oxide measurement is an emerging diagnostic tool and helpful particularly in relation to evaluating the differential diagnosis in more difficult rhinitis. Successfully identifying the cause of rhinitis in childhood and associated comorbidities can ensure that the patient is successfully treated as described in the recently published EAACI Pediatric Rhinitis Position Paper. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Trichuris suis ova therapy for allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Arnved, John; Rønborg, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections can protect against allergic airway inflammation in experimental models and have been associated with a reduced risk of atopy and a reduced course of asthma in some observational studies. Although no clinical evidence exists to support the use of helminth therapy for...

  1. ROLE OF INTRANASAL STEROIDAL SPRAY IN SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS WITH OCULAR SYMPTOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineel Muppidi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The eye is especially susceptible to the symptoms of allergic rhinitis, itching (pruritus, tearing (epiphora and redness (erythema because it lacks a mechanical barrier that could prevent the deposition of allergens, such as pollen on the conjunctival surface. These ocular symptoms have been described as examples of the type 1 immediate hypersensitivity reaction. A number of recently published clinical studies apparently support the positive effect of intranasal steroidal sprays on ocular allergy symptoms. The aim of the study is to evaluate the role of intranasal steroids in relieving ocular symptoms in allergic rhinitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS 60 subjects who had seasonal allergic rhinitis with ocular symptoms came to Outpatient Department of Chalmeda Anand Rao Hospital in the year 2015-2016. Randomly, each intranasal steroid is given to 12 patients to a total of 60 patients for 4 weeks 2 puffs in each nostril twice daily and the clinical response is observed. RESULTS A subjective improvement in ocular symptoms was observed in 11 of the 12 patients treated with fluticasone furoate, 8 of 12 patients with fluticasone propionate, 7 of the 12 patients with mometasone furoate, 6 of the 12 patients with beclomethasone and 6 of the 12 patients with budesonide. CONCLUSION Intranasal corticosteroids, which are used for seasonal allergic rhinitis with ocular symptoms are effective in controlling of ocular symptoms. Among these, intranasal corticosteroids, which are used for allergic rhinitis, fluticasone furoate is more effective in relieving ocular symptoms in our study.

  2. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lk

    2011-01-01

    Allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis are very common diseases in childhood in industrialized countries. Although these conditions are widely trivialized by both parents and physicians they induce a major impact on quality of life for the affected children and a substantial drainage of health care...... resources. Unfortunately, diagnostic specificity is hampered by nonspecific symptom history and lack of reliable diagnostic tests which may explain why the pathology behind such diagnoses is poorly understood. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis in young...... children may contribute to the discovery of new mechanisms involved in pathogenesis and help direct future research to develop correctly timed preventive measures as well as adequate monitoring and treatment of children with rhinitis. Asthma is a common comorbidity in subjects with allergic rhinitis...

  3. Effect of desloratadine on the control of morning symptoms in patients with seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Eric J

    2006-01-01

    The symptoms of allergic rhinitis vary in severity over the course of the day and often are worse in the morning. This review focuses on data from clinical studies of the antihistamine desloratadine to establish whether it effectively controls the morning symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Studies of desloratadine in patients with allergic rhinitis that used instantaneous scoring to assess the severity of morning symptoms were selected for inclusion from published literature (peer-reviewed articles and abstracts presented at professional meetings). When administered once daily, desloratadine is effective in alleviating the morning symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including nasal congestion. Its action is sustained over the 24-hour dosing interval. A comparison of morning and evening dosing of desloratadine revealed equivalent relief of morning symptoms, illustrating that the effect of desloratadine is independent of the time of dosing. Clinical studies indicate that desloratadine is nonsedating and well tolerated, with no evidence of adverse cardiac effects. For many patients with allergic rhinitis, symptoms are most severe in the morning. To maximize the benefits for patients, pharmacologic agents used in the management of allergic rhinitis should be effective in controlling these peak morning symptoms. The sustained 24-hour action of desloratadine and its effective control of morning symptoms make it a valuable tool for improving the quality of life of patients with allergic rhinitis.

  4. Differential skin test reactivity to pollens in pollen food allergy syndrome versus allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Von; Scott, David R; Chin, William K; Wineinger, Nathan E; Kelso, John M; White, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Pollen food allergy syndrome (PFAS), also called oral allergy syndrome, is a form of food allergy in which uncooked foods cause allergic symptoms generally limited to the oral mucosa. It occurs in a subset of patients with pollen allergy, although not all patients have prominent rhinitis symptoms. PFAS is related to antigenic similarity between the pollen and food allergen. The size of skin test reactions in a group of subjects with pollen sensitivity with PFAS was compared with a group of subjects who were pollen sensitive and without PFAS. Self-reported rhinitis symptoms between the two groups were compared to identify if symptom severity differed. Twenty subjects with PFAS and 20 subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis without PFAS were enrolled in the study. All the subjects underwent standard skin-prick testing to a panel of common allergens, including select fresh fruits and vegetables. The subjects completed a Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire as part of their clinical evaluation. The subjects with PFAS and those without PFAS were compared statistically. The subjects with PFAS had significantly larger-sized skin-prick test results specific to pollens (p allergic rhinitis and PFAS reported milder nasal symptoms in relation to pollen skin test result size when compared with allergic rhinitis controls without PFAS. Our study outlined basic differences between two seemingly similar patient groups with a particularly striking discordance between skin test result sizes and rhinitis symptoms. This discordance should be explored further to increase mechanistic understanding of allergen cross-reactivity in PFAS.

  5. Sublingual or subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Stephen R; Penagos, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is effective in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and, unlike antiallergic drugs, has been shown to modify the underlying cause of the disease, with proved long-term benefits. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been the gold standard, whereas sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has emerged as an effective and safe alternative. Previous Cochrane systematic reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed that both SLIT and SCIT are effective in patients with seasonal AR, whereas evidence for their efficacy in patients with perennial disease has been less convincing. Recent large, adequately powered trials have demonstrated reductions in both symptoms and use of rescue medication in patients with seasonal and those with perennial AR. Here we appraise evidence for SCIT versus SLIT based on indirect evidence from Cochrane reviews and recent well-powered double-blind, randomized controlled trials versus placebo and the limited direct evidence available from randomized blind head-to-head comparisons. At present, based on an overall balance of efficacy and side effects, the patient is in equipoise. Pending definitive comparative trials, choice might be determined largely by the local availability of SCIT and SLIT products of proved value and personal (patient) preference. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. International Consensus Statement on Allergy and Rhinology: Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sarah K; Lin, Sandra Y; Toskala, Elina; Orlandi, Richard R; Akdis, Cezmi A; Alt, Jeremiah A; Azar, Antoine; Baroody, Fuad M; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, G Walter; Chacko, Thomas; Cingi, Cemal; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Corey, Jacquelynne; Cox, Linda S; Creticos, Peter Socrates; Custovic, Adnan; Damask, Cecelia; DeConde, Adam; DelGaudio, John M; Ebert, Charles S; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Flanagan, Carrie E; Fokkens, Wytske J; Franzese, Christine; Gosepath, Jan; Halderman, Ashleigh; Hamilton, Robert G; Hoffman, Hans Jürgen; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Houser, Steven M; Hwang, Peter H; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Jarvis, Deborah; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kilpeläinen, Maritta; Kingdom, Todd T; Krouse, Helene; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree; Laury, Adrienne M; Lee, Stella E; Levy, Joshua M; Luong, Amber U; Marple, Bradley F; McCoul, Edward D; McMains, K Christopher; Melén, Erik; Mims, James W; Moscato, Gianna; Mullol, Joaquim; Nelson, Harold S; Patadia, Monica; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; Platt, Michael P; Reisacher, William; Rondón, Carmen; Rudmik, Luke; Ryan, Matthew; Sastre, Joaquin; Schlosser, Rodney J; Settipane, Russell A; Sharma, Hemant P; Sheikh, Aziz; Smith, Timothy L; Tantilipikorn, Pongsakorn; Tversky, Jody R; Veling, Maria C; Wang, De Yun; Westman, Marit; Wickman, Magnus; Zacharek, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Critical examination of the quality and validity of available allergic rhinitis (AR) literature is necessary to improve understanding and to appropriately translate this knowledge to clinical care of the AR patient. To evaluate the existing AR literature, international multidisciplinary experts with an interest in AR have produced the International Consensus statement on Allergy and Rhinology: Allergic Rhinitis (ICAR:AR). Using previously described methodology, specific topics were developed relating to AR. Each topic was assigned a literature review, evidence-based review (EBR), or evidence-based review with recommendations (EBRR) format as dictated by available evidence and purpose within the ICAR:AR document. Following iterative reviews of each topic, the ICAR:AR document was synthesized and reviewed by all authors for consensus. The ICAR:AR document addresses over 100 individual topics related to AR, including diagnosis, pathophysiology, epidemiology, disease burden, risk factors for the development of AR, allergy testing modalities, treatment, and other conditions/comorbidities associated with AR. This critical review of the AR literature has identified several strengths; providers can be confident that treatment decisions are supported by rigorous studies. However, there are also substantial gaps in the AR literature. These knowledge gaps should be viewed as opportunities for improvement, as often the things that we teach and the medicine that we practice are not based on the best quality evidence. This document aims to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the AR literature to identify areas for future AR research and improved understanding. © 2018 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. Oral delivery of a probiotic induced changes at the nasal mucosa of seasonal allergic rhinitis subjects after local allergen challenge: a randomised clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Ivory

    Full Text Available To determine effects of probiotic consumption on clinical and immunological parameters of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR in an out-of-season single nasal allergen challenge.In a study registered at ClinicalTrials.Gov (NCT01123252, a 16-week dietary intervention was undertaken in 60 patients with allergic rhinitis (>16 years old. Using a double-blinded, placebo-controlled anonymised design, the patients were divided equally into two groups. One group was given a dairy drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota to ingest daily while the other consumed a similar drink without bacteria. Participants attended the clinic on two consecutive days before the intervention and then again at the end of the study period. On the first day of each 2-day visit, following clinical examination, assessments were made of total nasal symptoms scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow. Nasal scrapings, nasal lavage and blood were collected for laboratory analyses of cellular phenotypes, soluble mediator release and in vitro responses to pollen allergen. These procedures were repeated 24 hours following nasal allergen challenge.Prior to and following intervention there were no detectable differences between study groups in measured clinical outcome. After intervention, there were differences between groups in their percentages of CD86+ epithelial cells (p = 0.0148, CD86+CD252+ non-epithelial cells (p = 0.0347, sIL-1RII release (p = 0.0289 and IL-1β (p = 0.0224 levels at the nasal mucosa. Delivery of probiotic also suppressed production of sCD23 (p = 0.0081, TGF-β (p = 0.0283 and induced increased production of IFN-γ (p = 0.0351 in supernatants of cultured peripheral blood.This study did not show significant probiotic-associated changes with respect to the primary clinical endpoint. An absence of overt clinical benefit may be due to an inability of single nasal challenges to accurately represent natural allergen exposure. Nevertheless

  8. Local allergic rhinitis: A critical reappraisal from a paediatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasi, Stefania; Pajno, Giovanni Battista; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo Maria

    2016-09-01

    The so-called local allergic rhinitis (LAR) has been proposed as a phenotype of rhinitis with Th2-driven prominent local allergic inflammation, nasal synthesis of specific IgE and a positive response to a nasal allergen provocation test, in the absence of 'systemic' atopy (negative skin prick test and serum allergen-specific IgE antibodies). To date, available data on LAR are mostly focused on adults. The purpose of this 'Rostrum' was to critically discuss data and implications of the 'LAR concept' in paediatrics. In the natural history of rhinitis due to IgE-mediated reactions triggered by exposure to allergens, a 'LAR' can be either the initial, transient stage of classical allergic rhinitis or a stable phenotype never evolving to 'systemic' IgE sensitization. Given the present difficulties in performing routinely nasal allergen provocation test in children, the development of sensitive and specific tests to detect IgE in the child's nasal secretions is a research priority. We suggest also the hypothetical role of allergen immunoprophylaxis or immunotherapy in LAR. Last, the term 'local allergic rhinitis' may be inappropriate, as rhinitis is always 'local', while IgE sensitization can be either 'local' or 'systemic'. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Treatment of allergic rhinitis is associated with improved attention performance in children: the Allergic Rhinitis Cohort Study for Kids (ARCO-Kids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kyu Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been well known that pediatric allergic rhinitis was associated with poor performance at school due to attention deficit. However, there were no cohort studies for the effect of treatment of allergic rhinitis on attention performance in pediatric population. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether attention performance was improved after treatment in children with allergic rhinitis. METHODS: In this ARCO-Kids (Allergic Rhinitis Cohort Study for Kids, consecutive pediatric patients with rhinitis symptoms underwent a skin prick test and computerized comprehensive attention test. According to the skin prick test results, the children were diagnosed as allergic rhinitis or non- allergic rhinitis. All of the patients were regularly followed up and treated with oral medication or intranasal corticosteroid sprays. The comprehensive attention tests consisted of sustained and divided attention tasks. Each of the tasks was assessed by the attention score which was calculated by the number of omission and commission errors. The comprehension attention test was repeated after 1 year. RESULTS: A total of 797 children with allergic rhinitis and 239 children with non-allergic rhinitis were included. Initially, the attention scores of omission and commission errors on divided attention task were significantly lower in children with allergic rhinitis than in children with non-allergic rhinitis. After 1 year of treatment, children with allergic rhinitis showed improvement in attention: commission error of sustained (95.6±17.0 vs 97.0±16.6 and divided attention task (99.1±15.8 vs 91.8±23.5. Meanwhile, there was no significant difference of attention scores in children with non-allergic rhinitis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that management of allergic rhinitis might be associated with improvement of attention.

  10. Treatment of allergic rhinitis is associated with improved attention performance in children: the Allergic Rhinitis Cohort Study for Kids (ARCO-Kids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Rhee, Chae Seo; Han, Doo Hee; Won, Tae-Bin; Kim, Dong-Young; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2014-01-01

    It has been well known that pediatric allergic rhinitis was associated with poor performance at school due to attention deficit. However, there were no cohort studies for the effect of treatment of allergic rhinitis on attention performance in pediatric population. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether attention performance was improved after treatment in children with allergic rhinitis. In this ARCO-Kids (Allergic Rhinitis Cohort Study for Kids), consecutive pediatric patients with rhinitis symptoms underwent a skin prick test and computerized comprehensive attention test. According to the skin prick test results, the children were diagnosed as allergic rhinitis or non- allergic rhinitis. All of the patients were regularly followed up and treated with oral medication or intranasal corticosteroid sprays. The comprehensive attention tests consisted of sustained and divided attention tasks. Each of the tasks was assessed by the attention score which was calculated by the number of omission and commission errors. The comprehension attention test was repeated after 1 year. A total of 797 children with allergic rhinitis and 239 children with non-allergic rhinitis were included. Initially, the attention scores of omission and commission errors on divided attention task were significantly lower in children with allergic rhinitis than in children with non-allergic rhinitis. After 1 year of treatment, children with allergic rhinitis showed improvement in attention: commission error of sustained (95.6±17.0 vs 97.0±16.6) and divided attention task (99.1±15.8 vs 91.8±23.5). Meanwhile, there was no significant difference of attention scores in children with non-allergic rhinitis. Our study showed that management of allergic rhinitis might be associated with improvement of attention.

  11. Psychological stress and its relationship with persistent allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hennawi, Diaa El Din Mohamed; Ahmed, Mohamed Rifaat; Farid, Alaa Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis is considered to be a major health problem that impairs quality of life. A possible relationship with psychological stress may exist. The aim of this study is to verify the relationship between persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR) and psychological stress aiming to improve treatment and thereby quality of life (QOL) of patients. Patients with PAR (166) were diagnosed then analyzed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Patients with allergic rhinitis and who were positive on the Kessler scale (122) were randomly divided equally into a control group which received levocetirizine and a study group which received levocetirizine and imipramine. Nasal symptom assessment and QOL assessment were performed in all patients after treatment. Of the 166 patients with PAR, 122 (73.5 %) were positive on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. There was a marked improvement in the study group compared with the control group as regards nasal symptoms with better QOL in the study group (6.93) compared with the control group (2.13). Psychological stress has a strong impact on persistent allergic rhinitis. When stress is controlled by a combined treatment of imipramine and levocetirizine, allergic rhinitis symptoms improved and a better QOL was obtained. 3b.

  12. IQ Score of Children with Persistent or Perennial Allergic Rhinitis: A Comparison with Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Javad; Abbaskhanian, Ali; Jalili, Masumeh; Yazdani Charati, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of allergies is different around the world. Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disease in children. Intelligence quotient (IQ) is an indicator of efficacy and many factors including chronic diseases may affect it. This study compares the IQs of children diagnosed with persistent or perennial allergic rhinitis with healthy children. This was a comparative study that was conducted from June 2011-May 2013 in an academic referral clinic. In this study, 90 patients aged 6- to 14-yearsold who were diagnosed with persistent or perennial allergic rhinitis and were compared to 90 age and gender match healthy patients from their respective families. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children was used to divide and calculate overall IQ, verbal IQ, and practical IQ. The t-test and chi square were used to analyze quantitative variables and qualitative variables, respectively. In this study, out of total 180 children, 90 (50%) in the case group and 90 children (50%), the control group participated for IQ comparison. One hundred (57%) were male and 80 (43%) were female. The overall IQ for allergic rhinitis patients and healthy patients was 109.2 and 107.5, respectively. This difference was not considered significant. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the IQ scores of males and females. Although allergic rhinitis is a chronic disease and effects quality of life, there were no identifiable negative effects on IQ.

  13. Effect of the external nasal dilator on adolescent athleteswith and without allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinardi, Ricardo Reis; de Andrade, Cláudia Ribeiro; da Cunha Ibiapina, Cássio

    2017-06-01

    The ability to effectively breathe through the nose is an important component of physical exercise. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of the external nasal dilator (END) on healthy adolescent athletes and those with allergic rhinitis. Clinical trial, double-blind, crossover, in which we evaluated healthy adolescent athletes with allergic rhinitis, using experimental and placebo ENDs, submitted to a maximum cardio-respiratory test in randomized order. Predicted values for peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF%) and nasal resistance (NR) were obtained, and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was also assessed after the race test. 65 adolescents participated in the study, 30 of whom had allergic rhinitis. The use of experimental ENDs demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in peak nasal inspiratory flow values (predicted %), nasal resistance, maximal oxygen uptake value (VO 2 Max.) and rating of perceived exertion, both in the healthy group and the one with allergic rhinitis. Results suggested that END reduces nasal resistance, improves maximal oxygen uptake and rating of perceived exertion after a maximum cardio-respiratory test on healthy adolescents and those with allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the eosinophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenigun, Alper; Sezen, Seda; Calim, Omer Faruk; Ozturan, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a type 1 hypersensitivity reaction of the nasal mucosa, the primary mediator of which is immunoglobulin E. Allergic rhinitis occurs in children and adolescents. This study examined the relationship between allergies and the eosinophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in children with allergic rhinitis with a positive skin-prick test. This study was planned and performed as a case-control study. There were 695 patients who presented to our clinic who were enrolled in the study. Only group 4 fit the criteria for allergic rhinitis. Group 1 (nonsensitized asymptomatic [control group]), group 2 (nonsensitized symptomatic), group 3 (sensitized asymptomatic), and group 4 (sensitized symptomatic). The patients' allergy symptoms and skin test results were assessed and compared. The eosinophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for each patient was calculated. The eosinophil and lymphocyte counts and the eosinophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were calculated for each group. The eosinophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and eosinophil counts in groups 3 and 4 were significantly higher (p pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis. This parameter is inexpensive to measure and easy to use and calculate.

  15. Allergen specific sublingual immunotherapy in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đurić-Filipović, Ivana; Caminati, Marco; Kostić, Gordana; Filipović, Đorđe; Živković, Zorica

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR) is significantly increased, especially in younger children. Current treatment for children with asthma and allergic rhinitis include allergen avoidance, standard pharmacotherapy, and immunotherapy. Since standard pharmacotherapy is prescribed for symptoms, immunotherapy at present plays an important role in the treatment of allergic diseases. This article presents insights into the up-to-date understanding of immunotherapy in the treatment of children with allergic rhinitis and asthma. PubMed articles published from 1990 to 2014 were reviewed using the MeSH terms "asthma", "allergic rhinitis", "children", and "immune therapy". Additional articles were identified by hand searching of the references in the initial search. Numerous studies have shown that sublingual application of allergen specific immunotherapy (SLIT) is an adequate, safe and efficient substitution to subcutaneous route of allergens administration (SCIT) in the treatment of IgE-mediated respiratory tract allergies in children. According to the literature, better clinical efficacy is connected with the duration of treatment and mono sensitized patients. At least 3 years of treatment and stable asthma before the immunotherapy are positive predictors of good clinical efficacy and tolerability of SLIT. SLIT reduces the symptoms of allergic diseases and the use of medicaments, and improves the quality of life of children with the diseases.

  16. Correlation of environmental mite levels and the symptoms of allergic rhinitis regarding the efficacy of preventive education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingi, C; Cakli, H; Miman, O; Altin, F; Aycan, O; Atambay, M; Daldal, N

    2007-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is still a commonly investigated disease all over the world. Allergens are usually in the nature of glycoprotein or protein which interact with antibodies resulting in the formation of specific Ig E in the body 1. It is presumed that some environmental factors play an important role in their clinics. In allergic rhinitis, symptoms usually occur after the interaction of nasal mucosa with allergens. Allergens may be indoors, outdoors or in both environments. House-dust contains most of the indoor allergens. Mites are the most egregious allergen in house dust. D. pteronyssinus is commonly seen in European countries, D. farinae is mostly seen in North America. House-dust mites play an important role in allergic sensitization of individuals in Turkey. Perennial allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder that results most frequently from sensitivity to house-dust mites. National and international guidelines for the management of allergic rhinitis recommend that house and dust mite avoidance measures be considered for all patients with house-dust mite provoked rhinitis. Symptoms of allergic rhinitis are related to the environmental mite level in which patients live. The aim of this study is to show the relationship between mite levels and symptoms of allergic rhinitis diagnosed patients and the change of mite levels in the environment after appropriate education.

  17. Allergic rhinitis is associated with poor asthma control in children with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Eric P.; Nijkamp, Anke; Duiverman, Eric J.; Brand, Paul L. P.

    Background Asthma and allergic rhinitis are the two most common chronic disorders in childhood and adolescence. To date, no study has examined the impact of comorbid allergic rhinitis on asthma control in children. Objective To examine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children with asthma, and

  18. House dust mite induced allergic rhinitis in children in primary care : Epidemiology and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. de Bot (Cindy)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAllergic rhinitis (AR) is an allergen-induced, upper-airway inflammatory disease. The characteristic symptoms of allergic rhinitis are a runny nose, sneezing, congestion, redness of the eyes, watering eyes, and itching of the eyes, nose and throat. Previously, allergic rhinitis was

  19. Greater risk of incident asthma cases in adults with Allergic Rhinitis and Effect of Allergen Immunotherapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccillo Giovita

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma and rhinitis are often co-morbid conditions. As rhinitis often precedes asthma it is possible that effective treatment of allergic rhinitis may reduce asthma progression. The aim of our study is to investigate history of allergic rhinitis as a risk factor for asthma and the potential effect of allergen immunotherapy in attenuating the incidence of asthma. Hospital-referred non-asthmatic adults, aged 18–40 years between 1990 and 1991, were retrospectively followed up until January and April 2000. At the end of follow up, available subjects were clinically examined for asthma diagnosis and history of allergen specific immunotherapy, second-hand smoking and the presence of pets in the household. A total of 436 non-asthmatic adults (332 subjects with allergic rhinitis and 104 with no allergic rhinitis nor history of atopy were available for final analyses. The highest OR (odds ratio associated with a diagnosis of asthma at the end of follow-up was for the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis at baseline (OR, 7.8; 95%CI, 3.1–20.0 in the model containing the covariates of rhinitis diagnosis, sex, second-hand smoke exposure, presence of pets at home, family history of allergic disorders, sensitization to Parietaria judaica; grass pollen; house dust mites; Olea europea: orchard; perennial rye; and cat allergens. Female sex, sensitization to Parietaria judaica and the presence of pets in the home were also significantly predictive of new onset asthma in the same model. Treatment with allergen immunotherapy was significantly and inversely related to the development of new onset asthma (OR, 0.53; 95%CI, 0.32–0.86. In the present study we found that allergic rhinitis is an important independent risk factor for asthma. Moreover, treatment with allergen immunotherapy lowers the risk of the development of new asthma cases in adults with allergic rhinitis.

  20. Greater risk of incident asthma cases in adults with Allergic Rhinitis and Effect of Allergen Immunotherapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polosa, Riccardo; Al-Delaimy, Wael K; Russo, Cristina; Piccillo, Giovita; Sarvà, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis are often co-morbid conditions. As rhinitis often precedes asthma it is possible that effective treatment of allergic rhinitis may reduce asthma progression. The aim of our study is to investigate history of allergic rhinitis as a risk factor for asthma and the potential effect of allergen immunotherapy in attenuating the incidence of asthma. Hospital-referred non-asthmatic adults, aged 18–40 years between 1990 and 1991, were retrospectively followed up until January and April 2000. At the end of follow up, available subjects were clinically examined for asthma diagnosis and history of allergen specific immunotherapy, second-hand smoking and the presence of pets in the household. A total of 436 non-asthmatic adults (332 subjects with allergic rhinitis and 104 with no allergic rhinitis nor history of atopy) were available for final analyses. The highest OR (odds ratio) associated with a diagnosis of asthma at the end of follow-up was for the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis at baseline (OR, 7.8; 95%CI, 3.1–20.0 in the model containing the covariates of rhinitis diagnosis, sex, second-hand smoke exposure, presence of pets at home, family history of allergic disorders, sensitization to Parietaria judaica; grass pollen; house dust mites; Olea europea: orchard; perennial rye; and cat allergens). Female sex, sensitization to Parietaria judaica and the presence of pets in the home were also significantly predictive of new onset asthma in the same model. Treatment with allergen immunotherapy was significantly and inversely related to the development of new onset asthma (OR, 0.53; 95%CI, 0.32–0.86). In the present study we found that allergic rhinitis is an important independent risk factor for asthma. Moreover, treatment with allergen immunotherapy lowers the risk of the development of new asthma cases in adults with allergic rhinitis. PMID:16381607

  1. [Aeroallergen spectrum of patients with allergic rhinitis in Enshi area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Yi; Wan, Jing; Liu, Zhong

    2011-07-01

    To investigate aeroallergen spectrum of patients with allergic rhinitis in Enshi area and analyze its related factors. Skin prick test was carried out in 463 patients with allergic rhinitis with 13 inhaled allergens. Detailed history was collected in all cases. Three hundred and eighty-seven cases (83.6%) showed positive reaction to at least one allergen of 13 allergens. The most common allergens found in patients were Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, followed by tropical mite, Periplaneta americana, Blattella germanica and dog hair. The positive reaction rate of single specie allergen were 51.9%, and most of them was positive to mites (49.6%). The positive reaction degree was significantly related to family history, asthma, age and housing enviroment. The major allergen of allergic rhinitis was mite. The positive reaction degree related to genetics, asthma, age and housing enviroment.

  2. Dust Mite-Induced Perennial Allergic Rhinitis in Pediatric Patients and Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Halie M; Wood, Robert A; Busse, William W

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common illness in children and can impair their quality of life. Furthermore, many children remain symptomatic despite maximizing systemic antihistamine and topical therapies. It is at this clinical juncture that immunotherapy may be considered. The efficacy and safety associated with both subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual (SLIT) approaches are reviewed and positioned as treatment options for pediatric patients, with specific focus on current literature as it relates to SLIT in children, including those with perennial allergic rhinitis. Although there is more extensive experience with SLIT treatment in Europe, grass and ragweed tablet forms of SLIT are approved in the US. Approaches to the care of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis are presented. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Asthma and allergic rhinitis in childhood: what's new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrorilli, Carla; Posa, Daniela; Cipriani, Francesca; Caffarelli, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Novel approaches are currently offered for the diagnostic workup and therapeutic management of allergic rhinitis and asthma. New predictive biomarkers of allergy and asthma are available. Primary and secondary prevention, earlier intervention, and modification of the natural history of allergic rhinitis and asthma are being intensively investigated. This review highlights advances in the understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of atopic airway diseases in childhood, as well as prenatal and early-life risk factors and strategies for prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Prevalence and severity of allergic rhinitis in house dust mite-allergic patients with bronchial asthma or atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, I.; Oosting, A. J.; Tempels-Pavlica, Z.; de Monchy, J. G. R.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C. A. F. M.; Hak, E.; van Wijk, R. Gerth

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis are closely associated. Although population-based studies report a high prevalence of rhinitis among asthma patients, less is known of the association between rhinitis and atopic dermatitis and the severity of concomitant rhinitis.

  5. Prevalence and severity of allergic rhinitis in house dust mite-allergic patients with bronchial asthma or atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, [No Value; Oosting, AJ; Tempels-Pavlica, Z; de Monchy, JGR; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, CAFM; Hak, E; van Wijk, R.

    Background Allergic rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis are closely associated. Although population-based studies report a high prevalence of rhinitis among asthma patients, less is known of the association between rhinitis and atopic dermatitis and the severity of concomitant rhinitis.

  6. Inconclusive evidence for allergic rhinitis to predict a prolonged or chronic course of acute rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Kristine A; Nigten, Gea; Romeijn, Kalynda; Kaper, Nina M; Grolman, Wilko; van der Heijden, Geert J M G

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence on allergic rhinitis as a predictor for a prolonged or chronic course in adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis. Pubmed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library. A systematic literature search was performed on March 15, 2013. During screening of title and abstract, 3 authors independently selected studies on allergic rhinitis as a predictor for the course of acute rhinosinusitis in adults. The reported study design was assessed for directness of evidence and risk of bias. We aimed to extract prior and posterior probabilities for a prolonged or chronic course of acute rhinosinusitis. Of 13,202 retrieved articles, 2 articles were eligible for study assessment. They provided a high directness of evidence but carried a high risk of bias. The studies showed an incidence of a prolonged and chronic course of, respectively, .19 (95% confidence interval [CI] .16-.23) and .05 (95% CI, .02-.13). In patients with allergic rhinitis, the incidence was .25 (95% CI, .18-.35) and .14 (95% CI, .04-.34), so the added value of allergic rhinitis to predict a prolonged course is 6% and to predict a chronic course 8%. While the 2 included studies suggest that allergic rhinitis adds little to the prediction of a prolonged or chronic course in patients with acute rhinosinusitis, they carry a high risk of bias. As the available evidence does not provide grounds for different management of patients with and without allergic rhinitis, namely, according to clinical practice guidelines, both can be managed with expectant observation and symptomatic treatment.

  7. Pediatric allergic rhinitis and asthma: can the march be halted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilochristou, Olympia A; Douladiris, Nikolaos; Makris, Michael; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2013-12-01

    The strong epidemiologic and pathophysiologic link between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma has led to the concept of 'united airways disease' or 'respiratory allergy', implying that allergy, in its widest sense, underlies this clinical syndrome. Progression from AR to asthma is frequent and part of the 'atopic march'. Since pediatric immune responses are more adaptable and therefore may be more amenable to treatment, interventions at early childhood are characterized by a higher chance to affect the natural history of respiratory allergy. Although current treatments are quite effective in alleviating respiratory allergy symptoms, it has proven much more difficult to confirm any influence on the progression of the disease. Much more promising is the field of specific allergen immunotherapy, where current evidence, although not yet of ideal robustness, points towards a disease-modifying effect. In addition, newer or emerging, possibly more effective or more targeted interventions are promising in the preventive sense.

  8. Allergic rhinitis - a total genome-scan for susceptibility genes suggests a locus on chromosome 4q24-q27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schøitz, P O

    2001-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disease of complex inheritance and is characterised by mucosal inflammation caused by allergen exposure. The genetics of closely related phenotypes such as asthma, atopy and to some extend atopic dermatitis has attracted attention in recent years. Genetic reports...... of allergic rhinitis on the contrary have as yet been most sparse. To identify candidate regions holding genes for allergic rhinitis we performed a total genome-scan on affected sib-pair families. From 100 Danish sib-pair families selected for allergy, families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype...... definition of both clinical allergic rhinitis and confirmed specific allergy were chosen. Thirty-three affected sib-pair families qualified for the scan that was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers. Non-parametric linkage results were obtained from MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. The study revealed...

  9. The Prevalence of Allergic Rhinitis in Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bakhshaee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is a multifactorial disease. Allergies are considered a predisposing factor to CRS; however, this remains controversial. The objective of this research was to investigate the prevalence of co-morbidities and allergic reaction, and to specify the most common allergens in patients with confirmed CRS.   Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with signs and symptoms of CRS who met the diagnostic endoscopic and radiologic criteria of chronic rhinosinusitis were selected. They filled out a questionnaire and underwent a skin prick test for the common inhalant allergens. Allergic rhinitis was diagnosed according to the history and positive skin prick tests.   Results: The mean age of patients was 34. Males were slightly more involved (54%. The prevalence of polypoid and none-polypoid rhinosinusitis was 54% and 46% respectively. The patients’ most common symptoms were nasal discharge (95%, blockage (94%, smell disorders (63%, cough (45%, halitosis (41%, lethargy (37%, and aural fullness (36%. Allergy to at least one allergen was noted in 64% of the CRS patients which is higher than general population in Mashhad, Iran with allergic rhinitis (22.4%. Salsola was the most common allergen. There was no significant difference in allergic reactions between polypoid and non-polypoid CRS patients.   Conclusion:  Allergic reactions was found in Iranian CRS patients with or without polyposis to be much higher than general population in Mashhad with allergic rhinitis alone.

  10. Exhaled Leukotrienes and Bronchial Responsiveness to Methacholine in Patients with Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čáp, P.; Malý, Marek; Pehal, F.; Pelikán, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 2 (2009), s. 103-109 ISSN 1081-1206 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NL7024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : allergic rhinitis * asthma * breath condensate * leukotrienes * gas chromatography * mass spectrometry analysis Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 2.457, year: 2009

  11. Tian Jiu therapy for allergic rhinitis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Wai; Zhong, Linda L D; Dai, Liang; Cheng, Chung-Wah; Lu, Ai-Ping; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2016-05-17

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common allergic diseases. The conventional treatments of allergic rhinitis are oral anti-histamines, the use of intranasal corticosteroids, and immunotherapy. Dissatisfied with the ineffectiveness and side effects of these treatments, substantial numbers of patients are turning to alternative treatments like Chinese herbal medicine, particularly Tian Jiu (TJ). TJ is a form of moxibustion in which herbal patches are applied to specific acupoints on the skin. This study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of TJ in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This will be a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial in patients with AR. After a 1-week run-in period, eligible subjects will be randomly assigned to the TJ group, placebo-control group or waitlist-control group. The TJ and placebo-control groups will undergo a 4-week treatment with one session per week and one 4-week post-treatment follow-up. Participants in the waitlist-control group will not receive any treatment during the first 4 weeks but will be required to be assessed. The primary outcome will be the change in the weekly average of the Total Nasal Symptom Score recorded from baseline to the end of treatment. The secondary outcomes will be change in symptoms and change in need for medication between baseline and the end of treatment by using the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire. Rescue medication (RM) needs will be measured using an RM score, comprising the weekly sum of daily assessments and any form of systemic steroids for allergic rhinitis. This study will be the first study to compare TJ treatment for allergic rhinitis with a placebo-control group, and a waitlist-control group. The investigation of TJ for allergic rhinitis will also suggest recommendations for clinical practice. The results of this study are expected to provide consolidated evidence for the effectiveness and safety of TJ for the treatment of patients with allergic

  12. Homeopathy for Allergic Rhinitis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kushal; Mathie, Robert T; Costelloe, Céire; Howick, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of homeopathic intervention in the treatment of seasonal or perennial allergic rhinitis (AR). Randomized controlled trials evaluating all forms of homeopathic treatment for AR were included in a systematic review (SR) of studies published up to and including December 2015. Two authors independently screened potential studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes included symptom improvement and total quality-of-life score. Treatment effect size was quantified as mean difference (continuous data), or by risk ratio (RR) and odds ratio (dichotomous data), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-analysis was performed after assessing heterogeneity and risk of bias. Eleven studies were eligible for SR. All trials were placebo-controlled except one. Six trials used the treatment approach known as isopathy, but they were unsuitable for meta-analysis due to problems of heterogeneity and data extraction. The overall standard of methods and reporting was poor: 8/11 trials were assessed as "high risk of bias"; only one trial, on isopathy for seasonal AR, possessed reliable evidence. Three trials of variable quality (all using Galphimia glauca for seasonal AR) were included in the meta-analysis: nasal symptom relief at 2 and 4 weeks (RR = 1.48 [95% CI 1.24-1.77] and 1.27 [95% CI 1.10-1.46], respectively) favored homeopathy compared with placebo; ocular symptom relief at 2 and 4 weeks also favored homeopathy (RR = 1.55 [95% CI 1.33-1.80] and 1.37 [95% CI 1.21-1.56], respectively). The single trial with reliable evidence had a small positive treatment effect without statistical significance. A homeopathic and a conventional nasal spray produced equivalent improvements in nasal and ocular symptoms. The low or uncertain overall quality of the evidence warrants caution in drawing firm conclusions about intervention effects. Use of either Galphimia glauca or a homeopathic nasal spray

  13. Nasal provocation test is useful for discriminating allergic, nonallergic, and local allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Young Hyo

    2015-01-01

    No standard study protocol or diagnostic criteria based on nasal provocation test (NPT) and acoustic rhinometry (AR) results are available for allergic rhinitis. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of NPT plus AR for the differential diagnosis of local allergic rhinitis (LAR), allergic, and nonallergic rhinitis. The medical records and skin-prick test (SPT) and NPT results of 262 patients with symptoms of chronic rhinitis were reviewed. Patients were allocated to one of three groups, that is, group A [n = 110, negative SPT result for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP)], group B (n = 53, weakly positive result), or group C (n = 99, strongly positive result). Twelve patients had a negative SPT result and provoked response in NPT [≥29% decrease of minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) after DP challenge] were diagnosed to have LAR. After DP challenge, group C showed significant aggravation of nasal symptoms and a greater decrease in acoustic parameters than groups A and B (p rhinitis, whereas the diagnostic criterion "a total nasal volume (TNV) change at 30 minutes after DP challenge of more than or equal to 27.6%" had 73.4% sensitivity and 58.1% specificity. NPT with AR could be a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of allergic, nonallergic, and local allergic rhinitis.

  14. Local IgE in non-allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, P; Rondón, C; Gould, H J; Barrionuevo, E; Gevaert, P; Blanca, M

    2015-05-01

    Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is characterized by the presence of a nasal Th2 inflammatory response with local production of specific IgE antibodies and a positive response to a nasal allergen provocation test (NAPT) without evidence of systemic atopy. The prevalence has been shown to be up to 25% in subjects affected with rhinitis with persistence, comorbidity and evolution similar to allergic rhinitis. LAR is a consistent entity that does not evolve to allergic rhinitis with systemic atopy over time although patients have significant impairment in quality of life and increase in the severity of nasal symptoms over time. Lower airways can be also involved. The diagnosis of LAR is based mostly on demonstration of positive response to NAPT and/or local synthesis of specific IgE. Allergens involved include seasonal or perennial such as house dusts mites, pollens, animal epithelia, moulds (alternaria) and others. Basophils from peripheral blood may be activated by the involved allergens suggesting the spill over of locally synthesized specific IgE to the circulation. LAR patients will benefit from the same treatment as allergic patients using antihistamines, inhaled corticosteroids and IgE antagonists. Studies on immunotherapy are ongoing and will determine its efficacy in LAR in terms of symptoms improvement and evolution of the natural course of the disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mite and cockroach sensitisation in patients with allergic rhinitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No studies have been conducted on sensitisation to the other storage mites, spider mites or cockroaches. We aimed to determine the prevalence of sensitisation to various housedust mites, storage mites, spider mites and cockroaches in patients with allergic rhinitis living in the Free State. Methods. Fifty consecutive patients ...

  16. [Effect of formaldehyde inhalation on allergic rhinitis in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Rong; Xu, Yu

    2015-08-01

    To observe the effect of formaldehyde inhalation on the allergic rhinitis mice model. Forty-eight male BALB/C mice in six experimental group were exposure to (A) saline control; (B) Der p1; (C) formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m3); (D) Derp1 + formaldehyde (1.5 mg/m3); (E) Der p1 + formaldehyde (3.0 mg/M3); (F) Der p1+ formaldehyde (6.0 mg/m3). The concentrations of IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ in the peripheral serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA). Nasal mucosal inflammation was evaluated by HE staining. Result: Formaldehyde exposure could increase the number of allergic rhinitis mice with sneezing and rubbing nose. The levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in group B, D, E and F were higher than that ingroup A (P formaldehyde exposure allergic rhinitis groups. The study showed that formaldehyde exposure can promote Th2 cytokines and eosinophil infiltration and then aggravate the allergic rhinitis symptoms.

