WorldWideScience

Sample records for allergenic products advisory

  1. Effects of nasal corticosteroids on boosts of systemic allergen-specific IgE production induced by nasal allergen exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Egger

    Full Text Available Allergen exposure via the respiratory tract and in particular via the nasal mucosa boosts systemic allergen-specific IgE production. Intranasal corticosteroids (INCS represent a first line treatment of allergic rhinitis but their effects on this boost of allergen-specific IgE production are unclear.Here we aimed to determine in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study whether therapeutic doses of an INCS preparation, i.e., nasal fluticasone propionate, have effects on boosts of allergen-specific IgE following nasal allergen exposure.Subjects (n = 48 suffering from grass and birch pollen allergy were treated with daily fluticasone propionate or placebo nasal spray for four weeks. After two weeks of treatment, subjects underwent nasal provocation with either birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 or grass pollen allergen Phl p 5. Bet v 1 and Phl p 5-specific IgE, IgG1-4, IgM and IgA levels were measured in serum samples obtained at the time of provocation and one, two, four, six and eight weeks thereafter.Nasal allergen provocation induced a median increase to 141.1% of serum IgE levels to allergens used for provocation but not to control allergens 4 weeks after provocation. There were no significant differences regarding the boosts of allergen-specific IgE between INCS- and placebo-treated subjects.In conclusion, the application of fluticasone propionate had no significant effects on the boosts of systemic allergen-specific IgE production following nasal allergen exposure.http://clinicaltrials.gov/NCT00755066.

  2. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  3. Risk assessment of allergen metals in cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Hande; Charehsaz, Mohammad; Güngör, Zerrin; Erdem, Onur; Soykut, Buğra; Akay, Cemal; Aydin, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetics are one of the most common reasons for hospital referrals with allergic contact dermatitis. Because of the increased use of cosmetics within the population and an increase in allergy cases, monitoring of heavy metals, especially allergen metals, is crucial. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentration of allergen metals, nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), and chromium (Cr), in the most commonly used cosmetic products including mascara, eyeliner, eye shadow, lipstick, and nail polish. In addition, for safety assessment of cosmetic products, margin of safety of the metals was evaluated. Forty-eight makeup products were purchased randomly from local markets and large cosmetic stores in Istanbul, Turkey, and an atomic absorption spectrometer was used for metal content determination. Risk assessment of the investigated cosmetic products was performed by calculating the systemic exposure dosage (SED) using Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety guideline. According to the results of this investigation in all the samples tested, at least two of the allergen metals, Ni and/or Co and/or Cr were detected. Moreover, 97% of the Ni-detected products, 96% of Cr- and 54% of Co-detected products, contained over 1 μg/g of this metals, which is the suggested ultimate target value for sensitive population and thereby can be considered as the possible allergen. On the basis of the results of this study, SED of the metals was negligible; however, contact dermatitis caused by cosmetics is most probably due to the allergen metal content of the products. In conclusion, to assess the safety of the finished products, postmarketing vigilance and routine monitoring of allergen metals are very important to protect public health. PMID:26753435

  4. 76 FR 52668 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Products Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of July 22, 2011 (76 FR... Laboratory of Enteric and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic, and Allergenic... where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy (5 U.S.C....

  5. [Are amylases in bakery products and flour potential food allergens?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Sander, I; Jansen, A; Czuppon, A B

    1994-05-21

    The enzyme alpha-amylase from the mould Aspergillus oryzae (Asp o II) routinely used for the production of bread, cakes and pastries has in recent years been identified as an inhalative allergen for occupational diseases (bakers' asthma). It is doubtful whether this amylase in the final product, i.e. after the baking procedure, can still be regarded as an allergen. To clarify this question, detailed case histories on 138 subjects were recorded (98 allergics, 20 patients suffering form chronic intestinal diseases, 20 healthy controls). The clinical examinations included prick skin test and IgE antibody determination using one of the customary enzyme preparations. EAST showed a few of these 138 bread consumers to be weakly sensitized to the enzyme. One of the subjects displayed a significant reaction to alpha-amylase heated to 200 degrees C. As expected, eleven bakers sensitized to alpha-amylase by inhaling it in the workplace (positive prick test, positive case history) predominantly exhibited specific IgE antibodies to the native enzyme. Apart from one weakly positive finding, heated alpha-amylase yielded negative results in this collective. Baking conditions vary widely, especially with regard to single components, temperature and duration. Thus, further investigations as to residual allergenicity or the feasible occurrence of new antigenic determinants during the production of bread, cake and pastries are required. 27% of bakers examined and 9% of atopics showed antibodies to a flour inherent enzyme, a beta-amylase. On the whole, the selected conditions hinted at a weakly sensitizing potential inherent in baking flour and in added amylase. PMID:8209207

  6. Food Production and Processing Considerations of Allergenic Food Ingredients: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Alvarez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although most consumers show no adverse symptoms to food allergens, health consequences for sensitized individuals can be very serious. As a result, the Codex General Standard for the Labelling of Prepackaged Foods has specified a series of allergenic ingredients/substances requiring mandatory declaration when present in processed prepackaged food products. Countries adhering to international standards are required to observe this minimum of eight substances, but additional priority allergens are included in the list in some countries. Enforcement agencies have traditionally focused their effort on surveillance of prepackaged goods, but there is a growing need to apply a bottom-up approach to allergen risk management in food manufacturing starting from primary food processing operations in order to minimize the possibility of allergen contamination in finished products. The present paper aims to review food production considerations that impact allergen risk management, and it is directed mainly to food manufacturers and policy makers. Furthermore, a series of food ingredients and the allergenic fractions identified from them, as well as the current methodology used for detection of these allergenic foods, is provided.

  7. Development and in-house validation of an allergen-specific ELISA for quantification of Bet v 4 in diagnostic and therapeutic birch allergen products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehus, Oliver; Zimmer, Julia; Döring, Sascha; Führer, Frank; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Holzhauser, Thomas; Neske, Florian; Strecker, Daniel; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Vieths, Stefan; Kaul, Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Birch (Betula) pollen is a major cause of allergy in northern and central Europe. The allergenic potency of products for diagnosis and therapy of birch pollen allergy is adjusted nearly exclusively to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1. Although every fifth patient is additionally sensitized to Bet v 4, both content and variability of this minor allergen in birch allergen products remain unclear due to a lack of simple and cost-effective quantitative methods. This study aimed to develop and in-house validate the first Bet v 4-specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Based on a murine monoclonal antibody in combination with a polyclonal rabbit antiserum, the ELISA proved to be highly sensitive, with a lower limit of quantification of 30 pg/ml Bet v 4. After confirmation of satisfactory accuracy, reproducibility, and robustness, the ELISA was utilized to quantify Bet v 4 in 30 authorized birch allergen products. The allergen was detected in all samples tested, ranging from 0.2 to 4.4 μg/ml. No significant correlation of Bet v 4 was found with the respective amount of Bet v 1. In contrast to Bet v 1, also no correlation of Bet v 4 with total protein content or total allergenic activity could be observed. Thus, it seems presently unfeasible to base birch allergen product standardization additionally on Bet v 4. In light of these results, the continuous monitoring of Bet v 4 in birch allergen products with the presented ELISA will provide a basis for the understanding of the clinical relevance of minor allergens. PMID:25572690

  8. Enhanced Approaches for Identifying Amadori Products: Application to Peanut Allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Katina L; Williams, Jason G; Maleki, Soheila J; Hurlburt, Barry K; London, Robert E; Mueller, Geoffrey A

    2016-02-17

    The dry roasting of peanuts is suggested to influence allergic sensitization as a result of the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on peanut proteins. Identifying AGEs is technically challenging. The AGEs of a peanut allergen were probed with nano-scale liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses. Amadori product ions matched to expected peptides and yielded fragments that included a loss of three waters and HCHO. As a result of the paucity of b and y ions in the MS/MS spectrum, standard search algorithms do not perform well. Reactions with isotopically labeled sugars confirmed that the peptides contained Amadori products. An algorithm was developed on the basis of information content (Shannon entropy) and the loss of water and HCHO. Results with test data show that the algorithm finds the correct spectra with high precision, reducing the time needed to manually inspect data. Computational and technical improvements allowed for better identification of the chemical differences between modified and unmodified proteins. PMID:26811263

  9. Managing allergens in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, C.; Wichers, H.J.; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K.

    2007-01-01

    Controlling allergens in food is a matter of increasing importance for the food industry, especially in light of recent legislation. Effective handling of allergens depends on identifying allergenic ingredients, creating separate production lines for allergen-free products, and effective labelling t

  10. Production of recombinant peanut allergen Ara h 2 using Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenting, J.; Poulsen, Lars K.; Kato, K.; Madsen, S.M.; Frøkiær, Hanne; Wendt, C.; Sorensen, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Natural allergen sources can supply large quantities of authentic allergen mixtures for use as immunotherapeutics. However, such extracts are complex, difficult to define, vary from batch to batch, which may lead to unpredictable efficacy and/ or unacceptable levels of side effects. The...... use of recombinant expression systems for allergen production can alleviate some of these issues. Several allergens have been tested in high- level expression systems and in most cases show immunereactivity comparable to their natural counterparts. The gram positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus...... lactis is an attractive microorganism for use in the production of protein therapeutics. L. lactis is considered food grade, free of endotoxins, and is able to secrete the heterologous product together with few other native proteins. Hypersensitivity to peanut represents a serious allergic problem. Some...

  11. 76 FR 14414 - Allergenic Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ...) Structure and Activities of the Laboratory of Immunobiochemistry (the Laboratory), Division of Bacterial... discussion where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy (5...

  12. 78 FR 54658 - Allergenic Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... will be available at the following links: November 5, 2013: http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer/?peid=3074a2c9f7ac478db3303477ac1c146b1d . November 6, 2013: http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer... notice. Therefore, you should always check the Agency's Web site at...

  13. Preparation of studies on antibody production against food allergens in mice and effect of flavonoids in simultaneous injection into mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We had tried to evaluate antibody production against food allergens in mouse models. Some food allergens, which were beta-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, and peanut allergen Ara h 1, were used as immunoges in this experiment. Under the same conditions these allergens were immunized as emulsion with freund...

  14. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  15. Production of recombinant peanut allergen Ara h 2 using Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenting, J.; Poulsen, Lars K.; Kato, K.;

    2007-01-01

    Background: Natural allergen sources can supply large quantities of authentic allergen mixtures for use as immunotherapeutics. However, such extracts are complex, difficult to define, vary from batch to batch, which may lead to unpredictable efficacy and/ or unacceptable levels of side effects. The...... lactis is an attractive microorganism for use in the production of protein therapeutics. L. lactis is considered food grade, free of endotoxins, and is able to secrete the heterologous product together with few other native proteins. Hypersensitivity to peanut represents a serious allergic problem. Some...

  16. 78 FR 64505 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... for nomination to the committee as later vacancies occur. ADDRESSES: All nominations for membership... Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... voting members to serve on the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee, Office of Science,...

  17. Selective suppression of antibody production with the aid of radiolabelled birch pollen allergen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the clonal selection theory we intended to prevent the development of artificially induced birch pollen allergy in rabbits with the aid of of the radiolabelled pollen allergen (75-1000 μCi125 I-pollen/animal) intravenously administered prior to pollen sensitization. The birch pollen allergen, in accordance with Burnet's working hypothesis, reacts only with a genetically determining B cell subpopulation. The fixation of the radiolabelled birch pollen allergen to the receptors of the competent B cell clone causes the lesion of the latter. Compared with the control group, this group of rabbits showed an extensive suppression of anaphylactic reagin-like PCA-antibodies, and haemagglutinating antibodies in the blood as well as in nasal secretion. In addition, we tried to influence the already ongoing synthesis of the antibodies with the aid of a subsequent intravenously administered radiolabelled birch pollen allergen (750-1000μCi125 I-pollen/animal). An intensive suppression of the synthesis of antibodies could also be proved in this case. The simultaneous immunization of the control rabbits with birch pollen and egg albumin resulted in the production of antibodies against both antigens, as expected. The hot-labelled birch pollen antigen intravenously injected before or after immunization with egg albumin and birch pollen led selectively to suppression of anti-birch-pollen PCA antibodies. The synthesis of anti-egg albumin PCA antibodies was unaffected. (author)

  18. 77 FR 4567 - Blood Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ..., the meeting will also be Web cast. The Blood Products Advisory Committee Web cast will be available at http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer/?peid=11253ea88a9041e5a91883236f342bfc1d . Contact Person: Bryan.... Therefore, you should always check the Agency's Web site and call the appropriate advisory committee...

  19. Production of the Allergenic Protein Alt a 1 by Alternaria Isolates from Working Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Justyna Skóra; Anna Otlewska; Beata Gutarowska; Joanna Leszczyńska; Iwona Majak; Łukasz Stępień

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of Alternaria isolates from workplaces to produce Alt a 1 allergenic protein, and to analyze whether technical materials (cellulose, compost, leather) present within the working environment stimulate or inhibit Alt a 1 production (ELISA test). Studies included identification of the isolated molds by nucleotide sequences analyzing of the ITS1/ITS2 regions, actin, calmodulin and Alt a 1 genes. It has been shown that Alternaria molds are signific...

  20. Methylisothiazolinone: an emergent allergen in common pediatric skin care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichte, Megan J; Katta, Rajani

    2014-01-01

    Recalcitrant dermatitis, such as that of the hands, face, or genitals, may be due to allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from ingredients in seemingly innocuous personal care products. Rising rates of allergy have been noted due to the preservative methylisothiazolinone (MI). This preservative is commonly found in skin and hair care products, especially wipes. This study evaluated the use of MI in products specifically marketed for babies and children and examined the associated marketing terms of such products. Ingredients of skin care products specifically marketed for babies and children were surveyed at two major retailers. Of 152 products surveyed, 30 products contained MI. Categories of products surveyed included facial or body wipes, antibacterial hand wipes, hair products, soaps, bubble baths, moisturizers, and sunscreens. Facial or body wipes and hair products were the categories with the greatest number of MI-containing products. MI-containing products were manufactured by a number of popular brands. Of note, products marketed as "gentle," "sensitive," "organic," or "hypoallergenic" often contained MI, thus emphasizing the importance of consumer scrutiny of product choices. These findings reinforce the importance of educating parents and providing consumer decision-making advice regarding common skin care products, in order to help prevent ACD in children. PMID:25342949

  1. 78 FR 37821 - Joint Meeting of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee and Tobacco Products Scientific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee...: Risk Communication Advisory Committee and Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee....

  2. 75 FR 47605 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Laboratory of Respiratory & Special Pathogens, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic, & Allergenic Products... discussion where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy (5...

  3. Milk hydrolysis products may retain their allergenic reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Barkholt, Vibeke; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    Background: Milk allergy is one of the most common allergies in small children. Extensively hydrolyzed milk formulas are therefore an important source of nutrients for infants being predisposed for allergy and not being breastfeed and to infants with cows milk allergy. The aim of this study was to...... investigate some extensively hydrolyzed milk whey products for their ability to retain sensitizing and reacting activity in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model. Method: BN rats were immunized i.p. three times without the use of adjuvant with 200 µg of either PBS (control), intact β-lactoglobulin (BLG), enzyme...... PEPTIGEN had no sensitizing capacity. However, antibodies from all rats immunized with the intact BLG could still react with both hydrolyzed BLG and PEPTIGEN in a manner that was statistically significant. Conclusion: The extensively hydrolyzed milk whey products investigated in this study showed no...

  4. Allergen nomenclature.

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, D. G.; Goodfriend, L.; King, T P; Lowenstein, H.; Platts-Mills, T A

    1986-01-01

    This article presents a nomenclature system for allergens which has been officially recommended by the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). The nomenclature is based on proposals of the IUIS Sub-Committee for Allergen Nomenclature and is applicable to highly purified, well-characterized allergens and to non-purified or partially purified allergenic extracts.

  5. 77 FR 45638 - Blood Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... meeting will also be Web cast. The Web cast will be available at the following links: On September 20, 2012, Blood Products Advisory Committee Day 1, http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer/?peid.../webcast/Viewer/?peid=8effe88a1e834779b4932f882b67e3391d . Contact Person: Bryan Emery or...

  6. 77 FR 20643 - Blood Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... unable to attend in person, the meeting will also be Web cast. The Web cast will be available at the following links. Blood Products Advisory Committee Web Cast Link May 15 http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer/?peid=ba104b31fe4c4c099568bacda9a4e5401d . May 16...

  7. Mammalian lipocalin allergens--insights into their enigmatic allergenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, T; Kinnunen, T; Rytkönen-Nissinen, M

    2012-04-01

    Most of the important mammal-derived respiratory allergens, as well as a milk allergen and a few insect allergens, belong to the lipocalin protein family. As mammalian lipocalin allergens are found in dander, saliva and urine, they disperse effectively and are widely present in the indoor environments. Initially, lipocalins were characterized as transport proteins for small, principally hydrophobic molecules, but now they are known to be involved in many other biological functions. Although the amino acid identity between lipocalins is generally at the level of 20-30%, it can be considerably higher. Lipocalin allergens do not exhibit any known physicochemical, functional or structural property that would account for their allergenicity, that is, the capacity to induce T-helper type 2 immunity against them. A distinctive feature of mammalian lipocalin allergens is their poor capacity to stimulate the cellular arm of the human or murine immune system. Nevertheless, they induce IgE production in a large proportion of atopic individuals exposed to the allergen source. The poor capacity of mammalian lipocalin allergens to stimulate the cellular immune system does not appear to result from the function of regulatory T cells. Instead, the T cell epitopes of mammalian lipocalin allergens are few and those examined have proved to be suboptimal. Moreover, the frequency of mammalian lipocalin allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells is very low in the peripheral blood. Importantly, recent research suggests that the lipocalin allergen-specific T cell repertoires differ considerably between allergic and healthy subjects. These observations are compatible with our hypothesis that the way CD4(+) T-helper cells recognize the epitopes of mammalian lipocalin allergens may be implicated in their allergenicity. Indeed, as several lipocalins exhibit homologies of 40-60% over species, mammalian lipocalin allergens may be immunologically at the borderline of self and non-self, which would not

  8. Outdoor allergens.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Christine Anne; Burge, Harriet A.

    2000-01-01

    Outdoor allergens are an important part of the exposures that lead to allergic disease. Understanding the role of outdoor allergens requires a knowledge of the nature of outdoor allergen-bearing particles, the distributions of their source, and the nature of the aerosols (particle types, sizes, dynamics of concentrations). Primary sources for outdoor allergens include vascular plants (pollen, fern spores, soy dust), and fungi (spores, hyphae). Nonvascular plants, algae, and arthropods contrib...

  9. 75 FR 58414 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of June 11, 2010... announced that a meeting of the Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee would...

  10. 77 FR 61007 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... nomination to the committee as later vacancies occur. ADDRESSES: All nominations for membership should be... nomination for voting members on the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. Elsewhere in this issue... Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  11. Production of the Allergenic Protein Alt a 1 by Alternaria Isolates from Working Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Skóra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of Alternaria isolates from workplaces to produce Alt a 1 allergenic protein, and to analyze whether technical materials (cellulose, compost, leather present within the working environment stimulate or inhibit Alt a 1 production (ELISA test. Studies included identification of the isolated molds by nucleotide sequences analyzing of the ITS1/ITS2 regions, actin, calmodulin and Alt a 1 genes. It has been shown that Alternaria molds are significant part of microbiocenosis in the archive, museum, library, composting plant and tannery (14%–16% frequency in the air. The presence of the gene encoding the Alt a 1 protein has been detected for the strains: Alternaria alternata, A. lini, A. limoniasperae A. nobilis and A. tenuissima. Environmental strains produced Alt a 1 at higher concentrations (1.103–6.528 ng/mL than a ATCC strain (0.551–0.975 ng/mL. It has been shown that the homogenization of the mycelium and the use of ultrafiltration allow a considerable increase of Alt a 1 concentration. Variations in the production of Alt a 1 protein, depend on the strain and extraction methods. These studies revealed no impact of the technical material from the workplaces on the production of Alt a 1 protein.

  12. Production of the allergenic protein Alt a 1 by Alternaria isolates from working environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skóra, Justyna; Otlewska, Anna; Gutarowska, Beata; Leszczyńska, Joanna; Majak, Iwona; Stępień, Łukasz

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of Alternaria isolates from workplaces to produce Alt a 1 allergenic protein, and to analyze whether technical materials (cellulose, compost, leather) present within the working environment stimulate or inhibit Alt a 1 production (ELISA test). Studies included identification of the isolated molds by nucleotide sequences analyzing of the ITS1/ITS2 regions, actin, calmodulin and Alt a 1 genes. It has been shown that Alternaria molds are significant part of microbiocenosis in the archive, museum, library, composting plant and tannery (14%-16% frequency in the air). The presence of the gene encoding the Alt a 1 protein has been detected for the strains: Alternaria alternata, A. lini, A. limoniasperae A. nobilis and A. tenuissima. Environmental strains produced Alt a 1 at higher concentrations (1.103-6.528 ng/mL) than a ATCC strain (0.551-0.975 ng/mL). It has been shown that the homogenization of the mycelium and the use of ultrafiltration allow a considerable increase of Alt a 1 concentration. Variations in the production of Alt a 1 protein, depend on the strain and extraction methods. These studies revealed no impact of the technical material from the workplaces on the production of Alt a 1 protein. PMID:25689994

  13. 76 FR 54777 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... November 1, 2011 will be considered for nomination to the committee if nominees are still needed. ADDRESSES... also specify the advisory committee for which the nominee recommended. Nomination must also acknowledge... Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  14. 76 FR 44016 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ..., Division of Bacterial, Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center... disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy (5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(6))....

  15. 76 FR 39405 - Blood Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ...-8900. For those unable to attend in person, the meeting will also be Web cast. The Web cast will be.../Viewer/?peid=b6ce0d080a594ddf9d362a0b1815b4491d . Blood Products Advisory Committee Day 2: http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer/?peid=68d4630cf50847c5aaec06b1720f205f1d . Contact Person: Bryan Emery...

  16. 75 FR 22147 - Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee:...

  17. 75 FR 33814 - Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee:...

  18. 76 FR 2398 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory.... Location: Center for Tobacco Products, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850. The phone number is...

  19. 76 FR 6626 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. General Function of... Cohen, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, 9200 Corporate...

  20. 75 FR 9422 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. General Function of....) Contact Person: Cristi Stark, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug...

  1. 76 FR 4705 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory.... Location: Center for Tobacco Products, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD, 20850. The telephone number...

  2. 77 FR 7589 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory.... to 5 p.m., and on March 2, 2012, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Center for Tobacco Products,...

  3. New strategies for allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnés, Jerónimo; Robinson, Douglas S

    2008-06-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy, consisting in the administration of increasing amounts of offending allergens into sensitive patients was first used nearly one hundred years ago and remains in use worldwide for treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. It has been recognised as the only effective treatment for type I allergic diseases when the appropriate quantities of allergens are used. The immunological mechanisms by which specific immunotherapy is effective include the modulation of T cells and the response of B-cells and is accompanied by significant decreases of specific IgE and increases in allergen specific IgG antibodies, mainly IgG4. While specific allergen injection immunotherapy is highly effective and the most common way of administration other routes such as oral or intranasal ways have been considered as and alternative to subcutaneous injections. During the last century, allergenic vaccines have been prepared using individual allergens adsorbed to different adjuvant substances. These vaccines have demonstrated efficacy and good results in different clinical trials. However, many novel approaches to allergen immunotherapy have been developed in the last years in order to increase the safety and efficacy of allergenic vaccines. In that way, different and modern vaccines have been prepared including more purified products such as depigmented allergen extracts; allergoids, consisting on big molecules of thousands of kDa, which contain all the individual allergens and show a significant decrease in severe adverse reactions; peptides or small aminoacid sequences; recombinant allergens; hypoallergenic vaccines where the IgE binding sites have been modified; or allergen-CpG fusion molecules. New presentations are under study and new treatments will be developed in the near future with the objective that the prevention of allergic disease may become a reality. The review article also discuss recent patent related to the field. PMID:19075996

  4. Production and immunological analysis of IgE reactive recombinant egg white allergens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapala, Pathum; Doran, Tim; Tang, Mimi L K; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2015-05-01

    IgE-mediated allergy to chicken egg affects a large number of children and adults worldwide. The current management strategy for egg allergy is strict avoidance, however this is impractical due to the presence of eggs in a range of foods and pharmaceutical products including vaccines. Strict avoidance also poses nutritional disadvantages due to high nutritional value of eggs. Allergen specific immunotherapy is being pursued as a curative treatment, in which an allergic individual is gradually exposed to the allergen to induce tolerance. Use of recombinant proteins for immunotherapy has been beneficial due to the purity of the recombinant proteins compared to natural proteins. In this study, we produced IgE reactive recombinant egg white proteins that can be used for future immunotherapy. Using E. coli as an expression system, we successfully produced recombinant versions of Gal d 1, 2 and 3, that were IgE reactive when tested against a pool of egg allergic patients' sera. The IgE reactivity indicates that these recombinant proteins are capable of eliciting an immune response, thus being potential candidates for immunotherapy. We have, for the first time, attempted to produce recombinant versions of all 4 major egg white allergens in E. coli, and successfully produced 3, with only Gal d 4 showing loss of IgE reactivity in the recombinant version. The results suggest that egg allergy in Australian populations may mainly be due to IgE reactivity to Gal d 3 and 4, while Gal d 1 shows higher IgE reactivity. This is the first report of a collective and comparative immunological analysis of all 4 egg white allergens. The significance of this study is the potential use of the IgE reactive recombinant egg white proteins in immunotherapy to treat egg allergic patients. PMID:25656803

  5. 78 FR 27971 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  6. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season....

  7. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season....

  8. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends...

  9. 76 FR 10609 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ...) is announcing an amendment to the notice of a meeting of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of January 26, 2011 (76 FR 4705). The... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Amendment...

  10. Emergent and unusual allergens in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, David; Moreau, Linda; Sasseville, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis from cosmetics is a common problem that is occasionally caused by new or rare allergens. When a patient has a positive patch test to a cosmetic product but to none of the common or commercially available allergens, it is important to further patch-test this patient to the ingredients of the product. Thorough testing with the breakdown of ingredients, usually obtained through cooperation with the manufacturer, often allows identification of the culprit allergen in the cosmetic product. In this article, we discuss emerging or rare allergens discovered by this method, including nail lacquer and lipstick allergens, copolymers, shellac, alkyl glucosides, glycols, protein derivatives, idebenone, and octocrylene. PMID:20487655

  11. Allergens and Irritants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environmental Agents Acrylamide Environmental Agents Acrylamide Air Pollution Environmental Agents Air Pollution Allergens & Irritants Environmental Agents Allergens & Irritants Cigarette Smoke ...

  12. Animal models to detect allergenicity to foods and genetically modified products: workshop summary.

    OpenAIRE

    Tryphonas, Helen; Arvanitakis, George; Vavasour, Elizabeth; Bondy, Genevieve

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory allergy and allergy to foods continue to be important health issues. There is evidence to indicate that the incidence of food allergy around the world is on the rise. Current estimates indicate that approximately 5% of young children and 1-2% of adults suffer from true food allergy (Kagan 2003). Although a large number of in vivo and in vitro tests exist for the clinical diagnosis of allergy in humans, we lack validated animal models of allergenicity. This deficiency creates serio...

  13. Review of statutory and voluntary labelling of food allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Mark; Dadswell, Ruth; Hattersley, Sue

    2005-11-01

    Food allergy represents an increasingly important health problem, with prevalence in Western Europe continuing to rise. While some reactions are mild, others can include life-threatening anaphylactic shock. It is estimated that food allergies affect 1-2% of the adult population and foods are to blame for a large majority of allergic reactions to food in the UK, with most reactions being to milk, eggs, peanuts (Arachis hypogea), nuts, fish, shellfish, soyabean, sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) and wheat. There is currently no cure for food allergy and the few available treatments are focused on relieving the specific symptoms. Consumers with food allergies and food intolerances rely on food labelling to enable them to make informed choices about the foods they eat. Whilst there have recently been important advances in the labelling of food allergens, these advances relate only to requirements for the labelling of the deliberate use of specified food allergens in foods sold pre-packed. In other areas the development of guidance for food manufacturers and retailers on how to assess the risks of possible allergen cross-contamination during food production and manufacture, and then to determine appropriate advisory labelling, is well advanced. Work to address the issue of how to provide appropriate allergen information for foods sold loose, or in catering establishments, is also in progress. PMID:16313690

  14. Cord blood allergen-specific IgE is associated with reduced IFN-gamma production by cord blood cells: the Protection against Allergy-Study in Rural Environments (PASTURE) Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Pfefferle, Petra Ina; Sel, Serdar; Ege, Markus Johannes; Büchele, Gisela; Blümer, Nicole; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne; Herzum, Ileana; Albers, Christoph E.; Lauener, Roger P.; Roponen, Marjut; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Riedler, Josef; Brunekreef, Bert; Dalphin, Jean-Charles

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is currently discussed whether allergic sensitization may start in utero under the influence of the maternal immune system and environmental determinants. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between allergen-specific cord blood (CB) IgE levels, parental sensitization, CB cytokine production, and environmental influences. METHODS: As part of an ongoing multicenter birth cohort study, allergen-specific IgE antibodies against 20 common seasonal, perennial, and food allergen...

  15. Food Allergens: Is There a Correlation between Stability to Digestion and Allergenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. It has not yet been established what makes a dietary protein a food allergen. Several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by food allergens. One of these is resistance to digestion. This paper reviews data from digestibility studies on purified food allergens and evaluates the predictive value of digestibility tests on the allergenic potential. We point out that food allergens do not necessarily resist digestion. We discuss how the choice of in vitro digestibility assay condition and the method used for detection of residual intact protein as well as fragments hereof may greatly influence the outcome as well as the interpretation of results. The finding that digests from food allergens may retain allergenicity, stresses the importance of using immunological assays for evaluating the allergenic potential of food allergen digestion products. Studies assessing the allergenicity of digestion products, by either IgE-binding, elicitation or sensitizing capacity, shows that digestion may abolish, decrease, have no effect, or even increase the allergenicity of food allergens. Therefore, the predictive value of the pepsin resistance test for assessing the allergenic potential of novel proteins can be questioned. PMID:25607526

  16. Identification of IgE-binding proteins from Lepidoglyphus destructor and production of monoclonal antibodies to a major allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventas, P; Carreira, J; Polo, F

    1991-08-01

    The allergen composition of one of the most important storage mites, Lepidoglyphus destructor, has been studied by immunodetection after SDS-PAGE with individual patient sera. An allergenic polypeptide of 14 kDa was identified with 95% of the sera. This major allergen was isolated in the supernatant of 60% ammonium sulfate salt precipitation of the whole extract, which was subsequently used to immunize BALB/c mice so as to produce monoclonal antibodies. Four mAbs recognizing molecules with IgE-binding ability were obtained. The specificity of the mAbs was assayed against different allergenic extracts, and the molecules recognized by them were characterized by immunoblotting. Two mAbs (Le5B5 and Le9E4) were directed to the 14-kDa allergen; the other two to several proteins of lesser allergenic significance. PMID:1722776

  17. Frozen, Fully-Cooked Products and Botulism--Food Safety Advisory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... Actions ${title} Loading... Frozen, Fully-Cooked Products & Botulism - Food Safety Advisory In August and September 2001, several cases ...

  18. Fungal allergens.

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, W E; Helbling, A; Salvaggio, J E; Lehrer, S B

    1995-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores occur widely and often in far greater concentrations than pollen grains. Immunoglobulin E-specific antigens (allergens) on airborne fungal spores induce type I hypersensitivity (allergic) respiratory reactions in sensitized atopic subjects, causing rhinitis and/or asthma. The prevalence of respiratory allergy to fungi is imprecisely known but is estimated at 20 to 30% of atopic (allergy-predisposed) individuals or up to 6% of the general population. Diagnosis and immuno...

  19. Cosmetic Contact Allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Goossens

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents trends in the frequency of cosmetics as causal factors of allergic contact dermatitis during a 26-year period in 14,911 patients patch-tested between 1990 and 2014, and discusses the cosmetic allergens identified during the last six years (2010–2015 in 603 patients out of 3105 tested. The data were retrieved from, and evaluated with, a patient database developed in-house. The results show the increasing importance of cosmetic allergies, up to 25% of the patients tested during the last five-year period. As expected, fragrance materials, preservatives, and hair dyes were the most frequent culprits, but a great variety of other allergenic ingredients were involved as well. This underlines the need of additional and extensive patch testing with the patient’s products used and their ingredients.

  20. 78 FR 56899 - Blood Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ..., the meeting will also be Web cast. The Web cast will be available at the following link: http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer/?peid=18390c01dfff405681afa644b1837e5a1d . Contact Person: Bryan Emery or... Agency's Web site at http://www.fda.gov/AdvisoryCommittees/default.htm and scroll down to the...

  1. 78 FR 2677 - Blood Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... webcast. The webcast will be available at the following link: http://fda.yorkcast.com/webcast/Viewer/?peid.... Therefore, you should always check the Agency's Web site at http://www.fda.gov/AdvisoryCommittees/default... material on its Web site prior to the meeting, the background material will be made publicly available...

  2. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhya Wakasa

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation.

  3. 75 FR 36432 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... Register of May 19, 2010 (75 FR 28027), FDA announced that a meeting of the Tobacco Products Scientific... Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of May 19, 2010 (75 FR 28027). The amendment... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Amendment...

  4. Tolerogenic dendritic cells derived from donors with natural rubber latex allergy modulate allergen-specific T-cell responses and IgE production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Alejandro; Aguirre, Adam; Guzmán, María Antonieta; González, Rodrigo; Catalán, Diego; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Larrondo, Milton; López, Mercedes; Pesce, Barbara; Rolland, Jennifer; O'Hehir, Robyn; Aguillón, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL; Hevea brasiliensis) allergy is an IgE-mediated reaction to latex proteins. When latex glove exposure is the main sensitizing agent, Hev b 5 is one of the major allergens. Dendritic cells (DC), the main antigen presenting cells, modulated with pharmacological agents can restore tolerance in several experimental models, including allergy. In the current study, we aimed to generate DC with tolerogenic properties from NRL-allergic patients and evaluate their ability to modulate allergen-specific T and B cell responses. Here we show that dexamethasone-treated DC (dxDC) differentiated into a subset of DC, characterized by low expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and CD83 molecules. Compared with LPS-matured DC, dxDC secreted lower IL-12 and higher IL-10 after CD40L activation, and induced lower alloantigenic T cell proliferation. We also show that dxDC pulsed with the dominant Hev b 5 T-cell epitope peptide, Hev b 5(46-65), inhibited both proliferation of Hev b 5-specific T-cell lines and the production of Hev b 5-specific IgE. Additionally, dxDC induced a subpopulation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells that suppressed proliferation of Hev b 5-primed T cells. In conclusion, dxDC generated from NRL-allergic patients can modulate allergen-specific T-cell responses and IgE production, supporting their potential use in allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:24465795

  5. Food allergen digestibility: The influence on allergenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    potential exist. Resistance to digestion is therefore a test parameter included in the safety assessment of the allergenic potential of novel proteins in genetically modified foods. In recent years, the association between resistance to digestion and allergenic potential has been challenged. When reviewing......Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. What makes a dietary protein a food allergen has not yet been established, though several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by the food allergens. One of the features believed to be a...... existing data from digestibility studies on known food allergens, it becomes evident that food allergens do not necessarily resist digestion. However, the choice of assay conditions, the method used for detection of residual intact protein as well as fragments hereof greatly influences the outcome. Studies...

  6. Food allergen digestibility: The influence on allergenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. What makes a dietary protein a food allergen has not yet been established, though several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by the food allergens. One of the features believed to be a general characteristic is resistance to digestion. This is based on studies showing that allergenic dietary proteins in general were more resistant to digestion than dietary proteins with no proven al...

  7. Bioanalytical methods for food allergy diagnosis, allergen detection and new allergen discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Gasilova, Natalia; Girault, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    For effective monitoring and prevention of the food allergy, one of the emerging health problems nowadays, existing diagnostic procedures and allergen detection techniques are constantly improved. Meanwhile, new methods are also developed, and more and more putative allergens are discovered. This review describes traditional methods and summarizes recent advances in the fast evolving field of the in vitro food allergy diagnosis, allergen detection in food products and discovery of the new all...

  8. p-Phenylenediamine and other allergens in hair dye products in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Dathan; Yazar, Kerem; Hamann, Carsten R;

    2014-01-01

    on the US market. METHODS: Ingredient labels of 107 hair dyes from 10 major brands were examined and used to assess the prevalence of hair dye substances known to be potent contact sensitizers. RESULTS: One hundred and six of 107 (99%) products contained at least one potent sensitizer, and the average...

  9. Allergens in veterinary medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, R. S.; Janda, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E.; Rhyner, C; Marti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies pr...

  10. Characterization of the allergenic potential of proteins: an assessment of the kiwifruit allergen actinidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearman, Rebecca J; Beresford, Lorna; Foster, Emily S; McClain, Scott; Kimber, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of the potential allergenicity (IgE-inducing properties) of novel proteins is an important challenge in the overall safety assessment of foods. Resistance to digestion with pepsin is commonly measured to characterize allergenicity, although the association is not absolute. We have previously shown that specific IgE antibody production induced by systemic [intraperitoneal (i.p.)] exposure of BALB/c strain mice to a range of proteins correlates with allergenic potential for known allergens. The purpose of the present study was to explore further the utility of these approaches using the food allergen, actinidin. Recently, kiwifruit has become an important allergenic foodstuff, coincident with its increased consumption, particularly as a weaning food. The ability of the kiwifruit allergen actinidin to stimulate antibody responses has been compared with the reference allergen ovalbumin, and with the non-allergen bovine haemoglobin. Haemoglobin was rapidly digested by pepsin whereas actinidin was resistant unless subjected to prior chemical reduction (reflecting intracellular digestion conditions). Haemoglobin stimulated detectable IgG antibody production at relatively high doses (10%), but failed to provoke detectable IgE. In contrast, actinidin was both immunogenic and allergenic at relatively low doses (0.25% to 1%). Vigorous IgG and IgG1 antibody and high titre IgE antibody responses were recorded, similar to those provoked by ovalbumin. Thus, actinidin displays a marked ability to provoke IgE, consistent with allergenic potential. These data provide further encouragement that in tandem with analysis of pepsin stability, the induction of IgE after systemic exposure of BALB/c strain mice provides a useful approach for the prospective identification of protein allergens. PMID:23754484

  11. Isoform identification, recombinant production and characterization of the allergen lipid transfer protein 1 from pear (Pyr c 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazzina, Ileana; Amato, Stefano; Passera, Elisabetta; Sforza, Stefano; Mistrello, Gianni; Berni, Rodolfo; Folli, Claudia

    2012-01-10

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins belonging to LTP1 family represent the most important allergens for non pollen-related allergies to Rosaceae fruits in the Mediterranean area. Peach LTP1 (Pru p 3) is a major allergen and is considered the prototypic allergenic LTP. On the contrary, pear allergy without pollinosis seems to be under-reported when compared to other Rosaceae fruits suggesting that the as-yet-uncharacterized pear LTP1 (Pyr c 3) has in vivo a low allergenicity. We report here on the identification of four cDNAs encoding for LTP1 in pear fruits. The two isoforms exhibiting amino acid sequences most similar to those of peach and apple homologues were obtained as recombinant proteins. Such isoforms exhibited CD spectra and lipid binding ability typical of LTP1 family. Moreover, pear LTP1 mRNA was mainly found in the peel, as previously shown for other Rosaceae fruits. By means of IgE ELISA assays a considerable immunoreactivity of these proteins to LTP-sensitive patient sera was detected, even though allergic reactions after ingestion of pear were not reported in the clinical history of the patients. Finally, the abundance of LTP1 in protein extracts from pear peel, in which LTP1 from Rosaceae fruits is mainly confined, was estimated to be much lower as compared to peach peel. Our data suggest that the two isoforms of pear LTP1 characterized in this study possess biochemical features and IgE-binding ability similar to allergenic LTPs. Their low concentrations in pear might be the cause of the low frequency of LTP-mediated pear allergy. PMID:22015956

  12. Hymenoptera allergens: from venom to "venome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillner, Edzard; Blank, Simon; Jakob, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    In Western Europe, Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA) primarily relates to venoms of the honeybee and the common yellow jacket. In contrast to other allergen sources, only a few major components of Hymenoptera venoms had been characterized until recently. Improved expression systems and proteomic detection strategies have allowed the identification and characterization of a wide range of additional allergens. The field of HVA research has moved rapidly from focusing on venom extract and single major allergens to a molecular understanding of the entire "venome" as a system of unique and characteristic components. An increasing number of such components has been identified, characterized regarding function, and assessed for allergenic potential. Moreover, advanced expression strategies for recombinant production of venom allergens allow selective modification of molecules and provide insight into different types of immunoglobulin E reactivities and sensitization patterns. The obtained information contributes to an increased diagnostic precision in HVA and may serve for monitoring, re-evaluation, and improvement of current therapeutic strategies. PMID:24616722

  13. Microvesicle formulations used in topical drugs and cosmetics affect product efficiency, performance and allergenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Ejner Andersen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Attempts to improve the formulations of topical products are continuing processes (ie, to increase cosmetic performance, enhance effects, and protect ingredients from degradation). The development of micro- and nanovesicular systems has led to the marketing of topical drugs and cosmetics that use...... these technologies. Several articles have reported improved clinical efficacy by the encapsulation of pharmaceuticals in vesicular systems, and the numbers of publications and patents are rising. Some vesicular systems may deliver the drug deeper in the skin as compared to conventional vehicles, or even make...... transdermal delivery more efficient for a number of drugs. Vesicular systems may also allow a more precise drug delivery to the site of action (ie, the hair follicles) and thereby minimize the applied drug concentration, reducing potential side effects. On the other hand, this may increase the risk of other...

  14. Allergens in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Janda, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Rhyner, C; Marti, E

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies provide evidence about the molecular structure of (particularly) dust mite, insect and mould allergens in dogs and horses, respectively. In those species, some major allergens differ from those in humans. This position paper summarizes the current knowledge about relevant allergens in dogs, cats and horses. PMID:26280544

  15. Reduction and alkylation of peanut allergen isoforms Ara h 2 and Ara h 6; characterization of intermediate- and end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Luykx, Dion; Warmenhoven, Hans; Verbart, Dennis; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jong, Govardus A H; Velickovic, Tanja Cirkovic; Koppelman, Stef J

    2013-12-01

    Conglutins, the major peanut allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, are highly structured proteins stabilized by multiple disulfide bridges and are stable towards heat-denaturation and digestion. We sought a way to reduce their potent allergenicity in view of the development of immunotherapy for peanut allergy. Isoforms of conglutin were purified, reduced with dithiothreitol and subsequently alkylated with iodoacetamide. The effect of this modification was assessed on protein folding and IgE-binding. We found that all disulfide bridges were reduced and alkylated. As a result, the secondary structure lost α-helix and gained some β-structure content, and the tertiary structure stability was reduced. On a functional level, the modification led to a strongly decreased IgE-binding. Using conditions for limited reduction and alkylation, partially reduced and alkylated proteins were found with rearranged disulfide bridges and, in some cases, intermolecular cross-links were found. Peptide mass finger printing was applied to control progress of the modification reaction and to map novel disulfide bonds. There was no preference for the order in which disulfides were reduced, and disulfide rearrangement occurred in a non-specific way. Only minor differences in kinetics of reduction and alkylation were found between the different conglutin isoforms. We conclude that the peanut conglutins Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 can be chemically modified by reduction and alkylation, such that they substantially unfold and that their allergenic potency decreases. PMID:24145103

  16. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. PMID:26725152

  17. Why are some proteins allergenic? Implications for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, S B; Horner, W E; Reese, G

    1996-07-01

    In recent years, a number of agricultural crops have been developed with recombinant DNA technology. Because the transferred genes code for proteins that are ordinarily not present in these particular foods, there is concern about the potential allergenicity of these new crop varieties. Foods contain many proteins; however, only a small fraction are allergens. Although the structural properties of proteins that cause allergic reactions have not been characterized completely, known food allergens in general have molecular weights between 10 and 70 kDa, stimulate the immune response (induce the production of allergen-specific IgE), and are stable molecules that are resistant to processing, cooking, and digestion. Although any type of food is potentially allergenic, the majority of food allergies are caused by a small group of foods (cows' milk, nuts, legumes, eggs, seafood). Cross-reactivities occur within a given food group and between foods and seemingly unrelated proteins. Even though most transgenic foods are considered safe, biotechnological manipulation can affect crop allergenicity. The safety evaluation of transgenic foods is relatively easy when the allergenicity of the gene sources are known. The recombinant food can be assayed using traditional in vitro inhibition assays. Recently, reduced allergen content of biotechnologically altered rice was shown. In contrast, increased allergenicity was demonstrated in transgenic soybeans after a methionine- and cystine-rich protein from Brazil nuts, identified as a major Brazil nut allergen, was expressed in soybean to increase its content of sulfur-rich amino acids. The most difficult issue regarding transgenic food allergenicity is the effect of transfer of proteins of unknown allergenicity. The challenge is to determine whether these proteins are allergenic as there is no generally accepted, established, definitive procedure to define or predict a protein's allergenicity. Comparing the structures of the

  18. 76 FR 13646 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... in the Laboratory of Bacterial Polysaccharides, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic, and Allergenic... be closed to permit discussion where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion...

