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Sample records for allelopathy

  1. Phenolics and Plant Allelopathy

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    De-An Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds arise from the shikimic and acetic acid (polyketide metabolic pathways in plants. They are but one category of the many secondary metabolites implicated in plant allelopathy. Phenolic allelochemicals have been observed in both natural and managed ecosystems, where they cause a number of ecological and economic problems, such as declines in crop yield due to soil sickness, regeneration failure of natural forests, and replanting problems in orchards. Phenolic allelochemical structures and modes of action are diverse and may offer potential lead compounds for the development of future herbicides or pesticides. This article reviews allelopathic effects, analysis methods, and allelopathic mechanisms underlying the activity of plant phenolic compounds. Additionally, the currently debated topic in plant allelopathy of whether catechin and 8-hydroxyquinoline play an important role in Centaurea maculata and Centaurea diffusa invasion success is discussed. Overall, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the allelopacthic potential of phenolic compounds to provide us with methods to solve various ecology problems, especially in regard to the sustainable development of agriculture, forestry, nature resources and environment conservation.

  2. Current Research Status of Allelopathy

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    AHMAD JUNAEDI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The term of allelopathy refers to chemical interactions (inhibitory or stimulatory between plants, between plants and microorganisms, and between microorganisms. The wealth of information on the processes, procedures, and practices of allelopathy has contributed to understanding this field of science. Recently, researches of allelopathy have been conducted in laboratory, greenhouse, and field with multifaceted standpoint in some concerning area: (i allelochemicals identifications and screening test; (ii ecological and physiological aspects of allelopathy; (iii genetic studies and the possibilities of using plant breeding or genetic manipulation to enhance allelopathic varieties; (iv the use of allelopathic potential in the biological control, including as natural pesticide, of weeds and plant diseases as eco-friendly approach for sustainable agriculture scheme.

  3. Allelopathy of plants in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Baba, K.; Fujii, Y.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakamura, T.; Yamashita, M.

    Allelopathy is a chemical way of interaction among many organisms living together on the earth, and forming ecological systems as the member of the biosphere. Biosynthesis of allelochemicals, their release, transport and sensing mechanism at the recipient organisms, which is associated with allelopathy, are under the influence of gravity in many aspects. Such gravitational action on the allelopathy could be ranged from perturbation on biochemical networks in the cells to macroscopic transportation phenomena around the organisms. If gravity is an environmental factor that governs those processes, allelopathy at the absence of gravity on space craft, or under the different magnitude of gravity on the outer planets might differ from allelopathy on the ground. Another important factor in allelopathy in space application is physical closure of living environment, and lack of natural process to decompose allelopathic chemicals or the sink among material circulation in the biosphere. Many organisms and ecological system may behave differently in spacecrafts or on outer planets, based on the modified inter-organisms and -species interactions associated with alleopahty. In order to examine allelopathy under exotic gravity and closed environment, we imposed pseudo-microgravity and physical closure on a plant-plant allelopathy system. Two plant species were co-cultured in a closed vessel, and gravity vector was randomized by the 3D-clinorotation. Velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens L.) is known to induce strong allelopathic action on many plant species. Velvet bean and lettuce was chosen as the pair. Growth of lettuce seedlings, co-cultured with velvet bean, was analyzed under the 3D-clinorotation, and compared it with growth of the ground control group. The degree of allelopathic suppression on the lettuce root growth was less on the 3D-clinorotation. L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxy-phennylalanine), released from root is the major substance responsible to the allelopathy of velvet bean

  4. The role of allelopathy in agricultural pest management.

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    Farooq, Muhammad; Jabran, Khawar; Cheema, Zahid A; Wahid, Abdul; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2011-05-01

    Allelopathy is a naturally occurring ecological phenomenon of interference among organisms that may be employed for managing weeds, insect pests and diseases in field crops. In field crops, allelopathy can be used following rotation, using cover crops, mulching and plant extracts for natural pest management. Application of allelopathic plant extracts can effectively control weeds and insect pests. However, mixtures of allelopathic water extracts are more effective than the application of single-plant extract in this regard. Combined application of allelopathic extract and reduced herbicide dose (up to half the standard dose) give as much weed control as the standard herbicide dose in several field crops. Lower doses of herbicides may help to reduce the development of herbicide resistance in weed ecotypes. Allelopathy thus offers an attractive environmentally friendly alternative to pesticides in agricultural pest management. In this review, application of allelopathy for natural pest management, particularly in small-farm intensive agricultural systems, is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Morphology to localizations and specifics of the manifestation allelopathy activities of the vegetable celery cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Baleev Dmitrij Nikolaevič; Buharov Aleksandr Fedorovič

    2011-01-01

    The extracts from different organ of the vegetable celery cultures differs on degree of the manifestation allelopathy to activities. The test-objects are characterized different allowing ability and selectivity at estimation allelopathy. On manifestation allelopathy to activities essential influence renders the ecological factor.

  6. Morphology to localizations and specifics of the manifestation allelopathy activities of the vegetable celery cultures

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    Baleev Dmitrij Nikolaevič

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracts from different organ of the vegetable celery cultures differs on degree of the manifestation allelopathy to activities. The test-objects are characterized different allowing ability and selectivity at estimation allelopathy. On manifestation allelopathy to activities essential influence renders the ecological factor.

  7. Research progress on the use of plant allelopathy in agriculture and the physiological and ecological mechanisms of allelopathy

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    Fang eCheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is a common biological phenomenon by which one organism produces biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, development, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and have beneficial or detrimental effects on target organisms. Plant allelopathy is one of the modes of interaction between receptor and donor plants and may exert either positive effects (e.g., for agricultural management, such as weed control, crop protection, or crop re-establishment or negative effects (e.g., autotoxicity, soil sickness, or biological invasion. To ensure sustainable agricultural development, it is important to exploit cultivation systems that take advantage of the stimulatory / inhibitory influence of allelopathic plants to regulate plant growth and development and to avoid allelopathic autotoxicity. Allelochemicals can potentially be used as growth regulators, herbicides, insecticides and antimicrobial crop protection products. Here, we reviewed the plant allelopathy management practices applied in agriculture and the underlying allelopathic mechanisms described in the literature. The major points addressed are as follows: (1 Description of management practices related to allelopathy and allelochemicals in agriculture. (2 Discussion of the progress regarding the mode of action of allelochemicals and the physiological mechanisms of allelopathy, consisting of the influence on cell micro- and ultra-structure, cell division and elongation, membrane permeability, oxidative and antioxidant systems, growth regulation systems, respiration, enzyme synthesis and metabolism, photosynthesis, mineral ion uptake, protein and nucleic acid synthesis. (3 Evaluation of the effect of ecological mechanisms exerted by allelopathy on microorganisms and the ecological environment. (4 Discussion of existing problems and proposal for future research directions in this field to provide a useful reference for future studies on

  8. Allelopathy relationship between plants and their use in organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, M.; Voşgan, Z.; Mare Roşca, O.; Mihalescu, L.

    2017-05-01

    Allelopathy is a process still little studied in the plant world, if we refer to the diversity of biochemical compounds, through which plants can interact with each other, with fungi or bacteria. Biochemical "dialogue" between organisms may have stimulatory or inhibitory effects, contributing to numerical setting of the populations, the assertion of some species over others, the establishment and strengthen of plant communities. Practically, the allelopathy can be exploited in organic farming in understanding and identifying compatibility between species, to finding natural substances with herbicide potential. In experiments conducted, diluted extracts of Taraxacum officinale and Cirsium vulgare strongly inhibited the germination and growth of corn and beans, while Hedera helix produced the same effect, but at higher concentrations of the extract. Humulus lupulus extract has a stimulating effect on the two species and it is possible to use as natural fertilizer. Extracts of Chenopodium album works as stimulator for Beta vulgaris, and potent inhibitor for Triticum aestivum. Agropyron repens is an aggressive competitor for Lycopersicon esculentum and Capsicum annuum, producing a strong inhibition. Juglans regia extracts and especially those of Satureja hortensis, can be used as natural herbicides for up delay germination and growth suppression for the species: Echinochloa crus-galli and Setaria glauca.

  9. Models for the directed evolution of bacterial allelopathy: bacteriophage lysins

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    James J. Bull

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbes produce a variety of compounds that are used to kill or suppress other species. Traditional antibiotics have their origins in these natural products, as do many types of compounds being pursued today in the quest for new antibacterial drugs. When a potential toxin can be encoded by and exported from a species that is not harmed, the opportunity exists to use directed evolution to improve the toxin’s ability to kill other species—allelopathy. In contrast to the typical application of directed evolution, this case requires the co-culture of at least two species or strains, a host that is unharmed by the toxin plus the intended target of the toxin. We develop mathematical and computational models of this directed evolution process. Two contexts are considered, one with the toxin encoded on a plasmid and the other with the toxin encoded in a phage. The plasmid system appears to be more promising than the phage system. Crucial to both designs is the ability to co-culture two species/strains (host and target such that the host is greatly outgrown by the target species except when the target species is killed. The results suggest that, if these initial conditions can be satisfied, directed evolution is feasible for the plasmid-based system. Screening with a plasmid-based system may also enable rapid improvement of a toxin.