  17. Diagnosing allergic rhinitis – is there a need? | Davis | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A definitive diagnosis of allergic rhinitis makes a difference to management. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  18. Cost of therapy for allergic rhinitis | Wessels | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To describe the cost of medicines used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis in South Africa. Design. MIMS was used as the reference for the list of drugs, drug formulation and size, and recommended dosage. These figures were then checked against the package insert of each agent. The cost of each agent was ...

  19. Is allergic rhinitis a trivial disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Solé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma and rhinitis often coexist, which potentially increases the disease severity and can negatively impact a patients' quality of life. However, there are few reports based on data obtained from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood examining asthma severity in combination with rhinitisrelated symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate whether current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis are associated with the development of asthma or its increasing severity in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS: The prevalence of current asthma was correlated with the prevalence of current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis in adolescents (13 to 14 year olds from 16 Brazilian centers (based on Spearman's rank correlation index. The influence of current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis on asthma presentation was also evaluated using the chi-squared test and was expressed as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. RESULTS: A significant positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of current asthma and current rhinitis (rs = 0.82; 95%CI: 0.60-0.93, p< 0.0001 and between the prevalence of current asthma and current rhinoconjunctivitis (rs = 0.75; 95%CI: 0.47-0.89, p < 0.0001. Current rhinitis was associated with a significantly increased risk of current asthma and of more severe asthma. Similar results were observed for current rhinoconjunctivitis. CONCLUSION: In this epidemiologic study of Brazilian adolescents, the presence of current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis was associated with a high risk of developing asthma and increased asthma severity. The mutual evaluation of rhinitis and asthma is necessary to establish an adequate treatment plan.

  20. Randomised controlled trial of butterbur and cetirizine for treating seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapowal, Andreas

    2002-01-19

    To compare the efficacy and tolerability of butterbur (Petasites hybridus) with cetirizine in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Randomised, double blind, parallel group comparison. Four outpatient general medicine and allergy clinics in Switzerland and Germany. 131 patients were screened for seasonal allergic rhinitis and 125 patients were randomised (butterbur 61; cetirizine 64). Butterbur (carbon dioxide extract tablets, ZE 339) one tablet, four times daily, or cetirizine, one tablet in the evening, both given for two consecutive weeks. Scores on SF-36 questionnaire and clinical global impression scale. Improvement in SF-36 score was similar in the two treatment groups for all items tested hierarchically. Butterbur and cetirizine were also similarly effective with regard to global improvement scores on the clinical global impression scale (median score 3 in both groups). Both treatments were well tolerated. In the cetirizine group, two thirds (8/12) of reported adverse events were associated with sedative effects (drowsiness and fatigue) despite the drug being considered a non-sedating antihistamine. The effects of butterbur are similar to those of cetirizine in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis when evaluated blindly by patients and doctors. Butterbur should be considered for treating seasonal allergic rhinitis when the sedative effects of antihistamines need to be avoided.

  1. Determinants of allergic rhinitis in young children with asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Moussu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the preschool period, allergic rhinitis (AR is infrequent and thus under-diagnosed. However, recent works have highlighted the occurrence of AR in toddlers although the causes of AR in this young population remain unknown. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of AR in young children with asthma. METHODS: We carried out a case-control study of 227 children with active asthma and enrolled in the Trousseau Asthma Program. AR and other allergic diseases (asthma, food allergy and eczema were diagnosed by medical doctors using standardized questionnaires. Parental history of AR and asthma, biological markers of atopy (total IgE, blood eosinophilia, allergic sensitization towards food and aeroallergens and environmental parameters were also collected. RESULTS: Forty one of the children (18.1% had AR. By univariate logistic regression analysis, AR was mainly associated with peanut sensitization (OR = 6.75; p = 0.002; food allergy (OR = 4.31; p = 0.026; mold exposure (OR = 3.81 p<0.01 and parental history of AR (OR = 1.42; p = 0.046. Due to the strong link between food allergy and peanut sensitization three models of multivariate logistic regression were performed and confirmed that AR is associated with peanut sensitization but also food allergy and mold exposure. A random forest analysis was also performed to explain AR. The results reinforced the logistic analysis that peanut sensitization and mold exposure were the principal determinants of AR. CONCLUSIONS & CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These results stress the importance of investigating AR in young children with asthma to potentially diagnose a particularly severe allergic asthmatic phenotype. Moreover, these data evoke the hypothesis that peanut could be an aeroallergen.

  2. Rising trend of allergic rhinitis prevalence among Turkish schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duksal, Fatma; Akcay, Ahmet; Becerir, Tulay; Ergin, Ahmet; Becerir, Cem; Guler, Nermin

    2013-09-01

    To assess the time trends and possible risk factors associated with allergic rhinitis symptoms in schoolchildren from Denizli, Turkey. Two identical cross-sectional surveys were performed in the 13- to 14-yr age group at intervals of six years using ISAAC questionnaire. Possible risk factors were also asked and the children completed questionnaires by self. A total of 4078 children (response rate 75%) in the 2008 and 3004 children (response rate, 93.8%) in 2002 were included. The lifetime prevalence of rhinitis, 12-month prevalence of rhinitis, prevalence of associated itchy eye in the previous 12 months and doctor diagnosed allergic rhinitis prevalence were increased from 34.2% to 49.4% (POR=1.87, 95% CI=47.8-50.9 and p ≤ 0.001), from 23.5.0% to 32.9% (POR=1.59, 95% CI=31.4-34.3 and p ≤ 0.001), from 9.6% to 14.9% (POR=1.64, 95% CI=13.8-16.0 and p ≤ 0.001), and from 4.3% to 7% (POR=1.67, 95% CI=6.2-7.8 and p ≤ 0.001) respectively. Severe interference with daily activity in the previous 12 months did not change. In multivariate analysis, history of family atopy, stuffed toys, high annual family income, presence of allergy in mother, father and accompaniment of children to their parents after school hours in textile industry were found as risk factors in 2008 study. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis increased significantly in 2008. Family history of atopy, stuffed toys, high annual family income and accompaniment of children to their parents in textile industry were found as risk factors for doctor diagnosed allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of montelukast in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ozge; Altintas, Derya; Rondon, Carmen; Cingi, Cemal; Oghan, Fatih

    2013-12-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood and carries significant morbidity as well as physical and psychosocial consequences. Therapy aims to alleviate clinical symptoms, prevent complications and improve psychosocial consequences. Leukotrienes which are amongst the main mediators in pathogenesis of AR have chemotactic properties and lead to increased vascular permeability. Thus, leukotriene antagonism may be an effective therapeutic option in treatment of allergic diseases, specifically AR. Montelukast which is a leukotriene receptor type I inhibitor has variable efficacy in children with AR and the guidelines recommend its use in children with seasonal AR aged six years and above. Although its efficacy is inferior to anti-histamines and intranasal corticosteroids, combination treatment may warrant clinical efficacy. Therefore, montelukast may be considered to be a well-tolerated therapeutic option for children with AR with minor side effects though long term results need to be assessed. In conclusion, larger scale research enrolling pediatric cases with seasonal and persistent AR are required before concise recommendations about montelukast use in pediatric AR can be made. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lk

    2011-01-01

    Allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis are very common diseases in childhood in industrialized countries. Although these conditions are widely trivialized by both parents and physicians they induce a major impact on quality of life for the affected children and a substantial drainage of health care...... resources. Unfortunately, diagnostic specificity is hampered by nonspecific symptom history and lack of reliable diagnostic tests which may explain why the pathology behind such diagnoses is poorly understood. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis in young...... airway patencies were strongly associated and independent of body size, rhinitis and asthma. The association was consistent for both baseline values and for decongested nasal airway patency and post-ß2 FEV1. Blood and nasal eosinophilia were also associated with nasal airway obstruction. This suggests...

  5. Cephalometric Evaluation of Children with Allergic Rhinitis and Mouth Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Helena Afonso; Furtado, Ivo Ãlvares; Silva, Francisco Salvado; Ustrell Torrent, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontists frequently treat children with mouth breathing. The purpose of the present study was to examine dental positions, skeletal effects and the pharyngeal airway space of children with chronic allergic rhinitis, when compared with a control group exhibiting a normal breathing pattern. Seventy Caucasian children from Santa Maria University Hospital - North Lisbon Hospital Center were evaluated, between September 2009 and February 2013. The study group comprised of 35 children with chronic allergic rhinitis, both genders, aged 5 - 14, with positive reaction to allergens, mouth breathing and malocclusion. The control group was composed of 35 children, both genders, displaying normal nasal breathing and malocclusion, who resorted to the orthodontic department. Measures of Ricketts, Steiner and McNamara's analysis were used and the t- Student test was applied to the data obtained. Statistically significant differences were observed between the oral and nasal breathers, respectively: lower facial height (49.1/45.9 mm), Frankfurt â mandibular plane angle (30.1/26.9º) and Sela-Nasion - oclusal plane angle (17.3/15º), maxillary length (78.4/82.4 mm), mandibular length (102.4/107 mm), overbite (0.8/3.1mm) and overjet (4/4.7 mm). Comparison between the allergic rhinitis and control group showed that there is an increased lower facial height, larger Frankfurt â mandibular plane angle and Sela-Nasion oclusal plane angle in children with chronic allergic rhinitis. This group also had a shorter maxillary and mandibular length, less overbite and decreased upper airway space. Children with allergic rhinitis and mouth breathing have longer faces, shorter maxillas and mandibles and a narrowed pharyngeal airway space. No statistical differences between the groups in sagital relationships or in dental inclinations were found.

  6. Relation between air pollution and allergic rhinitis in Taiwanese schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yung-Ling

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings suggest that exposure to outdoor air pollutants may increase the risk of allergic rhinitis. The results of these studies are inconsistent, but warrant further attention. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of relation between exposure to urban air pollution and the prevalence allergic rhinitis among school children. Methods We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study of 32,143 Taiwanese school children. We obtained routine air-pollution monitoring data for sulphur dioxide (SO2, nitrogen oxides (NOx, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, and particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10. A parent-administered questionnaire provided information on individual characteristics and indoor environments (response rate 92%. Municipal-level exposure was calculated using the mean of the 2000 monthly averages. The effect estimates were presented as odds ratios (ORs per 10 ppb change for SO2, NOx, and O3, 100 ppb change for CO, and 10 μg/m3 change for PM10. Results In two-stage hierarchical model adjusting for confounding, the prevalence of allergic rhinitis was significantly associated with SO2 (adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.25, 1.64, CO (aOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.07, and NOx (aOR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.15. Contrary to our hypothesis, the prevalence of allergic rhinitis was weakly or not related to O3 (aOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.12 and PM10 (aOR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.02. Conclusion Persistent exposure to NOx, CO, and SO2 may increase the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children.

  7. Effect of sublingual immunotherapy on platelet activity in children with allergic rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yanqiu; Zhou, Lifeng; Yang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The role of platelet activation in allergic inflammation is receiving increasing attention. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis can modify the immunological process to an allergen, rather than simply treating symptoms. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the role of platelet activation during sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis. Methods: Forty-two House Dust Mite - sensitized children with allergic rhinitis were enrolled...

  8. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Like Behavioral Problems and Parenting Stress in Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Sik; Kim, Se Hee; You, Ji Hee; Baek, Hyung Tae; Na, Chul; Kim, Bung Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have reported comorbidity of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and allergic diseases. The current study investigated ADHD like behavioral symptoms and parenting stress in pediatric allergic rhinitis. Methods Eighty-seven children (6-13 years old) with allergic rhinitis and 73 age- and sex-matched children of control group were recruited. Diagnosis and severity assessments of allergic rhinitis were determined by a pediatric allergist. The Parenting ...

  9. Effects of Hyeonggaeyeongyo-Tang in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Rhinitis Model

    OpenAIRE

    Se Hyang Hong; Soon Re Kim; Han-Seok Choi; Jin Mo Ku; Hye Sook Seo; Yong Cheol Shin; Seong-Gyu Ko

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is an allergic inflammation of the nasal airways. The prevalence of AR is increasing worldwide. We investigated whether Hyeonggaeyeongyo-tang (HYT) is effective to suppress the progression of AR induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Male BALB/c mice were used for this study. Allergic rhinitis was induced by OVA. Treatment with HYT was assessed to study the effect of HYT on allergic rhinitis in mice. Histological analysis, immunohistochemistry, multiplex cytokine assay, blood anal...

  10. Prevalence of Allergic Rhinitis in Children in the Trabzon Province of the Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çobanoğlu, Hatice Bengü; Işık, Abdülcemal Ümit; Topbaş, Murat; Ural, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children aged 12-15 years who lived in the Trabzon Province, specify possible risk factors, and compare the data obtained with those of the other studies conducted in our country and in other countries. First, 1372 students from nine primary schools determined according to the recommendations of Department of Public Health and approval of The Provincial Directorate of Health were screened in their schools with questionnaire forms. Second, students providing the response "yes" to the first and/or second questions in the questionnaire forms were considered as possible allergic rhinitis patients and invited to our clinic. Then, 246 students were subjected to a skin prick test. Data were collected with the evalution of questionnaire and skin prick test results together. The prevalance of allergic rhinitis in children between 12 and 15 years age was found to be 14.5% in Trabzon. Female gender was found to be a relative a risk factor for allergic rhinitis (p=0.015). The prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children whose both parents were smoking was significantly higher than that in children whose only one parent was smoking or both parents were nonsmokers (p=0.0024). In addition, living in an apartment flat (p=0.015) and owing pets (p=0.04) were detected to be other risk factors for allergic rhinitis. According to our investigations, this is the first prevalence study in Trabzon, which is the largest settlement in the Eastern Black Sea Region. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children was found to be 14.5%. Female gender, smoking habits of the parents, owing pets, and living in an apartment flat are risk factors for allergic rhinitis.

  11. The ARIA score of allergic rhinitis using mobile technology correlates with quality-of-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Arnavielhe, S; Bedbrook, A

    2018-01-01

    Mobile technology has been used to appraise allergic rhinitis control but more data are needed. In order to better assess the importance of mobile technologies in rhinitis control, the ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) score ranging from 0 to 4 of the Allergy Diary was compared wi...

  12. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA): Achievements in 10 years and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Schunemann, H.J.; Samolinski, B.; Demoly, P.; Baena-Cagnani, C.E.; Bachert, C.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L.P.; Bousquet, P.J.; Brozek, J.L.; Canonica, G.W.; Casale, T.B.; Cruz, A.A.; Fokkens, W.J.; Fonseca, J.A.; van Wijk, R.G.; Grouse, L.; Haahtela, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kuna, P.; Lockey, R.F.; Lodrup Carlsen, K.C.; Mullol, J.; Naclerio, R.; O'Hehir, R.E.; Ohta, K.; Palkonen, S.; Papadopoulos, N.G.; Passalacqua, G.; Pawankar, R.; Price, D.; Ryan, D.; Simons, F.E.; Togias, A.; Williams, D.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O.M.; Aberer, W.; Adachi, M.; Agache, I.; Ait-Khaled, N.; Akdis, C.A.; Andrianarisoa, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ansotegui, I.J.; Baiardini, I.; Bateman, E.D.; Bedbrook, A.; Beghe, B.; Beji, M.; Bel, E.H.; Ben Kheder, A.; Bennoor, K.S.; Bergmann, K.C.; Berrissoul, F.; Bieber, T.; Bindslev Jensen, C.; Blaiss, M.S.; Boner, A.L.; Bouchard, J.; Braido, F.; Brightling, C.E.; Bush, A.; Caballero, F.; Calderon, M.A.; Calvo, M.A.; Camargos, P.A.; Caraballo, L.R.; Carlsen, K.H.; Carr, W.; Cepeda, A.M.; Cesario, A.; Chavannes, N.H.; Chen, Y.Z.; Chiriac, A.M.; Chivato Perez, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Ciprandi, G.; Costa, D.J.; Cox, L.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Darsow, U.; De Blay, F.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J.A.; Devillier, P.; Didi, T.; Dokic, D.; Dolen, W.K.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S.R.; Dykewicz, M.S.; El-Gamal, Y.; El-Meziane, A.; Emuzyte, R.; Fiocchi, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fukuda, T.; Weel, C. van; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma represent global health problems for all age groups. Asthma and rhinitis frequently coexist in the same subjects. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) was initiated during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999 (published in 2001). ARIA has

  13. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) : Achievements in 10 years and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Schuenemann, H. J.; Samolinski, B.; Demoly, P.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bachert, C.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brozek, J. L.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T. B.; Cruz, A. A.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J. A.; van Wijk, R. Gerth; Grouse, L.; Haahtela, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kuna, P.; Lockey, R. F.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Mullol, J.; Naclerio, R.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Palkonen, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Passalacqua, G.; Pawankar, R.; Price, D.; Ryan, D.; Simons, F. E. R.; Togias, A.; Williams, D.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Aberer, W.; Adachi, M.; Agache, I.; Ait-Khaled, N.; Akdis, C. A.; Andrianarisoa, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Baiardini, I.; Bateman, E. D.; Bedbrook, A.; Beghe, B.; Beji, M.; Bel, E. H.; Ben Kheder, A.; Bennoor, K. S.; Bergmann, K. C.; Berrissoul, F.; Bieber, T.; Jensen, C. Bindslev; Blaiss, M. S.; Boner, A. L.; Bouchard, J.; Braido, F.; Brightling, C. E.; Bush, A.; Caballero, F.; Calderon, M. A.; Calvo, M. A.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Caraballo, L. R.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Cepeda, A. M.; Cesario, A.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiriac, A. M.; Chivato Perez, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Ciprandi, G.; Costa, D. J.; Cox, L.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Darsow, U.; De Blay, F.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J. A.; Devillier, P.; Didi, T.; Dokic, D.; Dolen, W. K.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Dykewicz, M. S.; El-Gamal, Y.; El-Meziane, A.; Emuzyte, R.; Fiocchi, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fukuda, T.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gereda, J. E.; Gonzalez Diaz, S.; Gotua, M.; Guzman, M. A.; Hellings, P. W.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O'B.; Howarth, P.; Humbert, M.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jackson, C.; Just, J.; Kalayci, O.; Kaliner, M. A.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keil, T.; Keith, P. K.; Khayat, G.; Kim, Y. Y.; N'Goran, B. Koffi; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kvedariene, V.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Le, L. T.; Lemiere, C.; Li, J.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Mahboub, B.; Makela, M. J.; Martin, F.; Marshall, G. D.; Martinez, F. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Mazon, A.; Melen, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Mendez, N. H.; Merk, H.; Mihaltan, F.; Mohammad, Y.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Muraro, A.; Nafti, S.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Niggemann, B.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E.; Nyembue, T. D.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Orru, M. P.; Ouedraogo, S.; Ozdemir, C.; Panzner, P.; Pali-Schoell, I.; Park, H. S.; Pigearias, B.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Postma, D. S.; Potter, P.; Rabe, K. F.; Ratomaharo, J.; Reitamo, S.; Ring, J.; Roberts, R.; Rogala, B.; Romano, A.; Rodriguez, M. Roman; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Rosenwasser, L.; Rottem, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G. K.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Sheikh, A.; Sisul, J. C.; Sole, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spicak, V.; Spranger, O.; Stein, R. T.; Stoloff, S. W.; Sunyer, J.; Szczeklik, A.; Todo-Bom, A.; Toskala, E.; Tremblay, Y.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valeyre, D.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; Van Cauwenberge, P.; Vandenplas, O.; van weel, C.; Vichyanond, P.; Viegi, G.; Wang, D. Y.; Wickman, M.; Woehrl, S.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    2012-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma represent global health problems for all age groups. Asthma and rhinitis frequently coexist in the same subjects. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) was initiated during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999 (published in 2001). ARIA has

  14. Serum periostin level is not associated with allergic rhinitis or allergic sensitization in Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Jeong Hong; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Hong, Seong-Chul; Lee, Hye-Sook; Kang, Ju Wan

    2017-02-01

    Periostin is a matricellular protein, synthesized in the airway epithelium and induced by interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13. The significance of periostin as a biomarker of T helper type 2 cell (Th2)-induced airway inflammation, and as a measure of the response to Th2-targeted therapy, has recently been highlighted. We explored the relationship between serum periostin and allergic rhinitis in Korean children. Data for fifth and sixth grade children from six randomly selected elementary schools located in Jeju and Seogwipo City, Korea, were investigated. Serum periostin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sex, school grade, body mass index, and presence of allergic nasal symptoms were obtained via a self-reported survey and skin prick testing was performed. There were no significant differences between groups, when stratification was applied according to sex, grade, presence of atopy, and presence of allergic nasal symptoms. Sex and body mass index were significantly associated with serum periostin levels in multivariate linear regression analysis. However, allergic rhinitis was not associated with serum periostin levels. Allergic rhinitis or allergic sensitization in Korean children did not influence serum periostin levels. Further studies are required to investigate the significance of serum periostin levels in pediatric allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 5-grass pollen tablets achieve disease control in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis unresponsive to drugs: a real-life study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastorello EA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Elide Anna Pastorello,1 Laura Losappio,1 Stefania Milani,2 Giuseppina Manzotti,3 Valentina Fanelli,4 Valerio Pravettoni,5 Fabio Agostinis,6 Alberto Flores D’Arcais,7 Ilaria Dell'Albani,8 Paola Puccinelli,9 Cristoforo Incorvaia,10 Franco Frati81Allergy and Immunology Department, Niguarda Hospital, Milan, 2Allergy Department, San Marco General Hospital, Bergamo, 3Allergy Department, Treviglio Hospital, Bergamo, 4Allergy Department, Italian Institute for Auxology, Milan, 5Clinical Allergy and Immunology Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, 6Department of Pediatrics, Riuniti Hospital, Bergamo, 7Department of Pediatrics, Legnano Hospital, Milan, 8Medical and Scientific Department, Stallergenes Italy, Milan, 9Regulatory Department, Stallergenes Italy, Milan, 10Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation, ICP Hospital, Milan, ItalyBackground: An important subpopulation in allergic rhinitis is represented by patients with severe form of disease that is not responsive to drug treatment. It has been reported that grass pollen subcutaneous immunotherapy is effective in drug-resistant patients. In a real-life study, we evaluated the efficacy of 5-grass pollen tablets in patients with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis not responsive to drug therapy.Methods: We carried out this multicenter observational study in adults and adolescents with grass-induced allergic rhinitis not responsive to drug therapy who were treated for a year with 5-grass pollen tablets. Clinical data collected before and after sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT included Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA classification of allergic rhinitis, response to therapy, and patient satisfaction.Results: Forty-seven patients entered the study. By ARIA classification, three patients had moderate to severe intermittent allergic rhinitis, ten had mild persistent allergic rhinitis, and 34 had moderate to severe persistent allergic rhinitis. There were no cases

  16. Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy against Allergic Rhinitis: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fujimura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent type I allergy in industrialized countries. Pollen scattering from trees or grasses often induces seasonal allergic rhinitis, which is known as pollinosis or hay fever. The causative pollen differs across different areas and times of the year. Impaired performance due to pollinosis and/or medication used for treating pollinosis is considered to be an important reason for the loss of concentration and productivity in the workplace. Antigen-specific immunotherapy is an only available curative treatment against allergic rhinitis. Subcutaneous injection of allergens with or without adjuvant has been commonly used as an immunotherapy; however, recently, sublingual administration has come to be considered a safer and convenient alternative administration route of allergens. In this review, we focus on the safety and protocol of subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy against seasonal allergic rhinitis. We also describe an approach to selecting allergens for the vaccine so as to avoid secondary sensitization and adverse events. The biomarkers and therapeutic mechanisms for immunotherapy are not fully understood. We discuss the therapeutic biomarkers that are correlated with the improvement of clinical symptoms brought about by immunotherapy as well as the involvement of Tr1 and regulatory T cells in the therapeutic mechanisms. Finally, we focus on the current immunotherapeutic approach to treating Japanese cedar pollinosis, the most prevalent pollinosis in Japan, including sublingual immunotherapy with standardized extract, a transgenic rice-based edible vaccine, and an immunoregulatory liposome encapsulating recombinant fusion protein.

  17. Effects of omalizumab therapy on allergic rhinitis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masieri, S; Cavaliere, C; Begvarfaj, E; Rosati, D; Minni, A

    2016-12-01

    The use of omalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody able to binding Ig-E, is currently authorized only for treatment of severe bronchial asthma. The use of omalizumab in other Ig-E related diseases is off-label, although some studies have provided promising results about it. The aim of this study was to evaluate if therapy with omalizumab in patients affected by asthma and allergic rhinitis has an impact also on allergic rhinitis-related symptoms. A longitudinal study was conducted on 11 patients affected by severe asthma and a periodic allergic rhinitis. Patients were treated with omalizumab for 24 weeks with a monthly subcutaneous administration at the dosage recommended by the current guidelines. We observed at the start and at the end of treatment: rhinitis symptoms using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS); the state of nasal mucosa with fiberoptic nasal endoscopy; airways inflammation by measuring the Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO); asthmatic symptomatology by means of the Asthma Control Test; the amount of total Ig-E in a blood sample; and the use of symptomatic drugs before and after treatment. VAS scores to measure general symptomatology and symptoms including nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, itching and sneezing were significantly reduced. Turbinate hypertrophy was resolved in six of nine patients. Furthermore, eight patients (73%) reduced or eliminated the use of symptomatic drugs. Our data confirm the efficacy of omalizumab in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Controlled studies will now have to be carried out to confirm these preliminary data and will specify indications for a very efficacious but still significantly expensive therapy.

  18. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in pediatric rhinitis patients: the difference between allergic and nonallergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Han, Doo Hee; Lee, Sun-Joo; Lee, Chul Hee; Rhee, Chae-Seo

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the relationship of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to asthma or allergic rhinitis (AR). However, little is known regarding the association between BHR and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). This study investigated the prevalence and risk factors of BHR in pediatric patients with rhinitis and analyzed the difference between patients with AR and those with NAR. A total of 227 subjects with rhinitis aged 6-15 years underwent a parental survey and laboratory tests, including skin-prick test and methacholine challenge test. Outcome variables were analyzed in relation to BHR. The prevalence of BHR was 55.7 and 25.5% in patients with AR and those with NAR, respectively. The persistency of rhinitis, blood eosinophil count, and baseline lung function were significantly associated with BHR in patients with AR, whereas individual or familial medical history, environmental factors, the serum immunoglobulin E level, the number of sensitized allergens, and the wheal size ratio of allergen to histamine did not affect the BHR rate. In multivariate analysis, the persistency of rhinitis was the only significant predictor of BHR in AR patients. However, persistent rhinitis symptoms did not increase the risk of BHR in NAR patients. BHR occurs over two times more frequently in children with AR than in those with NAR. In addition, persistent nasal inflammation appears to increase the risk of BHR only in the presence of atopy.

  19. Bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis and cholecystectomy: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gallbladder has not been associated with any allergic condition what so ever. However, certain patients with bronchial asthma and cholelithiasis have reported to the author improvement in their asthmatic attack after cholecystectomy. Methods: This was an observational study on 22 bronchial asthma or allergic ...

  20. Children with allergic and nonallergic rhinitis have a similar risk of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis have been associated with increased prevalence of asthma. To characterize asthma and intermediary asthma endpoints in young children with allergic and nonallergic rhinitis. Thirty-eight 7-year-old children with allergic rhinitis, 67 with nonallergic rhinitis, and 185 without rhinitis from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood birth cohort were compared for prevalence of asthma, eczema, food sensitization, filaggrin null-mutations, total IgE, blood eosinophil count, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), lung function, and bronchial responsiveness. Children with allergic rhinitis compared with asymptomatic controls had increased prevalence of asthma (21% vs 5%; P = .002), food sensitization (47% vs 13%; P allergic rhinitis (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.3-8.3) but did not modify these associations. Children with nonallergic rhinitis also had increased asthma prevalence (20% vs 5%; P = .001) but showed no association with filaggrin null-mutations, eczema, food sensitization, total IgE, blood eosinophil count, FeNO, or bronchial responsiveness. Asthma is similarly associated with allergic and nonallergic rhinitis, suggesting a link between upper and lower airways beyond allergy associated inflammation. Only children with allergic rhinitis had increased bronchial responsiveness and elevated FeNO, suggesting different endotypes of asthma symptoms in young children with allergic and nonallergic rhinitis. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Allergic and nonallergic rhinitis and skin sensitization to metals: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelardi, M; Guarino, R; Taliente, S; Quaranta, N; Carpentieri, A; Passalacqua, G

    2017-05-01

    Background. Chromium, Cobalt and Nickel are responsible for contact dermatitis, that is largely prevalent in the general population. They can act also as irritants in the upper and lower respiratory airways. Also rhinitis (allergic and nonallergic) is a high prevalence disorder. Both diseases could share some common inflammatory mechanisms, but the clinical association between skin sensitization to metals and rhinitis was never studied. Objective. We assessed the presence of skin sensitization to metals in subjects with rhinitis. Methods. Patients suffering from rhinitis underwent a standard diagnostic procedure, including skin testing, nasal endoscopy and nasal cytology. Control healthy subjects were also included. None of the patients had skin diseases. All subjects underwent patch test with Chromium, Cobalt and Nickel. Results. None of the 26 controls had positive skin prick test or nasal cytology. The 82 rhinitis patients were subdivided into allergic (group A = 27), nonallergic (group B = 31) and overlapping (group C = 24). The prevalence of positive patch test to metals was 26% in group A, 45% in group B, 42% in group C and 31% in controls. The percentage of patch-positive subjects was significantly different between Group A and B (p = 0.0045; OR: 0.43), Group A and C (p = 0.0186; OR: 0.49), and Group B and controls (p = 0.0360; OR: 1.85). There was a significant difference between groups A + controls and B + C. Conclusion. Even in the absence of skin diseases, the prevalence of sensitization to metals (patch test) is greater in nonallergic and overlapping rhinitis, as compared to allergic rhinitis and controls.

  2. Impact of allergic rhinitis and its treatment on the pharmacokinetics of nasally administered fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Michael; Fisher, Anthony N; Smith, Alan; Knight, Alastair

    2013-05-01

    Fentanyl pectin nasal spray (FPNS, Lazanda® in the US and PecFent® in Europe and Australia) is a novel analgesic approved for the management of breakthrough pain in cancer patients. Given that the fentanyl is nasally administered, it is important to understand whether concomitant allergic rhinitis, or its treatment with a vasoconstrictor, would affect its absorption and, potentially, its efficacy or safety. Subjects with a history of allergic rhinitis were screened to identify subjects who developed at least moderate rhinitis symptoms on exposure to pollen allergen (either ragweed or tree) in an environmental exposure chamber (EEC). These were entered into a randomized, three-way crossover study in which each subject received 100 μg of FPNS under three exposure conditions; Control (no rhinitis), Rhinitis (symptomatic without decongestant), Treated (symptomatic with concomitant oxymetazoline). Blood samples for fentanyl were collected over a 24-hour period. A total of 132 subjects was screened to identify 54 for inclusion in the study; 31 were evaluable for pharmacokinetics. Measures of fentanyl absorption (mean or median) were similar between Control and Rhinitis conditions: Cmax 453.0 vs. 467.8 pg/ml; AUCt 1,292.3 vs. 1,325.4 pg×h/ml, AUC0-∞ 1,430.6 vs. 1,387 pg×h/ml and tmax 20 vs. 17 minutes. When oxymetazoline was co-administered, overall fentanyl absorption was slightly reduced (AUC0-∞ 1,362.4 pg×h/ml); but, more clinically relevant were the delayed rate of absorption (tmax 53 minutes) and reduced Cmax (235.3 pg/ml). Patients treated with FPNS will be unaffected by the development of allergic rhinitis; but, if oxymetazoline is prescribed, the patient would benefit from added supervision when oxymetazoline is started and stopped.

  3. Basophil activation test for inhalant allergens in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogulur, Ismail; Kiykim, Ayca; Baris, Safa; Ozen, Ahmet; Yuce, Ezgi Gizem; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif

    2017-06-01

    Flow cytometric quantification of in vitro basophil activation can be quite performant and reliable tool to measure IgE-dependent allergen-specific responses in allergic patients. Current study aimed to evaluate the clinical relevance of basophil activation test (BAT) for the diagnosis of pediatric grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) allergies. Forty-seven patients suffering from allergic rhinitis with HDM and grass pollen co-sensitization with clinical history of allergic rhinitis and/or asthma and 15 non-allergic healthy subjects were enrolled. BAT was determined by flow cytometry upon double staining with anti-IgE/anti-CD63 mAb. Regarding HDM with cut-off point greater than 12.5% for CD63 + basophils sensitivity and specificity of the BAT were 90% and 73%, with positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) as 0.70 and 0.91, respectively. The analysis of concordance of being either allergic or healthy in comparison to BAT results for HDM revealed a substantial concordance (κ index = 0.61, p allergic or healthy in comparison to BAT results for grass pollen revealed an almost perfect concordance (κ index = 0.87, p allergic children was found to be remarkably higher in our cohort compared to other studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Comparative assessment of cryosurgical treatment results in allergic and non-allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Bliżniewska, Hanna; Repetowski, Marcin; Miłoński, Jarosław; Olszewski, Jurek

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to assess the treatment efficiency in patients with allergic and non-allergic vasomotor rhinitis after cryoablation procedures. The study covered 60 patients, including 32 women and 28 men, aged 18-66. The patients were divided into two groups: I - 30 patients with chronic allergic rhinitis, II - 30 patients with non-allergic vasomotor rhinitis. The study methodology involved: an otorhinolaryngological interview with a questionnaire and an allergological interview, an objective otolaryngological and rhinomanometrical examination with Homoth apparatus, a subjective evaluation questionnaire for nasal blockage intensification (the scale ranging from 0 to 10), skin tests to aeorallergens and food allergens (Allergopharma Co.), nasal endoscopy with a straight rigid Eleps endoscope before the treatment and 3 months following it. The cryoablation of nasal conchas was performed under local infiltration anesthesia (1% Xylokaina solution) using the Cryo-S apparatus from CryoFlex Poland Company and a flat probe in a spatula shape (L-50) that was placed on the outer surfaces of the inferior nasal concha. The inferior nasal concha cryoablation resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the subjective assessment scale in group I by 82.6% and group II by 141.2%. In the endoscopic examination 3 months following the cryoablation a good nasal patency was achieved in 63.3% patients from group I and 76.7% patients from group II. The conducted studies show a better nasal passages patency in patients with non-allergic rhinitis than in those with allergic rhinitis. Cryoablation procedures on the inferior nasal conchas are not the primary therapy, but together with other methods they can immensely improve the life comfort of a rhinitis patient. Copyright © 2011 Polish Otolaryngology Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner (Poland). All rights reserved.

  5. [Aeroallergen spectrum of patients with child allergic rhinitis in Changsha area of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhuqing; Wang, Fang; Wang, Tiansheng; Li, Liangming; Tan, Guolin

    2011-09-01

    To investigate aeroallergen spectrum and allergy positive rates of patients with child allergic rhinitis and analyze its related factors. Skin prick test was carried out in 562 cases with child allergic rhinitis using 13 inhaled allergens, and detailed history was collected in all cases. Four hundred and fifty-seven (81.3%) of 562 cases showed positive reaction to at least one allergen out of 13 allergens. The most common allergens found in patients was Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and positive reaction was 93.1% in child allergic rhinitis, followed by tropical mite, Periplaneta americana, Blattella germanica and dog hair. The pollen allergen, most common in American and European, was pretty rare in this study. The prevalence of child allergic rhinitis was significantly higher in urban than in rural (Penviroment. Most of patients with child allergic rhinitis can be treated by the mite specific immunotherapy. The skin prick test is a safe technique for diagnosis of children with allergic rhinitis.

  6. [Clinical comparative study on the influence of acupoint sticking therapy in dog days and in non-dog days to the quality of life of allergic rhinitis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Deng, Gui-Zhu; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Shao-Jie; Guo, Ya-Fei; Chen, Jun-Qi; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2012-01-01

    To observe and compare the influence of acupoint sticking therapy in dog days and in non-dog days to the quality of life of allergic rhinitis patients. Fifty-five cases were divided into group A (the acupoint sticking therapy in dog days group, 28 cases) and group B (the acupoint sticking therapy in non-dog day group, 27 cases) randomly. The acupoint sticking therapy description (Dazhui (GV 14), Fengmen (BL 12), Feishu (BL 13) etc. was used in both groups. Five times of acupoint sticking therapy were given to patients in group A during dog days in 2010, while another 5 times of acupoint sticking therapy were given to patients in group B before the dog days. The Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) was used to evaluate the effects before, after and half a year after treatment. The scores of behavior problems, nasal symptoms and quality of life in RQLQ of both groups all decreased after treatment (all P quality of life after treatment and in the follow-up period in group A were all greater than those in group B (P dog days and in non-dog dags can improve the symptoms of allergic rhinitis, but the improving degree to quality of life in the method of acupoint sticking in dog days is greater.

  7. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Ridolo, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1980s as a safer option to subcutaneous immunotherapy and in the latest decade achieved significant advances. Its efficacy in allergic rhinitis is supported by a number of meta-analyses. The development of SLIT preparations in tablets to fulfill the requirements of regulatory agencies for quality of allergen extracts made available optimal products for grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. Preparations of other allergens based on the same production methods are currently in progress. A notable outcome of SLIT, that is shared with subcutaneous immunotherapy, is the evident cost-effectiveness, showing significant cost savings as early as 3 months from starting the treatment, that become as high as 80% compared with drug treatment in the ensuing years.

  8. The Efficacy of Levocetirizine in Allergic Rhinitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Nyankovsky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversies about the preferred treatment of mild persistent or mild-to-moderate intermittent allergic rhinitis were considered in the study involved 62 primary school childrenю They were randomized to receive oral formulation of levocetirizine (5 mg/daily or nasal/ophthalmologic form of sodium cromoglycate (20 mg/ml, 1–2 sprays/drops 4 times daily for 2 weeks. At the end of the trial levocetirizine was 28 and 29 % more effective on the 1st and 2nd week of the treatment respectively (р 0.05. The use of levocetirizine improved compliance by 38 %, and quality of life by 46 % (р < 0.05 as compared to sodium cromoglycate treatment. The research concluded that levocetirizine is preferred in treatment of mild persistent or mild-to-moderate intermittent allergic rhinitis in children.

  9. Overview of the treatment of allergic rhinitis and nonallergic rhinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Alexander N; Meltzer, Eli O

    2011-03-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinopathy (NAR) represent common nasal conditions affecting millions of individuals across the world. Although patients present with similar symptomatology, those with NAR are frequently affected only after childhood and present with a lack of other comorbid atopic disorders such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergies. Patients with pure NAR usually have no identifiable specific allergen sensitivity, whereas those with mixed (allergic and nonallergic) rhinitis are sensitized to aeroallergens in a manner that does not fully explain the duration or extent of their symptoms. This review presents the diverse options of currently available pharmacologic agents for the treatment of AR and NAR, including intranasal corticosteroids, H(1)-antihistamines, decongestants, cromolyn sodium, antileukotrienes, anticholinergics, capsaicin, anti-IgE, and intranasal saline, in addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Furthermore, treatment algorithms for AR and NAR are presented with a stepped-up, stepped-down scheme to aid the clinician in choosing appropriate therapy.

  10. Efficacy comparison of cetirizine and loratadine for allergic rhinitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana; Rita Evalina; Lily Irsa; M. Sjabaroeddin Loebis

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis represents a global health problem affecting 10% to more than 40% of the population worldwide. Several studies in recent years have described the efficacy of second-generation antihistamines in younger children. It is not well established whether cetirizine is more effective than loratadine in reducing symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Objective The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of loratadine with cetirizine for treatment of allergic rhiniti...

  11. Quality of Sexual Life in Males with Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gul Soylu Ozler

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of sexual life of males with allergic rhinitis(AR). Material and Method: 40 patients with AR diagnosed with skin prick test and 40 control subjects with no evidence of allergy completed the study. International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire (IIEF) was used to evaluate the quality of sexual life of the subjects. Results: The mean scores of erectile function, orgasmic function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction and overall s...