  19. Fluorescence of atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1967-01-01

    Purified atopic allergens have been found to emit flue fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light of 365 mμ wavelength. The maximum of fluorescence is in the region 445–490 mμ and the intensity is of the same order of magnitude for different atopic allergens. Synthetic model compounds, inc

  20. What makes peanuts so allergenic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peanut allergy belongs to one of the most severe food allergies. So far 12 peanut allergens have been registered by the IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Subcommittee. Here, we describe the different peanut allergens and factors that contribute to allergenicity. Peanut contains several class I food allergens (especially Ara h 1, 2, 3 that are stable against heat denaturation and proteolytic digestion and represent storage proteins. These allergens are often associated with severe allergic reactions. Additionally, peanut contains class II food allergens (Ara h 5 and 8, where the IgE reactivity is caused by cross reactions to inhalant allergens. These allergens are mostly associated with mild to moderate allergic reactions. But the severity of symptoms may change by involvement of additional factors. The peanut matrix consists of about 50% of lipids, and allergen - lipid associations have been shown for several peanut allergens. Further factors influencing allergenicity depend on peanut varieties, geographical differences and alterations in food processing. Finally, the physiological function of allergens and the mechanisms, by which they interact with the immune system, are further modulating factors. Thus, the specific allergen structure, matrix, genetic variations, geographic alterations and further augmentation factors are important parameters that induce and influence allergenicity.

  1. Development of a multianalyte method based on micro-matrix-solid-phase dispersion for the analysis of fragrance allergens and preservatives in personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeiro, Maria; Guerra, Eugenia; Lamas, J Pablo; Lores, Marta; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2014-05-30

    An effective, simple and low cost sample preparation method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or gas chromatography-triple quadrupole-mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has been developed for the rapid simultaneous determination of 38 cosmetic ingredients, 25 fragrance allergens and 13 preservatives. All target substances are frequently used in cosmetics and personal care products and they are subjected to use restrictions or labeling requirements according to the EU Cosmetic Directive. The extraction procedure was optimized on real non-spiked rinse-off and leave-on cosmetic products by means of experimental designs. The final miniaturized process required the use of only 0.1g of sample and 1 mL of organic solvent, obtaining a final extract ready for analysis. The micro-MSPD method was validated showing satisfactory performance by GC-MS and GC-MS/MS analysis. The use of GC coupled to triple quadrupole mass detection allowed to reach very low detection limits (low ng g(-1)) improving, at the same time, method selectivity. In an attempt to improve the chromatographic analysis of preservatives, the inclusion of a derivatization step was also assessed. The proposed method was applied to a broad range of cosmetics and personal care products (shampoos, body milk, moisturizing milk, toothpaste, hand creams, gloss lipstick, sunblock, deodorants and liquid soaps among others), demonstrating the extended use of these substances. The concentration levels were ranging from the sub parts per million to the parts per mill. The number of target fragrance allergens per samples was quite high (up to 16). Several fragrances (linalool, farnesol, hexylcinnamal, and benzyl benzoate) have been detected at levels >0.1% (1,000 μg g(-1)). As regards preservatives, phenoxyethanol was the most frequently found additive reaching quite high concentration (>1,500 μg g(-1)) in five cosmetic products. BHT was detected in eight

  2. Allergens in the Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    Points out the health and legal implications related to laboratory substances that could cause allergic reactions. Presents a list of potential cosmetic allergens and irritants. Includes precautionary measures dealing with allergy situations. (ML)

  3. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria. PMID:19671382

  4. Modifications of allergenicity linked to food technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence of food allergies (FA) has increased over the past fifteen years. The reasons suggested are changes in dietary behaviour and the evolution of food technologies. New cases of FA have been described with chayote, rambutan, arguta, pumpkin seeds, custard apple, and with mycoproteins from Fusarium.... Additives using food proteins are at high risk: caseinates, lysozyme, cochineal red, papaïn, alpha-amylase, lactase etc. Heating can reduce allergenicity or create neo-allergens, as well as storage, inducing the synthesis of allergenic stress or PR proteins. Aeroallergens (miles, moulds) contaminate foods and can induce allergic reactions. Involuntary contamination by peanut proteins on production lines is a problem which is not yet solved. Genetically modified plants are at risk of allergenicity, requiring methodological steps of investigations: the comparison of the amino-acid sequence of the transferred protein with the sequence of known allergens, the evaluation of thermo degradability and of the denaturation by pepsin and trypsin are required, as well as the study with sera from patients allergic to the plant producing the gene. The combination of enzymatic hydrolysis, heating, or the development of genetically modified plants may offer new alternatives towards hypoallergenic foods (57 references). PMID:9503097

  5. HYMENOPTERA ALLERGENS: FROM VENOM TO VENOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edzard eSpillner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Western Europe hymenoptera venom allergy primarily relates to venoms of the honeybee and the common yellow jacket. In contrast to other allergen sources, only a few major components of hymenoptera venoms had been characterized until recently. Improved expression systems and proteomic detection strategies have allowed the identification and characterization of a wide range of additional allergens. The field of hymenoptera venom allergy research has moved rapidly from focusing on venom extract and single major allergens to a molecular understanding of the entire venome as a system of unique and characteristic components. An increasing number of such components has been identified, characterized regarding function and assessed for allergenic potential. Moreover, advanced expression strategies for recombinant production of venom allergens allow selective modification of molecules and provide insight into different types of IgE reactivities and sensitization patterns. The obtained information contributes to an increased diagnostic precision in hymenoptera venom allergy and may serve for monitoring, reevaluation and improvement of current therapeutic strategies.

  6. T-cell response to allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Cevdet; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening IgE-dependent type 1 hypersensitivity reaction in which multiple organ systems are involved. The existence of allergen exposure and specific IgE are the major contributors to this systemic reaction. The decision of the immune system to respond to allergens is highly dependent on factors including the type and load of allergen, behavior and type of antigen-presenting cells, innate immune response stimulating substances in the same micromilieu, the tissue of exposure, interactions between T and B lymphocytes, costimulators, and genetic propensity known as atopy. Antigen-presenting cells introduce processed allergens to T-helper lymphocytes, where a decision of developing different types of T-cell immunity is given under the influence of several cytokines, chemokines, costimulatory signals and regulatory T cells. Among Th2-type cytokines, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 are responsible for class switching in B cells, which results in production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies that bind to specific receptors on mast cells and basophils. After re-exposure to the sensitized allergen, this phase is followed by activation of IgE Fc receptors on mast cells and basophils resulting in biogenic mediator releases responsible for the symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis. Since the discovery of regulatory T cells, the concepts of immune regulation have substantially changed during the last decade. Peripheral T-cell tolerance is a key immunologic mechanism in healthy immune response to self antigens and non-infectious non-self antigens. Both naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible populations of allergen-specific, IL-10-secreting Treg type 1 cells inhibit allergen-specific effector cells and have been shown to play a central role in the maintenance of peripheral homeostasis and the establishment of controlled immune responses. On the other hand, Th17 cells are characterized by their IL-17 (or IL-17A), IL-17F, IL-6

  7. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, M A; Simons, F E R; Malling, Hans-Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    To cite this article: Calderón MA, Simons FER, Malling H-J, Lockey RF, Moingeon P, Demoly P. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy: mode of action and its relationship with the safety profile. Allergy 2012; 67: 302-311. ABSTRACT: Allergen immunotherapy reorients inappropriate immune responses in......-presenting cells (mostly Langerhans and myeloid dendritic cells) exhibit a tolerogenic phenotype, despite constant exposure to danger signals from food and microbes. This reduces the induction of pro-inflammatory immune responses leading to systemic allergic reactions. Oral tissues contain relatively few mast...... cells and eosinophils (mostly located in submucosal areas) and, in comparison with subcutaneous tissue, are less likely to give rise to anaphylactic reactions. SLIT-associated immune responses include the induction of circulating, allergen-specific Th1 and regulatory CD4+ T cells, leading to clinical...

  8. Application of a β-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide-modified fiber for solid-phase microextraction of six fragrance allergens in personal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiudan; Wang, Licheng; Tang, Xiaofen; Xiong, Chunming; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia

    2015-10-01

    A new β-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide hybrid material prepared via a chemical covalent interaction and layer-to-layer assembly was developed as a sorbent for the solid-phase microextraction of fragrance allergens. As a result of its ultra-large surface area, large delocalized π-electron system and abundant hydroxyls, the β-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide-coated fiber could be used to extract particular compounds via strong π-π interactions, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding interactions. β-Cyclodextrin with a hydrophobic interior cavity and hydrophilic peripheral face was conducive in extracting the fragrances with hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. Under the optimized extraction and desorption conditions, the β-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide-coated fiber showed acceptable extraction efficiency for hydrophilic and hydrogen-bonding-donating alcohols. Compared with other methods based on different coating fibers, the proposed fiber obtained wide linear ranges for fragrances with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9921 to 0.9970, and low limits of detection in the range of 0.050-0.150 μg L(-1). The obtained results indicated that the newly developed fiber was a selective, feasible and cost-effective microextraction medium and could be successfully applied for the determination of several fragrances in personal products. PMID:26332186

  9. Aspects of food processing and its effect on allergen structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Angelika

    2009-08-01

    The article summarizes current physical and chemical methods in food processing as storage, preparation, separation, isolation or purification and thermal application on the one hand as well as enzymatic treatment on the other and their impact on the properties of food proteins. Novel methods of food processing like high pressure, electric field application or irradiation and their impact on food allergens are presented. The EU project REDALL (Reduced Allergenicity of Processed Foods, Containing Animal Allergens: QLK1-CT-2002-02687) showed that by a combination of enzyme and heat treatment the allergic potential of hen's egg decreased about 100 fold. Clinical reactions do not appear anymore. An AiF-FV 12024 N project worked with fruits like mango, lychee and apple. Processed mango and lychee had no change in allergenic potential during heating while e. g. canning. Apple almost lost its allergenic potential after pasteurization in juice production. PMID:19557818

  10. Mechanisms of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer, Ozge U; Akdis, Mubeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2011-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only curative approach in the treatment of allergic diseases defined up-to-date. Peripheral T-cell tolerance to allergens, the goal of successful allergen-SIT, is the primary mechanism in healthy immune responses to allergens. By repeated administration of increased doses of the causative allergen, allergen-SIT induces a state of immune tolerance to allergens through the constitution of T regulatory (Treg) cells, including allergen-specific interleukin (IL)-10-secreting Treg type 1 cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg cells; induction of suppressive cytokines, such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor β; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4 and IgA; and suppression of mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, and inflammatory dendritic cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the mechanisms of allergen-SIT with emphasis on the roles of Treg cells in allergen-SIT. PMID:21530813

  11. Lanolin allergy: history, epidemiology, responsible allergens, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bailey; Warshaw, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Allergy to lanolin has been recognized by dermatologists for decades. This review summarizes the history, epidemiology, and allergenicity of lanolin and its derivatives. "The lanolin paradox" and the safety of pharmaceutical-grade lanolin products are also discussed. PMID:18413106

  12. New Cosmetic Contact Allergens

    OpenAIRE

    An Goossens

    2015-01-01

    Allergic and photo-allergic contact dermatitis, and immunologic contact urticaria are potential immune-mediated adverse effects from cosmetics. Fragrance components and preservatives are certainly the most frequently observed allergens; however, all ingredients must be considered when investigating for contact allergy.

  13. Food Processing and Allergenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, K.; Vissers, Y.; Baumert, J.L.; Faludi, R.; Fleys, M.; Flanagan, S.; Herouet-Guicheney, C.; Holzhauser, T.; Shimojo, R.; Bolt, van der Nieke; Wichers, H.J.; Kimber, I.

    2015-01-01

    Food processing can have many beneficial effects. However, processing may also alter the allergenic properties of food proteins. A wide variety of processing methods is available and their use depends largely on the food to be processed.

    In this review the impact of processing (heat and non

  14. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  15. New Cosmetic Contact Allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Goossens

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Allergic and photo-allergic contact dermatitis, and immunologic contact urticaria are potential immune-mediated adverse effects from cosmetics. Fragrance components and preservatives are certainly the most frequently observed allergens; however, all ingredients must be considered when investigating for contact allergy.

  16. [Recombinant allergens for diagnosis and specific immunotherapy--value in pediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couderc, Rémy; Just, Jocelyne

    2013-03-01

    Identification of culprit allergens is important for prophylactic measures and specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT). Since the late 1980s, the use of molecular cloning technology has led to a major improvement in our knowledge of epitopes involved in IgE-mediated allergy, and has also allowed in vitro production of recombinant allergens of interest for the diagnosis of allergenic sensitization. It has also improved our understanding of allergen cross-reactivity, which can be responsible for severe clinical manifestations, particularly in children with food allergy and allergic asthma. Better knowledge of molecular and cellular mechanisms of allergenic sensitization, based on the use of natural or modified recombinant allergens, has led to the development of effective SIT strategies which, in the foreseeable future, could provide genuine cure, therefore avoiding use of symptomatic therapeutics, starting very early in childhood. PMID:25163347

  17. The influence of digestibility on the allergenicity of food allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    potential exist. Resistance to digestion is therefore a test parameter included in the safety assessment of the allergenic potential of novel proteins in genetically modified foods. In recent years, the association between resistance to digestion and allergenic potential has been challenged. When reviewing......Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. What makes a dietary protein a food allergen has not yet been established, though several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by the food allergens. One of the features believed to be a...... existing data from digestibility studies on known food allergens, it becomes evident that food allergens do not necessarily resist digestion. However, the choice of assay conditions, the method used for detection of residual intact protein as well as fragments hereof greatly influences the outcome. Studies...

  18. The influence of digestibility on the allergenicity of food allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. What makes a dietary protein a food allergen has not yet been established, though several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by the food allergens. One of the features believed to be a general characteristic is resistance to digestion. This is based on studies showing that allergenic dietary proteins in general were more resistant to digestion than dietary proteins with no proven al...

  19. Allergenicity assay of allergen from Dermatophagoides farinae in transgenic tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Mingjuan; SHEN Ye; HU Yuanlei; CAO Lei; NI Ting; ZHANG Hongyu; LIN Zhongping

    2004-01-01

    Derf2 gene for one of mite allergens in Dermatophagoides farinae has been cloned and expressed under regulation of 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco. The transcriptional analysis showed that this mite complete gene structure in genomic sequence could be spliced at prediction site. Allergenicity assay with immunological sera indicated that the extracts from the transgenic tobacco gave obvious positive IgE binding reaction with specific serum pool. This work would be of potential use in allergenicity assessment of genetically modified food.

  20. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. PMID:23205714

  1. Allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moote William

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen-specific immunotherapy is a potentially disease-modifying therapy that is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis, allergic asthma and stinging insect hypersensitivity. However, despite its proven efficacy in these conditions, it is frequently underutilized in Canada. The decision to proceed with allergen-specific immunotherapy should be made on a case-by-case basis, taking into account individual patient factors such as the degree to which symptoms can be reduced by avoidance measures and pharmacological therapy, the amount and type of medication required to control symptoms, the adverse effects of pharmacological treatment, and patient preferences. Since this form of therapy carries the risk of anaphylactic reactions, it should only be prescribed by physicians who are adequately trained in the treatment of allergy. Furthermore, injections must be given under medical supervision in clinics that are equipped to manage anaphylaxis. In this article, the authors review the indications and contraindications, patient selection criteria, and the administration, safety and efficacy of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  2. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs and thromboxane A2 (TXA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187 induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells.

  3. Structural analysis of linear and conformational epitopes of allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Schein, Catherine H.; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Oezguen, Numan; Negi, Surendra S; Braun, Werner

    2008-01-01

    In many countries regulatory agencies have adopted safety guidelines, based on bioinformatics rules from the WHO/FAO and EFSA recommendations, to prevent potentially allergenic novel foods or agricultural products from reaching consumers. We created the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP, http://fermi.utmb.edu/SDAP/) to combine data that had previously been available only as flat files on Web pages or in the literature. SDAP was designed to be user friendly, to be of maximum use...

  4. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Derived from Donors with Natural Rubber Latex Allergy Modulate Allergen-Specific T-Cell Responses and IgE Production

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar, Alejandro; Aguirre, Adam; Guzmán, María Antonieta; González, Rodrigo; Catalán, Diego; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Larrondo, Milton; López, Mercedes; Pesce, Barbara; Rolland, Jennifer; O’Hehir, Robyn; Aguillón, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL; Hevea brasiliensis) allergy is an IgE-mediated reaction to latex proteins. When latex glove exposure is the main sensitizing agent, Hev b 5 is one of the major allergens. Dendritic cells (DC), the main antigen presenting cells, modulated with pharmacological agents can restore tolerance in several experimental models, including allergy. In the current study, we aimed to generate DC with tolerogenic properties from NRL-allergic patients and evaluate their ability to ...

  5. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal ...

  6. Antisense-mediated silencing of a gene encoding a major ryegrass pollen allergen

    OpenAIRE

    Prem L Bhalla; Swoboda, Ines; Singh, Mohan B.

    1999-01-01

    Type 1 allergic reactions, such as hay fever and allergic asthma, triggered by grass pollen allergens are a global health problem that affects ≈20% of the population in cool, temperate climates. Ryegrass is the dominant source of allergens because of its prodigious production of airborne pollen. Lol p 5 is the major allergenic protein of ryegrass pollen, judging from the fact that almost all of the individuals allergic to grass pollen show presence of serum IgE antibodies against this protein...

  7. Cosmetic Contact Allergens

    OpenAIRE

    An Goossens

    2016-01-01

    This article presents trends in the frequency of cosmetics as causal factors of allergic contact dermatitis during a 26-year period in 14,911 patients patch-tested between 1990 and 2014, and discusses the cosmetic allergens identified during the last six years (2010–2015) in 603 patients out of 3105 tested. The data were retrieved from, and evaluated with, a patient database developed in-house. The results show the increasing importance of cosmetic allergies, up to 25% of the patients tested ...

  8. Allergens from fish and egg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Hansen, T K; Nørgaard, A;

    2001-01-01

    Allergens from fish and egg belong to some of the most frequent causes of food allergic reactions reported in the literature. Egg allergens have been described in both white and yolk, and the egg white proteins ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin and lysozyme have been adopted in the allergen...... nomenclature as Gal d1-d4. The most reported allergen from egg yolk seems to be alpha-livitin. In fish, the dominating allergen is the homologues of Gad c1 from cod, formerly described as protein M. A close cross-reactivity exists within different species of fish between this calcium-binding protein family......, denominated the parvalbumins. This cross-reactivity has been indicated to be of clinical relevance for several species, since patients with a positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge to cod will also react with other fish species, such as herring, plaice and mackerel. In spite...

  9. The allergenicity of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia is influenced by growth temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Swee Yang; Dannemiller, Karen; Yao, Maosheng; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-07-01

    Common indoor and outdoor environmental fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus produce asexual spores containing a collection of proteins that can bind IgE antibodies and trigger allergic reactions. We characterized the impact of sporulation temperature on the IgE-binding capacity (allergenicity) of A. fumigatus and explored the links between variable allergenicity and temperature-dependant expression of genes encoding these allergenic proteins. A 12-fold increase in A. fumigatus allergenicity per spore was observed when sporulation temperatures were decreased from 32°C to 17°C. Per spore protein mass and Asp f 1 allergen mass also followed this trend. Functional gene expression analysis of A. fumigatus sporulating cultures by real-time reverse-transcription PCR and gene expression microarrays revealed that a greater number of genes encoding known, major allergens are more highly expressed at lower sporulation temperatures. The results of this study indicate that environmental conditions at growth significantly influence the allergenicity of this common mould through the differential production of allergenic proteins, and highlight the importance of in vivo or in vitro allergenicity measurements for understanding environmental exposure to airborne allergenic fungi. PMID:21724168

  10. Allergen specific responses in cord and adult blood are differentially modulated in the presence of endotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiwegger, T.; Mayer, E.; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Schabussova, I.; Dehlink, E.; Bohle, B.; Barkholt, Vibeke; Szépfalusi, Zsolt

    2008-01-01

    (LPS)-free allergens were evaluated at different time-points. Fractions of contaminated BLG were generated and assayed on their immuno-stimulatory capacity. The involvement of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4 was investigated by blocking antibodies and TLR-transfected human embryonic kidney cells....... Results The proliferative response of cord blood (CB)-derived mononuclear cells towards allergen-preparations at day 3 was related to the level of LPS contamination. At day 7, proliferation was also detected in the absence of endotoxin. Cytokine production in CB was strongly affected by the content of...... endotoxin, TLR-4 dependent and not related to the allergen content. Allergen- and endotoxin-induced proliferative responses were generally significantly higher in CB than in adult blood. Conclusion Endotoxins in allergen preparations confound allergen-specific cellular responses. The impact of these...

  11. GC-MS analysis of allergens in plant oils meant to cosmetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloustian Jacques

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous allergy occurs mainly as a result of the use of domestic products and cosmetics. Some fragrances, present in these products, may contain compounds that are responsible for allergy (allergens. The European Council offered a Directive limiting the level of 26 allergens found in cosmetics. GC-MS technique was used to determine the retention times of 25 allergens, determine detection and quantification limits and make calibration with standard solution of each allergen in concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 mgL–1 (21 allergens and 50 to 200 mgL–1 (4 allergens. Quantification was performed by the use of 2 internal standards (tetradecane and hexadecane. Seven oils issued from plants were studied by GC-MS. For all of them, the concentration of potential allergens was lower than their minimum detectable level. The alcoholic solution of extracts issued from different samples of oil did not demonstrate the presence of any quantifiable allergen, even when was concentrated 25 times. GC-MS could be a useful technique in the identification and, if necessary, quantification of allergen in ingredients meant to cosmetics.

  12. Molecular Characteristics of Cockroach Allergens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chii-Huei Wu; Mey-Fann Lee

    2005-01-01

    Cockroaches, commonly found in urban dwellings worldwide, have long been considered vectors of various infectious diseases and cockroach allergens are one of the major etiologic risk factors for IgE-mediated allergic respiratory illness throughout the world. A high prevalence of cockroach hypersensitivity in atopic (20-55 %) and asthmatic (49-60%) populations has been documented. Cockroach allergens with molecular weights ranging from 6 to 120 kD have been identified by various standard immunochemical techniques. This article covers the characteristics of major cockroach allergens that have been purified, sequenced, cloned, and produced as recombinant proteins.

  13. Measurement of endogenous allergens in genetically modified soybeans--short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladics, Gregory S; Budziszewski, Gregory J; Herman, Rod A; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Joshi, Saurabh; Lipscomb, Elizabeth A; McClain, Scott; Ward, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    The measurement of endogenous allergens is required by the European Commission (EC) as part of the compositional analysis for GM products from host plants that are common causes of food allergy, such as soybean (EC Implementing Regulation No. 503/2013). In each case, the EC Implementing Regulation indicates that analysis be conducted on identified allergens as specified in the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consensus documents on compositional considerations for new plant varieties. This communication discusses the methods available to measure endogenous allergens as well as the endogenous soybean allergens that should be analyzed. It is suggested herein that in conjunction with the 2012 OECD consensus document on soybean, any list of soybean allergens should be based on clinically relevant data among publicly available allergen databases and peer-reviewed scientific publications, and the ability to measure the identified allergen. Based on a detailed analysis of the scientific literature, the following key points are recommended: (1) the acceptance of serum-free, quantitative analytical method data as an alternative to traditional IgE reactivity qualitative or semi-quantitative data for evaluation of endogenous soybean allergen content; (2) eight of the 15 potential allergens listed in the OECD soybean consensus document (Gly m 3, Gly m 4, Gly m Bd28K, Gly m Bd30K, Gly m 5, Gly m 6, Gly m 8, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor) have both appropriate supporting clinical data and sufficient sequence information to be evaluated in comparative endogenous soybean allergen studies; and (3) the remaining seven proteins (Gly m 1, Gly m 2, unknown 50kDa protein, unknown 39kDa protein, P-22-25, lipoxygenase and lectin) lack sufficient data for clear classification as confirmed allergens and/or available sequence information and should not be currently included in the measurement of endogenous soybean allergens in the compositional analysis for the EU

  14. An international multicentre study on the allergenic activity of air-oxidized R-limonene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Andersen, Klaus; Bruze, Magnus;

    2013-01-01

    Limonene is a common fragrance terpene that, in its pure form, is not allergenic or is a very weak allergen. However, limonene autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. Oxidized R-limonene has previously been patch tested in multicentre studies, giving 2-3...

  15. A stronger patch test elicitation reaction to the allergen hydroxycitronellal plus the irritant sodium lauryl sulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Johansen, Jeanne Duus;

    2003-01-01

    Household and cleaning products often contain both allergens and irritants. The aim of this double-blinded, randomized, paired study was to determine whether patch testing with an allergen (hydroxycitronellal) combined with an irritant [sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS)] cause a stronger patch test...

  16. A revisit to cockroach allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookrung, Nitat; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2010-01-01

    Among cockroaches (CR) that live in people's homes, two species, i.e., German CR (Blattella germanica) and American CR (Periplaneta americana) predominate in temperate and tropical areas, respectively. CR is an important source of inhalant indoor allergens that sensitize atopic subjects to (localized) type I hypersensitivity or atopy including allergic rhinitis and atopic asthma. In Thailand the predominant CR species is P. americana. CR allergens are found throughout CR infested houses; the number found in kitchens correlates with the degree of CR infestation while sensitization and reactivation of the allergic morbidity are likely to occur in the living room and bedroom. Levels of the CR allergens in homes of CR allergic Thais, measured by using locally made quantification test kits, revealed that the highest levels occur in dust samples collected from the wooden houses of urban slums and in the cool and dry season. CR allergens are proteins that may be derived from any anatomical part of the insect at any developmental stage. The allergens may be also from CR secretions, excretions, body washes or frass. The proteins may be the insect structural proteins, enzymes or hormones. They may exist as dimers/multimers and/or in different isoforms. Exposure to CR allergens in infancy leads to allergic morbidity later in life. Clinical symptoms of CR allergy are usually more severe and prolonged than those caused by other indoor allergens. The mechanisms of acute and chronic airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) have been addressed including specific IgE- and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms, i.e., role of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2). Participation of various allergen activated-CD4+ T cells of different sublineages, i.e., Th2, Th17, Th22, Th9, Th25, Tregs/Th3 as well as invariant NKT cells, in asthma pathogenesis have been mentioned. The diagnosis of CR allergy and the allergy intervention by CR population control are also discussed. PMID:21038777

  17. Selected oxidized fragrance terpenes are common contact allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matura, Mihaly; Sköld, Maria; Börje, Anna;

    2005-01-01

    Terpenes are widely used fragrance compounds in fine fragrances, but also in domestic and occupational products. Terpenes oxidize easily due to autoxidation on air exposure. Previous studies have shown that limonene, linalool and caryophyllene are not allergenic themselves but readily form...... terpenes and some oxidation fractions and compounds. Oxidized linalool and its hydroperoxide fraction were found to be common contact allergens. Of the patients tested, 1.3% showed a positive reaction to oxidized linalool and 1.1% to the hydroperoxide fraction. About 0.5% of the patients reacted to...... allergenic products on air-exposure. This study aimed to determine the frequency and characteristics of allergic reactions to selected oxidized fragrance terpenes other than limonene. In total 1511 consecutive dermatitis patients in 6 European dermatology centres were patch tested with oxidized fragrance...

  18. Ethosome formulations of known contact allergens can increase their sensitizing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jacob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Simonsson, Carl; Johansen, Jeanne D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2010-07-01

    Vesicular systems, such as liposomes and ethosomes, are used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products to encapsulate ingredients, to protect ingredients from degradation, to increase bioavailability, and to improve cosmetic performance. Some reports have suggested that formulation of cosmetic ingredients in vesicular carrier systems may increase their contact allergy elicitation potential in humans. However, no sensitization studies have been published. We formulated two model contact allergens (isoeugenol and dinitrochlorobenzene) in ethosomes and investigated the sensitization response using a modified local lymph node assay (LLNA). The results were compared with those for the same allergens in similar concentrations and vehicles without ethosomes. Both allergens encapsulated in 200-300 nm ethosomes showed increased sensitizing potency in the murine assay compared with the allergens in solution without ethosomes. Empty ethosomes were non-sensitizing according to LLNA. The clinical implications are so far uncertain, but increased allergenicity from ethosome-encapsulated topical product ingredients cannot be excluded. PMID:20574602

  19. Crystal structure of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergen Ara h 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profilins from numerous species are known to be allergens, including food allergens, such as peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergen Ara h 5, and pollen allergens, such as birch allergen Bet v 2. Patients with pollen allergy can also cross-react to peanut. Structural characterization of allergens will al...

  20. Understanding Allergic Asthma from Allergen Inhalation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Cockcroft

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The allergen challenge has evolved, in less than 150 years, from a crude tool used to document the etiology of allergen-induced disease to a well-controlled tool used today to investigate the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of asthma. Highlights of the authors’ involvement with the allergen challenge include confirmation of the immunoglobulin E-dependence of the late asthmatic response, importance of (nonallergic airway hyper-responsiveness as a determinant of the airway response to allergen, identification of allergen-induced increase in airway hyper-responsiveness, documentation of beta2-agonist-induced increase in airway response to allergen (including eosinophilic inflammation, advances in understanding the pathophysiology and kinetics of allergen-induced airway responses, and development of a muticentre clinical trial group devoted to using the allergen challenge for investigating promising new therapeutic strategies for asthma.

  1. Associations between baseline allergens and polysensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, B.C.; Menne, T.; Johansen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    : Seven allergens - parabens mix, N-isopropyl-N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine, sesquiterpene lactone mix, wool alcohols, potassium dichromate, Myroxylon pereirae, and cobalt chloride - showed statistically significant positive associations to polysensitization. Five allergens p-phenylenediamine, neomycin...

  2. The Allergen Bank: a source of extra contact allergens for the dermatologist in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Rastogi, S C; Carlsen, L

    1996-01-01

    described. During its first 23 months 28 dermatologists asked for 2,209 allergen samples for testing of 386 patients, an average of 6 allergens per patient and 14 patients per dermatologist. A total number of 164 positive reactions have been registered, and 440 of the 540 allergens have been in use. One...... third of the positive reactions were caused by the 16 most frequently ordered allergens, which amounted to 340 allergen samples. The allergens included plant chemicals, acrylates, animal feed additives, fragrance chemicals and preservatives. Selected allergens were investigated for stability during...

  3. Current challenges facing the assessment of the allergenic capacity of food allergens in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; van Bilsen, Jolanda; Głogowski, Robert; López-Expósito, Iván; Bouchaud, Grégory; Blanchard, Carine; Bodinier, Marie; Smit, Joost; Pieters, Raymond; Bastiaan-Net, Shanna; de Wit, Nicole; Untersmayr, Eva; Adel-Patient, Karine; Knippels, Leon; Epstein, Michelle M; Noti, Mario; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Kimber, Ian; Verhoeckx, Kitty; O'Mahony, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem of increasing concern. The insufficiency of protein sources for human nutrition in a world with a growing population is also a significant problem. The introduction of new protein sources into the diet, such as newly developed innovative foods or foods produced using new technologies and production processes, insects, algae, duckweed, or agricultural products from third countries, creates the opportunity for development of new food allergies, and this in turn has driven the need to develop test methods capable of characterizing the allergenic potential of novel food proteins. There is no doubt that robust and reliable animal models for the identification and characterization of food allergens would be valuable tools for safety assessment. However, although various animal models have been proposed for this purpose, to date, none have been formally validated as predictive and none are currently suitable to test the allergenic potential of new foods. Here, the design of various animal models are reviewed, including among others considerations of species and strain, diet, route of administration, dose and formulation of the test protein, relevant controls and endpoints measured. PMID:27313841

  4. Cross-Reactivity of Peanut Allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-01-01

    Peanut seeds are currently widely used as source of human food ingredients in the United States of America and in European countries due to their high quality protein and oil content. This article describes the classification and molecular biology of peanut seed allergens with particular reference to their cross-reactivities. Currently, the IUIS allergen nomenclature subcommittee accepts 12 peanut allergens. Two allergens belong to the cupin and four to the prolamin superfamily, and six are d...

  5. Sensitising capacity of peptides from food allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Barkholt, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. What makes a dietary protein a food allergen has not yet been established, though several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by food allergens. One of the features believed to be a general characteristicof food allergens is resistance to digestion. This is based on studies showing that allergenic dietary proteins in general are more resistant to digestion than dietary proteins with ...

  6. Modeling of allergen proteins found in sea food products Modelagem de proteínas alergênicas em frutos do mar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Galán-Freyle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish are a source of food allergens, and their consumption is the cause of severe allergic reactions in humans. Tropomyosins, a family of muscle proteins, have been identified as the major allergens in shellfish and mollusks species. Nevertheless, few experimentally determined three-dimensional structures are available in the Protein Data Base (PDB. In this study, 3D models of several homologous of tropomyosins present in marine shellfish and mollusk species (Chaf 1, Met e1, Hom a1, Per v1, and Pen a1 were constructed, validated, and their immunoglobulin E binding epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools. All protein models for these allergens consisted of long alpha-helices. Chaf 1, Met e1, and Hom a1 had six conserved regions with sequence similarities to known epitopes, whereas Per v1 and Pen a1 contained only one. Lipophilic potentials of identified epitopes revealed a high propensity of hydrophobic amino acids in the immunoglobulin E binding site. This information could be useful to design tropomyosin-specific immunotherapy for sea food allergies.Os mariscos são fontes de alérgenos alimentares e seu consumo é a causa de graves reações alérgicas em humanos. Tropomiosinas, uma família de proteínas musculares, foram identificadas como os principais alérgenos em espécies de crustáceos e moluscos. No entanto, poucas estruturas experimentais tridimensionais estão disponíveis no Protein Data Base (PDB. Neste trabalho, modelos 3D de vários homólogos de tropomiosinas presentes em moluscos marinhos e espécies de moluscos (Chaf 1, Met e1, Hom a1, v1 Per e Pen a1 foram construídas, validadas e seus epítopos de ligação de imunoglobulina E (IgE foram identificados, utilizando ferramentas de bioinformática. Todos os modelos de proteína para esses alérgenos consistiam em longas alfa-hélices. Chaf 1, Met e1, e Hom a1 apresentaram seis regiões conservadas com similaridades de sequência para epítopos conhecidos

  7. Allergen Atlas: a comprehensive knowledge center and analysis resource for allergen information

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Joo Chuan; Lim, Shen Jean; Muh, Hon Cheng; Chew, Fook Tim; Tammi, Martti T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: A variety of specialist databases have been developed to facilitate the study of allergens. However, these databases either contain different subsets of allergen data or are deficient in tools for assessing potential allergenicity of proteins. Here, we describe Allergen Atlas, a comprehensive repository of experimentally validated allergen sequences collected from in-house laboratory, online data submission, literature reports and all existing general-purpose and specialist databases...

  8. Allergen-Experienced Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Acquire Memory-like Properties and Enhance Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Itziar; Mathä, Laura; Steer, Catherine A; Ghaedi, Maryam; Poon, Grace F T; Takei, Fumio

    2016-07-19

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) in the lung are stimulated by inhaled allergens. ILC2s do not directly recognize allergens but they are stimulated by cytokines including interleukin (IL)-33 released by damaged epithelium. In response to allergens, lung ILC2s produce T helper 2 cell type cytokines inducing T cell-independent allergic lung inflammation. Here we examined the fate of lung ILC2s upon allergen challenges. ILC2s proliferated and secreted cytokines upon initial stimulation with allergen or IL-33, and this phase was followed by a contraction phase as cytokine production ceased. Some ILC2s persisted long after the resolution of the inflammation as allergen-experienced ILC2s and responded to unrelated allergens more potently than naive ILC2s, mediating severe allergic inflammation. The allergen-experienced ILC2s exhibited a gene expression profile similar to that of memory T cells. The memory-like properties of allergen-experienced ILC2s may explain why asthma patients are often sensitized to multiple allergens. PMID:27421705

  9. Current Challenges in Detecting Food Allergens by Shotgun and Targeted Proteomic Approaches: A Case Study on Traces of Peanut Allergens in Baked Cookies

    OpenAIRE

    Romina Pedreschi; Jørgen Nørgaard; Alain Maquet

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for selective and sensitive methods to detect the presence of food allergens at trace levels in highly processed food products. In this work, a combination of non-targeted and targeted proteomics approaches are used to illustrate the difficulties encountered in the detection of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 from a representative processed food matrix. Shotgun proteomics was employed for selection of the proteotypic peptides for targeted approaches via...

  10. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...

  11. Characterisation of wheat flour allergens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šotkovský, Petr; Fuchs, M.; Havranová, M.; Tučková, Ludmila

    Vienna : Basic Science in Allergology, 2006, s. 416-416. [Congress of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology /25./. Vienna (AT), 10.06.2006-14.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2245 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : wheat flour * allergen * protein Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  12. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AI...

  13. Anaphylaxis to Insect Venom Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollert, Markus; Blank, Simon

    2015-01-01

    by a lack of specificity and venom immunotherapy by severe side effects and incomplete protection. In recent years, the knowledge about the molecular composition of Hymenoptera venoms has significantly increased and more and more recombinant venom allergens with advanced characteristics have become......, and to contribute to the understanding of the immunological mechanisms elicited by insect venoms....

  14. Recent progress in allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T

    2008-03-01

    The efficacy of allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with or without seasonal bronchial asthma and anaphylaxis caused by the sting of the hymenoptera class of insects has been clearly demonstrated in numerous well-designed, placebo-controlled trials. Immunotherapy whether by subcutaneous injection of allergen extract or by oral/sublingual routes modifies peripheral and mucosal TH2 responses in favour of TH1 responses and augments IL-10 synthesis by TRegs both locally and by peripheral T cells. Recent researches into the cellular and molecular basis of allergic reactions have advanced our understanding of the mechanisms involved in allergic diseases. They have also helped the development of innovative approaches that are likely to further improve the control of allergic responses in the future. Novel approaches to immunotherapy that are currently being explored include the use of peptide-based allergen preparations, which do not bind IgE and therefore do not activate mast cells, but reduce both Th1 and Th2-cytokine synthesis, while increasing levels of IL-10. Alternative strategies include the use of adjuvants, such as nucleotide immunostimulatory sequences derived from bacteria CpG or monophosphoryl lipid A that potentiate Th1 responses. Blocking the effects of IgE using anti-IgE such as omalizumab, a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to IgE, has been shown to be a useful strategy in the treatment of allergic asthma and rhinitis. The combination of anti-IgE-monoclonal antibody omalizumab with allergen immunotherapy has proved beneficial for the treatment of allergic diseases, offering improved efficacy, limited adverse effects, and potential immune-modifying effects. This combination may also accelerate the rapidity by which immunotherapy induces TReg cells. If allergic diseases are due to a lack of allergen-specific TReg cells, then effective therapies should target the induction and the

  15. Allergenic Proteins in Enology: A Review on Technological Applications and Safety Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Peñas; Chiara di Lorenzo; Francesca Uberti; Patrizia Restani

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous products are widely used as fining agents during winemaking to remove unwanted insoluble particles and undissolved microscopic particles (colloidal material) from the must or wine to improve stability. Some of them (egg white, caseinates, and fish gelatine) have allergenic potential and the presence of their residues in the final product could represent a risk for allergic individuals. Moreover, lysozyme (an egg allergen) is included among wine additives to control the fermentat...

  16. Sensitising capacity of peptides from food allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm

    . This PhD project aimed to investigate the sensitising potential of digestion products from the peanut allergen Ara h 1 and the cow’s milk allergen β-lactoglobulin (BLG) in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model. Further the project aimed to compare the IgE binding epitopes of intact and digested Ara h 1. This...... was done by digesting Ara h 1 and BLG in an in vitro model simulating the human gastric or gastroduodenal digestion process. Simulated gastric digestion was performed with immobilised pepsin for 120 min at pH 2.5, while simulated duodenal digestion was performed with immobilised trypsin and....... Comparison of intact and digested Ara h 1-specific IgE binding epitopes were performed by competitive immunoscreening using a random phage-displayed peptide library followed by mapping the identified IgE-binding epitope mimics on the surface of the Ara h 1 molecule. In addition to sera from the sensitised BN...

  17. Understanding the differentiating impacts of the communication strategies of a high involvement service (investment advisory services) and a high involvement product (precious jewellery) on customer satisfaction and loyalty.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Gauri

    2009-01-01

    While marketing literature has largely focused on high and low involvement purchases and the positive relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty; the differentiating impacts of communication strategies for a high involvement service and a high involvement product on customer satisfaction and loyalty has received little academic attention. Consequently, this study examines the differentiating impacts of the communication strategies for investment advisory services and precious jewe...

  18. Novel allergen preparations for use in allergen-specific immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Neimert Andersson, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Allergy is a common disease in the industrialized countries, affecting approximately 25% of the population. Therefore, there is a need to find new treatment strategies to improve the quality of life for allergic individuals. Today the only treatment that gives long-lasting reduction of allergic symptoms is allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). However, despite successful clinical outcome, the method as it is performed today has some drawbacks such as therapy associated side...

  19. Dust and storage mites: from allergen screening to allergen control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hýblová, Jana; Hubert, J.; Kudlíková, I.; Marešová, Lucie; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    Vienna : -, 2006. [EAACI 2006. Congress of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology /25./. 10.06.2006-14.06.2006, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550617 Grant ostatní: MŠk(CZ) 1P04OC853.003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : proteases * allergen * alpha-amylases Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  20. A plasmacytoid dendritic cell (CD123+/CD11c-) based assay system to predict contact allergenicity of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A predictive allergenicity test system for assessing the contact allergenicity of chemicals is needed by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to monitor product safety in the marketplace. Development of such non-animal alternative assay systems for skin sensitization and hazard identification has been pursued by policy makers and regulatory agencies. We investigated whether phenotypic and functional changes to a subset of dendritic cells (DC), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), could be used to identify contact allergens. To achieve this goal, normal human DC were generated from CD34+ progenitor cells and cryopreserved. Frozen DC were thawed and the pDC fraction (CD123+/CD11c-) was harvested using FACS sorting. The pDC were cultured, expanded, and exposed to chemical allergens (N = 26) or non-allergens (N = 22). Concentrations of each chemical that resulted in >50% viability was determined using FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells using pDC from 2 to 5 donors. Expression of the surface marker, CD86, which has been implicated in dendritic cell maturation, was used as a marker of allergenicity. CD86 expression increased (≥1.5-fold) for 25 of 26 allergens (sensitivity = 96%) but did not increase for 19 of 22 non-allergens (specificity = 86%). In a direct comparison to historical data for the regulatory approved, mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA) for 23 allergens and 22 non-allergens, the pDC method had sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 86%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the LLNA assay was 83% and 82%, respectively. In conclusion, CD86 expression in pDC appears to be a sensitive and specific indicator to identify contact allergenicity. Such an assay method utilizing normal human cells will be useful for high throughput screening of chemicals for allergenicity.