  10. Allelopathy as a potential strategy to improve microalgae cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    One of the main obstacles for continuous productivity in microalgae cultivation is the presence of biological contaminants capable of eliminating large numbers of cells in a matter of days or even hours. However, a number of strategies are being used to combat and prevent contamination in microalgae cultivation. These strategies include the use of extreme conditions in the culture media such as high salinity and high pH to create an unfavorable environment for the competitive organisms or predators of the microalgae. Numerous studies have explored the potential of naturally occurring bioactive secondary metabolites, which are natural products from plants and microorganisms, as a source of such compounds. Some of these compounds are herbicides, and marine and freshwater microalgae are a source of these compounds. Microalgae produce a remarkable diversity of biologically active metabolites. Results based on the allelopathic potential of algae have only been described for laboratory-scale production and not for algae cultivation on a pilot scale. The adoption of allelopathy on microalgal strains is an unexplored field and may be a novel solution to improve algae production. Here we present information showing the diversity of allelochemicals from microalgae and the use of an allelopathic approach to control microalgae cultivation on a pilot scale based on R&D activities being carried out in Brazil for biodiesel production. PMID:24499580

  11. Interaction between the macrophyte Stratiotes aloides and filamentous algae: does it indicate allelopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; Mau, B.; De Senerpont Domis, L.N.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Van Donk, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aquatic macrophyte Stratiotes aloides Linnaeus, which has recently received attention in studies on allelopathy, has been shown to suppress phytoplankton growth. In the Netherlands, S. aloides often co-occurs with floating filamentous algae. However, filamentous algae are generally absent in

  12. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed

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    Rasher, Douglas B.; Hay, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral–seaweed–herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence. PMID:24403332

  13. Pattern formation for a model of plankton allelopathy with cross-diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, C.R.; Zhang, Lai; Lin, Z.G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework for investigating spatial patterns on plankton allelopathy with cross-diffusion. We show that under some conditions the cross-diffusion is able to induce the Turing instability, which is further confirmed by the numerical simulations. Moreover...

  14. Periodic solutions for impulsive delay differential equations in the control model of plankton allelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Junguo [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China) and Department of Mathematics, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China)]. E-mail: jungjia2@zzu.edu.cn; Wang Miansen [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li Meili [Department of Applied Mathematics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2007-05-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional non-autonomous system with impulse that arises in plankton allelopathy involving discrete time delays and periodic environmental factors is studied. By the theory of the coincidence degree we obtain the conditions for the existence of periodic solution of this system.

  15. Interaction between the macrophyte Stratiotes aloides and filamentous algae: does it indicate allelopathy?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulderij, G.; Mau, B.; De Senerpont Domis, L.N.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Van Donk, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aquatic macrophyte Stratiotes aloides Linnaeus, which has recently received attention in studies on allelopathy, has been shown to suppress phytoplankton growth. In the Netherlands, S. aloides often co-occurs with floating filamentous algae. However, filamentous algae are generally absent in close proximity to S. aloides, resulting in gaps in filamentous algae mats. We analyzed whether those gaps may be caused by allelopathic substances excreted by S. aloides or by nutrient depletion. We ...

  16. Separation of allelopathy from resource competition using rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures.

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    Hai Bin He

    Full Text Available Plant-plant interference is the combined effect of allelopathy, resource competition, and many other factors. Separating allelopathy from resource competition is almost impossible in natural systems but it is important to evaluate the relative contribution of each of the two mechanisms on plant interference. Research on allelopathy in natural and cultivated plant communities has been hindered in the absence of a reliable method that can separate allelopathic effect from resource competition. In this paper, the interactions between allelopathic rice accession PI312777, non-allelopathic rice accession Lemont and barnyardgrass were explored respectively by using a target (rice-neighbor (barnyardgrass mixed-culture in hydroponic system. The relative competitive intensity (RCI, the relative neighbor effect (RNE and the competitive ratio (CR were used to quantify the intensity of competition between each of the two different potentially allelopathic rice accessions and barnyardgrass. Use of hydroponic culture system enabled us to exclude any uncontrolled factors that might operate in the soil and we were able to separate allelopathy from resource competition between each rice accession and barnyardgrass. The RCI and RNE values showed that the plant-plant interaction was positive (facilitation for PI312777 but that was negative (competition for Lemont and barnyardgrass in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The CR values showed that one PI312777 plant was more competitive than 2 barnyardgrass plants. The allelopathic effects of PI312777 were much more intense than the resource competition in rice/barnyardgrass mixed cultures. The reverse was true for Lemont. These results demonstrate that the allelopathic effect of PI312777 was predominant in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The most significant result of our study is the discovery of an experimental design, target-neighbor mixed-culture in combination with competition indices, can successfully

  17. Breeding cereal crops for enhanced weed suppression: optimizing allelopathy and competitive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Margaret; Reberg-Horton, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Interest in breeding grain crops with improved weed suppressive ability is growing in response to the evolution and rapid expansion of herbicide resistant populations in major weeds of economic importance, environmental concerns, and the unmet needs of organic producers and smallholder farmers without access to herbicides. This review is focused on plant breeding for weed suppression; specifically, field and laboratory screening protocols, genetic studies, and breeding efforts that have been undertaken to improve allelopathy and competition in rice, wheat, and barley. The combined effects of allelopathy and competition determine the weed suppressive potential of a given cultivar, and research groups worldwide have been working to improve both traits simultaneously to achieve maximum gains in weed suppression. Both allelopathy and competitive ability are complex, quantitatively inherited traits that are heavily influenced by environmental factors. Thus, good experimental design and sound breeding procedures are essential to achieve genetic gains. Weed suppressive rice cultivars are now commercially available in the U.S. and China that have resulted from three decades of research. Furthermore, a strong foundation has been laid during the past 10 years for the breeding of weed suppressive wheat and barley cultivars.

  18. Effects of ocean acidification on the potency of macroalgal allelopathy to a common coral

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    Del Monaco, Carlos; Hay, Mark E.; Gartrell, Patrick; Mumby, Peter J.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo

    2017-02-01

    Many coral reefs have phase shifted from coral to macroalgal dominance. Ocean acidification (OA) due to elevated CO2 is hypothesised to advantage macroalgae over corals, contributing to these shifts, but the mechanisms affecting coral-macroalgal interactions under OA are unknown. Here, we show that (i) three common macroalgae are more damaging to a common coral when they compete under CO2 concentrations predicted to occur in 2050 and 2100 than under present-day conditions, (ii) that two macroalgae damage corals via allelopathy, and (iii) that one macroalga is allelopathic under conditions of elevated CO2, but not at ambient levels. Lipid-soluble, surface extracts from the macroalga Canistrocarpus (=Dictyota) cervicornis were significantly more damaging to the coral Acropora intermedia growing in the field if these extracts were from thalli grown under elevated vs ambient concentrations of CO2. Extracts from the macroalgae Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Amansia glomerata were not more potent when grown under elevated CO2. Our results demonstrate increasing OA advantages seaweeds over corals, that algal allelopathy can mediate coral-algal interactions, and that OA may enhance the allelopathy of some macroalgae. Other mechanisms also affect coral-macroalgal interactions under OA, and OA further suppresses the resilience of coral reefs suffering blooms of macroalgae.

  19. A Study of Allelopathy of Some Shade Trees to Coffea arabicaL. Seedlings

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    Adi Prawoto

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of social economic judgment, many coffee planters nowadays grow Cassia spectabilisand in the certain regions used Cinnamomum burmani, Macadamia integrifolia, Tectona grandisand Cassia siameaas shade trees or intercrops. Before being used in large scale, allelopathy study is appropriate to be done because this effect is much more difficult to be overcome than competiton as growing factor. Research on allelopathy of those species had been conducted in glasshouse of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute using Salisbury & Ross method. Leachate of Cassia spectabilis Cinnamomum burmani, Macadamia integrifolia, Tectona grandisand Cassia siamea, pure media (without plant and control (well water were used as treatments. Planting material of Cinnamomum burmani, Macadamia integrifolia, Tectona grandisand Cassia siameawere as seedlings of one year old, whereas C. spectabiliswas 3 months old. Those materials were planted in polybags 20 cm x 30 cm and replicated five times. The media was a mixture of top soil, manure and sand 1 : 1 : 1 (v/v. After those species were maintained for one months and Arabica seedlings for three month old, watering of coffee seedlings then using leachate from shade trees media. Every two days, each seedling was applied with 200 ml. Control was applied with well water. Pure media was used to study the effect of nutrient supply contained in the leachate. The experiment was stopped at seven month old of the coffee seedlings. The result showed that C. spectabilisreleased chemicals which showed allelopathic effect to Arabica coffee, their growth was inhibited 10% to control. The growth decreament from Cassia siameaand D. zibethinustreatment mainly caused by lower mineral content in the leachate and indicated by weak allelopathic. On the other hand M. integrifoliaand C. burmanidid not show allelopathic to Arabica coffee. Thus, based on allelopathy aspect, it can be included that C. spectabilisand C. siamea were not

  20. Seaweed allelopathy against coral: surface distribution of a seaweed secondary metabolite by imaging mass spectrometry.