  12. Natural Course of Allergic and Nonallergic Rhinitis After 2 Years in Korean Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Choi, Ji Ho; Suh, Jeffrey D.; Chung, Sochung; Hong, Seok-Chan; Kim, Jin Kook; Cho, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Allergic and nonallergic rhinitis are very common disease for children, however, little is known about their natural courses in the general population. The purpose is to evaluate the natural course of allergic and nonallergic rhinitis in children. Methods. We analyzed data from Snoring Child Cohort of 178 children (107 boys and 71 girls). All children entered the study at the age of 7 years (range, 6.5 to 7.4 years). Questionnaires regarding chronic rhinitis, a skin prick test (SPT) for 5 inhalent allergens, and specific IgE for 2 dust mites were administered. Children were classified into 4 groups: allergic rhinitis (rhinitis, positive SPT), nonallergic rhinitis (rhinitis, negative SPT), sensitization only (no rhinitis, positive SPT), and control (no rhinitis, negative SPT). We repeated follow them annually, and analyzed the data of first and third year for this study. Results. Finally, the data of 122 children were analyzed. Among 18 children with allergic rhinitis at 7 years, 13 (72%) became sensitization only after 2 years and 5 (28%) were remained having allergic rhinitis. Five out of 19 children (26%) with nonallergic rhinitis developed into allergic rhinitis and 7 (37%) into control at 9 years. Twenty-four out of 28 children (86%) with sensitization only at 7 years remained the same at 9 years. Among 57 control children at 7 years, 2 (4%) developed into allergic rhinitis, 7 (12%) with nonallergic rhinitis, and 16 (28%) with sensitization only at 9 years. Conclusion. The status of chronic rhinitis and allergen sensitization is ever-changing in children. PMID:27095517

  13. Seasonal Local Allergic Rhinitis in Areas With High Concentrations of Grass Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca-Lopez, N; Campo, P; Salas, M; García Rodríguez, C; Palomares, F; Blanca, M; Canto, G; Feo Brito, F; Rondon, C

    2016-01-01

    Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is a phenotype of allergic rhinitis characterized by the presence of a localized immune response in the nasal mucosa of patients with negative skin prick test (SPT) results and undetectable serum specific IgE (sIgE). It unknown whether LAR is limited to areas with low or moderate aeroallergen exposure. To explore the presence of LAR and the clinical and immunological characteristics of this entity in geographic areas with high grass pollen loads. A cross-sectional observational study was carried out in 2 hospitals in central Spain (Madrid and Ciudad Real). Sixty-one patients with seasonal rhinitis and negative SPT results and undetectable serum sIgE were evaluated using a clinical questionnaire, determination of serum total IgE, and a nasal allergen provocation test (NAPT) with Phleum species. The response to NAPT was monitored using assessment of nasal symptoms, acoustic rhinometry, and determination of sIgE, tryptase, and eosinophil cationic protein in the nasal cavity. Seasonal LAR was detected in 37 patients (61%) using the techniques described above. Eleven percent of patients with LAR were adolescents or children, and 14% reported onset of rhinitis in childhood. Most patients reported persistent-moderate seasonal nasal symptoms, and 41% reported worsening of the disease during the last 2 years. Conjunctivitis was the most common comorbidity, affecting 95% of cases. LAR to grass pollen is relevant in patients with seasonal symptoms indicative of allergic rhinitis but with a negative skin test result who live in areas with high allergenic pollen loads. This entity should be included the differential diagnosis of rhinitis.

  14. Assessing the efficacy of a novel temperature and humidity control machine to minimize house dust mite allergen exposure and clinical symptoms in allergic rhinitis children sensitized to dust mites: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Padungpak, Savitree; Luecha, Orawin; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Sasisakulporn, Cherapat; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat; Monyakul, Veerapol; Benjaponpitak, Suwat

    2015-06-01

    House dust mite avoidance is advised in dust mite sensitized patients to decrease the risk to develop allergic symptoms. Maintaining a relative humidity (RH) of less than 50% in households is recommended to prevent dust mite proliferation. To investigate the efficacy of a novel temperature and humidity machine to control the level of dust mite allergens and total nasal symptom score (TNSS) in dust mite sensitized allergic rhinitis children. Children (8-15 years) with dust mite sensitized persistent allergic rhinitis (AR) were enrolled. The temperature and humidity control machine was installed in the bedroom where the enrolled children stayed for 6 months. TNSS was assessed before and every month after machine set up and the level of dust mite allergen (Der p 1 and Der f 1) from the mattress were measured before and every 2 months after machine set up using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 7 children were enrolled. Noticeable reduction of Der f 1 was observed as early as 2 months after installing the machine, but proper significant differences appeared 4 months after and remained low until the end of the experiment (p mite allergens, there was a significant reduction in TNSS at 2 and 4 months (p mite in mattresses was significantly reduced after using the temperature and humidity control machine. This machine may be used as an effective tool to control clinical symptoms of dust mite sensitized AR children.

  15. Seawater gel in allergic rhinitis: entrapment effect and mucociliary clearance compared with saline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingi, Cemal; Unlu, H Halis; Songu, Murat; Yalcin, Sinasi; Topcu, Ismail; Cakli, Hamdi; Bal, Cengiz

    2010-02-01

    We performed a prospective study to investigate the the efficacy of seawater gel in reducing symptoms in patients with mild allergic rhinitis. We also aimed to investigate the impact of nasal irrigation on mucociliary clearance with seawater gel compared with saline in this patient group. The study was performed in 100 consecutive adult individuals with a history of allergic rhinitis that was not controlled by anti-allergic drugs. Patients were assigned to receive seawater gel nasal spray for 10 days. The efficacy of treatment was assessed by means of total nasal symptom score and clinical findings. A statistically significant difference was found between scores of 'nasal discharge, nasal obstruction, sneezing, nasal itching'before and after treatment (p < 0.001). Clinical findings evaluation revealed a statistically significant decrease in lower turbinate colour rating and turbinate congestion at the end of treatment (p< 0.001). Saccharin transit time decreased from baseline in the seawater trials by 12% compared with a 4% decrease for saline. The difference between the percent changes was statistically significant (t = 2.177; p < 0.05). The present study provides evidence that a four times daily regimen of seawater gel can be an adjunctive therapy in the patient with allergic rhinitis.

  16. An overview of the novel H1-antihistamine bilastine in allergic rhinitis and urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, Ignacio; García-Lirio, Eduardo; Soriano, Ana María; Gamboa, Pedro M; Antépara, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Currently available second-generation H1-antihistamines include a wide group of drugs with a better therapeutic index (or risk-benefit ratio) than the classic antihistamines, although their properties and safety profiles may differ. Bilastine is a newly registered H1-antihistamine for the oral treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria, with established antihistaminic and antiallergic properties. Clinical studies in allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria show that once-daily treatment with bilastine 20 mg is effective in managing symptoms and improving patient's quality of life, with at least comparable efficacy to other nonsedative H1-antihistamines. As far as studies in healthy volunteers, clinical assays and clinical experience can establish, bilastine's safety profile is satisfactory, since it lacks anticholinergic effects, does not impair psychomotor performance or actual driving, and appears to be entirely free from cardiovascular effects.

  17. Lifetime allergic rhinitis prevalence among US primary farm operators: findings from the 2011 Farm and Ranch Safety survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Jacek M; Henneberger, Paul K

    2017-08-01

    Allergic rhinitis is associated with decreased quality of life, and reduced workplace performance and productivity. This study investigated the prevalence of lifetime allergic rhinitis and factors associated with allergic rhinitis among US primary farm operators. The 2011 Farm and Ranch Safety Survey data collected from 11,210 active farm operators were analyzed. Survey respondents were determined to have lifetime allergic rhinitis based on a "yes" response to the question: "Have you ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that you had hay fever, seasonal allergies, or allergic rhinitis?" Data were weighted to produce nationally representative estimates. An estimated 30.8% of the 2.1 million active farm operators had lifetime allergic rhinitis in 2011. The allergic rhinitis prevalence varied by demographic and farm characteristics. Farm operators with allergic rhinitis were 1.38 (95% CI 1.22-1.56) times more likely to be exposed to pesticides compared with operators with no allergic rhinitis. The association with pesticide exposure for allergic rhinitis and current asthma, and allergic rhinitis alone was statistically significant and greater than that for current asthma alone. Certain groups of farm operators may be at increased risk of allergic rhinitis. Studies should further investigate the association of allergic rhinitis with specific pesticide exposure.

  18. Application analysis of pidotimod in the treatment of allergic rhinitis in children accompanied by allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the application effect of pidotimod in the treatment of allergic rhinitis in children accompanied by allergic asthma. Methods: A total of 60 children with allergic rhinitis accompanied by allergic asthma who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2013 to January, 2015 were included in the study and randomized into the treatment group and the control group with 30 cases in each group. The patients in the two groups were given routine treatments in combined with sublingual immunotherapy. On this basis, the patients in the treatment group were given additional pidotimod. The immunological function, inflammatory cytokine level, and pulmonary function improvement in the two groups were observed. Results: The immunological function, inflammatory cytokine level, and pulmonary function improvement in the treatment group were significantly superior to those in the control group. Conclusions: Pidotimod can significantly enhance the immunological function in children with allergic rhinitis in children accompanied by allergic asthma, alleviate the inflammatory reaction, and promote the pulmonary function improvement, with an accurate efficacy.

  19. Levocetirizine modulates lymphocyte activation in patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Fadia; Arifhodzic, Nirmina; Haines, David; Novotney, Ladislav

    2008-10-01

    Levocetirizine, a second generation non-sedating antihistamine that blocks the H(1) histamine receptor, may exhibit immunoregulatory properties that augment its primary pharmacological mechanism. To investigate this possibility, 13 Kuwaiti seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) patients were treated with levocetirizine for four weeks in comparison with a 7-member placebo-treated control group, followed by clinical evaluation and flow cytometric analysis of peripheral venous blood for inflammatory cell and lymphocyte subpopulation profiles. Relative to the controls, levocetirizine-treated patients exhibited an expected reduction in early phase allergic symptoms, including sneezing (P<0.001), nasal itching (P<0.01), nasal congestion, and running nose (P<0.001); reduced percentages of eosinophils (P<0.05); and three subpopulations of activated T lymphocytes: CD4+CD29+, CD4+CD212+, and CD4+CD54+ (P<0.05). Levocetirizine treatment also correlated with a significant increase in the percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (P<0.001). The ability of levocetirizine to reduce percentage representation of cell phenotypes known to contribute to inflammatory tissue damage (eosinophils, CD4+CD29+, CD4+CD212+, and CD4+CD54+) and expand percentages of CD4+CD25+, which may include protective immunoregulatory (Treg) cells, indicates that the drug has pharmacological potential beyond the immediate effects of H(1) histamine-receptor inhibition. Although the present data does not define a therapeutic mechanism, the results reported here establish important trends that may be used to guide future mechanistic examination of immunoregulatory capacity of H(1) inhibitors.

  20. Levocetirizine as treatment for symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, M; Bertrand, B; Stiels, B; Vandenbulcke, K

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of levocetirizine in the treatment of the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) in patients consulting their primary care doctor. Open-label uncontrolled and non-randomised multi-centre study including patients presenting symptoms of SAR and treated with levocetirizine tablets, 5 mg OD, for 4 weeks. patients with nasal symptoms who were not on treatment or not responsive to treatment, or affected by excessive adverse events due to the antihistamines used previously. There were two visits (initial and after four weeks). Primary end point: efficacy as measured by T4SS (combined score of sneezing, rhinorrhoea, nasal and ocular pruritus, ranging from 0 to 12 recorded by the patient); change in Clinical Global Impression (CGI-c) as rated by the general practitioner, subjective satisfaction with and preference for levocetirizine. Secondary end points: treatment-related adverse events. 1290 patients were evaluated. Before the start of the study, 61.2% did not use any medication, 36.4% took anti-histamines which were not effective, and 27.0% of those previously treated patients experienced excessive adverse events. Statistically significant decreases (p comparison with previous treatments after levocetirizine was used. Levocetirizine showed an improvement in symptom control for SAR and was preferred by patients compared to the antihistamines they had taken previously. Levocetirizine was well tolerated.

  1. A comparison of the anti-inflammatory properties of intranasal corticosteroids and antihistamines in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, P H

    2000-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis manifests itself clinically due to the local release of mediators from activated cells within the nasal mucosa. Treatment strategies aim either to reduce the effects of these mediators on the sensory neural and vascular end organs, or to reduce the tissue accumulation of the activated cells that generate them. Corticosteroids intervene at a number of steps in the inflammatory pathway, and, by reducing the release of cytokines and chemokines, inhibit cell recruitment and activation. These effects are evident both in vivo and in vitro. While antihistamines also have some anti-inflammatory effects in vitro, these require higher concentrations than with corticosteroids and are not consistently reproduced in vivo. In addition, although antihistamines and corticosteroids might appear to have complementary mechanisms of action, clinical trials suggest that their co-administration does not confer any additional long-term benefits compared with that achieved with corticosteroids alone. Topical corticosteroids are therefore the preferred anti-inflammatory therapy for persistent allergic rhinitis.

  2. An overview of the pediatric medications for the symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis, cough, and cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Ji, Ping; Leonard-Segal, Andrea; Sahajwalla, Chandrahas G

    2013-12-01

    Upper respiratory infections and allergic rhinitis are common diseases in children. In recent years, U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been promoting pediatric drug development with marketing exclusivity incentives and requirements. The assessment of clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data has facilitated pediatric drug development and provided appropriate labeling for pediatric use. Regulatory decision making involves multiple evaluation processes, including drug exposure comparison between adult and pediatric population, formulation bridging, dose selection, and evaluation of efficacy and safety in pediatric patients. This article reviews the pediatric drugs indicated for cough, cold, and allergic rhinitis, focusing on the utility of clinical pharmacology, safety, and efficacy data in determining the pediatric dosing regimen and the approaches taken for regulatory decision making. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. Effect of probiotics on allergic rhinitis in Df, Dp or dust-sensitive children: a randomized double blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Teng-Yi; Chen, Chia-Jung; Chen, Li-Kuang; Wen, Shu-Hui; Jan, Rong-Hwa

    2013-02-01

    To study, we examined the effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on the clinical symptoms and medication use among children with established allergic rhinitis (AR). Double blind, randomized, controlled trial. Hualien Tzu-Chi General Hospital. Atopic children with current allergic rhinitis received 4x10(9) colony forming units/g of Lactobacillus salivarius (n=99) or placebo (n=100) daily as a powder mixed with food or water for 12 weeks. The SCORing Allergic rhinitis index (specific symptoms scores [SSS] and symptom medication scores [SMS]), which measures the extent and severity of AR, was assessed in each subject at each of the visits--2 weeks prior to treatment initiation (visit 0), at the beginning of the treatment (visit 1), then at 4 (visit 2), 8 (visit 3) and 12 weeks (visit 4) after starting treatment. The WBC, RBC, platelet and, eosinophil counts as well as the IgE antibody levels of the individuals were evaluated before and after 3 months of treatment. The major outcome, indicating the efficacy of Lactobacillus salivarius treatment, was the reduction in rhinitis symptoms and drug scores. No significant statistical differences were found between baseline or 12 weeks in the probiotic and placebo groups for any immunological or blood cell variables. Our study demonstrates that Lactobacillus salivarius treatment reduces rhinitis symptoms and drug usage in children with allergic rhinitis.

  4. Evaluation of effectiveness of specific subcutaneous immunotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Zandkarimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergen immunotherapy involves the administration of gradually increasing quantities of specific allergens to patients with IgE-mediated conditions until a dose is reached that is effective in reducing disease severity from natural exposure. This study evaluated the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy with extracts of common aeroallergens North-East of Iran in asthma and allergic rhinitis. Material and Methods: In this prospective study 156 cases were chosen randomley. The mean age of patients was 37 years (range 5-65 years. The patients with mild to moderate asthma and allergic rhinitis and history of atopy were selected for immunotherapy when they showed no effective response to medical treatment.Immunotherapy materials were made from common aeroallergens in north-eastern region of Iran by Dome Hollister US company. Immunotherapy schedule for injection of the extract with vial dilution of 1:10000pg was one injection every week for ten weeks and one injection with dilution of 1:1000pg every other week for the other ten weeks and one injection monthly from dilution of 1:100pg for two years. Results: One hundred twenty (77% of cases had allergic rhinitis 29(18.5% cases had allergic asthma and 7(4.5% cases were mixed. Mean age of patients were 37 years old. 48(30.8% cases were male. Analysis of efficacy of treatment showed that immunotherapy significantlyimproved the signs and symptoms of all the groups. In allergic rhinitis group 84(70% cases completely improved, 22(18.4% patients moderately responded and no response to immunotherapy was observed in 14(11.6% patients. In allergic asthma group, 22(75% cases completely improved 4(13.6% cases moderately responded and no response to immunotherapy was detected in 3(11.4% cases. In mixed group, 3(42.8% cases completely improved, 3(42.8% cases moderately responded and no response was observed in 1(14.4% case. Conclusion: Specific allergen immunotherapy for patients with allergic persistent

  5. Early protective and risk factors for allergic rhinitis at age 4½ yr

    OpenAIRE

    Alm, Bernt; Goksör, Emma; Thengilsdottir, Hrefna; Pettersson, Rolf; Möllborg, Per; Norvenius, Gunnar; Erdes, Laslo; Åberg, Nils; Wennergren, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Allergic heredity plays a major role in the development of allergic rhinitis. In addition the introduction of food may influence the risk of subsequent allergic disease. The aim of this study was to analyse early risk factors and protective factors for allergic rhinitis at preschool age. Data were obtained from a prospective, longitudinal study of a cohort of children born in the region of western Sweden in 2003 and 8,176 families (50% of the birth cohort) were randomly selected. The parents ...

  6. The effect of allergic rhinitis with positive skin prick test on choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenigun, Alper; Elbay, Ahmet; Dogan, Remzi; Ozturan, Orhan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Hakan

    2017-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disease that develops through immunoglobulin E in the rhino-ocular mucosa due to allergy. The main symptoms are runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing and itchy nose. This study was designed to investigate the effect of allergic rhinitis on choroidal thickness. This study was planned as a case-control study. This study performed in a tertiary referral center. The study included 61 patients with allergic rhinitis and 35 healthy subjects. Patients in both groups underwent skin prick test. In allergic rhinitis patients and healthy persons; subfoveal, temporal and nasal choroidal thickness measurement was performed. The choroidal thicknesses were measured without pupil dilation using the Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography. In the subfoveal and temporal region, choroidal tissue was followed up significantly thicker in allergic rhinitis patients statistically compared to healthy persons (p = 0.031, p = 0.049). However, no significant difference was followed up between the nasal choroidal thickness measurements statistically (p = 0.54). Runny nose (67.2%), sneeze (65.5%), stuffiness (62.2%), itching of the nose (40.9%), and nasal discharge (21.3%) complaints were observed significantly higher in the group having allergic rhinitis. The effect of allergic rhinitis on choroidal thickness were assessed and compared with the control group. Our study revealed that there was significant association between increased choroidal thickness and allergic rhinitis. Allergic sensitivity may play an important role in increased choroidal thickness.

  7. Identification of polymorphisms in the RNase3 gene and the association with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Inhong; An, Xue-hua; Oh, Yeon-Kyun; Lee, Sang Heon; Jung, Ha Min; Chae, Soo-Cheon; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2010-03-01

    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), a potent cytotoxic molecule, is released by activated eosinophils. ECP has been suggested to be involved in tissue remodeling of allergic diseases. The ECP (RNase3) gene is a candidate gene in atopic diseases. RNase3 polymorphisms have been reported to have an association with atopy. We determined whether polymorphisms in the RNase3 gene are associated with allergic rhinitis in a Korean population. The Taqman assay, restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and high-resolution melt (HRM) were used for genotyping. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; g.-550A>G, g.371G>C, and g.499G>C) were identified. The genotype of the SNPs was analyzed in patients with allergic rhinitis and controls without allergic rhinitis. The genotype and allele frequencies were compared between both groups. The genotype frequencies of the g.-550A>G and g.371G>C SNPs were not significantly different between patients with allergic rhinitis and controls (P > 0.05). However, in patients with allergic rhinitis, the genotype and allele frequencies of the g.499G>C SNP of RNase 3 were significantly different from those of the control group (P associated with allergic rhinitis (P = 0.048), while the G-G-G haplotype was negatively associated with allergic rhinitis (P = 0.004). Our study suggests that RNase3 polymorphisms are potentially associated with susceptibility to allergic rhinitis.

  8. Allergic sensitization to ornamental plants in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ömür; Erkekol, Ferda Öner; Misirloigil, Zeynep; Demirel, Yavuz Selim; Mungan, Dilşad

    2014-01-01

    Ornamental plants (OPs) can lead to immediate-type sensitization and even asthma and rhinitis symptoms in some cases. This study aimed to evaluate sensitization to OPs in patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and to determine the factors affecting the rate of sensitization to OPs. A total of 150 patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Demographics and disease characteristics were recorded. Skin-prick tests were performed with a standardized inhalant allergen panel. Skin tests by "prick-to-prick" method with the leaves of 15 Ops, which are known to lead to allergenic sensitization, were performed. Skin tests with OPs were positive in 80 patients (47.1%). There was no significant difference between OP sensitized and nonsensitized patients in terms of gender, age, number of exposed OPs, and duration of exposure. Skin test positivity rate for OPs was significantly high in atopic subjects, patients with allergic rhinitis, food sensitivity, and indoor OP exposure, but not in patients with pollen and latex allergy. Most sensitizing OPs were Yucca elephantipes (52.5%), Dieffenbachia picta (50.8%), and Euphorbia pulcherrima (47.5%). There was significant correlation between having Saintpaulia ionantha, Croton, Pelargonium, Y. elephantipes, and positive skin test to these plants. Sensitivity to OPs was significantly higher in atopic subjects and patients with allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and indoor OP exposure. Furthermore, atopy and food sensitivity were found as risk factors for developing sensitization to indoor plants. Additional trials on the relationship between sensitization to OPs and allergic symptoms are needed.

  9. Allergic sensitization and filaggrin variants predispose to the comorbidity of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis: results from the Isle of Wight birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyab, A H; Karmaus, W; Zhang, H; Holloway, J W; Steck, S E; Ewart, S; Arshad, S H

    2014-09-01

    Allergic sensitization and filaggrin gene (FLG) variants are important risk factors for allergic disorders; however, knowledge on their individual and interactive effects on the coexistence of eczema, asthma, and rhinitis is lacking. This study aimed at investigating the single and combined effects of allergic sensitization and FLG variants on the development of single and multiple allergic disorders. The Isle of Wight birth cohort (n = 1456) has been examined at 1, 2, 4, 10, and 18 years of age. Repeated measurements of eczema, asthma, rhinitis, and skin prick tests were available for all follow-ups. FLG variants were genotyped in 1150 participants. Associations of allergic sensitization and FLG variants with single and multiple allergic disorders were tested in log-binomial regression analysis. The prevalence of eczema-, asthma-, and rhinitis-only ranged from 5.6% to 8.5%, 4.9% to 10.2%, and 2.5% to 20.4%, respectively, during the first 18 years of life. The coexistence of allergic disorders is common, with approximately 2% of the population reporting the comorbidity of 'eczema, asthma, and rhinitis' during the study period. In repeated measurement analyses, allergic sensitization and FLG variants, when analysed separately, were associated with having single and multiple allergic disorders. Of particular significance, their combined effect increased the risk of 'eczema and asthma' (RR = 13.67, 95% CI: 7.35-25.42), 'asthma and rhinitis' (RR = 7.46, 95% CI: 5.07-10.98), and 'eczema, asthma, and rhinitis' (RR = 23.44, 95% CI: 12.27-44.78). The coexistence of allergic disorders is frequent, and allergic sensitization and FLG variants jointly increased risk of allergic comorbidities, which may represent more severe and complex clinical phenotypes. The interactive effect and the elevated proportion of allergic comorbidities associated with allergic sensitization and FLG variants emphasize their joint importance in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. © 2014 John

  10. Critical appraisal of Timothy grass pollen extract GRAZAX in the management of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaparrotta, Alessandra; Attanasi, Marina; Petrosino, Marianna I; Di Filippo, Paola; Di Pillo, Sabrina; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common diseases of adult and pediatric age, associated with grass pollen (GP) allergy in >50% cases, with a consistent impact on quality of life of affected patients. A grass allergen tablet, containing standardized extract derived from Timothy grass (Phleum pratense) pollen and ~15 μg major allergen P. pratense (rPhl p 5), may be the future of allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) for GP allergy. The aim of this review was to critically evaluate the role of Timothy GP extract IT for the management of allergic rhinitis. For this purpose, we have tried to analyze potential mechanisms of action at the basis of Timothy GP extract, we have reviewed efficacy studies to establish potential benefits and clinical response, and we have also evaluated safety and tolerability profiles and patient focus perspective, such as quality of life, satisfaction and acceptability, and compliance to this IT.

  11. Short review on sublingual immunotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Goda, Kaoru; Tongu, Miki; Yamada, Takaya; Aoi, Noriaki; Morikura, Ichiro; Fuchiwaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has been considered to be a painless and effective therapeutic treatment for allergic rhinitis, and is known as type 1 allergy of the nasal mucosa. So far, its mechanism of action has been elucidated employing peripheral blood serum and lymphocytes in an antigen-specific fashion. Because of the limitations in sampling human materials, there is still controversy among many reports between clinical efficacy and laboratory data. Therefore, its mechanism of action needs to be investigated further by using promising animal models such as rodents and monkeys. Bearing this in mind, in our present study, we successfully constructed an effective murine model for sublingual immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis in which mice were administered ovalbumin (OVA) sublingually followed by intraperitoneal sensitization and nasal challenge. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Efficacy of desloratadine in persistent allergic rhinitis - a GA²LEN study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, Giorgio W

    2010-01-01

    The ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) guidelines proposed a classification for allergic rhinitis based on the duration of symptoms (intermittent or persistent) rather than on the time of allergen exposure (seasonal or perennial). There had been no placebo-controlled, randomized, c...

  13. Allergic rhinitis in children: incidence and treatment in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, C.M.A. de; Moed, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groot, H. de; Wijk, R.G. van; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2009-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0–17 yr in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establish whether changes have occurred. A

  14. Allergic rhinitis in children in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, C.M.A. de; Moed, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groot, H. de; Wijk, R.G. van; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0-17 years in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establich whether changes

  15. Efficacy of desloratadine in intermittent allergic rhinitis: a GA(2)LEN study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Bachert, C; Canonica, G W

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines proposed a classification for allergic rhinitis based on the duration of symptoms (intermittent, persistent) rather than on the time of allergen exposure (seasonal, perennial). There is no placebo-controlled, randomized .......0%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first large trial to show that treatment can be effective in IAR. Desloratadine was effective and safe....

  16. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines: 2010 revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brozek, Jan L.; Bousquet, Jean; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E.; Bonini, Sergio; Canonica, G. Walter; Casale, Thomas B.; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Ohta, Ken; Zuberbier, Torsten; Schünemann, Holger J.; Agache, I.; Ameille, J.; Bachert, C.; Baker, A.; Bateman, E.; Ben Kheder, A.; Bouchard, J.; Boulet, L. P.; Bousquet, P. J.; Bush, A.; Calderon, M.; Camargos, P.; Carlsen, K. H.; Cazzola, M.; Chan, Yeung M.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chuchalin, A.; Costa, D. J.; Cox, L.; Cruz, A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; de Blay, F.; Demoly, P.; Denburg, J.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dykewicz, M. S.; El Gamal, Y.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fukuda, T.; Holgate, S.; Humbert, M.; Ivancevic, J. C.; Kalayci, O.; Kaliner, M.; Kim, Y. Y.; Kuna, P.; Larenas, D.; Le, L.; Lee, B. W.; Li, J.; Lipworth, B.; Lockey, R.; Malling, H. Y.; Marshall, G.; Martinez, F. D.; Mohammad, Y.; Mullol, J.; Nelson, H. S.; Niggemann, B.; O'Hehir, R.; Okamoto, Y.; Papadopoulos, N.; Park, H. S.; Pawankar, R.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Rabe, K.; Rodríguez-Pérez, N.; Rosenwasser, L.; Ryan, D.; Sanchez Borges, M.; Scadding, G.; Shaik, A.; Simons, F. E. R.; Toskala, E.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; van Weel, C.; Vandenplas, O.; Wang, D. Y.; Wickman, M.; Yawn, B.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O.; Zitt, M.

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis represents a global health problem affecting 10% to 20% of the population. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines have been widely used to treat the approximately 500 million affected patients globally. To develop explicit, unambiguous, and transparent

  17. Evaluation of total IgE, CRP and blood count parameters in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feti Tülübaş

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to research retrospectivelywhether asthma and allergic rhinitis are related to totalIgE, C-reactive protein (CRP and complete blood countparameters.Materials and methods: Files of 443 children who appliedto pediatric outpatient clinics of our hospital,aged2-18 were retrospectively investigated. Patients weregrouped into three as asthma (n=179, allergic rhinitis (n=171 and control group (n= 93. Patients’ ages, genders,total IgE, CRP and hemogram values were recorded.Results: While eosinophil count, MCHC and total IgElevels were significantly higher in asthma group, MCVlevels were significantly lower. Lymphocyte count, CRPand total IgE levels were significantly higher in allergicrhinitis group compared with control group whereas neutrophilcount were significantly lower and eosinophil countdid not change significantly. Total IgE levels were higherin asthma and allergic rhinitis compared with controls.However, CRP levels were higher only in allergic rhinitisgroup. MCV levels were significantly lower in asthmagroup compared with controls. MCHC levels were significantlyhigher in asthma group compared with allergicrhinitis and control groups. Neutrophil count decreasedwhile lymphocyte count increased significantly. Eosinophilcount significantly increased compared with controlgroup whereas a significant difference was not observedbetween allergic rhinitis and controls.Conclusions: Our findings suggest factors effective inasthma pathogenesis might be effective also in erythrocytemorphology. There are remarkable changes in bloodeosinophil levels in asthma and in neuthrophil and lymphocytelevels in allergic rhinitis. Serum total IgE level increasesin asthma group whereas it decreases in allergicrhinitis group.Key words: Asthma, allergic rhinitis, total IgE, CRP, MCV

  18. Airway function indicators and blood indicators in children with dust mite allergic rhinitis after sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the airway function indicators and blood indicators in children with dust mite allergic rhinitis after sublingual immunotherapy. Methods: A total of 68 children with dust mite allergic rhinitis treated in our hospital from November, 2012 to October, 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into observation group 34 cases and control group 34 cases. The control group received clinical routine therapy for allergic rhinitis, the observation group received sublingual immunotherapy, and then differences in basic lung function indicator values, small airway function indicator values and levels of serum inflammatory factors as well as serum ECP, TARC, Eotaxin-2 and VCAM were compared between two groups after treatment. Results: The FVC, FEV1, PEF and FEV1/FVC values of the observation group after treatment were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05; the MMEF, MEF50% and MEF25% values of the observation group were higher than those of the control group, and the proportion of AHR was lower than that of the control group (P<0.05; the serum IL-4, IL-9, IL-12, IL-13 and IL-16 levels of the observation group after treatment were lower than those of the control group, and the IL-10 and IL-12 levels are higher than those of the control group (P<0.05; the serum ECP, TARC, Eotaxin-2 and VCAM levels of the observation group children after treatment were lower than those of the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Sublingual immunotherapy for children with dust mite allergic rhinitis can optimize the airway function, reduce the systemic inflammatory response and eventually improve the children’s overall state, and it’s has positive clinical significance.

  19. Efficacy of ebastine in the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of ebastine in the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR and its safety. Methods: A total of 80 patients with AR who were admitted in our hospital from March, 2014 to January, 2015 were included in the study and divided into the study group and the control group with 40 cases in each group according to different treatment protocols. The patients in the two groups were given nasal spray of budesonide (Rhinocort. On this basis, the patients in the study group were orally given ebastine. The improvement of symptoms and the occurrence of adverse reactions before and after treatment in the two groups were compared. The double antibody sandwich ELISA was used to detect the levels of VCAM-1, IL-4, and IL-10. Results: The comparison of serum VCAM-1, IL-4, and IL-10 before treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant. After treatment, the levels of serum VCAM-1, IL-4, and IL-10 were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment. The levels of serum VCAM-1, IL-4, and IL-10 after treatment in the study group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The improvement of clinical symptoms after treatment in the study group was significantly superior to that in the control group. No obvious adverse reactions occurred during the treatment period in the two groups. Conclusions: Ebastine in the treatment of AR can significantly reduce the inflammatory reaction, and alleviate the clinical symptoms with no obvious adverse reactions and accurate efficacy

  20. The current role of sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis in adults and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Masieri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Cristoforo Incorvaia1, Simonetta Masieri2, Silvia Scurati3, Silvia Soffia3, Paola Puccinelli3, Franco Frati31Allergy/Pulmonary rehabilitation, Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milan, Italy; 2ENT Clinic, University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy; 3Medical and Scientific Department, Stallergenes, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Allergic rhinitis is a very common disease affecting about 20% of people. It may be treated by allergen avoidance when possible, by antiallergic drugs such as antihistamines and topical corticosteroids, and by allergen-specific immunotherapy. The latter is the only treatment able to act on the causes and not only on the symptoms of respiratory allergy and is able to maintain its efficacy even after stopping, provided an adequate duration of treatment of 3–5 years is ensured. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was introduced in the 1990s as a possible solution to the problem of adverse systemic reactions to subcutaneous immunotherapy and has been demonstrated by more than 50 trials and globally evaluated thus far by five meta-analyses as an effective and safe treatment for allergic rhinitis. Life-threatening reactions are extremely rare. However, it is important to note that clinical efficacy occurs only if SLIT meets its needs, ie, sufficiently high doses are regularly administered for at least 3 consecutive years. This is often overlooked in the current practice and may prevent the same success reported by trials from being achieved.Keywords: allergic rhinitis, sublingual immunotherapy, efficacy, safety, compliance, meta-analysis 

  1. Selecting the optimal oral antihistamine for patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Jeffrey M; Blaiss, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is now recognised as a global health problem that affects 10-30% of adults and up to 40% of children. Each year, millions of patients seek treatment from their healthcare provider. However, the prevalence of AR maybe significantly underestimated because of misdiagnosis, under diagnosis and failure of patients to seek medical attention. In addition to the classical symptoms such as sneezing, nasal pruritus, congestion and rhinorrhoea, it is now recognised that AR has a significant impact on quality of life (QOL). This condition can lead to sleep disturbance as a result of nasal congestion, which leads to significant impairment in daily activities such as work and school. Traditionally, AR has been subdivided into seasonal AR (SAR) or perennial AR (PAR). SAR symptoms usually appear during a specific season in which aeroallergens are present in the outdoor air such as tree and grass pollen in the spring and summer and weed pollens in the autumn (fall); and PAR symptoms are present year-round and are triggered by dust mite, animal dander, indoor molds and cockroaches. Oral histamine H(1)-receptor antagonists (H(1) antihistamines) are one of the most commonly prescribed medications for the treatment of AR. There are several oral H(1) antihistamines available and it is important to know the pharmacology, such as administration interval, onset of action, metabolism and conditions that require administration adjustments. When prescribing oral H(1) antihistamines, the healthcare provider must take into account the clinical efficacy and weigh this against the risk of adverse effects from the agent. In addition to the clinical efficacy, potential for improvement in QOL with a particular treatment should also be considered.

  2. "Resale Shammieh" First Source of Allergic Rhinitis Description by Rhazes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alembizar, Faranak; Nimrouzi, Majid

    2016-05-01

    Abū Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyyā al-Rāzī, known as Rhazes in the Western world (854-925 CE), was an Iranian polymath, physician and one of the most prominent sages in the medieval period. He wrote several medical books and treaties such as "Continents", a comprehensive medical encyclopedia, treaties in smallpox and measles, "Al-Mansuri" and many other important manuscripts in the medical field. "Resale Shammieh" is one of his pioneering well-known works in medicine; replying to Shahid-Ibn-Hussein Balkhi, dedicated to his master Abuzeid Ahmad-Ibn-sahl Balkhi, who was getting cold in spring at the time of rose blossoming. We are about to review "Resale Shammieh" because of the importance of this treaty as a pioneering work in allergy and its clinical manifestation. This study is a traditionary review of "Resale Shammieh" and similar copies as well as works cited by Abureihan Birooni, Ibn Abi-Ossaiba'ei, Ibn-e-nadim. It seems that this treatise has been prepared before treatise of Qest-ibn-Looqa, written for Abbasid Caliph Mutawakkil, about hay fever. Rhazes, in "Resale Shammieh" elucidated almost all clinical manifestations of allergic rhinitis and hay fever is mentioned in the conventional medical resources, including nasal stuffiness, itchy nose, sneezing repeatedly, runny nose, red face, and light elevated temperature of the body. He also cited complications of hay fever such as hoarseness, dyspnea and fever; and mentioned primary preventive measures including covering the head in cold weather, abstaining from drinking cold water as well as smelling musk, Costus and myrrh Maki. His proposed remedies for hay fever comprising of dipping a fabric in the nose, fumigation, shaving the head and rubbing mustard and allium on it, as well as ear or forehead bloodletting. "Resale Shammieh", a valuable work of Rhazes, the Muslim Persian physician, in hay fever is most probably the first known treaty about allergy in the season of rose blossoming, the spring.

  3. The Effectiveness of Sublingual Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy in Children with Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Prokhorova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the effectiveness of sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy with sublingual house dust mite and pollen allergens (early and late spring and autumn grass mixture in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis, perennial allergic rhinitis and perennial allergic rhinitis with bronchial asthma with mild persistent course, bronchial asthma with moderate persistent course. The estimation of the dynamics of cellular, humoral and local immunity has been carried out before and after treatment with sublingual allergens. The influence of sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy on the allergic eosinophilic inflammation is shown.

  4. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Like Behavioral Problems and Parenting Stress in Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sik; Kim, Se Hee; You, Ji Hee; Baek, Hyung Tae; Na, Chul; Kim, Bung Nyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have reported comorbidity of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and allergic diseases. The current study investigated ADHD like behavioral symptoms and parenting stress in pediatric allergic rhinitis. Methods Eighty-seven children (6-13 years old) with allergic rhinitis and 73 age- and sex-matched children of control group were recruited. Diagnosis and severity assessments of allergic rhinitis were determined by a pediatric allergist. The Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF), ADHD Rating Scale (ARS), and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) were completed by their mothers. Results In the allergic rhinitis group, the total PSI-SF score (pallergic rhinitis, those of children with comorbid ADHD demonstrated significantly higher parenting stress than those without comorbid ADHD (pallergic symptoms and the ARS total score (beta=0.50, pallergic symptom severity and the ARS total score (B=8.4, SD=2.5, t=3.3, pallergic rhinitis, and this factor increased parenting stress and disrupted the parent-child relationship. Routine evaluation and early management of ADHD symptoms in pediatric allergic rhinitis may benefit families of children with allergic rhinitis. PMID:25110499

  5. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder like behavioral problems and parenting stress in pediatric allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sik; Kim, Se Hee; You, Ji Hee; Baek, Hyung Tae; Na, Chul; Kim, Bung Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have reported comorbidity of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and allergic diseases. The current study investigated ADHD like behavioral symptoms and parenting stress in pediatric allergic rhinitis. Eighty-seven children (6-13 years old) with allergic rhinitis and 73 age- and sex-matched children of control group were recruited. Diagnosis and severity assessments of allergic rhinitis were determined by a pediatric allergist. The Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF), ADHD Rating Scale (ARS), and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) were completed by their mothers. In the allergic rhinitis group, the total PSI-SF score (pallergic rhinitis, those of children with comorbid ADHD demonstrated significantly higher parenting stress than those without comorbid ADHD (pallergic symptoms and the ARS total score (beta=0.50, pallergic symptom severity and the ARS total score (B=8.4, SD=2.5, t=3.3, pallergic rhinitis, and this factor increased parenting stress and disrupted the parent-child relationship. Routine evaluation and early management of ADHD symptoms in pediatric allergic rhinitis may benefit families of children with allergic rhinitis.

  6. Isotonic saline nasal irrigation is an effective adjunctive therapy to intranasal corticosteroid spray in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Shaun A; Psaltis, Alkis J; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if the addition of large-volume, low-positive pressure nasal irrigations delivered with isotonic sodium chloride (hereinafter "saline") added to intranasal corticosteroid therapy improves quality of life and objective measures of nasal breathing in patients with allergic rhinitis when compared with intranasal corticosteroid alone. A prospective, unblinded, single-arm pilot study was performed of patients with allergic rhinitis already on intranasal corticosteroid pharmacotherapy. Patients added large-volume low-pressure saline irrigation twice daily for 8 weeks to their ongoing regiment of nasal corticosteroid. Mini-Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of life Questionnaire (mRQLQ) assessment and nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) were performed at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks. A total of 40 patients were enrolled. Twice-daily nasal irrigation with isotonic saline significantly (p irrigation with isotonic saline is an effective adjunctive therapy to improve quality of life in patients with allergic rhinitis already on intranasal corticosteroid therapy. This study was a part of the clinical trial NCT01030146 registered at clinicaltrials.gov.