  1. Ultrasensitive aptamer based detection of β-conglutin food allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodova, Marketa; Mairal, Teresa; Nadal, Pedro; Bermudo, M Carmen; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2014-12-15

    Lupine has been increasingly used in food applications due to its high nutritional value and excellent functional properties. However, there has been a response to the increasing number of severe cases of lupine allergies reported during the last decade, and as a result lupine was recently added to the list of substances requiring mandatory advisory labelling on foodstuffs sold in the European Union. In this paper we report the robust and ultrasensitive detection of the anaphylactic β-conglutin allergen using Apta-PCR achieving a detection limit of 85 pM (25 ng mL(-1)). No cross-reactivity with other conglutins or plant species potentially used in lupine containing foodstuffs was observed. This robust method provides an effective analytical tool for the detection and quantification of the toxic β-conglutin subunit present in lupine flour. PMID:25038695

  2. Allergen immunotherapy in polysensitized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiško, M; Špičák, V

    2016-05-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only therapeutic method with positive impact on natural course of allergic disease - affecting clinical development (including the progression of rhinitis to asthma) and new sensitisations. The actual problem is the increasing number of patients manifesting poly-sensitivity in allergy skin tests and / or in specific IgE tests. Usually, AIT is not recommended in such individuals. The objective we are facing is that in many patients tested as poly-reactive, we have to distinguish in which cases it is a true polysensitization, and when it is due to cross-reactivity of specific IgE antibodies induced by panallergens. This may really determine when AIT may be an appropriate course of action. The article focuses on this problem in more detail, applying the long time Czech and Slovak experience with allergy testing and allergen immunotherapy. PMID:27152601

  3. Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeckx, Kitty; Broekman, Henrike; Knulst, André; Houben, Geert

    2016-08-01

    To solve the future food insecurity problem, alternative and sustainable protein sources (e.g. insects, rapeseed, fava bean and algae) are now being explored for the production of food and feed. To approve these novel protein sources for future food a comprehensive risk assessment is needed according to the European food legislation. Allergenicity risk assessment might pose some major difficulties, since detailed guidance on how to assess the allergenic potential of novel foods is not available. At present, the approach relies mostly on the guidance of allergenicity assessment for genetically modified (GM) plant foods. The most recent one was proposed by EFSA (2010 and 2011); "weight-of-evidence approach". However this guidance is difficult to interpret, not completely applicable or validated for novel foods and therefore needs some adjustments. In this paper we propose a conceptual strategy which is based on the "weight-of-evidence approach" for food derived from GM plants and other strategies that were previously published in the literature. This strategy will give more guidance on how to assess the allergenicity of novel food proteins and protein sources. PMID:27012375

  4. Allergenicity assessment of osmotin, a pathogenesis-related protein, used for transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prerna; Singh, Abinav Kumar; Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2011-09-28

    Genetic engineering can enhance abiotic stress tolerance of plants, thereby increasing productivity. The present study investigates allergenicity of osmotin protein used for developing transgenic crops. Bioinformatic analysis of osmotin was performed using SDAP and Farrp allergen databases. Osmotin was cloned in pET22b+ vector, purified to homogeneity, and analyzed for digestibility, heat stability, and IgE binding using atopic patients' sera. Osmotin showed 40-92% and 48-75% homology with allergens in SDAP and Farrp databases, respectively. These cross-reactive allergens were from apple, tomato, peach, capsicum, kiwi fruit, and cypress. Osmotin was resistant to pepsin digestion and heat treatment at 90 °C for 1 h. Osmotin protein showed dose-dependent inhibition with pooled patients' sera. It showed significant IgE binding with 22 of 117 patients' sera who were sensitized to tomato and apple, thus indicating cross-reactivity among tomato, apple, and osmotin allergens. In conclusion, osmotin was identified as a potential allergen and showed cross-reactivity with tomato and apple allergens. PMID:21838306

  5. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors DCs are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence DCs behavior through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarize current understanding of how allergens are recognized by DCs and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitization and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signaling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitization hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases. PMID:24204367

  6. Identification and characterization of major cat allergen Fel d 1 mimotopes on filamentous phage carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzar, Jernej; Molek, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Korošec, Peter; Košnik, Mitja; Štrukelj, Borut; Lunder, Mojca

    2016-03-01

    Cat allergy is one of the most prevalent allergies worldwide and can lead to the development of rhinitis and asthma. Thus far, only allergen extracts from natural sources have been used for allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, extracts and whole allergens in immunotherapy present an anaphylaxis risk. Identification of allergen epitopes or mimotopes has an important role in development of safe and effective allergen-specific immunotherapy. Moreover, with a suitable immunogenic carrier, the absence of sufficient immune response elicited by short peptides could be surmounted. In this study, we identified five structural mimotopes of the major cat allergen Fel d 1 by immunoscreening with random peptide phage libraries. The mimotopes were computationally mapped to the allergen surface, and their IgE reactivity was confirmed using sera from cat-allergic patients. Importantly, the mimotopes showed no basophil activation of the corresponding cat-allergic patients, which makes them good candidates for the development of hypoallergenic vaccine. As bacteriophage particles are becoming increasingly recognized as immunogenic carriers, we constructed bacteriophage particles displaying multiple copies of each selected mimotope on major phage coat protein. These constructed phages elicited T cell-mediated immune response, which was predominated by the type 1 T cell response. Mimotopes alone contributed to the type 1 T cell response by promoting IL-2 production. Fel d 1 mimotopes, as well as their filamentous phage immunogenic carriers, represent promising candidates in the development of hypoallergenic vaccine against cat allergy. PMID:26908079

  7. Encapsulating contact allergens in liposomes, ethosomes, and polycaprolactone may affect their sensitizing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2011-06-01

    Attempts to improve formulation of topical products are a continuing process and the development of micro- and nanovesicular systems as well as polymeric microparticles has led to marketing of topical drugs and cosmetics using these technologies. Encapsulation of some well-known contact allergens in ethanolic liposomes have been reported to enhance allergenicity compared with the allergens in similar vehicles without liposomes. The present report includes data on more sensitization studies using the mouse local lymph node assay with three contact allergens encapsulated in different dermal drug-delivery systems: liposomes, ethosomes, and polycaprolactone particles. The results show that the drug-delivery systems are not sensitizers in themselves. Encapsulating the hydrophilic contact allergen potassium dichromate in all three drug-delivery systems did not affect the sensitizing capacity of potassium dichromate compared with control solutions. However, encapsulating the lipophilic contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in polycaprolactone reduced the sensitizing capacity to 1211 ± 449 compared with liposomes (7602 ± 2658) and in acetone:olive oil (4:1) (5633 ± 666). The same trend was observed for encapsulating isoeugenol in polycaprolactone (1100 ± 406) compared with a formulation in acetone:olive oil (4491 ± 819) and in liposomes (3668 ± 950). Further, the size of DNCB-loaded liposomes did not affect the sensitizing properties. These results suggest that modern dermal drug-delivery systems may in some cases magnify or decrease the sensitizing capacity of the encapsulated contact allergen. PMID:21198410

  8. Therapeutic Effects of DNA Vaccine on Allergen-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mouse Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping Li; Zhigang Liu; Nanshan Zhong; Bin Liao1; Ying Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA encoding Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 (Der p 2) allergen previously showed its effects of immunologic protection on Der p 2 allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice. In present study, we investigated whether DNA vaccine encoding Der p 2 could exert therapeutic role on allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation in mouse model and explored the mechanism of DNA vaccination in asthma specific-allergen immunotherapy. After sensitized and challenged by Der p 2, the BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine. The degrees of cellular infiltration were scored. IgE levels in serum and IL-4/lL-13 levels in BALF were determined by ELISA. The lung tissues were assessed by histological examinations. Expressions of STAT6 and NF-κB in lung were determined by immunohistochemistry staining. Vaccination of mice with DNA vaccine inhibited the development of airway inflammation and the production of mucin induced by allergen, and reduced the level of Der p 2-specific IgE level. Significant reductions of eosinophii infiltration and levels of IL-4and IL-13 in BALF were observed after vaccination. Further more, DNA vaccination inhibited STAT6 and NF-κBexpression in lung tissue in Der p 2-immunized mice. These results indicated that DNA vaccine encoding Der p 2allergen could be used for therapy of allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation in our mouse model.

  9. Food allergens: molecular and immunological aspects, allergen databases and cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Anne-Regine; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The currently known food allergens are assigned to a relatively small number of protein families. Food allergens grouped into protein families share common functional and structural features that can be attributed to the allergenic potency and potential cross-reactivity of certain proteins. Molecular data, in terms of structural information, biochemical characteristics and clinical relevance for each known allergen, including isoforms and variants, are mainly compiled into four open-access databases. Allergens are designated according to defined criteria by the World Health Organization and the International Union of Immunological Societies Allergen Nomenclature Sub-committee. Food allergies are caused by primary sensitisation to the disease-eliciting food allergens (class I food allergen), or they can be elicited as a consequence of a primary sensitisation to inhalant allergens and subsequent IgE cross-reaction to homologous proteins in food (class II food allergens). Class I and class II allergens display different clinical significance in children and adults and are characterised by different molecular features. In line with this, high stability when exposed to gastrointestinal digestion and heat treatment is attributed to many class I food allergens that frequently induce severe reactions. The stability of a food allergen is determined by its molecular characteristics and can be influenced by structural (chemical) modifications due to thermal processing. Moreover, the immunogenicity and allergenicity of food allergens further depends on specific T cell and B cell epitopes. Although the T cell epitope pattern can be highly diverse for individual patients, several immuno-prominent T cell epitopes have been identified. Such conserved T cell epitopes and IgE cross-reactive B cell epitopes contribute to cross-reactivity between food allergens of the same family and to clinical cross-reactivity, similar to the birch pollen-food syndrome. PMID:26022861

  10. New routes for allergen immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Pål; von Moos, Seraina; Mohanan, Deepa; Kündig, Thomas M.; Senti, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergy is a highly prevalent disease in the industrialized world. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) should be the preferred treatment, as it has long lasting protective effects and can stop the progression of the disease. However, few allergic patients choose to undergo SIT, due to the long treatment time and potential allergic adverse events. Since the beneficial effects of SIT are mediated by antigen presenting cells inducing Th1, Treg and antibody responses, whereas the a...

  11. Soybean allergen detection methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mona H; Holzhauser, Thomas; Bisson, Caroline;

    2008-01-01

    ) using basophils passively sensitized with patient serum and a PCR method detecting soy DNA. Eight food products were selected as model foods to test the performance of the methods. There was an overall good agreement between the methods in terms of ranks of soy content but not the quantity. The sandwich......Soybean containing products are widely consumed, thus reliable methods for detection of soy in foods are needed in order to make appropriate risk assessment studies to adequately protect soy allergic patients. Six methods were compared using eight food products with a declared content of soy...... ELISA aimed at native soy proteins had the lowest detection limit of 0.05 ppm, but only identified soy in 5/8 products, and generally in lower amounts compared to other methods. The competitive ELISA had a higher detection limit of 21 ppm, but seemed more successful in detecting processed soy. Only HR...

  12. Understanding Allergic Asthma from Allergen Inhalation Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Donald W Cockcroft; Hargreave, Fredrick E; Paul M O’Byrne; Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2007-01-01

    The allergen challenge has evolved, in less than 150 years, from a crude tool used to document the etiology of allergen-induced disease to a well-controlled tool used today to investigate the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of asthma. Highlights of the authors’ involvement with the allergen challenge include confirmation of the immunoglobulin E-dependence of the late asthmatic response, importance of (nonallergic) airway hyper-responsiveness as a determinant of the airway response to alle...

  13. [Significance of inhaled environmental allergens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochert, J

    1983-01-01

    Whereas the importance of pollen as inhalative allergens has been largely investigated and is generally known, the experience in the frequency and the role of the sensibilization with air-borne fungi is relatively limited. In 720 patients with Asthma bronchiale the degree of sensitization has been tested with various extracts of air-borne fungi of SSW Dresden (mould mixture, aspergillin, mucor, cladosporium and penicillium and alternaria). The most frequent and also the strongest reactions were found with alternaria and the smallest part of positive skin reactions with penicillium. An isolated sensitization with mould has been demonstrated in 20 per cent of the cases. In 60 per cent of the tested patients a manifest mould allergy was shown by means of the Inhalative Allergen Test, the most favourable correlation between Intracutaneous Test (ICT) and Inhalative Test (IAT) was found with alternaria (76%). A conformance between ICT and basophils degranulation test (BDT) was stated in 69% of the cases. The aim should be comparable tests with allergen extracts without irritative effects and qualitative measurements of air-borne fungi. PMID:6649704

  14. Allergen Recognition by Innate Immune Cells: Critical Role of Dendritic and Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial...

  15. New Allergens of Relevance in Tropical Regions: The Impact of Ascaris lumbricoides Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Caraballo, Luis; Acevedo, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    One of the many aspects of the relationships between parasite infections and allergic diseases is the possibility that allergens from parasites enhance the TH2 responses, especially IgE production, in allergic diseases such as asthma. In this review we discuss about the allergenic composition of the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides and their potential impact on allergy sensitization and asthma pathogenesis and prevalence in populations living in the tropics and naturally exposed to both, mite al...

  16. Cross-reactivity between aeroallergens and food allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2015-06-26

    In patients with respiratory allergy, cross-reactivity between aeroallergens and foods may induce food allergy, symptoms ranging from oral allergy syndrome to severe anaphylaxis. Clinical entities due to IgE sensitization to cross-reactive aeroallergen and food allergen components are described for many sources of plant origin (pollen-food syndromes and associations, such as birch-apple, cypress-peach and celery-mugwort-spice syndromes, and mugwort-peach, mugwort-chamomile, mugwort-mustard, ragweed-melon-banana, goosefoot-melon associations), fungal origin (Alternaria-spinach syndrome), and invertebrate, mammalian or avian origin (mite-shrimp, cat-pork, and bird-egg syndromes). Clinical cases of allergic reactions to ingestion of food products containing pollen grains of specific plants, in patients with respiratory allergy to Asteraceae pollen, especially mugwort and ragweed, are also mentioned, for honey, royal jelly and bee polen dietary supplements, along with allergic reactions to foods contaminated with mites or fungi in patients with respiratory allergy to these aeroallergens. Medical history and diagnosis approach may be guided by the knowledge about the diverse cross-reacting allergens involved, and by the understanding of these clinical entities which may vary significantly or may be overlapping. The association between primary IgE sensitization with respiratory symptoms to inhaled allergens and food allergy due to cross-reactive allergen components is important to assess in allergy practice. The use of molecular-based diagnosis improves the understanding of clinically relevant IgE sensitization to cross-reactive allergen components from aeroallergen sources and foods. PMID:26140270

  17. 75 FR 17929 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants. The committee will discuss what additional... characterization of cell substrates, viral seeds, and other biological materials used in the production of...

  18. Aspergillus fumigatus allergen expression is coordinately regulated in response to hydrogen peroxide and cyclic AMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowyer Paul

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A. fumigatus has been associated with a wide spectrum of allergic disorders such as ABPA or SAFS. It is poorly understood what allergens in particular are being expressed during fungal invasion and which are responsible for stimulation of immune responses. Study of the dynamics of allergen production by fungi may lead to insights into how allergens are presented to the immune system. Methods Expression of 17 A. fumigatus allergen genes was examined in response to various culture conditions and stimuli as well as in the presence of macrophages in order to mimic conditions encountered in the lung. Results Expression of 14/17 allergen genes was strongly induced by oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (Asp f 1, -2, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -10, -13, -17 and -18, all >10-fold and Asp f 11, -12, and -22, 5-10-fold and 16/17 allergen genes were repressed in the presence of cAMP. The 4 protease allergen genes (Asp f -5, -10, -13 and -18 were expressed at very low levels compared to the comparator (β-tubulin under all other conditions examined. Mild heat shock, anoxia, lipid and presence of macrophages did not result in coordinated changes in allergen gene expression. Growth on lipid as sole carbon source contributed to the moderate induction of most of the allergen genes. Heat shock (37°C > 42°C caused moderate repression in 11/17 genes (Asp f 1, -2, -4, -5, -6, -9, -10, -13, -17, -18 and -23 (2- to 9-fold, which was mostly evident for Asp f 1 and -9 (~9-fold. Anaerobic stress led to moderate induction of 13/17 genes (1.1 to 4-fold with one, Asp f 8 induced over 10-fold when grown under mineral oil. Complex changes were seen in gene expression during co-culture of A. fumigatus with macrophages. Conclusions Remarkable coordination of allergen gene expression in response to a specific condition (oxidative stress or the presence of cAMP has been observed, implying that a single biological stimulus may play a role in allergen gene

  19. Ethosome formulations of known contact allergens can increase their sensitizing capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Karlberg, Ann-Therese;

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular systems, such as liposomes and ethosomes, are used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products to encapsulate ingredients, to protect ingredients from degradation, to increase bioavailability, and to improve cosmetic performance. Some reports have suggested that formulation of cosmetic...... ingredients in vesicular carrier systems may increase their contact allergy elicitation potential in humans. However, no sensitization studies have been published. We formulated two model contact allergens (isoeugenol and dinitrochlorobenzene) in ethosomes and investigated the sensitization response using a...... modified local lymph node assay (LLNA). The results were compared with those for the same allergens in similar concentrations and vehicles without ethosomes. Both allergens encapsulated in 200-300 nm ethosomes showed increased sensitizing potency in the murine assay compared with the allergens in solution...

  20. Occupational exposure to allergens in oxidative hair dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Lunder, Tomaž; Bilban, Marjan; Zaletel, Polona

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative hair dyes are the most important hair dying products. Hairdressers are exposed to the allergens found in oxidative hair dyes during the process of applying dyes to the hair, when cutting freshly dyed hair, or as a consequence of prior contamination of the working environment. pphenylenediamine, toluene-2,5-diamine and its sulphate are the most common ingredients in oxidative hair dyes that cause allergic contact dermatitis in hairdressers. Cross-reactivity of p-phenylenediamine with...

  1. The Reactivity and Allergenic Potential of Hazelnut Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lavinia Florina Calinoiu; Dan Cristian Vodnar; Carmen Socaciu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to focus on proteins present in some food products, like hazelnuts and to investigate their allergenic potential. Several techniques were used to characterize these extracted proteins, with respect to their composition, degradability by digestive proteolytic enzymes and their reactivity with specific antibodies. It was important to analyse which proteins were present in the hazelnuts, to see if there were proteins present to trigger an allergic reaction and if the di...

  2. Latex allergens in tire dust and airborne particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel, A G; Cass, G R; Weiss, J; Glovsky, M M

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of latex allergy has increased dramatically in the last 15 years due to exposure to natural rubber products. Although historically this health risk has been elevated in hospital personnel and patients, a recent survey has indicated a significant potential risk for the general population. To obtain a wide-spread source for latex exposure, we have considered tire debris. We have searched for the presence of latex allergens in passenger car and truck tire tread, in de...

  3. A review of the materials and allergens in protective gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Rebecca F; Lyons, Paul; Horne, Helen; Mark Wilkinson, S

    2009-09-01

    The ingredients previously reported to cause protective glove allergy are presented and evaluated for strength of evidence. Allergens that have caused both delayed hypersensitivity and contact urticaria are considered for rubber, plastic, leather, and textile gloves. The current guidelines regarding glove manufacture are described. A list of materials confirmed by the industry to be used in glove production is presented together with a suggested series for investigating patients with delayed type hypersensitivity and contact urticaria secondary to glove use. PMID:19780770

  4. Commercialized rapid immunoanalytical tests for determination of allergenic food proteins: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert-Ullrich, Patricia; Rudolf, Judith; Ansari, Parisa; Galler, Brigitte; Führer, Manuela; Molinelli, Alexandra; Baumgartner, Sabine

    2009-09-01

    Food allergies have become an important health issue especially in industrialized countries. Undeclared allergenic ingredients or the presence of "hidden" allergens because of contamination during the food production process pose great health risks to sensitised individuals. The EU directive for food labelling lists allergenic foods that have to be declared on food products by the manufacturers. The list includes gluten-containing cereals, crustaceans, eggs, fish, peanuts, soybeans, milk, various nuts (e.g. almond, hazelnut, and walnut, etc.), celery, mustard, sesame seeds, lupin, and molluscs. Reliable methods for detection and quantification of food allergens are needed that can be applied in a fast and easy-to-use manner, are portable, and need only limited technical equipment. This review focuses on the latest developments in food allergen analysis with special emphasis on fast immunoanalytical methods such as rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), lateral-flow immunochromatographic assays (LFA) and dipstick tests. Emerging technologies such as immunochemical microarrays and biosensors are also discussed and their application to food allergen analysis is reviewed. Finally, a comprehensive overview of rapid immunochemical test kits that are currently available commercially is given in tabular form. PMID:19308361

  5. Contents of fragrance allergens in children's cosmetics and cosmetic-toys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rastogi, S C; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Menné, T;

    1999-01-01

    Fragrances are one of the major causes of allergic contact dermatitis from use of cosmetics. The aim of the current study was to assess the possible exposure of infants and children to fragrance allergens from cosmetic products and "toy-cosmetics". 25 children's cosmetics or toy-cosmetic products...... was present in a maximum concentration of 0.07%. In one cosmetic-toy, cinnamic alcohol was present at 3.7% which exceeds the current industry guideline for safe products by a factor of 5. In all types of products other fragrance allergens were frequently found. In conclusion, children are already...

  6. New routes for allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Pål; von Moos, Seraina; Mohanan, Deepa; Kündig, Thomas M; Senti, Gabriela

    2012-10-01

    IgE-mediated allergy is a highly prevalent disease in the industrialized world. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) should be the preferred treatment, as it has long lasting protective effects and can stop the progression of the disease. However, few allergic patients choose to undergo SIT, due to the long treatment time and potential allergic adverse events. Since the beneficial effects of SIT are mediated by antigen presenting cells inducing Th1, Treg and antibody responses, whereas the adverse events are caused by mast cells and basophils, the therapeutic window of SIT may be widened by targeting tissues rich in antigen presenting cells. Lymph nodes and the epidermis contain high density of dendritic cells and low numbers of mast cells and basophils. The epidermis has the added benefit of not being vascularised thereby reducing the chances of anaphylactic shock due to leakage of allergen. Hence, both these tissues represent highly promising routes for SIT and are the focus of discussion in this review. PMID:23095873

  7. Proteomic analysis of secretory products from the model gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus reveals dominance of Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Hewitson, James P.; Harcus, Yvonne; Murray, Janice; van Agtmaal, Maaike; Filbey, Kara J.; Grainger, John R.; Bridgett, Stephen; Blaxter, Mark L; Ashton, Peter D.; Ashford, David; Rachel S Curwen; Wilson, R Alan; Dowle, Adam A.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal helminth parasite, Heligmosomoides polygyrus offers a tractable experimental model for human hookworm infections such as Ancylostoma duodenale and veterinary parasites such as Haemonchus contortus. Parasite excretory-secretory (ES) products represent the major focus for immunological and biochemical analyses, and contain immunomodulatory molecules responsible for nematode immune evasion. In a proteomic analysis of adult H. polygyrus secretions (termed HES) matched to an extensi...

  8. Mass spectrometric investigation of molecular variability of grass pollen group 1 allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenaille, François; Nony, Emmanuel; Chabre, Henri; Lautrette, Aurélie; Couret, Marie-Noëlle; Batard, Thierry; Moingeon, Philippe; Ezan, Eric

    2009-08-01

    Natural grass pollen allergens exhibit a wide variety of isoforms. Precise characterization of such microheterogeneity is essential to improve diagnosis and design appropriate immunotherapies. Moreover, standardization of allergen vaccine production is a prerequisite for product safety and efficiency. Both qualitative and quantitative analytical methods are thus required to monitor and control the huge natural variability of pollens, as well as final product quality. A proteomic approach has been set up to investigate in depth the structural variability of five group 1 allergens originating from distinct grass species (Ant o 1, Dac g 1, Lol p 1, Phl p 1, and Poa p 1). Whereas group 1 is the most conserved grass pollen allergen, great variations were shown between the various isoforms found in these five species using mass spectrometry, with many amino acid exchanges, as well as variations in proline hydroxylation level and in main N-glycan motifs. The presence of O-linked pentose residues was also demonstrated, with up to three consecutive units on the first hydroxyproline of Ant o 1. In addition, species-specific peptides were identified that might be used for product authentication or individual allergen quantification. Lastly, natural or process-induced modifications (deamidation, oxidation, glycation) were evidenced, which might constitute useful indicators of product degradation. PMID:19572759

  9. The Effect of Climate Change and Air Pollution on Allergenic Potential of Pollens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Adina TODEA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is associated with atmospheric warming due to continuous increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentration following the industrial revolution. The urban areas are more responsible for these changes. Europe for example has experienced a progressive warming +0.9°C for 1901-2005. Climate change is unequivocal and represents a possible threat for patients affected by allergic conditions because it is related with an increased distribution and concentration of pollen. Higher temperature, wet condition (especially thunderstorms, wind speed, transition of cold fronts, environmental changes (allergenic pollens arrived in new areas, are mechanisms which involve changes of production, dispersion and allergen content of pollen. Prolonged and more severe pollen seasons are leading to worsened asthma and allergies. The interaction of pollen with urban air pollutants could also lead to an increased effect of aero allergens on allergic patients, with a greater likelihood of the development of an allergic respiratory disease in sensitized subjects and exacerbation of symptomatic patients. Air pollution could induce damage to airways mucosa, thus promoting sensitization of the airways; also it could increase the expression of allergenic proteins (allergen contents of pollen produce by plants is increased by higher temperature and CO2 enriched atmosphere. By increasing pollen concentration or making the airways susceptible to allergens, the climate change and air pollution have a negative impact on human health.

  10. Summary of the ACS symposium on Advances in Food Allergen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark M; Jackson, Lauren

    2013-06-19

    A symposium titled "Advances in Food Allergen Detection" was held at the 243rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in March 2012 in San Diego, CA, and was sponsored by the ACS Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The purpose of the symposium was to convene the leaders in the food allergen analysis field for presentations on, and discussions of, the state of the art, new developments, and critical challenges in the detection and quantitation of allergenic proteins in foods. Twenty-five presentations were delivered by speakers representing academic, government, and industrial institutions in 10 countries. The presentations covered all aspects of food allergens, including a historical progress review, regulatory policies, clinical practices, food-processing effects, food production equipment cross-contamination and cleaning, and the performance of several food allergen analytical strategies and technologies. This paper is intended to provide a brief summary of the presentations as well as a record of the proceedings of the symposium, which was deemed a great success in advancing food allergen analysis. PMID:23167825

  11. The hammock: a reservoir of allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca X. M. Rego

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Asthma affects approximately 10% of the world's population. Sensitization to allergens is an important risk factor, and exposure to allergens is associated with disease severity. METHODS: We performed skin tests to evaluate allergen sensitization to mites, cockroaches, cats, dogs, and molds in 73 asthmatic patients. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay was used to assay the mite and cockroach allergens found in dust from the bedding, hammocks, bedroom floors, living rooms, and kitchens of 29 patients and 14 controls. RESULTS: Fifty patients (68.5% had positive skin test responses. There were positive responses to D. pteronyssinus (52.0%, B. tropicalis (53.4%, T. putrescentiae (15.0%, E. maynei (12.3%, L. destructor (8.2%, B. germanica (20.5%, P. americana (21.9%, Felis catus (10.9%, C. herbarium (2.7%, A. alternata (4.1%, and P. notatun (1.3%. The exposure to mite and cockroach allergens was similar in the patients and the controls. The Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus Group 1 levels were highest in the beds and hammocks. The Blattella germanica Group 1 levels were highest in the kitchens, living rooms and hammocks. DISCUSSION: The positive skin tests to mites, cockroaches and cats were consistent with previous studies. D pteronyssinus was the most prevalent home dust mite, and hammocks were a source of allergens. To improve asthma prophylaxis, it is important to determine its association with mite allergen exposure in hammocks.

  12. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita Hiroyuki; Soyka Michael B; Akdis Mübeccel; Akdis Cezmi A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a ro...

  13. Food Allergens: Is There a Correlation between Stability to Digestion and Allergenicity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. It has not yet been established what makes a dietary protein a food allergen. Several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by food allergens. One of these is resistance to digestion. This....... Therefore, the predictive value of the pepsin resistance test for assessing the allergenic potential of novel proteins can be questioned....

  14. Cat allergen exposure at school : Evaluation of sampling methods and allergen avoidance strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    Cat allergy is the most common allergy among school children in Sweden. Cat allergen is ubiquitous in school premises and other public places and this indirect exposure to cat may induce symptoms among cat sensitized children with asthma. The aim of the present thesis was to evaluate sampling methods and allergen avoidance strategies used in this environment. The first study evaluated a new allergen sampling method (Petri dishes) for collection of airborne settling dust. ...

  15. Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This chapter of "The Best of the Best of ERIC," Volume 2, contains 14 summaries of documents and journal articles on citizen advisory committees, all of which are indexed in either "Resources in Education" or "Current Index to Journals in Education." The materials included deal with various aspects of this topic, such as the role of the school…

  16. Analysis and critical comparison of food allergen recalls from the European Union, USA, Canada, Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchini, Luca; Guzzon, Antonella; Poms, Roland; Senyuva, Hamide

    2016-05-01

    As part of a European Union-funded project (FP7) developing 'Integrated approaches to food allergen and allergy management', a database was constructed based on publicly available information on food allergen recalls in Europe, North America, Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand. Over 2000 entries were made into the database. The database covers a 4-year period from 2011 to 2014 and each entry is categorised into food type (two different classifications), identified allergen and cause where indicated by the authorities. Across different authorities, by far the biggest incidence of undeclared allergens occurred in the food categories of prepared dishes and snacks (range = 12-53%), and cereals and bakery products (range = 14-25% of all recalls and/or alerts). The biggest incidence of undeclared allergens, according to the information from most authorities, occurred for milk and milk products (16-31% of all products with recall or alert), followed by cereals containing gluten (9-19%), soy (5-45%), and egg and egg products (5-17%). Although 42-90% of the products with recalls/alerts were explained as being 'Not indicated on the label', this is a generic explanation of cause and does not provide much insight into the causes of the recall/alerts. However, 0-17% of products with recalls/alerts could be coded as caused by the unintended presence of an allergen as the probable result of cross-contact in production. Construction of the database of allergen recalls has provided some important lessons and recommendations to the authorities are made in this paper in terms of the harmonisation of the reporting of allergen recalls into a more standardised format. PMID:27004727

  17. Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives' allergenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipinda, Itai; Simoyi, Reuben H; Siegel, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Benzoquinone (BQ) and benzoquinone derivatives (BQD) are used in the production of dyes and cosmetics. While BQ, an extreme skin sensitizer, is an electrophile known to covalently modify proteins via Michael Addition (MA) reaction whilst halogen substituted BQD undergo nucleophilic vinylic substitution (SNV) mechanism onto amine and thiol moieties on proteins, the allergenic effects of adding substituents on BQ have not been reported. The effects of inserting substituents on the BQ ring has not been studied in animal assays. However, mandated reduction/elimination of animals used in cosmetics testing in Europe has led to an increased need for alternatives for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents on BQ were assessed for effects on BQ reactivity toward nitrobenzene thiol (NBT). The NBT binding studies demonstrated that addition of EWG to BQ as exemplified by the chlorine substituted BQDs increased reactivity while addition of EDG as in the methyl substituted BQDs reduced reactivity. BQ and BQD skin allerginicity was evaluated in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). BQD with electron withdrawing groups had the highest chemical potency followed by unsubstituted BQ and the least potent were the BQD with electron donating groups. The BQD results demonstrate the impact of inductive effects on both BQ reactivity and allergenicity, and suggest the potential utility of chemical reactivity data for electrophilic allergen identification and potency ranking. PMID:26612505

  18. Chemical allergens stimulate human epidermal keratinocytes to produce lymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a cell-mediated immune response that involves skin sensitization in response to contact with various allergens. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis both play roles in the allergic sensitization process. Epidermal keratinocytes can produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to UV irradiation and during wound healing. However, the effect of haptenic chemical allergens on the VEGF production of human keratinocytes, which is the primary contact site of toxic allergens, has not been thoroughly researched. We systematically investigated whether immune-regulatory cytokines and chemical allergens would lead to the production of VEGF in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) in culture. VEGF production significantly increased when NHKs were treated with IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22 or TNFα. Among the human sensitizers listed in the OECD Test Guideline (TG) 429, we found that CMI/MI, DNCB, 4-phenylenediamine, cobalt chloride, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, citral, HCA, cinnamic alcohol, imidazolidinyl urea and nickel chloride all significantly upregulated VEGF production in NHKs. In addition, common human haptenic allergens such as avobenzone, formaldehyde and urushiol, also induced the keratinocyte-derived VEGF production. VEGF upregulation by pro-inflammatory stimuli, IFNγ, DNCB or formaldehyde is preceded by the production of IL-8, an acute inflammatory phase cytokine. Lymphangiogenic VEGF-C gene transcription was significantly increased when NHKs were treated with formaldehyde, DNCB or urushiol, while transcription of VEGF-A and VEGF-B did not change. Therefore, the chemical allergen-induced VEGF upregulation is mainly due to the increase in lymphangiogenic VEGF-C transcription in NHKs. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived VEGF may regulate the lymphangiogenic process during the skin sensitization process of ACD. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induced VEGF production in normal human

  19. Chemical allergens stimulate human epidermal keratinocytes to produce lymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ok-Nam [College of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seyeon; Jin, Sun Hee; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung [College of Pharmacy, Natural Products Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Sun [College of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Young-Jin [College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ai-Young, E-mail: leeay@duih.org [Department of Dermatology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang 410-773 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Minsoo, E-mail: minsoo@alum.mit.edu [College of Pharmacy, Natural Products Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a cell-mediated immune response that involves skin sensitization in response to contact with various allergens. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis both play roles in the allergic sensitization process. Epidermal keratinocytes can produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to UV irradiation and during wound healing. However, the effect of haptenic chemical allergens on the VEGF production of human keratinocytes, which is the primary contact site of toxic allergens, has not been thoroughly researched. We systematically investigated whether immune-regulatory cytokines and chemical allergens would lead to the production of VEGF in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) in culture. VEGF production significantly increased when NHKs were treated with IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22 or TNFα. Among the human sensitizers listed in the OECD Test Guideline (TG) 429, we found that CMI/MI, DNCB, 4-phenylenediamine, cobalt chloride, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, citral, HCA, cinnamic alcohol, imidazolidinyl urea and nickel chloride all significantly upregulated VEGF production in NHKs. In addition, common human haptenic allergens such as avobenzone, formaldehyde and urushiol, also induced the keratinocyte-derived VEGF production. VEGF upregulation by pro-inflammatory stimuli, IFNγ, DNCB or formaldehyde is preceded by the production of IL-8, an acute inflammatory phase cytokine. Lymphangiogenic VEGF-C gene transcription was significantly increased when NHKs were treated with formaldehyde, DNCB or urushiol, while transcription of VEGF-A and VEGF-B did not change. Therefore, the chemical allergen-induced VEGF upregulation is mainly due to the increase in lymphangiogenic VEGF-C transcription in NHKs. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived VEGF may regulate the lymphangiogenic process during the skin sensitization process of ACD. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induced VEGF production in normal human

  20. The human allergens of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killian Sue

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A computerized statistical analysis of allergy skin test results correlating patient reactivities initiated our interest in the cross-reactive allergens of mesquite tree pollen. In-vitro testing with mesquite-sensitized rabbits and a variety of deciduous tree pollens revealed so many cross-reactivities that it became apparent there could be more allergens in mesquite than previously described in the world literature. Our purpose was to examine the allergens of mesquite tree pollen (Prosopis juliflora which elicit an IgE response in allergic humans so that future research could determine if these human allergens cross-react with various tree pollens in the same manner as did the mesquite antiserum from sensitized rabbits. Methods Proteins from commercial mesquite tree pollen were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium-dodecyl-sulphate. These mesquite proteins were subjected to Western blotting using pooled sera from ten mesquite-sensitive patients and goat anti-human IgE. The allergens were detected using an Amplified Opti-4-CN kit, scanned, and then interpreted by Gel-Pro software. Results Thirteen human allergens of mesquite pollen were detected in this study. Conclusion The number of allergens in this study of mesquite exceeded the number identified previously in the literature. With the increased exposure to mesquite through its use in "greening the desert", increased travel to desert areas and exposure to mesquite in cooking smoke, the possible clinical significance of these allergens and their suggested cross-reactivity with other tree pollens merit further study.

  1. HYMENOPTERA ALLERGENS: FROM VENOM TO VENOME

    OpenAIRE

    Edzard eSpillner; Simon eBlank; Thilo eJakob

    2014-01-01

    In Western Europe hymenoptera venom allergy primarily relates to venoms of the honeybee and the common yellow jacket. In contrast to other allergen sources, only a few major components of hymenoptera venoms had been characterized until recently. Improved expression systems and proteomic detection strategies have allowed the identification and characterization of a wide range of additional allergens. The field of hymenoptera venom allergy research has moved rapidly from focusing on venom extr...

  2. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy in Food Anaphylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Kerzl, Regina; Mempel, Martin; Ring, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) protocols for nutritional allergens have only recently been established with a focus on oral allergy syndrome because of pollen cross-reacting antibodies. For these patients, a substantial number of studies have been published suggesting benefits from SIT. The situation in true anaphylaxis to food allergens such as peanut allergy is more complex, and therapeutic strategies are based on individual protocols rather than controlled studies. However, in defined cases,...

  3. Allergen specific immunotherapy in nasobronchial allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than one antigen has been used for immunotherapy of allergic disorders. So far less than five antigens have been employed with variable results. AIM: To evaluate effect of multiple antigens up to six in the immunotherapy of nasobronchial allergy. SETTING AND DESIGN: Based on clinical history, symptoms present for at least 3 years with set criteria of immunomodulation for asthma and rhinitis: documented IgE mediated asthma and rhinitis, failure in allergen avoidance and moderate to severe clinical manifestations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five hundred cases of various allergic disorders attending allergy clinic of Bombay hospital were screened. Allergen specific immunotherapy was initiated in 131 subjects (56 -rhinitis and 75 asthma with prior consent. Patients suffering from allergic disorders secondary to diseases or drug therapy were excluded. Multiple allergen immunotherapy was given at specific intervals up to a period of one year. Allergen extracts were prepared as per standard technique. For statistical analysis "students′t test" was used. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Significant improvement in PEFR, reduction in skin sensitivity to allergens used in immunotherapy formulation and symptomatic relief without any untoward reaction show that multiple allergen immunotherapy is as effective as monoallergen immunotherapy in nasobronchial allergy.

  4. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens. 4.32a Section 4.32a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE...

  5. 27 CFR 4.32b - Petitions for exemption from major food allergen labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Petitions for exemption from major food allergen labeling. 4.32b Section 4.32b Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF...

  6. 27 CFR 5.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens. 5.32a Section 5.32a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED...

  7. 27 CFR 5.32b - Petitions for exemption from major food allergen labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Petitions for exemption from major food allergen labeling. 5.32b Section 5.32b Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING...

  8. Hydrolysed egg displays strong decrease in allergenicity and is well tolerated by egg-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmer-Weber, B K; Brockow, K; Fiocchi, A; Theler, B; Vogel, L; Ring, J; Szépfalusi, Z; Mazzina, O; Schaller, R; Fritsché, R; Vissers, Y M; Nutten, S

    2016-05-01

    Food allergies are believed to be on the rise, and currently, management relies on the avoidance of the food. Hen's egg allergy is after cow's milk allergy the most common food allergy; eggs are used in many food products and thus difficult to avoid. A technological process using a combination of enzymatic hydrolysis and heat treatment was designed to produce modified hen's egg with reduced allergenic potential. Biochemical (SDS-PAGE, Size exclusion chromatography and LC-MS/MS) and immunological (ELISA, immunoblot, RBL-assays, animal model) analysis showed a clear decrease in intact proteins as well as a strong decrease of allergenicity. In a clinical study, 22 of the 24 patients with a confirmed egg allergy who underwent a double-blind food challenge with the hydrolysed egg remained completely free of symptoms. Hydrolysed egg products may be beneficial as low-allergenic foods for egg-allergic patients to extent their diet. PMID:26836363

  9. Is high pressure treatment able to modify the allergenicity of the largemouth bass allergens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chu-Yi; Tao, Sha; Liu, Rong; Chen, Fu-Sheng; Xue, Wen-Tong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the influence of high pressure treatment on the structural changes and allergenicity of largemouth bass. We treated the allergens at 100, 200, 300 and 400 MPa for 15 min and at 300 MPa for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min at 20 °C. The treated samples from largemouth bass were tested for their IgE-binding properties by combining Sodium dodecyl sulfate-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with western blotting (WB) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Circular dichroism analysis was performed to characterize the structural change. In summary, we can determine that the greatest structure changes were found for samples treated by 400 MPa for 15 min. High pressure treatment did change the structure, subunit composition and molecular weight of largemouth bass allergens, but it did not change the allergenicity of the allergens.

  10. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (2): common food allergen sources in dogs and cats

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Ralf S.; Olivry, Thierry; Prélaud, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background To diagnose cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFRs) in dogs and cats, dietary restriction-provocation trials are performed. Knowing the most common offending food allergens for these species would help determining the order of food challenges to optimize the time to diagnosis. Results The search for, and review and analysis of the best evidence available as of January 16, 2015 suggests that the most likely food allergens contributing to canine CAFRs are beef, dairy products, chick...

  11. The Reactivity and Allergenic Potential of Hazelnut Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Florina Calinoiu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to focus on proteins present in some food products, like hazelnuts and to investigate their allergenic potential. Several techniques were used to characterize these extracted proteins, with respect to their composition, degradability by digestive proteolytic enzymes and their reactivity with specific antibodies. It was important to analyse which proteins were present in the hazelnuts, to see if there were proteins present to trigger an allergic reaction and if the digestion enzymes trypsin and pepsin influence the presence of the (allergic protein compounds. Allergies to tree nuts and seeds can cause life-threatening and sometimes fatal reactions. To examine the properties of Hazelnut protein it was important to solubilize it by extraction. After extraction, it was investigated how hazelnut protein can be modified by proteases and what the effect was on the immune reaction. The Bradford method is a fast and sensitive method to determine the concentration of soluble protein. When the Bradford reagent (Coomassie Brilliant Blue binds to the protein, the colour changes from red to purple and the absorption maximum changes from 495 to 595 nm. The value obtained as the final concentration of proteins was 7.3495. SDS-PAGE is a method to separate mixtures of proteins by electrophoresis. Protein molecules are negatively charged by binding of SDS molecules; subsequently they are separated in an electric field. Their differences in size (molecular weight leads to separation. In this case the method is used to follow proteolytic degradation of hazelnut proteins (allergens by intestinal proteases (trypsin, pepsin. A different, more specific and sensitive method is immunoblotting (Western Blot in which the SDS-PAGE separated proteins are transferred from the gel to a membrane and specific antibodies are used in a series of reactions to visualize specific allergens on this membrane. The remarked spots represented a positive

  12. Allergenic extracts from Metarhizium canisopliae: obtainment and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, R T; Croce, J; Gandra, R F; Gagete, E; Paula, C R; Gambale, W

    2005-01-01

    Metarhizium anisopliae is used as a biopesticide for insects that damage agricultural plantations like sugar cane and forage plants. In a previous study the sensitization to this fungus of asthmatic patients coming from sugar cane areas was showed. The aims of this work were: to compare crude extracts obtained with Tris-HCl and Coca liquid from several growth phases of M. anisopliae concerning the total content of proteins and their electrophoretic analysis profile; to evaluate in vivo allergic sensitization in Balb/c mice and allergic patients from a sugar cane area, and to characterize the allergenic fractions in the sera of patients positive for the prick test by means of Western-blotting. The extract obtained with Coca liquid on the 16th day was the one that presented the greatest number of proteic fractions, including all those present in the other extracts. Twelve fractions were verified in this extract with approximate molecular weights from 94 to 14 kDa. The allergenicity of the extract obtained on the 16th day was proven by the production of IgE antibodies in Balb/c mice, with titres of 200. Prick tests carried out with the extract of the 16th day in 79 atopic individuals (from sugar cane area), 35 atopic individuals (from urban area) and 11 non- atopic individuals showed respective positivity of 29%, 9% and 0%. The allergenic characterization in vitro was performed by means of Western blotting, and the fractions that reacted with the positive individuals' sera were those of approximate molecular weights of 67 kDa (95%); 20 kDa (55%); 94 kDa (36%); 34 and 36 kDa (23%); 43 and 48 kDa (14%); 16 kDa (9%) and 54kDa (5%). It was concluded that the crude allergenic extract, obtained with Coca liquid from the 16th day growth of Metarhizium anisopliae, contains allergenic fractions and can be used in diagnostic screening tests. PMID:16047714

  13. Effect of high intensity ultrasound on the allergenicity of shrimp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The tropomyosin fraction of shrimp proteins is potentially responsible for allergic reaction in individuals with genetic predisposition to allergy. However, there are no efficient and safe methods to reduce its allergenicity. High intensity ultrasound is known to change the structure of proteins. This study is aimed at assessing high intensity ultrasound's effect on the allergenicity of shrimp allergen. Shrimp and purified shrimp allergen were treated with high intensity ultrasound for 30~180 min. Extracts of treated samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with pool serum of shrimp allergy patients and polyclonal anti-allergen antibodies and by immunoblotting after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Shrimp treated with high intensity ultrasound showed a decrease in allergenicity measured with ELISA. A linear relationship between the immune response induced by treated shrimp allergen and the applied treatment time was observed. The decrease in allergenicity was confirmed by immunoblot assays with shrimp allergic patients serum. Allergenicity of shrimp allergen extracted from treated shrimp was higher than that of purified shrimp allergen with the same treatment time. Gel-filtration HPLC was applied for analysis of shrimp allergen after treatment with high intensity ultrasound. Some fractions were appeared with increasing treatment time. The results suggested that high intensity ultrasound could be used to reduce the allergenicity of shrimp.