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    Andras, Tiffany D; Alexander, Troy S; Gahlena, Asiri; Parry, R Mitchell; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kubanek, Julia; Wang, May D; Hay, Mark E

    2012-10-01

    Coral reefs are in global decline, with seaweeds increasing as corals decrease. Although seaweeds inhibit coral growth, recruitment, and survivorship, the mechanism of these interactions is poorly understood. Here, we used field experiments to show that contact with four common seaweeds induces bleaching on natural colonies of Porites rus. Controls in contact with inert, plastic mimics of seaweeds did not bleach, suggesting seaweed effects resulted from allelopathy rather than shading, abrasion, or physical contact. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the hydrophobic extract from the red alga Phacelocarpus neurymenioides revealed a previously characterized antibacterial metabolite, neurymenolide A, as the main allelopathic agent. For allelopathy of lipid-soluble metabolites to be effective, the compounds would need to be deployed on algal surfaces where they could transfer to corals on contact. We used desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to visualize and quantify neurymenolide A on the surface of P. neurymenioides, and we found the molecule on all surfaces analyzed, with highest concentrations on basal portions of blades.

  1. Perspectives on allelopathy in mexican traditional agroecosystems: A case study in tlaxcala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, A L; Ramos, L; Cruz, R; Hernández, J G; Nava, V

    1987-11-01

    Agroecosystems in Tlaxcala, Mexico, are surrounded by trees and water channels and have a great variety of cultivated and noncultivated plants. The main results of a study carried out on a traditional agroecosystem in Santa Inés, Tlaxcala are presented. Some ecological aspects of polycultures, plant covers (dry leaves ofAlnus firmifolia, Berula erecta, andJuncus sp.), and the allelopathic potential of crops and noncultivated plants (fresh and dry material) were analyzed. The main plants (trees, shrubs, and herbs) present in the agroecosystem were identified. The total number of weeds in plots where plant covers were added was reduced. The number of nodules ofRhizobium phaseoli and the production of bean and squash increased with plant covers. Corn, beans, and squash showed a clear allelopathic effect, as well asChenopodium murale, Tradescantia crassifolia, Melilotus indicus, andAmaranthus hybridus, among other weeds. The contribution of allelopathy in studies of traditional agroecosystems is of great importance for the management of species in space and time. Allelopathy can be the basis of biological control of pests and weeds and of the discovery of new useful substances.

  2. Taraxacum officinale pollen depresses seed set of montane wildflowers through pollen allelopathy

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    Deirdre Loughnan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant species that share pollinators can suffer from interspecific pollen deposition. Male reproductive success is inevitably reduced by the loss of pollen to flowers of another species. Female reproductive success can be affected by reduced stigmatic area or, more strongly, through allelopathic effects by which the admixture of some foreign pollen reduces seed or fruit set. We tested for allelopathic effects of Taraxacum officinale (Asteracaeae pollen on the seed set of montane wildflowers Erythronium grandiflorum (Liliaceae and Erysimum capitatum (Brassicaceae, by hand-pollinating plants with pollen mixtures. Taraxacum is a common invasive species, which produces allelopathic chemicals in its root and vegetative tissue, making it a likely candidate for pollen allelopathy. Flowers of both species produced fewer well-developed seeds when pollinated with pollen mixtures containing Taraxacum pollen. The pollen-allelopathic potential of weedy dandelion may add to its ability to disrupt communities that it invades.

  3. Allelopathy of rice: effect of rice mulching on the growth of avena sativa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.H.; Khan, S.N.; Bashir, U.; Bajwa, R.

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of suitable weed management practice is a critical step in crop production technology to reduce the competition for water, nutrients, space and light between the economically important crops and weeds. Mechanical, chemical or biological agents are being used by the farmer community to cope with the weed problem but these methods are specific in nature, expensive and detrimental to ecosystem. Allelopathy is a cost-effective and environment friendly approach replacing the previous techniques. Therefore, keeping in view the role of rice mulching in weed management, the present study was designed to manipulate the allelopathic traits of rice for the control of Avena sativa in a field trial during which it was grown in non-mulch and rice mulch regimes of different concentrations. (author)

  4. Prymnesium parvum revisited: Relationship between allelopathy, ichthyotoxicity, and chemical profiles in 5 strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blossom, Hannah E., E-mail: hblossom@bio.ku.dk [Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Strandpromenaden 5, 3000 Helsingør (Denmark); Rasmussen, Silas A. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 221, 2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Nikolaj G. [Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Strandpromenaden 5, 3000 Helsingør (Denmark); Larsen, Thomas O.; Nielsen, Kristian F. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Søltofts Plads, Building 221, 2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Per J. [Marine Biological Section, University of Copenhagen, Strandpromenaden 5, 3000 Helsingør (Denmark)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Five strains of P. parvum were tested for toxicity towards rainbow trout and microalgae. • Toxicity towards microalgae was not correlated to toxicity towards fish. • A microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a reliable proxy for ichthyotoxicity. • Concentrations of GATs were low and not correlated to effects on fish or on algae. • P. parvum does not produce oleamide based on {sup 13}C labeling and extraction in glass. - Abstract: Bioassay-guided discovery of ichthyotoxic algal compounds using in vivo fish assays is labor intensive, costly, and highly regulated. Since the mode of action of most known algal-mediated fish-killing toxins is damage to the cell membranes in the gills, various types of cell-based bioassays are often used for bioassay guided purification of new ichthyotoxins. Here we tested the hypothesis that allelopathy is related to ichthyotoxicity and thus that a microalgal bioassay can be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity by comparing the toxicity of five strains of Prymnesium parvum toward rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 10 g) and the microalga Teleaulax acuta. No relationship between median effective concentrations (EC{sub 50}s) on fish and median lethal concentrations (LC{sub 50}s) on algae was observed in the 5 strains showing that a microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity. Fish were more sensitive to P. parvum with EC{sub 50}s ranging from 6 × 10{sup 3} to 40 × 10{sup 3} cells ml{sup −1}, compared to the test alga where LC{sub 50}s ranged from 30 × 10{sup 3} to nearly non-toxic at 500 × 10{sup 3} cells ml{sup −1}. In addition, the cellular concentrations of two recently suggested ichthyotoxins produced by P. parvum, the “golden algae toxins”, GAT 512 and a novel GAT 510, did not show any relationship to either ichthyotoxicity or allelopathy, and are not the biologically relevant toxins, but are simply lipids found in algal chloroplasts. Finally, we demonstrate that the recently

  5. Seasonal and scale-dependent variability in nutrient- and allelopathy-mediated macrophyte–phytoplankton interactions

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    Lombardo P.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available macrophyte–phytoplankton interactions were investigated using a dual laboratory and field approach during a growing season, with responses quantified as changes in biomass. Short-term, close-range interactions in laboratory microcosms always led to mutual exclusion of macrophytes (Elodea canadensis or Ceratophyllum demersum and algae (Raphidocelis subcapitata, Fistulifera pelliculosa or cyanobacteria (Synechococcus leopoliensis, suggesting regulation by positive feedback mechanisms, progressively establishing and reinforcing a “stable state”. Laboratory results suggest that close-range regulation of R. subcapitata and F. pelliculosa by macrophytes was primarily via nutrient (N, P mediation. Sprig-produced allelochemicals may have contributed to inhibition of S. leopoliensis in C. demersum presence, while S. leopoliensis was apparently enhanced by nutrients leaked by subhealthy (discolored leaves; biomass loss E. canadensis. Seasonal changes in algal growth suppression were correlated with sprig growth. Marginal differences in in situ phytoplankton patterns inside and outside monospecific macrophyte stands suggest that the nutrient- and/or allelopathy-mediated close-range mechanisms observed in the laboratory did not propagate at the macrophyte-stand scale. Factors operating at a larger scale (e.g., lake trophic state, extent of submerged vegetation coverage appear to override in situ macrophyte–phytoplankton close-range interactions.