  7. Critical appraisal of Timothy grass pollen extract GRAZAX® in the management of allergic rhinitis

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    Scaparrotta A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alessandra Scaparrotta, Marina Attanasi, Marianna I Petrosino, Paola Di Filippo, Sabrina Di Pillo, Francesco Chiarelli Department of Pediatrics, University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy Abstract: Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common diseases of adult and pediatric age, associated with grass pollen (GP allergy in >50% cases, with a consistent impact on quality of life of affected patients. A grass allergen tablet, containing standardized extract derived from Timothy grass (Phleum pratense pollen and ~15 µg major allergen P. pratense (rPhl p 5, may be the future of allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT for GP allergy. The aim of this review was to critically evaluate the role of Timothy GP extract IT for the management of allergic rhinitis. For this purpose, we have tried to analyze potential mechanisms of action at the basis of Timothy GP extract, we have reviewed efficacy studies to establish potential benefits and clinical response, and we have also evaluated safety and tolerability profiles and patient focus perspective, such as quality of life, satisfaction and acceptability, and compliance to this IT. Keywords: Timothy grass pollen extract, allergic rhinitis, Grazax, efficacy, safety, compliance

  8. The efficacy of intranasal antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliner, Michael A; Berger, William E; Ratner, Paul H; Siegel, Charles J

    2011-02-01

    To discuss the new use of intranasal antihistamines as first-line therapies, compare and contrast this class of medication with the traditionally available medications, and discuss the potential for intranasal antihistamines to provide relief superior to second-generation oral antihistamines. Review articles and original research articles were retrieved from MEDLINE, OVID, PubMed (1950 to November 2009), personal files of articles, and bibliographies of located articles that addressed the topic of interest. Articles were selected for their relevance to intranasal antihistamines and their role in allergic rhinitis. Publications included reviews, treatment guidelines, and clinical studies (primarily randomized controlled trials) of both children and adults. This panel was charged with reviewing the place of intranasal antihistamines in the spectrum of treatment for allergic rhinitis. Intranasal antihistamines have been shown in numerous randomized, placebo-controlled trials to be more efficacious than the oral antihistamines. Although intranasal corticosteroids are considered by some to be superior to intranasal antihistamines, multiple studies have shown an equal effect of the 2 classes of medication. Both intranasal corticosteroids and intranasal antihistamines have been shown to reduce all symptoms of allergic rhinitis. In addition, some intranasal antihistamines have a more rapid onset of action than intranasal corticosteroids. The future of allergy treatment will likely involve a combination of both intranasal corticosteroids and intranasal antihistamines because of the benefits of local administration and their additive effect on efficacy. Copyright © 2011 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [The use of modern topical medications for the stepwise treatment of allergic rhinitis: the effectiveness and prospects for the further extension of their application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosulya, E V; Kim, I A

    The objective of the present work was to summarize the results of clinical studies designed to evaluate the effectiveness of 'Momate Rhino Advance' in the form of the nasal spray (based on the fixed combination of mometasone furoate and azelastine) that finds an increasingly wide application for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The available data give evidence that this medication can be prescribed to the patients presenting with the severe and moderate form of allergic rhinitis. The treatment should be started with the use of the combined preparation and continued, after the adequate control of the clinical symptoms of allergic rhinitis is achieved, using 'Momate Rhino' during the next 2-4 weeks for the reliable management of the disease. It is concluded that the proposed strategy makes it possible to avoid the simultaneous application of multiple medications (polypragmasy) and thereby reduce the intake of medicines by the patients suffering from allergic rhinitis.

  10. Lymphocyte mitogen-induced proliferation in patients with allergic rhinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorostowska-Wynimko, J.; Kleniewska, D.; Sokolnicka, I.; Rogala, E.; Skopinska-Rozewska, E.

    1995-01-01

    Lymphocytes play a central regulatory role in mechanisms contributing to impaired function of immune system in atopy. The aim of our study was evaluate the mitogen-induced proliferation of lymphocytes in a group of asymptomatic, seasonal allergic rhinitis patients. A highly significant lower mitogen-induced proliferation and, in contrast to other studies, significantly lower background proliferative activity of lymphocytes were found in the atopic persons, comparing to the controls. We concluded that the decreased mitogen-induced proliferation of lymphocytes observed in allergic patients reflects abnormal T cell function, which is due to the atopic status, and not only as it was believed to the antigen-induced lymphocyte activation. (author). 26 refs, 1 tab

  11. Lymphocyte mitogen-induced proliferation in patients with allergic rhinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorostowska-Wynimko, J.; Kleniewska, D.; Sokolnicka, I.; Rogala, E.; Skopinska-Rozewska, E. [Dept. of Immunology. Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Lymphocytes play a central regulatory role in mechanisms contributing to impaired function of immune system in atopy. The aim of our study was evaluate the mitogen-induced proliferation of lymphocytes in a group of asymptomatic, seasonal allergic rhinitis patients. A highly significant lower mitogen-induced proliferation and, in contrast to other studies, significantly lower background proliferative activity of lymphocytes were found in the atopic persons, comparing to the controls. We concluded that the decreased mitogen-induced proliferation of lymphocytes observed in allergic patients reflects abnormal T cell function, which is due to the atopic status, and not only as it was believed to the antigen-induced lymphocyte activation. (author). 26 refs, 1 tab.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on mast cell-mediated allergic responses in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Hong; Jia, Jihui; He, Mingqiang

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has commonly been used for the treatment of various allergic diseases. However, its precise anti-allergic rhinitis effect and mechanism remain unknown. In the present study, the effect of curcumin on allergic responses in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis mouse was investigated. We explored the effect of curcumin on the release of allergic inflammatory mediators, such as histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and inflammatory cytokines. Also, we found that curcumin improved rhinitis symptoms, inhibited the histopathological changes of nasal mucosa, and decreased the serum levels of histamine, OVA-specific IgE and TNF-α in OVA-induced allergic rhinitis mice. In addition, curcumin suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Moreover, curcumin significantly inhibited PMA-induced p-ERK, p-p38, p-JNK, p-Iκ-Bα and NF-κB. These findings suggest that curcumin has an anti-allergic effect through modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses in allergic rhinitis, at least partly by inhibiting MAPK/NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Allergic Rhinitis Control Test questionnaire-driven stepwise strategy to improve allergic rhinitis control: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Chen, H; Zhu, R; Liu, G; Huang, N; Li, W; Yang, L; Zhang, S; Qi, S; Daurès, J-P; Chiriac, A M; Demoly, P

    2016-11-01

    Allergic Rhinitis Control Test (ARCT) has been validated for assessing allergic rhinitis (AR) control and identifying severe AR. The aim of the study was to assess the ARCT questionnaire as a tool for stepwise pharmacotherapy. A standard pharmacotherapy regimen from Step 1 (oral second-generation H1 antihistamine as needed) to Step 5 (oral corticosteroid) was carried out prospectively in a Chinese AR population. The AR patients were initiated with Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) appropriate step treatment and assessed with ARCT every 15 days. If ARCT score was equal or above 20 (controlled AR) and maintained for 15 days, the patient would finish the study; if ARCT score was strictly <20 (uncontrolled AR), the patient would receive higher step treatment according to a predefined open design up to Step 5. The different AR control subgroups were compared. A total of 255 patients were enrolled in the study; 5 patients dropped out and 2 (0.8%) were controlled at day 0, 85 (34.0%) at day 15, 177 (70.8%) at day 30, 222 (88.8%) at day 45, 241 (96.4%) at day 60 and 242 (96.8%) at day 75. Only 8 (3.2%) patients remained uncontrolled at the endpoint of the study. Patients with ARIA moderate/severe or persistent symptoms, moderate/severe impaired quality of life, asthma history, rhinorrhea and cough symptoms always needed up to Step 4 (nasal corticosteroid plus antihistamine) and prolonged treatments to achieve disease control. The majority of AR can be controlled with standard stepwise treatment. ARCT offers an objective criterion for the stepwise pharmacotherapy of AR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Effects of Hyeonggaeyeongyo-tang in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Se Hyang; Kim, Soon Re; Choi, Han-Seok; Ku, Jin Mo; Seo, Hye Sook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is an allergic inflammation of the nasal airways. The prevalence of AR is increasing worldwide. We investigated whether Hyeonggaeyeongyo-tang (HYT) is effective to suppress the progression of AR induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Male BALB/c mice were used for this study. Allergic rhinitis was induced by OVA. Treatment with HYT was assessed to study the effect of HYT on allergic rhinitis in mice. Histological analysis, immunohistochemistry, multiplex cytokine assay, blood analysis, and cell viability assay were performed to verify inhibitory effect of HYT on allergic rhinitis. HYT did not show any toxicity maintaining body weight. Food intake was steady without variation in mice. HYT reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells and mast cells into nasal cavity. HYT reduced the levels of cytokines and leukocytes in the blood. HYT decreased the splenocyte cell viability. Antihistamines and steroids are the most common medications used to treat allergic rhinitis. However, long-term use of drug generates resistance or side effects requiring the development of new drug. Our present study clearly demonstrates that HYT suppresses the progression of allergic rhinitis induced by OVA. This suggests that HYT might be a useful drug for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

  15. Effects of Hyeonggaeyeongyo-Tang in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Rhinitis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Hyang Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis (AR is an allergic inflammation of the nasal airways. The prevalence of AR is increasing worldwide. We investigated whether Hyeonggaeyeongyo-tang (HYT is effective to suppress the progression of AR induced by ovalbumin (OVA. Male BALB/c mice were used for this study. Allergic rhinitis was induced by OVA. Treatment with HYT was assessed to study the effect of HYT on allergic rhinitis in mice. Histological analysis, immunohistochemistry, multiplex cytokine assay, blood analysis, and cell viability assay were performed to verify inhibitory effect of HYT on allergic rhinitis. HYT did not show any toxicity maintaining body weight. Food intake was steady without variation in mice. HYT reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells and mast cells into nasal cavity. HYT reduced the levels of cytokines and leukocytes in the blood. HYT decreased the splenocyte cell viability. Antihistamines and steroids are the most common medications used to treat allergic rhinitis. However, long-term use of drug generates resistance or side effects requiring the development of new drug. Our present study clearly demonstrates that HYT suppresses the progression of allergic rhinitis induced by OVA. This suggests that HYT might be a useful drug for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

  16. Botolinum toxin in rhinitis: Literature review and posterior nasal injection in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Edward Zhiyong; Tan, Sophocles; Loh, Ian

    2017-11-01

    Current pharmacological management of allergic rhinitis (AR) varies in onset, duration, symptom control, and requires frequent administration. Single-dose botulinum toxin (BTX) has been documented in various trials as a treatment option in rhinitis. We review the current literature on the use of BTX in rhinitis and investigate the efficacy and safety profile of a novel intranasal injection site for AR control. Single-arm pilot study. Ten adult patients having moderate to severe AR with proven house dust-mite allergy were recruited. Each patient received 12.5 units of Botox injected to the posterior lateral wall of each side of the nose under endoscopic guidance. Immediate postprocedural discomfort and Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS) at 2 and 4 weeks were used as primary outcome measures. Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) was used as secondary outcome measure. Overall TNSS (minimum = 0; maximum = 20) showed an improvement from a mean of 15.1 (preinjection) to 7.6 (2 weeks) and 7.7 (4 weeks). Greatest effect was seen in subscales of rhinorrhea (4.0-1.7) followed by sneeze, nasal congestion, and itch. Mean discomfort of the procedure was scored 5.7 over 10. RQLQ scores similarly showed an improvement in all domains of quality of life. Two subjects complained of mild headache not requiring any medical intervention. Based on our review of current literature, BTX shows clear efficacy on symptoms of both intrinsic and allergic rhinitis, with a good safety profile. Single-dose posterior nasal injection demonstrates good efficacy and duration of action, with moderate discomfort. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2447-2454, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Current issues on sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis

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    Živković Zorica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology was the first official organization to recognize that sublingual administration could be “promising route” for allergic desensitization. A few years later, the World Health Organization recommended this therapy as “a viable alternative to the injection route in adults.” The first meta-analysis showed sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy (SLIT effectiveness for allergic rhinitis and another study showed SLIT can actually help prevent the development of asthma both in adults and in children. The main goal of this review article is to present insight into the most up-to-date understanding of the clinical efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. A literature review was performed on PubMed from 1990 to 2015 using the terms “asthma,” “allergic rhinitis,” “children,” “allergen specific immune therapy.” Evaluating data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (DB-PC-RCTs, the clinical efficacy (assessed as the reduction of symptom score and the need of rescue medicament of SLIT for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, has been confirmed in various meta-analysis Outcomes such as rhinoconjunctivitis score and medication scores, combined scores, quality of life, days with severe symptoms, immunological endpoints, and safety parameters were all improved in the SLIT-tablet compared with placebo group. SLIT safety has been already proven in many DB-PC-RCTs and real-life settings. In accordance with all of the above mentioned, the goals for future trials and studies are the development of comprehensive guidelines for clinical practice on immunotherapy, embracing all the different potential participants. The importance of allergen immunotherapy is of special relevance in the pediatric age, when the plasticity and modulability of the immune system are maximal, and when

  18. Determinants of allergic rhinitis in young children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussu, Lise; Saint-Pierre, Philippe; Panayotopoulos, Virginie; Couderc, Rémy; Amat, Flore; Just, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    In the preschool period, allergic rhinitis (AR) is infrequent and thus under-diagnosed. However, recent works have highlighted the occurrence of AR in toddlers although the causes of AR in this young population remain unknown. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of AR in young children with asthma. We carried out a case-control study of 227 children with active asthma and enrolled in the Trousseau Asthma Program. AR and other allergic diseases (asthma, food allergy and eczema) were diagnosed by medical doctors using standardized questionnaires. Parental history of AR and asthma, biological markers of atopy (total IgE, blood eosinophilia, allergic sensitization towards food and aeroallergens) and environmental parameters were also collected. Forty one of the children (18.1%) had AR. By univariate logistic regression analysis, AR was mainly associated with peanut sensitization (OR = 6.75; p = 0.002); food allergy (OR = 4.31; p = 0.026); mold exposure (OR = 3.81 pfood allergy and peanut sensitization three models of multivariate logistic regression were performed and confirmed that AR is associated with peanut sensitization but also food allergy and mold exposure. A random forest analysis was also performed to explain AR. The results reinforced the logistic analysis that peanut sensitization and mold exposure were the principal determinants of AR. These results stress the importance of investigating AR in young children with asthma to potentially diagnose a particularly severe allergic asthmatic phenotype. Moreover, these data evoke the hypothesis that peanut could be an aeroallergen.

  19. Chinese Guideline on allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yixiao; Chen, Jianjun; Cheng, Lei; Guo, Yinshi; Hong, Suling; Kong, Weijia; Lai, He; Li, Houyong; Li, Huabin; Li, Jing; Li, Tianying; Lin, Xiaoping; Liu, Shixi; Liu, Zheng; Lou, Hongfei; Meng, Juan; Qiu, Qianhui; Shen, Kunling; Tang, Wei; Tao, Zezhang; Wang, Chengshuo; Wang, Xiangdong; Wei, Qingyu; Xiang, Li; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yu; Zhang, Gehua; Zhang, Yuan; Zheng, Yiwu; Zhi, Yuxiang; Chen, Dehua; Hong, Haiyu; Li, Quansheng; Liu, Lin; Meng, Yifan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Yihui; Zhou, Yue

    2017-01-01

    The present document is based on a consensus reached by a panel of experts from Chinese Society of Allergy (CSA) and Chinese Allergic Rhinitis Collaborative Research Group (C2AR2G). Allergen immunotherapy (AIT), has increasingly been used as a treatment for allergic rhinitis (AR) globally, as it has been shown to provide a long-term effect in improving nasal and ocular symptoms, reducing medication need, and improving quality of life. AIT is currently the only curative intervention that can potentially modify the immune system in individuals suffering from AR and prevent the development of new sensitization and the progression of disease from AR to asthma. Although the use of AIT is becoming more acceptable in China, to date no AR immunotherapy guideline from China is available for use by the international community. This document has thus been produced and covers the main aspects of AIT undertaken in China; including selection of patients for AIT, the allergen extracts available on the Chinese market, schedules and doses of allergen employed in different routes of AIT, assessment of effect and safety, patients’ administration and follow-up, and management of adverse reactions. The Chinese guideline for AR immunotherapy will thus serve as a reference point by doctors, healthcare professionals and organizations involved in the AIT of AR in China. Moreover, this guideline will serve as a source of information for the international community on AIT treatment strategies employed in China. PMID:29268533

  20. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) score of allergic rhinitis using mobile technology correlates with quality of life: The MASK study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Arnavielhe, S; Bedbrook, A; Fonseca, J; Morais Almeida, M; Todo Bom, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Caimmi, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Siroux, V; Menditto, E; Passalacqua, G; Stellato, C; Ventura, M T; Cruz, A A; Sarquis Serpa, F; da Silva, J; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Rodriguez Gonzalez, M; Burguete Cabañas, M T; Bergmann, K C; Keil, T; Klimek, L; Mösges, R; Shamai, S; Zuberbier, T; Bewick, M; Price, D; Ryan, D; Sheikh, A; Anto, J M; Mullol, J; Valero, A; Haahtela, T; Valovirta, E; Fokkens, W J; Kuna, P; Samolinski, B; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Eller, E; Bosnic-Anticevich, S; O'Hehir, R E; Tomazic, P V; Yorgancioglu, A; Gemicioglu, B; Bachert, C; Hellings, P W; Kull, I; Melén, E; Wickman, M; van Eerd, M; De Vries, G

    2018-02-01

    Mobile technology has been used to appraise allergic rhinitis control, but more data are needed. To better assess the importance of mobile technologies in rhinitis control, the ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) score ranging from 0 to 4 of the Allergy Diary was compared with EQ-5D (EuroQuol) and WPAI-AS (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment in allergy) in 1288 users in 18 countries. This study showed that quality-of-life data (EQ-5D visual analogue scale and WPA-IS Question 9) are similar in users without rhinitis and in those with mild rhinitis (scores 0-2). Users with a score of 3 or 4 had a significant impairment in quality-of-life questionnaires. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  1. Psychometric validation of the experience with allergic rhinitis nasal spray questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford B

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Crawford1, Richard H Stanford2, Audrey Y Wong3, Anand A Dalal2, Martha S Bayliss11Mapi Values, Boston, MA, USA; 2GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 3BioMedical Insights, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: Patient experience and preference are critical factors influencing compliance in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR receiving intranasal corticosteroids. The Experience with Allergic Rhinitis Nasal Spray Questionnaire (EARNS-Q was developed to measure subject experiences with and preferences for nasal sprays.Objective: To describe the psychometric validation of the EARNS-Q modules.Methods: An observational study was conducted with subjects aged 18–65 years with physician-diagnosed vasomotor, seasonal, and/or perennial allergic rhinitis who were using a prescription nasal spray. Subjects completed the experience module of the EARNS-Q and the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire with Medication (TSQM at baseline and after 2 weeks. Further validation analyses were conducted in a 3-week, randomized, single-blind, crossover, multicenter clinical study in which subjects ≥18 years of age with documented seasonal AR received flunisolide and beclomethasone and completed the EARNS-Q experience module on days 1 and 8, the EARNS-Q preference module on day 22, and the TSQM on days 8 and 22.Results: The observational and clinical studies were completed by 121 and 89 subjects, respectively. Both modules demonstrated acceptable reliability (α = 0.72 experience module; α = 0.93 preference module global scores and validity (intraclass correlation coefficient or ICC 0.64 to 0.82 test–retest validity. Correlations among the experience and preference modules were moderate (r = 0.39 to 0.79 and within internal consistency reliability estimates, indicating measurement of distinct constructs.Conclusion: The EARNS-Q is a patient-reported outcomes measure that enables reliable and valid measurement of subject experience with, and preference

  2. Health economic analysis of allergen immunotherapy for the management of allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy and venom allergy: A systematic overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asaria, M.; Dhami, S.; van Ree, R.; Gerth van Wijk, R.; Muraro, A.; Roberts, G.; Sheikh, A.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is developing guidelines for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for the management of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, IgE-mediated food allergy and venom allergy. To inform the development of clinical recommendations, we

  3. SQ house dust mite sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK) improves allergic rhinitis in patients with house dust mite allergic asthma and rhinitis symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Holger; Canonica, G Walter; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: House dust mite (HDM) allergy is associated with persistent allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic asthma. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of a SQ HDM sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) in adults and adolescents with HDM respiratory...

  4. Use of the Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARATkids) in children and adolescents: Validation in Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emons, J A M; Flokstra, B M J; de Jong, C; van der Molen, T; Brand, H K; Arends, N J T; Amaral, R; Fonseca, J A; Gerth van Wijk, R

    2017-03-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma are common and closely related diseases. Recently, a Portuguese questionnaire has been developed 'The Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test' (CARATkids) that measures disease control of both diseases in children. This study aims to validate the CARATkids in Dutch children and for the first time in adolescents and, in addition, to calculate the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). A prospective observational study was conducted in an outpatient clinic. After translation of the CARATkids from Portuguese to Dutch, patients (6-18 years) with asthma or asthma and allergic rhinitis completed the CARATkids, Asthma Control Test, and visual analog scale questionnaire three times. Baseline characteristics, mean scores, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, cross-sectional and longitudinal validity, discriminative properties, responsiveness, and MCID of the CARATkids were assessed. A total of 111 patients were included. In total, 86% and 79%, respectively, completed the questionnaires at the second and third visits. All children had asthma, and 85% had concomitant allergic rhinitis. The internal consistency was good with all expected a priori correlations met. CARATkids scores were higher in patients with uncontrolled asthma and patients with moderate-severe rhinitis compared to better controlled subjects. Patients with a variable asthma control had significantly higher scores during periods of uncontrolled asthma. Also the Guyatt's responsiveness index was good. The MCID was 2.8. The CARATkids questionnaire is a reliable and valid tool to assess allergic rhinitis and asthma control among Dutch children. The tool can be used in adolescents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Variance of melatonin and cortisol rhythm in patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidan, Vural; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Gozeler, Mustafa; Karaaslan, Onder; Binay, Omer; Cingi, Cemal

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory disease which effects 10%-50% of the normal population. The mechanism of its formation and the circadian rhythm of cortisol and melatonin in allergic rhinitis have not been investigated. Salivary levels of melatonin and cortisol were measured by radioimmunoassay in 35 newly diagnosed allergic rhinitis patients and in 23 control subjects matched for age and gender. In the study group; amplitude, baseline and peak levels of salivary melatonin were significantly decreased compared with healty controls (pmelatonin between the study and control groups (p>0.05). In the study subjects, the circadian rhythm of cortisol was flattened when compared with the control group. The amplitude and the 24h mean levels of salivary cortisol in the study group were significantly lower than in the control group and the acrophase was delayed in patients compared with control subjects (pmelatonin and cortisol were found to be disrupted in patients with allergic rhinitis. These results may also be contributive data to explain the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis and also they can be applicable as adjunctive therapeutic tools in the future and melatonin drugs might be an alternative in the therapy of resistant allergic rhinitis patients or allergic rhinitis patients who cannot use cortisol drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intranasal administration of IL-35 inhibits allergic responses and symptoms in mice with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motohiko; Yokota, Makoto; Nakamura, Yoshihisa; Ozaki, Shinya; Murakami, Shingo

    2017-04-01

    IL-35 was recently identified as an anti-inflammatory cytokine. We previously reported that recombinant fusion protein of murine IL-35 and human IgG1 Fc fragment (rIL-35) reduced Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) in vitro. However, it is unclear whether IL-35 can attenuate nasal allergic responses and symptoms of allergic rhinitis in vivo. To investigate the in vivo effect of IL-35 on allergic rhinitis in mice, mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). Intranasal administration of rIL-35 and intranasal challenge of OVA were then performed. Nasal symptoms were estimated after the last nasal challenge. Nasal tissue and cervical lymph nodes (CLN) were collected. OVA-specific IgE in sera, OVA-specific T cell response, and the production of cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) stimulated by the OVA antigen were measured. The transcription level of Foxp3 and the frequency of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells were also measured. rIL-35 significantly inhibited the number of sneezes and nasal rubbing movements. It also reduced the number of eosinophils in the nasal mucosa and significantly decreased the level of OVA-specific IgE, the OVA-specific T cell proliferation, and the production of IL-4 and IL-5. Furthermore, rIL-35 significantly increased the production of IL-10, the transcription level of Foxp3, and the frequency of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells. This study showed for the first time that rIL-35 inhibits nasal allergic responses and symptoms in mice, and that rIL-35 increases IL-10, Foxp3, and CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in CLN. This study also suggests that intranasal administration of IL-35 can attenuate allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis of probiotics for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Alexander E; Adams, Austin S; Turner, Justin H

    2015-06-01

    Probiotics have proven beneficial in a number of immune-mediated and allergic diseases. Several human studies have evaluated the efficacy of probiotics in allergic rhinitis; however, evidence for their use has yet to be firmly established. The current systematic review seeks to synthesize the results of available randomized trials. In a systematic review and meta-analysis, the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were reviewed and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were extracted based on defined inclusion criteria. The effect of probiotics on Rhinitis Quality of Life (RQLQ) scores, Rhinitis Total Symptom Scores (RTSS), as well as total and antigen-specific serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were evaluated by meta-analysis. A total of 23 studies with 1919 patients were identified, including 21 double-blind RCTs and 2 randomized crossover studies. Multiple probiotic strains, study populations, and outcome measures were used in individual trials. Seventeen studies showed a significant clinical benefit from the use of probiotics in at least 1 outcome measure when compared to placebo, whereas 6 trials showed no benefit. Among the trials eligible for meta-analysis, the use of probiotics resulted in a significant improvement in RQLQ scores compared to placebo (standard mean difference [SMD] -2.23; p = 0.02). Probiotics had no effect on RTSS (SMD -0.36; p = 0.13) or total IgE levels (SMD 0.01; p = 0.94), although there was a trend toward a reduction in antigen-specific IgE (SMD 0.20; p = 0.06) in the placebo group compared to probiotic. Probiotics may be beneficial in improving symptoms and quality of life in patients with allergic rhinitis; however, current evidence remains limited due to study heterogeneity and variable outcome measures. Additional high-quality studies are needed to establish appropriate recommendations. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  8. Allergic Rhinitis and Associated Comorbidities: Prevalence in Oman with Knowledge Gaps in Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Al-Abri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Allergic rhinitis (AR is a global health problem and its impact on health related quality of life for patients is substantial, and the economic impact often underestimated. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis in Oman is unknown. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of AR and associated co-morbidities among adults in Oman. Its secondary objective was to identify knowledge gaps in the literature with the aim of directing future research. Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional study of patients who presented to the outpatient otolaryngology clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital with nasal symptoms between June 2010 and June 2011 was conducted. Results: A total of 887 patients were seen with nasal complaints. Among them 127 patients were diagnosed with non-infective rhinitis, the mean age of presentation was 27 years. AR was noted in 48% of patients, and non-allergic rhinitis in 52%. The prevalence of AR was 7%, with females being more affected than males, and age ranging from 18 to 51 years. Prevalence of perennial AR was 84% compared to seasonal AR which was 16%. The most common perennial antigens were house dust mites (80% followed by cockroaches (67%. All patients diagnosed with seasonal AR were found to be sensitive to Russian thistle. The prevalence of chronic rhinosinusitis in patients with AR was 34%. Conclusion: The prevalence of AR in the adult population presenting with nasal symptoms was found to be 7%, with associated chronic rhinosinusitis present in a third of these patients. However, there appears to be substantial knowledge gaps regarding the association of other comorbidities, like otitis media, bronchitis and bronchial asthma, the long-term outcomes of medical management, and indication of surgical intervention in patients with AR. Future research in AR among Omani patients should aim to address these issues.

  9. The burden of allergic rhinitis and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis on adolescents: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiss, Michael S; Hammerby, Eva; Robinson, Susan; Kennedy-Martin, Tessa; Buchs, Sarah

    2018-04-04

    To evaluate the literature regarding the burden of allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) in adolescents (10-19 years). Searches were performed in MEDLINE, Embase, Health Technology Assessment Database, and National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database for studies evaluating concepts of symptoms, quality of life (QOL), daily activities, sleep, examination performance, school absenteeism and presenteeism, and treatment burden in adolescents with AR or ARC. English-language journal articles indexed in the last 15 years describing non-interventional population-based studies. Records were assessed by 2 independent reviewers. A total of 27 articles were identified; outcomes evaluated were: symptoms (n=6 studies), QOL (n=9), daily activities (n=5), emotional aspects (n=3), sleep (n=6), education (n=7), and treatment burden (n=2). AR symptoms rated most bothersome were rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and itchy eyes. QOL was worse in adolescents with AR versus controls regardless of QOL instrument used. Nasal symptoms and nasal obstruction were more likely to be associated with poor QOL in adolescents than in adults or younger children, respectively. Daily functioning and sleep were also negatively impacted by AR. In addition, a detrimental effect on absenteeism, school productivity, and academic performance was reported. Although AR and ARC are sometimes perceived as trivial conditions, this review indicates that their impact on adolescent life is negative and far-reaching. It is critical that clinicians gain a greater understanding of the unique burden of AR and ARC in adolescents to ensure they receive prompt and appropriate care and treatment in order to improve clinical and academic outcomes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Prevalence of Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis among Adults in Yaounde, Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefura-Yone, Eric Walter; Kengne, André Pascal; Balkissou, Adamou Dodo; Boulleys-Nana, Julie Raïcha; Efe-de-Melingui, Nelly Rachel; Ndjeutcheu-Moualeu, Patricia Ingrid; Mbele-Onana, Charles Lebon; Kenmegne-Noumsi, Elvira Christelle; Kolontchang-Yomi, Barbara Linda; Theubo-Kamgang, Boris Judicaël; Ebouki, Emilienne Régine; Djuikam-Kamga, Chrystelle Karen; Magne-Fotso, Christiane Gaelle; Amougou, Francine; Mboumtou, Liliane; Ngo-Yonga, Martine; Petchou-Talla, Elsie Linda; Afane-Ze, Emmanuel; Kuaban, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background Population-based estimates of asthma and allergic rhinitis in sub-Saharan African adults are lacking. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergic rhinitis in urban adult Cameroonians. Methods A community-based survey was conducted from December 2013 to April 2014 among adults aged 19 years and above (N = 2,304, 57.3% women), selected through multilevel stratified random sampling across all districts of Yaounde (Capital city). Internationally validated questionnaires were used to investigate the presence of allergic diseases. Logistic regressions were employed to investigate the determinants of allergic conditions. Results Prevalence rates were 2.7% (95% CI: 2.1-3.4) for asthma-ever, 6.9% (5.9-7.9) for lifetime wheezing, 2.9% (92.2-3.6) for current wheezing and 11.4% (10.1-12.7) for self-reported lifetime allergic rhinitis; while 240 (10.4%) participants reported current symptoms of allergic rhinitis, and 125 (5.4%) had allergic rhino-conjunctivitis. The prevalence of current asthma medication use and self-reported asthma attack was 0.8 (0.4-1.2) and 1 (0.6-1.4) respectively. Multivariable adjusted determinants of current wheezing were signs of atopic eczema [2.91 (1.09-7.74)] and signs of allergic rhinitis [3.24 (1.83-5.71)]. Age group 31-40 years [0.27(0.09-0.78), p = 0.016] was an independent protective factor for wheezing. Determinants of current rhinitis symptoms were active smoking [2.20 (1.37-3.54), pallergic rhinitis among adults in this population were at the lower tails of those reported in other regions of the world. Beside the classical interrelation between allergic diseases found in this study, active smoking was an independent determinant of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Nationwide surveys are needed to investigate regional variations. PMID:25853516

  11. EFFICIENCY OF PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS, AS EVALUATED BY DECREASED CONCENTRATIONS OF FREE HEMOGLOBIN IN NASAL SECRETIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Mokronosova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Forty four patients with persistent allergic rhinitis and sensitization to the house dust mites were observed. All the patients have been examined in conformity with international diagnostic standards. The first group of observation included fifteen patients who received intranasal therapy by flutikasone propionate nasal spray at a dose of 200 mkg once a day for two weeks. The second group of observation included fourteen patients who received 10 inhalations of Affinoleukin® (a lyophilized complex of low molecular weight proteins from human leukocyte membranes with glycine, as aerosol, at a single dose of 2 units. Fifteen non-treated patients comprised a group of comparison. Eosinophil counts and concentrations of free hemoglobin (by immunometrical method in co-agglutination reaction were made in nasal secretions twice (before treatment and two weeks later. It was found that the increase of free hemoglobin levels, as well as increase in eosinophil count in nasal secretions represents a symptom typical of exacerbation in persistent allergic rhinitis and reflects severity of disease. The therapy led to significant clinical improvement, decrease in free hemoglobin levels and eosinophil counts in nasal secretions, corresponding to clinical effect of both therapeutic modes of topical pharmacotherapy, resp., in 73% and 79% of the patients with persisting allergic rhinitis. Decrease in free hemoglobin level has allowed for the first time to reveal the immunotherapeutic efficiency of treatment with Affinoleukin® aerosol during exacerbations of persisting allergic rhinitis.

  12. Personalized symptoms forecasting for pollen-induced allergic rhinitis sufferers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voukantsis, D.; Berger, U.; Tzima, F.; Karatzas, K.; Jaeger, S.; Bergmann, K. C.

    2015-07-01

    Hay fever is a pollen-induced allergic reaction that strongly affects the overall quality of life of many individuals. The disorder may vary in severity and symptoms depending on patient-specific factors such as genetic disposition, individual threshold of pollen concentration levels, medication, former immunotherapy, and others. Thus, information services that improve the quality of life of hay fever sufferers must address the needs of each individual separately. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of information services that offer personalized pollen-induced symptoms forecasts. The backbone of these services consists of data of allergic symptoms reported by the users of the Personal Hay Fever Diary system and pollen concentration levels (European Aeroallergen Network) in several sampling sites. Data were analyzed using computational intelligence methods, resulting in highly customizable forecasting models that offer personalized warnings to users of the Patient Hay Fever Diary system. The overall system performance for the pilot area (Vienna and Lower Austria) reached a correlation coefficient of r = 0.71 ± 0.17 (average ± standard deviation) in a sample of 219 users with major contribution to the Pollen Hay Fever Diary system and an overall performance of r = 0.66 ± 0.18 in a second sample of 393 users, with minor contribution to the system. These findings provide an example of combining data from different sources using advanced data engineering in order to develop innovative e-health services with the capacity to provide more direct and personalized information to allergic rhinitis sufferers.

  13. The complex link between severity of asthma and rhinitis in mite allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonicelli, Leonardo; Braschi, Maria Chiara; Bresciani, Megon; Bonifazi, Martina; Baldacci, Sandra; Angino, Anna; Pala, Anna Paola; Viegi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the link between the severity of upper and lower airways diseases in mite allergic patients with respiratory allergy. A multicentre, observational, cross-sectional study was carried out in 556 consecutively enrolled mite allergic patients with rhinitis and asthma comorbidity attending a specialist unit. Severity assessment of rhinitis and asthma was evaluated in accordance with ARIA and GINA guidelines. Reliable data were available for 518 patients. The distribution of rhinitis severity was: 15.6% mild intermittent rhinitis, 4.4% moderate-severe intermittent rhinitis, 30.3% mild persistent rhinitis and 49.6% moderate persistent rhinitis. The distribution of asthma severity was: 41.3% mild intermittent asthma, 14.3% mild persistent asthma, 19.1% moderate persistent asthma and 25.3% severe persistent asthma. In patients with moderate-severe persistent rhinitis (49.5%) a significant trend (p = 0.005) was found pointing to an increased link with asthma severity. A link between respective severities of rhinitis and asthma was found in only half of mite allergic patients with rhinitis and asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Survey on the prevalence of childhood allergic rhinitis in Yinchuan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Di; Ma, Ruixia; Shen, Xueliang; Ha, Huiyu

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the epidemic features of childhood allergic rhinitis (AR) and correlative risk factors in Yinchuan. A questionnaire survey on AR was conducted among 800 children in eight communities, aged from 5 to 14 years old, by random cluster sampling, from March 2012 to March 2013 in Yinchuan. Suspects of AR, as identified by the survey, were recommended to specialist examinations for accurate diagnosis. The results were statistically analyzed. Seven hundred and sixteen questionnaires were returned and 662 questionnaires were available. The prevalence rate of AR in children aged from 5 to 14 is 14.65% in Yinchuan. Seventy-nine point thirty-eight percent children suffered from intermittent AR, while 20.61% children suffered from persistent AR. The difference of prevalence between female (13.57%) and male (15.44%) was insignificant statistically (Χ2=0.454, P>0.05). The difference of prevalence between the Han (15.72%) and the Hui (11.35%) insignificant statistically (Χ2=2.055, P>0.05). The prevalence of AR children aged five to nine years was 13.80%, as aged ten to fourteen years was 19.72%. There was a significante differece between two groups (Χ2=4.056, Pallergic rhinitis was July to September. The most common allergens found in patients were seasonal plants: mugwort, weed, dandelion, cereal, locust, ragweed, and willow. Fifteen point forty-six percent patients with AR also had rhinitic, 14.43% patients had asthma and 14.43% patients had allergic conjunctivitis. The history of drug allergy accounted for 12.37% in patients with AR, and food allergy accounted for 26.80%. In allergic rhinitis risk factors, family history accounted for 30.92%, non-breastfeeding representing accounted for 34.02%, animal feeding history accounted for 19.59%; exposure to passive smoking accounted for 42.26%; domestic decoration accounted for 12.37%. There were significante difference between AR children and normal in family history and non-breastfeeding (P<0.05). The prevalence

  15. Sublingual immunotherapy reduces allergic symptoms in a mouse model of rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimnes, J; Kildsgaard, J; Jacobi, H; Lund, K

    2007-04-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a clinically effective treatment in both pollen and house dust mite-induced rhinitis and asthma. However, the mechanisms by which this is accomplished are not clear. The objective of the current study was to establish a mouse model of rhinitis in order to study the effect and mechanisms of SLIT. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injections of alum-adsorbed Phleum pratense extract. Sensitized mice were SLIT-treated and subsequently challenged intranasally and analysed for clinical symptoms, antibody levels, eosinophilia and T cell response. Intranasal challenge of sensitized mice led to the development of rhinitis characterized by significantly increased sneezing and influx of eosinophils into the nose. Levels of specific IgE were fivefold increased in nasopharyngeal lavage (NAL) fluid and more than doubled in serum. Furthermore, a T-helper type 2 (Th2) like T cell response was observed in local draining lymph nodes. SLIT treatment of sensitized mice reduced sneezing, eosinophilia and IgE levels in the NAL by more than 50%. Moreover, serum levels of IgE and IgG1 as well as T cell response in the draining lymph nodes were also significantly reduced. Treatment for a shorter time or with a lower dose only led to minor reductions of the clinical and immunological parameters, indicating that the effect of SLIT is time and dose dependent. In the present study, we have established a mouse model displaying the hallmarks of allergic rhinitis using a clinically relevant allergen. Using this model, we have demonstrated that SLIT treatment is able to reduce allergic symptoms in a time- and dose-dependent manner.

  16. [Prevalence of rhinitis allergic in populations of several states of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Hernández, Eleazar; Medina-Ávalos, Miguel Alejandro; Barnica-Alvarado, Raúl Humberto; Soto-Candia, Diego; Guerrero-Venegas, Rosario; Zecua-Nájera, Yahvéh

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disorder of the nasal mucosa, characterized by symptoms of itching, rhinorrhea, nasal congestion and sneezing induced by an IgE-mediated response. In Mexico we have reports of prevalence, with fluctuations of 5.5% to 47.7% with the question of rhinitis symptoms the past 12 months. To determine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in schoolchildren from various states of Mexico. A descriptive study of prevalence in which a questionnaire was applied to preschool, elementary-, middle- and high-school population. It was performed in four cities in four states of Mexico: Puebla, Puebla, Tulancingo, Hidalgo, Tlaxcala, Tlaxcala and Cancun, Quintana Roo. Parents answered questionnaires of preschool and elementary school and middle- and high-school students answered their questionnaires. The study was conducted from June 2014 to January 2015. The instrument used was: questionnaire diagnosis of allergic rhinitis for epidemiological studies. Of the surveys, 8,159 completed questionnaires were obtained, in the city of Puebla: 2,267, Tulancingo, Hidalgo: 2,478, Tlaxcala, Tlaxcala: 2,574, Cancun, Quintana Roo: 840; total male: 4,190 (51%). The overall average rate of prevalence of allergic rhinitis among four states including all respondents ages was 15%. With the use of the questionnaire diagnosis of allergic rhinitis for epidemiological studies in the four cities in four different states, we found a prevalence of allergic rhinitis of 15% in ≥13 yearpopulation and 13% in ≤12 year-old children.