  14. Authentication of food allergen quality by physicochemical and immunological methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sancho, A I; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; Alessandri, S;

    2010-01-01

    Purified allergens are required to detect cross-contamination with other allergenic foods and to understand allergen interaction with other components of the food matrix. Pure allergens are also used for the diagnosis and treatment of food allergies. For example, serological methods are being...... developed to improve the quality of diagnosis, and to reduce the need for food challenge tests. In addition, recombinant allergens are being evaluated as candidate vaccines for safe and efficacious specific immunotherapy. Pure allergens are indispensable as reference materials for the calibration and...... standardization of methods between different laboratories and operators for risk assessment in the food industry. Therefore, there is a need for well-defined purified food allergens. In this context, a panel of 46 food allergens from plant and animal sources has been purified, from either the food sources or as...

  15. Domestic cat allergen and allergic sensitisation in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Chih-Mei; Gehring, Ulrike; Wickman, Magnus; Hoek, Gerard; Giovannangelo, Mariella; Nordling, Emma; Wijga, Alet; de Jongste, Johan; Pershagen, Goeran; Almqvist, Catarina; Kerkhof, Marjan; Bellander, Tom; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Brunekreef, Bert; Heinrich, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Studies have presented conflicting associations between cat allergen exposure and sensitisation and atopic disease. We therefore investigated the association between the observed domestic cat allergen level and cat sensitisation in young children in four study populations from three European countri

  16. Specific IgE response to different grass pollen allergen components in children undergoing sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcucci Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grass pollen is a major cause of respiratory allergy worldwide and contain a number of allergens, some of theme (Phl p 1, Phl p 2, Phl p 5, and Phl 6 from Phleum pratense, and their homologous in other grasses are known as major allergens. The administration of grass pollen extracts by immunotherapy generally induces an initial rise in specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE production followed by a progressive decline during the treatment. Some studies reported that immunotherapy is able to induce a de novo sensitisation to allergen component previously unrecognized. Methods We investigated in 30 children (19 males and 11 females, mean age 11.3 years, 19 treated with sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT by a 5-grass extract and 11 untreated, the sIgE and sIgG4 response to the different allergen components. Results Significant increases (p  Conclusions These findings confirm that the initial phase of SLIT with a grass pollen extract enhances the sIgE synthesis and show that the sIgE response concerns the same allergen components which induce IgE reactivity during natural exposure.

  17. The peanut allergy epidemic: allergen molecular characterisation and prospects for specific therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Maria P; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2007-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergy is a major cause of food-induced anaphylaxis, with increasing prevalence worldwide. To date, there is no cure for peanut allergy, and, unlike many other food allergies, it usually persists through to adulthood. Prevention of exposure to peanuts is managed through strict avoidance, which can be compromised by the frequent use of peanuts and peanut products in food preparations. Conventional subcutaneous-injection allergen immunotherapy using crude peanut extract is not a recommended treatment because of the risk of severe side effects, largely as a result of specific IgE antibodies. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a suitable peanut allergen preparation that can induce specific clinical and immunological tolerance to peanuts in allergic individuals without adverse side effects. This requires detailed molecular and immunological characterisation of the allergenic components of peanut. This article reviews current knowledge on clinically relevant peanut allergens, in particular Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3, together with options for T-cell-reactive but non-IgE-binding allergen variants for specific immunotherapeutic strategies. These include T-cell-epitope peptide and hypoallergenic mutant vaccines. Alternative routes of administration such as sublingual are also considered, and appropriate adjuvants for delivering effective treatments at these sites examined. PMID:17210088

  18. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Soyka, Michael B; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases. PMID:22409879

  19. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1 cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases.

  20. Immunological mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, C A

    2011-06-01

    The studies on the mechanisms of specific immunotherapy (SIT) point out its targets that decide on the efficacy of SIT and hence might be used for its further improvement. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of immunotherapy. The knowledge of the mechanisms underlying allergic diseases and curative treatment possibilities has experienced exciting advances over the last three decades. Studies in several clinical trials in allergen-SIT have demonstrated that the induction of a tolerant state against allergens in many ways represents a key step in the development of a healthy immune response against allergens. Several cellular and molecular mechanisms have been demonstrated: allergen-specific suppressive capacities of both inducible subsets of CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box P3(+) T-regulatory and IL-10-secreting type 1 T-regulatory cells increase in peripheral blood; suppression of eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils; Ab isotype change from IgE to IgG4. This review aims at the better understanding of the observed immunological changes associated with allergen SIT. PMID:21466562

  1. Intranasal immunization with a dominant T-cell epitope peptide of a major allergen of olive pollen prevents mice from sensitization to the whole allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazuela, Eva G; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Fernández-García, Héctor; García, M Soledad; Villalba, Mayte; Batanero, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Mucosal tolerance induction with vaccines based on peptides representing T-cell epitopes of allergens is a promising way for treating allergic diseases. Ole e 1 is the main allergen of olive pollen, which is an important cause of allergy in Mediterranean countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the peptide T109-K130 containing a dominant T-cell epitope of Ole e 1, to modulate the allergen-specific immune response in a prophylactic mouse model. Mice were intranasally treated with the peptide 1 week prior to sensitization with Ole e 1. Blood, lungs and spleens were collected and analysed for immune response. Intranasal pretreatment of mice with the peptide led to suppress serum specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody levels, and markedly reduced proliferative T-cell response and Th2-cytokine production, but increased IFN-gamma secretion in spleen cell cultures. Increased mRNA IL-10 levels were observed in lungs from pretreated mice. Pathologic alterations of the lung associated with airway inflammation (peribronchial/perivascular infiltrates, eosinophilia and mucus production) were significantly suppressed after pretreatment. Similar results were obtained when mice were sensitized 10 weeks after treatment. Our results demonstrate that intranasal administration of a single T-cell peptide protects mice against subsequent sensitization to the allergen, possibly via IFN-gamma and IL-10. This study emphasizes the usefulness of nasal peptide T-based vaccines against allergy. PMID:17662454

  2. Report from the World Health Organization's Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) meeting, Geneva, 7-9th Sep 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersing, Birgitte K; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Kaslow, David C; Moorthy, Vasee S

    2016-06-01

    There are more vaccines in development, against a greater number of pathogens, than ever before. A challenge with this exceptional level of activity and investment is how to select and resource the most promising approaches to have the most significant impact on public health. The WHO Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) was established in 2014 to provide strategic advice and recommendations to WHO for vaccines in clinical development that could have a significant impact on public health in low and middle income countries. On 7-9th September 2015, PDVAC was convened for the second time, when the committee reviewed vaccine developments in 24 disease areas. This report summarises the key recommendations from that consultation. PMID:26993336

  3. Indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Daniel C; Wobbema, Amanda Teresa; Norlien, Kathleen; Dorschner, Dale F

    2009-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of allergens in the indoor environment may cause allergic sensitization and symptoms. Occupant exposure to indoor allergens in educational facilities should and can be controlled. This study (1) assessed the presence of indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers, (2) characterized the distribution of allergens in different materials, and (3) evaluated the effect of building and maintenance interventions on allergen concentrations. Settled dust samples were collected from carpet, vinyl tile floors, and upholstered furniture in six schools and seven child care centers before and after interventions. Interventions included changes to cleaning, ventilation, entry mats, furnishings, flooring, and classroom items. The amount of total dust, culturable fungi, and indoor allergens--cockroach, dust mite, cat, and dog--were quantified in the dust samples. Cockroach and dust mite allergens were generally low and below the detection limit, but one dust mite allergen was detected in some areas. Cat and dog allergens were frequently detected at elevated levels, with half the samples above the provisional sensitization risk thresholds and a few samples above the symptom thresholds. Allergen concentrations were highest in upholstered furniture, followed by carpeting and then vinyl floor tile. Cat and dog allergens were lower after the interventions. Cat and dog allergens, but not dust mite and cockroach allergens, seem to be ubiquitous in child care and elementary schools of the U.S. Midwest. These allergens may contribute to sensitization in atopic individuals and occasionally cause symptoms in sensitized allergic individuals. Fleecy materials that are not adequately cleaned, such as upholstered furniture, appear to be the most significant allergen reservoirs. Modest environmental interventions can be implemented by building staff, which should result in lower allergen concentrations. PMID:19585331

  4. Encapsulating contact allergens in liposomes, ethosomes, and polycaprolactone may affect their sensitizing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus;

    2011-01-01

    Attempts to improve formulation of topical products are a continuing process and the development of micro- and nanovesicular systems as well as polymeric microparticles has led to marketing of topical drugs and cosmetics using these technologies. Encapsulation of some well-known contact allergens...... dichromate compared with control solutions. However, encapsulating the lipophilic contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in polycaprolactone reduced the sensitizing capacity to 1211 ± 449 compared with liposomes (7602 ± 2658) and in acetone:olive oil (4:1) (5633 ± 666). The same trend was observed...

  5. Encapsulating contact allergens in liposomes, ethosomes, and polycaprolactone may affect their sensitizing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus;

    2011-01-01

    Attempts to improve formulation of topical products are a continuing process and the development of micro- and nanovesicular systems as well as polymeric microparticles has led to marketing of topical drugs and cosmetics using these technologies. Encapsulation of some well-known contact allergens...... dichromate compared with control solutions. However, encapsulating the lipophilic contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in polycaprolactone reduced the sensitizing capacity to 1211 ± 449 compared with liposomes (7602 ± 2658) and in acetone:olive oil (4:1) (5633 ± 666). The same trend was observed...

  6. Allergen-induced cytokine secretion in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children

    OpenAIRE

    Böttcher (Fagerås), Malin; Bjurström, Jenny; Mai, Xiaomei; Nilsson, Lennart; Jenmalm, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Atopic asthma is characterized by excessive T helper 2 (Th2)-like immunity to allergens in the bronchial mucosa. The Th2-cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 induces IgE production, while the Th2-cytokine IL-5 promotes eosinophilic inflammation in the airways of asthmatics. Most asthmatics are atopic, but a subgroup is non-atopic. We hypothesize that allergen-induced Th2, particularly IL-5, responses can be observed in peripheral blood in both atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children but not in health...

  7. Characterisation of potential novel allergens in the fish parasite Anisakis simplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Kruse Fæste

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic nematode Anisakis simplex occurs in fish stocks in temperate seas. A. simplex contamination of fish products is unsavoury and a health concern considering human infection with live larvae (anisakiasis and allergic reactions to anisakid proteins in seafood. Protein extracts of A. simplex produce complex band patterns in gel electrophoresis and IgE-immunostaining. In the present study potential allergens have been characterised using sera from A. simplex-sensitised patients and proteome data obtained by mass spectrometry. A. simplex proteins were homologous to allergens in other nematodes, insects, and shellfish indicating cross-reactivity. Characteristic marker peptides for relevant A. simplex proteins were described.

  8. Multiplex detection of food allergens and gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chung Y; Nowatzke, William; Oliver, Kerry; Garber, Eric A E

    2015-05-01

    To help safeguard the food supply and detect the presence of undeclared food allergens and gluten, most producers and regulatory agencies rely on commercial test kits. Most of these are ELISAs with a few being PCR-based. These methods are very sensitive and analyte specific, requiring different assays to detect each of the different food allergens. Mass spectrometry offers an alternative approach whereby multiple allergens may be detected simultaneously. However, mass spectrometry requires expensive equipment, highly trained analysts, and several years before a quantitative approach can be achieved. Using multianalyte profiling (xMAP®) technology, a commercial multiplex test kit based on the use of established antibodies was developed for the simultaneous detection of up to 14 different food allergens plus gluten. The assay simultaneously detects crustacean seafood, egg, gluten, milk, peanut, soy, and nine tree nuts (almond, Brazil nut, cashew, coconut, hazelnut, macadamia, pine nut, pistachio, and walnut). By simultaneously performing multiple tests (typically two) for each analyte, this magnetic bead-based assay offers built-in confirmatory analyses without the need for additional resources. Twenty-five of the assays were performed on buffer extracted samples, while five were conducted on samples extracted using reduced-denatured conditions. Thus, complete analysis for all 14 allergens and gluten requires only two wells of a 96-well microtiter plate. This makes it possible to include in a single analytical run up to 48 samples. All 30 bead sets in this multiplex assay detected 5 ng/mL of food allergen and gluten with responses greater than background. In addition, 26 of the bead sets displayed signal/noise ratios of five or greater. The bead-based design makes this 30-plex assay expandable to incorporate new antibodies and capture/detector methodologies by ascribing these new detectors to any of the unassigned bead sets that are commercially available. PMID

  9. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy: T-regulatory cells and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Johan; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2006-05-01

    Activation-induced cell death, anergy, or immune response modulation by regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are essential mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance. Genetic predisposition and environmental instructions tune thresholds for the activation of T cells, other inflammatory cells, and resident tissue cells in allergic diseases. Skewing allergen-specific effector T cells to a Treg-cell phenotype seems to be crucial in maintaining a healthy immune response to allergens and successful allergen-specific immunotherapy. The Treg-cell response is characterized by an abolished allergen-specific T-cell proliferation and the suppressed secretion of T-helper 1- and T-helper 2-type cytokines. Suppressed proliferative and cytokine responses against allergens are induced by multiple suppressor factors, including cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and cell surface molecules such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed death-1, and histamine receptor 2. The increased levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta produced by Treg cells potently suppress IgE production while simultaneously increasing the production of noninflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. In addition, Treg cells directly or indirectly suppress the activity of effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils. In conclusion, peripheral tolerance to allergens is controlled by multiple active suppression mechanisms on T cells, regulation of antibody isotypes, and suppression of effector cells. The application of current knowledge of Treg cells and related mechanisms of peripheral tolerance may soon lead to more rational and safer approaches to the prevention and cure of allergic disease. PMID:16701141

  10. Citral a fragrance allergen and irritant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner;

    2003-01-01

    Citral is a well known contact allergen and a contact irritant. Routine patch testing in the past may have been restricted because of possible irritant (IR) patch test responses. 586 consecutive patients, with hand eczema, were patch tested with a selection of fragrances including citral 2...... positive patch test reactions to other fragrances compared with IR reactions (n = 82) was established. The difference regarding fragrance history found between those with IR and positive reactions to citral was not significant. Citral could be an allergen and/or irritant, worthy of further more extensive...

  11. Workshop overview : Approaches to the assessment of the allergenic potential of food from genetically modified crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladics, G.S.; Holsapple, M.P.; Astwood, J.D.; Kimber, I.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Helm, R.M.; Dong, W.

    2003-01-01

    There is a need to assess the safety of foods deriving from genetically modified (GM) crops, including the allergenic potential of novel gene products. Presently, there is no single in vitro or in vivo model that has been validated for the identification or characterization of potential food allerge

  12. Comparison of elicitation potential of chloroatranol and atranol--2 allergens in oak moss absolute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeanne D; Bernard, Guillaume; Giménez-Arnau, Elena;

    2006-01-01

    Chloroatranol and atranol are degradation products of chloroatranorin and atranorin, respectively, and have recently been identified as important contact allergens in the natural fragrance extract, oak moss absolute. Oak moss absolute is widely used in perfumery and is the cause of many cases of...

  13. The current state of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Gabrielle; Malling, H-J

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy is a well documented treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The majority of the disadvantages of the treatment are related to the poor quality of the natural allergen extracts which can contain varying amounts of individual allergens including allergens to which the...... patient may not be sensitized. Recombinant allergens offer a possibility to use well defined molecules with consistent pharmaceutical quality defined in mass units. The proof of concept of the clinical efficacy of recombinant allergens is based on two studies published as full articles....

  14. Food allergens of plant origin - their molecular and evolutionary relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, E. N. C.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Shewry, P. R.;

    2003-01-01

    usually triggered by the protein components in a food, which are also known as allergens. However, not all the proteins in an allergenic food like peanut are allergens. Why should this be? This question has been addressed by an EU-funded inter-disciplinary network of clinicians, food chemists and plant...... biochemists called Protall. From the groups considerations it is clear that, whilst the abundance of a protein in a food is one factor involved in determining its allergenic potential, this is not sufficient on its own to predict its allergenicity. Through an analysis of common properties of plant food...

  15. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy and immune tolerance to allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress in understanding mechanisms of immune regulation in allergy, asthma, autoimmune diseases, tumors, organ transplantation and chronic infections has led to a variety of targeted therapeutic approaches. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific way of treatment. The mechanisms by which allergen-AIT has its mechanisms of action include the very early desensitization effects, modulation of T- and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes as well as inhibition of migration of eosinophils, basophils and mast cells to tissues and release of their mediators. Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been identified as key regulators of immunological processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in AIT. Naturally occurring FoxP3(+) CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and inducible type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE, and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils and eosinophils and suppression of effector T cell migration to tissues. New strategies for immune intervention will likely include targeting of the molecular mechanisms of allergen tolerance and reciprocal regulation of effector and regulatory T cell subsets. PMID:26023323

  16. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy and immune tolerance to allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Cezmi A Akdis; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress in understanding mechanisms of immune regulation in allergy, asthma, autoimmune diseases, tumors, organ transplantation and chronic infections has led to a variety of targeted therapeutic approaches. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific way of treatment. The mechanisms by which allergen-AIT has its mechanisms of action include the very early d...

  17. Simultaneous allergen inactivation and detoxification of castor bean cake by treatment with calcium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricinus communis L. is of great economic importance due to the oil extracted from its seeds. Castor oil has been used for pharmaceutical and industrial applications, as a lubricant or coating agent, as a component of plastic products, as a fungicide or in the synthesis of biodiesel fuels. After oil extraction, a castor cake with a large amount of protein is obtained. However, this by-product cannot be used as animal feed due to the presence of toxic (ricin) and allergenic (2S albumin) proteins. Here, we propose two processes for detoxification and allergen inactivation of the castor cake. In addition, we establish a biological test to detect ricin and validate these detoxification processes. In this test, Vero cells were treated with ricin, and cell death was assessed by cell counting and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase activity. The limit of detection of the Vero cell assay was 10 ng/mL using a concentration of 1.6 × 105 cells/well. Solid-state fermentation (SSF) and treatment with calcium compounds were used as cake detoxification processes. For SSF, Aspergillus niger was grown using a castor cake as a substrate, and this cake was analyzed after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of SSF. Ricin was eliminated after 24 h of SSF treatment. The cake was treated with 4 or 8% Ca(OH)2 or CaO, and both the toxicity and the allergenic properties were entirely abolished. A by-product free of toxicity and allergens was obtained

  18. The impact of nitration on the structure and immunogenicity of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Ackaert

    Full Text Available Allergy prevalence has increased in industrialized countries. One contributing factor could be pollution, which can cause nitration of allergens exogenously (in the air or endogenously (in inflamed lung tissue. We investigated the impact of nitration on both the structural and immunological behavior of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 to determine whether nitration might be a factor in the increased incidence of allergy. Bet v 1.0101 was nitrated with tetranitromethane. Immune effects were assessed by measuring the proliferation of specific T-cell lines (TCLs upon stimulation with different concentrations of nitrated and unmodified allergen, and by measurement of cytokine release of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs and primary DCs (primDCs stimulated with nitrated versus unmodified allergen. HPLC-MS, crystallography, gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis, size exclusion chromatography and molecular dynamics simulation were performed to characterize structural changes after nitration of the allergen. The proliferation of specific TCLs was higher upon stimulation with the nitrated allergen in comparison to the unmodified allergen. An important structural consequence of nitration was oligomerization. Moreover, analysis of the crystal structure of nitrated Bet v 1.0101 showed that amino acid residue Y83, located in the hydrophobic cavity, was nitrated to 100%. Both moDCs and primDCs showed decreased production of TH1-priming cytokines, thus favoring a TH2 response. These results implicate that nitration of Bet v 1.0101 might be a contributing factor to the observed increase in birch pollen allergy, and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity.

  19. Animal allergens and their presence in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eZahradnik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to animal allergens is a major risk factor for sensitization and allergic diseases. Besides mites and cockroaches, the most important animal allergens are derived from mammals. Cat and dog allergies affect the general population; whereas, allergies to rodents or cattle is an occupational problem. Exposure to animal allergens is not limited to direct contact to animals. Based on their aerodynamic properties, mammalian allergens easily become airborne, attach to clothing and hair, and can be spread from one environment to another. For example, the major cat allergen Fel d 1 was frequently found in homes without pets and in public buildings, including schools, day care centers and hospitals. Allergen concentrations in a particular environment showed high variability depending on numerous factors.Assessment of allergen exposure levels is a stepwise process that involves dust collection, allergen quantification and data analysis. Whereas a number of different dust sampling strategies are used, ELISA assays have prevailed in the last years as the standard technique for quantification of allergen concentrations. This review focuses on allergens arising from domestic, farm and laboratory animals and describes the ubiquity of mammalian allergens in the human environment. It includes an overview of exposure assessment studies carried out in different indoor settings (homes, schools, workplaces using numerous sampling and analytical methods and summarizes significant factors influencing exposure levels. However, methodological differences among studies have contributed to the variability of the findings and make comparisons between studies difficult. Therefore, a general standardization of methods is needed and recommended.

  20. Technological processes to decrease the allergenicity of peach juice and nectar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, O; Pompei, C; Ortolani, C; Pravettoni, V; Farioli, L; Pastorello, E A

    2000-02-01

    Among vegetable foods peach (Prunus persica) has been recognized as a significant cause of allergy. The protein, which is considered to be the major peach allergen, has been named Pru p 1. Because peaches are consumed both as fresh fruits and after processing to obtain peach juice, nectar, jam, syrupy peach, etc., research was carried out to identify a technological process for production of hypo- or nonallergenic peach-based products. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis of extracts prepared from four commercial peach nectars showed that the Pru p 1 was not removed, and neither was its allergenic activity decreased by technological treatments carried out for nectar production. Some treatments oriented toward a removal of or, at least, a decrease in the allergenic power were assumed and verified at laboratory scale. A variable considered was heat treatment at 121 degrees C for 10 and 30 min: this treatment was not able to decrease the allergenicity of the Pru p 1 protein. Furthermore, the protein band was still present even after 60-min reaction with two different acidic proteases. The two technological treatments that were found to decrease the major allergen of peach were chemical lye peeling of fruits and ultrafiltration of juice through membranes with suitable cutoff. On the basis of the results obtained from this research, a processing flow sheet was defined to obtain hypoallergenic or probably nonallergenic limpid juices and nectars. These products may represent, besides finished foods, intermediates to obtain various products after addition of further ingredients such as pectins, sugars, and fiber. PMID:10691663

  1. Allergen-Specific CD4(+) T Cells in Human Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Morris F; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    In allergic asthma, aeroallergen exposure of sensitized individuals mobilizes robust innate and adaptive airway immune responses, stimulating eosinophilic airway inflammation and the activation and infiltration of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells into the airways. Allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells are thought to be central players in the asthmatic response as they specifically recognize the allergen and initiate and orchestrate the asthmatic inflammatory response. In this article, we briefly review the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of human allergic airway inflammation in allergic individuals, discuss the use of allergen-major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers to characterize allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells, and highlight current gaps in knowledge and directions for future research pertaining to the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in human asthma. PMID:27027948

  2. Evaluation of the allergenicity potential of TcPR-10 protein from Theobroma cacao.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pereira Menezes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis related protein PR10 (TcPR-10, obtained from the Theobroma cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction library, presents antifungal activity against M. perniciosa and acts in vitro as a ribonuclease. However, despite its biotechnological potential, the TcPR-10 has the P-loop motif similar to those of some allergenic proteins such as Bet v 1 (Betula verrucosa and Pru av 1 (Prunus avium. The insertion of mutations in this motif can produce proteins with reduced allergenic power. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the allergenic potential of the wild type and mutant recombinant TcPR-10 using bioinformatics tools and immunological assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mutant substitutions (T10P, I30V, H45S were inserted in the TcPR-10 gene by site-directed mutagenesis, cloned into pET28a and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3 cells. Changes in molecular surface caused by the mutant substitutions was evaluated by comparative protein modeling using the three-dimensional structure of the major cherry allergen, Pru av 1 as a template. The immunological assays were carried out in 8-12 week old female BALB/c mice. The mice were sensitized with the proteins (wild type and mutants via subcutaneous and challenged intranasal for induction of allergic airway inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that the wild TcPR-10 protein has allergenic potential, whereas the insertion of mutations produced proteins with reduced capacity of IgE production and cellular infiltration in the lungs. On the other hand, in vitro assays show that the TcPR-10 mutants still present antifungal and ribonuclease activity against M. perniciosa RNA. In conclusion, the mutant proteins present less allergenic potential than the wild TcPR-10, without the loss of interesting biotechnological properties.

  3. Bystander suppression to unrelated allergen sensitization through intranasal administration of tolerogenic exosomes in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Noela; Cañamero, Marta; Villalba, Mayte; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Batanero, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Exosomes represent a new family of bioactive nanovesicles (30-100 nm in diameter) secreted by different cell types whose appealing features can be exploited for designing vaccines in the context of several human diseases. We previously reported the potential of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)-derived tolerogenic exosomes (Exo(Tol)) to be used as a nasal allergy vaccine in a mouse model of sensitization to Ole e 1, the main allergen of olive pollen. The aim of the study was to investigate whether such nanovesicles specific to Ole e 1 can also prevent the sensitization to other unrelated allergen, as Bet v 1 from birch pollen. Exo(Tol) were isolated from BALF of mice tolerized against Ole e 1 and used in a prophylactic approach. BALB/c mice were intranasally pretreated with Exo(Tol) one week before sensitization/challenge with Bet v 1, and the magnitude of allergen-specific response was analyzed. Intranasal pretreatment with Exo(Tol) resulted in significant inhibition of both specific IgE and IgG1 antibodies levels. Moreover, T cells from mice pretreated with Exo(Tol) showed a reduction in IL-5 and IL-13 (Th2 cytokines) production. Lung inflammatory response triggered by unrelated allergen-challenge was also significantly reduced after pretreatment: perivascular/peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophilia and mucus secretion. In conclusion, Exo(Tol) specific to Ole e 1, in addition to inhibit specific immune response to this allergen, blocked the allergic response to a second unrelated allergen such as Bet v 1. The in vivo "bystander suppression" that we herein describe for Exo(Tol) may have implications for the treatment of allergy based on mucosal tolerance induction. PMID:20478618

  4. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5ng/mL and 0.2ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0ng/mL, 0.2ng/mL, and 1.5ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption. PMID:26859787

  5. Identification of wheat allergens using proteomic approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šotkovský, Petr; Hubálek, M.; Hernychová, L.; Novák, Petr; Havranová, M.; Fuchs, M.; Stulík, J.; Tučková, Ludmila

    Latina : Allergy data laboratories, 2007, s. 41-41. [International Symposium on Molecular Allergology /2./. Roma (IT), 22.04.2007-24.04.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2245 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : wheat flour * wheat allergens * proteins Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  6. Kiwifruit as a food allergen source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Milica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its first appearance on the market kiwifruit has become very popular in the human diet due to its pleasant taste, low caloric value and high content of vitamin C. However, kiwifruit allergy has become a frequent cause of type I hypersensitivity in the western society. Molecular basis for kiwifruit allergy has been ascribed to up-to-now 11 identified IgE reactive molecules. They are proteins and glycoproteins with a molecular mass between 50 and 10 kDa. The major kiwifruit allergen is a cysteine protease denoted as Act d 1, which represents 50% of the soluble protein extract. Due to a difference in the abundance of protein components and biological activity, the quality of kiwifruit extracts intended for allergy diagnosis can vary in content and amount of IgE reactive molecules. In addition, the quality of allergen extracts for allergy diagnosis depends on the fruit ripening stage and storage conditions. In terms of clinical reactivity it has become evident that kiwifruit allergy is not a homogeneous disorder. Different patterns of IgE reactivity accompany several clinical subgroups that have been identified in different geographical regions. In the last decade an enormous progress has been made in isolation and characterization of kiwifruit allergens. This paper will give an overview of the structural features of kiwifruit allergens. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172049

  7. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future

    OpenAIRE

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-01-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the char...

  8. Developing a preventive immunization approach against insect bite hypersensitivity using recombinant allergens: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Hamza, Eman; Janda, Jozef; Rhyner, Claudio; Meinke, Andreas; Marti, Eliane; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjorg

    2015-07-15

    there was no indication of induction of IgE-mediated reactions, as horses neither responded to Culicoides extract stimulation in a sulfidoleukotriene release test, nor developed a relevant immediate hypersensitivity reaction to the recombinant allergens in skin test. IL-4 expression was significantly higher in horses vaccinated intralymphatically without IC31(®), as compared to horses intradermally vaccinated with IC31(®). Both routes gave higher IL-10 expression with IC31(®). Both intralymphatic and intradermal vaccination of horses with recombinant allergens in IC31(®) adjuvant induced an immune response without adverse effects and without IgE production. The horses were not sensitized and produced IgG that could inhibit allergen-specific IgE binding. We therefore conclude that both the injection routes and the IC31(®) adjuvant are strong candidates for further development of immunoprophylaxis and therapy in horses. PMID:26004943

  9. Environmental allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to find out the common environmental allergens responsible for sensitivity in patients with allergic rhinitis. Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: A local allergy clinic in an urban area of Lahore during the year 2000-2001. Subjects and Methods: Eighty patients with allergic rhinitis irrespective of age and sex were studied. These cases were selected on the basis of symptoms like sneezing, itching, watery nasal discharge and eosinophilia in nasal secretions. Forty matched healthy subjects as controls were also studied. Allergy test was performed on all the subjects by skin prick test to determine sensitivity to common environmental allergens using Bencard (England) allergy kit. Results: common environmental allergens responsible for sensitivity in allergic rhinitis patients were house dust (82.5 %), house dust mites (73.7%), mixed threshing (80%), straw dust (58.7%, hay dust (63.7%), mixed feathers (45%), cat fur (57.5%), cotton flock (56.2%), tree pollens (45%) and grass pollens (48.7%). Sensitivity to these allergens was observed in significantly higher (P<0.01) percentage of allergic rhinitis patients as compared with control subjects. Sensitivity to house dust, house dust mites and cat fur was of severe degree in majority of allergic rhinitis patients. While sensitivity to mixed threshing, straw dust, hay dust and mixed feathers was of moderate to severe degree in majority of these patients. Conclusion: Skin prick tests provide an effective and definitive mean to find out sensitivity to different allergens in cases with allergic rhinitis. Based on these findings, the physician can manage these patients in better way. (author)

  10. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Moises A; Demoly, Pascal; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Bousquet, Jean; Sheikh, Aziz; Frew, Anthony; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Malling, Hans J; Valenta, Rudolph; Bilo, Beatrice; Nieto, Antonio; Akdis, Cezmi; Just, Jocelyne; Vidal, Carmen; Varga, Eva M; Alvarez-Cuesta, Emilio; Bohle, Barbara; Bufe, Albrecht; Canonica, Walter G; Cardona, Victoria; Dahl, Ronald; Didier, Alain; Durham, Stephen R; Eng, Peter; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Jacobsen, Lars; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Lötvall, Jan; Moreno, Carmen; Mosges, Ralph; Muraro, Antonella; Niggemann, Bodo; Pajno, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rak, Sabina; Senna, Gianenrico; Senti, Gabriela; Valovirta, Erkka; van Hage, Marianne; Virchow, Johannes C; Wahn, Ulrich; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy.Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies.Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals' quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases.Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as a

  11. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderon Moises A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy. Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals’ quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases. Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in

  12. 77 FR 6791 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act requires... production of biobased fuels and biobased products. Tentative Agenda Update on USDA Biomass R&D...

  13. Prevalence of and risk factors for increased serum levels of allergen-specific IgE in a population of Norwegian dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Bjelland, Annelin A.; Dolva, Frederik L.; Nødtvedt, Ane; Sævik, Bente Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of different allergens in association with IgE production and canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) has been poorly studied and few studies exist on factors influencing allergen-specific IgE antibodies in serum. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of elevated IgE levels to different environmental allergens in Norwegian dogs with a suspicion of CAD. The secondary aim was to identify risk factors associated with elevated serum levels of all...

  14. Bridging PCR and partially overlapping primers for novel allergen gene cloning and expression insert decoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Lin Tao; Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To obtain the entire gene open reading frame (ORF)and to construct the expression vectors for recombinant allergen production.METHODS: Gene fragments corresponding to the gene specific region and the cDNA ends of pollen allergens of short ragweed (Rg, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) were obtained by pan-degenerate primer-based PCR and rapid amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE), and the products were mixed to serve as the bridging PCR (BPCR) template. The full-length gene was then obtained. Partially overlapping primer-based PCR (POP-PCR) method was developed to overcome the other problem, i.e., the non-specific amplification of the ORF with routine long primers for expression insert decoration.Northern blot was conducted to confirm pollen sources of the gene. The full-length coding region was evaluated for its gene function by homologue search in GenBank database and Western blotting of the recombinant protein Amb a 8 (D106) expressed in Escherichia colipET-44 system.RESULTS: The full-length cDNA sequence of Amb a 8(D106)was obtained by using the above procedure and deduced to encode a 131 amino acid polypeptide. Multiple sequence alignment exhibited the gene D106sharing a homology as high as 54-89% and 79-89% to profilin from pollen and food sources, respectively. The expression vector of the allergen gene D106was successfully constructed by employing the combined method of BPCR and POP-PCR. Recombinant allergen rAmb a 8(D106) was then successfully generated.The allergenicity was hallmarked by immunoblotting with the allergic serum samples and its RNA source was confirmed by Northern blot.CONCLUSION: The combined procedure of POP-PCR and BPCR is a powerful method for full-length allergen gene retrieval and expression insert decoration, which would be useful for recombinant allergen production and subsequent diagnosis and immunotherapy of pollen and food allergy.

  15. [Evaluation of the total biological activity and allergenic composition of allergenic extracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardero, M; González, R; Duffort, O; Juan, F; Ayuso, R; Ventas, P; Cortés, C; Carreira, J

    1986-01-01

    In the present study, a complete procedure is presented in order to standardize allergenic extracts, the meaning of which is the measurement of the total allergenic activity and the determination of the allergenic composition. The measurement of the biological activity comprises 2 steps: Preparation of Reference Extracts and determination of their "in vivo" activity. Evaluation of the total allergenic activity of extracts for clinical use. Reference extracts were prepared from the main allergens and their "in vivo" biological activity was determined by a quantitative skin prick test in a sample of at least 30 allergic patients. By definition, the protein concentration of Reference Extract that produces, in the allergic population, a geometric mean wheal of 75 mm.2 has an activity of 100 biological units (BUs). The determination of the biological activity of a problem extract is made by RAST inhibition. The sample is compared with the corresponding Reference Extract by this technique and, from this comparison, it is possible to quantify the activity of the problem extract in biologic units (BUs) with clinical significance. Likewise, different techniques have been used to determine the allergenic composition of extracts. These techniques comprise 2 steps: Separation of the components of the extract. Identification of the components that bind specific human IgE. The separation of the components of the extract has been carried out by isoelectric focusing (IEF) and electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS-PAGE). In order to identify the allergenic components, an immunoblotting technique has been employed. The separated components in the IEF gel or SDS-PAGE gel are transferred to a nitrocellulose sheet and later on, this membrane is overlaid with a serum pool from allergic patients and a mouse monoclonal anti-human IgE, labelled with 125I. Finally, the autoradiography of the nitrocellulose membrane is obtained. In this way it is possible to compare

  16. First National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing: survey design and methods for the allergen and endotoxin components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Patrick J; Friedman, Warren; Marker, David A; Clickner, Robert; Rogers, John W; Viet, Susan M; Muilenberg, Michael L; Thorne, Peter S; Arbes, Samuel J; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2002-01-01

    From July 1998 to August 1999, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences conducted the first National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing. The purpose of the survey was to assess children's potential household exposure to lead, allergens, and bacterial endotoxins. We surveyed a sample of 831 homes, representing 96 million permanently occupied, noninstitutional housing units that permit resident children. We administered questionnaires to household members, made home observations, and took environmental samples. This article provides general background information on the survey, an overview of the survey design, and a description of the data collection and laboratory methods pertaining to the allergen and endotoxin components. We collected dust samples from a bed, the bedroom floor, a sofa or chair, the living room floor, the kitchen floor, and a basement floor and analyzed them for cockroach allergen Bla g 1, the dust mite allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1, the cat allergen Fel d 1, the dog allergen Can f 1, the rodent allergens Rat n 1 and mouse urinary protein, allergens of the fungus Alternaria alternata, and endotoxin. This article provides the essential context for subsequent reports that will describe the prevalence of allergens and endotoxin in U.S. households, their distribution by various housing characteristics, and their associations with allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis. PMID:12003758

  17. Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M J; Burns, D T; Elliott, C T; Gowland, M H; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is an increasing problem for those affected, their families or carers, the food industry and for regulators. The food supply chain is highly vulnerable to fraud involving food allergens, risking fatalities and severe reputational damage to the food industry. Many facets are being pursued to ameliorate the difficulties including better food labelling and the concept of thresholds of elicitation of allergy symptoms as risk management tools. These efforts depend to a high degree on the ability reliably to detect and quantify food allergens; yet all current analytical approaches exhibit severe deficiencies that jeopardise accurate results being produced particularly in terms of the risks of false positive and false negative reporting. If we fail to realise the promise of current risk assessment and risk management of food allergens through lack of the ability to measure food allergens reproducibly and with traceability to an international unit of measurement, the analytical community will have failed a significant societal challenge. Three distinct but interrelated areas of analytical work are urgently needed to address the substantial gaps identified: (a) a coordinated international programme for the production of properly characterised clinically relevant reference materials and calibrants for food allergen analysis; (b) an international programme to widen the scope of proteomics and genomics bioinformatics for the genera containing the major allergens to address problems in ELISA, MS and DNA methods; (c) the initiation of a coordinated international programme leading to reference methods for allergen proteins that provide results traceable to the SI. This article describes in more detail food allergy, the risks of inapplicable or flawed allergen analyses with examples and a proposed framework, including clinically relevant incurred allergen concentrations, to address the currently unmet and urgently required analytical requirements. Support for the

  18. Footwear dermatitis - Clinical patterns and contact allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa S

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty patients suspected of contact dermatitis to footwear studied to evaluate various clinical presentations and possible sensitizers. ′V′ chappals and sandals were suspected alone in 12, a combination of open and closed shoes in 15 and closed shoes alone in 3 patients. Commonest affected sites were dorsa of feet and toes in 14 and dorsa of feet corresponding to the shape of footwear in 12 patients. Patch tests were done using a battery of sixteen allergens. Positive patch tests were seen in 29 patients. Rubber chemicals were the commonest allergens detected in 26 patients, dyes in 10,leather in 6, glues and neoprene cements in 4 and rubber material from suspected footwear as such in 4 patients respectively.

  19. New Trends in Food Allergens Detection: Toward Biosensing Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rita C; Barroso, M Fátima; González-García, María Begoña; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2016-10-25

    Food allergens are a real threat to sensitized individuals. Although food labeling is crucial to provide information to consumers with food allergies, accidental exposure to allergenic proteins may result from undeclared allergenic substances by means of food adulteration, fraud or uncontrolled cross-contamination. Allergens detection in foodstuffs can be a very hard task, due to their presence usually in trace amounts, together with the natural interference of the matrix. Methods for allergens analysis can be mainly divided in two large groups: the immunological assays and the DNA-based ones. Mass spectrometry has also been used as a confirmatory tool. Recently, biosensors appeared as innovative, sensitive, selective, environmentally friendly, cheaper and fast techniques (especially when automated and/or miniaturized), able to effectively replace the classical methodologies. In this review, we present the advances in the field of food allergens detection toward the biosensing strategies and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of this technology. PMID:25779935

  20. Allergen extracts for immunotherapy: to mix or not to mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nony, Emmanuel; Martelet, Armelle; Jain, Karine; Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is established as a curative treatment for allergic rhinitis, asthma, as well as insect venom allergy. AIT is based on the administration of natural allergen extracts via the subcutaneous or sublingual routes to reorient the immune system towards tolerogenic mechanisms. In this regard, since many patients are poly-allergic, mixtures of allergen extracts are often used with a potential risk to cause allergen degradation, thereby affecting treatment efficacy. Herein, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of mixing homologous (i.e., related) or heterogeneous (i.e., unrelated) allergen extracts. We provide evidence for incompatibilities between mixes of grass pollen and house dust mite extracts containing bodies and feces, and summarize critical points to consider when mixing allergen extracts for AIT. PMID:26652799

  1. Allergen immunotherapy for birch pollen-allergic patients: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moingeon, Philippe; Floch, Véronique Bordas-Le; Airouche, Sabi; Baron-Bodo, Véronique; Nony, Emmanuel; Mascarell, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    As of today, allergen immunotherapy is performed with aqueous natural allergen extracts. Recombinant allergen vaccines are not yet commercially available, although they could provide patients with well-defined and highly consistent drug substances. As Bet v 1 is the major allergen involved in birch pollen allergy, with more than 95% of patients sensitized to this allergen, pharmaceutical-grade recombinant Bet v 1-based vaccines were produced and clinically tested. Herein, we compare the clinical results and modes of action of treatments based on either a birch pollen extract or recombinant Bet v 1 expressed as hypoallergenic or natural-like molecules. We also discuss the future of allergen immunotherapy with improved drugs intended for birch pollen-allergic patients suffering from rhinoconjunctivitis. PMID:27140409

  2. Expression of yellow jacket and wasp venom Ag5 allergens in bacteria and in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, R I; Lu, G; King, T P

    1999-01-01

    Antigen 5 (Ag5), of unknown biological function, is one of the major venom allergens of vespids and fire ants. We have compared the expression of Ag5 in bacteria and in yeast. Recombinant Ag5 from bacteria formed an insoluble intracellular product, which was not properly folded, but that produced in Pichia pastoris was secreted to the extracellular medium. Immunochemical characterizations showed the secreted Ag5 to have the native structure of the natural protein. This is of interest since the B cell epitopes of Ag5 are mainly of the discontinuous type. These studies were made with Ag5s from yellow jacket (Vespula vulgaris) and paper wasp (Polistes annularis), and with hybrid Ag5 molecules that contained partial sequences of these two species. In vitro allergenicity studies with sera from yellow jacket-sensitive patients showed that some of these hybrid molecules had a greatly reduced allergenicity but retained the immunogenicity of the natural allergen. This could be of importance for immunotherapy of this type of allergy. PMID:11487873

  3. Allergen specific immunotherapy in nasobronchial allergy.

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi S; Tripathi D; Dhar H

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than one antigen has been used for immunotherapy of allergic disorders. So far less than five antigens have been employed with variable results. AIM: To evaluate effect of multiple antigens up to six in the immunotherapy of nasobronchial allergy. SETTING AND DESIGN: Based on clinical history, symptoms present for at least 3 years with set criteria of immunomodulation for asthma and rhinitis: documented IgE mediated asthma and rhinitis, failure in allergen avoidance and modera...

  4. Footwear dermatitis - Clinical patterns and contact allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Handa S; Sharma S; Sharma V; Kaur S.

    1991-01-01

    Thirty patients suspected of contact dermatitis to footwear studied to evaluate various clinical presentations and possible sensitizers. ′V′ chappals and sandals were suspected alone in 12, a combination of open and closed shoes in 15 and closed shoes alone in 3 patients. Commonest affected sites were dorsa of feet and toes in 14 and dorsa of feet corresponding to the shape of footwear in 12 patients. Patch tests were done using a battery of sixteen allergens. Positive patch tes...