  6. Mixed, short rotation culture of red alder and black cottonwood: growth, coppicing, nitrogen fixation, and allelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilman, P.; Stettler, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Alnus rubra seedlings were grown in a 1:1 mixture at a spacing of 1.2 x 1.2 m with 28 Populus clones (25 clones pf P. trichocarpa, 2 of P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa, and one P. deltoides x P. nigra) in a study established in W. Washington in March 1979. Trees were harvested at 4 yr old. At harvest, average heights were: pure Populus, 10.2 m; Populus in the mixed stand 11.0 m; and alder 8.4 m. Most Populus sprouted satisfactorily after harvest (6.6 shoots/plant when pure, 7.6 shoots/plant in the mixture), but alder sprouted poorly (3.6 shoots/plant). Above-ground biomass at harvest was 15.9 t/ha p.a. for the mixture and 16.7 t/ha p.a. for pure Populus, although the mixture had been more productive at 2 yr. Nitrogenase activity (nitrogen fixation as measured by acetylene reduction) of alder declines in the 4th season; competition was the most important factor influencing this decline. Soil N content had no effect on fixation. A pot study showed that ground Populus leaf and litter material inhibited the growth of red alder seedlings, although soil collected from Populus plots had no effect. Results indicated that allelopathy is probably a minor factor under field conditions, at most, and that growing mixed stands may, on balance, be beneficial. 20 references.

  7. Allelopathy as an emergent, exploitable public good in the bloom-forming microalga Prymnesium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, William W; Espinosa, Noelle J; Eldakar, Omar T; Hackett, Jeremiah D

    2013-06-01

    Many microbes cooperatively secrete extracellular products that favorably modify their environment. Consistent with social evolution theory, structured habitats play a role in maintaining these traits in microbial model systems, by localizing the benefits and separating strains that invest in these products from 'cheater' strains that benefit without paying the cost. It is thus surprising that many unicellular, well-mixed microalgal populations invest in extracellular toxins that confer ecological benefits upon the entire population, for example, by eliminating nutrient competitors (allelopathy). Here we test the hypotheses that microalgal exotoxins are (1) exploitable public goods that benefit all cells, regardless of investment, or (2) nonexploitable private goods involved in cell-level functions. We test these hypotheses with high-toxicity (TOX+) and low-toxicity (TOX-) strains of the damaging, mixotrophic microalga Prymnesium parvum and two common competitors: green algae and diatoms. TOX+ actually benefits from dense populations of competing green algae, which can also be prey for P. parvum, yielding a relative fitness advantage over coexisting TOX-. However, with nonprey competitors (diatoms), TOX- increases in frequency over TOX+, despite benefiting from the exclusion of diatoms by TOX+. An evolutionary unstable, ecologically devastating public good may emerge from traits selected at lower levels expressed in novel environments. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Allelopathy in a leguminous mangrove plant, Derris indica: protoplast co-culture bioassay and rotenone effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Aya; Mori, Daisuke; Minagawa, Reiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2015-05-01

    To investigate allelopathic activity of a leguminous mangrove plant, Derris indica, the 'Protoplasts Co-culture Method' for bioassay of allelopathy was developed using suspension culture. A suspension culture was induced from immature seed and sub-cultured in Murashige and Skoog's (MS) basal medium containing 10 μM each of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-benzyladenine (BA). The protoplasts were isolated using the separate wells method with 2% each of Cellulase RS, Driselase 20 and Macerozyme R10 in 0.4 M mannitol solution. Protoplast cultures of D. indica revealed that high concentrations of cytokinins, BA and thidiazuron, were effective for cell divisions. The co-cultures of D. indica protoplasts with recipient lettuce protoplasts using 96 multi-well culture plates were performed in MS basal medium containing 0.4 M mannitol solution and 1 μM 2,4-D and 0.1 μM BA. The protoplast density of D. indica used in co-culturing varied from 6 x 10(3) - 10(5) / mL. Very strong inhibitory allelopathic effects of D. indica protoplasts on lettuce protoplast growth were found. A similar strong inhibitory allelopathic activity of dried young leaves on lettuce seedling growth was also observed by using the sandwich method. Rotenone, which is a component of Derris root, dissolved in DMSO, was highly inhibitory on the growth of lettuce protoplasts in culture and this could be one of the causes of the strong allelopathic activity of D. indica.

  9. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta M Bonaldo

    Full Text Available Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae, and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  10. Seasonal changes in phosphorus competition and allelopathy of a benthic microbial assembly facilitate prevention of cyanobacterial blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghong; Wang, Fengwu; Xiao, Xi; Liu, Junzhuo; Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Hong; Kerr, Philip; Shurin, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    Interactions among microbes determine the prevalence of harmful algal blooms that threaten water quality. These interactions can be indirectly mediated by shared resources or consumers, or through interference by the production of allelochemicals. Allelopathic interactions and resource competition have been shown to occur among algae and associated microbes. However, little work has considered seasonal influences on ecosystem structure and function. Here, we report results of our investigations on seasonal changes in the interactions between benthic microbial assemblies and the bloom forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. We show that phosphorus (P) competition and allelopathy by the microbial assembly vary seasonally and inhibit growth of M. aeruginosa. The interactions per unit biomass of the microbial assembly are stronger under winter than summer conditions and inhibit the recruitment of the cyanobacteria, thereby preventing the reoccurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in the following summer. The seasonality of these interactions correlates with changes in composition, metabolic activity and functional diversity of the microbial assembly. Our findings highlight the importance of competitive and allelopathic interactions in regulating the occurrence of harmful algal blooms. Our results also imply that seasonal variation of competition and allelopathy of the microbial assembly might be beneficial to adjust aquatic ecosystem structure and function. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Sources and modes of action of invasive knotweed allelopathy: the effects of leaf litter and trained soil on the germination and growth of native plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalin Parepa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Invasive knotweeds, native to Eastern Asia, are among the most dominant plant invaders of European and North American temperate ecosystems. Recent studies indicate that one cause of this dominance might be allelopathy, but the possible sources and modes of action of this allelopathy are insufficiently understood. Here, we asked whether the invasive knotweed Fallopia × bohemica can exert allelopathic effects on native plants also through its leaf litter, or through persistent soil contaminants, and whether these affect the germination or growth of native plants. In a germination experiment with nine native species neither litter leachate, an aqueous extract of knotweed leaves added to the soil, nor trained soil with a history of Fallopia pre-cultivation suppressed the germination or early growth of natives. A mesocosm study with experimental native communities showed that the presence of F. × bohemica, although not a dominant in these communities, caused significant shifts of life-history strategy in two dominant natives, and that similar effects could be elicited through litter leachates or trained soil alone. However, there were hardly any effects on the biomass of natives. Our study indicates that knotweed allelopathy acts on the growth rather than germination of natives, and that soil contamination through persistent allelochemicals may not be a significant problem in habitat restoration. It also shows that allelopathic effects can sometimes be subtle changes in life-history and allocation patterns of the affected species.

  12. Alelopatia e homeopatia no manejo da tiririca (Cyperus rotundus Allelopathy and homeopathy in the management of nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R.O. Silveira

    2010-01-01

    weed of difficult control, causing reduction of stand and yield of a wide variety of commercial crops. Due to its aggressiveness, reproduction capacity, high dispersion and rusticity, its control is difficult and costly. The aim of this work was to evaluate alternative methods of nutsedge control based on allelopathy and homeopathy. In the management with allelopathy, aqueous extracts of jack bean (Canavalia ensiformes, black velvet bean (Stizolobium aterrimum, rosemary pepper (Lippia sidoides and lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus were tested. With homeopathy, the Hahnemannian centesimal scale was used, testing the 3CH, 6CH, 9CH and 12CH dynamizations. Both experiments were conducted in transparent Gerboxes containing washed coarse sand, 1 to 3 mm thick grains, and 10 healthy nutsedge tubers, distributed evenly within the container. After the application of the treatments, the containers were placed in a BOD germination chamber at 25 oC with a 12 hour photoperiod, where they remained for 15 days until the final evaluation. The extract presenting the best nutsedge management was rosemary pepper, which reduced plantlet emergence percentage and vigor, with the extract of this species causing a length reduction in the nutsedge plant higher than that of 2.5 kg ha-1 a.i. of atrazine, the herbicide used for comparison. The homeopathy treatment did not present a significant difference, not exhibiting the expected effect with its nutsedge control dynamizations. The lemon grass, black velvet bean and jack bean extracts did not present allelopathic effects. However the rosemary pepper extract was found to be promising as a nutsedge alternative management, with further studies being necessary to elucidate the chemical principles involved and its true action in the metabolism of the plant.