  17. Treatment of allergic rhinitis with acupoint herbal plaster: an oligonucleotide chip analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Lee, Yun-Shien; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-11-04

    Allergic rhinitis is regarded as an imbalanced Th1/Th2 cell-mediated response. The present study used microarray analysis to compare gene expression levels between allergic rhinitis patients before and after a series of acupoint herbal plaster applications. In this experimental pilot study, volunteers experiencing sneezing, runny nose, and congestion for more than 9 months in the year following initial diagnoses were included after diagnostic confirmation by otolaryngologists to exclude patients with sinusitis and nasal polyps. Patients with persistent allergic rhinitis each received four acupoint herbal plaster treatments applied using the moxibustion technique. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ). Peripheral blood samples were analyzed using an ImmunoCAP Phadiatop test, and patients were classified as phadiatop (Ph)-positive or -negative. Microarray results were analyzed for genes that were differentially expressed between (1) Ph-positive and -negative patients treated with herbal plaster; and (2) before and after herbal plaster treatment in the Ph-positive patient group. Unsupervised and supervised methods were used for gene-expression data analysis. Nineteen Ph-positive and four Ph-negative participants with persistent allergic rhinitis were included in the study. RQLQ results indicated that the 19 Ph-positive volunteers experienced improvement in six of seven categories following acupoint herbal plaster treatments, whereas the four Ph-negative participants reported improvement in only two categories. Hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis of the gene expression profiles of Ph-positive and -negative participants indicated the groups exhibited distinct physiological responses to acupoint herbal treatment. Evaluation of gene networks using MetaCore identified that the "Immune response_IL-13 signaling via JAK-STAT" and the "Inflammation_Interferon signaling" were down- and up

  18. [Expression level and significance of IL-17 and IL-23 in serum and nasal secretion of patients with allergic rhinitis and non-allergrie rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zheng, Guoxi; Zhang, Luyao; Zhu, Kang; Xin, Wenjun; Wei, Junrong

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of IL-17 and IL-23 in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis(AR) and non. allergic rhinitis(NAR). Selected 156 cases of patients with allergic rhinitis (AR group) and 59 cases of patients with non-allergic rhinitis (NAR group), 60 cases of healthy people (control group). All cases in AR group and NAR groups were evaluated by a visual analog scale (VAS) score of nasal symptoms. Collected peripheral blood and nasal secretions in all cases and then detected IL-17 and IL-23 expression levels. There was no significant difference in VAS score of AR group and NAR group (P>0. 05). IL-17 and IL-23 levels of serum and nasal secretions in AR group and NAR group were both higher than control group, with a highly significant difference (P rhinitis and non-allergic rhinitis.

  19. Does adenoid hypertrophy affect disease severity in children with allergic rhinitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, Mahmut; Evcimik, Muhammed Fatih; Calim, Omer Faruk

    2017-01-01

    Our study aims to evaluate the presence of adenoid hypertrophy (AH) in children with allergic rhinitis (AR) and the association of AH disease severity and clinical laboratory finding from retrospective, cross-sectional, and nonrandomized trial. The study included 566 children being treated and followed up for allergic rhinitis. Skin prick test for the same allergens was performed for all patients. Adenoid tissue was analyzed by an ENT specialist and the diagnosis was confirmed based on the patient history, endoscopic physical examination and radiology. Adenoid hypertrophy was detected in 118 (21.2 %) of the children with AR. Children with and without AH did not differ statistically and significantly by gender, age, presence of atopy in the family, exposure to smoke (p > 0.05). Comparison of the groups for AR duration demonstrated significantly higher frequency of persistent rhinitis in patients with AH (p  0.05). On the other hand, sensitivity to Alternaria alternata was significantly more frequent in AR patients with AH (p = 0.032). The presence of AH increased the severity of the disease and prolongs disease duration. There was a negative relationship between AH and asthma in children with AR. AH is more common among children with mold sensitivity. AH should be considered and investigated particularly in non-asthmatic children with pronounced nasal congestion and A. alternata sensitivity.

  20. Association of allergic rhinitis, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crans Yoon, Angelina M; Chiu, Vicki; Rana, Jamal S; Sheikh, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation is implicated in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Allergic diseases also involve a systemic inflammatory state, which may potentiate cardiovascular disease. To examine the association of allergic rhinitis, coronary heart disease (CHD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD), and all-cause mortality. We conducted a retrospective, population-based, matched cohort study comparing the incidence of CHD, CVD, and all-cause mortality from January 1, 1999, through December 31, 2012, in patients with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, documented allergic rhinitis matched 1:1 by age, sex, and ethnicity to a reference cohort without allergic rhinitis within Kaiser Permanente Southern California. Fully adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated. Further analyses for those with positive environmental allergen specific IgE (sIgE) test results within the allergic rhinitis cohort were also performed. Patients with physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis (N = 110, 207 in matched cohort) had significantly lower risk for myocardial infarction (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-0.67; P allergic rhinitis was associated with decreased CHD, CVD, and all-cause mortality. This decreased risk was more pronounced after excluding patients with asthma. Patients with positive sIgE test results also had decreased risk of CHD. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recommendations for the pharmacologic management of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyte, Flavia C L; Meltzer, Eli O; Ostrom, Nancy K; Nelson, Harold S; Bensch, Greg W; Spangler, Dennis L; Storms, William W; Weinstein, Steven F; Katial, Rohit K

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) affects at least 60 million people in the United States each year, resulting in a major impact on patient quality of life, productivity, and direct and indirect costs. As new therapies, data, and literature emerge in the management of AR, there is a need to communicate and disseminate important information to health care professionals to advance the practice of medicine and lessen the disease burden from AR. Treatment recommendations for AR have not been updated since the 2012 Food and Drug Administration approval of nonaqueous intranasal aerosol agents using hydrofluoroalkane propellants and the first aqueous intranasal combination product. Here, we present an updated algorithm for the pharmacologic treatment of AR that includes these new treatment options. Treatment recommendations are categorized by disease severity (mild versus moderate/severe) and duration of symptoms (episodic versus nonepisodic, with episodic defined as well as alternative options for consideration by clinicians in the context of individual patient needs. This recommendation article also outlines the importance of treatment monitoring, which can be conducted using the recently developed Rhinitis Control Assessment Test. Successful therapeutic outcomes depend on multiple factors, including use of the most effective pharmacologic agents as well as patient adherence to therapy. Therefore, it is imperative that rhinitis patients not only receive the most effective therapeutic options, but that they also understand and are able to adhere to the comprehensive treatment regimen. Successful treatment, with all of these considerations in mind, results in better disease outcomes, improved quality of life for patients, and greater economic productivity in the home and workplace.

  2. Does allergic rhinitis affect communication skills in young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingi, Can Cemal; Sakallıoğlu, Öner; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a chronic disorder with a high prevalence in the general population. The symptoms of AR can impair the cognitive capabilities of the affected people. The study of communication skills and AR interaction has not been adequately discussed. We aimed to analyze Social Communication Skills of university students with AR. Fifty patients suffering from AR and 50 healthy subjects were studied. All participants completed two questionnaires [Social Communication Skills Rating Scale (SCSRS) and Communication Questionnaire] for the assessment of social communication skills. Total scores of both SCSRS and Communication Questionnaire were higher in participants with AR than controls. When the questions of SCSRS were compared between the groups one by one, significant difference was observed between the groups for questions numbered 1-9 and 11, 12 (p Communication Questionnaire (p communication skills of the patients with AR. More research is however needed to validate this hypothesis.

  3. Current and future directions in pediatric allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Deborah; Bartholow, Ashton; Valovirta, Erkka; Scadding, Glenis; Skoner, David

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common pediatric problem that significantly affects sleep, learning, performance, and quality of life. In addition, it is associated with significant comorbidities and complications. The aim was to provide an update on the epidemiology, comorbidities, pathophysiology, current treatment, and future direction of pediatric AR. Literature reviews in each of these areas were conducted, and the results were incorporated. The prevalence of AR is increasing in the pediatric population and is associated with significant morbidity, comorbidities, and complications. The mainstay of current treatment strategies includes allergen avoidance, pharmacotherapy, and allergen specific immunotherapy. In the future, diagnosis will be improved by microarrayed recombinant allergen testing and therapy will be expanded to include emerging treatments such as sublingual immunotherapy and combination products. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of Sexual Life in Males with Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Soylu Ozler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of sexual life of males with allergic rhinitis(AR. Material and Method: 40 patients with AR diagnosed with skin prick test and 40 control subjects with no evidence of allergy completed the study. International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire (IIEF was used to evaluate the quality of sexual life of the subjects. Results: The mean scores of erectile function, orgasmic function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction and overall satisfaction for AR group were significantly lower than control group(p=0.0001. Discussion: AR has negative effects on quality of life. The effective treatment of AR by the clinician will also avoid these concomitting social, sexual and sleep disturbances.

  5. Investigation of asthma comorbidity in children with different severities of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, Mahmut

    2016-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma comorbidity is widely seen. However, the effects of AR on asthma are more likely to be studied in the literature. To investigate the prevalence of asthma in children with AR who are followed-up and to evaluate the effect of asthma on the severity of AR. A total of 509 children with AR who were followed-up in the pediatric allergy-immunology department between January 2012 and December 2013 were enrolled in the study. Asthma and AR are diagnosed by using the Global Initiative for Asthma and the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma, respectively. The patients were categorized into two groups according to the presence of asthma. The two groups were compared according to sociodemographic characteristics, clinical features, and laboratory findings. Skin-prick test results, serum immunoglobulin E levels, and the percentage of eosinophils of the patients were evaluated. A total of 299 of the patients were boys (58.7%) the mean age was 7.2 ± 3.5 years (range, 1.5-18 years). Patients with moderate-severe persistent rhinitis (40.5% of all patients) were the most common rhinitis subgroup. Mild intermittent rhinitis was diagnosed in 17.7%, mild persistent rhinitis in 11.2%, and moderate-severe intermittent rhinitis in 30.6% of the patients. Two hundred seventy-one children with AR (53.2%) also had concomitant asthma. The patients were categorized into two groups: AR-asthma comorbidity group (group I) and AR-only group (group II). There was no significant difference between these two groups when compared with the sex, age, familial atopy, exposure to smoke, and severity of AR (p > 0.05). The duration of illness, immunoglobulin E levels, number of positive sensitivity, sensitivity to house-dust mites, sensitivity to cockroaches, and polysensitization were significantly higher in the AR-asthma comorbidity group (p < 0.05). This study showed that asthma comorbidity had no effect on the severity of AR. However, it was also shown that the

  6. Comparison of the combinations of fexofenadine-pseudoephedrine and loratadine-montelukast in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinuddin, Rizwan; deTineo, Marcy; Maleckar, Barbara; Naclerio, Robert M; Baroody, Fuad M

    2004-01-01

    Antihistamine-decongestant combinations are used routinely for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Recently, the combination of an antihistamine and a leukotriene receptor antagonist has been shown to be efficacious. To compare the 2 combinations in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. This was a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel study in which patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis received either fexofenadine, 60 mg, and pseudoephedrine, 120 mg, twice daily, or loratadine, 10 mg, and montelukast, 10 mg, once daily, for 2 weeks. The Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) was completed at the beginning and end of the study. Patients recorded nasal symptoms and measured nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) twice daily. Baseline measurements were obtained before initiation of treatment. Compared with baseline, both treatments resulted in statistically and clinically meaningful reductions of overall and individual RQLQ domain scores (P allergic rhinitis. The lack of improvement in sleep in the fexofenadine-pseudoephedrine group is probably related to insomnia, a known adverse effect of pseudoephedrine.

  7. Local Allergic Rhinitis in Adult Patients with Chronic Nasal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Wojtys, Anna; Jarzab, Jerzy; Zawadzińska, Kamila; Pyrkosz, Katarzyna; Bozek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) remains an underdiagnosed condition characterized by the local production of IgE antibodies during the natural exposure to aeroallergens. The prevalence of LAR in adult patients with a previous diagnosis of non-AR was assessed. Eighty-four patients with perennial nasal allergy symptoms but a negative skin prick test and specific IgE antibodies against common inhalant allergens were included in the study. Nasal provocation tests were performed with the inhalant allergens Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Alternaria, and cat allergen, followed by the detection of nasal-specific IgE antibodies in the lavage during the challenge. LAR was confirmed in 21 (25%) study patients. In the remaining 63 (75%) patients, non-AR was diagnosed. In addition, LAR was found following exposure to D. pteronyssinus in 19 (22.6%) patients, Alternaria in 3 (3.6%) patients, and the cat allergen in 1 (1.2%) patient. In 2 patients, concomitant allergies to D. pteronyssinus and Alternaria were observed. LAR can be a form of chronic perennial rhinitis that has previously been considered to be non-AR. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Comparison of efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of montelukast-levocetirizine and montelukast-fexofenadine in patients of allergic rhinitis: A randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatme, Mohini Sachin; Dakhale, Ganesh Natthuji; Tadke, Kanchan; Hiware, Sachin Keshaorao; Dudhgaonkar, S D; Wankhede, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a global health problem. Almost 10%-25% of population worldwide is affected by AR. Oral/intranasal H1-antihistamine, decongestants, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and intranasal corticosteroids are the pillars in the management of AR. The combination therapy of montelukast with antihistaminic provides enhancing and complimentary effects, thereby reducing the symptoms effectively, but there are scanty data regarding the comparisons of combinations. Therefore, we aimed to compare the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of montelukast-levocetirizine and montelukast-fexofenadine combination in patients of AR. Seventy patients with AR participated in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel, active-controlled, comparative 4-week trial. The patients between the age group of 18-65 years of either gender having moderate-severe intermittent or mild persistent AR were included in the study. The study inclusion criteria required the patients with total nasal symptom score (TNSS) of 5 or higher. The patients were randomly divided into two treatment groups with montelukast-levocetirizine (10 mg and 5 mg) in one group and montelukast-fexofenadine (10 mg and 120 mg) in another group. TNSS parameter was the main effectiveness parameter. Evaluation of TNSS revealed significant difference ( P < 0.05) when compared from baseline to 4 th week in both groups. The mean change of TNSS, i.e., 9.46 was significant ( P < 0.05) in montelukast-fexofenadine group. The cost-effectiveness ratio was less in montelukast-levocetirizine group than in montelukast-fexofenadine group. The decrease in TNSS was more in montelukast-fexofenadine group, but the cost-effectiveness is more with montelukast-levocetirizine combination.

  9. Clinical verification in homeopathy and allergic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wassenhoven, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The literature on clinical research in allergic conditions treated with homeopathy includes a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCT) for hay fever with positive conclusions and two positive RCTs in asthma. Cohort surveys using validated Quality of Life questionnaires have shown improvement in asthma in children, general allergic conditions and skin diseases. Economic surveys have shown positive results in eczema, allergy, seasonal allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy and chronic allergic rhinitis. This paper reports clinical verification of homeopathic symptoms in all patients and especially in various allergic conditions in my own primary care practice. For preventive treatments in hay fever patients, Arsenicum album was the most effective homeopathic medicine followed by Nux vomica, Pulsatilla pratensis, Gelsemium, Sarsaparilla, Silicea and Natrum muriaticum. For asthma patients, Arsenicum iodatum appeared most effective, followed by Lachesis, Calcarea arsenicosa, Carbo vegetabilis and Silicea. For eczema and urticaria, Mezereum was most effective, followed by Lycopodium, Sepia, Arsenicum iodatum, Calcarea carbonica and Psorinum. The choice of homeopathic medicine depends on the presence of other associated symptoms and 'constitutional' features. Repertories should be updated by including results of such clinical verifications of homeopathic prescribing symptoms. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Variable prevalence of allergic rhinitis and risk factors affecting the prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Öner; Elmas, Bahri

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is described as a chronic inflammation of the nasal mucosa causing rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal congestion and itching, often characterized with conjunctival injection and ocular itching. The prevalence of pediatric allergic rhinitis has recently shown a sharp increase throughout the world. However, there are significant differences among the regions, thus indicating to the influence of varying genetic and environmental factors upon the development of allergic rhinitis. This regional difference is mainly related to the 'western diet' and 'western lifestyle', with its swift changes in environmental and behavioral factors, besides a genetic predisposition. Some main and potential risk factors contributing to the development of allergic rhinitis are still unclear. In this review, we discuss mostly well known and some emerging new risk factors in the light of recent literature.

  11. Effect of allergic rhinitis and asthma on the quality of life in young Thai adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritipsukho, Paskorn; Satdhabudha, Araya; Nanthapisal, Sira

    2015-09-01

    Despite an increasing recognition that both asthma and allergic rhinitis are serious health disorders in Thailand, their combined effects on patients' quality of life in the Thai population has not been reported. The study aimed to evaluate the impacts of allergic rhinitis and asthma on the quality of life of young adolescents in Thailand. A total of 1,440 pupils, aged 12-14 years, were randomly recruited from 4 schools located in Bangkok and Pathum Thani Province. Allergic rhinitis and asthmatic symptoms were identified by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) written questionnaire. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) questionnaire was used to evaluate their quality of life. There were 1,230 completed questionnaires for analysis. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis alone, asthma alone and diseases co-occurrence was 32.8%, 7.2%, and 12.7% respectively. Pupils with respiratory allergy had significantly lower PedsQL mean scores than healthy pupils, for all dimensions (p < 0.006). The greatest reduction of the PedsQL mean score was for emotional functioning. Among pupils with allergic rhinitis, those who were also affected with asthma had significantly lower mean scores, for all quality of life domains (all p < 0.001). Compared to allergic rhinitis, asthma significantly reduced PedsQL mean scores in almost all domains (p < 0.001), except for physical health. Allergic rhinitis and asthma have a significant influence on the quality of life in young Thai adolescents, in particular regarding emotional functioning. Asthma has stronger negative effects on life quality than allergic rhinitis, especially regarding psychosocial health.

  12. TREATMENT OF ALLERGIC RHINITIS IN CHILDREN: SELECTION OF ANTIHISTAMINE DRUG AND NECESSITY OF FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Karaulov

    2013-01-01

    This literature review contains analysis of research results on treatment of allergic rhinitis in children according to the evidence-based medicine. Oral and intranasal antihistamine drugs along with intranasal steroids are the first-line drugs for treatment of allergic rhinitis, although the latter are more efficient in suppression of nasal stuffiness. First- and second-generation antihistamine agents used nowadays in medical practice are discussed in the article. The advantages of non-sedat...

  13. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran.   Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Sy...

  14. Allergic rhinitis in children: incidence and treatment in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    OpenAIRE

    Bot, C.M.A. de; Moed, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groot, H. de; Wijk, R.G. van; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2009-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0–17 yr in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establish whether changes have occurred. A comparison was made with data from the first (1987) and second (2001) Dutch national surveys of general practice on children aged 0–17 yr. Incidence rates were compared by age, sex, level of urbani...

  15. Allergic rhinitis in children in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001.

    OpenAIRE

    Bot, C.M.A. de; Moed, H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groot, H. de; Wijk, R.G. van; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disorder in children, mostly diagnosed in primary health care. This study investigated the national incidence and treatment of allergic rhinitis among children aged 0-17 years in Dutch general practice in 1987 and 2001 to establich whether changes have occurred. Materials & methods: a comparison was made with data from the first (1987) and second (2001) Dutch National Surveys of General Practice on children aged 0-17 years. The management of...

  16. Efficacy comparison of cetirizine and loratadine for allergic rhinitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Juliana; Rita Evalina; Lily Irsa; M. Sjabaroeddin Loebis

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis represents a global health problem affecting 10% to more than 40% of the population worldwide. Several studies in recent years have described the efficacy of second-generation antihistamines in younger children. It is not well established whether cetirizine is more effective than loratadine in reducing symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Objective The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of loratadine with cetirizine for treatment of...

  17. Reliability assessment of the endoscopic examination in patients with allergic rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ziade, Georges K.; Karami, Reem A.; Fakhri, Ghina B.; Alam, Elie S.; Hamdan, Abdul latif; Mourad, Marc M.; Hadi, Usama M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study if nasal endoscope can be a reliable tool in assessing patients with allergic rhinitis. Materials and Methods: A prospective study. Patients who were diagnosed with allergic rhinitis underwent a nasal endoscopic examination performed by two physicians blinded to the scoring of each other. A correlation was made among symptom severity, endoscopic findings, and interrater variability. Results: Ninety patients were included in the study: 34 patients had mild disease and 56 ha...

  18. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in patients with allergic rhinitis: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luukkainen Annika

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is a tryptophan catalyzing enzyme. It has been suggested that it has a role in lower airway allergic inflammations, but its role in allergic rhinitis has not been investigated. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the expression of IDO in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients allergic to birch pollen during peak exposure to birch pollen allergen and compare it to non-atopic patients. Methods IDO expression was immunohistochemically evaluated from nasal specimens obtained in- and off-season from otherwise healthy non-smoking volunteers both allergic to birch pollen (having mild or moderate allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and non-allergic controls. Results: The IDO expression levels were low in healthy controls and remained low also in patients allergic to birch pollen. There were no differences in the expression of IDO in- and off-season in either healthy or allergic subjects. Conclusions There is a controversy in the role of IDO in upper and lower airways during allergic airway disease. It seems that IDO is associated to allergic inflammations of the lower airways, but does not have a local role in the nasal cavity at least in mild or moderate forms of allergic rhinitis.

  19. Allergic rhinitis in northern vietnam: increased risk of urban living according to a large population survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lâm Hoàng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about prevalence and risk factors of allergic rhinitis and chronic nasal symptoms among adults in Vietnam. We aimed to estimate the prevalence, risk factor patterns and co-morbidities of allergic rhinitis and chronic nasal symptoms in one urban and one rural area in northern Vietnam. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted from August 2007 to January 2008 in urban Hoankiem and rural Bavi in Hanoi among adults aged 21-70 years. Of 7008 randomly selected subjects, 91.7% participated in Bavi and 70.3% in Hoankiem. Results Allergic rhinitis ever or chronic nasal symptoms were reported by 50.2%. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis ever was considerably higher in Hoankiem compared to Bavi, 29.6% vs 10.0% (p Conclusions Allergic rhinitis ever was considerably more common in the urban area. Nasal blocking and runny nose was each reported by about one third of the studied sample with no major urban-rural difference. Further, exposure to air pollution at work was significantly associated with allergic rhinitis ever, nasal blocking and runny nose.

  20. Google unveils a glimpse of allergic rhinitis in the real world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M-G; Song, W-J; Choi, S; Kim, H; Ha, H; Kim, S-H; Cho, S-H; Min, K-U; Yoon, S; Chang, Y-S

    2015-01-01

    Google Trends (GT) is a Web-based surveillance tool used to explore the searching trends of specific queries on Google. Recent studies have suggested the utility of GT in predicting outbreaks of influenza and other diseases. However, this utility has not been thoroughly evaluated for allergic diseases. Therefore, we investigated the utility of GT for predicting the epidemiology of allergic rhinitis. In the USA, GT for allergic rhinitis showed repetitive seasonality that peaked in late April and early May and then rapidly decreased, and a second small peak occurred in September. These trends are highly correlated with the searching trends for other queries such as 'pollen count', antihistamines such as loratadine and cetirizine (all r > 0.88 and all P Google Trends for allergic rhinitis was similar to the monthly changes in rhinitis symptoms according to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, sales for Claritin(®) and all over-the-counter antihistamines, and the number of monthly page views of 'claritin.com'. In conclusion, GT closely reflects the real-world epidemiology of allergic rhinitis in the USA and could potentially be used as a monitoring tool for allergic rhinitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Influence of degree of specific allergic sensitivity on severity of rhinitis and asthma in Chinese allergic patients

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    Zhao Changqing

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between sensitizations and severity of allergic diseases is controversial. Objective This study was to investigate the association between severity of asthma and rhinitis and degree of specific allergic sensitization in allergic patients in China. Method A cross-sectional survey was performed in 6304 patients with asthma and/or rhinitis from 4 regions of China. Patients completed a standardized questionnaire documenting their respiratory and allergic symptoms, their impact on sleep, daily activities, school and work. They also underwent skin prick tests with 13 common aeroallergens. Among the recruited subjects, 2268 provided blood samples for serum measurement of specific IgE (sIgE against 16 common aeroallergens. Results Significantly higher percentage of patients with moderate-severe intermittent rhinitis were sensitized to outdoor allergens while percentage of patients sensitized to indoor allergens was increased with increasing severity of asthma. Moderate-severe intermittent rhinitis was associated with the skin wheal size and the level of sIgE to Artemisia vulgaris and Ambrosia artemisifolia (p Dermatophagoides (D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae (p Conclusions Artemisia vulgaris and Ambrosia artemisifolia sensitizations are associated with the severity of intermittent rhinitis and D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae sensitizations are associated with increasing severity of asthma in China. Increase in number of allergens the patients are sensitized to may also increase the severity of rhinitis and asthma.

  2. The effectiveness of modern antihistamines for treatment of allergic rhinitis - an IPD meta-analysis of 140,853 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösges, Ralph; König, Volker; Köberlein, Juliane

    2013-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis represents a worldwide health problem. The prevalence is increasing. The aim of this study was to analyse the correlation between the severity of allergic rhinitis and an adequate treatment dose of modern oral antihistamines. From a comprehensive databank containing data from ten different open-label prospective observational studies including raw data of 140,853 patients with allergic rhinitis, symptomatology variables were analysed and scored to study the effects of treatment with four antihistamines (Desloratadine, Ebastine, Fexofenadine, Levocetirizine) alone or in combination with intranasal corticosteroids. The patient data were collected in 23,606 study centres from Germany, mostly medical specialist and some primary care physicians in private practice. The analyses were performed via individual patient data meta-analysis techniques. Finally 92,900 patient data from nine of ten studies could be analysed. One study with data of 47,953 patients was excluded due to incomplete treatment documentation. Both monotherapy analysis subgroups (Total Symptom Score and Total Nasal Symptom Score) were significantly better than those of their combinations with intranasal steroids. Monotherapy with levocetirizine was determined to be significantly more effective in lowering the Total Symptom Score (p antihistamines. In the next stage, a greater positive effect of levocetirizine was demonstrated in relation to the severity of the clinical symptoms of allergic rhinitis (Total Nasal Symptom Score in cases with severe symptomatology [effect size = -0.09]). Levocetirizine asserted itself as the only antihistamine compared with the others as significant in this analysis. The study authors recommend monotherapy with the new-generation antihistamine levocetirizine, especially in severe cases of allergic rhinitis.

  3. Effect of micronized cellulose powder on the efficacy of topical oxymetazoline in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerieva, Anna; Popov, Todor A; Staevska, Maria; Kralimarkova, Tanya; Petkova, Elena; Valerieva, Elitsa; Mustakov, Tihomir; Lazarova, Tsvetelina; Dimitrov, Vasil; Church, Martin K

    2015-01-01

    Defective nasal barrier function is implicated in allergic rhinitis, which results in persistent inflammation and clinical symptoms, among which congestion plays a prominent role. In searching ways to improve the efficacy of nasally applied drugs in this condition, we tested the hypothesis that hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), known as a mucoprotective agent, could enhance the efficacy of a decongestant (oxymetazoline nasal spray, 0.05%) by "sealing" it to the mucosa. This double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted with 40 patients (mean age, 35 years; 23 women) with persistent allergic rhinitis. The patients were randomized to receive 1 puff of oxymetazoline, followed by 1 puff of either HPMC or lactose powder (placebo) twice a day for 7 days and then only oxymetazoline rescue medication for another week. Peak inspiratory nasal flow (PNIF) was measured for 360 minutes after oxymetazoline and HPMC or placebo insufflation on days 1 and 8, and at a single point on day 15. Symptoms assessments involve visual analog scales and total nasal symptom scores. HPMC significantly enhanced oxymetazoline-increased PNIF at days 1 (p = 0.042) and 8 (p = 0.006). Baseline PNIF was greater in the HPMC group at day 15 (p = 0.014), indicative of further reduced nasal congestion. All nasal symptoms improved in both groups at day 8, but only the HPMC group showed further amelioration at day 15. Rescue medication was smaller in the HPMC group between days 8 and 15. HPMC enhances decongestion through mucoadhesion but may also be augmenting the mucosal barrier in allergic rhinitis, which explains the carryover efficacy of oxymetazoline for a week after its discontinuation. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01986582.

  4. Allergic sensitization is age-dependently associated with rhinitis, but less so with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warm, Katja; Hedman, Linnea; Lindberg, Anne; Lötvall, Jan; Lundbäck, Bo; Rönmark, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiologic data describing the association between allergic sensitization and asthma and allergic rhinitis in adults are scarce. To determine the prevalence and impact of specific sensitization to airborne allergens on asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in relation to age. A random population sample (age 21-86 years) was examined with structured interview and analysis of specific IgE to 9 common airborne allergens. Of those invited, 692 (68%) subjects participated in blood sampling. IgE level of 0.35 U/mL or more to the specific allergen was defined as a positive test result. Allergic sensitization decreased with increasing age, both in the population sample and among subjects with asthma and allergic rhinitis. In a multivariate model, sensitization to animal was significantly positively associated with asthma (odds ratio [OR], 4.80; 95% CI, 2.68-8.60), whereas sensitization to both animal (OR, 3.90; 95% CI, 2.31-6.58) and pollen (OR, 4.25; 95% CI, 2.55-7.06) was significantly associated with allergic rhinitis. The association between allergic sensitization and rhinitis was consistently strongest among the youngest age group, whereas this pattern was not found for asthma. The prevalence of allergic sensitization among patients with asthma decreased by increasing age of asthma onset, 86% with asthma onset at age 6 y or less, 56% at age 7 to 19 years, and 26% with asthma onset at age 20 years or more. Sensitization to animal was associated with asthma across all age groups; allergic rhinitis was associated with sensitization to both pollen and animal and consistently stronger among younger than among older adults. Early onset of asthma was associated with allergic sensitization among adults with asthma. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo

    2011-01-01

    and epidemiological surveys have suggested a close connection between upper and lower airway diseases expressed as the "united airways concept". Furthermore, an association between upper and lower airway diseases also seems to exist in non-atopic individuals. Nevertheless, the nature of this association is poorly...... understood and there is a paucity of data objectivizing this association in young children. The aim of this thesis was to describe pathology in the upper and lower airways in young children from the COPSAC birth cohort with investigator-diagnosed allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis. Nasal congestion is a key...... airway patency end-points derived from paper I to examine whether upper and lower airway patency are associated. Upper airway patency was assessed by acoustic rhinometry before and after intranasal α-agonist and lower airway patency by spirometry before and after inhaled β2-agonist. Upper and lower...

  6. Allergic rhinitis causes loss of smell in children: The OLFAPEDRIAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Cristóbal; Guilemany, José María; Valls, Meritxell; Alobid, Isam; Bartra, Joan; Dávila, Ignacio; Del Cuvillo, Alfonso; Ferrer, Marta; Jáuregui, Ignacio; Montoro, Javier; Sastre, Joaquín; Valero, Antonio; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the OLFAPEDRIAL study was to assess the olfactory dysfunction in allergic paediatric population, which has been scarcely studied. Observational, cross-sectional and multicentre study evaluated the sense of smell in untreated allergic rhinitis (AR) paediatric patients aged 6-12 years. Forty-four per cent (551 of 1260) of children with AR reported smell dysfunction, with both loss of smell frequency (52.1%, p smell frequency and intensity increased according to disease severity (m-ARIA classification) but always being significantly higher in persistent (p smell frequency and intensity which is clearly related to the disease duration and severity. The loss of smell can be considered, as in adults, a clinical marker of disease severity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Intralymphatic treatment of flagellin-ovalbumin mixture reduced allergic inflammation in murine model of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E H; Kim, J H; Samivel, R; Bae, J-S; Chung, Y-J; Chung, P-S; Lee, S E; Mo, J-H

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial flagellin, a Toll-like receptor 5 agonist, is used as an adjuvant for immunomodulation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect and its mechanism following intralymphatic administration of OVA-flagellin (FlaB) mixture in the mouse model of allergic rhinitis. BALB/c mice were sensitized with OVA and treated with an OVA-FlaB mixture via intranasal, sublingual, and intralymphatic routes to evaluate the effect of each treatment. Several parameters for allergic inflammation and its underlying mechanisms were then evaluated. Intralymphatic injection of the OVA-FlaB mixture reduced symptom scores, eosinophil infiltration in the nasal mucosa, and total and OVA-specific IgE levels more significantly than intranasal and sublingual administration. Systemic cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ) production and local cytokine (IL-4 and IL-5) production were also reduced significantly after intralymphatic injection with OVA-FlaB. Double intralymphatic injection of the mixture was more effective than single injection. Moreover, the expression of innate cytokines such as IL-25 and IL-33 in nasal epithelial cells was reduced, and the expression of chemokines such as CCL24 (eotaxin-2), CXCL1, and CXCL2 was decreased in the nasal mucosa, suggesting the underlying mechanism for intralymphatic administration of the OVA-FlaB mixture. Intralymphatic administration of an OVA-FlaB mixture was more effective in alleviating allergic inflammation than intranasal and sublingual administration in a mouse model of allergic rhinitis. This effect may be attributed to the reduced expression of innate cytokines and chemokines. This treatment modality can be considered as a new therapeutic method and agent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy and paediatric allergic rhinitis: A patient-oriented decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli Sopo, Stefano; Battista, Andrea; Greco, Monica; Monaco, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines and systematic review report that allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is, in general, effective in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. However, experts suggest not generalising the results of different clinical studies: for example, it would not be advisable to translate the results found in an adult population to a paediatric population or the results on the efficacy of AIT against a specific allergen to the AIT against a different allergen. Moreover, according to Evidence Based Medicine (EBM), clinical decisions are individualised and should derive from the "integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values". Taking into account the high specificity of the AIT and EBM principles, we tried to answer the question on how advisable it is to prescribe the AIT for the management of grass allergic rhinitis in children. To do this, we revised the scientific literature in order to solve a specific case scenario. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The association between the parenting stress of the mother and the incidence of allergic rhinitis in their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Bum; Kim, Jeong Hong; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Hong, Seong-Chul; Lee, Hye-Sook; Kang, Ju Wan

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis and the social burden related to the management of allergic rhinitis have persistently increased. There are many studies investigating the association between the allergic diseases of children and the stress of their parent. However, the relationship between parenting stress and the incidence of allergic rhinitis among children requires further investigation. We aimed to investigate the significance of parenting stress for mothers with children treated for allergic rhinitis. The mothers of 250 children in the second and third grade of elementary school were involved in this study. The Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) was used to measure parenting stress. Additionally, the monthly household income, treatment history for allergic diseases (atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinitis) during the past 12 months, and maternal education status were investigated using the questionnaire. Parenting stress index score was significantly higher among the mothers of children treated for allergic rhinitis (76.41 ± 9.35) compared with the parents of children without treatment history for allergic rhinitis (70.06 ± 13.74). Nonetheless, there were no significant differences between the cases of children with atopic dermatitis and those with asthma. We analyzed the association between allergic rhinitis and parenting stress adjusted for the monthly household income, and maternal education status, and showed that a treatment history of allergic rhinitis was significantly associated with parenting stress (coefficient 7.477, 95% interval 1.703-13.252; p = 0.011). Treatment of the children for allergic rhinitis significantly affects the parenting stress of their mother. We recommend that mothers with children with allergic rhinitis should receive appropriate counseling about parenting stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Allergic rhinitis is often un-diagnosed and un-treated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Gyldenløve, Mette; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A few earlier studies have indicated that allergic rhinitis (AR) is under-diagnosed and under-treated. OBJECTIVE: To assess awareness, diagnosis and treatment of allergic rhinitis in a general population of Danish adults. METHODS: Between October 2007 and June 2008, a total of 1277...... consecutive participants in a Danish general population study of 18-69-year-olds were skin prick tested and asked about respiratory symptoms. AR was defined as a combination of self-reported rhinitis symptoms and skin prick test reactivity against inhalant allergens. Participants reporting rhinitis symptoms...... completed an additional questionnaire on medication for rhinitis symptoms. RESULTS: The prevalence of AR was 23.1%. A total of 43.6% (n=122/280) of persons with AR had not received any treatment in the previous 12 months and only 56.6% (n=163/288) had been given a diagnosis of hay fever by a doctor. 48...

  11. Laryngeal effects of nasal allergen provocation in singers with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verguts, Monique M. L.; Eggermont, Anita; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix I. C. R. S.; Hellings, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of our recent insight into nasobronchial interaction mechanisms in allergic airway disease, the association between allergic rhinitis and voice complaints remains obscure. To evaluate the effects of nasal allergen provocation and seasonal grass pollen exposure on subjective and objective

  12. Early protective and risk factors for allergic rhinitis at age 4½ yr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, Bernt; Goksör, Emma; Thengilsdottir, Hrefna; Pettersson, Rolf; Möllborg, Per; Norvenius, Gunnar; Erdes, Laslo; Aberg, Nils; Wennergren, Göran

    2011-06-01

    Allergic heredity plays a major role in the development of allergic rhinitis. In addition the introduction of food may influence the risk of subsequent allergic disease. The aim of this study was to analyse early risk factors and protective factors for allergic rhinitis at preschool age. Data were obtained from a prospective, longitudinal study of a cohort of children born in the region of western Sweden in 2003 and 8,176 families (50% of the birth cohort) were randomly selected. The parents answered questionnaires at 6 and 12 months and at 4½ yr of age. The response rate at 4½ yr was 4,496, i.e. 83% of the 5,398 questionnaires distributed at 4½ yr. At 4½ yr of age, 5.5% reported symptoms of allergic rhinitis during the last year. In the multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for allergic rhinitis were: allergic sensitisation to food allergens at 4½ yr (OR 10.21; 95% confidence interval 4.22-24.73), recurrent wheeze at 4½ yr (3.33; 1.56-7.10), doctor-diagnosed eczema at 4½ yr (2.72; 1.62-4.55), parental rhinitis (2.21; 1.39-3.53), eczema first year (1.97; 1.19-3.26) and male gender (1.82; 1.13-2.94). The risk was reduced with fish introduction before 9 months (0.49; 0.29-0.82). In conclusion, we found that previous and present allergic disease, heredity and male gender increased the risk of allergic rhinitis at 4½ yr of age. The introduction of fish before the age of 9 months reduced the risk. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Tap water nasal irrigation in adults with seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Min; Fu, Xiaoyan; Deng, Wenting; Lai, Huangwen; Yang, Chuanhong

    2014-06-01

    Saline nasal irrigation is effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and sodium chloride itself has no antiallergic effects. The mechanism of saline nasal irrigation depends mainly on washing away allergens and inflammatory mediators induced by allergic reactions. Tap water has the same washing effects as saline. In this study, it was investigated if tap water nasal irrigation was effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Sixty-four patients diagnosed with seasonal allergic rhinitis were enrolled. Patients were randomized to tap water nasal irrigation group and non-tap water nasal irrigation group for treatment. Patients of both groups were treated with desloratadine. Treatment outcomes were measured using allergic rhinitis Quality of Life (QoL) survey was completed at baseline and after 3 weeks of therapy. There were statistically significant differences in QoL scores between tap water nasal irrigation group and non-tap water nasal irrigation group. The tap water nasal irrigation group had better QoL scores than the non-tap water nasal irrigation group. Tap water nasal irrigation can be a valuable adjuvant therapy for patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis.

  14. Eating fish and farm life reduce allergic rhinitis at the age of twelve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiadou, Styliana; Wennergren, Göran; Strömberg Celind, Frida; Åberg, Nils; Pettersson, Rolf; Alm, Bernt; Goksör, Emma

    2018-02-15

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis has increased, but the cause of this rise is partly unknown. Our aim was to analyse the prevalence, risk factors and protective factors for allergic rhinitis in 12-year-old Swedish children. Data were collected from a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of children born in western Sweden in 2003. The parents answered questionnaires when the children were six months to 12 years. The response rate at 12 years was 76% (3,637/4,777) of the questionnaires distributed. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis at 12 years was 22% and 57% were boys. Mean age at onset was 7.8 years and 55% reported their first symptoms after eight years. The most common trigger factors were pollen (85%), furry animals (34%) and mites (17%). A multivariate analysis showed that the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the independent risk factors for allergic rhinitis at 12 were: parental allergic rhinitis (2.32, 1.94-2.77), doctor-diagnosed food allergy in the first year (1.75, 1.21-2.52), eczema in the first year (1.61, 1.31-1.97) and male gender (1.25, 1.06-1.47). Eating fish once a month or more at age 12 months reduced the risk of allergic rhinitis at 12 years (0.70, 0.50-0.98) as did living on a farm with farm animals at four years (0.51, 0.32-0.84). Continuous farm living from age 4 to 12 seemed to drive the association. Allergic rhinitis affected more than 20% of 12-year-olds, but was lower in children who ate fish at 12 months or grew up with farm animals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effect of PM10 on Allergy Symptoms in Allergic Rhinitis Patients During Spring Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Il Gyu; Ju, Youn Hee; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Kwang Pil; Oh, Dae Kyu; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Young Hyo; Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Seon Tae

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asian sand dust (ASD) that originates in the Mongolian Desert in the spring induces serious respiratory health problems throughout East Asia (China, Korea, Japan). PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter allergic rhinitis during the spring season, when ASD frequently develops. Methods: We investigated the changes in allergic symptoms in 108 allergic patients and 47 healthy subjects by comparing their 120-day symptom scores from February to May 2012. At the same time, the contributions of pollen count and PM10 concentration were also assessed. We also compared symptom scores before and 2 days after the daily PM10 concentration was >100 μg/m3. Results: The PM10 concentration during the 120 days was allergic symptom scores (p > 0.05). However, allergic symptoms were significantly correlated with outdoor activity time (p allergic rhinitis during the 2012 ASD season. PMID:25590148

  16. TREATMENT OF ALLERGIC RHINITIS IN CHILDREN: SELECTION OF ANTIHISTAMINE DRUG AND NECESSITY OF FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Karaulov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review contains analysis of research results on treatment of allergic rhinitis in children according to the evidence-based medicine. Oral and intranasal antihistamine drugs along with intranasal steroids are the first-line drugs for treatment of allergic rhinitis, although the latter are more efficient in suppression of nasal stuffiness. First- and second-generation antihistamine agents used nowadays in medical practice are discussed in the article. The advantages of non-sedative 2d-genereation antihistamine drugs, especially so called active metabolites (fexofenadine, cetirizine, levocetirizine, desloratadine are emphasized. The data on loratadine and desloratadine as ones of the most effective drugs in childhood allergic rhinitis are shown in detail. The possible directions for the further investigations in order to provide effective control over allergic inflammation in children resistant to medicinal agents are discussed.