  5. Lack of detectable allergenicity of transgenic maize and soya samples

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Rita; Nunes, Baltazar; Carmo, Manuela; Cardoso, Carlos; Helena, São José; Almeida, António Bugalho de; Manique, Alda; Bento, Leonor; Ricardo, Cândido Pinto; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2005-01-01

    Background: The safety issues regarding foods derived from genetically modified (GM) plants are central to their acceptance into the food supply. The potential allergenicity of proteins newly introduced in GM foods is a major safety concern. Objective: We sought to monitor, in potentially sensitive human populations, the allergenicity effects of 5 GM materials obtained from sources with no allergenic potential and already under commercialization in the European Union. ...

  6. Allergen Immunotherapy: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Marek; Kosowska, Anna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2016-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT), although in clinical use for more than a century, is still the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. The safety and efficacy of AIT has been demonstrated in a large number of clinical trials. In addition to allergy symptom reduction AIT plays an essential role in preventing new allergies and asthma and shows long-term effects after discontinuation of treatment. Ideally, it is capable of curing allergy. However, AIT is not effective in all allergic individuals and is not equally effective in the treatment of various hypersensitivities to different allergens. For many years, the route of administration and the vaccine compositions have been evolving. Still there is a strong need for research in the field of new AIT modalities to increase its effectiveness and safety. Growing evidence on immunological effects of AIT, especially new T cell subsets involved in antigen/allergen tolerance, provides novel concepts for safer and more effective vaccination. Pharmacoeconomic studies have demonstrated a clear advantage of AIT over pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26922928

  7. The Level of Sensitivity of Food Allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Rengganis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the occurrence of allergy continues to increase rapidly both domestically and globally. World Allergy Organization (WAO revealed that 22% of the world population suffers from allergies, and this number increases every year. Food allergy is a condition caused by the reaction of IgE against substances (chemicals in food. Food allergy can interfere with brain function and body organ systems as well as affect the quality of life. The purpose of this study is to know the level of sensitivity of food allergens in the Immunology Allergy Poly RSCM in 2007. Data were collected from 208 patients who have medical records and went through skin prick tests in the Immunology Allergy Clinic RSCM in 2007. Univariate analysis was performed to describe the types of food allergens within groups of children and adults. Around 49% of the respondents were sensitive to food allergens. The types of foods that caused the most allergies for children and adults are respectively shrimp, egg white and cornstarch. Cow's milk and wheat flour are the types of food that caused most allergies for children only, whereas for adults, the food that caused the most allergies is crab.

  8. Mold allergens in respiratory allergy: from structure to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twaroch, Teresa E; Curin, Mirela; Valenta, Rudolf; Swoboda, Ines

    2015-05-01

    Allergic reactions to fungi were described 300 years ago, but the importance of allergy to fungi has been underestimated for a long time. Allergens from fungi mainly cause respiratory and skin symptoms in sensitized patients. In this review, we will focus on fungi and fungal allergens involved in respiratory forms of allergy, such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Fungi can act as indoor and outdoor respiratory allergen sources, and depending on climate conditions, the rates of sensitization in individuals attending allergy clinics range from 5% to 20%. Due to the poor quality of natural fungal allergen extracts, diagnosis of fungal allergy is hampered, and allergen-specific immunotherapy is rarely given. Several factors are responsible for the poor quality of natural fungal extracts, among which the influence of culture conditions on allergen contents. However, molecular cloning techniques have allowed us to isolate DNAs coding for fungal allergens and to produce a continuously growing panel of recombinant allergens for the diagnosis of fungal allergy. Moreover, technologies are now available for the preparation of recombinant and synthetic fungal allergen derivatives which can be used to develop safe vaccines for the treatment of fungal allergy. PMID:25840710

  9. Measurement of Horse Allergen (Equ cx) in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Emenius, Gunnel; Elfman, Lena; Smedje, Greta

    2011-01-01

    Background. The presence of horse allergen in public places is not well-known, unlike for instance cat and dog allergens, which have been studied extensively. The aim was to investigate the presence of horse allergen in schools and to what extent the influence of number of children with regular horse contact have on indoor allergen levels. Methods. Petri dishes were used to collect airborne dust samples during one week in classrooms. In some cases, vacuumed dust samples were also collected. All samples were extracted, frozen and analysed for Equ cx content shortly after sampling, and some were re-analysed six years later with a more sensitive ELISA assay. Results. Horse allergen levels were significantly higher in classrooms, in which many children had horse contact, regardless of sampling method. Allergen levels in extracts from Petri dish samples, which had been kept frozen, dropped about 53% over a six-year period. Conclusion. Horse allergen was present in classrooms and levels were higher in classrooms where many children had regular horse contact in their leisure time. This suggests that transfer of allergens takes place via contaminated clothing. Measures should be taken to minimize possible transfer and deposition of allergens in pet-free environments, such as schools. PMID:23724238

  10. Computational detection of allergenic proteins attains a new level of accuracy with in silico variable-length peptide extraction and machine learning

    OpenAIRE

    Soeria-Atmadja, D.; Lundell, T.; Gustafsson, M. G.; Hammerling, U.

    2006-01-01

    The placing of novel or new-in-the-context proteins on the market, appearing in genetically modified foods, certain bio-pharmaceuticals and some household products leads to human exposure to proteins that may elicit allergic responses. Accurate methods to detect allergens are therefore necessary to ensure consumer/patient safety. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach a new level of accuracy in computational detection of allergenic proteins by presenting a novel detector, Detection based...

  11. Current challenges facing the assessment of the allergenic capacity of food allergens in animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; van Bilsen, Jolanda; Głogowski, Robert;

    2016-01-01

    of novel food proteins. There is no doubt that robust and reliable animal models for the identification and characterization of food allergens would be valuable tools for safety assessment. However, although various animal models have been proposed for this purpose, to date, none have been formally...... validated as predictive and none are currently suitable to test the allergenic potential of new foods. Here, the design of various animal models are reviewed, including among others considerations of species and strain, diet, route of administration, dose and formulation of the test protein, relevant...

  12. Peanut Allergy, Allergen Composition, and Methods of Reducing Allergenicity: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peanut allergy affects 1-2% of the world's population. It is dangerous, and usually lifelong, and it greatly decreases the life quality of peanut-allergic individuals and their families. In a word, peanut allergy has become a major health concern worldwide. Thirteen peanut allergens are identified, and they are briefly introduced in this paper. Although there is no feasible solution to peanut allergy at present, many methods have shown great promise. This paper reviews methods of reducing peanut allergenicity, including physical methods (heat and pressure, PUV, chemical methods (tannic acid and magnetic beads, and biological methods (conventional breeding, irradiation breeding, genetic engineering, enzymatic treatment, and fermentation.

  13. Human CD4+ T cell responses to the dog major allergen Can f 1 and its human homologue tear lipocalin resemble each other.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino L K Liukko

    Full Text Available Lipocalin allergens form a notable group of proteins, as they contain most of the significant respiratory allergens from mammals. The basis for the allergenic capacity of allergens in the lipocalin family, that is, the development of T-helper type 2 immunity against them, is still unresolved. As immunogenicity has been proposed to be a decisive feature of allergens, the purpose of this work was to examine human CD4+ T cell responses to the major dog allergen Can f 1 and to compare them with those to its human homologue, tear lipocalin (TL. For this, specific T cell lines were induced in vitro from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Can f 1-allergic and healthy dog dust-exposed subjects with peptides containing the immunodominant T cell epitopes of Can f 1 and the corresponding TL peptides. We found that the frequency of Can f 1 and TL-specific T cells in both subject groups was low and close to each other, the difference being about two-fold. Importantly, we found that the proliferative responses of both Can f 1 and TL-specific T cell lines from allergic subjects were stronger than those from healthy subjects, but that the strength of the responses within the subject groups did not differ between these two antigens. Moreover, the phenotype of the Can f 1 and TL-specific T cell lines, determined by cytokine production and expression of cell surface markers, resembled each other. The HLA system appeared to have a minimal role in explaining the allergenicity of Can f 1, as the allergic and healthy subjects' HLA background did not differ, and HLA binding was very similar between Can f 1 and TL peptides. Along with existing data on lipocalin allergens, we conclude that strong antigenicity is not decisive for the allergenicity of Can f 1.

  14. Comparative genomics of fungal allergens and epitopes shows widespread distribution of closely related allergen and epitope orthologues

    OpenAIRE

    Fraczek Marcin; Bowyer Paul; Denning David W

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Allergy is a common debilitating and occasionally life threatening condition. The fungal kingdom contains a number of species that produce a wide range of well defined protein allergens although the vast majority of fungal species have unknown allergenic potential. The recent genome sequencing of a variety of fungi provides the opportunity to assess the occurrence of allergen orthologues across the fungal kingdom. Here we use comparative genomics to survey the occurrence o...

  15. Sensitization rates of causative allergens for dogs with atopic dermatitis: detection of canine allergen-specific IgE

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Ha-Jung; Jang, Hye-Jin; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE serology tests became commercially available in the 1980s. Since then these tests have been widely used to diagnose and treat allergic skin diseases. However, the relationship between a positive reaction and disease occurrence has been controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate allergens using a serologic allergy test in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). Dogs clinically diagnosed with AD (n=101) were tested using an allergen-specific IgE immunoassay. Among ...

  16. Responsiveness of the major birch allergen Bet v 1 scaffold to the gastric environment: Impact on structure and allergenic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sancho, Ana I; Wangorsch, Andrea; Jensen, Bettina M;

    2011-01-01

    Four Bet v 1 homologous food allergens from celeriac (rApi g 1), apple (rMal d 1), peach (rPru p 1) and hazelnut (rCor a 1), were used to probe the structural responsiveness of the Bet v 1 scaffold to gastric digestion conditions and its impact on allergenicity.......Four Bet v 1 homologous food allergens from celeriac (rApi g 1), apple (rMal d 1), peach (rPru p 1) and hazelnut (rCor a 1), were used to probe the structural responsiveness of the Bet v 1 scaffold to gastric digestion conditions and its impact on allergenicity....

  17. The “time-window” effect of early allergen exposure on a rat asthma model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yan; LIU Ping; LI Hai-chao; WANG Yue-dan

    2013-01-01

    Background The hygiene hypothesis has been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of asthma.Allergen exposure was shown to inhibit asthma in an animal model.But the optimal timing of allergen exposure remains unclear.This study aims to explore the time effcct of allergen exposure and the possible mechanisms.Methods Neonate Wistar rats were randomly divided into asthma group,control group and day 1,day 3,day 7,and day 14 groups.The day 1,day 3,day 7 and day 14 groups were injected with ovalbumin (OVA) subcutaneously on days 1,3,7 and 14 after birth,respectively.Six weeks later,all groups,except the control group,were sensitized and stimulated with OVA to make the asthma model.We observed the pulmonary pathologic changes,detected the regulatory T cells,and CD28 expression level in thymus and spleen by flow cytometry.Results The asthmatic inflammation in the day 1,day 3 and day 7 groups,but not the day 14 group,was alleviated.The asthma group and day 14 group had lower proportions of regulatory T cells in the thymus compared with the control group,day 1,day 3,and day 7 groups.There was no significant difference in the CD28 expression levels on the regulatory and conventional T cells among groups.But the control group and the day 1,day 3,and day 7 groups had relatively higher proportions of CD28 positive regulatory T cells in the thymus than the day 14 group and the asthma group.Conclusions There is a “time-window” for early allergen exposure.The impairment of regulatory T cells may promote the development of asthma.Allergen exposure in the “time-window” can make the thymus produce normal quantity of regulatory cells.The CD28 signal on regulatory T cells may participate in the production of regulatory T cells.

  18. 78 FR 78340 - Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... International Trade Administration Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee AGENCY... Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee (RE&EEAC) will meet via conference call on January... renewable energy and energy efficiency (RE&EE) products and services. DATES: January 23, 2014, from 2:00...

  19. 76 FR 63614 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy... announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee under section... products. Tentative Agenda: Agenda Will Include the Following Update on USDA Biomass R&D Activities;...

  20. 77 FR 26276 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy... announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. The Federal... products. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include the following: Update on USDA Biomass R&D Activities...

  1. 76 FR 22091 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy... announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. The Federal... products. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include the following: Update on USDA Biomass R&D Activities...

  2. Serological response of cattle to Brucella allergen after repeated intradermal applications of this allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muskens, J.A.M.; Bercovich, Z.; Damen, C.P.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether an allergen that has been prepared from a mucoid strain of Brucella abortus triggers a serum antibody response that interferes with the interpretation of serologic tests results. Fifteen cattle seronegative for Brucella antigen were tested with the SDTH tes

  3. A protein allergen microarray detects specific IgE to pollen surface, cytoplasmic, and commercial allergen extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katinka A Vigh-Conrad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current diagnostics for allergies, such as skin prick and radioallergosorbent tests, do not allow for inexpensive, high-throughput screening of patients. Additionally, extracts used in these methods are made from washed pollen that lacks pollen surface materials that may contain allergens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sought to develop a high-throughput assay to rapidly measure allergen-specific IgE in sera and to explore the relative allergenicity of different pollen fractions (i.e. surface, cytoplasmic, commercial extracts. To do this, we generated a protein microarray containing surface, cytoplasmic, and commercial extracts from 22 pollen species, commercial extracts from nine non-pollen allergens, and five recombinant allergenic proteins. Pollen surface and cytoplasmic fractions were prepared by extraction into organic solvents and aqueous buffers, respectively. Arrays were incubated with <25 uL of serum from 176 individuals and bound IgE was detected by indirect immunofluorescence, providing a high-throughput measurement of IgE. We demonstrated that the allergen microarray is a reproducible method to measure allergen-specific IgE in small amounts of sera. Using this tool, we demonstrated that specific IgE clusters according to the phylogeny of the allergen source. We also showed that the pollen surface, which has been largely overlooked in the past, contained potent allergens. Although, as a class, cytoplasmic fractions obtained by our pulverization/precipitation method were comparable to commercial extracts, many individual allergens showed significant differences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support the hypothesis that protein microarray technology is a useful tool for both research and in the clinic. It could provide a more efficient and less painful alternative to traditionally used skin prick tests, making it economically feasible to compare allergen sensitivity of different populations, monitor individual

  4. The potential of papain and alcalase enzymes and process optimizations to reduce allergenic gliadins in wheat flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Yu, Jianmei; Goktepe, Ipek; Ahmedna, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to select effective enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of allergenic proteins, gliadins, in wheat flour and to optimize the enzymatic treatment conditions. Six proteases were tested. Hydrolyzed samples were tested for residual gliadin concentrations and in vitro allergenicity. The hydrolysis conditions of wheat protein by the effective enzymes were optimized by central composite design. Results showed that alcalase from Bacillus licheniformis, and papain from latex of papaya fruit had greater ability to reduce gliadin content of wheat flour than flavourzyme, pepsin, trypsin or α-chymotrypsin. The sequential-treatment of wheat flour by alcalase-papain was more effective in reducing gliadin content than single enzyme treatment. Under the optimal conditions of sequential enzymatic treatment, gliadin was almost completely removed, resulting in the flour extract showing lowest IgE-binding. Therefore, this could be a promising biotechnology for preparing low allergenic wheat products. PMID:26593625

  5. What do we know about plant food allergens?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenkins, J. A.; Sancho, A. I.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard;

    2005-01-01

    databases has allowed their classification into families. This has shown that plant food allergens fall into four main families, with the prolamin superfamily (including the 2S albumins, nonspecific lipid transfer proteins and cc-amylase inhibitors) predominating, followed by the family of allergens related...

  6. An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A K G; Venkatesh, Y P

    2015-11-01

    Plant allergens, being one of the most widespread allergenic substances, are hard to avoid. Hence, their identification and characterization are of prime importance for the diagnosis and treatment of food allergy. The reported allergies to fruits mainly evoke oral allergy syndrome caused by the presence of cross-reactive IgE to certain pollens and thus, allergy to fruits has also been linked to particular pollens. Many fruit allergies are being studied for their causative allergens, and are being characterized. Some tropical or exotic fruits are responsible for region-specific allergies for which only limited information is available, and generally lack allergen characterization. From a survey of the literature on fruit allergy, it is clear that some common fruits (apple, peach, musk melon, kiwi fruit, cherry, grape, strawberry, banana, custard apple, mango and pomegranate) and their allergens appear to be at the center of current research on food allergy. The present review focuses on common fruits reported as allergenic and their identified allergens; a brief description of allergens from six rare/tropical fruits is also covered. PMID:26549334

  7. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  8. Ethosome formulations of known contact allergens can increase their sensitizing capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Karlberg, Ann-Therese;

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular systems, such as liposomes and ethosomes, are used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products to encapsulate ingredients, to protect ingredients from degradation, to increase bioavailability, and to improve cosmetic performance. Some reports have suggested that formulation of cosmetic...... ingredients in vesicular carrier systems may increase their contact allergy elicitation potential in humans. However, no sensitization studies have been published. We formulated two model contact allergens (isoeugenol and dinitrochlorobenzene) in ethosomes and investigated the sensitization response using a...

  9. Characterisation of potential novel allergens in the fish parasite Anisakis simplex

    OpenAIRE

    Christiane Kruse Fæste; Jonscher, Karen R.; Maaike M.W.B. Dooper; Wolfgang Egge-Jacobsen; Anders Moen; Alvaro Daschner; Eliann Egaas; Uwe Christians

    2014-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Anisakis simplex occurs in fish stocks in temperate seas. A. simplex contamination of fish products is unsavoury and a health concern considering human infection with live larvae (anisakiasis) and allergic reactions to anisakid proteins in seafood. Protein extracts of A. simplex produce complex band patterns in gel electrophoresis and IgE-immunostaining. In the present study potential allergens have been characterised using sera from A. simplex-sensitised patients and p...

  10. ALLERGEN-SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY: VACCINES FOR ALLERGIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Fedorov

    2015-10-01

    via increased production of specific IgG antibodies, primarily of IgG4 subtype. The shift of balance between IgE and IgG4 towards IgG4 production is now considered a fundamental condition for successful ASIT. It has been proven that the allergen-specific IgG4 antibodies against IgE persist after discontinuation of the treatment and can provide long-term clinical tolerance. Modern prospectives for development of new forms and species of preparations for ASIT are also reviewed. Two groups of drugs for ASIT have been adopted for clinical practice until now, i.e., allergens and allergoids (allergens chemically modified by treatment with formaldehyde, in order to enhance their immunogenicity and to reduce the incidence of adverse allergic reactions associated with their application. Immunological mechanisms of SLIT (sublingual immunotherapy are subjected to special consideration. So far, SLIT is the safest and most promising option of ASIT today, its usage is most expedient in pediatric practice.

  11. Novel developments in the mechanisms of immune tolerance to allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiwegger, Thomas; Gruber, Saskia; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2012-10-01

    Allergy is the result of a disbalanced immune response to environmental innocuous antigens. Despite of accumulating data to define the pathomechanisms that take place in case of allergic diseases a detailed understanding of sequence of events that lead to the "normal" scenario of tolerance development are still under debate. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. It modifies the immune response to a particular antigen to achieve tolerance against the symptom-causing allergen. This process is considered to mirror physiological peripheral tolerance induction. A number of immunological changes have been described to occur under allergen immunotherapy, including the generation of allergen-specific regulatory T cells, the induction of allergen-specific IgG4, an increase in the Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio and decreased activation and function of effector cells such as mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. PMID:23095863

  12. The dichotomy of pathogens and allergens in vaccination approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Fiona J; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-01-01

    Traditional prophylactic vaccination to prevent illness is the primary objective of many research activities worldwide. The golden age of vaccination began with an approach called variolation in ancient China and the evolution of vaccines still continues today with modern developments such as the production of Gardasil(TM) against HPV and cervical cancer. The historical aspect of how different forms of vaccination have changed the face of medicine and communities is important as it dictates our future approaches on both a local and global scale. From the eradication of smallpox to the use of an experimental vaccine to save a species, this review will explore these successes in infectious disease vaccination and also discuss a few significant failures which have hampered our efforts to eradicate certain diseases. The second part of the review will explore designing a prophylactic vaccine for the growing global health concern that is allergy. Allergies are an emerging global health burden. Of particular concern is the rise of food allergies in developed countries where 1 in 10 children is currently affected. The formation of an allergic response results from the recognition of a foreign component by our immune system that is usually encountered on a regular basis. This may be a dust-mite or a prawn but this inappropriate immune response can result in a life-time of food avoidance and lifestyle restrictions. These foreign components are very similar to antigens derived from infectious pathogens. The question arises: should the allergy community be focussing on protective measures rather than ongoing therapeutic interventions to deal with these chronic inflammatory conditions? We will explore the difficulties and benefits of prophylactic vaccination against various allergens by means of genetic technology that will dictate how vaccination against allergens could be utilized in the near future. PMID:25076945

  13. The dichotomy of pathogens and allergens in vaccination approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona J. Baird

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional prophylactic vaccination to prevent illness is the primary objective of many research activities worldwide. The golden age of vaccination began with an approach called variolation in ancient China and the evolution of vaccines still continues today with modern developments such as the production of Gardasil™ against HPV and cervical cancer. The historical aspect of how different forms of vaccination have changed the face of medicine and communities is important as it dictates our future approaches on both a local and global scale. From the eradication of smallpox to the use of an experimental vaccine to save a species, this review will explore these successes in infectious disease vaccination and also discuss a few significant failures which have hampered our efforts to eradicate certain diseases. The second part of the review will explore designing a prophylactic vaccine for the growing global health concern that is allergy. Allergies are an emerging global health burden. Of particular concern is the rise of food allergies in developed countries where 1 in 10 children is currently affected. The formation of an allergic response results from the recognition of a foreign component by our immune system that is usually encountered on a regular basis. This may be a dust-mite or a prawn but this inappropriate immune response can result in a life-time of food avoidance and lifestyle restrictions. These foreign components are very similar to antigens derived from infectious pathogens. The question arises: should the allergy community be focussing on protective measures rather than ongoing therapeutic interventions to deal with these chronic inflammatory conditions? We will explore the difficulties and benefits of prophylactic vaccination against various allergens by means of genetic technology that will dictate how vaccination against allergens could be utilised in the near future.

  14. Simultaneous allergen inactivation and detoxification of castor bean cake by treatment with calcium compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Fernandes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ricinus communis L. is of great economic importance due to the oil extracted from its seeds. Castor oil has been used for pharmaceutical and industrial applications, as a lubricant or coating agent, as a component of plastic products, as a fungicide or in the synthesis of biodiesel fuels. After oil extraction, a castor cake with a large amount of protein is obtained. However, this by-product cannot be used as animal feed due to the presence of toxic (ricin and allergenic (2S albumin proteins. Here, we propose two processes for detoxification and allergen inactivation of the castor cake. In addition, we establish a biological test to detect ricin and validate these detoxification processes. In this test, Vero cells were treated with ricin, and cell death was assessed by cell counting and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase activity. The limit of detection of the Vero cell assay was 10 ng/mL using a concentration of 1.6 x 10(5 cells/well. Solid-state fermentation (SSF and treatment with calcium compounds were used as cake detoxification processes. For SSF, Aspergillus niger was grown using a castor cake as a substrate, and this cake was analyzed after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of SSF. Ricin was eliminated after 24 h of SSF treatment. The cake was treated with 4 or 8% Ca(OH2 or CaO, and both the toxicity and the allergenic properties were entirely abolished. A by-product free of toxicity and allergens was obtained.

  15. Simultaneous allergen inactivation and detoxification of castor bean cake by treatment with calcium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, K.V.; Deus-de-Oliveira, N. [Laboratório de Química e Função de Proteínas e Peptídeos, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Godoy, M.G. [Laboratório de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Guimarães, Z.A.S. [Laboratório de Biologia Celular e Tecidual, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nascimento, V.V. [Laboratório de Química e Função de Proteínas e Peptídeos, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Melo, E.J.T. de [Laboratório de Biologia Celular e Tecidual, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, D.M.G. [Laboratório de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Dansa-Petretski, M.; Machado, O.L.T. [Laboratório de Química e Função de Proteínas e Peptídeos, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-08-24

    Ricinus communis L. is of great economic importance due to the oil extracted from its seeds. Castor oil has been used for pharmaceutical and industrial applications, as a lubricant or coating agent, as a component of plastic products, as a fungicide or in the synthesis of biodiesel fuels. After oil extraction, a castor cake with a large amount of protein is obtained. However, this by-product cannot be used as animal feed due to the presence of toxic (ricin) and allergenic (2S albumin) proteins. Here, we propose two processes for detoxification and allergen inactivation of the castor cake. In addition, we establish a biological test to detect ricin and validate these detoxification processes. In this test, Vero cells were treated with ricin, and cell death was assessed by cell counting and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase activity. The limit of detection of the Vero cell assay was 10 ng/mL using a concentration of 1.6 × 10{sup 5} cells/well. Solid-state fermentation (SSF) and treatment with calcium compounds were used as cake detoxification processes. For SSF, Aspergillus niger was grown using a castor cake as a substrate, and this cake was analyzed after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of SSF. Ricin was eliminated after 24 h of SSF treatment. The cake was treated with 4 or 8% Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO, and both the toxicity and the allergenic properties were entirely abolished. A by-product free of toxicity and allergens was obtained.

  16. Reduction of the Number of Major Representative Allergens: From Clinical Testing to 3-Dimensional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vast amounts of allergen sequence data have been accumulated, thus complicating the identification of specific allergenic proteins when performing diagnostic allergy tests and immunotherapy. This study aims to rank the importance/potency of the allergens so as to logically reduce the number of allergens and/or allergenic sources. Meta-analysis of 62 allergenic sources used for intradermal testing on 3,335 allergic patients demonstrated that in southern China, mite, sesame, spiny amaranth, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and house dust account for 88.0% to 100% of the observed positive reactions to the 62 types of allergenic sources tested. The Kolmogorov-Smironov Test results of the website-obtained allergen data and allergen family featured peptides suggested that allergen research in laboratories worldwide has been conducted in parallel on many of the same species. The major allergens were reduced to 21 representative allergens, which were further divided into seven structural classes, each of which contains similar structural components. This study therefore has condensed numerous allergenic sources and major allergens into fewer major representative ones, thus allowing for the use of a smaller number of allergens when conducting comprehensive allergen testing and immunotherapy treatments.

  17. Vaccine development for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant allergens and synthetic allergen peptides: Lessons from the past and novel mechanisms of action for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Rudolf; Campana, Raffaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Niederberger, Verena

    2016-02-01

    In the past, the development of more effective, safe, convenient, broadly applicable, and easy to manufacture vaccines for allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been limited by the poor quality of natural allergen extracts. Progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization has now made it possible to produce defined vaccines for AIT and eventually for preventive allergy vaccination based on recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry. Here we review the characteristics of recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that have reached clinical evaluation and discuss how molecular vaccine approaches can make AIT more safe and effective and thus more convenient. Furthermore, we discuss how new technologies can facilitate the reproducible manufacturing of vaccines of pharmaceutical grade for inhalant, food, and venom allergens. Allergy vaccines in clinical trials based on recombinant allergens, recombinant allergen derivatives, and synthetic peptides allow us to target selectively different immune mechanisms, and certain of those show features that might make them applicable not only for therapeutic but also for prophylactic vaccination. PMID:26853127

  18. Citizens Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemnock, Suzanne K.

    1968-01-01

    This document contains the results of a national survey designed to determine the composition and location of permanent citizens advisory committees operating within the nation's school districts. The 52 district-wide, continuing citizens advisory bodies identified by 290 responding school systems are listed alphabetically by State. The following…

  19. Development and inter-laboratory transfer of a decaplex polymerase chain reaction assay combined with capillary electrophoresis for the simultaneous detection of ten food allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Wu, Jiajie; Zhang, Jin; Pan, Aihu; Quan, Sheng; Zhang, Dabing; Kim, HaeYeong; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Shan; Yang, Litao

    2016-05-15

    Food allergies cause health risks to susceptible consumers and regulations on labeling of food allergen contents have been implemented in many countries and regions. To achieve timely and accurate food allergen labeling, the development of fast and effective allergen detection methods is very important. Herein, a decaplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay combined with capillary electrophoresis was developed to detect simultaneously 10 common food allergens from hazelnut, pistachio, oat, sesame, peanut, cashew, barley, wheat, soybean and pecan. The absolute limit of detection (LODa) of this system is between 2 and 20 copies of haploid genome, and the relative LOD (LODr) is as low as 0.005% (w/w) in simulated food mixtures. The developed assay was subsequently applied to 20 commercial food products and verified the allergen ingredients stated on the labels. Furthermore, results using this decaplex PCR assay was successfully replicated in three other laboratories, demonstrating the repeatability and applicability of this assay in routine analysis of the 10 food allergens. PMID:26776037

  20. Exposure to indoor allergens and association with allergy symptoms of employees in a work environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Brunetto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to indoor allergens is an important risk factor for sensitisation and respiratory allergy. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the levels of mite, cat and latex allergens in dust collected from an indoor workplace and to assess whether the exposure to these allergens was associated with the allergy symptoms reported by employees. Sixty dust samples were collected. Allergen concentrations were measured with antibody based ELISAs. All 144 participants compiled a questionnaire exploring possible symptoms of allergy. No association between latex allergen exposure and symptoms was found in spite of the high frequency of latex allergens. Mite allergens were detected in a minority of rooms. Cat allergen was the most important indoor allergen in the sampled workplace and exposure to this allergen could represent a risk for employees.

  1. cDNA Cloning, Expression and Characterization of an Allergenic 60s Ribosomal Protein of Almond (Prunus dulcis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassani Mohsen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tree nuts, including almond (prunus dulcis are a source of food allergens often associated with life-threatening allergic reactions in susceptible individuals. Although the proteins in almonds have been biochemically characterized, relatively little has been reported regarding the identity of the allergens involved in almond sensitivity. The present study was undertaken to identify the allergens of the almond by cDNA library approach. cDNA library of almond seeds was constructed in Uni-Zap XR lamda vector and expressed in E. coli XL-1 blue. Plaques were immunoscreened with pooled sera of allergic patients. The cDNA clone reacting significantly with specific IgE antibodies was selected and subcloned and subsequently expressed in E. coli. The amino acids deducted from PCR product of clone showed homology to 60s acidic ribosomal protein of almond. The expressed protein was 11,450 Dalton without leader sequence. Immunoreactivity of the recombinant 60s ribosomal protein (r60sRP was evaluated with dot blot analysis using pooled and individual sera of allergic patients. The data showed that r60sRP and almond extract (as positive control possess the ability to bind the IgE antibodies. The results showed that expressed protein is an almond allergen.Whether this r60sRP represents a major allergen of almond needs to be further studied which requires a large number of sera from the almond atopic patients and also need to determine the IgE-reactive frequencies of each individual allergen.

  2. Characteristics of T-cell and B-cell immune respoonses to pollen allergens in Bulgarian patients with pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHIVKA KOSTOVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the pollen allergens and identification of the main T-cell and B-cell epitopes is of crucial importance, since the clarification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms will allow long-term control of this type allergic diseases and development of safe immunotherapeutic medication. The objective of this study was to identify which pollen allergens are responsible for the T-cell activation in atopic patients with pollinosis and to determine whether the same allergens are responsible for the IgE-mediated reactions. Thirty-seven patients with pollinosis and thirteen non-allergic subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were collected out of the pollen season. T-cell responses (IFN-γ production towards different pollen allergens and levels of pollen specific IgE and IgG in the sera were measured by ELISA. The T-cell reactivity in most patients was directed towards the grass pollen B1, tree pollen I and autumn pollen B5. 70% of the allergic individuals responded to allergens from Lolium perenne, 84% to Dactylis glomerata, 11% to Phleum pratense, 65% to Betula pendula and 70% to Taxus baccata. Elevated serum levels of specific IgE in the allergic patients (p<0.01 were measured against the tree pollen I and autumn pollen, which include widespread deciduous trees (birch, willow, poplar and yew and Artemisia absinthium, respectively. Our results show that the T-cell reactivity and antibody responses may be directed towards different or the same allergens. In addition, we propose that short synthetic peptides, which contain overlapping T- and B-cell epitopes can be used for specific immunotherapy treatment if they lack antibody recognition domains.

  3. Effect of Formaldehyde on Asthmatic Response to Inhaled Allergen Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezratty, Véronique; Bonay, Marcel; Neukirch, Catherine; Orset-Guillossou, Gaëlle; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background Exposure to formaldehyde may lead to exacerbation of asthma. Objectives Our aim in this study was to investigate whether exposure to a low level (500 μg/m3) of formaldehyde enhances inhaled allergen responses. Methods Twelve subjects with intermittent asthma and allergy to pollen were exposed, at rest, in a double-blind crossover study to either formaldehyde or purified air for 60 min. The order of exposure to formaldehyde and air-only was randomized, and exposures were separated by 2 weeks. We also performed an allergen inhalation challenge after each exposure. Airway responsiveness to methacholine and lower airway inflammation (induced sputum) were assessed 8 hr after allergen challenge. Results The median dose of allergen producing a 15% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (PD15FEV1) was 0.80 IR (index of reactivity) after formaldehyde exposure compared with 0.25 IR after air-only exposure (p = 0.06). Formaldehyde exposure did not affect allergen-induced increase in responsiveness to methacholine (p = 0.42). We found no formaldehyde-associated effect on the airway inflammatory response, in particular the eosinophilic inflammatory response, induced by the allergen challenge 8 hr before. Conclusion In this study, exposure to 500 μg/m3 formaldehyde had no significant deleterious effect on airway allergen responsiveness of patients with intermittent asthma; we found a trend toward a protective effect. PMID:17384766

  4. Controlling allergens in animal rooms by using curtains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Thomas Cæcius; Itter, Gabi; Fosse, Richard;

    2006-01-01

    The reduction and control of allergens in the animal facility is important for staff working with laboratory animals. This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of perforated Makrolon curtains in front of racks as a method to reduce the amount of allergen in the animal room. The experimen...... the curtains and prevents its spread from the cages into the aisle. The present study shows that the use of curtains in front of the cage racks is an efficient way to prevent spread of allergens from rodent cages to the entire animal room.......The reduction and control of allergens in the animal facility is important for staff working with laboratory animals. This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of perforated Makrolon curtains in front of racks as a method to reduce the amount of allergen in the animal room. The...... experimental situation we studied provides some information regarding allergen disposition in animal rooms but is clearly artificial and does not reflect a typical, ‘real-world’ environment in terms of preventing exposure of workers to allergens. Plastic curtains with holes were placed in front of racks, and a...

  5. Helminth Allergens, Parasite-Specific IgE, and Its Protective Role in Human Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Colin Matthew; Falcone, Franco Harald; Dunne, David William

    2014-01-01

    The Th2 immune response, culminating in eosinophilia and IgE production, is not only characteristic of allergy but also of infection by parasitic worms (helminths). Anti-parasite IgE has been associated with immunity against a range of helminth infections and many believe that IgE and its receptors evolved to help counter metazoan parasites. Allergens (IgE-antigens) are present in only a small minority of protein families and known IgE targets in helminths belong to these same families (e.g., EF-hand proteins, tropomyosin, and PR-1 proteins). During some helminth infection, especially with the well adapted hookworm, the Th2 response is moderated by parasite-expressed molecules. This has been associated with reduced allergy in helminth endemic areas and worm infection or products have been proposed as treatments for allergic conditions. However, some infections (especially Ascaris) are associated with increased allergy and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between worm proteins (e.g., tropomyosins) and highly similar molecules in dust-mites and insects. The overlap between allergy and helminth infection is best illustrated in Anisakis simplex, a nematode that when consumed in under-cooked fish can be both an infective helminth and a food allergen. Nearly 20 molecular allergens have been isolated from this species, including tropomyosin (Ani s 3) and the EF-hand protein, Ani s troponin. In this review, we highlight aspects of the biology and biochemistry of helminths that may have influenced the evolution of the IgE response. We compare dominant IgE-antigens in worms with clinically important environmental allergens and suggest that arrays of such molecules will provide important information on anti-worm immunity as well as allergy. PMID:24592267

  6. Projected carbon dioxide to increase grass pollen and allergen exposure despite higher ozone levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Albertine

    Full Text Available One expected effect of climate change on human health is increasing allergic and asthmatic symptoms through changes in pollen biology. Allergic diseases have a large impact on human health globally, with 10-30% of the population affected by allergic rhinitis and more than 300 million affected by asthma. Pollen from grass species, which are highly allergenic and occur worldwide, elicits allergic responses in 20% of the general population and 40% of atopic individuals. Here we examine the effects of elevated levels of two greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2, a growth and reproductive stimulator of plants, and ozone (O3, a repressor, on pollen and allergen production in Timothy grass (Phleum pratense L.. We conducted a fully factorial experiment in which plants were grown at ambient and/or elevated levels of O3 and CO2, to simulate present and projected levels of both gases and their potential interactive effects. We captured and counted pollen from flowers in each treatment and assayed for concentrations of the allergen protein, Phl p 5. We found that elevated levels of CO2 increased the amount of grass pollen produced by ∼50% per flower, regardless of O3 levels. Elevated O3 significantly reduced the Phl p 5 content of the pollen but the net effect of rising pollen numbers with elevated CO2 indicate increased allergen exposure under elevated levels of both greenhouse gases. Using quantitative estimates of increased pollen production and number of flowering plants per treatment, we estimated that airborne grass pollen concentrations will increase in the future up to ∼200%. Due to the widespread existence of grasses and the particular importance of P. pratense in eliciting allergic responses, our findings provide evidence for significant impacts on human health worldwide as a result of future climate change.

  7. Prediction of allergenic proteins and mapping of IgE epitopes in allergens

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    In present era use of genetically modified proteins in foods, therapeutics and biopharmaceuticals is increasing with exponential rate. Thus it is important to predict whether a modified protein allergenic or not. In 2003, the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex) conveyed a panel of international food safety regulators to review the FAO/ WHO 2001 recommendations and recognized the uncertainties associated with the bioinformatics part of the guidelines. They recommended various tests for exami...

  8. Authentication of food allergen quality by physicochemical and immunological methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sancho, A I; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; Alessandri, S;

    2010-01-01

    and standardization of methods between different laboratories and operators for risk assessment in the food industry. Therefore, there is a need for well-defined purified food allergens. In this context, a panel of 46 food allergens from plant and animal sources has been purified, from either the food sources...... or as recombinant forms, within the EU-funded EuroPrevall project. These allergens have been characterized by a battery of diagnostic tests demonstrating that they constitute an authentic, well-defined library of comparable quality. The review summarizes the applications, potentials and limitations of key...

  9. Identification of novel allergen in edible insect, Gryllus bimaculatus and its cross-reactivity with Macrobrachium spp. allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinroch, Chutima; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Punyarit, Phaibul; Phiriyangkul, Pharima

    2015-10-01

    Edible insects have recently been promoted as a source of protein and have a high nutrition value. Identification of allergens and cross-reactivity between Macrobrachium spp. and the field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) is necessary for food safety control and to assist in the diagnosis and therapy of allergy symptoms. Denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to separate proteins. Allergens were determined and identified by IgE-immunoblotting with pooled sera from prawn-allergic patients (n=16) and LC-MS/MS. Arginine kinase (AK) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were determined as the important allergens in muscle of Macrobrachium rosenbergii whereas, hemocyanin (HC) was identified as an allergen in Macrobrachium spp. The allergens in Macrobrachium lanchesteri were identified as AK and HC. In addition, hexamerin1B (HEX1B) was identified as a novel and specific allergen in G. bimaculatus. The important allergen in G. bimaculatus and Macrobrachium spp. is AK and was found to cross-react between both species. PMID:25872439

  10. 76 FR 75874 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of Meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold..., attention: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology Advisory Committee'' in any...

  11. 76 FR 8715 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold...: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology Advisory Committee'' in any written...

  12. Biomarkers for Allergen Immunotherapy: A "Panoromic" View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers (BMKs) are biological parameters that can be measured to predict or monitor disease severity or treatment efficacy. The induction of regulatory dendritic cells (DCs) concomitantly with a downregulation of proallergic DC2s (ie, DCs supporting the differentiation of T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells) in the blood of patients allergic to grass pollen has been correlated with the early onset of allergen immunotherapy efficacy. The combined use of omics technologies to compare biological samples from clinical responders and nonresponders is being implemented in the context of nonhypothesis-driven approaches. Such comprehensive "panoromic" strategies help identify completely novel candidate BMKs, to be subsequently validated as companion diagnostics in large-scale clinical trials. PMID:26617233

  13. Thresholds of allergenic proteins in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Threshold doses or Estimated Eliciting Doses (EEDs) represent an important new field of research in food allergy. Clinicians and regulators have embraced some toxicological concepts such as LOAEL and NOAEL and applied them to an area of significant clinical uncertainty and interest. The impact of intrinsic human factors (e.g., asthma and exercise) and extrinsic event factors (e.g., season, location and especially dose of allergen) on a future allergic reaction in the community needs to be considered carefully when interpreting results of clinical and research low-dose food challenges. The ongoing cooperation of food allergy research groups in medicine, food science and government will surely deliver results of the highest importance to the wider communities of allergology, food science and technology and the increasing number of allergic consumers

  14. Enzymatic treatment of soy protein isolates: effects on the potential allergenicity, technofunctionality, and sensory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinlschmidt, Pia; Sussmann, Daniela; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute; Eisner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Soybean allergy is of great concern and continues to challenge both consumer and food industry. The present study investigates the enzyme-assisted reduction in major soybean allergens in soy protein isolate using different food-grade proteases, while maintaining or improving the sensory attributes and technofunctional properties. SDS-PAGE analyses showed that hydrolysis with Alcalase, Pepsin, and Papain was most effective in the degradation of the major soybean allergens with proteolytic activities of 100%, 100%, and 95.9%, respectively. In the course of hydrolysis, the degree of hydrolysis increased, and Alcalase showed the highest degree of hydrolysis (13%) among the proteases tested. DSC analysis confirmed the degradation of major soybean allergens. The sensory experiments conducted by a panel of 10 panelists considered the overall improved sensory properties as well as the bitterness of the individual hydrolysates. In particular, Flavourzyme and Papain were attractive due to a less pronounced bitter taste and improved sensory profile (smell, taste, mouthfeeling). Technofunctional properties showed a good solubility at pH 7.0 and 4.0, emulsifying capacity up to 760 mL g(-1) (Flavourzyme) as well as improved oil-binding capacities, while the water-binding properties were generally decreased. Increased foaming activity for all proteases up to 3582% (Pepsin) was observed, whereas lower foaming stability and density were found. The hydrolysates could potentially be used as hypoallergenic ingredients in a variety of food products due to their improved technofunctional properties and a pleasant taste. PMID:26788306

  15. A fluorescence-based centrifugal microfluidic system for parallel detection of multiple allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q. L.; Ho, H. P.; Cheung, K. L.; Kong, S. K.; Suen, Y. K.; Kwan, Y. W.; Li, W. J.; Wong, C. K.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports a robust polymer based centrifugal microfluidic analysis system that can provide parallel detection of multiple allergens in vitro. Many commercial food products (milk, bean, pollen, etc.) may introduce allergy to people. A low-cost device for rapid detection of allergens is highly desirable. With this as the objective, we have studied the feasibility of using a rotating disk device incorporating centrifugal microfluidics for performing actuationfree and multi-analyte detection of different allergen species with minimum sample usage and fast response time. Degranulation in basophils or mast cells is an indicator to demonstrate allergic reaction. In this connection, we used acridine orange (AO) to demonstrate degranulation in KU812 human basophils. It was found that the AO was released from granules when cells were stimulated by ionomycin, thus signifying the release of histamine which accounts for allergy symptoms [1-2]. Within this rotating optical platform, major microfluidic components including sample reservoirs, reaction chambers, microchannel and flow-control compartments are integrated into a single bio-compatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. The flow sequence and reaction time can be controlled precisely. Sequentially through varying the spinning speed, the disk may perform a variety of steps on sample loading, reaction and detection. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using centrifugation as a possible immunoassay system in the future.