  13. Allelopathie: chemische communicatie.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, G.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Substances from plants and decomposing organic matter can stimulate or inhibit other plants. This mechanism opens perspectives for biological agriculture (f.i. weed control by inhibiting seed germination)

  14. Effect of seasonal variation in Sálvia allelopathy potential / Efeito da variação sazonal no potencial alelopático de Sálvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tatiana Araujo da Cruz-Silva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis and the accumulation of the chemical composites that have allelopathy characteristics in Salvia officinalis L. (Lamiaceae are resulting from the secondary plant metabolism. The present work had as objective to analyze the allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts of fresh leaves of Sálvia collected during the seasons, obtained by decoction, static infusion and grinding, on the germination and development of seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.. The experiment had 20 treatments (concentrations 0; 7.5; 15; 22.5 and 30%. The results had been submitted to the Tukey test, to the level at 5% probability. The appraised variables, germination percentage, the germination speed index (GSI, the growth of shoot and roots and abnormality formation of seedlings did not present a pattern of allelopathy in the different seasons, indicating a possible alteration in the plant metabolism in function of the seasonal variation in the plant ambient.A biossíntese e o acúmulo dos compostos químicos que conferem a característica alelopática em Salvia officinalis L. (Lamiaceae são resultantes do metabolismo secundário do vegetal. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo analisar os efeitos alelopáticos de extratos aquosos de folhas frescas de Sálvia coletadas durante as estações do ano, obtidos por decocção, maceração estática, infusão e trituração sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento de plântulas de alface (Lactuca sativa L., totalizando 20 tratamentos nas concentrações 0; 7,5; 15; 22,5 e 30%. Os resultados obtidos foram submetidos ao teste de Tukey, ao nível de 5% de probabilidade. As variáveis avaliadas, porcentagem de germinação, índice de velocidade de germinação (IVG, crescimento da parte aérea e das raízes e formação de plântulas anormais não apresentaram um padrão de resposta alelopática nas diferentes estações do ano, indicando possível alteração no metabolismo vegetal em função da varia

  15. Light energy partitioning, photosynthetic efficiency and biomass allocation in invasive Prunus serotina and native Quercus petraea in relation to light environment, competition and allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robakowski, Piotr; Bielinis, Ernest; Sendall, Kerrie

    2018-02-07

    This study addressed whether competition under different light environments was reflected by changes in leaf absorbed light energy partitioning, photosynthetic efficiency, relative growth rate and biomass allocation in invasive and native competitors. Additionally, a potential allelopathic effect of mulching with invasive Prunus serotina leaves on native Quercus petraea growth and photosynthesis was tested. The effect of light environment on leaf absorbed light energy partitioning and photosynthetic characteristics was more pronounced than the effects of interspecific competition and allelopathy. The quantum yield of PSII of invasive P. serotina increased in the presence of a competitor, indicating a higher plasticity in energy partitioning for the invasive over the native Q. petraea, giving it a competitive advantage. The most striking difference between the two study species was the higher crown-level net CO 2 assimilation rates (A crown ) of P. serotina compared with Q. petraea. At the juvenile life stage, higher relative growth rate and higher biomass allocation to foliage allowed P. serotina to absorb and use light energy for photosynthesis more efficiently than Q. petraea. Species-specific strategies of growth, biomass allocation, light energy partitioning and photosynthetic efficiency varied with the light environment and gave an advantage to the invader over its native competitor in competition for light. However, higher biomass allocation to roots in Q. petraea allows for greater belowground competition for water and nutrients as compared to P. serotina. This niche differentiation may compensate for the lower aboveground competitiveness of the native species and explain its ability to co-occur with the invasive competitor in natural forest settings.

  16. Allelopathy of winter cover straws on the initial maize growthAlelopatia de palhadas de coberturas de inverno sobre o crescimento inicial de milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Senen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In agricultural crops is common planting the main crop on the remains of straw harvesting the crop earlier due to no-tillage system. The straw remaining in the soil can exert positive or negative influence on the main crop through the release of organic compounds that carry allelopathy on plants of the subsequent growing. This experiment consisted of mixing and blending of different types of turnip (Brassica rapa L., oats (Avena sativa L., crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst. Ex RE Fries, Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. and rapeseed (Brassica napus L . var in soil and placed in plastic trays where they planted the seeds of maize. The experimental design was completely randomized design with six treatments and three repetições. As ratings were: emergence, rate of emergence, shoot length, root length, root dry weight, dry weight of shoots. The cover crops canola and safflower showed a positive effect, as crambe, turnips and oats had a negative effect on initial growth of maize seedlings, are not suitable for cover crop to maize sowing.Nas lavouras agrícolas é comum o cultivo da cultura principal sobre os restos de palha da colheita do cultivo anterior em decorrência do sistema de plantio direto. A palhada remanescente no solo pode exercer influência positiva ou negativa sobre a cultura principal pela liberação de compostos orgânicos que exercem alelopatia sobre as plantas da cultura subsequente. Este experimento constou da mistura e homogeneização das palhas de nabo (Brassica rapa L., aveia (Avena sativa L., crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst. ex R. E. Fries, cartamo (Carthamus tinctorius L. e canola (Brassica napus L.var no solo, que foi colocado em bandejas plásticas onde semeou-se o milho. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizados com seis tratamentos e três repetições. As características analizadas foram: emergência, índice de velocidade de emergência, comprimento de parte aérea, comprimento de raiz, massa

  17. Alelopatia de duas espécies de braquiária em sementes de três espécies de estilosantes Allelopathy of two brachiaria species in seeds of three species of stylosanthes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Paula D'Agostini Contreiras Rodrigues

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A alelopatia é muito comum em gramíneas como a Brachiaria brizantha e B. decumbens, podendo representar um problema em pastagens consorciadas com Stylosanthes, já que, nessa situação, a perpetuação da leguminosa depende da ressemeadura natural. Apesar da grande quantidade de sementes de estilosantes produzidas anualmente, nessas pastagens consorciadas, observa-se, em campo, pequena quantidade de plantas jovens, o que pode ser atribuído a um possível efeito alelopático da gramínea. Considerando a importância da alelopatia no consórcio de braquiárias com estilosantes, testou-se o potencial alelopático de extratos de Brachiaria brizantha e B. decumbens na germinação de sementes de três espécies de estilosantes. Verificou-se que há efeito alelopático negativo de B. brizantha e B. decumbens na germinação de sementes de Stylosanthes guianensis e somente de B. decumbens na germinação de S. capitata; há efeito alelopático positivo de B. brizantha nas sementes de S. macrocephala; não há efeito alelopático de B. brizantha na germinação de sementes de S. capitata e nem de B. decumbens em S. macrocephala.The allelopathy is very common in grasses such as Brachiaria brizantha and Brachiaria decumbens, could represent a problem in pastures consortium with Stylosantes since, in this situation, the perpetuation of the legume dependent natural reseed. In spite of the great amount of estilosantes seed produced annually in those pastures consortium, it is observed in field, small amount of young plants, which can be attributed to a possible allelopathic effect of the grass. Considering the importance of allelopathy in the consortium of Brachiaria with estilosantes, we tested the allelopathic potential of extracts of B. brizantha and B. decumbens on seed germination of three estilosantes species. It was found that there allelopathic negative effect of B. brizantha and B. decumbens on seed germination of Stylosanthes guianensis and

  18. Allelopathy regulates wheat genotypes performance at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth adaptation and allelopathic potential of four winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accessions has been investigated in pot experiments by prohydrojasmon (PDJ, 10 - 5M) and soil water (75 and 45%) at the enhancement stage. This paper also presented the performance of photosynthesis, water use and weed ...

  19. Allelopathy regulates wheat genotypes performance at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... The direct phenomenon is the change of photosynthesis parameter of ..... 25 was weaker than that of aerial parts under water and. PDJ treatment. In contrast .... expression indicators included allelopathic potential such as R - RI and S - RI implying roots response index and aerial parts response index and ...

  20. Lichen secondary metabolites affect growth of Physcomitrella patens by allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Michal; Antreich, Sebastian J; Bačkor, Martin; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Lang, Ingeborg

    2017-05-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites can function as allelochemicals and affect the development and growth of neighboring bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, microorganisms, and even other lichens. Lichen overgrowth on bryophytes is frequently observed in nature even though mosses grow faster than lichens, but there is still little information on the interactions between lichens and bryophytes.In the present study, we used extracts from six lichen thalli containing secondary metabolites like usnic acid, protocetraric acid, atranorin, lecanoric acid, nortistic acid, and thamnolic acid. To observe the influence of these metabolites on bryophytes, the moss Physcomitrella patens was cultivated for 5 weeks under laboratory conditions and treated with lichen extracts. Toxicity of natural mixtures of secondary metabolites was tested at three selected doses (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 %). When the mixture contained substantial amounts of usnic acid, we observed growth inhibition of protonemata and reduced development of gametophores. Significant differences in cell lengths and widths were also noticed. Furthermore, usnic acid had a strong effect on cell division in protonemata suggesting a strong impact on the early stages of bryophyte development by allelochemicals contained in the lichen secondary metabolites.Biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites were confirmed in several studies such as antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antiherbivore, antioxidant, antipyretic, and analgetic action or photoprotection. This work aimed to expand the knowledge on allelopathic effects on bryophyte growth.