  17. Nasal and bronchial response to exercise in children with seasonal allergic rhinitis out of the pollen season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmancı, Koray; Urhan, Barıs; Anıl, Hülya; Kocak, Abdulkadır

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a type I allergic disease of the nasal mucosa, and is characterized by paroxysmal sneezing, watery rhinorrhea, and nasal blockage. In seasonal allergic rhinitis subjects, even subthreshold allergen doses have been found to cause inflammatory cell infiltration in the nasal mucosa. This study aimed to investigate the presence of nasal obstructions and symptoms in seasonal allergic rhinitis subjects by assessing an exercise challenge test (ECT) outside of the pollen season. Twenty patients and 20 healthy children who were admitted to the Osmangazi University Medical School Pediatric Allergy Clinic were included in the study in a pollen free season. The total nasal airflow and visual analog scale (for rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, sneezing, and itching) and pulmonary function tests were evaluated before and after each ECT. The nasal airflow and resistance changes were evaluated with anterior rhinomanometry. Eight patients and one healthy child had nasal obstructions after the ECT. There was a significant difference in the exercise-induced nasal obstructions between the 2 groups (p = 0.02). Eighteen children with exposure to tobacco smoke in the patient and control groups had lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and forced expiratory flow 25% to 75% (FEF25-75 ) values than the children without exposure to tobacco smoke. The prevalence of exercise-induced nasal obstruction in children with seasonal rhinitis out of the pollen season is 40%. We showed that minimal persistent inflammation and nasal symptoms can also be diagnosed in rhinitis children in a symptom-free period. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma are associated with differences in school performance among Korean adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Jin-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have reported negative relations between allergic diseases and school performance but have not simultaneously considered various allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis, and only examined a limited number of participants. The present study investigated the associations of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis with school performance in a large, representative Korean adolescent population. A total of 299,695 7th through 12th grade students participated in the Korea Youth Risk Behaviour Web-based Survey (KYRBWS) from 2009 to 2013. The subjects’ history of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis and number of school absences due to these diseases in the previous 12 months were examined and compared. School performance was classified into 5 levels. The relations between allergic disorders and school performance were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions with complex sampling and adjusted for the subjects’ durations of sleep, days of physical activity, body mass indexes (BMIs), regions of residence, economic levels, parents’ education levels, stress levels, smoking status, and alcohol use. A subgroup analysis of the economic groups was performed. Allergic rhinitis was positively correlated with better school performance in a dose-dependent manner (adjusted odds ratios, AOR, [95% confidence interval, CI] = 1.50 [1.43–1.56 > 1.33 [1.28–1.38] > 1.17 [1.13–1.22] > 1.09 [1.05–1.14] for grades A > B > C > D; P allergic diseases and school performance. Compared to other allergic disorders, the asthma group had more school absences due to their symptoms (P allergic rhinitis and negatively correlated with asthma in Korean adolescents, even after adjusting for other variables. The asthma group had an increased number of school absence days, which presumably contributes to these students’ poor school performance. PMID:28207843

  19. Allergic rhinitis and its associated co-morbidities at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania; A prospective review of 190 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Said A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the commonest atopic diseases which contribute to significant morbidity world wide while its epidemiology in Tanzania remains sparse. There was paucity of information regarding allergic rhinitis in our setting; therefore it was important to conduct this study to describe our experience on allergic rhinitis, associated co-morbidities and treatment outcome in patients attending Bugando Medical Centre. Methods This was descriptive cross-sectional study involving all patients with a clinical diagnosis of allergic rhinitis at Bugando Medical Centre over a three-month period between June 2011 and August 2011. Data was collected using a pre-tested coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS statistical computer software version 17.0. Results A total of 190 patients were studied giving the prevalence of allergic rhinitis 14.7%. The median age of the patients was 8.5 years. The male to female ratio was 1:1. Adenoid hypertrophy, tonsillitis, hypertrophy of inferior turbinate, nasal polyps, otitis media and sinusitis were the most common co-morbidities affecting 92.6% of cases and were the major reason for attending hospital services. Sleep disturbance was common in children with adenoids hypertrophy (χ2 = 28.691, P = 0.000. Allergic conjunctivitis was found in 51.9%. The most common identified triggers were dust, strong perfume odors and cold weather (P χ2 = 4.583, P = 0.032. In this study family history of allergic rhinitis was not a significant risk factor (P =0.423. The majority of patients (68.8% were treated surgically for allergic rhinitis co morbidities. Post operative complication and mortality rates were 2.9% and 1.6% respectively. The overall median duration of hospital stay of in-patients was 3 days (2 – 28 days. Most patients (98.4% had satisfactory results at discharge. Conclusion The study shows that allergic rhinitis is common in our settings representing 14.7% of all

  20. PHYSICIANS' PREFERENCES FOR ALLERGIC RHINITIS TREATMENT IN PREGNANT WOMEN: COMPARISON WITHIN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia A. Chukhareva*, Roman A.Bontsevich,Kristina V.Shchurovskaya, Sergei B. Nikolaev, Galina A. Lazareva, Alexander A. Stepchenko,Sergey V. Povetkin, Vladimir I.Shutov

    2017-01-01

    The article is devoted to the essential problem of allergic diseases treatment in pregnant women, in particular, allergic rhinitis. The obstetrician-gynecologists (OGs) and general practitioners’ (GPs) pregnancy follow-up tactics was analyzed during the research in Belgorod region. We compared the obtained results with the results of the All-Russian Pharmacoepidemiological Study, 2d stage- ‘The Epidemiology of Drugs Use in Pregnant Women’ (February-April, 2015). Key words: pregnancy, allergic...

  1. Prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in Yaounde, Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Walter Pefura-Yone

    Full Text Available Population-based estimates of asthma and allergic rhinitis in sub-Saharan African adults are lacking. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergic rhinitis in urban adult Cameroonians.A community-based survey was conducted from December 2013 to April 2014 among adults aged 19 years and above (N = 2,304, 57.3% women, selected through multilevel stratified random sampling across all districts of Yaounde (Capital city. Internationally validated questionnaires were used to investigate the presence of allergic diseases. Logistic regressions were employed to investigate the determinants of allergic conditions.Prevalence rates were 2.7% (95% CI: 2.1-3.4 for asthma-ever, 6.9% (5.9-7.9 for lifetime wheezing, 2.9% (92.2-3.6 for current wheezing and 11.4% (10.1-12.7 for self-reported lifetime allergic rhinitis; while 240 (10.4% participants reported current symptoms of allergic rhinitis, and 125 (5.4% had allergic rhino-conjunctivitis. The prevalence of current asthma medication use and self-reported asthma attack was 0.8 (0.4-1.2 and 1 (0.6-1.4 respectively. Multivariable adjusted determinants of current wheezing were signs of atopic eczema [2.91 (1.09-7.74] and signs of allergic rhinitis [3.24 (1.83-5.71]. Age group 31-40 years [0.27(0.09-0.78, p = 0.016] was an independent protective factor for wheezing. Determinants of current rhinitis symptoms were active smoking [2.20 (1.37-3.54, p<0.001], signs of atopic eczema [2.84 (1.48-5.46] and current wheezing [3.02 (1.70-5.39].Prevalence rates for asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in this population were at the lower tails of those reported in other regions of the world. Beside the classical interrelation between allergic diseases found in this study, active smoking was an independent determinant of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Nationwide surveys are needed to investigate regional variations.

  2. Impact of allergic rhinitis in school going children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Elias; Panjabi, Chandramani; Shah, Ashok

    2012-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common chronic pediatric disorder. The International Study for Asthma and Allergies in Childhood phase III found that the global average of current rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms in the 13-14 year age-group was 14.6% and the average prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms in the 6-7 year age-group was 8.5%. In addition to classical symptoms, AR is associated with a multidimensional impact on the health related quality of life in children. AR affects the quality of sleep in children and frequently leads to day-time fatigue as well as sleepiness. It is also thought to be a risk factor for sleep disordered breathing. AR results in increased school absenteeism and distraction during class hours. These children are often embarrassed in school and have decreased social interaction which significantly hampers the process of learning and school performance. All these aspects upset the family too. Multiple co-morbidities like sinusitis, asthma, conjunctivitis, eczema, eustachian tube dysfunction and otitis media are generally associated with AR. These mostly remain undiagnosed and untreated adding to the morbidity. To compound the problems, medications have bothersome side effects which cause the children to resist therapy. Children customarily do not complain while parents and health care professionals, more often than not, fail to accord the attention that this not so trivial disease deserves. AR, especially in developing countries, continues to remain a neglected disorder.

  3. Assessing the onset of allergic rhinitis by nasal cytology and immunoglobulin E antibody levels in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Hirokuni; Otsuka, Kuninori; Matsune, Shoji; Okubo, Kimihiro

    2018-01-01

    It is difficult to identify the onset of allergic rhinitis in infants because making a conclusive diagnosis can be challenging. We used a combination of cell differentials in nasal swabs and immunoglobulin E (sIgE) antibody values to food and inhalant allergens to make the diagnosis and identify relevant allergens for investigation of the onset of allergic rhinitis. We studied 302 children, 2 to 120 months old, who visited our clinic for rhinorrhea. Nasal swabs were taken from all children, and neutrophils (N), eosinophils (Eo), and mast cells (Mc) were identified by nasal cytology and their numbers were estimated. Levels of sIgE antibodies to various food and inhalant allergens were determined in patients with nasal Eo and Mc. Percentages of participants with Eo-Mc and Eo-Mc-N at 2-14 (n = 84), 15-24 (n = 57), 25-60 (n = 73), and 61-120 months of age (n = 88) were 20, 23, 58, and 65%, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 2-14 and 15-24, and 25-60 and 61-120 months age groups, but there was a significant difference between the 15-24 and 25-60 months age groups (p = 0.00013). The percentages of participants with sIgE antibodies to food and inhalant allergens as solitary or main allergen were 12%/0% at 2-14 months old, 10.5%/7% at 15-24 months old, 1.3%/42.4% at 25-60 months old, and 0%/56.8% at 61-120 months old, respectively with a significant difference between 15-24 and 25-60 months old groups (p = 0.00025) for inhalant allergens. Allergic rhinitis associated with inhalant allergens in infants rhinitis in these infants may be associated with sIgE antibodies to food allergens. Transition of sIgE responses from food to inhalant allergens occurred after 15 months of age, and sIgE antibodies to inhalant allergens were predominant after 25 months.

  4. Comparison of Acoustic and Stroboscopic Findings and Voice Handicap Index between Allergic Rhinitis Patients and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Eltaf Ayça Özbal; Koç, Bülent; Erbek, Selim

    2014-12-01

    In our experience Allergic Rhinitis (AR) patients suffer from voice problems more than health subjects. To investigate the acoustic analysis of voice, stroscopic findings of larynx and Voice Handicap Index scores in allergic rhinitis patients compared with healthy controls. Case-control study. Thirty adult patients diagnosed with perennial allergic rhinitis were compared with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without allergy. All assessments were performed in the speech physiology laboratory and the testing sequence was as follows: 1. Voice Handicap Index (VHI) questionnaire, 2. Laryngovideostroboscopy, 3. Acoustic analyses. No difference was observed between the allergic rhinitis and control groups regarding mean Maximum Phonation Time (MPT) values, Fo values, and stroboscopic assessment (p>0.05). On the other hand, mean VHI score (p=0.001) and s/z ratio (p=0.011) were significantly higher in the allergic rhinitis group than in controls. Our findings suggest that the presence of allergies could have effects on laryngeal dysfunction and voice-related quality of life.

  5. [Sensitization to Ficus benjamina prevalence in adult patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedó Mejía, Giovanni Antonio; Weinmann, Alejandra Macías; González Díaz, Sandra N; Vidaurri Ojeda, Alma Catalina

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis can be caused by allergens such as house dust mites, pollen, fungi, and animals. A less common cause is allergy to Ficus benjamina. To determine the prevalence of sensitization to Ficus benjamina on patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis, and to describe the epidemiologic factors associated to Ficus benjamina sensitization. It is an observational, transversal, prospective study; patients with persistent moderate-severe allergic rhinitis diagnosis were included; skin tests to the most frequent aeroallergens and to Ficus benjamina were applied to these patients, as well as a questionnaire in order to investigate the degree of exposure to Ficus benjamina. 89 patients with persistent moderate-severe allergic rhinitis were included. 59% had a Ficus benjamina plant at home or at work, 97% were located outdoors. Nine patients (10.1%) were sensitized to Ficus benjamina. A statistically significant association was found between sensitization to Ficus benjamina and to Felix domesticus, Canis familiaris, and Periplaneta. Prevalence of sensitization to Ficus benjamina was similar to that reported in the literature, and it is associated to three or more indoor allergens. Patients with allergic rhinitis should avoid contact with Ficus benjamina because of the risk of acquiring sensitization.

  6. Comparison of Acoustic and Stroboscopic Findings and Voice Handicap Index between Allergic Rhinitis Patients and Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltaf Ayça Özbal Koç

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In our experience Allergic Rhinitis (AR patients suffer from voice problems more than health subjects. Aims: To investigate the acoustic analysis of voice, stroscopic findings of larynx and Voice Handicap Index scores in allergic rhinitis patients compared with healthy controls. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Thirty adult patients diagnosed with perennial allergic rhinitis were compared with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without allergy. All assessments were performed in the speech physiology laboratory and the testing sequence was as follows: 1. Voice Handicap Index (VHI questionnaire, 2. Laryngovideostroboscopy, 3. Acoustic analyses. Results: No difference was observed between the allergic rhinitis and control groups regarding mean Maximum Phonation Time (MPT values, Fo values, and stroboscopic assessment (p>0.05. On the other hand, mean VHI score (p=0.001 and s/z ratio (p=0.011 were significantly higher in the allergic rhinitis group than in controls. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the presence of allergies could have effects on laryngeal dysfunction and voice-related quality of life.

  7. Fungal levels in the home and allergic rhinitis by 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Paul C; Celedón, Juan C; Chew, Ginger L; Ryan, Louise M; Burge, Harriet A; Muilenberg, Michael L; Gold, Diane R

    2005-10-01

    Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that sensitization to fungi, such as Alternaria, is strongly associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma in children. However, the role of exposure to fungi in the development of childhood allergic rhinitis is poorly understood. In a prospective birth cohort of 405 children of asthmatic/allergic parents from metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts, we examined in-home high fungal concentrations (> 90th percentile) measured once within the first 3 months of life as predictors of doctor-diagnosed allergic rhinitis in the first 5 years of life. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, predictors of allergic rhinitis included high levels of dust-borne Aspergillus [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.50-7.14], Aureobasidium (HR = 3.04; 95% CI, 1.33-6.93), and yeasts (HR = 2.67; 95% CI, 1.26-5.66). The factors controlled for in these analyses included water damage or mild or mildew in the building during the first year of the child's life, any lower respiratory tract infection in the first year, male sex, African-American race, fall date of birth, and maternal IgE to Alternaria > 0.35 U/mL. Dust-borne Alternaria and nonsporulating and total fungi were also predictors of allergic rhinitis in models excluding other fungi but adjusting for all of the potential confounders listed above. High measured fungal concentrations and reports of water damage, mold, or mildew in homes may predispose children with a family history of asthma or allergy to the development of allergic rhinitis.

  8. [Antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis--update 2008/2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszewski, Jerzy

    2009-09-01

    The following paper reviews the latest news on antihistamines used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. It describes the new results of investigations on clinical application of H3 and H4 receptors in therapy of allergic diseases as well as the effect of emedastine on histamine-induced tissue remodeling. Contemporary clinical research of these drugs fulfills the requirements of placebo-controlled trials, including the comparison with a reference drug, usually cetirizine. The paper discusses efficacy and safety of a new drug--bilastine, and the possibility to improve clinical outcome by combining antihistamine drugs with inhaled glucocorticosteroids and antileukotrienes. It also presents the studies on high efficacy of nasal antihistamines, which most probably results from their high concentration in inflamed tissue, as well as describes the latest news on safe use of antihistamines, including studies of fexofenadine enantiomers in drug interactions with P-glycoprotein, safety of a new antihistamine medication--rupatadine, and psychostimulating effect of some other antihistamines. The review shows that antihistamines, the most frequently used class of anti-allergy medications, have been constantly improved, which is of significant importance for progress of allergic diseases treatment.

  9. Prenatal, perinatal, and childhood vitamin D exposure and their association with childhood allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Platts-Mills, Thomas A; Workman, Lisa; Sordillo, Joanne E; Camargo, Carlos A; Gillman, Matthew W; Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A

    2016-04-01

    The role of early-life vitamin D in childhood allergy is controversial. We sought to assess vitamin D exposure in early life by multiple modalities and ascertain its association with childhood allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitization. One thousand two hundred forty-eight mother-child pairs from a US prebirth cohort unselected for any disease were studied. Vitamin D exposure was assessed by measures of maternal intake during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels in mothers during pregnancy, cord blood, and children at school age (median age, 7.7 years; interquartile range, 1.0 years). Tests for associations between vitamin D exposure with ever allergic rhinitis, serum total IgE level, and allergen sensitization at school age were conducted. The correlations between maternal intake of vitamin D during pregnancy and serum 25(OH)D levels in pregnant mothers, cord blood, and children at school age were weak to moderate (r = -0.03 to 0.53). Each 100 IU/d of food-based vitamin D intake during the first and second trimesters (equivalent to the amount of vitamin D in an 8-ounce serving of milk) was associated with 21% and 20% reduced odds of ever allergic rhinitis at school age (odds ratios of 0.79 [95% CI, 0.67-0.92] and 0.80 [95% CI, 0.68-0.93]), respectively. There were no associations between maternal supplemental vitamin D intake or serum 25(OH)D levels at any time point with ever allergic rhinitis. There were no associations between any vitamin D exposure and serum total IgE level or allergen sensitization at school age. Inclusion of foods containing vitamin D in maternal diets during pregnancy may have beneficial effects on childhood allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxymetazoline adds to the effectiveness of fluticasone furoate in the treatment of perennial allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, Fuad M; Brown, David; Gavanescu, Laura; DeTineo, Marcy; Naclerio, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    In clinical trials, only about 60% of subjects report an excellent response to intranasal steroids, suggesting a need to add therapies to intranasal steroids to provide additional efficacy. To determine whether the combination of fluticasone furoate and oxymetazoline is more efficacious than either agent alone, and to determine whether rhinitis medicamentosa develops after treatment. We performed a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel study. Sixty patients with perennial allergy were randomized to 4 weeks of once-a-night treatment with fluticasone furoate, oxymetazoline hydrochloride, the combination, or placebo. They were monitored during treatment and for 2 weeks posttreatment. The total nasal symptom score over the 4 weeks of treatment was lower with the combination (median, 143; range, 30-316) compared with treatment with placebo (262; 116-358) and oxymetazoline alone (219; 78-385; ANOVA, P = .04). When acoustic rhinometry was compared between the groups at the end of 4 weeks of treatment, the combination resulted in significantly higher nasal volume (mean + SEM, 15.8 + 1.1 mL; Poxymetazoline (12.4 + 0.8 mL) alone. The quality of life data showed no significant differences among the groups. Peak flow showed a nonsignificant improvement with the groups on fluticasone furoate. There was no evidence of rhinitis medicamentosa. The addition of oxymetazoline adds to the effectiveness of fluticasone furoate in the treatment of perennial allergic rhinitis. The lack of development of rhinitis medicamentosa suggests the need for a large multicenter study to develop a once-a-day combination of an intranasal steroid and a long-acting topical decongestant. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of the Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARATkids) in children and adolescents : Validation in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, J A M; Flokstra, B. M. J.; de Jong, C.; van der Molen, T.; Brand, H K; Arends, N. J. T.; Amaral, R; Fonseca, J. A.; van Wijk, R. Gerth

    Background: Allergic rhinitis and asthma are common and closely related diseases. Recently, a Portuguese questionnaire has been developed The Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test' (CARATkids) that measures disease control of both diseases in children. This study aims to validate the

  12. Persistent allergic rhinitis has a moderate impact on the sense of smell, depending on both nasal congestion and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilemany, José Maria; García-Piñero, Alfons; Alobid, Isam; Cardelús, Sara; Centellas, Silvia; Bartra, Joan; Valero, Antonio; Picado, César; Mullol, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    A degree of smell disturbance has been found in seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis, but alterations in olfaction in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (PER) have not yet been evaluated. The aims of the study were to evaluate the impact of PER on the sense of smell, and to characterize this impact based on self-reported hyposmia (SRH) and PER severity. A prospective controlled study was performed on 49 consecutive patients with PER. PER patients were subclassified depending on severity and the presence of SRH. Olfactory function was evaluated by the Barcelona Smell Test-24 (BAST-24) olfactometry for smell detection, identification, and forced choice for first and fifth cranial nerve (CN) dependent odors in comparison to a group of 60 healthy volunteers. In patients with SRH, obstruction was evaluated by peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) and acoustic rhinometry; and nasal inflammation was evaluated by nasal nitric oxide (nNO). Most patients with PER (67%) presented SRH. Moderate/severe PER (84.8%) predominated among patients with SRH, while mild PER (75%) predominated among patients without SRH. Smell detection, identification, and forced choice tests were significantly worse in PER patients (P smell detection (P smell. Patients with PER have a moderate loss of smell (BAST-24) with a higher impairment in those with self-reported hyposmia and moderate-to-severe PER. These results suggest that the sense of smell should be further investigated in all patients with allergic rhinitis, both in a clinical setting and in clinical trials.

  13. Safety of Grass Pollen Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinitis in Concomitant Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahadevan, A; Cusack, R; Lane, S J

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis (AR) occurs predominantly as a result of grass pollen allergy. Grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been proven effective in treating AR1. SLIT is currently licensed for use in AR with concomitant stable mild asthma. There is evidence that SLIT improves asthma control when primarily used to treat AR2. The aim was to assess the safety of SLIT in patients with severe seasonal allergic rhinitis who have co-existing stable mild asthma. The secondary aim was to determine whether asthma control improved post SLIT. There was no deterioration in asthma control after 6-36 months of SLIT. 27/30 (90%) patients' asthma control remained stable or indeed improved (p < 0.021). Of this 15 (50%) patients' asthma improved. There was no statistically significant change in their asthma pharmacotherapy after SLIT (p = 0.059). In conclusion, grass pollen SLIT is safe and can potentially treat dual allergic rhinitis- mild asthmatic patients.

  14. Regional Difference of Causative Pollen in Children with Allergic Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate role of common pollen in Korean school-aged children with allergic rhinitis (AR) in 5 provinces (Incheon Metropolitan City-Gyeonggi Province, Chungcheongbuk-do, Gwangju Metropolitan City, Busan Metropolitan City, and Jeju Special Self-Governing Province), using a questionnaire and skin prick test, and to assess the differences among the residential regions. Among the enrolled 14,678 total children, 1,641 (22.0%) had AR. The sensitization rate to pollen (38.7%) was the second highest among examined allergens and significant differences were in the sensitization rates to trees, weeds, and grasses among the 5 provinces (P < 0.05). The sensitization to trees (25.2%) was the highest common among the pollen types and significant differences also were observed in the sensitization rates to alder, birch, Japanese cedar, oak, and elm among the 5 provinces. The sensitization rate to weeds (19.9%) was the second highest and significant differences were observed in the sensitization rate to Japanese hop, mugwort, and ragweed among the 5 provinces. The sensitization rate to house dust mite was 86.8%, the highest among examined allergens and that to Dermatophagoides farinae exhibited regional differences (P = 0.003) but not to D. farinae (P = 0.584). The sensitization rate to mold (13.5%) was the highest in Jeju and lowest in Busan, and a statistically significant difference was detected among the 5 provinces. These results support that examined pollen allergens are strongly associated with residential region due to regional causative pollen differences among children with AR within Korea to investigate the main pollen allergens. PMID:28480649

  15. Allergic rhinitis severity can be assessed using a visual analogue scale in mild, moderate and severe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cuvillo, A; Santos, V; Montoro, J; Bartra, J; Davila, I; Ferrer, M; Jauregui, I; Sastre, J; Mullol, J; Valero, A

    2017-03-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a global healthcare problem due to its high prevalence, impact on individuals and socioeconomic burden for the nations. Allergic rhinitis severity evaluation is the key to a correct treatment, prevention of comorbidities and improving the quality of life of patients. This evaluation should be made with a simple, easy, fast but accurate and reliable methodology, both in a primary care and specialist setting. The visual analogue scale (VAS) meets all requirements to be the ideal tool to assess allergic rhinitis severity and has already been validated by using a single cut-off point, but this classification in two degrees of severity suffer from not allocating the patients uniformly and from giving a blind interval to classify the patients when the score is between 5 to 6 cm. The main objective of our study is to describe the optimal cut-off points by using a VAS to discriminate between three degrees of allergic rhinitis severity (mild, moderate, and severe) following the ARIA modified severity criteria that has been previously validated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values just like receiver operating characteristic curves were used to select the best cut-off values. In a cross-sectional multicentre study with 3,572 patients included we have found that VAS has a significant correlation with nasal symptom score and quality of life and that the best cut-off points to differentiate between mild, moderate an severe allergic rhinitis are a VAS score of 4 and 7, respectively. Allergic rhinitis severity could be assessed in three degrees by using VAS in a simple, easy, and accurate method.

  16. Effect of allergic rhinitis on nasal obstruction outcomes after functional open septorhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoya, Mofiyinfolu; Gonzalez, Joseph R; Winkler, Andrew A

    2018-03-05

    To evaluate whether a diagnosis of allergic rhinitis affects surgical outcomes of open septorhinoplasty (OSR) and to examine whether OSR provides the same level of improvement in quality of life to patients with and without allergic rhinitis. We performed a retrospective evaluation of 646 patients who underwent open septorhinoplasty in a tertiary otolaryngology practice between 2008 and 2015. Preoperative and postoperative quality of life (QoL) measurement using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) Scale was performed on 307 patients meeting inclusion criteria. These patients were then divided into two groups based on a diagnosis of allergic rhinitis (non-AR vs AR). Comparisons were then made based on quality of life improvements by the NOSE score. There were 213 patients in the non-AR group vs. 94 patients in the AR group. After OSR, patients in both groups experienced significant improvement in nasal airway obstruction. Pre-op NOSE score averages were similar for the non-AR and AR groups (69.9 vs 73.4 p = 0.087). Average improvement in NOSE score for the non-AR and AR groups at 30 days was 48.6 vs 45.9 (p = 0.41); and at 90 day of 48.1 vs 51.5 (p = 0.402). Patients with and without allergic rhinitis experience similar OSR outcomes as measured by the NOSE score. Open septorhinoplasty addresses multiple components contributing to nasal airway obstruction, and may offset the effects of allergic rhinitis. When indicated, it should be offered to patients with allergic rhinitis after complete medical management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects of perennial allergic rhinitis on dental and skeletal development: a comparison of sibling pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, G M; Shapiro, G G; Shapiro, P A

    1987-10-01

    This study analyzed the effect of perennial allergic rhinitis on dental and facial skeletal characteristics. Twenty-five allergic children who were apparent mouth breathers, their 25 siblings who did not have the disease and were apparent nose breathers, and 14 nasal breathing control subjects were examined medically, dentally, and cephalometrically. Compared with their siblings, the allergic subjects had more nasal mucosal edema, a higher proportion of eosinophils in their nasal secretions, and greater nasal power. The allergic subjects were characterized by deeper palatal height, retroclined mandibular incisors, increased total anterior facial height and lower facial height, a larger gonial angle, and greater SN, palatal, and occlusal planes to mandibular plane angles. All of these measures except gonial angle were also significantly different between the allergic children and the nonconsanguineous controls. Also, the allergic subjects compared with controls had smaller SNB and SN-pogonion angles and an increased overjet. Both allergic and nonallergic sibling groups showed larger mean adenoid size on radiographs than controls. For most variables the nonallergic siblings fell between the allergic children and the control subjects. Overall, the allergic children had longer, more retrusive faces than controls. This retrusive characteristic was present in nonallergic siblings and cannot be ascribed to the apparent breathing mode at the time of the study. These results confirm earlier reports that allergic rhinitis may be associated with altered facial growth. Controlled longitudinal studies to analyze a possible cause-and-effect relationship and the effects of medical and surgical treatments should be undertaken.

  18. Masticatory Changes in Oral Breath Secondary to Allergic Rhinitis: Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis (2012 defines allergic rhinitis as a nasal mucosa inflammation, mediated by immunoglobulin E, after exposure to allergens. The classic signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis are nasal obstruction, watery rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment, and mouth breathing (breathing predominantly through the mouth, regardless of the cause, due to a nasal breathing impairment in some cases. Objective To evaluate the literature on masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing due to allergic rhinitis. Methods We conducted a search of the past 10 years, at Bireme and MEDLINE databases, for articles that covered masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing secondary to allergic rhinitis. Results We found 1,986 articles, including 15 repeated in databases, but only two articles met the inclusion criteria fully. Discussion We found few studies to answer the question raised in this review, and those studies have some methodological limitations. Most articles claimed no have statistically significant differences in masticatory changes in this population. Conclusion A better controlled study (isolating diseases, exposure time, with a larger sample (sample calculation appropriate, would be necessary to examine such changes.

  19. Dental caries, cariogenic microorganisms and salivary properties of allergic rhinitis children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkamhaeng, Kan; Poachanukoon, Orapan; Koontongkaew, Sittichai

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the caries activities of allergic rhinitis patients in relation to salivary properties, salivary levels of mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacillus (LB), oral hygiene and dietary habits. The study groups composed of 40 allergic rhinitis children and 40 healthy controls aged between 6 and 13 years old. Demographic data, oral hygiene practices and dietary habits were recorded by questionnaire. For permanent teeth, caries experience was expressed as DMFT (D=decayed; M=missing; F=filled; T=teeth) index. The dmft (d=decayed; m=missing; f=filling; t=teeth) index was used for caries prevalence in primary teeth. Unstimulated salivary flow rate, salivary buffering capacity, and salivary MS and LB were also determined in children with allergic rhinitis and controls. There were no significant differences in combined DMFT/dmft, salivary flow rate, buffer capacity of saliva, salivary LB levels, and sugary food consumption between cases and controls (p>0.05). However, higher salivary MS levels were observed in allergic rhinitis patients, compared to controls (Pallergic rhinitis had an increase in the level of salivary MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased association between febrile convulsion and allergic rhinitis in children: a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Ya; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Ku, Yi-Chia; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-04-01

    Febrile convulsions and allergic rhinitis are both common childhood disorders and both are considered as generally benign disorders. Yet, especially in the case of allergic rhinitis, adverse effects on school performance and limited socialization are found. The relationship between febrile convulsions and allergic rhinitis has not been previously reported; thus, this article seeks to explore the association between these two disorders by collecting data from the Taiwanese nationwide cohort database. A total of 1304 children with febrile convulsions were identified as the case cohort, and controls were matched based on age, sex, urbanization levels, and parents' occupation on a 1 to 4 ratio. Cox's proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio and confidence interval of allergic rhinitis disorder among children with febrile convulsions. During an average 6.7 years follow-up period, the incidence of allergic rhinitis in the febrile convulsions case group was higher (65.16 vs 51.45 per 1000 person-years). After 11 years of follow-up, the allergic rhinitis incidence in the febrile convulsion patients was approximate 4% higher than controls (log-rank test P allergic rhinitis in the febrile convulsions group was found to be 1.21 times higher than in the control group (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.36). This risk of allergic rhinitis development is further increased (0.94 vs 18.9) with frequency of febrile convulsions-related medical visits (one to three visits vs more than three visits, P allergic rhinitis occurrence in children. Children with more than three febrile convulsion-related medical visits had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of allergic rhinitis. Both disorders have previously been reported to have similar cytokine profiles and specific viral infection association. More studies are required to explore a possible link between the two disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Short Time Efficiency of Rhinophototherapy in Management of Patients with Allergic Rhinitis Resistant to Medical Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Soheila Alyasin; Seyed Hesamedin Nabavizadeh; Hamidreza Houshmand; Hossein Esmaeilzadeh; Sina Jelodar; Reza Amin

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common health problems with a major effect on the quality of life. We intended to treat Allergic Rhinitis (AR) in patients who are either unresponsive to antihistamines or their job requires optimal alertness that may be disturbed by antihistamine’s side effects and those who do not comply with the regular use. We tried short term phototherapy and evaluated its effect on AR. As phototherapy is effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) and the sa...

  2. Association between allergic rhinitis and hospital resource use among asthmatic children in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov Kocevar, V; Thomas, J; Jonsson, L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preliminary evidence suggests that inadequately controlled allergic rhinitis in asthmatic patients can contribute towards increased asthma exacerbations and poorer symptom control, which may increase medical resource use. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the effect...... of concomitant allergic rhinitis on asthma-related hospital resource utilization among children below 15 years of age with asthma in Norway. METHODS: A population-based retrospective cohort study of children (aged 0-14 years) with asthma was conducted using data from a patient-specific public national database...

  3. The Link between Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma: A Role for Antileukotrienes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis and asthma are both chronic heterogeneous disorders, with an overlapping epidemiology of prevalence, health care costs and social costs in quality of life. Both are inflammatory disorders with a similar pathophysiology, and both share some treatment approaches. However, each disorder has an array of treatments used separately in controlling these atopic disorders, from inhaled corticosteroids, beta2-agonists and antihistamines to newer monoclonal antibody-based treatments. The present article reviews the shared components of allergic rhinitis and asthma, and examines recent evidence supporting antileukotrienes as effective agents in reducing the symptoms of both diseases.

  4. The Atopic March: Progression from Atopic Dermatitis to Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantz, Selene K; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2014-04-01

    The development of atopic dermatitis (AD) in infancy and subsequent allergic rhinitis and asthma in later childhood is known as the atopic march. This progressive atopy is dependent on various underlying factors such as the presence of filaggrin mutations as well as the time of onset and severity of AD. Clinical manifestations vary among individuals. Previously it was thought that atopic disorders may be unrelated with sequential development. Recent studies support the idea of a causal link between AD and later onset atopic disorders. These studies suggest that a dysfunctional skin barrier serves as a site for allergic sensitization to antigens and colonization of bacterial super antigens. This induces systemic Th2 immunity that predisposes patients to allergic nasal responses and promotes airway hyper reactivity. While AD often starts early in life and is a chronic condition, new research signifies that there may be an optimal window of time in which targeting the skin barrier with therapeutic interventions may prevent subsequent atopic disorders. In this review we highlight recent studies describing factors important in the development of atopic disorders and new insights in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the atopic march.

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency and Allergic Rhinitis in Children: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Ghaffari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases are the most common chronic diseases among children. Although the cause of AR has yet to be clearly identified, genetic and environmental factors are known to play an important role in the development of the disease. Evidence Acquisition: In a more recent classification, AR is categorized as intermittent and permanent. Vitamin D has a known and important role in the absorption of calcium and preservation of bone density. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children is reported to be between 30% and 50% in the world. Vitamin D confers the growth and development of the immune system including the development of regulatory T cells. Results: Two-thirds of the reviewed articles show a correlation between serum levels of vitamin D and allergic diseases, while the reaming ones demonstrate no correlation between vitamin D and AR and some even report a rise in the incidence of AR following the use of vitamin D supplement. Conclusions: It seems that further clinical trials and meta-analytic studies are necessary to confirm this correlation. The present study aimed at reviewing vitamin D deficiency in children with AR.

  6. [Effect of micro-ecological environment on incidence of allergic rhinitis on mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Song, Yongli; Wang, Jimeng; Yan, Hui; Mi, Wenjuan; Qiu, Jianhua; Qiao, Li

    2014-12-01

    This study was designed to find out the impact of micro-ecological environment on the incidence of allergic rhinitis after developing a model of allergic rhinitis on mice. Sixty mice were randomly divided into GF group (n=30) and SPF group (n=30). Mice of GF group were fed in the germ-free environment and mice of SPF group were fed in the specific pathogen-free environment. Then each group were randomly divided into model group (20 mice) and control group (10 mice). Establish allergic rhinitis model in the mice of model group using ovalbumin (OVA) at the age of 6 weeks, observe and score the corresponding symptoms and signs that could been induced. Stain with hematoxylin eosin (HE) staining method for nasal mucosa to observe the morphological changes. Using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect the concentration of IgE, IFN-γ and IL-4 in the peripheral blood serum. The chi square test showed that the incidence of allergic rhinithis in the mice of GF group was significantly higher than that in the SPF group (Pmicro-ecological environment may play a key role in the occurrence of allergic rhinitis in mice.

  7. Efficacy and safety of azelastine nasal spray for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, S J; Craig, T J

    1999-07-01

    Azelastine hydrochloride is a nasally administered antihistamine that is effective and safe for the treatment of perennial and seasonal allergic rhinitis. In addition to acting as a histamine H1-receptor antagonist, azelastine also inhibits the production or release of many chemical mediators of the allergic response such as leukotrienes, free radicals, and cytokines. After nasal administration, azelastine is systemically absorbed with a bioavailability of about 40%. The side effects of azelastine are drowsiness, headache, and bitter taste. Azelastine has a rapid onset of action with a benefit in about 2 hours and a prolonged duration of activity (12 to 24 hours). Studies have shown azelastine to be more effective than placebo in terms of reduction of the major and total symptom complexes of allergic rhinitis. Comparison studies have demonstrated that azelastine is as effective as ebastine, loratadine, cetirizine hydrochloride, and terfenadine at symptom reduction, with varying results when compared with the corticosteroids budesonide and beclomethasone. Although there are conflicting studies, some have demonstrated that azelastine reduces the nasal congestion of allergic rhinitis. This feature that distinguishes it from oral antihistamines is of great interest because corticosteroids are known to be quite effective for the relief of nasal congestion, whereas the antihistamines are effective for the sneezing, itchy eyes, itchy nose, and watery eyes, but not the congestion. Azelastine nasal spray seems to be an efficacious treatment for allergic rhinitis with a rapid onset and long duration of activity, but without the systemic adverse effects of traditional sedating antihistamines.

  8. [Changing analysis of allergic rhinitis inhalant allergen spectrum in Xinjiang region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y P; Maimaiti, Yimin; Wang, Y; Wang, L L; Tan, G P; Zhang, H

    2017-05-07

    Objective: To investigate the aeroallergen spectrum in allergic rhinitis in Xinjiang area and analyze its relating factors. Methods: Skin prick test was carried out in 480 cases with allergic rhinitis using 20 inhaled allergens. The major change in recent years with allergic rhinitis and allergen distribution was compared.SPSS 17.0 software was used to analyze the data. Results: Among 480 cases, 406 showed positive reaction. The most common allergens found in patients were chenopodium (61.6%) and mugwort (44.1%), followed by willow(37.7%), maple(37.7%), poplar(30.3%), house dust mite(30.3%), plantain(29.8%), acacia(25.9%), dust mite maple(25.4%), and so on. The rate of positive reaction to only one allergen was 9.6%, of which 21 were mite allergens. The positiverate to allergensin male and female were 84.2% and 85.1%, the distribution of allergens in both sexes did not differ(χ(2)=0.001, P =0.978). The positiverate to allergens in patients aged 21 to 35 years old was 88.6%, in patients aged 36 to 54 years old was 78.4%, the difference was statistically significant(χ(2)=0.258, P allergic rhinitis is chenopodium. Among them, Kazakh allergic positive rate is higher than other ethnic groups.

  9. Prevalence of allergic rhinitis among elementary and middle school students in Changsha city and its impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Wang, M; Xie, J; Li, W; Zhang, X; Wang, T; Tan, G

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the prevalence of allergic rhinitis among elementary and middle school students and examine its impact on their quality of life. Stratified sampling and cluster sampling surveys were performed among 10-17-year-old students in Changsha city from June 2011 to April 2012. In the stratified sampling survey, the self-reported allergic rhinitis rate was 42.5 per cent. Further examination demonstrated that the average prevalence of allergic rhinitis was 19.4 per cent. The cluster sampling survey demonstrated that 214 of 814 students appeared to be atopic (26.3 per cent). The prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma was 17.2 and 2.1 per cent, respectively. In total, 71 atopic individuals (8.7 per cent) were without any symptoms of allergic disease. Further analysis showed that allergic rhinitis influenced the students' sleep, emotions and memory (p allergic rhinitis was 15.8 -19.4 per cent, showing an increase with age. Allergic rhinitis affected students' sleep, emotions and memory.