  16. House dust mite allergen Der f enhanced bronchial epithelial cell cytokine expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO QING SUN; WEI TANG; ALBERT CHAN; ADRIAN WU; NAN SHAN ZHONG

    2006-01-01

    The house dust mites ( Dermatophagoides farinae, Der f) are the major source of aeroallergens implicated in the expression of atopic disorders, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. In particular, strong circumstantial evidence suggests that house dust mite antigens are important precipitating factors of asthma. Many house dust mite allergens are proteases that can elicit airway inflammation by stimulating the release of cytokines from bronchial epithelial cells. To investigate whether Derf allergen proteases induced cytokine production from the epithelial cell line BEAS-2B,BEAS-2B cells were cultured with 4 different concentrations of Derf (0.02, 0.2, 2, 20 μg/ml) for 24-96 h, after which supernatants were assayed for interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 with ELISA. Reverse transcription-PCR was also performed. The cell sheets were intact throughout the observation in control group without any exposure to Derf antigen. In the experimental groups cells treated with Der f allergen showed changes in the anchorage status of the monolayer. There was a significant increase in the level of cytokine production compared with the untreated sample. The release of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in a concentration-dependent manner ( P < 0.05, respectively) with the addition of increasing dosage of Der f to the cell sheets. Levels of IL-6 and IL-8 began to rise at 24 h and 48 h after allergen exposure, and they increased significantly in the supernatants at 72 h and 96 h. At the same time the concentration dependence of induction of IL-6 and IL-8 expression as well as an increase in the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA manifested evidently. HDM-induced airway inflammation may include Der f-mediated release of inflammatory mediators, and the proteolytic activity of an allergen may stimulate the release of proinflammatory cytokines from human bronchial epithelium. It is suggested that IL-6 and IL-8 production by bronchial epithelial cells may play a role in the

  17. Repeated intranasal TLR7 stimulation reduces allergen responsiveness in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiff Lennart

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between Th1 and Th2 immune responses are of importance to the onset and development of allergic disorders. A Toll-like receptor 7 agonist such as AZD8848 may have potential as a treatment for allergic airway disease by skewing the immune system away from a Th2 profile. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal AZD8848. Methods In a placebo-controlled single ascending dose study, AZD8848 (0.3-600 μg was given intranasally to 48 healthy subjects and 12 patients with allergic rhinitis (NCT00688779. In a placebo-controlled repeat challenge/treatment study, AZD8848 (30 and 60 μg was given once weekly for five weeks to 74 patients with allergic rhinitis out of season: starting 24 hours after the final dose, daily allergen challenges were given for seven days (NCT00770003. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and biomarkers were monitored. During the allergen challenge series, nasal symptoms and lavage fluid levels of tryptase and α2-macroglobulin, reflecting mast cell activity and plasma exudation, were monitored. Results AZD8848 produced reversible blood lymphocyte reductions and dose-dependent flu-like symptoms: 30–100 μg produced consistent yet tolerable effects. Plasma interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was elevated after administration of AZD8848, reflecting interferon production secondary to TLR7 stimulation. At repeat challenge/treatment, AZD8848 reduced nasal symptoms recorded ten minutes after allergen challenge up to eight days after the final dose. Tryptase and α2-macroglobulin were also reduced by AZD8848. Conclusions Repeated intranasal stimulation of Toll-like receptor 7 by AZD8848 was safe and produced a sustained reduction in the responsiveness to allergen in allergic rhinitis. Trial registration NCT00688779 and NCT00770003 as indicated above.

  18. Cytochrome P450-mediated activation of the fragrance compound geraniol forms potent contact allergens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contact sensitization is caused by low molecular weight compounds which penetrate the skin and bind to protein. In many cases, these compounds are activated to reactive species, either by autoxidation on exposure to air or by metabolic activation in the skin. Geraniol, a widely used fragrance chemical, is considered to be a weak allergen, although its chemical structure does not indicate it to be a contact sensitizer. We have shown that geraniol autoxidizes and forms allergenic oxidation products. In the literature, it is suggested but not shown that geraniol could be metabolically activated to geranial. Previously, a skin-like CYP cocktail consisting of cutaneous CYP isoenzymes, was developed as a model system to study cutaneous metabolism. In the present study, we used this system to investigate CYP-mediated activation of geraniol. In incubations with the skin-like CYP cocktail, geranial, neral, 2,3-epoxygeraniol, 6,7-epoxygeraniol and 6,7-epoxygeranial were identified. Geranial was the main metabolite formed followed by 6,7-epoxygeraniol. The allergenic activities of the identified metabolites were determined in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Geranial, neral and 6,7-epoxygeraniol were shown to be moderate sensitizers, and 6,7-epoxygeranial a strong sensitizer. Of the isoenzymes studied, CYP2B6, CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 showed high activities. It is likely that CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 are mainly responsible for the metabolic activation of geraniol in the skin, as they are expressed constitutively at significantly higher levels than CYP2B6. Thus, geraniol is activated through both autoxidation and metabolism. The allergens geranial and neral are formed via both oxidation mechanisms, thereby playing a large role in the sensitization to geraniol

  19. Cross-reactions between respiratory and food allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blay, F; Pauli, G; Bessot, J C

    1991-01-01

    Cross-reactions between inhaled and food allergens are usually attributed to pollen hypersensitivity associated with fruit and vegetable allergy. However, other allergens are involved in these types of cross-reactions. In a few cases, there is a complete similarity between the inhaled and food allergens (garlic, crustacea proteins). More frequently, partial similarity has been demonstrated: whole inhaled allergens are included in ingested substances. Moreover, immunological techniques can demonstrate common antigenic epitopes in organic substances without any apparent relationship. This has been demonstrated by RAST-inhibition and/or immunoblot techniques, using sera from patients cross-sensitized to (1) pollens and fruits or vegetables or (2) avian sera and eggs. Respiratory sensitization always seems to precede food allergy symptoms. PMID:1720408

  20. Airway responses to NO2 and allergen in asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Barck, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (N02), a gas produced by combustion, is a common environmental air pollutant. Individuals with asthma are more sensitive to N02 exposure than healthy subjects, according to results from controlled human-exposure studies. N02 can enhance the asthmatic response to inhaled allergen. The mechanisms for N02's enhancing effect on the asthmatic reaction to allergen appear to be related to an increased inflammatory reaction in the airways. The general aim of the ...

  1. Hymenoptera Allergens: From Venom to “Venome”

    OpenAIRE

    Spillner, Edzard; Blank, Simon; Jakob, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    In Western Europe, Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA) primarily relates to venoms of the honeybee and the common yellow jacket. In contrast to other allergen sources, only a few major components of Hymenoptera venoms had been characterized until recently. Improved expression systems and proteomic detection strategies have allowed the identification and characterization of a wide range of additional allergens. The field of HVA research has moved rapidly from focusing on venom extract and single m...

  2. Sputum RNA signature in allergic asthmatics following allergen bronchoprovocation test

    OpenAIRE

    Zuiker, Rob G.J.A.; Catherine Tribouley; Zuzana Diamant; J. Diderik Boot; Cohen, Adam F; K. Van Dyck; De Lepeleire, I; Veronica M. Rivas; Malkov, Vladislav A.; Jacobus Burggraaf; Marcella K. Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inhaled allergen challenge is a validated disease model of allergic asthma offering useful pharmacodynamic assessment of pharmacotherapeutic effects in a limited number of subjects. Objectives: To evaluate whether an RNA signature can be identified from induced sputum following an inhaled allergen challenge, whether a RNA signature could be modulated by limited doses of inhaled fluticasone, and whether these gene expression profiles would correlate with the clinical endpoints meas...

  3. Sputum RNA signature in allergic asthmatics following allergen bronchoprovocation test

    OpenAIRE

    Zuiker, Rob G.J.A.; Tribouley, Catherine; Diamant, Zuzana; Boot, J. Diderik; Cohen, Adam F; K. Van Dyck; De Lepeleire, I; Veronica M. Rivas; Malkov, Vladislav A.; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Marcella K. Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inhaled allergen challenge is a validated disease model of allergic asthma offering useful pharmacodynamic assessment of pharmacotherapeutic effects in a limited number of subjects.Objectives: To evaluate whether an RNA signature can be identified from induced sputum following an inhaled allergen challenge, whether a RNA signature could be modulated by limited doses of inhaled fluticasone, and whether these gene expression profiles would correlate with the clinical endpoints measu...

  4. Allergen and endotoxin exposure in a companion animal hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Samadi, S.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Krop, E. J. M.; Jamshidifard, A.R.; Willemse, T; Wouters, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to allergens, both in general and occupational environments, is known to result in sensitisation and exacerbation of allergic diseases, while endotoxin exposure might protect against allergic diseases. This may be important for veterinarians and co-workers. However, exposure levels are mostly unknown. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the allergen and endotoxin exposure levels of veterinary medicine students and workers in a companion animal hospital. METHODS: Airborne and surfa...

  5. The effects of gastric digestion on codfish allergenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Untersmayr, Eva; Poulsen, Lars K.; Platzer, Michael H;

    2005-01-01

    In a recent murine study, we showed that impaired gastric digestion supports the induction of fish allergy by protecting the digestion-sensitive major allergen parvalbumin and thus enhancing its sensitizing properties.......In a recent murine study, we showed that impaired gastric digestion supports the induction of fish allergy by protecting the digestion-sensitive major allergen parvalbumin and thus enhancing its sensitizing properties....

  6. Simultaneous allergen inactivation and detoxification of castor bean cake by treatment with calcium compounds

    OpenAIRE

    K.V. Fernandes; Deus-de-Oliveira, N.; Godoy, M.G.; Z.A.S. Guimarães; V.V. Nascimento; de Melo, E.J.T.; Freire, D. M.G.; M. Dansa-Petretski; O.L.T. Machado

    2012-01-01

    Ricinus communis L. is of great economic importance due to the oil extracted from its seeds. Castor oil has been used for pharmaceutical and industrial applications, as a lubricant or coating agent, as a component of plastic products, as a fungicide or in the synthesis of biodiesel fuels. After oil extraction, a castor cake with a large amount of protein is obtained. However, this by-product cannot be used as animal feed due to the presence of toxic (ricin) and allergenic (2S albumin) protein...

  7. Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Matsuo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is an adverse immune response to certain kinds of food. Although any food can cause allergic reactions, chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shellfish, fruit, and buckwheat account for 75% of food allergies in Japan. Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE antibodies play a pivotal role in the development of food allergy. Recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the efficient analysis of food allergens. As a result, many food allergens have been identified, and their molecular structure and IgE-binding epitopes have also been identified. Studies of allergens have demonstrated that IgE antibodies specific to allergen components and/or the peptide epitopes are good indicators for the identification of patients with food allergy, prediction of clinical severity and development of tolerance. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the allergens and IgE epitopes in the well-researched allergies to chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shrimp, and peanut.

  8. Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hiroaki; Yokooji, Tomoharu; Taogoshi, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is an adverse immune response to certain kinds of food. Although any food can cause allergic reactions, chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shellfish, fruit, and buckwheat account for 75% of food allergies in Japan. Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies play a pivotal role in the development of food allergy. Recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the efficient analysis of food allergens. As a result, many food allergens have been identified, and their molecular structure and IgE-binding epitopes have also been identified. Studies of allergens have demonstrated that IgE antibodies specific to allergen components and/or the peptide epitopes are good indicators for the identification of patients with food allergy, prediction of clinical severity and development of tolerance. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the allergens and IgE epitopes in the well-researched allergies to chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shrimp, and peanut. PMID:26433529

  9. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Si-Yin; Houska, Milan; Reed, Shawndrika

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens. Since high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts containing caffeic acid were treated with each of the following: (1) HP; (2) HP+PPO; (3) PPO; and (4) none. HP was conducted at 300 and 500 MPa, each for 3 and 10 min, 37 °C. After treatment, SDS-PAGE was performed and allergenic capacity (IgE binding) was determined colorimetrically in inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots, using a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic patients. Data showed that HP alone had no effect on major peanut allergens. However, HP at 500 MPa combined with PPO (HP500/PPO) induced a higher (approximately twofold) reduction of major peanut allergens and IgE binding than PPO alone or HP300/PPO. There was no difference between treatment times. We concluded that HP500/PPO at 3-min enhanced a twofold reduction of the allergenic capacity of peanut extracts, as compared to PPO itself.

  10. Characterization of Allergen Emission Sources in Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariñanos, Paloma; Adinolfi, Cristiano; Díaz de la Guardia, Consuelo; De Linares, Concepción; Casares-Porcel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Pollen released by urban flora-a major contributor to airborne allergen content during the pollen season-has a considerable adverse impact on human health. Using aerobiological techniques to sample and characterize airborne biological particulate matter (BPM), we can identify the main species contributing to the pollen spectrum and chart variations in counts and overall pollen dynamics throughout the year. However, given the exponential increase in the number of pollen allergy sufferers in built-up areas, new strategies are required to improve the biological quality of urban air. This paper reports on a novel characterization of the potential allergenicity of the tree species most commonly used as ornamentals in Mediterranean cities. Values were assigned to each species based on a number of intrinsic features including pollination strategy, pollen season duration, and allergenic capacity as reported in the specialist literature. Findings were used to generate a database in which groups of conifers, broadleaves, and palm trees were assigned a value of between 0 and 36, enabling their allergenicity to be rated as nil, low, moderate, high, or very high. The case study presented here focuses on the city of Granada in southern Spain. The major airborne-pollen-producing species were identified and the allergenicity of species growing in urban green zones was estimated. Corrective measures are proposed to prevent high allergen levels and thus improve biological air quality. PMID:26828180

  11. Algae Bloom Advisories 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Only a fraction of all water bodies in Oregon are monitored due to limited physical and monetary resources. A water body with no advisory is not an indication that...

  12. Thermal processing effects on peanut allergen Ara h 2 allergenicity in mice and its antigenic epitope structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenju; Zhu, Qingqing; Zhang, Tong; Cai, Qin; Chen, Qin

    2016-12-01

    Ara h 2 was purified from peanuts that were thermally treated by various processes, including boiling, glycation, frying and roasting. The allergenicity of Ara h 2 in Balb/c mice and the influence of thermal processing on the structural characteristics, and binding capacity of three core antigenic epitopes were studied. The results demonstrated that boiling, glycation and frying induced the down-regulation of the allergenicity of Ara h 2 in Balb/c mice, the collapse of its tertiary/secondary structure, and a reduction in the core epitope binding capacity; roasting showed a comparable allergenicity and the weakest inhibitory effect on core epitope binding capacity. These results indicate that thermal processing causes alteration of the protein structure and core epitopes of Ara h 2, and may affect its allergenicity. PMID:27374581

  13. The Plagiarism Advisory Service

    OpenAIRE

    Duggan, Fiona

    2003-01-01

    The issue of plagiarism in education has existed for many years, however, advances in technology resulting in easy access to a multitude of information sources has reduced the effort required to incorporate the work of others into an essay or report. A Plagiarism Advisory Service has been established to provide advice and guidance on all aspects of plagiarism prevention and detection. This article presents the background to the Advisory Service and the associated electronic Plagiarism Detecti...

  14. Environmental effects on allergen levels in commercially grown non-genetically modified soybeans: assessing variation across North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severin E. Stevenson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max is a hugely valuable soft commodity that generates tens of billions of dollars annually. This value is due in part to the balanced composition of the seed which is roughly 1:2:2 oil, starch and protein by weight. In turn, the seeds have many uses with various derivatives appearing broadly in processed food products. As is true with many edible seeds, soybeans contain proteins that are anti-nutritional factors and allergens. Soybean, along with milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts and wheat, elicit a majority of food allergy reactions in the United States. Soybean seed composition can be affected by breeding, environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, moisture, insect/pathogen load, and/or soil nutrient levels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of genotype and environment on allergen and anti-nutritional proteins in soybean. To address genetic and environmental effects, four varieties of non-GM soybeans were grown in six geographically distinct regions of North America (Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Ontario, and Pennsylvania. Absolute quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry can be achieved with a technique called multiple reaction monitoring (MRM, during which signals from an endogenous protein are compared to those from a synthetic heavy-labeled internal standard. Using MRM, eight allergens were absolutely quantified for each variety in each environment. Statistical analyses show that for most allergens, the effects of environment far outweigh the differences between varieties brought about by breeding.

  15. Environmental Effects on Allergen Levels in Commercially Grown Non-Genetically Modified Soybeans: Assessing Variation Across North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Severin E.; Woods, Carlotta A.; Hong, Bonnie; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Thelen, Jay J.; Ladics, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a hugely valuable soft commodity that generates tens of billions of dollars annually. This value is due in part to the balanced composition of the seed which is roughly 1:2:2 oil, starch, and protein by weight. In turn, the seeds have many uses with various derivatives appearing broadly in processed food products. As is true with many edible seeds, soybeans contain proteins that are anti-nutritional factors and allergens. Soybean, along with milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, and wheat, elicit a majority of food allergy reactions in the United States. Soybean seed composition can be affected by breeding, and environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, moisture, insect/pathogen load, and/or soil nutrient levels). The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of genotype and environment on allergen and anti-nutritional proteins in soybean. To address genetic and environmental effects, four varieties of non-GM soybeans were grown in six geographically distinct regions of North America (Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Ontario, and Pennsylvania). Absolute quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry can be achieved with a technique called multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), during which signals from an endogenous protein are compared to those from a synthetic heavy-labeled internal standard. Using MRM, eight allergens were absolutely quantified for each variety in each environment. Statistical analyses show that for most allergens, the effects of environment far outweigh the differences between varieties brought about by breeding. PMID:22969785

  16. Signal amplification in electrochemical detection of buckwheat allergenic protein using field effect transistor biosensor by introduction of anionic surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Hideshima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Food allergens, especially buckwheat proteins, sometimes induce anaphylactic shock in patients after ingestion. Development of a simple and rapid screening method based on a field effect transistor (FET biosensor for food allergens in food facilities or products is in demand. In this study, we achieved the FET detection of a buckwheat allergenic protein (BWp16, which is not charged enough to be electrically detected by FET biosensors, by introducing additional negative charges from anionic surfactants to the target proteins. A change in the FET characteristics reflecting surface potential caused by the adsorption of target charged proteins was observed when the target sample was coupled with the anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS, while no significant response was detected without any surfactant treatment. It was suggested that the surfactant conjugated with the protein could be useful for the charge amplification of the target proteins. The surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the SDS-coupled proteins were successfully captured by the receptors immobilized on the sensing surface. Additionally, we obtained the FET responses at various concentrations of BWp16 ranging from 1 ng/mL to 10 μg/mL. These results suggest that a signal amplification method for FET biosensing is useful for allergen detection in the food industry.

  17. ALIMENTOS TRANSGÉNICOS Y ALERGENICIDAD Transgenic foods and allergenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Acosta Losada

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La utilización de la tecnología transgénica en la modificación de las fuentes alimentarias ha permitido desarrollar alimentos menos caros y más saludables. Esta tecnología tiene la potencialidad de reducir el uso de plaguicidas químicos, incrementar la productividad y proteger el hábitat de los humanos y de otras especies. No obstante, los alimentos genéticamente modificados (GM han dado origen a preocupaciones públicas entre las organizaciones no gubernamentales (NGOs, los consumidores y los medios con relación a su potencial toxicidad, alergenicidad y alteración de los nutrientes. Se presenta una revisión crítica de la literatura reciente sobre las respuestas inmunológicas adversas a las proteínas de los alimentos. Esta revisión incluye las características físicas y químicas de los alergenos, la heterogeneidad en la prevalencia de la alergia a los alimentos y los avances en la comprensión de los desordenes alérgicos producidos por alimentos. Se realiza una descripción del espectro clínico de las reacciones alérgicas inducidas por alimentos, las cuales son responsables de una variedad de síntomas que afectan la piel, el tracto respiratorio y el tracto gastrointestinal. Los métodos utilizados en las pruebas para evaluar la seguridad de los alimentos derivados de los cultivos GM se presentan y discuten. Se concluye que los riesgos alergénicos potenciales introducidos por los alimentos GM no son mayores que los presentados por los alimentos derivados de cultivos modificados genéticamente por los métodos convencionales.The use of transgenic technology to modify food sources has anticipated the possibility of developing less expensive and healthier food. This technology has the potential of reducing the use of chemical pesticides, increasing the productivity and protecting the environment in which human beings and other species live. However, genetically modified (GM foods have raised a public concern among

  18. In silico allergenicity prediction of several lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garino, Cristiano; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are common allergens and they are particularly widespread within the plant kingdom. They have a highly conserved three-dimensional structure that generate a strong cross-reactivity among the members of this family. In the last years several web tools for the prediction of allergenicity of new molecules based on their homology with known allergens have been released, and guidelines to assess potential allergenicity of proteins through bioinformatics have been established. Even if such tools are only partially reliable yet, they can provide important indications when other kinds of molecular characterization are lacking. The potential allergenicity of 28 amino acid sequences of LTPs homologs, either retrieved from the UniProt database or in silico deduced from the corresponding EST coding sequence, was predicted using 7 publicly available web tools. Moreover, their similarity degree to their closest known LTP allergens was calculated, in order to evaluate their potential cross-reactivity. Finally, all sequences were studied for their identity degree with the peach allergen Pru p 3, considering the regions involved in the formation of its known conformational IgE-binding epitope. Most of the analyzed sequences displayed a high probability to be allergenic according to all the software employed. The analyzed LTPs from bell pepper, cassava, mango, mungbean and soybean showed high homology (>70%) with some known allergenic LTPs, suggesting a potential risk of cross-reactivity for sensitized individuals. Other LTPs, like for example those from canola, cassava, mango, mungbean, papaya or persimmon, displayed a high degree of identity with Pru p 3 within the consensus sequence responsible for the formation, at three-dimensional level, of its major conformational epitope. Since recent studies highlighted how in patients mono-sensitized to peach LTP the levels of IgE seem directly proportional to the chance of developing cross

  19. 75 FR 30002 - Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee AGENCY... the charter for the Threat Reduction Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as the Committee). FOR... Acquisition, Technology and Logistics and the Director of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency on the...

  20. 75 FR 60430 - Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... announces a meeting of the Threat Reduction Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as ``the Committee..., October 21, 2010, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Heritage...

  1. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases

    OpenAIRE

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic ana...

  2. Feces derived allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae reared on dried dog food and evidence of the strong nutritional interaction between the mite and Bacillus cereus producing protease bacillolysins and exo-chitinases

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas eErban; Dagmar eRybanska; Karel eHarant; Bronislava eHortova; Jan eHubert

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food. Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis o...

  3. Expression of a Chimeric Allergen with High Rare Codons Content in Codon Bias-Adjusted Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)-Codon Plus RIL as an Efficient Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Hamid Reza; Karkhah, Ahmad; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2016-07-01

    The expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is importantly affected by codon bias. Hence, the aim of the current study was to determine which codon bias-adjusted E. coli strain is sufficient for expression of a chimeric allergen coded by high rare codon content. To investigate the expression level, a chimeric protein of Chenopodium album (C. album) was used as an appropriate model. An expression construct was assembled and was transformed to four strains of codon bias-adjusted E. coli including origami, BL21 (DE3), BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL, and Rosetta. The level of expression and solubility of the chimeric allergen was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In addition, the allergenicity of chimeric allergen was determined using immunoblotting. Our results showed that the chimeric allergen was expressed at high level in E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL and Rosetta. In detail, this recombinant allergen was isolated from soluble fraction in the codon bias-adjusted strains of E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL and Rosetta. Moreover, some lower molecular weight proteins were observed in Rosetta, which could be related to inappropriate expression or broken compartments of the chimeric allergen. The immunoblotting assay confirmed that the IgE-specific immune reactivity of our chimeric allergen expressed in BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL was significantly higher than the other strains. Our results showed that the expression of the chimeric allergen with high rare codons content in a codon bias-adjusted strain E. coli BL21 (DE3)-codon plus RIL improves the quality and solubility of the heterologous protein production. PMID:27040822

  4. Chapter 3: Allergen immunotherapy: definition, indication, and reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgy, Mary S; Saltoun, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy is the administration of increasing amounts of specific allergens to which the patient has type I immediate hypersensitivity. It is a disease modifying therapy, indicated for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and hymenoptera hypersensitivity. Specific IgE antibodies for appropriate allergens for immunotherapy must be documented. Indications for allergen immunotherapy include (1) inadequate symptom control despite pharmacotherapy and avoidance measures, (2) a desire to reduce the morbidity from allergic rhinitis and/or asthma or reduce the risk of anaphylaxis from a future insect sting, (3) when the patient experiences undesirable side effects from pharmacotherapy, and (4) when avoidance is not possible. Furthermore, patients may seek to benefit from economic savings of allergen immunotherapy compared with pharmacotherapy over time. Several studies have reported that immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis appears to prevent the development of new allergic sensitizations and/or new-onset asthma. Humoral, cellular, and tissue level changes occur with allergen immunotherapy including large increases in antiallergen IgG(4) antibodies, a decrease in the postseasonal rise of antiallergen IgE antibodies, reduced numbers of nasal mucosal mast cells and eosinophils, induction of Treg cells, and suppression of Th2 more than Th1 lymphocytes. There is a corresponding increase in IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta. In the United States, allergen immunotherapy is administered by the subcutaneous route in the physician's office, whereas primarily in some countries in Europe, it is administered for allergic rhinitis and asthma by the sublingual route by the patient at home. PMID:22794676

  5. Allergenic evaluation of Malassezia furfur crude extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandra, R F; Melo, T A; Matsumoto, F E; Pires, M F C; Croce, J; Gambale, W; Paula, C R

    2002-01-01

    Crude extracts of the lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur were obtained from 2, 6, 10 and 28 day old cultures. The in vitro cultivation periods corresponded, respectively, to the lag phase, middle of the log phase, end of log phase and the decline phase of the growth curve, which was based on viable cell counts obtained with a fluorescent viability test. Biochemical analyses showed that the protein and carbohydrate contents were greater in day 10 extracts. Seventy patients with different allergic manifestations and 30 healthy volunteers were skin prick tested using the extracts. Of these, thirteen (18.57%) patients gave positive responses. SDS PAGE gradient electrophoretic profiles of the preparations indicated that the 28 day extracts contained the greatest number of protein bands with molecular weights ranging mostly between 30 and 94 kDa. Immunoblots incubated with individual patient sera showed that four IgE binding M. furfur allergens of approximately 88, 61, 52 and 39 kDa were present in the 28 day extracts. The components identified could be used for detecting IgE mediated responses to M. furfur among individuals affected with different allergic conditions. PMID:12650593

  6. 77 FR 38065 - The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... management, IT vendor performance management, Senior Executive Service (SES) leadership development and SES... ADMINISTRATION The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting.... SUMMARY: The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB), a Federal Advisory Committee established...

  7. 76 FR 53901 - The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... management, SES leadership development, and SES performance appraisal systems. The meeting minutes will be... ADMINISTRATION The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting.... SUMMARY: The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB), a Federal Advisory Committee established...

  8. House dust mite allergen level and allergen sensitization as risk factors for asthma among student in Central Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Sundaru

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a community-based study to get an overview about House Dust Mite (HDM allergen level, allergen sensitization as risk factors of asthma. This is a cross-sectional study on 3,840 students from 19 junior high schools, aged 13-14 years. All of the respondents filled out the International Study on Asthma and Allergy in Children (ISAAC questionnaire. Of 3840 respondents, 288 (7.5% were assigned to asthma group (experience wheezing during the last 12 months. The skin prick test was performed on 207 respondents and the house dust mite was collected from 135 respondents. Of 2601 respondents in non-asthma group, the skin prick test was randomly performed on 274 respondents and the house dust mite was collected from 165 respondents. There is no significant difference on HDM allergen concentration for Der p1, Der f1 or Group I between asthma and control group. The risk of asthma was caused especially by sen D.pteronyssinus (crude odds ration (OR: 12.68, 95% confidence interval (CI: 7.50-21.44, D.farinae (OR: 10.50, CI: 6.35-17.34 and cockroach allergen (OR:5.57, CI:3.44-9.01. The risk for asthma was not correlated with the level of house dust mite allergens but its sensitization. In conclusion, sensitization to HDM and cockroach allergen should be concerned in order to reduce risk and prevalence of asthma. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:55-9Keywords: house dust mite, allergen sensitization, asthma, risk factor

  9. Cloning, expression, and analysis of the group 2 allergen from Dermatophagoides farinae from China

    OpenAIRE

    Cui Yu-bao; Ying Zhou; Shi Weihong; Ma Guifang; Li Yang; Wang Yungang

    2010-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant group 2 allergen product of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 2), the Der f 2 gene was synthesized by RT-PCR. The full-length cDNA comprised 441 nucleotides and was 99.3% identical to the reference sequence (GenBank AB195580). The cDNA was bound to vector pET28a to construct plasmid pET28a(+)-Der f 2, which was transformed into E. coli BL21 and induced by IPTG. SDS-PAGE showed a specific band of about 14kDa in the hole cell lysate. s estiated by chroatography, about 3....

  10. Helminth Allergens, Parasite-Specific IgE, and Its Protective Role in Human Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzsimmons, Colin Matthew; Falcone, Franco Harald; Dunne, David William

    2014-01-01

    The Th2 immune response, culminating in eosinophilia and IgE production, is not only characteristic of allergy but also of infection by parasitic worms (helminths). Anti-parasite IgE has been associated with immunity against a range of helminth infections and many believe that IgE and its receptors evolved to help counter metazoan parasites. Allergens (IgE-antigens) are present in only a small minority of protein families and known IgE targets in helminths belong to these same families (e.g.,...

  11. Review on immunotherapy in airway allergen sensitised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, J P M; de Jong, N W; Gerth van Wijk, R

    2015-07-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a more than 100-year-old treatment in particular for birch pollen, grass pollen, house dust mite and cat dander sensitised allergic patients. The mechanism of allergen-specific immunotherapy is complex. Different hypotheses have been postulated to explain the mode of action, such as a decrease of the number of tissue mast cells, eosinophils and basophils, an increase of IgG4 and IgA synthesis, a shift from Th2 to Th1 cells and an increase in the number and function of IL-10 producing T-regulatory cells (T-reg). All these immunological effects may contribute to immune tolerance and long-term changes in the immune system. The efficacy and safety of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with pollen and house dust mite have been investigated in many trials, meta-analyses and reviews. Nowadays grass pollen SLIT and SCIT, and birch pollen and house dust mite SCIT are implemented in clinical practice to treat therapy-resistant patients. However, the treatment is not effective for all patients and often not without side effects. Therefore, the development of new, safer and more effective immunotherapies is needed. These are approached along novel routes, including improved administration, combined treatment with immune response modifiers, fusion with immune response modifiers, allergen coupled to adjuvants and reconstruction of natural extracts with multiple recombinant allergens or with modified allergens. These developments are promising, but more research is required to implement them in clinical practice. PMID:26228190

  12. Common environmental allergens causing respiratory allergy in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A B; Kumar, Pawan

    2002-03-01

    Respiratory allergy affects all age groups but the children are the worst affected by the respiratory allergy. Bioparticles from different biological sources are the main cause of allergy. Pollen grains, fungal spores, insect and other materials of biological origin form the most important allergen load in the air. For the efficient diagnosis of the allergy and its effective treatment it is very important to know about the prevalence, seasonal and annual variations of aeroallergens of the area. India being the climatically diversed country, there is diversity in the flora and fauna of different parts of the country. Atmospheric surveys carried out in different parts of India reveal that, Alanus nitida, Amarantus spinosus, Argemone mexicana Cocos nucifera, Betula utilis, Borasus flabellifer, Caraica papaya, Cedrus deodara, Cassia fistula, Parthenium, Chenopodium album, Dodonaea viscosa, Malotus phillipensis, Plantago ovata, Prosopis juliflora, Ricinus communis, Holoptelea intergifolia are the allergenically important pollens of the country. Among the fungal aeroallergens, Alternaria, Candida aibieans, Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus japonicus, Cladosporium cladosporoides, Fusarium roseum, Ganoderma lucidum,Neurospora sitophila Helminthosporium, Ustilago trtici, Uromyses are important allergens. Dust mites D. farinae, D.pteronyssinus are also important source of inhalant allergens particularly in the coastal areas of the country. Cockroaches, beetles, weevils, mosquitoes, house flies also contribute towards the aeroallergen load and are allergenically implicated. Avoidance of the indoor and outdoor aeroallergens is recommended for better management of respiratory allergy. PMID:12003301

  13. IgE sensitization against food allergens : Natural history, relation to airway inflammation and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Patelis, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to recent studies in children, IgE sensitization not only against perennial allergens, but also against food allergens, is related to asthma risk and increased airway inflammation. During the last decade, a new technique for IgE determination based on allergen components has become available, but its use in epidemiological studies has been limited. Aims: To investigate the relationship between the pattern of IgE sensitization to allergen components and the prevalence of ...

  14. The Allergenicity of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia is influenced by growth temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Swee Yang; Dannemiller, Karen; Yao, Maosheng; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Common indoor and outdoor environmental fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus produce asexual spores containing a collection of proteins that can bind IgE antibodies and trigger allergic reactions. We characterized the impact of sporulation temperature on the IgE-binding capacity (allergenicity) of A. fumigatus and explored the links between variable allergenicity and temperature-dependant expression of genes encoding these allergenic proteins. A 12-fold increase in A. fumigatus allergenicity p...

  15. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kei E Fujimura; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A.; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C.; Boushey, Homer A.; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Lynch, Susan V.

    2013-01-01

    Early-life exposure to dogs is protective against allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct milieu of house dust microbial exposures. Here, we show that mice exposed to dog-associated house dust are protected against airway allergen challenge. These animals exhibit reduced Th2 cytokine production, fewer activated T cells, and a distinct gut microbiome composition, highly enriched for Lactobacillus johnsonii, which itself can confer airway protection when or...

  16. Modification of house dust mite allergens by monomethoxypolyethylene glycol. Allergenicity measured by in vitro and in vivo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbech, H; Dreborg, S; Påhlman, I; Stahl Skov, P; Steringer, I; Weeke, B

    1988-01-01

    In animal models, allergen modification by coupling to monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) molecules can reduce allergenicity of the extract and makes the allergen capable of suppressing boosted IgE response. To investigate in a human system the degree of attenuation implied by a mPEG modification of a house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) extract, 55 adults with asthma caused by house dust mites were tested by skin prick test (SPT) and histamine release assay (HR). RAST inhibition was performed on sera from 6 additional patients. Modified extract containing 0.42 mmol mPEG/g protein was used for the analyses. In order to get the same response of the two extracts when assessed by HR and SPT, a median increase in concentration of 10-fold of the mPEG-modified extract compared to the unmodified extract was needed. Interindividual variation was limited. Sixty-four to 72% needed a dose increase within +/- half a decade from this value. In 42-49% of the patients, results from SPT and HR deviated less than half a decade. The relative potency of the modified extract as measured by RAST inhibition was reduced to 17-78% (mean 39%). Reduced allergenicity would by itself mean less side effects in immunotherapy. When planning such therapy it is important to know that mPEG modification reduces the allergenicity to a similar extent in a majority of patients. PMID:2448247

  17. Allergens from Brazil nut: immunochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, B; Méndez, J D; Armentia, A; Vallverdú, A; Palacios, R

    1997-01-01

    The increase in the consumption of tropical nuts in the Northern Hemisphere during the last years, has evolved in a simultaneous enhancement of allergic IgE mediated (Hypersensitivity type 1) reported cases produced by this kind of food. The Brazil nut is the seed of the Bertholletia excelsa tree (Family Lecythidaceae) and, as in other seeds, proteins represent one of its major components making up 15-17% of its fresh weight and 50% of defatted flour. Of these, storage proteins are the most important ones, and the 12 S globulin legumin-like protein and the 2 S albumin have been described as the most representative. The 2 S protein, due to its high sulfur-rich amino acid content (3% cysteine and 18% methionine), is being studied, cloned and expressed in some important agronomic seeds (soybean, bean, oilseed rape) in order to enrich the nutritional quality of them. The case of a patient with serious clinical allergic symptoms (vomiting, diarrhoea and loss of consciousness) caused by oral contact with the Brazil nut, is presented. The patient gave a positive Skin Prick Test response to Brazil nut, kiwi and hazelnut extracts, and negative to regionally specific aeroallergens and other food extracts. The patient serum showed a high level of specific IgE by RAST to Brazil nut (> 17.5 PRU/ml, Class 4), and significative levels to hazelnut, and mustard. In vitro immunological studies (SDS-Immunoblotting and IEF-Immunoblotting) revealed IgE-binding proteins present in the extract. It was shown that not only the heavy (Mr 9) and light (Mr 4) subunits of the known allergenic 2 S albumin but also the alpha-subunits (Mr approximately 33.5 and 32) and at least one of the beta-subunits (Mr approximately 21) of the 12 S Brazil nut globulin, hitherto never involved in allergic problems, showed a strong IgE-binding capacity. PMID:9208050

  18. Effect of local allergen priming on early, late, delayed-phase, and epicutaneous skin reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, FR; Weller, MS; Jansen, HM; deMonchy, JGR

    1996-01-01

    Allergic disease is renected in a chronic inflammatory response to an allergen. It is thought that local allergen priming underlies this chronicity. To assess the effect of allergen priming on the amplitude and histologic effect of the allergic reaction, four sequential, intracutaneous skin tests we

  19. Development and evolution of risk assessment for food allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crevel, Rene' W. R.; Baumert, Joseph L.; Baka, Athanasia;

    2014-01-01

    The need to assess the risk from food allergens derives directly from the need to manage effectively this food safety hazard. Work spanning the last two decades dispelled the initial thinking that food allergens were so unique that the risk they posed was not amenable to established risk assessment...... approaches and methodologies. Food allergens possess some unique characteristics, which make a simple safety assessment approach based on the establishment of absolute population thresholds inadequate. Dose distribution modelling of MEDs permitted the quantification of the risk of reaction at the population...... level and has been readily integrated with consumption and contamination data through probabilistic risk assessment approaches to generate quantitative risk predictions. This paper discusses the strengths and limitations of this approach and identifies important data gaps, which affect the outcomes of...

  20. The thermal aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles decreases its allergenicity for egg allergic patients and in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, M; Lupi, R; Bouchaud, G; Bodinier, M; Brossard, C; Denery-Papini, S

    2016-07-15

    Most egg-allergic children can tolerate extensively cooked eggs. Ovalbumin, a major allergen in egg whites, is prone to aggregate upon heating. This study compares ovalbumin's allergenicity when it is aggregated as large particles to ovalbumin in its native form. Immunoglobulins (Ig)-binding and the degranulation capacities of native and aggregated ovalbumin were measured with sera from egg-allergic children and from mice sensitized to native or aggregated ovalbumin. The influence of ovalbumin structure on Ig production upon sensitization and elicitation potency by challenge was also studied. We showed that heat aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles enhances IgG production and promotes IgG2a production (a shift toward the T helper 1 profile). Aggregated ovalbumin displayed lower Ig-binding and basophil-activation capacities for sera from both allergic patients and mice. This work illustrates the links between ovalbumin structure after heating and allergenicity potential using parameters from both the sensitization and elicitation phases of the allergic reaction. PMID:26948598

  1. [Assessment of allergenicity of genetically modified food crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauzu, M; Pöting, A; Rubin, D; Lampen, A

    2012-03-01

    The placing on the European Union's market of genetically modified crops requires authorization by the European Commission which is based on the proof that the derived foods are as safe as their conventional counterparts. The assessment of potential allergenicity is part of the necessary investigations recommended in the updated Guidance Document of the Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is based on internationally agreed recommendations. All genetically modified crops which so far have been authorized in the European Union were evaluated by the EFSA GMO Panel which considered it unlikely that their overall allergenicity has been altered. PMID:22373855

  2. Structure of the house dust mite allergen Der f 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Birthe R; Skov, Lars; Kastrup, Jette S; Kristensen, Ole; Bolwig, Caroline; Larsen, Jørgen; Spangfort, Michael; Lund, Kaare; Gajhede, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the group 2 major allergen from Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 2) was determined to 1.83 A resolution. The overall Der f 2 structure comprises a single domain of immunoglobulin fold with two anti-parallel beta-sheets. A large hydrophobic cavity is formed in the interior of...... Der f 2. Structural comparisons to distantly related proteins suggest a role in lipid binding. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity between group 2 house dust mite major allergens can be explained by conserved surface areas representing IgE binding epitopes....

  3. Mite antigen and allergen contents of house dust samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Akira; Yatani,Toshiko; Abe, Tatsuya; Go,Han Jin

    1988-01-01

    The house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) antigen and allergen contents were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with enzyme-labelled anti-human IgE and anti-mite rabbit IgG antibodies. Antigen content was high in dust samples from homes of patients with allergy but not in samples from homes of patients with Kawasaki disease or of normal control subjects. Allergen content was high in dust samples from homes of Kawasaki disease patients. However, the values overlap...

  4. Allergen identification in 5 grasses by means of crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diener, C.; Skibbe, K.; Jaeger, L. (Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (German Democratic Republic))

    1984-01-01

    Using crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis aqueous extracts from pollen of Phleum pratense, Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis, Festuca pratensis and Alopecurus pratensis were investigated for allergen composition. Between 24 and 32 antigens were detected. Employing sera from 11 patients with well established hay fever, IgE binding could be demonstrated in 15 out of 28 antigens in Phleum pratense, 13 out of 32 in Lolium perenne, 14 out of 26 in Poa pratensis, 12 out of 24 Festuca pratensis and 12 out of 24 antigens in Alopecurus pratensis. The 11 patients showed an individual pattern of sensitization against the various pollen allergens.

  5. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  6. Assessment of the sensitizing potential of processed peanut proteins in Brown Norway rats: roasting does not enhance allergenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Kroghsbo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IgE-binding of process-modified foods or proteins is the most common method for examination of how food processing affects allergenicity of food allergens. How processing affects sensitization capacity is generally studied by administration of purified food proteins or food extracts and not allergens present in their natural food matrix. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to investigate if thermal processing increases sensitization potential of whole peanuts via the oral route. In parallel, the effect of heating on sensitization potential of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 was assessed via the intraperitoneal route. METHODS: Sensitization potential of processed peanut products and Ara h 1 was examined in Brown Norway (BN rats by oral administration of blanched or oil-roasted peanuts or peanut butter or by intraperitoneal immunization of purified native (N-, heated (H- or heat glycated (G-Ara h 1. Levels of specific IgG and IgE were determined by ELISA and IgE functionality was examined by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL cell assay. RESULTS: In rats dosed orally, roasted peanuts induced significant higher levels of specific IgE to NAra h 1 and 2 than blanched peanuts or peanut butter but with the lowest level of RBL degranulation. However, extract from roasted peanuts was found to be a superior elicitor of RBL degranulation. Process-modified Ara h 1 had similar sensitizing capacity as NAra h 1 but specific IgE reacted more readily with process-modified Ara h 1 than with native. CONCLUSIONS: Peanut products induce functional specific IgE when dosed orally to BN rats. Roasted peanuts do not have a higher sensitizing capacity than blanched peanuts. In spite of this, extract from roasted peanuts is a superior elicitor of RBL cell degranulation irrespectively of the peanut product used for sensitization. The results also suggest that new epitopes are formed or disclosed by heating Ara h 1 without glucose.

  7. Ole e 13 is the unique food allergen in olive: Structure-functional, substrates docking, and molecular allergenicity comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, J C; Robles-Bolivar, P; Lopez-Valverde, F J; Lima-Cabello, E; Kotchoni, S O; Alché, J D

    2016-05-01

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) are enzymes with important functions in pathogens defense and in the response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Last identified olive allergen (Ole e 13) is a TLP, which may also importantly contribute to food allergy and cross-allergenicity to pollen allergen proteins. The goals of this study are the characterization of the structural-functionality of Ole e 13 with a focus in its catalytic mechanism, and its molecular allergenicity by extensive analysis using different molecular computer-aided approaches covering a) functional-regulatory motifs, b) comparative study of linear sequence, 2-D and 3D structural homology modeling, c) molecular docking with two different β-D-glucans, d) conservational and evolutionary analysis, e) catalytic mechanism modeling, and f) IgE-binding, B- and T-cell epitopes identification and comparison to other allergenic TLPs. Sequence comparison, structure-based features, and phylogenetic analysis identified Ole e 13 as a thaumatin-like protein. 3D structural characterization revealed a conserved overall folding among plants TLPs, with mayor differences in the acidic (catalytic) cleft. Molecular docking analysis using two β-(1,3)-glucans allowed to identify fundamental residues involved in the endo-1,3-β-glucanase activity, and defining E84 as one of the conserved residues of the TLPs responsible of the nucleophilic attack to initiate the enzymatic reaction and D107 as proton donor, thus proposing a catalytic mechanism for Ole e 13. Identification of IgE-binding, B- and T-cell epitopes may help designing strategies to improve diagnosis and immunotherapy to food allergy and cross-allergenic pollen TLPs. PMID:27017426

  8. Citizen Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leann R.

    This guide, describing community involvement through citizen advisory committees, is a summary of the literature on such committees. Its main concern is district committees created by school boards. Citations in the bibliography contain all points of view on committees and present many alternatives on most of the topics covered in the guide.…

  9. 77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Call for nominations for the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture has established the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee (Recreation...