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis of Allelopathy in Rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L B; Courtois, B; Olofsdotter, M

    2008-01-01

    The allelopathic potential of rice (Oryza sativa L.) against Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv. was investigated under both laboratory and greenhouse conditions. A population of 150 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was derived through single-seed descent from a cross between the indica cultivar AC...

  2. Allelopathy: Potential Role to Achieve New Milestones in Rice Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Amb

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rice fields are ecosystems with many types of plants, microbes, invertebrates, birds and animals. The rice farming protects the biodiversity of the region and maintains the ecosystem for the benefit of environment. Some rice varieties release biocidal allelochemicals which might affect major weeds, microbial and pathogenic diversity around rice plants, even soil characteristics. A large number of compounds such as phenolic acids, fatty acids, indoles and terpenes have been identified in rice root exudates and decomposing rice residues, as putative allelochemicals which can interact with surrounding environment. Since these allelopathic interactions may be positive, they can be used as effective contributor for sustainable and eco-friendly agro-production system. Genetic modification of crop plants to improve their allelopathic properties and enhancement of desirable traits has been suggested. Development of crops with enhanced allelopathic traits by genetic modification should be done cautiously, keeping in view of the ecological risk assessment (non-toxic and safe for humans and ecosystem, crop productivity, ratio of benefit and cost, etc..

  3. An allelopathy based model for the Listeria overgrowth phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fgaier, Hedia; Kalmokoff, Martin; Ells, Timothy; Eberl, Hermann J

    2014-01-01

    In a standard procedure of food safety testing, the presence of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes can be masked by non-pathogenic Listeria. This phenomenon of Listeria overgrowth is not well understood. We present a mathematical model for the growth of a mixed population of L. innocua and L. monocytogenes that includes competition for a common resource and allelopathic control of L. monocytogenes by L. innocua when this resource becomes limited, which has been suggested as one potential explanation for the overgrowth phenomenon. The model is tested quantitatively and qualitatively against experimental data in batch experiments. Our results indicate that the phenomenon of masked pathogens can depend on initial numbers of each population present, and on the intensity of the allelopathic effect. Prompted by the results for the batch setup, we also analyze the model in a hypothetical chemostat setup. Our results suggest that it might be possible to operate a continuous growth environment such that the pathogens outcompete the non-pathogenic species, even in cases where they would be overgrown in a batch environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Allelopathy of root exudates from different resistant eggplants to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three eggplant cultivars were inoculated with Verticillium dahliae Kleb. to assess their resistance to Verticillium wilt. Solanum tor was resistant, “Liyuanziqie” was tolerant, and “Xi'anlvqie” susceptible. The disease incidence and disease index of Verticillium wilt and the amount of V. dahliae in rhizospheric soil, variation of ...

  5. Allelopathy of plant species of pharmaceutical importance to cultivated species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álisson Sobrinho Maranho

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify possible allelopathic effects of leaf aqueous extracts of Baccharis dracunculifolia DC., Pilocarpus pennatifolius Lem., Cyperus rotundus L., Morus rubra L., Casearia sylvestris Sw., and Plectranthus barbatus Andr. on the germination and initial growth of Lactuca sativa L., Brassica oleracea L. cv. capitata, B. oleracea L. cv. italica, B. pekinenses L., B. campestris L., Lycopersicum esculentum Miller, and Eruca sativa L. To obtain the aqueous extracts, leaves previously dried at a 1g.10mL-1 concentration were used, diluted in six solutions (10, 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% and compared to control, distilled water, with five replications of 10 seeds for all vegetable species. The aqueous extracts of all species showed allelopathic potential for germination of seeds, the germination speed index, and the initial growth of shoots and roots of vegetable crops. The aqueous extracts of C. rotundus and P. barbatus promoted lower and higher allelopathic effects, respectively, and the vegetal structure mostly affected by the extracts was the primary root. The results indicate the existence of allelopathic potential in the species tested, so there’s a need for adopting care procedures when cultivating vegetables with them.

  6. Seasonality effect on the allelopathy of cerrado species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, A B; Takao, L K; Pereira, V C; Ferreira, A G; Lima, M I S; Gualtieri, S C J

    2014-08-01

    The Brazilian cerrado presents strong climate seasonality. During the dry season, plants may be exposed to stressful situations, such as a soil surface water deficit, that stimulate their chemical defenses. However, the seasonality effect on the production of allelopathic compounds of cerrado plant species is poorly understood. In this study, the phytotoxic activities of common native cerrado plants were evaluated during rainy and dry seasons. Crude leaves extracts (10% concentration: weight/volume, with dry leaves and distilled water) from eleven species were tested on lettuce and sesame germination. The negative effects on germination percentages, rates and informational entropies of the target species were higher when submitted to plant extracts from the dry season, where the germination rate was the most sensible parameter. The higher sensibility of lettuce and the germination rate parameter showed this difference. Only two exceptions had higher effects for rainy season extracts; one species showed higher negative effects on germination informational entropy of lettuce and another species on the germination rate of sesame. Thus, increases in the allelopathic activity were seen in the majority of the studied cerrado plant species during the dry season. These distinct responses to stressful situations in a complex environment such as the Brazilian cerrado may support the establishment and survival of some species.

  7. Allelopathy by extracts of Caatinga species on melon seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreya Kalyana de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The melon crop is of great socioeconomic importance in Brazil and some species from the Caatinga biome show allelopathic effects on other species. The aim of this study was to assess leaf and seed extracts of cumaru (Amburana cearensis (Allemao A.C. Sm., the jujube tree (Zizyphus joazeiro Mart., Jucá (Caesalpinia ferrea Mart. Ex. Tul. Var. Ferrea and mulungu (Erythrina velutina Willd. on the emergence of melon seeds (Cucumis melo L.. Leaves and seeds were used to produce extracts for each species at concentrations of a 1%, b 0.5% c 0.25%, d 0.125% and e 0% (control. The experiment was conducted with each extract type and its respective concentrations in a completely randomized design, with four replicates, each of 20 seeds. The percentage emergence and rate index, percentage of abnormal seedlings, seedling dry matter and seedling shoot and root length were assessed. Seed extracts of A. cearensis prevented melon germination, whereas the other extracts had no effect on this variable. Leaf extracts of A. cearensis and leaf and seed extracts of Z. joazeiro, C. ferrea and E. velutina resulted in abnormal melon seedlings. The percentage of abnormal melon seedlings exceeded 30% when treated with C. ferrea seed extract at the highest concentration. Most extracts did not affect seedling dry matter, but E. velutina leaf and seed extract increased the dry matter accumulation of melon seedlings and Z. joazeiro seed extract decreased dry matter accumulation at a concentration of 0.25%. The highest concentrations of mulungu and jucá leaf extracts promoted the shoot growth of melon seedlings. The extract from E. velutina seeds negatively affected root length compared to the control, similar to the effect of C. ferrea and E. velutina leaf extracts at the highest concentrations. Extracts of different organs of Caatinga plants can affect the emergence and characteristics related to seedling growth, depending on the concentration. Most extracts did not affect germination or the emergence rate index, but affected seedling growth.

  8. Intraspecific variability in allelopathy of Heracleum mantegazzianum is linked to the metabolic profile of root exudates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandová, Kateřina; Dostál, Petr; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Kameník, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 5 (2015), s. 821-831 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA ČR GAP504/10/0132 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : giant hogweed * root exudates * UHPLC–TOF-MS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 3.982, year: 2015

  9. Allelopathy in two species of Chenopodium -inhibition of germination and seedling growth of certain weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C. Datta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of washed leaf and inflorescence material of Chenopodium ambrosioides and C. murale, decaying leaves and inflorescences, and field soils collected beneath Chenopodium plants were examined in terms of the inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth of five weeds, viz. Abutilon indicum, Cassia sophera var. purpurea, C. tora, Evolvulus numularius and Tephrosia hamiltonii. The allelopathic pattern varied in each of the two test species and this depended on the type of test matter. However, the germination as well as the root and hypocotyl growth of A. indicum and E. nummularius were more hampered by phytotoxins or inhibitors from Chenopodium than were the other weeds. Since the leaf and inflorescence of Chenopodium formed the source of inhibitors, the respective plant-parts from the two species were chemically analysed and the presence of three terpenes (p-cymene, ascaridole and aritazone from C. ambrosioides and an organic acid (oxalic acid from C. murale were implicated in the allelopathic effect.

  10. Catechin-metal interactions as a mechanism for conditional allelopathy by the invasive plant, Centaurea maculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrod L. Pollock; Ragan M. Callaway; Giles C. Thelen; William E. Holben

    2009-01-01

    Considering variation, or conditionality, in the ways that plants compete for resources, facilitate or indirectly interact with each other has been crucial for understanding the relative importance of these interactions in the organization of plant communities (Tilman 1985; Wilson & Keddy 1986; Kitzberger, Steinaker & Veblen 2000; Levine 2000; Brooker...