  10. Acupuncture for moderate to severe allergic rhinitis: A non-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Dan; Jin, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Mai-Hong; Fang, Ying; Huang, Li-Qin

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effect and safety of acupuncture therapy on patients with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis. A non-randomized controlled design was used to compare between the acupuncture group and the medication group. The acupuncture group received 8-week acupuncture therapy, and the medication group received budesonide nasal spray with cetirizine tablets for 8 weeks. The clinical symptoms and signs were analyzed before treatment, at 4 and 8 weeks after the start of treatment, and at 12 weeks after the end of treatment. Furthermore, the clinical efficacy and safety indicators were compared between the two groups. A total of 76 participants consisting of 38 in each of the two groups were enrolled. The scores of each clinical symptom and sign, including sneezing, runny nose, stuffy nose, nasal itching, and turbinate edema, and the total scores decreased over time in both groups (all P0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the effective rates of the acupuncture group at 4 and 8 weeks after the start of treatment as well as at 12-week follow-up compared with those of the medication group (83.3% vs. 91.2%, and 94.4 % vs. 85.3%; and 80.6 % vs. 82.4%, all P>0.05). Experimental items including blood routine, urine routine, aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, urea nitrogen and creatinine were all in the normal reference ranges during the treatment in the acupuncture group. Acupuncture therapy has a comparable effect to the medication treatment on patients with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis, and it is safe with no severe adverse effects.

  11. Validation study of the pediatric allergic rhinitis quality of life questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudi, Antigoni; Chrysochoou, Elisavet-Anna; Boyle, Robert J; Papastergiopulos, Antonis; Karantaglis, Nikolaos; Karagiannidou, Agathi; Xinias, Ioannis; Farmaki, Evangelia; Hatziagorou, Elpis; Kirvassilis, Fotios; Kourentas, Grigorios; Tsanakas, John; Warner, John O

    2016-06-01

    The Paediatric Allergic Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (Ped-AR-QoL) is the first tool developed for the assessment of health-related quality of life (QoL) in Greek children with allergic rhinitis (AR). The aim of the current study was to validate the child and parent forms of the Ped-AR-QoL in children aged 6-14 years-old who suffered from AR and were followed in a pediatric allergy clinic. The Ped-AR-QoL, which was completed by 112 children and their parents, was correlated to the generic QoL questionnaire (Disabkids), which is already valid in Greece for children with chronic disorders, as well as with expert opinions on the severity of disease. The Ped-AR-QoL child and parent forms had very good internal consistency (α values of 0.797 and 0.872, respectively), while there was a moderate positive correlation of the disease-specific questionnaire with most of the subscales of the generic questionnaire. There has been a statistically significant association between the Ped-AR-QoL and the expert perception of disease severity. The Ped-AR-QoL had very good reliability and convergent validity when compared with the generic Disabkids QoL. The significance of the association between the disease-specific questionnaire and the expert opinion is an important finding validating the questionnaire. The Ped-AR-QoL may become a helpful tool which can be used in everyday clinical practice by clinicians and it may also be used for assessing therapeutic interventions in clinical trials.

  12. Polymorphism 4G/5G of the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene as a risk factor for the development of allergic rhinitis symptoms in patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampalo, Marina; Jukic, Irena; Bingulac-Popovic, Jasna; Marunica, Ivona; Petlevski, Roberta; Pavlisa, Gordana; Popovic-Grle, Sanja

    2017-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a glycoprotein which has a role in tissue remodelling after inflammatory processes. The objective is to investigate the frequency of PAI-1 gene polymorphism (4G/5G) in patients with a lung ventilation dysfunction in asthma and allergic rhinitis. Genomic DNA was isolated and genotypes of polymorphism of PAI-1 4G/5G and ABO were determined using the methods of RT-PCR and PCR-SSP. Study group includes 145 adult patients diagnosed with chronic asthma, with all clinically relevant parameters and the laboratory markers of pO 2 , IgE and eosinophils in sputum and nasal swab. In the processing of data, appropriate statistical tests (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, median, interquartile ranges, χ 2 and Mann-Whitney U tests) were used. Patients with symptoms of allergic rhinitis were significantly younger and had an almost four time higher levels of IgE (P = 0.001), higher pO 2 (P = 0.002) and PEF (P = 0.036), compared to those who do not have these symptoms. Genotype PAI 4G/4G is significantly more common in patients with allergic rhinitis (28.1% vs. 16.1%; P = 0.017) compared to the genotype 5G/5G. Carriers of the genotype 4G/5G also have a borderline statistical significance. There were no statistically significant difference in the incidence of allergic rhinitis in the carriers of any ABO genotypes. The frequency of PAI genotype 4G/4G is significantly more common in patients with allergic rhinitis. The results suggest that the carriers of at least one 4G allele are at a higher risk for developing symptoms of allergic rhinitis in asthma.

  13. Memory and multitasking performance during acute allergic inflammation in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikojat, K; Buske-Kirschbaum, A; Plessow, F; Schmitt, J; Fischer, R

    2017-04-01

    In previous research, patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) showed poorer school and work performance during periods of acute allergic inflammation, supporting the idea of an impact of SAR on cognitive functions. However, the specific cognitive domains particularly vulnerable to inflammatory processes are unclear. In this study, the influence of SAR on memory and multitasking performance, as two potentially vulnerable cognitive domains essential in everyday life functioning, was investigated in patients with SAR. Non-medicated patients with SAR (n = 41) and healthy non-allergic controls (n = 42) performed a dual-task paradigm and a verbal learning and memory test during and out of symptomatic allergy periods (pollen vs. non-pollen season). Disease-related factors (e.g. symptom severity, duration of symptoms, duration of disease) and allergy-related quality of life were evaluated as potential influences of cognitive performance. During the symptomatic allergy period, patients showed (1) poorer performance in word list-based learning (P = 0.028) and (2) a general slowing in processing speed (P multitasking. Yet, typical parameters indicating specific multitasking costs were not affected. A significant negative association was found between learning performance and duration of disease (r = -0.451, P = 0.004), whereas symptom severity (r = 0.326; P = 0.037) and quality of life (r = 0.379; P = 0.015) were positively associated with multitasking strategy. Our findings suggest that SAR has a differentiated and complex impact on cognitive functions, which should be considered in the management of SAR symptoms. They also call attention to the importance of selecting sensitive measures and carefully interpreting cognitive outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Efficacy and safety of once daily triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray in adults with non-allergic and allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccioglu Kavut, A; Kalpaklıoğlu, F

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of corticosteroid has not been thoroughly studied in the treatment of non-allergic rhinitis. This study was designed to compare the efficacy of nasal corticosteroid in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), and non-allergic rhinitis (NAR). The efficacy of triamcinolone acetonide nasal spray (TANS) on total nasal symptom scores (TNSS), and nasal peak inspiratory flow rate (nPIFR) was studied in a six-week parallel-group trial of NAR (n: 25), and AR (n: 16) patients. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were also analysed. The TNSSs, and symptom scores of conjunctivitis, snoring, and postnasal drainage were significantly improved in both groups, after two and six weeks of treatment. In contrast to AR, patients with NAR had statistically significant improvement in nasal obstruction, and postnasal drainage beginning from two weeks of the treatment. nPIFR slightly increased in both groups. Scores of generic (SF-36), rhinitis specific (MiniRQLQ) and ESS questionnaires generally improved better in AR than NAR. TANS was well-tolerated in AR and NAR groups with minor adverse events including headache, nasal burning, and bitter mouth taste. Our study disproved the idea of ineffectiveness of corticosteroid treatment in NAR, and showed that triamcinolone acetate may be an alternative drug in the treatment of NAR. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Polygenic analysis of genome-wide SNP data identifies common variants on allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadnejad, Afsaneh; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Haagerup, Annette

    Background: Allergic Rhinitis (AR) is a complex disorder that affects many people around the world. There is a high genetic contribution to the development of the AR, as twins and family studies have estimated heritability of more than 33%. Due to the complex nature of the disease, single SNP...... analysis has limited power in identifying the genetic variations for AR. We combined genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) with polygenic risk score (PRS) in exploring the genetic basis underlying the disease. Methods: We collected clinical data on 631 Danish subjects with AR cases consisting of 434...... sibling pairs and unrelated individuals and control subjects of 197 unrelated individuals. SNP genotyping was done by Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 5.0. SNP imputation was performed using "IMPUTE2". Using additive effect model, GWAS was conducted in discovery sample, the genotypes...

  16. Intranasal phototherapy versus azelastine in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Silviu; Baschir, Sorin

    2013-10-01

    It has been suggested that intranasal phototherapy represents an alternative choice in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR). Our aim was to compare the efficacy of intranasal phototherapy with that of azelastine in patients with SAR. Seventy seven patients were randomly assigned to the two treatment groups: Group A (phototherapy) and Group B (azelastine). Subjective and objective outcomes were represented by changes in Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS), Quality of life scores (Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire - RQLQ), and nasal resistance. The study demonstrated that both azelastine and intranasal phototherapy are able to significantly improve TNSS, including individual nasal symptoms. Nevertheless, phototherapy reduced nasal obstruction better than azelastine (p=0.038). Both treatments were highly effective in improving RQLQ scores overall and in seven separate domains. Whether intranasal phototheraphy will be a standard treatment of SAR or not should be appraised in future studies and clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of oral allergy syndrome in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis by food challenge test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahzad Jabbari Azad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral allergy syndrome (OAS characterized by oral IgE-mediated symptoms, which is caused by cross-reactivity between proteins in pollens, fresh fruit and vegetables. OAS is presents in 40% to 80% of Allergic rhinitis patients. Association between oral allergy syndrome and duration of seasonal allergic rhinitis is not well known. Early treatment of Patients with OAS caused improvement in quality of life and relief of their symptoms. Material and methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study between March 2012 to September 2012, 103 consecutive patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis were entered to this study. Their sensitizations to common aeroallergens were confirmed by skin prick test (SPT by three mm more than negative control. According to food allergy history and prick-to-prick test results, we considered 63 of 103 patients for single-blind oral food challenge test. Data analyzed bty SPSS software (ver 11.5, and by Chi squeare test and paired T test. P-value lower than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Among studied cases, 63 patients (61.2% with 28.8±10.6 years old had OAS and 40 (38.8% with 26.8±13.2 years old not OAS. We found that there was significant difference between duration of seasonal allergic rhinitis in OAS group (7±5.9 years and non-OAS group (5±4 years (P=0.03, CI=0.03-0.04. This syndrome was more in women and patients who had concomitant asthma and allergic conjunctivitis but statistical association was not significant. Conclusions: This study showed that all of the patients with hay fever do not develop OAS. Duration of seasonal allergic rhinitis was associated significantly with oral allergy syndrome. However, further studies with more sample size and double-blind placebo controlled methods might be needed.

  18. Obesity is a risk factor for allergic rhinitis in children of Wuhan (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yang; Yang, Huang; Zhen, Long

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between obesity and allergic diseases in children of China is unclear. To analysis the relationship between obesity and overweight and the prevalence of allergic diseases and the impact of gender. Questionnaire based on those used in National Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood in China. The study included 3,327 participants (23.7% aged 2-6 years, 65.8% aged 7-12 years, 10.5% aged 13-14 years) in Wuhan City. Allergic diseases were determined by physicians. Overweight was found in 35.68% of participants (8.96% of 2-6 years old, 32.83% of 7-12 years old, and 48.57% of 13-14 years old), obesity in 12.53% (4.18%, 12.01%, and 4.29%, respectively). Obesity (odds ratio [OR], 1.33) increased the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Obesity (OR, 1.48) affected the incidence of allergic rhinitis in girls. There was no relationship between body mass index (BMI) and asthma in child from Wuhan City. Obesity and overweight did not affect the frequency of asthma, food allergy, and drug allergy. Obesity increased the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis in child. Higher BMI was no relationship with the prevalence of asthma, food allergy, and drug allergy.

  19. Active or passive exposure to tobacco smoking and allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis, and food allergy in adults and children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgita Saulyte

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis, and food allergy are extremely common diseases, especially among children, and are frequently associated to each other and to asthma. Smoking is a potential risk factor for these conditions, but so far, results from individual studies have been conflicting. The objective of this study was to examine the evidence for an association between active smoking (AS or passive exposure to secondhand smoke and allergic conditions.We retrieved studies published in any language up to June 30th, 2013 by systematically searching Medline, Embase, the five regional bibliographic databases of the World Health Organization, and ISI-Proceedings databases, by manually examining the references of the original articles and reviews retrieved, and by establishing personal contact with clinical researchers. We included cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies reporting odds ratio (OR or relative risk (RR estimates and confidence intervals of smoking and allergic conditions, first among the general population and then among children. We retrieved 97 studies on allergic rhinitis, 91 on allergic dermatitis, and eight on food allergy published in 139 different articles. When all studies were analyzed together (showing random effects model results and pooled ORs expressed as RR, allergic rhinitis was not associated with active smoking (pooled RR, 1.02 [95% CI 0.92-1.15], but was associated with passive smoking (pooled RR 1.10 [95% CI 1.06-1.15]. Allergic dermatitis was associated with both active (pooled RR, 1.21 [95% CI 1.14-1.29] and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.07 [95% CI 1.03-1.12]. In children and adolescent, allergic rhinitis was associated with active (pooled RR, 1.40 (95% CI 1.24-1.59 and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.09 [95% CI 1.04-1.14]. Allergic dermatitis was associated with active (pooled RR, 1.36 [95% CI 1.17-1.46] and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.06 [95% CI 1.01-1.11]. Food allergy was associated with SHS (1

  20. Active or Passive Exposure to Tobacco Smoking and Allergic Rhinitis, Allergic Dermatitis, and Food Allergy in Adults and Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulyte, Jurgita; Regueira, Carlos; Montes-Martínez, Agustín; Khudyakov, Polyna; Takkouche, Bahi

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis, and food allergy are extremely common diseases, especially among children, and are frequently associated to each other and to asthma. Smoking is a potential risk factor for these conditions, but so far, results from individual studies have been conflicting. The objective of this study was to examine the evidence for an association between active smoking (AS) or passive exposure to secondhand smoke and allergic conditions. Methods and Findings We retrieved studies published in any language up to June 30th, 2013 by systematically searching Medline, Embase, the five regional bibliographic databases of the World Health Organization, and ISI-Proceedings databases, by manually examining the references of the original articles and reviews retrieved, and by establishing personal contact with clinical researchers. We included cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies reporting odds ratio (OR) or relative risk (RR) estimates and confidence intervals of smoking and allergic conditions, first among the general population and then among children. We retrieved 97 studies on allergic rhinitis, 91 on allergic dermatitis, and eight on food allergy published in 139 different articles. When all studies were analyzed together (showing random effects model results and pooled ORs expressed as RR), allergic rhinitis was not associated with active smoking (pooled RR, 1.02 [95% CI 0.92–1.15]), but was associated with passive smoking (pooled RR 1.10 [95% CI 1.06–1.15]). Allergic dermatitis was associated with both active (pooled RR, 1.21 [95% CI 1.14–1.29]) and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.07 [95% CI 1.03–1.12]). In children and adolescent, allergic rhinitis was associated with active (pooled RR, 1.40 (95% CI 1.24–1.59) and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.09 [95% CI 1.04–1.14]). Allergic dermatitis was associated with active (pooled RR, 1.36 [95% CI 1.17–1.46]) and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.06 [95% CI 1.01–1

  1. Active or passive exposure to tobacco smoking and allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis, and food allergy in adults and children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulyte, Jurgita; Regueira, Carlos; Montes-Martínez, Agustín; Khudyakov, Polyna; Takkouche, Bahi

    2014-03-01

    Allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis, and food allergy are extremely common diseases, especially among children, and are frequently associated to each other and to asthma. Smoking is a potential risk factor for these conditions, but so far, results from individual studies have been conflicting. The objective of this study was to examine the evidence for an association between active smoking (AS) or passive exposure to secondhand smoke and allergic conditions. We retrieved studies published in any language up to June 30th, 2013 by systematically searching Medline, Embase, the five regional bibliographic databases of the World Health Organization, and ISI-Proceedings databases, by manually examining the references of the original articles and reviews retrieved, and by establishing personal contact with clinical researchers. We included cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies reporting odds ratio (OR) or relative risk (RR) estimates and confidence intervals of smoking and allergic conditions, first among the general population and then among children. We retrieved 97 studies on allergic rhinitis, 91 on allergic dermatitis, and eight on food allergy published in 139 different articles. When all studies were analyzed together (showing random effects model results and pooled ORs expressed as RR), allergic rhinitis was not associated with active smoking (pooled RR, 1.02 [95% CI 0.92-1.15]), but was associated with passive smoking (pooled RR 1.10 [95% CI 1.06-1.15]). Allergic dermatitis was associated with both active (pooled RR, 1.21 [95% CI 1.14-1.29]) and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.07 [95% CI 1.03-1.12]). In children and adolescent, allergic rhinitis was associated with active (pooled RR, 1.40 (95% CI 1.24-1.59) and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.09 [95% CI 1.04-1.14]). Allergic dermatitis was associated with active (pooled RR, 1.36 [95% CI 1.17-1.46]) and passive smoking (pooled RR, 1.06 [95% CI 1.01-1.11]). Food allergy was associated with SHS (1.43 [1

  2. Utility of the Atopy Patch Test in the Diagnosis of Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Fuiano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The diagnostic work-up of allergic rhinitis (AR is first and foremost based on the combination of clinical history data and results of skin prick tests (SPT. Other tests, including specific IgE measurement, nasal challenge, and, as a third option, component resolved diagnosis or basophil activation test, may be useful when the diagnosis is difficult because of polysensitization or when negative results of SPT are observed despite a suggestive history for allergy. The atopy patch test (APT that assesses the type 4 delayed hypersensitivity allergy is currently not sufficiently used. The data obtained in recent studies on the diagnostic utility of the APT in patients with AR was reviewed. Data Sources: Review of the literature. Conclusion:  The data from available studies show that the APT is frequently positive in patients with AR, especially when there is a positive history for atopic dermatitis. Very often, APT is the only positive test and therefore performing only SPT or in vitro IgE measurement may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of nonallergic rhinitis. Recent data suggest a role for APT not only for diagnosis but also in epidemiological investigation on respiratory allergy.

  3. Evaluating the impact of allergic rhinitis on quality of life among Thai students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsaprang, Siwaporn; Setabutr, Dhave; Kulalert, Prapasri; Temboonnark, Panipak; Poachanukoon, Orapan

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) in Thailand continues to rise. We report the prevalence and evaluate its impact upon quality of life (QoL) in students on a metropolitan campus. From March 2013 to February 2014, 222 students from Thammasat University Medical School were evaluated using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Questionnaire (ISAAC) questionnaire and the rhinoconjunctivitis QoL questionnaire (Rcq-36) to assess subjective symptoms. Those students with clinical symptoms of AR underwent skin prick testing (SPT) using 5 common allergens found in Thailand. The association between AR and QoL was then determined using a paired t test. A total of 222 students were enrolled in the study; 86 (38.7%) were men. There were 183 (81.9%) students with AR symptoms and 130 (71.4%) students with positive results for SPT. The students' QoL as defined by the Rcq-36 revealed a significant worsening in students who self-reported rhinitis symptoms within the past 12 months. Compared to the non-AR group, in those with AR, eye symptoms were significantly more common. The prevalence of AR at a college campus was 58.5%. The presence of rhinitis symptoms was the highest predictor of the presence of AR, with 67.7% having subsequent positive SPT. Students with AR had poorer scores in every dimension of QoL as defined by the Rcq-36 when compared to their non-AR counterparts. Educational performances among the 2 groups were unaffected. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  4. Allergic rhinitis is associated with otitis media with effusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner-Møller, E; Chawes, B L K; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2012-01-01

    Childhood otitis media with effusion is a common disease and a link to allergic diseases has been suggested.......Childhood otitis media with effusion is a common disease and a link to allergic diseases has been suggested....

  5. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran. This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ) questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data. The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant ( P=0.046); and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets' skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose) were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038). These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring. In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions.

  6. [The effect of nasal irrigation in the treatment of allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minghai; Wang, Qiuping; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Kunmin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhiyi; Ji, Jun Feng; Cheng, You; Zhong, Nanshan

    2014-03-01

    To compare the symptoms and lower airway inflammatory factors of patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), and to observe the effect of nasal irrigation in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Sixty-one cases diagnosed as AR after skin prick test (SPT)were selected and randomly divided into three groups: 17 patients in group A used nasal steroid spray; 21 cases in group B used nasal irrigation; 23 patients in group C combined ir rigation with nasal steroid. Before and after 3 months treatment, nasal visual analogue scale (VAS) score, rhino conjunctivtis quality of life questionnaire (RQLQ) score, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) values were observed and compared in each group. Before treatment, there is no statistically difference between three groups (P > 0.05). After 3 months of treatment, VAS, RQLQ, FENO of all patients was significantly decreased (P 0.05), FENO value has no statistically significant difference between group A and group B (P > 0.05), but were less than that in group C (P irrigation can ameliorate nasal symptoms, improve quality of life, decrease lower airway inflammation of allergic rhinitis patients. Nasal irrigation is an effective treatment of allergic rhinitis. Nasal irrigation combined with nasal steroid can achieve more significant efficacy.

  7. Implementation of guidelines for allergic rhinitis in specialist practices. A randomized pragmatic controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bodez, Thierry; Gehano, Pierre; Klossek, Jean Michel; Liard, François; Neukirch, Françoise; Le Gal, Martine; Janin, Nicole; Allaf, Bashar

    2009-01-01

    Guidelines for allergic rhinitis are more effective than free-treatment choice in the control of seasonal allergic rhinitis. To validate the ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) guidelines in the treatment of intermittent and persistent allergic rhinitis induced by pollens. A multicenter, open-label, parallel, pragmatic randomized study compared two therapeutic strategies during a 2-week treatment course. In the first strategy ('guidelines group'), 417 patients were treated according to ARIA with ebastine as oral antihistamine. In the second strategy ('free-choice treatment group'), investigators had a free choice for the treatment of 422 patients. Quality of life measured using the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ), work productivity and daily symptom medication scores. 94.2% patients returned the baseline visit questionnaires and 88.6% returned the posttreatment period questionnaires. RQLQ scores were similar in the two groups at baseline. After treatment, there were improvements in the overall score and in all domains in both treatment groups. According to pragmatic methodology, the improvements show that the guidelines group (-1.70 +/- 1.20) is more effective than the free-choice treatment group (-1.52 +/- 1.22) with a gamma risk of 2%. Individual RQLQ scores, work productivity, and daily symptom scores were significantly improved in the guidelines group by comparison to the free-choice treatment group. A treatment based on ARIA guidelines offers patients a significant improvement in comparison to the use of a nonstandardized treatment regimen. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Specific immunotherapy can greatly reduce the need for systemic steroids in allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Torp-Pedersen, C; Backer, V

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 400 million individuals have allergic rhinitis, which has a significant impact on the individual's general health. Most patients self-medicate with over-the-counter drugs, but severe cases need treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or immunotherapy (SCIT). Although the A...... the ARIA guidelines discourage the use of systemic corticosteroids, this treatment is often used by general practitioners....

  9. Comparison of turbinoplasty surgery efficacy in patients with and without allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerschmidt, Rodrigo; Hamerschmidt, Rogério; Moreira, Ana Tereza Ramos; Tenório, Sérgio Bernardo; Timi, Jorge Rufno Ribas

    2016-01-01

    Turbinoplasty is a procedure that aims to reduce the size of the inferior turbinate through exuberant bone removal with high mucosal preservation. The procedure is recommended for patients with or without allergic rhinitis and those showing irreversible hypertrophy of inferior turbinates. To evaluate the efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty for obstructive and non-obstructive symptoms in patients with or without allergic rhinitis. Prospective study with 57 patients who underwent inferior turbinoplasty. They were evaluated for nasal obstruction, snoring, facial pressure, smell alterations, sneezing, nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, surgery time, and intraoperative bleeding. The last evaluation took place three months after surgery. Thirty-nine patients with allergic rhinitis and 18 without were assessed. Ninety days after surgery, 94.7% of patients showed degrees IV and V of breathing improvement; 89.5% showed moderate or complete improvement in snoring; all patients showed smell improvement (only one showed moderate improvement; all the others had full improvement); 95.5% experienced complete facial pressure improvement; and 89.7% showed moderate to complete improvement in nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, as well as in sneezing. The efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty was confirmed not only for obstructive symptoms, but also for non-obstructive symptoms in patients with and without allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Treating allergic rhinitis with depot-steroid injections increase risk of osteoporosis and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Vaag, Allan

    2013-01-01

    In Denmark, 23% of the adult population have allergic rhinitis. We have previously demonstrated that a majority of hay fever patients are treated with depot-steroid injections in violation of the guidelines. It has been hypothesised that 1-2 annual depot-steroid injections are not harmful...

  11. Age: An effect modifier of the association between allergic rhinitis and Otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditi, Rachel E; Veling, Maria; Shin, Jennifer J

    2016-07-01

    1) To determine whether there is a significant relationship between allergic rhinitis and otitis media with effusion (OME), Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD), or tympanic membrane retraction (TMR) in children in a nationally representative population; and 2) to determine whether age is an effect modifier of any such association because this hypothesis has yet to be tested. Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional national databases with limited potential for referral bias. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2010. Univariate, multivariate, stratified, and subgroup analyses were performed as defined a priori. The primary outcomes were OME, ETD, or TMR; the primary predictor variable was allergic rhinitis, with age evaluated as an effect modifier. Data representing 1,491,045,375 pediatric visits were examined and demonstrated that age was an effect modifier of the assessed association. More specifically, in children 6 years of age or older, the presence of allergic rhinitis significantly increased the odds of OME, ETD, or TMR (odds ratio [OR] 4.20; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.17, 8.09; P allergic rhinitis and OME; a significant relationship is observed in children 6 years of age and older, whereas there is no significant association in younger children. 2c. Laryngoscope, 126:1687-1692, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. THE MAIN CULPRIT IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS - HOUSE DUST OR HOUSE DUST MITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis especially perennial type makes life miserable for the patient. House dust mite is one of the major players causing it. This study is to compare the allergen i n city of house dust mite versus house dust and evaluate any cross - allergenicity between them. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study in a tertiary referral hospital. MATERIALS & METHODS: Forty patients of allergic rhinitis and well matched controls were subjected to intradermal skin tests to house dust and house dust mite allergen. The skin tests were graded as per standard norms and the responses matched after correlating with different parameters. Statistical analysis was done and the results evaluated. RESULTS: House dust mite was the main allergen, as compared to house dust, responsible for causing allergic rhinitis. The allergen reactivity potential of house dust mite was significantly more as compared to house dust. And, as such there was no statistically significant cross - allergenicity between the two groups. CONCLUSION: House dust mite rather than house dust is the main culprit in causing allergic rhinitis. Hence, precautionary and preventive measures to control the exposure to house dust mite can be undertaken

  13. Analysis of Exhaled Leukotrienes in Nonasthmatic Adult Patients with Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čáp, P.; Pehal, F.; Malý, Marek; Chládek, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2005), s. 171-176 ISSN 0105-4538 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : allergic rhinitis * asthma * breath condensate * gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis * leukotrienes Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 4.120, year: 2005

  14. Efficacy and safety of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei LP-33 in allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, D J; Marteau, P; Amouyal, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: An imbalance between Th1 and Th2 cells is involved in allergic rhinitis (AR) that may be improved by probiotics. To test the efficacy of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei LP-33, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was carried out in pat...

  15. Is chronic rhinosinusitis related to allergic rhinitis in adults and children? Applying epidemiological guidelines for causation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgalas, C.; Vlastos, I.; Picavet, V.; van Drunen, C.; Garas, G.; Prokopakis, E.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis has been assessed in a number of observational and experimental studies. In this review, we attempt their synthesis and evaluation using the modified Bradford Hill guidelines for causation. Although there is no proof of causation,

  16. Comparison of turbinoplasty surgery efficacy in patients with and without allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Hamerschmidt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Turbinoplasty is a procedure that aims to reduce the size of the inferior turbinate through exuberant bone removal with high mucosal preservation. The procedure is recommended for patients with or without allergic rhinitis and those showing irreversible hypertrophy of inferior turbinates. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty for obstructive and non-obstructive symptoms in patients with or without allergic rhinitis. METHODS: Prospective study with 57 patients who underwent inferior turbinoplasty. They were evaluated for nasal obstruction, snoring, facial pressure, smell alterations, sneezing, nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, surgery time, and intraoperative bleeding. The last evaluation took place three months after surgery. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients with allergic rhinitis and 18 without were assessed. Ninety days after surgery, 94.7% of patients showed degrees IV and V of breathing improvement; 89.5% showed moderate or complete improvement in snoring; all patients showed smell improvement (only one showed moderate improvement; all the others had full improvement; 95.5% experienced complete facial pressure improvement; and 89.7% showed moderate to complete improvement in nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, as well as in sneezing. CONCLUSION: The efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty was confirmed not only for obstructive symptoms, but also for non-obstructive symptoms in patients with and without allergic rhinitis.

  17. Sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis : quality of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Roeder, Esther; van Wijk, Roy G.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    Systematic reviews have gained popularity as a way to combine the increasing amount of research information. This study assessed the quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for allergic rhinitis in children, published since 2000. Eligible reviews were

  18. [The role of sinomenine in treatment of allergic rhinitis mice model and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Tao, Zezhang; Zhang, Nana; Ren, Jie; Deng, Yuqin; Xiao, Bakui

    2013-01-01

    To explore the role of sinomenine in treatment of allergic rhinitis mice model and its possible mechanism. We used ovalbumin (OVA) to make allergic rhinitis model of BALB/c mice. Saline was used in the control group. When we challenged the mice with OVA intranasally, the mice in sinomenine treatment group were feed by the food containing sinomenine. Mice were then killed 24 h after the last OVA challenge. The noses of mice from each group were removed en bloc and fixed, then each section was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. ELISA assay was used to measure the concentration of anti-OVA IgE, IL-4 and IFN-gamma. The proteins expressive level of T-bet and GATA3 were examined. Nasal mucosa of the mice in sinomenine treatment group were not hyperplasia and without obvious infiltration of eosinophils. The concentration of anti-OVA IgE, IL-4 and IFN-gamma in the serum and T-bet and GATA3 expression levels of sinomenine treatment group were lower than those of allergic rhinitis group. The sinomenine can be used to treat allergic rhinitis mice, and the mechanism may rely on the improvements of the Th1/Th2 imbalance.

  19. Effect of inhaled corticosteroids on long-term growth in pediatric patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Rebecca M; Erramouspe, John; Bell, Edward A; Cleveland, Kevin W

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of orally and nasally inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on final adult height in pediatric patients with mild to moderate persistent asthma and allergic rhinitis. MEDLINE (1975-April 2013), Cochrane Library (through 2012), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1975-April 2013) were searched for prospective clinical trials assessing the effects of orally or intranasally ICS use on growth in pediatric patients with asthma or allergic rhinitis using the terms inhaled/intranasal corticosteroid, linear growth, height, and asthma or allergic rhinitis. Eligible articles included double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of at least 1 year with growth velocity or height as the primary outcome. Seven trials and 1 follow-up study analyzing the effects of orally ICSs were examined. Of these studies, 4 found a delay in growth in at least 1 subset of its participants of approximately 1 cm, 1 study found a decrease in final adult height of 1.2 cm, and 3 studies found no effect. Of the 4 studies examining nasally ICS, 1 found evidence of growth delay in a subgroup using supratherapeutic dosing. There are conflicting data on whether ICS use causes long-term growth reduction in pediatric patients. The concern surrounding their long-term use including a potential delay or decrease in growth may result in underuse and potential mismanagement of persistent asthma and/or allergic rhinitis. Patients should be treated with the lowest effective corticosteroid dose to achieve symptomatic control while minimizing excessive systemic effects. Orally ICS use may cause a delay in growth, but a decrease in final adult height (1.2 cm) has been documented in only one study. This single report should not preclude daily use of inhaled corticosteroids if needed to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with pediatric reactive airway disease. Continued studies on the systemic effects of ICS are required before truly understanding the class's effect on

  20. A comparison of fluticasone propionate nasal spray and cetirizine in ragweed fall seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Linda B; Matz, Jonathan; Hankinson, Todd; Prillaman, Barbara; Georges, George

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids are generally considered the most effective medication class for controlling allergic rhinitis. Previous comparative studies with oral antihistamines have been only partially informative due to a variety of variables encountered during their execution. To compare fluticasone propionate nasal spray (FPNS) with the second-generation antihistamine cetirizine (oral tablet) and with placebo in a head-to-head study in a 2-week treatment study during fall ragweed season. A total of 978 subjects were screened for this study. Six hundred and eighty-two subjects were randomized into the study (170 subjects, FPNS 200 mcg once daily; 170, cetirizine 10 mg once daily; 171, FPNS placebo; 171, cetirizine placebo) and comprised the intent-to-treat population. A 1-week placebo run-in was followed by a 2-week active treatment period during which time a total nasal symptom score (TNSS), total ocular symptom score, and the Nocturnal Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire were collected. The primary efficacy end point was the mean change from baseline over the entire treatment period in A.M. reflective TNSS. The TNSS was the sum of the four individual nasal congestion, nasal itching, rhinorrhea, and sneezing scores, in which each symptom was scored on a scale of 0 to 3. Both FPNS and cetirizine improved the primary end point when compared with placebo during the active treatment period. Although there was a trend that favored FPNS with regard to the primary and secondary end points, there was not a statistical difference between the two treatments. FPNS and cetirizine were equally effective in treating fall seasonal allergic rhinitis during a 2-week head-to-head treatment investigation. Clinical trial NCT01916226, www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  1. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines-2016 revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brożek, Jan L; Bousquet, Jean; Agache, Ioana; Agarwal, Arnav; Bachert, Claus; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Canonica, G Walter; Casale, Thomas; Chavannes, Niels H; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Cruz, Alvaro A; Cuello-Garcia, Carlos A; Demoly, Pascal; Dykewicz, Mark; Etxeandia-Ikobaltzeta, Itziar; Florez, Ivan D; Fokkens, Wytske; Fonseca, Joao; Hellings, Peter W; Klimek, Ludger; Kowalski, Sergio; Kuna, Piotr; Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée E; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Manning, Peter J; Meltzer, Eli; Mullol, Joaquim; Muraro, Antonella; O'Hehir, Robyn; Ohta, Ken; Panzner, Petr; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Park, Hae-Sim; Passalacqua, Gianni; Pawankar, Ruby; Price, David; Riva, John J; Roldán, Yetiani; Ryan, Dermot; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Sheikh, Aziz; Togias, Alkis; Valero, Antonio; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Ventresca, Matthew; Wallace, Dana; Waserman, Susan; Wickman, Magnus; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Yepes-Nuñez, Juan José; Zhang, Luo; Zhang, Yuan; Zidarn, Mihaela; Zuberbier, Torsten; Schünemann, Holger J

    2017-10-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) affects 10% to 40% of the population. It reduces quality of life and school and work performance and is a frequent reason for office visits in general practice. Medical costs are large, but avoidable costs associated with lost work productivity are even larger than those incurred by asthma. New evidence has accumulated since the last revision of the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines in 2010, prompting its update. We sought to provide a targeted update of the ARIA guidelines. The ARIA guideline panel identified new clinical questions and selected questions requiring an update. We performed systematic reviews of health effects and the evidence about patients' values and preferences and resource requirements (up to June 2016). We followed the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) evidence-to-decision frameworks to develop recommendations. The 2016 revision of the ARIA guidelines provides both updated and new recommendations about the pharmacologic treatment of AR. Specifically, it addresses the relative merits of using oral H 1 -antihistamines, intranasal H 1 -antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, and leukotriene receptor antagonists either alone or in combination. The ARIA guideline panel provides specific recommendations for the choice of treatment and the rationale for the choice and discusses specific considerations that clinicians and patients might want to review to choose the management most appropriate for an individual patient. Appropriate treatment of AR might improve patients' quality of life and school and work productivity. ARIA recommendations support patients, their caregivers, and health care providers in choosing the optimal treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  2. Asthma with allergic rhinitis management in China: a nationwide survey of respiratory specialists at tertiary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Nan; Lin, Jiangtao; Liu, Guoliang; Yin, Kaisheng; Zhou, Xin; Shen, Huahao; Chen, Ping; Chen, Rongchang; Liu, Chuntao; Wu, Changgui; Zhao, Jianping; Lin, Yanping

    2015-03-01

    Many asthmatic patients have coexisting allergic rhinitis (AR). This study aims to investigate the compliance of physicians with respiratory medicine specialty (PRMs) to Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) and Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines during the management of their asthma-AR patients. This cross-sectional questionnaire study surveyed the diagnostic methods and treatment patterns for asthma-AR comorbidity by PRMs from 98 hospitals across China. PRMs reported an estimated prevalence of asthma-AR comorbidity of >30% at their clinics. PRMs with greater work experience and a higher professional title estimated treating a significantly higher proportion of patients with AR within the previous month (p = 0.002 and p PRMs with ≥11 years work experience prescribed nasal steroids for AR as compared to those with 1 to 10 years experience (56.9% vs 44.7%, p = 0.002). A greater proportion of chief physicians used leukotriene modifiers and a lower proportion used antihistamine H1 -receptor blockers for AR as compared to residents (resident vs assistant chief: 27.5% vs 11.6%, p = 0.002; and resident vs chief PRMs: 27.5% vs 9.5%, p = 0.001). PRMs in China demonstrated an up-to-date comprehension of asthma management (>90%); however, knowledge gaps existed in their concepts of AR and asthma-AR comorbidity. Thus, further education is warranted for PRMs regarding the importance of AR in asthma patients, definitive diagnosis (allergy tests), classifications of AR, and treatment guidelines for the asthma-AR comorbidity. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  3. Prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children with allergic rhinitis, a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Benjamin C; Ng, Daniel K

    2016-05-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) may be caused by various factors including Eustachian tube dysfunction, inflammatory response as well as atopy. Allergic rhinitis (AR), a common chronic disorder in children, is associated with swelling of the mucosa and can therefore result in Eustachian tube dysfunction. This study aims to compare the prevalence of OME in subjects with and without AR. Children aged 4-12 were recruited from the clinics at Kwong Wah Hospital, Hong Kong. Subjects recruited were interviewed and a questionnaire filled in regarding nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, sneezing, itching of the nose and/or post nasal discharge (ARIR document). The children were then examined by a doctor using a pneumatic otoscopy and a portable tympanometer. Children found to have OME were offered a follow-up visit 3 months later. 12 out of 159 (7.5%) of the AR group were found to have OME compared with 3 out of 185 (1.6%) in the non-AR group, p=0.016. During the 2nd visit at 3 months, 85.7% of the AR subjects showed resolution of their OME. Our data showed a significant difference in the prevalence of OME between AR and non-AR subjects. Of the 185 non AR subjects (Control group), 3 was found to have OME, suggesting a point prevalence of OME of 1.6% in the community in Hong Kong. OME is more likely to occur in children with allergic rhinitis and it may be wiser to manage OME in these individuals differently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma are associated with differences in school performance among Korean adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported negative relations between allergic diseases and school performance but have not simultaneously considered various allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis, and only examined a limited number of participants. The present study investigated the associations of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis with school performance in a large, representative Korean adolescent population. A total of 299,695 7th through 12th grade students participated in the Korea Youth Risk Behaviour Web-based Survey (KYRBWS from 2009 to 2013. The subjects' history of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis and number of school absences due to these diseases in the previous 12 months were examined and compared. School performance was classified into 5 levels. The relations between allergic disorders and school performance were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions with complex sampling and adjusted for the subjects' durations of sleep, days of physical activity, body mass indexes (BMIs, regions of residence, economic levels, parents' education levels, stress levels, smoking status, and alcohol use. A subgroup analysis of the economic groups was performed. Allergic rhinitis was positively correlated with better school performance in a dose-dependent manner (adjusted odds ratios, AOR, [95% confidence interval, CI] = 1.50 [1.43-1.56 > 1.33 [1.28-1.38] > 1.17 [1.13-1.22] > 1.09 [1.05-1.14] for grades A > B > C > D; P < 0.001. Asthma was negatively correlated with better school performance (AOR [95% CI] = 0.74 [0.66-0.83], 0.87 [0.79-0.96], 0.83 [0.75-0.91], 0.93 [0.85-1.02] for performance A, B, C, and D, respectively; P < 0.001. Atopic dermatitis was not significantly correlated with school performance. The subgroup analysis of the students' economic levels revealed associations between allergic diseases and school performance. Compared to other allergic disorders, the asthma group

  5. Allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma are associated with differences in school performance among Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have reported negative relations between allergic diseases and school performance but have not simultaneously considered various allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis, and only examined a limited number of participants. The present study investigated the associations of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis with school performance in a large, representative Korean adolescent population. A total of 299,695 7th through 12th grade students participated in the Korea Youth Risk Behaviour Web-based Survey (KYRBWS) from 2009 to 2013. The subjects' history of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis and number of school absences due to these diseases in the previous 12 months were examined and compared. School performance was classified into 5 levels. The relations between allergic disorders and school performance were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions with complex sampling and adjusted for the subjects' durations of sleep, days of physical activity, body mass indexes (BMIs), regions of residence, economic levels, parents' education levels, stress levels, smoking status, and alcohol use. A subgroup analysis of the economic groups was performed. Allergic rhinitis was positively correlated with better school performance in a dose-dependent manner (adjusted odds ratios, AOR, [95% confidence interval, CI] = 1.50 [1.43-1.56 > 1.33 [1.28-1.38] > 1.17 [1.13-1.22] > 1.09 [1.05-1.14] for grades A > B > C > D; P school performance (AOR [95% CI] = 0.74 [0.66-0.83], 0.87 [0.79-0.96], 0.83 [0.75-0.91], 0.93 [0.85-1.02] for performance A, B, C, and D, respectively; P school performance. The subgroup analysis of the students' economic levels revealed associations between allergic diseases and school performance. Compared to other allergic disorders, the asthma group had more school absences due to their symptoms (P School performance was positively correlated with allergic rhinitis and negatively

  6. Predictive factors to differentiate between allergic and nonallergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Erdem; Bakirtas, Arzu; Yılmaz, Ozlem; Karagöl, Ilbilge Hacer Ertoy; Arslan, Umut; Arga, Mustafa; Demirsoy, Mehmet Sadik; Turktas, Ipek

    2014-06-01

    Although symptoms and signs of allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) are similar, treatment and follow-up are different. We aimed to find predictive factors that can be used in primary health care to differentiate AR from NAR. We made a retrospective analysis of cases aged 6-18 years old who were diagnosed as having chronic rhinitis within a 1-year period. Skin-prick tests were done and severity of rhinitis symptoms was recorded on a visual analog scale in all patients. There were 472 cases whose medical records were complete and included in the analysis. The median age was 11 (interquartile range [IQR], 5) years. AR was diagnosed in 363 patients (76.9%) and was different from NAR with respect to: median age (p = 0.042), seasonality of the symptoms (p = 0.002), persistent symptoms (p = 0.003), moderate/severe according to visual analogue scale (VAS) score (p = 0.017), conjunctivitis (p rhinitis, and response to antihistamines were identified as significant independent parameters to differentiate AR from NAR. Features of rhinitis patients with seasonality, sneezing, moderate/severe rhinitis, and response to antihistamines may help in differentiation of AR from NAR at the primary care level. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. Fish and polyunsaturated fat intake and development of allergic and nonallergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Jessica; Kull, Inger; Westman, Marit; Håkansson, Niclas; Wolk, Alicja; Melén, Erik; Wickman, Magnus; Bergström, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Rhinitis is one of the most common diseases in childhood. Fish, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and vitamin D intakes have been hypothesized to affect the risk of allergic disease; however, it is unclear whether these are linked to the development of rhinitis. We sought to assess potential associations between consumption of fish, dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFAs, and vitamin D at age 8 years and development of allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) between the ages of 8 and 16 years. We included 1970 participants from a birth cohort. Data on dietary intake was obtained from a food frequency questionnaire at age 8 years. The rhinitis definition was based on questionnaires and IgE measures. The prevalence of rhinitis symptoms at age 8 years was 19% (n = 380). Among the 1590 children without rhinitis symptoms at age 8 years, 21% (n = 337) had AR between ages 8 and 16 years, and 15% (n = 236) had NAR. Regular intake of oily fish and higher long-chain n-3 PUFA intake were associated with a reduced risk of cumulative incidence of NAR (adjusted odds ratio, 0.52 [95% CI, 0.32-0.87] for oily fish; odds ratio, 0.45 [95% CI, 0.30-0.67] for highest vs lowest tertile of long-chain n-3 PUFAs; P trend fish and dietary long-chain n-3 PUFAs in childhood might decrease the risk of rhinitis, especially NAR, between the ages of 8 and 16 years. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Audiological findings in pediatric perineal allergic rhinitis (house dust mite allergy) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursoy, Mustafa Atilla; Aksoy, Fadlullah; Dogan, Remzi; Ozturan, Orhan; Eren, Sabri Baki; Veyseller, Bayram; Ozkaya, Emin; Demir, Ayşegul Dogan; Ozturk, Burak

    2014-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the type 1 hypersensitivity reaction of the nasal mucosa and its primary mediator is Ig E. It is most frequently observed in children and adolescents. Our purpose in this study is to investigate the impact of allergy on hearing functions in children with perineal allergic rhinitis (house dust mite allergy). 50 perineal allergic rhinitis (house dust mite allergy) patients (33 male, 17 female patients, aged between 6 and 15, average age 10.4) and 20 control patients (12 male, 8 female, aged between 6 and 15, average age 11.2) underwent high frequency pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, otacoustic emission (OAE) and auditory brainstem potentials to assess their auditory functions. No statistically significant difference was detected between the study group and the control group with respect to their hearing thresholds (250-16,000 Hz). No statistically significant difference was detected as a result of the comparison between the study group and control group in terms of their signal-noise ratios at Distortion Product OAE in all frequencies (996-8,004 Hz). No statistically significant difference was detected between the study group and the control group in terms of the 1st, 3rd and 5th wave latencies and 1-3, 3-5 and 1-5 inter-peak values. This study is the first study where the audiological functions of the pediatric perineal allergic rhinitis (house dust mite allergy) patients were assessed. No significant difference was detected between the group of pediatric perineal allergic rhinitis (house dust mite allergy) patients and the control group with respect to their audiological functions.