  10. 78 FR 50040 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Notice of Meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) announces that on September 12, 2013, the CFTC's Technology Advisory Committee (TAC) will hold a...

  11. 76 FR 776 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold...., Washington, DC 20581, attention: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology...

  12. 75 FR 58367 - Technology Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee...., Washington, DC 20581, attention: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology...

  13. Immunochemical Characterization of Acacia Pollen Allergens and Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity Pattern with the Common Allergenic Pollens

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad-Hosein Shamsbiranvand; Ali Khodadadi; Mohammad-Ali Assarehzadegan; Seyed Hamid Borsi; Akram Amini

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from the Acacia has been reported as an important source of pollinosis in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The aim of this study was to characterize the IgE binding protein of Acacia farnesiana pollen extract and evaluate cross-reactivity with the most allergenic pollens. In this study, pollen extract was fractionated by SDS-PAGE and the allergenic profile was determined by IgE-immunoblotting and specific ELISA using forty-two Acacia allergic patients. Potential cross-rea...

  14. Allergen Micro-Bead Array for IgE Detection: A Feasibility Study Using Allergenic Molecules Tested on a Flexible Multiplex Flow Cytometric Immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Debora Pomponi; Maria Livia Bernardi; Marina Liso; Paola Palazzo; Lisa Tuppo; Chiara Rafaiani; Mario Santoro; Alexis Labrada; Maria Antonietta Ciardiello; Adriano Mari; Enrico Scala

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergies represent the most prevalent non infective diseases worldwide. Approaching IgE-mediated sensitizations improved much by adopting allergenic molecules instead of extracts, and by using the micro-technology for multiplex testing. OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: To provide a proof-of-concept that a flow cytometric bead array is a feasible mean for the detection of specific IgE reactivity to allergenic molecules in a multiplex-like way. A flow cytometry Allergenic Molecule-based micr...

  15. IL-10 and regulatory T cells cooperate in allergen-specific immunotherapy to ameliorate allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Livia; Maxeiner, Joachim; Meyer-Martin, Helen; Reuter, Sebastian; Finotto, Susetta; Klein, Matthias; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias; Taube, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Human studies demonstrated that allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) represents an effective treatment for allergic diseases. IT involves repeated administration of the sensitizing allergen, indicating a crucial contribution of T cells to its medicinal benefit. However, the underlying mechanisms of IT, especially in a chronic disease, are far from being definitive. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the suppressive mechanisms of IT in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma. OVA-sensitized mice were challenged with OVA or PBS for 4 wk. After development of chronic airway inflammation, mice received OVA-specific IT or placebo alternately to airway challenge for 3 wk. To analyze the T cell-mediated mechanisms underlying IT in vivo, we elaborated the role of T-bet-expressing Th1 cells, T cell-derived IL-10, and Ag-specific thymic as well as peripherally induced Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. IT ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in a chronic asthma model. Of note, IT even resulted in a regression of structural changes in the airways following chronic inhaled allergen exposure. Concomitantly, IT induced Th1 cells, Foxp3(+), and IL-10-producing Treg cells. Detailed analyses revealed that thymic Treg cells crucially contribute to the effectiveness of IT by promoting IL-10 production in Foxp3-negative T cells. Together with the peripherally induced Ag-specific Foxp3(+) Treg cells, thymic Foxp3(+) Treg cells orchestrate the curative mechanisms of IT. Taken together, we demonstrate that IT is effective in a chronic allergic disease and dependent on IL-10 and thymic as well as peripherally induced Ag-specific Treg cells. PMID:25527785

  16. Development of a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich ELISA for Peanut Allergen Ara h 1 in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanlai Xu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We have established a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA based on two monoclonal antibodies (mAb to measure the content of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 in foods. Two mAbs were selected out of 12 murine hybridoma cells secreting Ara h 1-specific antibody. Using mAb 6 as the capture antibody and HRP-labelled mAb 4 as the detection antibody, the limit of detection (LOD the assay was 0.34 ng/mL. Cross-reaction analysis showed that this method was strongly specific and had no cross-reactions with Ara h 2, pea protein or soy protein. Sample analysis showed that this ELISA was a useful tool to monitor peanut allergens in food products by measuring Ara h 1 content.

  17. Fragrance Allergens, Overview with a Focus on Recent Developments and Understanding of Abiotic and Biotic Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Bråred Christensson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fragrances and fragranced formulated products are ubiquitous in society. Contact allergies to fragrance chemicals are among the most common findings when patch-testing patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis, as well as in studies of contact allergy in the general population. The routine test materials for diagnosing fragrance allergy consist mainly of established mixes of fragrance compounds and natural extracts. The situation is more complex as several fragrance compounds have been shown to be transformed by activation inside or outside the skin via abiotic and/or biotic activation, thus increasing the risk of sensitization. For these fragrance chemicals, the parent compound is often non-allergenic or a very weak allergen, but potent sensitizers will be formed which can cause contact allergy. This review shows a series of fragrance chemicals with well-documented abiotic and/or biotic activation that are indicative and illustrative examples of the general problem. Other important aspects include new technologies such as ethosomes which may enhance both sensitization and elicitation, the effect on sensitization by the mixtures of fragrances found in commercial products and the effect of antioxidants. A contact allergy to fragrances may severely affect quality of life and many patients have multiple allergies which further impact their situation. Further experimental and clinical research is needed to increase the safety for the consumer.

  18. S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibition regulates allergen-induced lung inflammation and airway hyperreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Ferrini

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2 type inflammation, leading to airway hyperresponsivenes, mucus hypersecretion and tissue remodeling. S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR is an alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of S-nitrosothiols. GSNOR activity has been shown to be elevated in human asthmatic lungs, resulting in diminished S-nitrosothiols and thus contributing to increased airway hyperreactivity. Using a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we report that intranasal administration of a new selective inhibitor of GSNOR, SPL-334, caused a marked reduction in airway hyperreactivity, allergen-specific T cells and eosinophil accumulation, and mucus production in the lungs in response to allergen inhalation. Moreover, SPL-334 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the production of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 and the level of the chemokine CCL11 (eotaxin-1 in the airways. Collectively, these observations reveal that GSNOR inhibitors are effective not only in reducing airway hyperresponsiveness but also in limiting lung inflammatory responses mediated by CD4(+ Th2 cells. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSNOR may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation.

  19. Molecular characterization of recombinant T1, a non-allergenic periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) protein, with sequence similarity to the Bet v 1 plant allergen family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffer, Sylvia; Hamdi, Said; Lupinek, Christian; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Grote, Monika; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Scheiner, Otto; Kraft, Dietrich; Rideau, Marc; Valenta, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    More than 25% of the population suffer from Type I allergy, an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity disease. Allergens with homology to the major birch ( Betula verrucosa ) pollen allergen, Bet v 1, belong to the most potent elicitors of IgE-mediated allergies. T1, a cytokinin-inducible cytoplasmic periwinkle ( Catharanthus roseus ) protein, with significant sequence similarity to members of the Bet v 1 plant allergen family, was expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant T1 (rT1) did not react with IgE antibodies from allergic patients, and failed to induce basophil histamine release and immediate-type skin reactions in Bet v 1-allergic patients. Antibodies raised against purified rT1 could be used for in situ localization of natural T1 by immunogold electron microscopy, but did not cross-react with most of the Bet v 1-related allergens. CD analysis showed significant differences regarding secondary structure and thermal denaturation behaviour between rT1 and recombinant Bet v 1, suggesting that these structural differences are responsible for the different allergenicity of the proteins. T1 represents a non-allergenic member of the Bet v 1 family that may be used to study structural requirements of allergenicity and to engineer hypo-allergenic plants by replacing Bet v 1-related allergens for primary prevention of allergy. PMID:12656672

  20. 75 FR 18165 - Notice of Meeting of Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel on Phthalates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Meeting of Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel on Phthalates AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety... the first meeting of the Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel (CHAP) on Phthalates. The Commission appointed this CHAP to study the effects on children's health of all phthalates and phthalate alternatives...

  1. 78 FR 44133 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... and gene therapy products. CBER is planning to publish guidance on this topic during calendar year... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  2. 75 FR 66381 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... Lentiviral Vector Based Gene Therapy Products. FDA intends to make background material available to the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  3. 76 FR 22405 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... gene therapy products for the treatment of retinal disorders. Topics to be considered include the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  4. Contact allergens in shoe leather among patients with foot eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Coevorden, AM; Coenraads, PJ; Pas, HH; van der Valk, PGM

    2002-01-01

    Some patients with relapsing foot eczema and a shoe leather allergy, who fail to show positive results with standard series and shoe wear screening tray patch testing, do not respond to the use of hypoallergenic shoe leather. We assume that relevant allergens are present in hypoallergenic shoe leath

  5. Assessment of protein allergenicity studies in brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    For the safety evaluation of genetically engineered crops, the potential allergenicity of the newly introduced protein(s) has become an important issue. There is, however, no universal and reliable test system for the evaluation of the allergic sensitizing ability of food proteins. Therefore, there

  6. Experimental approaches to predict allergenic potential of novel food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Kroghsbo, Stine; Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm

    2013-01-01

    of understanding of the significance of dose for the development of food allergy or its counterpart oral tolerance makes risk assessment very difficult. In addition route of exposure and digestibility are relevant variables. Examples of the use and limitations of animal models for predicting the allergenicity...

  7. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukselen, Ayfer

    2016-07-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  8. NUTIRTION LABELLING OF FOOD AND ALLERGEN IN FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Golian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The new regulation introduced mandatory nutrition labelling and ordering food manufacturers provide information on energy and six nutrients: fat, saturated fatty acids, carbohydrates, sugars, protein and salt - in that order, and per 100 g or 100 ml. This information should be included in the nutritional table in one visual field (usually on the back cover, moreover, can also be expressed on per serving. It is important to realize that this regulation requires manufacturers indicate the nutritional value in one field of vision, usually on the "back cover" designation in the principal field (e.g. "on the front cover" remains voluntary. Food allergy is a significant public health issue worldwide. Regulatory risk management strategies for allergic consumers have focused on providing information about the presence of food allergens through label declarations. A number of countries and regulatory bodies have recognized the importance of providing this information by enacting laws, regulations or standards for food allergen labelling of ‘‘priority allergens. Increasing volume of the international food trade suggests that there would be value in supporting sensitive consumers by harmonizing (to the extent possible these regulatory frameworks. As a first step toward this goal, an inventory of allergen labelling regulations was assembled and analyzed to identify commonalities, differences, and future needs.doi:10.5219/230

  9. Allergenicity assessment of genetically modified crops - what makes sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodman, Richard E.; Vieths, Stefan; Sampson, Hugh A.; Hill, David; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Taylor, Steve L.; van Ree, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    GM crops have great potential to improve food quality, increase harvest yields and decrease dependency on certain chemical pesticides. Before yields and decrease dependency on certain chemical Before entering the market their safety needs to be This includes a detailed analysis of allergenic risks,

  10. The impact of common metal allergens in daily devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Carsten R; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2013-01-01

    We are widely exposed to metal allergens in our daily doings. As exposures constantly changes because of fashion trends and technological developments, there is a need for a continuous update of patch testers. An overview of consumer metal exposure studies that have been published in 2012 and 2013...

  11. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  12. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  13. Occupational Asthma after Withdrawal from the Occupational Allergen Exposure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusáčková, P.; Pelclová, D.; Lebedová, J.; Marečková, H.; Brabec, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 4 (2006), s. 629-638. ISSN 0019-8366 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : occupational asthma * allergen exposure withdrawal Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.911, year: 2006 http://www.jniosh.go.jp/en/indu_hel/pdf/indhealth_44_4_629.pdf

  14. STUDY OF AIRBORNE INSECT ALLERGEN IN ASTHMATIC PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙秀珍; 刘云; 周玎

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study the variety of airborne allergenic insects and its sensibility in asthmatic patients. Methods 300 asthmatic patients and 100 normal controls underwent skin prick test (SPT) with 13 kinds of superior airborne insect vaccine, and sera sIgE of those whose SPT results were positive were tested by BSA-ELISA. Results The total positive rate of SPT with 13 kinds of insect vaccine in asthmatic patients was 58%, and it was significantly higher than that of normal control (P<0.01). The results of SPT with Stayridae, Heliothis armigera, Psilgramma menephorn and other 7 kinds of insects were more than 30% in asthmatic patients which meant these 10 kinds of insects were main allergenic insects to asthmatic patients. The positive rate of sIgE in asthmatic patients was more than 85%, while the normal control was only 6.0%. There was significant difference between two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion Stayridae, Heliothis armigera, Psilgramma menephorn and other 7 kinds of insects were main allergenic insects to asthmatic patients and perhaps they were the main allergens to the onset of asthma at the end summer or the early autumn.

  15. Milk hydrolysis products may retain their allergenic reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Barkholt, Vibeke; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    sensitizing capacity, but could bind to antibodies raised in rats immunized with intact BLG. The results in this study resemble observations seen in humans where infants sensitized to cow’s milk may react to extensively hydrolyzed infant formulas. These observations should lead to the development of new...

  16. The direct peptide reactivity assay: selectivity of chemical respiratory allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalko, Jon F; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank; Foertsch, Leslie M; Api, Anne Marie; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that some chemicals are capable of causing allergic diseases of the skin and respiratory tract. Commonly, though not exclusively, chemical allergens are associated with the selective development of skin or respiratory sensitization. The reason for this divergence is unclear, although it is hypothesized that the nature of interactions between the chemical hapten and proteins is influential. The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) has been developed as a screen for the identification of skin-sensitizing chemicals, and here we describe the use of this method to explore whether differences exist between skin and respiratory allergens with respect to their peptide-binding properties. Known skin and respiratory sensitizers were reacted with synthetic peptides containing either lysine (Lys) or cysteine (Cys) for 24 h. The samples were analyzed by HPLC/UV, and the loss of peptide from the reaction mixture was expressed as the percent depletion compared with the control. The potential for preferential reactivity was evaluated by comparing the ratio of Lys to Cys depletion (Lys:Cys ratio). The results demonstrate that the majority of respiratory allergens are reactive in the DPRA, and that in contrast to most skin-sensitizing chemicals, preferentially react with the Lys peptide. These data suggest that skin and respiratory chemical allergens can result in different protein conjugates, which may in turn influence the quality of induced immune responses. Overall, these investigations reveal that the DPRA has considerable potential to be incorporated into tiered testing approaches for the identification and characterization of chemical respiratory allergens. PMID:22713598

  17. Current glimpse of airborne allergenic pollen in Indian subcontinent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Ghosal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory allergic diseases such as bronchial asthma, rhinitis, urticaria, atopic dermatitis have been steadily increasing all over the world, including India. Owing to its alarming trend, several aerobiological surveys have been undertaken in different parts of India to delineate the variety of pollen and spore load. In this review, we have reported the current state of aerobiological knowladge in India with particular reference to allergenic airborn pollen occurence in 2001–2015. Pollen have been found to contribute a significant proportion in the air and caused allergy symptoms in the local inhabitants. Aerobiological records, a questionnaire survey and hospitalization records have been employed for the analysis. Holoptelea integrifolia, Amaranthus spinosus in northern region, Sorghum vulgare, Pennisetum, Gynandropsis gynandra, Parthenium hysterophorus, Dolichandrone platycalyx in southern regions, and Parthenium hysterophorus from the western region; Cynodon dactylon, Cenchrus ciliaris in the central area; Acacia auriculiformis, Cleome gynandra, Catharanthus roseus, Phoenix sylvestris, Areca catechu, and Lantana camara in the eastern regions as potential aeroallergens in India. The statistical approach confirmed the correlation between hospitalization rate associated with allergy-related health troubles and the prevalent allergenic pollen in the air. The Poaceae group has been found to be dominant throughout India. Immuno-biochemical studies identified various protein with allergenic potential found in the pollen recorded. Epitope identification and homology of the major allergenic protein Cat r1 of Catharanthus sp and Par j 1 of Parietaria judaica have been found. Identification of allergenic pollen grains and the modern approach concerning cross-reactivity and epitope revelation of dominant airborne pollen have important clinical implications for the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of allergic diseases in India.

  18. Immunochemical characterization of acacia pollen allergens and evaluation of cross-reactivity pattern with the common allergenic pollens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsbiranvand, Mohammad-Hosein; Khodadadi, Ali; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Borsi, Seyed Hamid; Amini, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from the Acacia has been reported as an important source of pollinosis in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The aim of this study was to characterize the IgE binding protein of Acacia farnesiana pollen extract and evaluate cross-reactivity with the most allergenic pollens. In this study, pollen extract was fractionated by SDS-PAGE and the allergenic profile was determined by IgE-immunoblotting and specific ELISA using forty-two Acacia allergic patients. Potential cross-reactivity among Acacia and selected allergenic plants was evaluated with ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition experiments. There were several resolved protein fractions on SDS-PAGE which ranged from 12 to 85 kDa. Several allergenic protein bands with molecular weights approximately between 12 and 85 kDa were recognized by IgE-specific antibodies from Acacia allergic patients in the immunoblot assay. The inhibition by the Prosopis juliflora pollen extract was more than those by other pollen extracts. Moreover, the wheal diameters generated by the Acacia pollen extract were highly correlated with those of P. juliflora pollen extracts. The findings suggest that several proteins such as 15, 23, 45, and 50 kDa proteins could be used as diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for patients allergic to A. farnesiana and P. juliflora. PMID:24949020

  19. Immunochemical Characterization of Acacia Pollen Allergens and Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity Pattern with the Common Allergenic Pollens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hosein Shamsbiranvand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen from the Acacia has been reported as an important source of pollinosis in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The aim of this study was to characterize the IgE binding protein of Acacia farnesiana pollen extract and evaluate cross-reactivity with the most allergenic pollens. In this study, pollen extract was fractionated by SDS-PAGE and the allergenic profile was determined by IgE-immunoblotting and specific ELISA using forty-two Acacia allergic patients. Potential cross-reactivity among Acacia and selected allergenic plants was evaluated with ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition experiments. There were several resolved protein fractions on SDS-PAGE which ranged from 12 to 85 kDa. Several allergenic protein bands with molecular weights approximately between 12 and 85 kDa were recognized by IgE-specific antibodies from Acacia allergic patients in the immunoblot assay. The inhibition by the Prosopis juliflora pollen extract was more than those by other pollen extracts. Moreover, the wheal diameters generated by the Acacia pollen extract were highly correlated with those of P. juliflora pollen extracts. The findings suggest that several proteins such as 15, 23, 45, and 50 kDa proteins could be used as diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for patients allergic to A. farnesiana and P. juliflora.

  20. Up-Regulation of Interleukin-9 and the Interleukin-9-Associated Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel hCLCA1 in Nasal Mucosa Following In Vivo Allergen Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauber Hans-Peter

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-9 is a pleiotropic T helper 2-type cytokine that has been shown to be up-regulated in allergic airway disease, including asthma. IL-9 has been demonstrated to be a potent stimulus for the production and secretion of mucus from airway epithelial cells via induction of a calcium-activated chloride channel, hCLCA1. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-9 and hCLCA1 following allergen challenge in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients. Nasal biopsies were obtained from allergic rhinitis patients out of allergen season both before (baseline and after local antigen challenge with either ragweed or diluent (control. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to assess IL-9 protein and hCLCA1 messenger ribonucleic acid. Eosinophils and T cells were detected using immunohistochemistry. IL-9 and hCLCA1 were very low at baseline, and expression was significantly up-regulated following ragweed challenge. Whereas the number of eosinophils increased after allergen challenge, T-cell counts did not change significantly. The results of this study demonstrate the relationship between specific allergen challenge and expression of both IL-9 and hCLCA1, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increased production of mucus from airway epithelial cells in allergic rhinitis.

  1. Cockroach-allergen study: allergen patterns of three common cockroach species probed by allergic sera collected in two cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, B C; Wilson, M; Price, K H; Kambara, T

    1991-06-01

    Antigens/allergens of three common cockroach extracts, crude whole body extract of the American cockroach (CRa-A), crude whole body extract of the German cockroach (CRa-G), and crude whole body extract of the Oriental cockroach (CRa-O), were studied with crossed immunoelectrophoresis, crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis, and Western blot analysis. Sera of cockroach-allergic patients with asthma, 10 from Chicago, Ill. (C group) and six patients from Lexington, Ky. (L group), were used; results were then compared with sera of control subjects with asthma. Qualitative differences in protein bands were noted among CRa-A, CRa-G, and CRa-O by crossed immunoelectrophoresis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allergen bands on Western blot were analyzed for distribution by molecular weight (MW) with relative intensity scores. Results were compared by species and by geography. Two to 12 allergenic bands of variable MW (14 kd to greater than 116 kd) were identified by 13 of 16 individual sera from cockroach-allergic patients from all three extracts. CRa-A demonstrated 55 bands with an intensity score of 125; CRa-G, 58 bands with an intensity score of 100; and CRa-O, 51 bands with an intensity score of 108. Allergenic bands of CRa-A were identified by six sera of the C group and one sera of the L group, whereas bands of both CRa-G and CRa-O were noted by nine sera of the C group and four sera of the L group. All three species had an allergen band in MW range of 40 to 45 kd that reacted to most sera from cockroach-allergic patients with asthma. PMID:2045612

  2. Atmospheric release advisory capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARAC system (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) is described. The system is a collection of people, computers, computer models, topographic data and meteorological input data that together permits a calculation of, in a quasi-predictive sense, where effluent from an accident will migrate through the atmosphere, where it will be deposited on the ground, and what instantaneous and integrated dose an exposed individual would receive

  3. Allergen micro-array detection of specific IgE-reactivity in Chinese allergy patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yi-wu; ZHONG Nan-shan; Michael D Spangfort; LI Jing; LAI Xu-xin; ZHAO De-yu; LIU Xiao-fan; LIN Xiao-ping; Birgitte Gjesing; Paola Palazzo; Adriano Mari

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergen micro-arrays are powerful tools for screening of serum IgE-reactivity.In this study allergen micro-arrays were used to identify dominating IgE-binding allergens and cross-reactivity patterns among selected Chinese allergy patients.Methods The study was conducted using patient sera from the cities of Guangzhou,Nanjing,Chengdu and Shenyang.In total 100 sera with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) specific IgE-levels higher than 50 kU/L were selected for testing against 103 individual allergens.Results Among 100 selected patients, 95% showed IgE-reactivity towards house-dust mite allergens Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) 1,Der f 2 and Der p 2 and 94% were IgE positive against Der p 1,and 60% of sera contained IgE reacting against allergen Euroglyphus maynei (Eur m) 2.IgE against cat allergen,Felisdomesticus (Fel d)1,was seen in 20%.Only 2% showed specific IgE-reactivity to Der p 10,a panallergen belonging to the tropomyosin family.Serum IgE-reactivity towards other allergens was in general low.IgE-reactivity against pollen allergens showed geographic differences.Conclusions This study clearly confirms that group 1 and group 2 are major allergens of house dust mites.These selected house-dust mite allergy patients are close to being mono-sensitized.Der p 10 is not an important allergen for cross-reactivity.Specific IgE-sensitization towards pollen allergens is low in southern China compared to other regions.The prevalence of food and stinging insect allergens known to give rise to IgE-mediated cross-reactivity is 2% or less.

  4. 78 FR 77443 - Electricity Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Electricity Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Department of... Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770.../oe/services/electricity-advisory-committee-eac . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matthew...

  5. 76 FR 34088 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Open Teleconference Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department of Homeland...

  6. 76 FR 55079 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Open Teleconference Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... subject line of the message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department...

  7. 77 FR 26774 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of partially closed federal advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... number in the subject line of the message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory...

  8. 76 FR 58813 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of open teleconference Federal Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... message. Fax: (202) 282-9207 Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department of Homeland...

  9. 77 FR 59627 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of open teleconference federal advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... line of the message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department...

  10. 75 FR 26782 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Open Teleconference Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... (Homeland Security) Review Advisory Committee. DATE: The HSAC conference call will take place from 4 p.m....

  11. 76 FR 81516 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Closed Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will meet on January 9... Homeland Security Advisory Council is being published in the Federal Register on December 27, 2011, 14...

  12. 75 FR 2880 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Committee management; Notice of partially closed federal advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory.... E-mail: HSAC@dhs.gov . Fax: 202-282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, 1100...

  13. 75 FR 53707 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Open Teleconference Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will...: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department of Homeland Security, Mailstop 0850, 245 Murray Lane,...

  14. 75 FR 59278 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Closed Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will meet on... message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department of Homeland...

  15. 78 FR 70317 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting (via Teleconference) of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY... Invasive Species Advisory Committee. The purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to...

  16. 12 CFR 1291.4 - Advisory Councils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...' AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAM § 1291.4 Advisory Councils. (a) Appointment. (1) Each Bank's board of directors... responses. (3) The Bank's board of directors shall appoint Advisory Council members from a diverse range of... Advisory Council members. Pursuant to policies adopted by the Bank's board of directors, Advisory...

  17. Purification, characterization and allergenicity assessment of 26kDa protein, a major allergen from Cicer arietinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Sandeep; Gupta, Rinkesh Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh; Gupta, Kriti; Giridhar, B H; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2016-06-01

    Chickpea (CP), a legume of the family Fabaceae, is an important nutrient-rich food providing protein, essential amino acids, vitamins, dietary fibre, and minerals. Unfortunately, several IgE-binding proteins in CP have been detected that are responsible for allergic manifestations in sensitized population. Therefore, the prevalence of CP induced allergy prompted us towards purification, characterization and allergenicity assessment of a major ∼26kDa protein from chickpea crude protein extract (CP-CPE). Purification of CP 26kDa protein was done using a combination of fractionation and anion exchange chromatography. This protein was further characterized as "Chain A, crystal structure of a plant albumin" from Cicer arietinum with Mol wt 25.8kDa by Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Further, allergenic potential of purified 25.8kDa protein was assessed using in vivo and in vitro model. Purified protein showed IgE-binding capacity with sensitized BALB/c mice and CP allergic patient's sera. Enhanced levels of specific and total IgE, MCP-1, MCPT-1, myeloperoxidase, histamine, prostaglandin D2, and cysteinyl leukotriene were found in sera of mice treated with CP ∼26kDa protein. Further, expressions of Th2 cytokines (i.e. IL-4, IL-5, IL-13), transcription factors (i.e. GATA-3, STAT-6, SOCS-3) and mast cell signaling proteins (Lyn, cFgr, Syk, PLC-γ2, PI-3K, PKC) were also found increased at mRNA and protein levels in the intestines of mice treated with CP ∼26kDa protein. In addition, enhanced release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, cysteinyl leukotriene and prostaglandin D2 were observed in RBL2H3 cell line when treated (125μg) with CP 26kDa protein. Conclusively, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed the allergenic potential of purified CP 26kDa protein. Being a potential allergen, plant albumin may play a pivotal role in CP induced allergenicity. Current study will be helpful for better development of therapeutic approaches to

  18. Profile of food allergens in urticaria patients in Hyderabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Sai Priya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Urticaria is one of the manifestations of a pattern of allergy. The associated disorders are vascular reaction and wheals. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sensitivity to food allergens in Hyderabad in patients suffering from allergy. Four hundred and one patients attending the Allergy Clinic at BMMRC, with a confirmed diagnosis of bronchial asthma, rhinitis or urticaria were skin tested. Total sIgE levels were estimated by ELISA. Positivity to beans (53% was highest, followed by mustard (41% and cardamom (40%. Often patients having positive skin tests to food allergens which may have skin reactions to foods prove to be a problem. Foods that produce significant positive skin tests could be avoided in the diet; however, other foods that do not show skin reactions may contribute to the disease.

  19. Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DunnGalvin, A.; Chan, C. -H.; Crevel, R.;

    2015-01-01

    result has been reduced avoidance, reduced quality of life and increased risk-taking by consumers who often ignore PAL. All contributing stakeholders agree that PAL must reflect actual risk. PAL should be transparent and consistent with rules underpinning decision-making process being communicated......Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) was introduced by the food industry to help manage and communicate the possibility of reaction from the unintended presence of allergens in foods. However, in its current form, PAL is counterproductive for consumers with food allergies. This review aims to...... summarize the perspectives of all the key stakeholders (including clinicians, patients, food industry and regulators), with the aim of defining common health protection and risk minimization goals. The lack of agreed reference doses has resulted in inconsistent application of PAL by the food industry and in...

  20. Recent advances using rodent models for predicting human allergenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential allergenicity of newly introduced proteins in genetically engineered foods has become an important safety evaluation issue. However, to evaluate the potential allergenicity and the potency of new proteins in our food, there are still no widely accepted and reliable test systems. The best-known allergy assessment proposal for foods derived from genetically engineered plants was the careful stepwise process presented in the so-called ILSI/IFBC decision tree. A revision of this decision tree strategy was proposed by a FAO/WHO expert consultation. As prediction of the sensitizing potential of the novel introduced protein based on animal testing was considered to be very important, animal models were introduced as one of the new test items, despite the fact that non of the currently studied models has been widely accepted and validated yet. In this paper, recent results are summarized of promising models developed in rat and mouse

  1. Categorization of fragrance contact allergens for prioritization of preventive measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uter, Wolfgang; Johansen, Jeanne D; Börje, Anna;

    2013-01-01

    Contact allergy to fragrances is still relatively common, affecting ∼ 16% of patients patch tested for suspected allergic contact dermatitis, considering all current screening allergens. The objective of the review is to systematically retrieve, evaluate and classify evidence on contact allergy to...... fragrances, in order to arrive at recommendations for targeting of primary and secondary prevention. Besides published evidence on contact allergy in humans, animal data (local lymph node assay), annual use volumes and structure-activity relationships (SARs) were considered for an algorithmic categorization...... are considered to be of special concern, owing to the high absolute number of reported cases of contact allergy (> 100). Additionally, 18 single substances and one natural mixture are categorized as established contact allergens in animals. SARs, combined with limited human evidence, contributed to...

  2. Allergenic Potential of Tomatoes Cultivated in Organic and Conventional Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowianek, Marta; Skorupa, Marta; Hallmann, Ewelina; Rembiałkowska, Ewa; Leszczyńska, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) are a widely consumed vegetables and contain many health beneficial micronutrients. Unfortunately, they may also cause adverse allergic reactions in sensitized people. Many studies, conducted in recent years, indicate that organically produced vegetables have higher nutritional value, improved sensory quality and contain more health-enhancing bioactive compounds than vegetables grown under the conventional system. However, the relation between organic methods of cultivation and allergenic potential of tomatoes has received little scientific attention. This study analyzed samples of five tomato cultivars taken from organic and conventional systems over three consecutive years. The content of profilin, Bet v 1 and lipid transfer protein (LTP) analogues in tomato samples was determined using an indirect ELISA assay. Substantial quantities of these proteins were found in certain cultivars across all three years of cultivation. On the basis of these findings, organically grown tomatoes appear to offer little advantage over conventionally cultivated plants in terms of reduced allergenic potential. PMID:26590604

  3. The investigation of inhalational allergen in 208 asthmatic infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to investigate the inhalational allergen in 208 asthmatic infants and children with allergen steep puncturing skin. The positive cases were 169(81.25%). There were 18 inhalational allergens in allergen steep. The positive rate of the dust acarus was 78.85%, and the dust was 35.58%, the smoke was 32.69% among the allergens. There was not any positive reaction in other allergens. There were no sexual differences in the positive rate. There was nothing with hypersusceptibility of the individual and the family. The positive rate of the infant was less than the child. There was significant difference of the positive rate in the age group (P < 0.01). The result indicated that dust acarus, air pollution or passive smoke was the quite dangerous factor in the many factors of the asthma. It was very important to strengthen the study of the infant and child prevention and cure

  4. 77 FR 6113 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC's) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  5. 78 FR 39289 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  6. 78 FR 21354 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  7. 75 FR 20844 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  8. 76 FR 64348 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  9. 75 FR 70004 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  10. 75 FR 60458 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  11. 75 FR 6031 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  12. 77 FR 57085 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  13. 75 FR 53694 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital... Communications Commission's (FCC) Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

  14. 75 FR 22790 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations of Candidates for EPA's Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...; economic modeling; air quality modeling; atmospheric science and engineering; ecology and ecological risk... AGENCY Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations of Candidates for EPA's Advisory...) and EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION:...

  15. 77 FR 2277 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board; Closed... discussions of classified information relating to DIA's intelligence operations including its support to... Advisory Board to discuss DIA operations and capabilities in support of current intelligence...

  16. 78 FR 295 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board; Closed... discussions of classified information relating to DIA's intelligence operations including its support to... the Advisory Board to discuss DIA operations and capabilities in support of current...

  17. 77 FR 62222 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board; Closed... discussions of classified information relating to DIA's intelligence operations including its support to... the Advisory Board to discuss DIA operations and capabilities in support of current...

  18. 76 FR 70425 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Advisory Board... discussions of classified information relating to DIA's intelligence operations including its support to... Advisory Board to discuss DIA operations and capabilities in support of current intelligence...

  19. Allergens in Paved Road Dust and Airborne Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel, Ann G.; Cass, Glen R.; Glovsky, M. Michael; Weiss, Jay

    1999-01-01

    Paved road dust present on the surface of streets in Southern California consists of a complex mixture of soil dust, deposited motor vehicle exhaust particles, tire dust, brake lining wear dust, plant fragments, and other biological materials. The research presented here shows that allergens from at least 20 different source materials are found in the paved road dust. These include pollens and pollen fragments, animal dander, and molds. When paved road dust is resuspended into the atmosphere ...

  20. Allergenicity of Peanut Proteins is Retained Following Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Hydrolysis of peanut proteins by food-grade enzymes may reduce allergenicity and could lead to safer forms of immunotherapy. Methods: Light roasted peanut flour extracts were digested with pepsin (37°C, pH 2), Alcalase (60°C pH 8), or Flavourzyme (50°C, pH 7) up to 1 hr, or sequentially w...

  1. Ragweed as an Example of Worldwide Allergen Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswalt Matthew L

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple factors are contributing to the expansion of ragweed on a worldwide scale. This review seeks to examine factors that may contribute to allergen expansion with reference to ragweed as a well-studied example. It is our hope that increased surveillance for new pollens in areas not previously affected and awareness of the influence the changing environment plays in allergic disease will lead to better outcomes in susceptible patients.

  2. The allergens causing contact sensitization in textile industry workers

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem Su; Dilek Biyik Ozkaya; Serpil Pirmit; Hande Arda Ulusal; Nahide Onsun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: Our aim was to determine the frequency of contact sensitization to textile materials and the most common textile allergens in patients who work in the textile industry and have been diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Materials and Methods: Fifty textile industry workers, who attended our outpatient clinic with the diagnosis of ACD, between October 2005-December 2009, were enrolled in this study. While 50 patients were tested with the Thin layer-Rapid-...

  3. Novel developments in the mechanisms of immune tolerance to allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Eiwegger, Thomas; Gruber, Saskia; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Cezmi A Akdis

    2012-01-01

    Allergy is the result of a disbalanced immune response to environmental innocuous antigens. Despite of accumulating data to define the pathomechanisms that take place in case of allergic diseases a detailed understanding of sequence of events that lead to the "normal" scenario of tolerance development are still under debate. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. It modifies the immune response to a particular antigen to achieve tolerance against th...

  4. ALLERGEN-SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY: VACCINES FOR ALLERGIC DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorov, A. S.; L. S. Litvinova; V. I. But-Gusaim; S. N. Litvinenko

    2015-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) is the most effective method of allergy treatment which consists of exposure to small doses of antigen responsible for development of allergic condition in the particular patient. Therefore, one may achieve desensitization to this antigen. The history of ASIT application lasts for more than 100 years, and, over this time, huge clinical evidence for the usage of the method has been accumulated. Use of ASIT causes reduction of allergy symptoms and treatmen...

  5. The Dactylis glomerata (Grass Pollen) Allergen Repertoire for Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Luís; Marques, Andreia; Martins, Ana; Bento, Ofélia

    2011-01-01

    Companion animals’ consultation because of allergic diseases is increasing much beyond the common flea bite allergic dermatitis. Several sources of aeroallergens, as well as many food allergens are also frequent causes of allergic reactions, showing different target organs from skin to eye conjunctiva, respiratory or digestive systems. Hypersensitivity reactions studies, mainly from type I, but also from type IV are presenting a grown-up relevance also in veterinary medicine, as shown by ...

  6. Maize pollen is an important allergen in occupationally exposed workers

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenburg Marcus; Petersen Arnd; Baur Xaver

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The work- or environmental-related type I sensitization to maize pollen is hardly investigated. We sought to determine the prevalence of sensitization to maize pollen among exposed workers and to identify the eliciting allergens. Methods In July 2010, 8 out of 11 subjects were examined who were repeatedly exposed to maize pollen by pollinating maize during their work in a biological research department. All 8 filled in a questionnaire and underwent skin prick testing (SPT)...

  7. Heated Allergens and Induction of Tolerance in Food Allergic Children

    OpenAIRE

    Irmeli Penttila; Patrick Quinn; Michael Gold; Maria Makrides; Merryn Netting

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are one of the first manifestations of allergic disease and have been shown to significantly impact on general health perception, parental emotional distress and family activities. It is estimated that in the Western world, almost one in ten children have an IgE-mediated allergy. Cow’s milk and egg allergy are common childhood allergies. Until recently, children with food allergy were advised to avoid all dietary exposure to the allergen to which they were sensitive, in the tho...

  8. New potential allergens of the storage mite Acarus siro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pytelková, Jana; Lepšík, Martin; Šanda, Miloslav; Marešová, Lucie; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    Nottingham : British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2011. s. 54-54. [British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology Annual Meeting. 11.07.2011-13.07.2011, Nottingham] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP525/09/P600 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acarus siro * allergen * protease * alpha-amylase Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  9. Mass spectrometric characterization of the rubber elongation factor - major allergen in natural latex gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work is the mass spectrometric characterization of the possible latex allergens present in natural latex gloves. The introduction covers a brief description of the molecular basis and types of allergens, and some of the promising therapeutic possibilities. It shows the composition of the natural latex milk and gives a summary of the conversion of the raw material into its products. The most important natural latex allergens are described and the knowledge about the medical aspects of this illness are summarized. The different chemical and biological methods applied during this study are also introduced in this chapter from the simple methods for protein extraction to the sophisticated ones for primary structure characterization. Chapter 4.1. describes the mass spectrometric analysis of the natural latex milk. Different samples - representing subsequent steps of processing of the raw material before the production of the gloves - were investigated. The effects of the sample preparation methods on the MALDI MS measurements were studied and compared. Several compounds could be detected in the freshly tapped natural latex sap and the change of the composition of the milk following the steps of preparation could be observed. Natural latex gloves were investigated in chapter 4.2. without extraction, directly by means of MALDI mass spectrometry. The protein pattern of the gloves during production - before and after the washing steps - was investigated. We found not only a difference between these two stages of the process, but also a variation of the protein pattern on the inner and outer sides of the gloves. Several types of finished products were studied and it could be concluded, that the detection of a part of the proteins revealed in the natural latex milk is still possible in this goods with MALDI mass spectrometry, without extraction and purification. It turned out, that the characteristics of the surface and the pore structure of the gloves

  10. Results of patch testing with a standard series of allergens at Manipal

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoi Shrutakirthi; Srinivas C; Balachandran C

    1994-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the common sensitizers in allergic contact dermatitis, to evolve a standard patch test tray for screening patients at our centre and to suggest allergens for multicentric trial in India. 212 patients (65 women, 147 men) were patch tested with a standard series of allergens (23 allergens of European standard series extended with lanolin, cresol and gentamycin). The frequent sensitizers observed were gentamycin (14.2%), potassium dichromate (7.1%...

  11. The human allergens of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora)

    OpenAIRE

    Killian Sue; McMichael John

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background A computerized statistical analysis of allergy skin test results correlating patient reactivities initiated our interest in the cross-reactive allergens of mesquite tree pollen. In-vitro testing with mesquite-sensitized rabbits and a variety of deciduous tree pollens revealed so many cross-reactivities that it became apparent there could be more allergens in mesquite than previously described in the world literature. Our purpose was to examine the allergens of mesquite tre...

  12. Allergen specific immunotherapy: The future cure for allergic asthma. Mechanisms and improvement in a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Taher, Y.A.

    2007-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a disease characterized by persistent allergen-driven airway inflammation, remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). CD4+ T-cells, in particular T-helper type 2 (Th2) cells, play a critical role in orchestrating the disease process through the release of cytokines like IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) is currently the only disease-modifying treatment with long-term suppression of allergen-induced complaints. However, although IT is effective...

  13. AllerTOP - a server for in silico prediction of allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, Ivan; Flower, Darren R.; Doytchinova, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergy is a form of hypersensitivity to normally innocuous substances, such as dust, pollen, foods or drugs. Allergens are small antigens that commonly provoke an IgE antibody response. There are two types of bioinformatics-based allergen prediction. The first approach follows FAO/WHO Codex alimentarius guidelines and searches for sequence similarity. The second approach is based on identifying conserved allergenicity-related linear motifs. Both approaches assume that allergenicit...

  14. Clinico-Immunological Analysis of Eggplant (Solanum melongena) Allergy Indicates Preponderance of Allergens in the Peel

    OpenAIRE

    Harish Babu, Bheemanapalli N; Yeldur P Venkatesh

    2009-01-01

    Background Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is known to cause food allergy in some Asian countries but detailed studies on eggplant allergy are lacking. Objective The objective is to investigate sensitization to different parts of eggplant fruit, and detection of the allergens. Methods Six eggplant-allergic subjects were assessed for sensitization to eggplant (peel/pulp, and raw/cooked) by skin prick test, allergen-specific IgE, and immunoblots. Allergens were analyzed for glycoprotein nature ...

  15. Exposure of Laboratory Animal Care Workers to Airborne Mouse and Rat Allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Glueck, Joshua T; Huneke, Richard B; Perez, Hernando; Burstyn, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Urine of rats and mice is the main source of allergenic proteins that can enter the respiratory tract of laboratory animal care workers. Little is known about the levels and determinants of these exposures in the United States. We investigated the relationship between activities in animal facilities and levels of personal exposure to allergen by collecting personal breathing zone dust samples from 7 caretakers during full workdays for 1 wk. Mice and rat urinary allergens in inhalable dust wer...

  16. Proteomic and Immunochemical Characterization of Glutathione Transferase as a New Allergen of the Nematode Ascaris lumbricoides

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Acevedo; Jens Mohr; Josefina Zakzuk; Martin Samonig; Peter Briza; Anja Erler; Anna Pomés; Huber, Christian G.; Fatima Ferreira; Luis Caraballo

    2013-01-01

    Helminth infections and allergy have evolutionary and clinical links. Infection with the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides induces IgE against several molecules including invertebrate pan-allergens. These antibodies influence the pathogenesis and diagnosis of allergy; therefore, studying parasitic and non-parasitic allergens is essential to understand both helminth immunity and allergy. Glutathione transferases (GSTs) from cockroach and house dust mites are clinically relevant allergens and compa...