  11. Contribution of a phytotoxic compound to the allelopathy of Ginkgo biloba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Takeshita, Sayaka

    2013-01-01

    Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) has not changed over 121 million years. There may be unknown special strategy for the survival. Gingko litter inhibited the growth of weed species ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.). The inhibition was greater with the litter of the close position than that of the far position from the gingko tree. A phytotoxic substance, 2-hydroxy-6-(10-hydroxypentadec-11-enyl)benzoic acid (HHPEBA) was isolated in the litter. HHPEBA concentration was greater in the litter of the close position than that of the far position from the tree. HHPEBA inhibited the ryegrass growth at concentrations greater than 3 μM. HHPEBA was estimated to be able to cause 47–62% of the observed growth inhibition of ryegrass by the gingko litter. Therefore, HHPEBA may contribute to the inhibitory effect caused by ginkgo litter and may provide a competitive advantage for gingko to survive through the growth inhibition of the neighboring plants. PMID:24300166

  12. Contribution of allelopathy and competition to weed suppression by winter wheat, triticale and winter rye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Antje; Fomsgaard, Inge S.; Mathiassen, Solvejg Kopp

    of competitive traits, such as early vigour, crop height and leaf area index and presence of phytotoxic compounds of the group of benzoxazinoids to weed suppression. Four cultivars of each of the winter cereals wheat, triticale and rye were grown in field experiments at two locations. Soil samples were taken...... 2016. Competitive traits were measured throughout the growing season. Partial least squares regression with weed biomass as response variable was used for modelling. Competitive traits, as well as benzoxazinoid concentrations contributed significantly to the models on winter wheat, winter triticale...... and winter rye data and explained 63, 69 and 58% of the variance in weed biomass in the first two components, respectively. Consequently, it can be concluded that competitive, as well as allelopathic traits, contributed significantly to weed suppressive outcome in winter cereals. This knowledge...

  13. Variation among four white ash families in response to competition and allelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Rink; J.W. Van Sambeek

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of three environmental variables affecting seedling growth of four half-sib white ash families was dominated by a three-way interaction between soil moisture stress, fescue leachate, and family. Of these, soil moisture stress contributed by far the most to the interaction and resulted in an average growth decline of 62%. Although fescue leachate appeared to be...

  14. Presence of oligosaccharides in seed-coat mucilage of Lepidium sativum : role in allelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Amjad

    2010-01-01

    Lepidimoide is a naturally occurring disaccharide reported to be an oligosaccharin, i.e. to exhibit ‘hormone-like’ biological activity. It was found in cress (Lepidium sativum) root exudates and exerts apparently allelopathic effects on neighbouring Amaranthus seedlings. In the present study the effect of cress root exudates on hypocotyl and root length of Amaranthus caudatus and Lactuca sativa was studied. The seedlings of both species grown with Lepidium sativum seedlings had...

  15. Herbivore exclusion drives the evolution of plant competitiveness via increased allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Akane; Kessler, André

    2013-05-01

    The 'Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA)' hypothesis predicts the evolution of plant invasiveness in introduced ranges when plants escape from their natural enemies. So far, the EICA hypothesis has been tested by comparing plant vigor from native and invasive populations, but these studies are confounded by among-population differences in additional environmental factors and/or founder effects. We tested the major prediction of EICA by comparing the competitive ability (CA) of Solidago altissima plants originating from artificial selection plots in which we manipulated directly the exposure to above-ground herbivores. In a common garden experiment, we found an increase in inter-specific, but not intra-specific, CA in clones from herbivore exclusion plots relative to control plots. The evolutionary increase in inter-specific CA coincided with the increased production of polyacetylenes, whose major constituent was allelopathic against a heterospecific competitor, Poa pratensis, but not against conspecifics. Our results provide direct evidence that release from herbivory alone can lead to an evolutionary increase in inter-specific CA, which is likely to be mediated by the increased production of allelopathic compounds in S. altissima. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Leucaena allelopathy on weeds and soybean seed germination / Alelopatia de Leucena sobre soja e plantas invasoras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Leszczynski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advance of agriculture, there was consequent rising in environment degradation. Therefore, It is interesting the use of plants which have in their chemical composition substances capable of helping in the control of weeds to minimize the use of pesticides. Hence, the objective of this paper was to evaluate solutions of leucena extract on weeds that are frequent on soybean crop. The treatments were leucena extracts at 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% at room temperature water and water heated to 80°C. The extracts were obtained by crushing 200g of leucena leaves and mixing them with one liter of distilled water with the help of a blender. Seeds were kept in B.O.D. at a temperature of 25°C, with a photoperiod of 12 hours of light. Evaluations were done on a daily basis, from the first to the last day of the experiment, varying according to the species. Results show a negative interference of the extracts, both hot and cold, in the root length of Ipomoea grandifolia, in the percentage of germination and in the root length of Arrowleaf sida and Hair beggarticks. There was no negative interference in the analyzed parameters for soybean seeds. Thus, the results indicate allelopatic potential of Leucaena leuucocephala as an alternative for the management of weeds without interfering on the development of the soybean crop.Com o desenvolvimento da agricultura surgiram os conseqüentes aumentos na degradação ambiental. Assim, estuda-se a utilização de plantas que possuam em sua composição química substâncias capazes de auxiliar no controle de plantas invasoras, amenizando o uso de agrotóxicos. Desta forma, o objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar soluções de extratos de leucena sobre plantas invasoras que freqüentemente ocorrem na cultura da soja. Foram utilizados como tratamentos os seguintes extratos de leucena nas proporções de: 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100% com água à temperatura ambiente e com água aquecida à 80°C. Os extratos foram obtidos triturando-se 200 g de folhas de leucena em um litro de água destilada, com auxílio de um liquidificador. As sementes foram mantidas em B.O.D. à temperatura de 25°C, com fotoperíodo de 12 horas de luz. As avaliações foram diárias, do primeiro ao último dia de experimento, este variando conforme a espécie. Os resultados demonstraram interferência negativa dos extratos, tanto quente quanto frio, no comprimento de raiz de corda de viola, na porcentagem de germinação e no comprimento de raiz de guanxuma e picão-preto. Não foram constatadas interferências negativas nos parâmetros analisados para as sementes de soja. Sendo assim, os resultados obtidos indicam potencial alelopático da espécie Leucaena leuucocephala como alternativa de manejo de plantas invasoras sem interferir no desenvolvimento da cultura da soja.

  17. Karlodinium veneficum in India: Effect of fixatives on morphology and allelopathy in relation to Skeletonema costatum

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, R.K.; Chitari, R.R.; Anil, A.C.

    of routine monitoring programme involving collection of phytoplankton samples with the intention of raising cultures, we have isolated and cul- tured K. veneficum. This is the first report of this species from waters around the subcontinent of India. K...

  18. Contribution of a phytotoxic compound to the allelopathy of Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Takeshita, Sayaka

    2013-11-01

    Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) has not changed over 121 million years. There may be unknown special strategy for the survival. Gingko litter inhibited the growth of weed species ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.). The inhibition was greater with the litter of the close position than that of the far position from the gingko tree. A phytotoxic substance, 2-hydroxy-6-(10-hydroxypentadec-11-enyl)benzoic acid (HHPEBA) was isolated in the litter. HHPEBA concentration was greater in the litter of the close position than that of the far position from the tree. HHPEBA inhibited the ryegrass growth at concentrations greater than 3 μM. HHPEBA was estimated to be able to cause 47-62% of the observed growth inhibition of ryegrass by the gingko litter. Therefore, HHPEBA may contribute to the inhibitory effect caused by ginkgo litter and may provide a competitive advantage for gingko to survive through the growth inhibition of the neighboring plants.

  19. Autotoxicity and Allelopathy of 3,4-Dihydroxyacetophenone Isolated from Picea schrenkiana Needles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Hui Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioassay-guided fractionation of the diethyl ether fraction of a water extract of Picea schrenkiana needles led to the isolation of the phenolic compound 3,4-dihydroxy- acetophenone (DHAP. The allelopathic effects of DHAP were evaluated under laboratory conditions on P. schrenkiana, rice (Oryza sativa L., wheat (Triticum aestivum L., radish (Raphanus sativus L., lettuce (Latuca sativa L., cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. and mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus L.. DHAP significantly inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of P. schrenkiana at concentrations of 2.5 mM and 0.5 mM (p < 0.05. Soil analysis revealed that P. schrenkiana forest soils contained exceptionally high DHAP concentrations (mean = 0.51 ± 0.03 mg/g dry soil, sufficient to inhibit natural P. schrenkiana recruitment. DHAP also exhibited strong allelopathic potential. It significantly inhibited wheat and lettuce seed germination at concentrations of 1 mM and 0.5 mM (p < 0.05. The active compound also completely inhibited root growth of the six test species at high concentrations. Our results suggest a dual role of DHAP, both as an allelochemical and as an autotoxicant. The potential for a single plant needle-leached compound to influence both inter- and intra-specific interactions emphasized the complex effects that plant secondary metabolites might have on plant population and community structure.