  9. Increased Frequency of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Allergic Rhinitis among Pesticide Sprayers and Associations with Pesticide Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koureas, Michalis; Rachiotis, George; Tsakalof, Andreas; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2017-08-01

    Objective : The aim of this study was to identify diseases linked with the pesticide sprayer occupation and explore possible associations with exposure history data. Methods : Α cross sectional study was conducted among pesticide sprayers ( n = 80) and the general population ( n = 90) in Thessaly (Greece). Medical history, demographic characteristics and detailed exposure history were recorded by conducting personal interviews. Lifetime exposure indicators were calculated for several pesticide chemical subclasses. Moreover, organophosphate metabolite levels were quantified in urine samples of all participants by using gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Multinomial analysis was used to determine associations between occupational pesticide exposure and diseases or disorders. Results : In the pesticide sprayers group, significantly higher frequencies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and allergic rhinitis were observed compared with the control group ( p = 0.002 and p = 0.024 respectively). Within the pesticide sprayers group, high lifetime pesticide exposure was associated with increased risk for reporting RA (OR: 43.07 95% CI: 3.09-600.67) and allergic rhinitis (OR: 9.72 95% CI: 2.31-40.89), compared with low pesticide exposure. Exposure to organophsphate, guanidine and quinone pesticides were associated with RA while organophosphates, pyrethroids and paraquat were associated with allergic rhinitis. Despite the higher levels of certain pesticide metabolites observed among participants with rheumatoid arthritis, the differences were not statistically significant. One metabolite (diethylthiophosphate) was found to be significantly increased in allergic rhinitis cases ( p = 0.037). Conclusion s : The results from the current study suggest a possible association of occupational pesticide exposure with RA and allergic rhinitis that should be further investigated.

  10. Increased Frequency of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Allergic Rhinitis among Pesticide Sprayers and Associations with Pesticide Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Koureas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to identify diseases linked with the pesticide sprayer occupation and explore possible associations with exposure history data. Methods: Α cross sectional study was conducted among pesticide sprayers (n = 80 and the general population (n = 90 in Thessaly (Greece. Medical history, demographic characteristics and detailed exposure history were recorded by conducting personal interviews. Lifetime exposure indicators were calculated for several pesticide chemical subclasses. Moreover, organophosphate metabolite levels were quantified in urine samples of all participants by using gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Multinomial analysis was used to determine associations between occupational pesticide exposure and diseases or disorders. Results: In the pesticide sprayers group, significantly higher frequencies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA and allergic rhinitis were observed compared with the control group (p = 0.002 and p = 0.024 respectively. Within the pesticide sprayers group, high lifetime pesticide exposure was associated with increased risk for reporting RA (OR: 43.07 95% CI: 3.09–600.67 and allergic rhinitis (OR: 9.72 95% CI: 2.31–40.89, compared with low pesticide exposure. Exposure to organophsphate, guanidine and quinone pesticides were associated with RA while organophosphates, pyrethroids and paraquat were associated with allergic rhinitis. Despite the higher levels of certain pesticide metabolites observed among participants with rheumatoid arthritis, the differences were not statistically significant. One metabolite (diethylthiophosphate was found to be significantly increased in allergic rhinitis cases (p = 0.037. Conclusions: The results from the current study suggest a possible association of occupational pesticide exposure with RA and allergic rhinitis that should be further investigated.

  11. Efficacy of a novel food supplement in the relief of the signs and symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis and in the reduction of the consumption of anti-allergic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariano, Renato

    2015-04-27

    Seasonal Allergic rhinitis (SAR) is characterized by runny nose, congestion, sneezing and sinus pressure. A clinical study was performed to demonstrate the efficacy of Lertal®, an innovative food supplement containing Quercetin, Perilla frutescens and Vitamin D3 formu-lated in a double layer "fast-slow" release tablet form, in the relief of symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis and in the reduction of consumption of anti-allergic drugs. 23 subjects enrolled in the open clinical study had at least one year history of allergic rhinitis and positive skin prick test or RAST to Parietaria officinalis pollen. At baseline, the subjects had symptoms of nasal and/or ocular seasonal allergic rhinitis. The activity of the food supplement was evaluated using the Total Symptoms Score at first (baseline) and second (final) visit, after one month of supplementation. The consumption of anti-allergic drugs was also evaluated. All subjects enrolled completed the study. The comparison of the scores obtained in the two visits (baseline and final) showed a highly significant reduction of the overall symptoms: approximately 70% for symptom scores and 73% in use of anti-allergic drugs. Sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, ocular itching, lacrimation and congestion of the conjunctiva, all showed a highly significant reduction. No noteworthy side effect was recorded and all patients finished the study with good compliance. The results showed a clear efficacy of the food supplement Lertal® in reducing nasal and/or eye symptoms. This activity was objectively confirmed by the reduction in the consumption of anti-allergic drugs used to relieve symptoms. (www.actabiomedica.it).

  12. Second generation antihistamines in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis due to Parietaria and cypress pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, L; Caiaffa, M F; Di Paola, R; De Michele, G; Bariletto, G; Iudice, A; Tursi, A

    2001-12-01

    Second generation antihistamines have been employed in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis for many years. However, their effects on two distinctive Mediterranean allergic conditions, viz. Parietaria pollinosis and cypress pollinosis, have been scarcely investigated, so far. A comparative efficacy and side effect trial of astemizole and terfenadine in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis due to either Parietaria or cypress pollen was carried out in 27 adult patients, according to a double-blind, double-dummy parallel-group design. Airborne pollen monitoring allowed comparison of symptom scores with pollen counts. Seven patients (26%) withdrew, due to poor symptom control. In contrast, in a subset of 15 patients who completed the trial, treatment led to a substantial and statistically significant decline in symptom severity in both the astemizole and the terfenadine study group. However, no statistically significant inter-group differences could be detected. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Hot topics in paediatric immunology: IgE-mediated food allergy and allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueter, Kristina; Prescott, Susan

    2014-10-01

    The epidemic of allergic disease is a major public health crisis. The greatest burden of allergies is in childhood, when rapidly rising rates of disease are also most evident. General practitioners (GP) have a key role in recognising and addressing aller-gy-related problems and identifying whether a child requires referral to a paediatric allergist. This article focuses on IgE-mediated food allergies and allergic rhinitis, the most commonly seen conditions in paediatric im-munology. We will discuss prevention, diagnosis, management and treatment strategies. Currently there is no cure for food allergy. Oral tolerance induction continues to be a significant focus of research. All children with a possible food allergy should be referred to an allergist for further testing and advice. Children who develop allergic rhinitis need a regular review by their GP. Immunotherapy should be discussed early in the disease process and needs to be com-menced by an allergist.

  14. Desloratadine and levocetirizine improve nasal symptoms, airflow, and allergic inflammation in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Cirillo, Ignazio; Vizzaccaro, Andrea; Civardi, Elisa; Barberi, Salvatore; Allen, Michela; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2005-12-01

    Nasal obstruction is the main symptom in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. Some new antihistamines have been demonstrated to be capable of improving this symptom. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate nasal symptoms, nasal airflow, eosinophils, and IL-4 in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis, before and after treatment with two new antihistamines: desloratadine and levocetirizine. Thirty patients with perennial allergic rhinitis were evaluated, 26 males and 4 females (mean age 26+/-7.1 years). All of them received either desloratadine (5 mg/daily) or levocetirizine (5 mg/daily) or placebo for 4 weeks. The study was double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, and randomized. Total symptom score (including: rhinorrhea, nasal itching, sneezing, and nasal obstruction) was assessed before and after treatment. Rhinomanometry and decongestion test, nasal lavage, and nasal scraping were performed in all subjects before and after treatment. Eosinophils were counted by conventional staining; IL-4 was measured by immunoassay of fluids recovered from nasal lavage. Desloratadine and levocetirizine treatment induced significant symptom relief and significant reduction of IL-4. Both antihistamines significantly affected all parameters in comparison with placebo. This pilot study demonstrates the effectiveness of antihistaminic treatment in: i) relieving nasal symptoms, including obstruction, ii) improving nasal airflow, iii) exerting decongestant activity, iv) reducing eosinophil infiltration, and v) diminishing IL-4 levels.

  15. Analysis of Peripheral B Cell Subsets in Patients With Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Guo, Huanhuan; Liu, Zhuofu; Peng, Tao; Hu, Xianting; Han, Miaomiao; Yang, Xiangping; Zhou, Xuhong; Li, Huabin

    2018-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that B cells can both promote and inhibit the development and progression of allergic disease. However, the characteristics of B cell subsets in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) have not been well documented. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of B cell subsets in the peripheral blood of AR patients. Forty-seven AR patients and 54 healthy controls were enrolled in this study, and the B cell subsets in peripheral blood of all subjects were analyzed by flow cytometry. Moreover, the serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgE concentrations secreted into the cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found the peripheral blood of AR patients contained higher percentages of memory B cells, plasma cells, and CD19⁺CD24(hi)CD27⁺ regulatory B cells (Bregs) than those of age-matched healthy controls (PB cells and CD19⁺CD24(hi)CD38(hi) Bregs were significantly lower in AR patients than in healthy individuals (PB cells or plasma cells and decreases in CD19⁺CD24(hi)CD38(hi) Breg cells in the peripheral blood. Copyright © 2018 The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology · The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease.

  16. Effect of the KTP laser in inferior turbinate surgery on eosinophil influx in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusakul, Supinda; Choktaweekarn, Thitima; Snidvongs, Kornkiat; Phannaso, Chuntima; Aeumjaturapat, Songklot

    2011-02-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) are first-line medications for moderate to severe allergic rhinitis (AR). Patients who have had nasal congestion for many years often develop inferior turbinate (IT) hypertrophy. Some patients are refractory to INCS yet decline to receive allergen-specific immunotherapy. IT reduction is then indicated. There have been very few studies evaluating the allergic biomarker changes after IT reduction in AR. This study aimed to determine the effect of potassium titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser IT surgery on eosinophil influx after challenge with dust mites. A randomized prospective controlled study. Tertiary academic rhinology clinic. Thirty-five house dust mite AR patients were randomly assigned to receive either INCS or KTP laser IT surgery. On the first visit, 2 nasal lavages prior to and 6 hours after challenge with Dermatophagiodes pteronyssinus were performed before receiving treatment. On the second visit, 3 months after treatment, the same procedures were repeated. No antiallergic medications were allowed for 2 weeks before each visit. Net changes in eosinophil numbers in the lavages were compared at baseline and 3 months after treatment and between the 2 treatments. Treatment with KTP laser IT surgery resulted in a significant reduction in eosinophil influx after nasal challenge (P = .013), whereas such a reduction was not shown in the control. However, the net changes in the percentage of eosinophils were not different between the 2 groups at either visit. KTP laser IT surgery reduces eosinophil influx after nasal challenge in perennial AR.

  17. [Prevalence and associated factors to allergic rhinitis in school children of ciudad Guzmán, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; Cuevas-Ríos, Germán; García-Barboza, Evelín; Barrera-Zepeda, Ana Teresa; Morales-Romero, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    A considerable amount of risk factors have been proposed to explain the increase in the frequency of allergic rhinitis; some of them are atopy, cigarette smoking of parents, birthweight, type of feeding at the time of birth and the nutritional state, but the results have been inconsistent. The present study seeks to investigate the role played by these risk factors in the development of allergic rhinitis in a sample of school children. The data was gathered from 6-12 year old school children. Their parents filled out the questionary which was validated by means of the International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Further questioning included background regarding atopy, breastfeeding, birthweight and type of delivery; weight and height were used to calculate the body mass index. Among 740 children in this study, the frequency of allergic rhinitis was 5.5%; the past history of allergic disease in the father (OR = 3.1; CI 95%, 1.2-8.1, p = 0.018) or in the mother (OR = 3.2; CI 95%, 1.5-6.6, p = 0.002) was importantly associated to the development of allergic rhinitis. We did not find association with the rest of the variables under study. These results indicate that the prevalence of allergic rhinitis is similar to the one reported in previous studies. The only risk factor associated to allergic rhinitis was the past history of atopic disease in their parents.

  18. [Examination of acute phase proteins concentrations in children with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Iwona; Sobieska, Magdalena; Pucher, Beata; Grzegorowski, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disorder of upper respiratory tract (about 15 per cent of the population in industrialized countries suffer from this condition), characterized by frequent sneezing and a runny or stuffy nose sometimes accompanied by watery eyes. As the most common allergic condition, allergic rhinitis affects people of all ages. Boys are twice as likely to get allergic rhinitis than girls. The median age of onset of the condition is 10 years old, meaning that equal numbers of children develop the condition before and after age 10. Symptoms usually appear in childhood first and then lessen by the age of 30 or 40. Seasonal allergic rhinitis usually results from tree, grass or weed pollen. With this type of rhinitis, symptoms will decrease with the arrival of cold weather. Perennial allergic rhinitis can cause year-round symptoms. This allergic reaction is the result of indoor irritants such as feathers, mold spores, animal dander (hair and skin shed by pets) or dust mites. It is often aggravated by a food allergy, the most common being an allergy to milk. Acute phase proteins (APP) belong to the most ancient part of the unspecific immunity and contribute markedly to the keeping of homeostasis. As much as 30 various proteins are for the moment regarded as APP. Being multifunctional regulators and effectors APP stay in multiple relations to practically all types of cells and molecules. Among APP following functional groups may be described: transport proteins (transferrin, ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin), clotting factors (fibrinogen), antiproteases (alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antichymotrypsin, alpha2-macroglobulin), complement components (C3, C4) and several proteins of hardly known function, like C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A, acid alpha1-glycoprotein (AGP) and others. From a group of 32 children, aged from 5 to 14 years, with symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and from a control group of 10 healthy children sex and age matched

  19. Impaired mucociliary clearance in allergic rhinitis patients is related to a predisposition to rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Ioannis; Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Panogeorgou, Theodora; Margaritis, Vassilios; Naxakis, Stefanos; Goumas, Panos D

    2009-04-01

    Although mucociliary clearance has been shown to be impaired in patients with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis, its exact role in relation to a predisposition to rhinosinusitis is unknown. To investigate this possible association, we conducted a prospective study of 125 patients with allergic rhinitis. Of this group, 23 patients were classified as being sinusitis-prone based on their history of antibiotic consumption for the treatment of rhinosinusitis; the remaining 102 patients were deemed to be not sinusitis-prone. The saccharine test was used to evaluate mucociliary clearance in all patients. Several variables-age, sex, smoking habits, rhinitis severity, and medication history-were examined. We found that the sinusitis-prone patients had a significantly greater mucociliary clearance time than did those who were not prone (median: 15 and 12 min, respectively; p = 0.02). No other statistically significant differences were seen between the 2 groups with respect to any other variables that might have affected mucociliary clearance. We conclude that impaired mucociliary clearance in allergic rhinitis patients is associated with a predisposition to rhinosinusitis.

  20. A comparison of the effect of diphenhydramine and desloratadine on vigilance and cognitive function during treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Jeffrey A; Kane, Robert L; Ellis, Anne K; Rafeiro, Elizabeth; Briscoe, Maureen P; Sullivan, Cynthia L; Day, James H

    2003-10-01

    Decrements in cognitive performance are associated with the use of sedating antihistamines. Most, but not all, second-generation antihistamines have been found to be nonsedating. To examine the central nervous system (CNS) profile of a new second-generation antihistamine, desloratadine. Subjects with ragweed-induced allergic rhinitis (aged 18-60 years) who demonstrated a predetermined severity of symptoms after priming with ragweed pollen in the Environmental Exposure Unit were randomized to receive a single dose of desloratadine, 5 mg; diphenhydramine, 50 mg; or placebo. A comprehensive battery of repeatable, automated neuropsychological tests was administered to subjects before treatment (symptomatic baseline) and 90 minutes after taking study medication. Both desloratadine (P = .04) and diphenhydramine (P allergic rhinitis compared with placebo, but treatment with diphenhydramine was associated with clinically meaningful decrements on all vigilance parameters (P allergic rhinitis symptoms without adversely affecting performance. Diphenhydramine improved allergic rhinitis symptoms but caused significant decrements in vigilance and cognitive functioning. Thus, efficacy of antihistamine treatment must be balanced against the associated effects on CNS functioning.

  1. Impact of allergic rhinitis symptoms on quality of life in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Philippe Jean; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Philippe; Mesbah, Kamal; Bousquet, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) impairs quality of life (QoL), sleep and work. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) classification is widely used, but the impact of the different symptoms on QoL is not clear. To describe characteristics of patients consulting in primary care for AR and to study the impact of AR symptoms and the ARIA classes on QoL. A multicenter prospective observational cross-sectional study assessed the visual analogue scale (VAS) in the management of AR in 990 patients consulting general practitioners for AR. Patients were classified according to the four classes of ARIA. VAS, Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) and total symptom score (TSS) for nasal and non-nasal symptoms were evaluated. VAS and TSS measures were compared with RQLQ. Mild intermittent rhinitis was diagnosed in 20% of patients, mild persistent rhinitis in 17%, moderate/severe intermittent rhinitis in 15% and moderate/severe persistent rhinitis in 48%. The presence of treatments did not affect VAS levels. Both severity and duration of rhinitis had an impact on QoL and VAS levels. Ocular symptoms (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.965-3.939) including eyelid edema (OR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.274-3.360) and asthenia (OR: 2.73, 95% CI: 1.922-3.877) had more impact on RQLQ than nasal obstruction (OR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.078-2.405) and nasal pruritus (OR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.028-2.042). Sneezing and rhinorrhea did not impact RQLQ. This study confirmed that ocular symptoms and, to a lesser degree, nasal obstruction and pruritus have a significant impact on QoL. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Utility Weights for Allergic Rhinitis Based on a Community Survey with a Time Trade-off Technique in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Tamayama

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: The authors consider that the elicited utility weights are reliable. The results of this study could facilitate economic evaluations regarding allergic rhinitis in various contexts, contributing to better management of the disease.

  3. How to design and evaluate randomized controlled trials in immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: an ARIA-GA(2) LEN statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Schünemann, H J; Bousquet, P J

    2011-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the treatments for allergic rhinitis. However, for allergists, nonspecialists, regulators, payers, and patients, there remain gaps in understanding the evaluation of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Although treating the same diseases, RCTs in SIT...

  4. Implementation of guidelines for seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Lund, V J; van Cauwenberge, P; Bremard-Oury, C; Mounedji, N; Stevens, M T; El-Akkad, T

    2003-08-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disease altering quality of life. Its treatment is well established and guidelines have been proposed. However, their efficacy has never been tested. The aim of the study was to validate the guidelines of the International Consensus on Rhinitis in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. A multicenter, multinational, open label, parallel, randomized study compared two therapeutic strategies in seasonal allergic rhinitis during a 3-week treatment. General practitioners were randomized into two groups. In the first group of 224 patients, doctors followed guidelines from the International Consensus on Rhinitis. Depending on the severity of nasal and ocular symptoms defined using visual analogue scales, patients received ebastine (an oral antihistamine), triamcinolone acetonide (a topical corticosteroid) and/or ophthalmic nedocromil sodium (a topical ocular cromone). In the second group of 241 patients, general practitioners had a free choice of treatment. The primary efficacy end points were quality of life measured using the standardized rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire (RQLQ) and the symptom-medication scores assessed daily with an electronic dairy system. Adjusted mean total symptom scores over 21 days were 4.93 in the guidelines strategy group compared with 7.48 in the free-choice treatment group (P = 0.0001). Mean total scores in the RQLQ decreased by 2.19 in the guidelines group compared with a decrease of 1.79 in the free-choice treatment group (P = 0.0001). At 21 days, the least square mean difference in improvement in overall scores for RQLQ in the guidelines group compared with the free-choice treatment group was 0.53, which was greater than the minimal important difference. Patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis often present severe symptoms which are not well recognized or controlled by physicians using their own criteria of severity and treatment. Using a simple method for the evaluation of the severity

  5. Changes in basophil activation during immunotherapy with house dust mite and mugwort in patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Soon-Hee; Chung, Soo-Jie; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Byung-Keun; Lim, Kyung-Whan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2018-01-01

    The basophil activation test (BAT) is a promising tool for monitoring allergen-specific immunotherapy responses. We aimed to investigate the changes in basophil activation in response to the inhalant allergens of house dust mite (HDM) and mugwort pollen during immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis. We enrolled patients with allergic rhinitis who were to receive subcutaneous immunotherapy for the inhalant allergens HDM or mugwort. A BAT was performed to assess CD63 upregulation in response to allergen stimulation using peripheral blood collected from the patients prior to immunotherapy and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after beginning immunotherapy. Rhinitis symptoms were evaluated using the rhinitis quality of life questionnaire (RQLQ) at 1-year intervals. Seventeen patients (10 with HDM sensitivity, 3 with mugwort sensitivity, and 4 with sensitivity to both HDM and mugwort) were enrolled in the study. Basophil reactivity to HDM did not change significantly during 24 months of immunotherapy. However, a significant reduction in basophil reactivity to mugwort was observed at 24-month follow-up. There was no significant association between the change in clinical symptoms by RQLQ and the change in basophil reactivity to either allergen. The change in allergen-specific basophil reactivity to HDM was well correlated with the change in nonspecific basophil activation induced by anti-FcεRI antibody, although basophil reactivity to anti-FcεRI antibody was not significantly reduced during immunotherapy. Suppression of CD63 upregulation in the BAT was only observed with mugwort at 2-year follow-up. However, the basophil response did not reflect the clinical response to immunotherapy.

  6. Physical Activity, Sedentary Habits, Sleep, and Obesity are Associated with Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Chang Hee; Sim, Songyong; Hong, Sung Kwang; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2017-09-01

    Since pathophysiologic evidence has been raised to suggest that obesity could facilitate an allergic reaction, obesity has been known as an independent risk factor for allergic disease such as asthma. However, the relationship between sedentary behavior and lifestyle which could lead to obesity, and those allergic diseases remains unclear. We analyzed the relations between physical activity, including sitting time for study, sitting time for leisure and sleep time, and obesity, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis using the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, which was conducted in 2013. Total 53769 adolescent participants (12 through 18 years old) were analyzed using simple and multiple logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Longer sitting time for study and short sitting time for leisure were associated with allergic rhinitis. High physical activity and short sleep time were associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. Underweight was negatively associated with atopic dermatitis, whereas overweight was positively correlated with allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. High physical activity, and short sleep time were associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  7. [Efficacy of the dust mites drops sublingual immunotherapy in pediatric allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lisheng; Jiang, Yinzhu; Li, Qi

    2016-03-01

    To observe the role of the dust mites drops sublingual immunotherapy(SLIT) in pediatric allergic rhiriitis caused by dust mites and compare its efficacy between monosensitized and polysensitized children. A total of 77 pediatric allergic rhinitis patients received Dermatophagoides farina extracts sublingual immunotherapy for 2 years were enrolled as desensitization group and were allocated into monosensitized group (41 cases) and polysensitized group (36 cases) according to the number of coexisting allergens. Meanwhile another 33 allergic rhinitis children treated by pharmacotherapy during the period were collected as control group. The total symptom scores (TNSS), total medication scores (TMS) and visual analogue scale(VAS) were assessed at the beginning, six months, 1 year and 2 years of the treatment. SPSS 13. 0 software was used to analyze the data. the score of TNSS and VAS in desensitization was slightly higher than the control after six months treatment, but without difference at l year and 2 years; the score of TMS had significantly improved in desensitization compared with the corresponding points in control. All the parameters in monosensitized group were equivalent with polysensitizend group, except the score of TMS was slightly lower than the polysensitizend group at six months. Dust mite drops sublingual immunotherapy is effective for the allergic rhinitis children caused by mites. And it has similar immunotherapy efficacy between monosensitized and polysensitized children.

  8. Effect of sublingual immunotherapy on platelet activity in children with allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Chen

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The role of platelet activation in allergic inflammation is receiving increasing attention. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis can modify the immunological process to an allergen, rather than simply treating symptoms. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the role of platelet activation during sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis. Methods: Forty-two House Dust Mite - sensitized children with allergic rhinitis were enrolled and received House Dust Mite allergen extract for sublingual immunotherapy or placebo. Serum of different time points during treatment was collected and used for detection of Platelet Factor-4 and Beta-Thromboglobulin concentration by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay. Results: Our data showed decreased expression of Platelet Factor-4 and Beta-Thromboglobulin protein after one year's sublingual immunotherapy. In addition, the decrease of symptom scores and serum Platelet Factor-4 and Beta-Thromboglobulin protein concentrations was positively related. Conclusion: During sublingual immunotherapy, platelet activation was inhibited significantly. Our results might indicate that inhibition of platelet activation within the systemic circulation is an important mechanism during sublingual immunotherapy.

  9. Antibiotics in the first week of life is a risk factor for allergic rhinitis at school age

    OpenAIRE

    Alm, Bernt; Goks?r, Emma; Pettersson, Rolf; M?llborg, Per; Erdes, Laslo; Loid, Petra; ?berg, Nils; Wennergren, G?ran

    2014-01-01

    Background Heredity as well as external factors influences the development of allergic rhinitis. The aim of this study was to analyse early risk factors and protective factors for allergic rhinitis at school age. Methods This is a prospective, longitudinal study of children born in western Sweden in 2003 where 50% of the birth cohort was randomly selected. The parents answered questionnaires at 6?months, 12?months, 4.5?yr and 8?yr. At 8?yr, 5044 questionnaires were distributed. Of these, 4051...

  10. Concealing Emotions at Work Is Associated with Allergic Rhinitis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Hongdeok; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Won, Jong-Uk; Lee, Wanhyung; Lee, June-Hee; Jung, Pil Kyun; Roh, Jaehoon

    2016-01-01

    Concealing emotions at work can cause considerable psychological stress. While there is extensive research on the adverse health effects of concealing emotions and the association between allergic diseases and stress, research has not yet investigated whether concealing emotions at work is associated with allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease in many industrialized countries, and its prevalence is increasing. Thus, our aim was to determine the strength of this association using data from three years (2007-2009) of the 4th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants (aged 20-64) were 8,345 individuals who were economically active and who had completed the questionnaire items on concealing emotions at work. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for allergic rhinitis using logistic regression models. Among all participants, 3,140 subjects (37.6%) reported concealing their emotions at work: 1,661 men and 1,479 women. The OR (95% CIs) for allergic rhinitis among those who concealed emotions at work versus those who did not was 1.318 (1.148-1.512). Stratified by sex, the OR (95% CIs) was 1.307 (1.078-1.585) among men and 1.346 (1.105-1.639) among women. Thus, individuals who concealed their emotions at work were significantly more likely to have a diagnosis of AR in comparison to those who did not. Because concealing emotions at work has adverse health effects, labor policies that aim to reduce this practice are needed.

  11. Uso de probióticos na rinite alérgica Probiotics in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Cândida Rodrigues Nogueira

    2011-02-01

    system modulation through the induction of cytokine production which cause a dominant TH1 response in allergic patients by modulating the TH1/TH2 balance effect. CONCLUSION: The use of probiotic bacteria could be an effective and safe way to prevent and/or treat allergic rhinitis, but its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, clinical studies using probiotics and dietary intervention should be the focus of future research to enable a more widespread use.

  12. Clinical efficacy and mechanism of probiotics in allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha-Jung Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors partially contributes to the development of allergic diseases through immune development during prenatal and early life. To explain the dramatic increase in the prevalence of allergic diseases, hygiene hypothesis was proposed that allergic diseases were prevented by early exposure to infection. This hygiene hypothesis has been changed to microbial hypothesis, which is closely linked to the development of early immune system and allergic diseases. The intestinal flora may be a contributor to allergic disease due to its substantial effect on mucosal immunity. On the basis of the findings that exposure to microbial flora early in life allows for a change in the Th1/Th2 balance, favoring a Th1 cell response, probiotics may be beneficial in preventing allergic diseases. However, evidence to prove its efficacy is lacking from both clinical and basic researches. To date, studies have yielded inconsistent findings on the usefulness of probiotics in allergic diseases. Due to limitations such as different first supplementation period, duration, different strains, short follow-up period, and host factors, it is difficult to demonstrate an exact effect of probiotics in asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy. However, there are many literatures that demonstrate a significant clinical improvement in atopic dermatitis with the use of probiotics. An accurate understanding of the development of human immunity, intestinal barrier function, intestinal microbiota, and systemic immunity is required to comprehend the effects of probiotics on allergic diseases.

  13. Allergic sensitization, rhinitis, and tobacco smoke exposure in U.S. children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargorodsky, Josef; Garcia-Esquinas, Esther; Navas-Acien, Ana; Lin, Sandra Y

    2015-06-01

    Childhood tobacco exposure has been linked with sinonasal pathology, and may be associated with allergic sensitization. This study evaluates the association between exposure to active smoking or secondhand smoke (SHS) and the prevalence of rhinitis and allergic sensitization in the U.S. pediatric population. Cross-sectional study in 2714 children and adolescents aged 6 to 19 in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2005-2006. Active smoking was defined as self-reported smoking or serum cotinine concentrations >10 ng/mL. SHS was defined as nonactive smokers who reported living with ≥1 smokers or had serum cotinine ≥0.011 ng/mL. Self-reported rhinitis was based on symptoms during the past 12 months, and allergen sensitization was defined as a positive response to any of the 19 specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antigens tested. About half of the population (54%) had detectable levels of IgE specific to at least 1 of the tested allergens, and 25% reported a history of rhinitis. After multivariate adjustment, an increased prevalence rate ratio (PRR) of self-reported rhinitis was seen in individuals in the highest cotinine tertile among active smokers (PRR, 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.43), with a significant trend between increasing cotinine levels in individuals exposed to either secondhand smoke or active smoking (p = 0.05 for both analyses). Significantly less food allergen sensitization was observed in participants in the highest cotinine tertile of secondhand smoke (PRR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.85). Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with increased prevalence of rhinitis symptoms, but decreased prevalence of allergic sensitization. The results highlight the complex relationship between tobacco exposure and sinonasal pathology. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  14. Sleep disorders in Latin-American children with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Pereira, M; Solé, D; Chong Neto, H J; Acosta, V; Cepeda, A M; Álvarez-Castelló, M; Almendarez, C F; Lozano-Saenz, J; Sisul-Alvariza, J C; Rosario, N A; Castillo, A J; Valentin-Rostan, M; Badellino, H; Castro-Almarales, R L; González-León, M; Sanchez-Silot, C; Avalos, M M; Fernandez, C; Berroa, F; De la Cruz, M M; Sarni, R O S

    Asthma and/or allergic rhinitis have been associated with sleep disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep disorders in Latin-American children (4-10 years) from nine countries, with persistent asthma (A) and/or allergic rhinitis (AR) and in normal controls (C). Parents from 454 C children and 700 A and/or AR children followed up in allergy reference clinics completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) which is a retrospective one-week questionnaire composed of 33 questions composed of seven subscales (bedtime resistance, sleep duration, sleep anxiety, night wakings, parasomnias, sleep-disordered breathing and daytime sleepiness). The total scale of CSHQ and the subscales were compared between groups C and A+AR, A (n=285) vs. AR (n=390), and between controlled A (CA, n=103) vs. partially controlled/uncontrolled A (UA, n=182). The comparison between C and A+AR showed no significant differences in age (6.7 years vs. 7.0 years, respectively), mean Body Mass Index and total scale of CSHQ (53.3 vs. 63.2, respectively) and the subscales were significantly higher in the A+AR group. Comparison between groups A and AR, except for sleep anxiety, showed significantly higher values for CSHQ total scale (66.9 vs. 61.0, respectively) and subscales for group A. The UA group showed significantly higher values for total CSHQ scale and subscales in comparison to CA (71.1 vs. 59.4, respectively). Latin-American children with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis showed sleep disorders identified by the CSHQ when compared to normal controls. Despite being treated, asthma causes sleep impairment, especially when uncontrolled. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of sublingual immunotherapy combined with Loratadine on blood parameters and induced sputum indicators in children with allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling He

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of sublingual immunotherapy combined with Loratadine on blood parameters and induced sputum indicators in children with allergic rhinitis. Methods: A total of 172 cases of children with allergic rhinitis treated in our hospital from August 2012 to November 2014 were selected as research subjects and randomly divided into observation group 86 cases and control group 86 cases according to different treatment methods. Control group received Loratadine therapy alone, observation group received sublingual immunotherapy combined with Loratadine, and then differences in EOS count, lymphocyte subset levels, serum inflammation-related factor levels and growth factor levels in induced sputum between two groups were compared. Results: Eos count values of observation group at all times after treatment were lower than those of control group; CD3-CD19+, CD8+ and CD8+CD28- levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group, and CD8+CD28+ and CD28+ levels were higher than those of control group; IL-4 and IL-17 levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group, and IL-10, IL-35 and IFN-γ levels were higher than those of control group; EGF, PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 levels of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group, and PDGF-AA, bFGF and VEGF levels were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Sublingual immunotherapy combined with Loratadine therapy for children with allergic rhinitis can effectively optimize body’s immune status and restore microenvironment homeostasis, and it has active clinical significance.

  16. Phenylephrine hydrochloride modified-release tablets for nasal congestion: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in allergic rhinitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eli O; Ratner, Paul H; McGraw, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Over-the-counter phenylephrine hydrochloride (PEH) is used for relief of nasal congestion caused by allergic rhinitis; however, data to support its efficacy are lacking. The US Food and Drug Administration recommended clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PEH in patients with this condition. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of PEH 30-mg modified-release (MR) tablets in patients with nasal congestion caused by allergic rhinitis in a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, 2-arm, parallel-group study. Eligible adults at least 18 years old with documented hypersensitivity to fall pollen allergens were randomized to PEH-MR or placebo every 12 hours for 7 days from August 30 to October 12, 2011. The primary end point was mean change from baseline during the entire treatment period in daily reflective nasal congestion score. Secondary end points included changes in other symptom score assessments, time to maximal effect, duration of effect, and quality of life. Safety assessments included adverse events, serious adverse events, vital signs, physical examination, and electrocardiograms. Of 575 patients, 288 received PEH-MR and 287 received placebo. No significant beneficial difference was detected between PEH-MR and placebo for the primary end point (PEH-MR, mean -0.394, SD 0.4880; placebo, mean -0.412, SD 0.5383; P = .2655). Likewise, no significant differences were observed for most secondary end points or quality of life. Overall, 89 of 575 patients (15.5%), equally distributed between the PEH-MR and placebo groups, experienced at least 1 treatment-emergency adverse event. PEH-MR 30-mg tablets taken orally every 12 hours for 7 days is not more efficacious than placebo in relieving nasal congestion caused by allergic rhinitis. clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT01413958, protocol CL2011-06. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Climate change impacts on pollinic productivity and allergic rhinitis in Montreal between 1994 and 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garneau, M.; Breton, M.; Fortier, I. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This presentation defined the correlation between pollinic concentrations of ragweed and medical consultations for allergic rhinitis in Montreal between 1994 and 2002, taking into account meteorological variables and socio-economic factors. The spatio-temporal dynamic of pollinic, meteorological, socio-economic and epidemiological values was reconstituted from descriptive, geographical and statistical analyses. Throughout the ragweed pollinic seasons (August to October) between 1994 and 2002 in the Montreal island area, there were 7,138 consultations for allergic rhinitis. The study concluded that the lengthening of