  17. Multiplex component-based allergen microarray in recent clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patelis, A; Borres, M P; Kober, A; Berthold, M

    2016-08-01

    During the last decades component-resolved diagnostics either as singleplex or multiplex measurements has been introduced into the field of clinical allergology, providing important information that cannot be obtained from extract-based tests. Here we review recent studies that demonstrate clinical applications of the multiplex microarray technique in the diagnosis and risk assessment of allergic patients, and its usefulness in studies of allergic diseases. The usefulness of ImmunoCAP ISAC has been validated in a wide spectrum of allergic diseases like asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, food allergy and anaphylaxis. ISAC provides a broad picture of a patient's sensitization profile from a single test, and provides information on specific and cross-reactive sensitizations that facilitate diagnosis, risk assessment, and disease management. Furthermore, it can reveal unexpected sensitizations which may explain anaphylaxis previously categorized as idiopathic and also display for the moment clinically non-relevant sensitizations. ISAC can facilitate a better selection of relevant allergens for immunotherapy compared with extract testing. Microarray technique can visualize the allergic march and molecular spreading in the preclinical stages of allergic diseases, and may indicate that the likelihood of developing symptomatic allergy is associated with specific profiles of sensitization to allergen components. ISAC is shown to be a useful tool in routine allergy diagnostics due to its ability to improve risk assessment, to better select relevant allergens for immunotherapy as well as detecting unknown sensitization. Multiplex component testing is especially suitable for patients with complex symptomatology. PMID:27196983

  18. Frequency of Mold Allergens in Allergic Rhinitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonyadi, MR. (PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Allergic rhinitis can be stimulated by several allergens. Molds are among these allergens and it is important to assess their frequency in different geographic area. Hence, we aimed at determining the frequency of mold allergens in allergic rhinitis patients referred to specialized clinics of Tabriz Imam Reza hospital, 2011. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on the serums of 90 rhinitis patients diagnosed by specialized physician. Using Immunoblotting method, the level of specific IgE against four molds including Penicillium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and Cladosporium were investigated. Results: Of 90 Patients, 40 were men (44.4% and 50 were women (55.6%. The participants were between 6 to 53 years and the most were 28-31years. The allergy was related to Penicillium (3.3%, Aspergillus (5.6%, Alternaria (13.3% and Cladosporium (4.4%. There was a significant statistical relation between age and allergic rhinitis to Alternaria (P=0.011. Conclusion: Molds can grow and proliferate in very humid environments. Because of low humidity climate in Tabriz (in the northwest of Iran, allergy to molds is relatively low in this region. Key words: Rhinitis Allergic; Mold; Allergy

  19. Percutaneous penetration characteristics and release kinetics of contact allergens encapsulated in ethosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus;

    2011-01-01

    Formulation of the contact allergens dinitrochlorobenzene and isoeugenol in ethanolic liposomes (ethosomes) increases their sensitizing properties in the local lymph node assay compared with an ethanol-water formulation of the allergens. Likewise, isoeugenol and methyldibromo-glutaronitrile formu......Formulation of the contact allergens dinitrochlorobenzene and isoeugenol in ethanolic liposomes (ethosomes) increases their sensitizing properties in the local lymph node assay compared with an ethanol-water formulation of the allergens. Likewise, isoeugenol and methyldibromo......-glutaronitrile formulated in ethosomes enhanced the patch test reactions in sensitized human volunteers. The relationship between the percutaneous penetration/absorption and sensitization/elicitation phases of contact allergy is not well elucidated....

  20. Percutaneous penetration characteristics and release kinetics of contact allergens encapsulated in ethosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus;

    2011-01-01

    Formulation of the contact allergens dinitrochlorobenzene and isoeugenol in ethanolic liposomes (ethosomes) increases their sensitizing properties in the local lymph node assay compared with an ethanol-water formulation of the allergens. Likewise, isoeugenol and methyldibromo-glutaronitrile formu......-glutaronitrile formulated in ethosomes enhanced the patch test reactions in sensitized human volunteers. The relationship between the percutaneous penetration/absorption and sensitization/elicitation phases of contact allergy is not well elucidated.......Formulation of the contact allergens dinitrochlorobenzene and isoeugenol in ethanolic liposomes (ethosomes) increases their sensitizing properties in the local lymph node assay compared with an ethanol-water formulation of the allergens. Likewise, isoeugenol and methyldibromo...

  1. Milk processing as a tool to reduce cow’s milk allergenicity: a mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Bu, Guanhao; Luo, Yongkang; Chen, Fusheng; Liu, Kunlun; Zhu, Tingwei

    2013-01-01

    Milk processing technologies for the control of cow’s milk protein allergens are reviewed in this paper. Cow’s milk is a high nutritious food; however, it is also one of the most common food allergens. The major allergens from cow’s milk have been found to be β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin and caseins. Strategies for destroying or modifying these allergens to eliminate milk allergy are being sought by scientists all over the world. In this paper, the main processing technologies used to preve...

  2. Mining Novel Allergens from Coconut Pollen Employing Manual De Novo Sequencing and Homology-Driven Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bodhisattwa; Sircar, Gaurab; Pandey, Naren; Gupta Bhattacharya, Swati

    2015-11-01

    Coconut pollen, one of the major palm pollen grains is an important constituent among vectors of inhalant allergens in India and a major sensitizer for respiratory allergy in susceptible patients. To gain insight into its allergenic components, pollen proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, immunoblotted with coconut pollen sensitive patient sera, followed by mass spectrometry of IgE reactive proteins. Coconut being largely unsequenced, a proteomic workflow has been devised that combines the conventional database-dependent analysis of tandem mass spectral data and manual de novo sequencing followed by a homology-based search for identifying the allergenic proteins. N-terminal acetylation helped to distinguish "b" ions from others, facilitating reliable sequencing. This led to the identification of 12 allergenic proteins. Cluster analysis with individual patient sera recognized vicilin-like protein as a major allergen, which was purified to assess its in vitro allergenicity and then partially sequenced. Other IgE-sensitive spots showed significant homology with well-known allergenic proteins such as 11S globulin, enolase, and isoflavone reductase along with a few which are reported as novel allergens. The allergens identified can be used as potential candidates to develop hypoallergenic vaccines, to design specific immunotherapy trials, and to enrich the repertoire of existing IgE reactive proteins. PMID:26426307

  3. Sensitization and exposure to pet allergens in asthmatics versus non-asthmatics with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, A H; Holmen, T L; Bjermer, L

    2001-02-01

    In sensitized subjects with allergic rhinitis (AR) or asthma, allergen exposure provokes symptoms. Among non-asthmatics with AR, an association between allergen sensitization, pollen season and lower airway inflammation has been demonstrated. Our aims were to compare AR and asthma with regard to patterns of allergen sensitization, the degree of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and levels of exhaled nitric oxide (ENO). Finally, we wanted to relate our findings to previous or current exposure to household pets. Four hundred and thirty-one adolescents with different clinical phenotypes were randomly selected from a large-scale epidemiological survey. They were investigated with allergy screening, measurements of ENO and a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Sensitization to pet allergens (cat, dog and horse) was associated with increased AHR and ENO both in asthmatics and non-asthmatics with AR. The risk of being sensitized to cat allergens was significantly reduced in those who had kept cats vs. those who had never kept them. Keeping dogs or horses did not influence the risk of being sensitized to the respective allergens. Only in steroid-naive, non-smoking asthmatics, a trend towards increased ENO in those sensitized and exposed to cat or dog allergens was seen. Although sensitization towards pet allergens was associated with inflammation in the lower airways irrespective of clinical phenotype, keeping pets did not increase the risk of being sensitized to pet allergens. PMID:11217908

  4. Prevalence of food and airborne allergens in allergic patients in Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Fouladseresht

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of various environmental allergens is the major challenge in allergic diseases and the only treatment is avoiding these allergens. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of food and airborne allergens in allergic patients using Skin Prick Test (SPT. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done on clinically confirmed patients of atopic-dermatitis (n=54, allergenic-rhinitis (n=64 and chronic-urticaria (n=39 who referred to asthma and allergy clinic at Afzali-Pour hospital in Kerman during 2008-2010. Skin prick test was done using allergen extracts to determine the patients' sensitivity to food and airborne antigens. Results: Fifty-nine percent of patients responded to at least one allergen. Allergy to airborne and food allergens was 55.9 % and 21.7%, respectively. Chenopodiaceae (22.9% and egg white (10.2% were most prevalent airborne and food allergens. Allergy to cockroach, egg white, egg yolk and tomato was significantly higher in males than in females (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results indicated that allergy to food and airborne allergens is different depending on the nutrition and environmental conditions.

  5. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to advancement. The person concerned has requested that the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General be brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) from 24 March to 10 April 2006. Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  6. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mrs Judith Igo-Kemenes concerning the application of procedures foreseen by Administrative Circular N§ 26 (Rev. 3). As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 6 to 20 June 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  7. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Poul Frandsen concerning his assimilation into the new career structure. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 13 to 24 January 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  8. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a former member of the personnel, a beneficiary of the CERN Pension Fund, against the calculation of his pension in the framework of the Progressive Retirement Programme.   The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be available from 26 July to 11 August 2013 at the following link. HR Department Head Office

  9. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel against the decision to grant him only a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (bldg. 500) from 1 September to 14 September 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  10. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel against the decision to grant him only a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 500) from 1 September to 14 September 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  11. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has requested that the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General be brought to the notice of the members of the personnel, in accordance with Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (Bldg. 60) from 24 September to 7 October 2007. Human Resources Department

  12. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to award him a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (Bldg. 500) from 17 March to 30 March 2008. Human Resources Department Tel. 73911

  13. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 500) from 26 May to 6 June 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  14. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel, in accordance with Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations. These documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 60) from 21 January to 3 February 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  15. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Aloïs Girardoz with regard to classification and advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the Board's report and the Director-General's decision will be brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 15 to 29 August 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  16. 78 FR 63222 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... class of products will be discussed. FDA intends to make background material available to the public no... providing access to electrical outlets. FDA welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory...

  17. 78 FR 28237 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory... Telecommunications Advisory Committee, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland...

  18. 76 FR 7551 - Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance: Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance: Hearing AGENCY: Advisory Committee on Student Financial... Student Financial Assistance (the Advisory Committee). This notice also describes the functions of the.... Alison Bane, Associate Director of Government Relations, Advisory Committee on Student...

  19. Efficacy of a House Dust Mite Sublingual Allergen Immunotherapy Tablet in Adults With Allergic Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virchow, J Christian; Backer, Vibeke; Kuna, Piotr;

    2016-01-01

    corticosteroid (ICS) reduction period. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial conducted between August 2011 and April 2013 in 109 European trial sites. The trial included 834 adults with HDM allergy-related asthma not well controlled by ICS or combination products......, and with HDM allergy-related rhinitis. Key exclusion criteria were FEV1 less than 70% of predicted value or hospitalization due to asthma within 3 months before randomization. Efficacy was assessed during the last 6 months of the trial when ICS was reduced by 50% for 3 months and then completely...... moderate or severe asthma exacerbation during the ICS reduction period. Secondary outcomes were deterioration in asthma symptoms, change in allergen-specific immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4), change in asthma control or asthma quality-of-life questionnaires, and adverse events. RESULTS: Among 834 randomized...

  20. Introduction: what are the issues in addressing the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Dean D

    2003-06-01

    There is growing concern among the general public and the scientific community regarding the potential toxicity of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The use of biotechnology to enhance pest resistance or nutritional value has raised a number of fundamental questions including the consequences of insertion of reporter genes, the spread of resistance genes to surrounding plants, and the use of suicide genes to prohibit reuse of seed from engineered plants. Of particular interest is the ability of proteins from GMOs to elicit potentially harmful immunologic responses, including allergic hypersensitivity. The lack of information of the potential toxicity of these products suggests a need to identify the critical issues and research needs regarding these materials and to develop testing strategies to examine the allergenicity of these compounds. PMID:12826482

  1. 77 FR 64970 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory... open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development... and biobased products. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include the following: Update on USDA Biomass...

  2. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR Modulates Cockroach Allergen-Induced Immune Responses through Active TGFβ1 Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, a multifunctional regulator that senses and responds to environmental stimuli, plays a role in normal cell development and immune regulation. Recent evidence supports a significant link between environmental exposure and AhR in the development of allergic diseases. We sought to investigate whether AhR plays a role in mediating cockroach allergen-induced allergic immune responses. Methods. AhR expression in human lung fibroblasts from asthmatic and healthy individuals and in cockroach extract (CRE treated human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 was examined. The role of AhR in modulating CRE induced TGFβ1 production was investigated by using AhR agonist, TCDD, antagonist CH122319, and knockdown of AhR. The role of latent TGFβ1 binding protein-1 (LTBP1 in mediating TCDD induced active TGFβ1 release was also examined. Results. AhR expression was higher in airway fibroblasts from asthmatic subjects as compared to healthy controls. AhR in fibroblasts was activated by TCDD with an increased expression of cyp1a1 and cyp1b1. Increased AhR expression was observed in CRE-treated fibroblasts. Importantly, CRE induced TGFβ1 production in fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by TCDD but inhibited by CH122319. Reduced TGFβ1 production was further confirmed in fibroblasts with AhR knockdown. Moreover, AhR knockdown inhibited CRE induced fibroblast differentiation. Furthermore, TCDD induced active TGFβ1 release was significantly inhibited by LTBP1 knockdown. Conclusion. These results provide evidence for the role of AhR in modulating cockroach allergen-induced immune responses through controlling the active TGFβ1 release, suggesting a possible synergistic effect between exposure to allergens and environmental chemicals on the development of allergic diseases.

  3. Multicomponent analytical methodology to control phthalates, synthetic musks, fragrance allergens and preservatives in perfumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Llompart, Maria; Lamas, J Pablo; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Lores, Marta

    2011-07-15

    A simple, fast, robust and reliable multicomponent analytical method applicable in control laboratories with a high throughput level has been developed to analyze commercial brands of perfumes. Contents of 52 cosmetic ingredients belonging to different chemical families can be determined in a single run. Instrumental linearity, precision of the method and recovery studies in real samples showed excellent results, so that quantification by external calibration can be effectively applied. Relevant limits of detection and quantification were obtained for all the targets considered, far below the legal requirements and amply adequate for its accurate analytical control. A survey of 70 commercial perfumes and colognes has been performed, in order to verify whether these products complied with the recent changes in European legislation: regarding the maxima allowed concentrations of the ingredients and/or ingredient labelling. All samples contained some of the target ingredients. Several samples do not comply with the regulations concerning the presence of phthalates. Musks data confirmed the trend about the replacement of nitromusks by polycyclic musks; as well as the noticeable introduction of macrocyclic musks in the perfumes composition. The prohibited musk moskene has been detected in one sample in an appreciable concentration. The average number of fragrance allergens is twelve per sample; their presence must be indicated in the list of ingredients when its concentration exceeds the 0.001%, but values higher than 1% have been found in some samples. Preservatives data show that parabens, although ubiquitous in other cosmetic products, are not widely used in perfumery. In contrast, the presence of BHT is indeed widespread. The degree of compliance with the European Regulation on the labelling has been evaluated in a subset of samples, and only about the 38% of the perfumes were properly labelled for the allergens tested. PMID:21645712

  4. In silico analyses of structural and allergenicity features of sapodilla (Manilkara zapota) acidic thaumatin-like protein in comparison with allergenic plant TLPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok Kumar, Hassan G; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2014-02-01

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) belong to the pathogenesis-related family (PR-5) of plant defense proteins. TLPs from only 32 plant genera have been identified as pollen or food allergens. IgE epitopes on allergens play a central role in food allergy by initiating cross-linking of specific IgE on basophils/mast cells. A comparative analysis of pollen- and food-allergenic TLPs is lacking. The main objective of this investigation was to study the structural and allergenicity features of sapodilla (Manilkara zapota) acidic TLP (TLP 1) by in silico methods. The allergenicity prediction of composite sequence of sapodilla TLP 1 (NCBI B3EWX8.1, G5DC91.1) was performed using FARRP, Allermatch and Evaller web tools. A homology model of the protein was generated using banana TLP template (1Z3Q) by HHPRED-MODELLER. B-cell linear epitope prediction was performed using BCpreds and BepiPred. Sapodilla TLP 1 matched significantly with allergenic TLPs from olive, kiwi, bell pepper and banana. IgE epitope prediction as performed using AlgPred indicated the presence of 2 epitopes (epitope 1: residues 36-48; epitope 2: residues 51-63), and a comprehensive analysis of all allergenic TLPs displayed up to 3 additional epitopes on other TLPs. It can be inferred from these analyses that plant allergenic TLPs generally carry 2-3 IgE epitopes. ClustalX alignments of allergenic TLPs indicate that IgE epitopes 1 and 2 are common in food allergenic TLPs, and IgE epitopes 2 and 3 are common in pollen allergenic TLPs; IgE epitope 2 overlaps with a portion of the thaumatin family signature. The secondary structural elements of TLPs vary markedly in regions 1 and 2 which harbor all the predicted IgE epitopes in all food and pollen TLPs in either of the region. Further, based on the number of IgE epitopes, food TLPs are grouped into rosid and non-rosid clades. The number and distribution of the predicted IgE epitopes among the allergenic TLPs may explain the specificity of food or pollen allergy as

  5. Alternaria alternata allergens: Markers of exposure, phylogeny and risk of fungi-induced respiratory allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Marta F; Postigo, Idoia; Tomaz, Cândida T; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Alternaria alternata spores are considered a well-known biological contaminant and a very common potent aeroallergen source that is found in environmental samples. The most intense exposure to A. alternata allergens is likely to occur outdoors; however, Alternaria and other allergenic fungi can colonize in indoor environments and thereby increase the fungal aeroallergen exposure levels. A consequence of human exposure to fungal aeroallergens, sensitization to A. alternata, has been unequivocally associated with increased asthma severity. Among allergenic proteins described in this fungal specie, the major allergen, Alt a 1, has been reported as the main elicitor of airborne allergies in patients affected by a mold allergy and considered a marker of primary sensitization to A. alternata. Moreover, A. alternata sensitization seems to be a triggering factor in the development of poly-sensitization, most likely because of the capability of A. alternata to produce, in addition to Alt a 1, a broad and complex array of cross-reactive allergens that present homologs in several other allergenic sources. The study and understanding of A. alternata allergen information may be the key to explaining why sensitization to A. alternata is a risk factor for asthma and also why the severity of asthma is associated to this mold. Compared to other common environmental allergenic sources, such as pollens and dust mites, fungi are reported to be neglected and underestimated. The rise of the A. alternata allergy has enabled more research into the role of this fungal specie and its allergenic components in the induction of IgE-mediated respiratory diseases. Indeed, recent research on the identification and characterization of A. alternata allergens has allowed for the consideration of new perspectives in the categorization of allergenic molds, assessment of exposure and diagnosis of fungi-induced allergies. PMID:26826364

  6. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Protects Lungs from Cockroach Allergen-Induced Inflammation by Modulating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhou, Yufeng; Qiu, Lipeng; Do, Danh C; Zhao, Yilin; Cui, Zhuang; Wang, Heng; Liu, Xiaopeng; Saradna, Arjun; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei; Gao, Peisong

    2015-12-15

    Exposure to cockroach allergen leads to allergic sensitization and increased risk of developing asthma. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a receptor for many common environmental contaminants, can sense not only environmental pollutants but also microbial insults. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells with the capacity to modulate immune responses. In this study, we investigated whether AhR can sense cockroach allergens and modulate allergen-induced lung inflammation through MSCs. We found that cockroach allergen-treated AhR-deficient (AhR(-/-)) mice showed exacerbation of lung inflammation when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an AhR agonist, significantly suppressed allergen-induced mouse lung inflammation. MSCs were significantly reduced in cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice as compared with WT mice, but increased in cockroach allergen-challenged WT mice when treated with TCDD. Moreover, MSCs express AhR, and AhR signaling can be activated by cockroach allergen with increased expression of its downstream genes cyp1a1 and cyp1b1. Furthermore, we tracked the migration of i.v.-injected GFP(+) MSCs and found that cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice displayed less migration of MSCs to the lungs compared with WT. The AhR-mediated MSC migration was further verified by an in vitro Transwell migration assay. Epithelial conditioned medium prepared from cockroach extract-challenged epithelial cells significantly induced MSC migration, which was further enhanced by TCDD. The administration of MSCs significantly attenuated cockroach allergen-induced inflammation, which was abolished by TGF-β1-neutralizing Ab. These results suggest that AhR plays an important role in protecting lungs from allergen-induced inflammation by modulating MSC recruitment and their immune-suppressive activity. PMID:26561548

  7. Impact of Wild Loci on the Allergenic Potential of Cultivated Tomato Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; D'Agostino, Nunzio; Citterio, Sandra; Raiola, Assunta; Asero, Riccardo; Barone, Amalia; Rigano, Maria Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most extensively consumed vegetables but, unfortunately, it is also able to induce allergic reactions. In the past, it has been shown that the choice of tomato cultivar significantly influenced the allergic reaction of tomato allergic subjects. In this study we investigated the allergenic potential of the cultivated tomato line M82 and of two selected lines carrying small chromosome regions from the wild species Solanum pennellii (i.e. IL7-3 and IL12-4). We evaluated the positive interactions of IgEs of allergic subjects in order to investigate the different allergenic potential of the lines under investigation. We used proteomic analyses in order to identify putative tomato allergens. In addition, bioinformatic and transcriptomic approaches were applied in order to analyse the structure and the expression profiles of the identified allergen-encoding genes. These analyses demonstrated that fruits harvested from the two selected introgression lines harbour a different allergenic potential as those from the cultivated genotype M82. The different allergenicity found within the three lines was mostly due to differences in the IgE recognition of a polygalacturonase enzyme (46 kDa), one of the major tomato allergens, and of a pectin methylesterase (34 kDa); both the proteins were more immunoreactive in IL7-3 compared to IL12-4 and M82. The observed differences in the allergenic potential were mostly due to line-dependent translational control or post-translational modifications of the allergens. We demonstrated, for the first time, that the introgression from a wild species (S. pennellii) in the genomic background of a cultivated tomato line influences the allergenic properties of the fruits. Our findings could support the isolation of favorable wild loci promoting low allergenic potential in tomato. PMID:27182705

  8. Impact of Wild Loci on the Allergenic Potential of Cultivated Tomato Fruits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ghiani

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is one of the most extensively consumed vegetables but, unfortunately, it is also able to induce allergic reactions. In the past, it has been shown that the choice of tomato cultivar significantly influenced the allergic reaction of tomato allergic subjects. In this study we investigated the allergenic potential of the cultivated tomato line M82 and of two selected lines carrying small chromosome regions from the wild species Solanum pennellii (i.e. IL7-3 and IL12-4. We evaluated the positive interactions of IgEs of allergic subjects in order to investigate the different allergenic potential of the lines under investigation. We used proteomic analyses in order to identify putative tomato allergens. In addition, bioinformatic and transcriptomic approaches were applied in order to analyse the structure and the expression profiles of the identified allergen-encoding genes. These analyses demonstrated that fruits harvested from the two selected introgression lines harbour a different allergenic potential as those from the cultivated genotype M82. The different allergenicity found within the three lines was mostly due to differences in the IgE recognition of a polygalacturonase enzyme (46 kDa, one of the major tomato allergens, and of a pectin methylesterase (34 kDa; both the proteins were more immunoreactive in IL7-3 compared to IL12-4 and M82. The observed differences in the allergenic potential were mostly due to line-dependent translational control or post-translational modifications of the allergens. We demonstrated, for the first time, that the introgression from a wild species (S. pennellii in the genomic background of a cultivated tomato line influences the allergenic properties of the fruits. Our findings could support the isolation of favorable wild loci promoting low allergenic potential in tomato.

  9. Impact of Wild Loci on the Allergenic Potential of Cultivated Tomato Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; D’Agostino, Nunzio; Citterio, Sandra; Raiola, Assunta; Asero, Riccardo; Barone, Amalia; Rigano, Maria Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most extensively consumed vegetables but, unfortunately, it is also able to induce allergic reactions. In the past, it has been shown that the choice of tomato cultivar significantly influenced the allergic reaction of tomato allergic subjects. In this study we investigated the allergenic potential of the cultivated tomato line M82 and of two selected lines carrying small chromosome regions from the wild species Solanum pennellii (i.e. IL7-3 and IL12-4). We evaluated the positive interactions of IgEs of allergic subjects in order to investigate the different allergenic potential of the lines under investigation. We used proteomic analyses in order to identify putative tomato allergens. In addition, bioinformatic and transcriptomic approaches were applied in order to analyse the structure and the expression profiles of the identified allergen-encoding genes. These analyses demonstrated that fruits harvested from the two selected introgression lines harbour a different allergenic potential as those from the cultivated genotype M82. The different allergenicity found within the three lines was mostly due to differences in the IgE recognition of a polygalacturonase enzyme (46 kDa), one of the major tomato allergens, and of a pectin methylesterase (34 kDa); both the proteins were more immunoreactive in IL7-3 compared to IL12-4 and M82. The observed differences in the allergenic potential were mostly due to line-dependent translational control or post-translational modifications of the allergens. We demonstrated, for the first time, that the introgression from a wild species (S. pennellii) in the genomic background of a cultivated tomato line influences the allergenic properties of the fruits. Our findings could support the isolation of favorable wild loci promoting low allergenic potential in tomato. PMID:27182705

  10. Environmental Effects on Allergen Levels in Commercially Grown Non-Genetically Modified Soybeans: Assessing Variation Across North America

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Severin E.; Woods, Carlotta A.; Hong, Bonnie; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Thelen, Jay J.; Ladics, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a hugely valuable soft commodity that generates tens of billions of dollars annually. This value is due in part to the balanced composition of the seed which is roughly 1:2:2 oil, starch, and protein by weight. In turn, the seeds have many uses with various derivatives appearing broadly in processed food products. As is true with many edible seeds, soybeans contain proteins that are anti-nutritional factors and allergens. Soybean, along with milk, eggs, fish, crustace...

  11. Environmental effects on allergen levels in commercially grown non-genetically modified soybeans: assessing variation across North America

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Severin E.; Woods, Carlotta A.; Bonnie eHong; Xiaoxiao ekong; Thelen, Jay J.; Ladics, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a hugely valuable soft commodity that generates tens of billions of dollars annually. This value is due in part to the balanced composition of the seed which is roughly 1:2:2 oil, starch and protein by weight. In turn, the seeds have many uses with various derivatives appearing broadly in processed food products. As is true with many edible seeds, soybeans contain proteins that are anti-nutritional factors and allergens. Soybean, along with milk, eggs, fish, crust...

  12. Assessment of fracking for shale gas production from the viewpoints of energy policy and environmental policy. Opinion of the German Advisory Council on the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proponents of shale gas production in Europe hope that the effects it has occasioned in the USA, namely falling prices and growing competitiveness, will also come about in Germany. However a decrease in gas prices is not to be expected, given Germany's comparatively modest shale gas reserves; these are even only enough to have a slightly moderating effect on the country's decline in domestic natural gas production. While it is true that the improved climate footprint of the USA is attributable to the increasing substitution of natural gas for coal, this is of little benefit to the global climate, since the coal does not remain in the ground but, as a result of the decline in domestic demand, is successfully exported as a cheap energy resource, leading to higher CO2 emissions elsewhere. For the purposes of the energy turnaround shale gas production is dispensable because it is not available short-term and gas demand will decrease over the medium term. Shale gas production is associated with a real risk of groundwater contamination or an inadvertent release of climatically harmful gases; however these are probably controllable with the aid of continued research as well as stringent environmental regulations and monitoring. Other consequences such as soil sealing and the loss of natural and recreational space cannot be avoided, however. Here the costs and benefit of shale gas production will have to be weighed against each other with great care. There are still major gaps in available knowledge on its environmental effects; these should be closed through representative pilot projects prior to commercial production.

  13. Crash course in readers' advisory

    CERN Document Server

    Orr, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    One of the key services librarians provide is helping readers find books they'll enjoy. This ""crash course"" will furnish you with the basic, practical information you need to excel at readers' advisory (RA) for adults and teens.

  14. Advisory group on the explanation and application of the Agency's transport regulations, Vienna, 21-25 May 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advisory Group AG-445 charged with the task of initiating development of new explanatory and advisory material on the revised Agency's Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Series No. 6. The eventual products of this activity will take the form of new editions of Safety Series No. 7 and No. 37

  15. 76 FR 59143 - Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive... of Committees: Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk... break loose and move within the circulatory system) associated with use of these products may be...

  16. Vagotomy Reverses Established Allergen-Induced Airway Hyperreactivity to Methacholine in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate ma...

  17. Isolation, cloning, and characterization of the 2S albumin: A new allergen from hazelnut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Garino; L. Zuidmeer; J. Marsh; A. Lovegrove; M. Morati; S. Versteeg; P. Schilte; P. Shewry; M. Arlorio; R. van Ree

    2010-01-01

    Scope: 2S albumins are the major allergens involved in severe food allergy to nuts, seeds, and legumes. We aimed to isolate, clone, and express 2S albumin from hazelnut and determine its allergenicity. Methods: 2S albumin from hazelnut extract was purified using size exclusion chromatography and RP-

  18. Structure, Stability, and IgE Binding of the Peach Allergen Peamaclein (Pru p 7)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuppo, Lisa; Spadaccini, Roberta; Alessandri, Claudia; Wienk, Hans; Boelens, Rolf; Giangrieco, Ivana; Tamburrini, Maurizio; Mari, Adriano; Picone, Delia; Ciardiello, Maria Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the structural properties of allergenic proteins is a necessary prerequisite to better understand the molecular bases of their action, and also to design targeted structural/functional modifications. Peamaclein is a recently identified 7 kDa peach allergen that has been associated with

  19. Risk assessment and food allergy: the probabilistic model applied to allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, M.Q.I.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Rennen, M.A.J.; Houben, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    In order to assess the risk of unintended exposure to food allergens, traditional deterministic risk assessment is usually applied, leading to inconsequential conclusions as 'an allergic reaction cannot be excluded'. TNO therefore developed a quantitative risk assessment model for allergens based on

  20. Allergens on desktop surfaces in preschools and elementary schools of urban children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchongkittiphon, W; Sheehan, W J; Friedlander, J; Chapman, M D; King, E-M; Martirosyan, K; Baxi, S N; Permaul, P; Gaffin, J M; Kopel, L; Bailey, A; Fu, C; Petty, C R; Gold, D R; Phipatanakul, W

    2014-07-01

    Desktop dust has been studied as a source of food allergen, but not as a source of potential aeroallergen exposure. Thirty-six wiped samples from desktop surfaces were collected from preschools and schools. Samples were analyzed for detectable levels of common aeroallergens including Alternaria, cockroach, dog, dust mite, cat, mouse, and rat allergens by immunoassay. Mouse allergen was the most prevalent, detectable in 97.2% of samples. Cat allergen was detectable in 80.6% of samples, and dog allergen was detectable in 77.8% of samples. Other allergens were not as prevalent. Mouse was the only allergen that was highly correlated with settled floor dust collected from the same rooms (r = 0.721, P < 0.001). This is the first study to detect aeroallergens on desktop surfaces by using moist wipes. Allergens for mouse, cat, and dog were highly detectable in wipes with mouse desktop surface levels correlating with levels in vacuumed floor dust. PMID:24750034

  1. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2014-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited.

  2. Is there a threshold concentration of cat allergen exposure on respiratory symptoms in adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.M.; Thiering, E.; Zock, J.P.; Villani, S.; Olivieri, M.; Modig, L.; Jarvis, D.; Norbäck, D.; Verlato, G.; Heinrich, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Cat allergen concentrations higher than 8 μg/g in settled house dust, have been suggested to provoke exacerbation of allergic respiratory symptoms. However, whether the 8μg/g of indoor cat allergen concentration is indeed the minimal exposure required for triggering the ast

  3. [Leather dust and sensitizing agents. A study on occupational indoor allergenic pollution in shoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirla, Angelo Mario; Del Frate, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed to ascertain a possible pollution by allergenic Mites in 15 samples of leather dust belonging to occupational environments of 4 Italian shoes factories. All dosages were both performed by a quantitative immunologic and ELISA method (Indoor Biotechnology Lmd) and a semi-quantitative colorimetric method (Aclotest Lofarma) and the results were compared according to a five steps risk-evaluation. In all factories allergenic components of Mites were documented. The highest concentration of Der p1 and Der f 1 in dust was 15,4 mcg/g, while allergens prevailed around the working-places, where discards of leather usually were collected. Moulds were studied in 29 samples of 9 shoes factories, adopting specific cultures. In all but one occupational environment moulds were present and taxa of Alternaria, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium were prevalent, spores of them have known allergenic propert. Besides the identification, quantitative levels were not planned in this study. Dermatophytes were absent, while four taxa of Keratinophylic non allergenic moulds were observe. When leather dust are disperded in occupational environments a risk due to allergenic agents as secondary contamination must be carefully considered. Such a risk, according to our results, may be classified as "intermediate for allergenic Mites" and temptatively "light for allergenic moulds". Such a risk might be carefully considered for legal and preventive purposes and also monitored by occupational healthcare professionals. PMID:22697032

  4. Using phenolic compounds to reduce the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since phenolic compounds may form insoluble complexes with proteins, we determined that their interaction with peanut allergens leads to a reduction in the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries. Phenolics, such as, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and ferulic acid were e...

  5. Cellular cytokine and chemokine responses to parasite antigens and fungus and mite allergens in children co-infected with helminthes and protozoa parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Hegewald, Jana; Gantin, Richard G.; Christian J. Lechner; Huang, Xiangsheng; Agosssou, Abram; Agbeko, Yvon F; Soboslay, Peter T.; Köhler, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa poly-parasite infections are frequently observed in children, and with poly-parasitism modulating immune mechanisms, mediated by cytokines and chemokines, are required to prevent overwhelming inflammation and host tissue damage. We analyzed in children co-infected with helminthes and protozoan parasites their cellular production of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to parasite antigens and allergens. Methods Intestinal and in...

  6. In-Vial Micro-Matrix-Solid Phase Dispersion for the Analysis of Fragrance Allergens, Preservatives, Plasticizers, and Musks in Cosmetics

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Celeiro; Juan Pablo Lamas; Maria Llompart; Carmen Garcia-Jares

    2014-01-01

    Fragrance allergens, preservatives, plasticizers, and synthetic musks are usually present in cosmetic and personal care products formulations and many of them are subjected to use restrictions or labeling requirements. Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) is a very suitable analytical technique for the extraction of these compounds providing a simple, low cost sample preparation, and the possibility of performing both extraction and clean-up in one step, reducing possible contamination and an...

  7. Liver-Specific Allergen Gene Transfer by Adeno-Associated Virus Suppresses Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheng-Chi; Lai, Chin-Wen; Wu, Chia-Jen; Chen, Li-Chen; Tao, Mi-Hua; Kuo, Ming-Ling

    2016-08-01

    Allergic airway inflammation driven by T helper 2 (Th2)-type immunity is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic infiltration, and elevated IgE production. Various novel strategies for managing asthma have been explored, such as DNA vaccines, T-cell peptides, and allergen-specific immunotherapy. A principal goal of most immunotherapeutic approaches is active and long-term allergen-specific tolerance. Liver-specific gene transfer using adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been shown to favorably induce tolerogenic responses to therapeutic products in various experimental models. AAV8 has strong liver tropism and induces immune tolerance in mice. The present study aimed to determine whether hepatocyte-specific allergen expression by pseudotyped AAV2/8 alleviates asthmatic symptoms in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice. Mice were intravenously injected with AAV2/8 vector carrying membrane-bound OVA transgene under transcriptional control of a hepatocyte-specific alpha 1 antitrypsin promoter (AAV2/8-OVA) and then sensitized with OVA. AAV2/8-OVA specifically transduced the OVA transgene in the liver. Airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, mucus hypersecretion, and Th2 cytokines were significantly suppressed in both the lungs and secondary lymphoid organs of asthmatic mice infected with AAV2/8-OVA. Significant reduction of OVA-specific antibodies was detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from AAV2/8-OVA-treated mice. Moreover, AAV2/8-OVA treatment prominently promoted the expression of Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-β in the liver. Enhanced Foxp3 expression was also detected in the lungs of asthmatic mice after AAV2/8-OVA treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the induction of immune tolerance by hepatic AAV gene transfer may be beneficial for modulating allergic asthma. PMID:27178525

  8. Identification of hazelnut major allergens in sensitive patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorello, Elide A; Vieths, Stefan; Pravettoni, Valerio; Farioli, Laura; Trambaioli, Chiara; Fortunato, Donatella; Lüttkopf, Dirk; Calamari, Marianna; Ansaloni, Raffaella; Scibilia, Joseph; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Poulsen, Lars K.; Wütrich, Brunello; Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Robino, Anna Maria; Ortolani, Claudio; Conti, Amedeo

    2002-01-01

    The hazelnut major allergens identified to date are an 18-kd protein homologous to Bet v 1 and a 14-kd allergen homologous to Bet v 2. No studies have reported hazelnut allergens recognized in patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) results or in patients...

  9. Structural and functional localization of airway effects from episodic exposure of infant monkeys to allergen and/or ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both allergen and ozone exposure increase asthma symptoms and airway responsiveness in children. Little is known about how these inhalants may differentially modify airway responsiveness in large proximal as compared to small distal airways. We evaluated whether bronchi and respiratory bronchioles from infant monkeys exposed episodically to allergen and/or ozone differentially develop intrinsic hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and whether eosinophils and/or pulmonary neuroendocrine cells play a role. Infant monkeys were exposed episodically for 5 months to: (1) filtered air, (2) aerosolized house dust mite allergen, (3) ozone 0.5 ppm, or (4) house dust mite allergen + ozone. Studying the function/structure relationship of the same lung slices, we evaluated methacholine airway responsiveness and histology of bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, intrinsic responsiveness was increased by allergen exposure, an effect reduced by bombesin antagonist. In respiratory bronchioles, intrinsic airway responsiveness was increased by allergen + ozone exposure. Eosinophils were increased by allergen and allergen + ozone exposure in bronchi and by allergen exposure in respiratory bronchioles. In both airways, exposure to allergen + ozone resulted in fewer tissue eosinophils than did allergen exposure alone. In bronchi, but not in respiratory bronchioles, the number of eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells correlated with airway responsiveness. We conclude that episodically exposing infant monkeys to house dust mite allergen with or without ozone increased intrinsic airway responsiveness to methacholine in bronchi differently than in respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells may play a role in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness

  10. Antigenic and allergenic analysis of psyllium seed components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlian, L G; Vyszenski-Moher, D L; Lawrence, A T; Schrotel, K R; Ritz, H L

    1992-04-01

    The outer portions (husk) of psyllium seeds are a concentrated source of natural fiber used in some bulk-fiber laxatives and cereals. They are known to elicit respiratory allergic reactions after inhalation or ingestion among sensitized individuals. Antigenic and allergenic characterization of three psyllium-seed fractions (husk, endosperm, and embryo) was conducted with crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE), crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the source of psyllium allergenicity. Homologous CIE demonstrated psyllium endosperm and embryo extracts contained seven and four antigens, respectively. Husk extracts were too gelatinous to react by CIE. However, heterologous CIE profiles of endosperm or embryo extracts, reacted with antihusk antibodies, resulted in antigen-antibody precipitin peaks that matched the heavy staining precipitin lines of homologous reactions for endosperm and embryo, respectively. These results indicated that commercial-grade husk, endosperm, and embryo contained similar antigens. Extracts of all three seed components contained antigens that bound IgE antibodies in the sera of 11 psyllium RAST-positive individuals, as determined by crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis. The few prominent husk protein/peptide bands resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were common in either embryo or endosperm. Immunoblots revealed common IgE reactive bands in all three seed fractions. Microscopic examination of the powdered commercial-grade psyllium (95% pure) revealed it contained endosperm and embryo particles. These immunologic, biochemical, and microscopic findings suggest that other contaminating seed components are primarily responsible for the allergenicity of commercial-grade psyllium-husk powder rather than the husk itself. PMID:1560169

  11. Occupational exposure to allergenic mites in a Polish zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarz, Krzysztof; Szilman, Piotr; Szilman, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    The study was carried out from April 2000-March 2001. During this period 49 samples of dust, litter, debris and residues from cages and run-offs of mammals, birds and reptiles in the Silesian Zoo, were examined for the presence of mites, especially the allergenic taxa. Mites were extracted using the Berlese method and preserved in 70 % ethanol. For identification, the mites were mounted in Hoyer's medium on microscope slides. Mites were found in 44 of 49 samples analyzed (89.8 %). A total of 5,097 mites were collected, from which 60.3 % were found in samples collected in spring, whereas only 13 % in summer and 24.1 % in autumn. The remaining 2.6 % of the total mite population was found in winter. Majority of mites (82.7 %) were collected from aviaries of macaws and cockatiels (Ara ararauna and Nymphicus hollandicus). A total of 10 species of astigmatid mites were identified that belong to 4 families--Acaridae, Glycyphagidae, Anoetidae and Pyroglyphidae. Generally, the allergenic mites of the order Astigmata constituted 49.5 % of the total count. Among them Acarus farris was predominant (34 % of the total count), followed by Tyrophagus putrescentiae (4.7 %), Caloglyphus sp. (4.35 %) and Acarus immobilis (4.31 %). Dermatophagoides farinae, the house-dust-mite species, was for the first time found in this environment. D. farinae (0.05 % of the total population) was associated with parrots, canids and artiodactyls. Summarizing, it should be stressed, that cages and run-offs of different mammals, aviaries of parrots and terrariums of snakes are important sources of some allergenic mites, especially A. farris and T. putrescentiae, that might cause allergies in workers. PMID:15236495

  12. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years

  13. 78 FR 30305 - The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Public Advisory Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... work and focus for 2013 which include Management Innovation and Optimizing Federal Real Estate. In... ADMINISTRATION The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Public Advisory Meeting AGENCY: Office of... Management Advisory Board (PMAB), a Federal Advisory Committee established in accordance with the...

  14. 78 FR 60863 - Threat Reduction Advisory Committee; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... of the Secretary Threat Reduction Advisory Committee; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting... Federal advisory committee meeting of the Threat Reduction Advisory Committee (``the Committee''). DATES...: Mr. William Hostyn, DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency/J2/5/8R-ACP, 8725 John J. Kingman Road,...

  15. 78 FR 77663 - Threat Reduction Advisory Committee; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... of the Secretary Threat Reduction Advisory Committee; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting... Federal advisory committee meeting of the Threat Reduction Advisory Committee (``the Committee''). This... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. William Hostyn, DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency/J2/5/8R-AC, 8725 John J....

  16. 78 FR 29334 - Threat Reduction Advisory Committee; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... of the Secretary Threat Reduction Advisory Committee; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting... advisory committee meeting of the Threat Reduction Advisory Committee (``the Committee''). DATES: Wednesday... Hostyn, DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency/J2/5/8R-ACP, 8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201,...

  17. Effect of Formaldehyde on Asthmatic Response to Inhaled Allergen Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Ezratty, Véronique; Bonay, Marcel; Neukirch, Catherine; Orset-Guillossou, Gaëlle; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Background Exposure to formaldehyde may lead to exacerbation of asthma. Objectives Our aim in this study was to investigate whether exposure to a low level (500 μg/m3) of formaldehyde enhances inhaled allergen responses. Methods Twelve subjects with intermittent asthma and allergy to pollen were exposed, at rest, in a double-blind crossover study to either formaldehyde or purified air for 60 min. The order of exposure to formaldehyde and air-only was randomized, and exposures were separated b...

  18. [Hemodynamic response to cotton allergen exposure in the industrial environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakuleva, N S; Usol'tsev, B G; Orlova, O A

    1983-03-01

    The methods of functional diagnosis (mechanocardiography, rheoencephalography) were used to examine the responses of the central and craniocerebral hemodynamics to inhalations of specific cotton allergens in female workers of a textile factory with different grades of sensitization. It was discovered that both the initial level and response pattern on the part of the cardiovascular system and craniocerebral circulation depend to a certain measure on the level of background reactivity. The data obtained enable prognosing the status of the cardiovascular system and taking measures aimed at its correction in subjects sensitized to cotton dust, who continue working in cotton industry. PMID:6830989

  19. Lactoferrin restrains allergen-induced pleurisy in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocięba, Maja; Kaleta-Kuratewicz, Katarzyna; Kruzel, Marian L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the utility of lactoferrin (LF), a natural immunomodulator, to restrain allergen-induced pleurisy in mice. Material and subjects BALB/c female mice, 8- to 10-week old, weighing 24 g on average, were used. Treatment Mice were immunized intraperitoneally with 50 μg of ovalbumin (OVA) and the pleurisy was elicited 14 days later by intrapleural injection of 12.5 μg of OVA. LF was given 24 and 3 h before elicitation of the allergic reaction. Methods T...

  20. Allergen immunotherapy for the prevention of allergic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Halken, Susanne; Calderón, Moises A; Muraro, Antonella; Roberts, Graham; Du Toit, George; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo Maria; Pajno, Giovanni; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Pfaar, Oliver; Ryan, Dermot; Santos, Alexandra F; Timmermanns, Frans; Wahn, Ulrich; Sheikh, A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Prevention of Allergic Disease. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT in the...... established instruments. Data will be descriptively and, if possible and appropriate, quantitatively synthesised. DISCUSSION: The findings from this review will be used to inform the development of recomendations for EAACI's Guidelines on AIT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....