  20. Allelopathy of Sage and White Wormwood on Purslane Germination and Seedling Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza PIRZAD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A bioassay run was carried out in the incubator to evaluate possible allelopathic effects of water extracts of sage and white wormwood on germination and seedling growth of purslane. Results showed that the type of extract and its concentration (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% significantly influenced final germination percentage, germination rate and index, root and shoot length, root/shoot ratio, fresh and dry weight of seedling of purslane. The interaction between these two experimental factors was always significant, producing different results according to the different combination levels. The statistical comparison of means indicated that the maximum germination percentage and germination rate (respectively 68% and 11.4% d-1 were obtained from the untreated control (0% extract, while the lowest values for the same two characters occurred with 15% of sage (respectively 45% and 6.4% d-1 and 20% of white wormwood (38% and 7.5% d-1. Concerning germination indexes, the highest (55 and the lowest (32 values were observed respectively on the control and with 15% of sage extract or 20% of white wormwood extract. The longest (4.5 cm and the shortest (1.3 cm root of purslane were obtained with 5% of white wormwood and 20% of sage extracts, respectively. Changes in shoot length with sage and white wormwood extracts were similar to those in root length, even though shoot length was less affected by the concentration of extracts. Root and shoot length changes brought to maximum (22.0 and minimum (8.9 values for the root/shoot length ratio, respectively with 5% of white wormwood and 20% of sage extracts. The maximum fresh (2.111 g and dry (0.338 g seedling weight of purslane were obtained from untreated control, producing the same seedling weight with 5% of sage, 5 and 10% of white wormwood extract. While the minimum fresh (0.692 g and dry (0.111 g seedling weight were obtained from 15% of white wormwood extract, so that there is no significant differences between this value and the seedling weight produced under 10, 15 and 20% of sage and 20% of white wormwood extract.

  1. Macrophyte-phytoplankton interactions: the relative importance of allelopathy versus other factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; Nes, van E.H.; Donk, van E.

    2007-01-01

    Submerged aquatic macrophytes are important in shallow aquatic ecosystems because they stabilize the macrophyte-dominated state by increasing water transparency in various ways. One of these is the excretion of allelopathic substances inhibitory to phytoplankton, but it is still controversial

  2. Macrophyte-phytoplankton interactions: the relative importance of allelopathy versus other factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; van Nes, E.H.; Van Donk, E.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Submerged aquatic macrophytes are important in shallow aquatic ecosystems because they stabilize the macrophyte-dominated state by increasing water transparency in various ways. One of these is the excretion of allelopathic substances inhibitory to phytoplankton, but it is still

  3. Impact of submerged macrophytes including charophytes on phyto- and zooplankton communities: allelopathy versus other mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Donk, E.; Van de Bund, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes are crucial for the stabilization of the clear water state in shallow, mesotrophic and eutrophic lakes. Especially, charophytes often play an important role because they are typically rapid colonizers and because charophyte meadows are believed to have a particularly strong

  4. Seaweed allelopathy to corals: are active compounds on, or in, seaweeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, G. O.; Hay, M. E.

    2017-03-01

    Numerous seaweeds produce secondary metabolites that are allelopathic to corals. To date, most of the compounds identified in this interaction are lipid-soluble instead of water-soluble. Thus, understanding whether these compounds are stored internally where they would not contact corals, or occur on external surfaces where they could be transferred to corals, is critical to understanding seaweed-coral interactions and to informing realistic experiments on chemically mediated interactions. We conducted field experiments assessing the effects of lipid-soluble extracts from macroalgal surfaces alone versus total lipid-soluble extracts from both internal and external tissues on the coral Pocillopora verrucosa. Extracts of the red algae Amansia rhodantha and Asparagopsis taxiformis, the green alga Chlorodesmis fastigiata, and the brown alga Dictyota bartayresiana suppressed coral photochemical efficiency; in these bioactive species, the total lipid-soluble extracts were not more potent than surface-only extracts despite the concentration of total extracts being many times greater than surface-only extracts. This suggests that previous assays with total extracts may be ecologically meaningful, but also that future assays should be conducted with the simpler, less concentrated, and more ecologically relevant surface extracts. Allelopathic effects of As. taxiformis and C. fastigiata were significantly greater than the effect of D. bartayresiana, with effects of Am. rhodantha intermediate between these groups. Neither surface-only nor total lipid-soluble extracts of the seaweed Turbinaria ornata were allelopathic, and its lack of potency differed significantly from all other species. Our results suggest that lipid-soluble, allelopathic compounds are usually deployed on seaweed surfaces where they can be effective in surface-mediated interactions against other species.

  5. Varietal Response of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Towards the Allelopathy of Different Weeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahamdad, K.; Ijaz, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    In a laboratory trial three chickpea varieties viz, Karak-I, Karak-III and Shenghar were tested against the phytotoxicity of five weed species: Parthenium hysterophorus L., Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin., Datura alba L., Cyperus rotundus L. and Convolvulus arvensis L.in January 2013. The weed extracts were prepared at the rate of 120 g/L (w/v) after shade dry. The results indicated highly significant inhibitory effect of all the tested weed species on the chickpea varieties. The results also showed that the chickpea variety Karak-III was more susceptible to the phototoxicity of the tested weed extracts. Among the extract, C. arvensis proved much toxic in term of inhibition of germination by giving only 43.33% germination in comparison with control where 97.50% germination was recorded. On the other hand, the effect of P. australis extract was found a little stimulator by speeding the seed germination in all varieties and giving a low (2.21) mean germination time (MGT) value. From the current results it can be concluded that the infestation of C. arvensis can pollute the soil by accumulating toxic chemicals that leads to the germination failure and growth suppression in chickpea. Therefore, the prevention and removal of C. arvensis in the chickpea growing areas could be recommended. In addition, P. australis must be tested against chickpea weeds (chickpea varieties withstand against its phototoxicity), so that it can be popularized as bio herbicide in chickpea if it gave promising results in controlling chickpea weeds. (author)

  6. Alelopatia de cultivos de cobertura vegetal sobre plantas infestantes = Allelopathy of cover crop on weed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Kazue Tokura

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho avaliou o potencial alelopático de cultivos de cobertura vegetal de trigo, aveia preta, milheto, nabo forrageiro e colza sobre o desenvolvimento de plantas infestantes e verificou qual das coberturas vegetais exerce maior controle sobre as mesmas. Os cultivos de cobertura vegetal foram implantados sob preparo convencional (uma aração e uma gradagem no Núcleo Experimental de Engenharia Agrícola (NEEA, da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná (Unioeste, Cascavel, Estado do Paraná. Mensalmente, realizou-se o acompanhamento e identificação das plantas infestantes emersas nas áreas de cobertura vegetal no período de agosto de 2000 a agosto de 2001. Os resultados obtidos permitiram concluir que das espécies encontradas, o capim marmelada foi o que apresentou maior potencial alelopático e a erva-de-santa-maria o menor. As coberturasvegetais que apresentaram melhor controle do total de plantas infestantes presentes na área experimental, incluindo àquelas com reconhecido potencial alelopático, foram aveia preta, colza, nabo forrageiro e milheto.This work evaluated the cover crop allelopathic potential of wheat, black oat, pearl millet, turnip and rape on the development of weed plants. It also verified which cover crop has larger control on the weed plants. The cover crop was implanted under conventional tillage (one disk plowing plus one disk harrowing in the Experimental Nucleus of Agricultural Engineering (NEEA, of the State University of the West of Paraná (Unioeste, Cascavel, Paraná State. Monthly (from August 2000 to August 2001, weed plants identification in the cover crop area was made. Results showed that from the found species, the alexander grass was the one that presented larger allelopathic potential, and, the mexican-tea was the one that presented smaller control. The vegetable coverings that presented larger control of the total of weed plants in the experimental area, including those with recognized allelopathic potential, was black oat, rape, turnip and pearl millet.

  7. Allelopathy as an emergent, exploitable public good in the bloom-forming microalga Prymnesium parvum

    OpenAIRE

    Driscoll, William W.; Espinosa, Noelle J.; Eldakar, Omar T.; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2013-01-01

    Many microbes cooperatively secrete extracellular products that favorably modify their environment. Consistent with social evolution theory, structured habitats play a role in maintaining these traits in microbial model systems, by localizing the benefits and separating strains that invest in these products from ‘cheater’ strains that benefit without paying the cost. It is thus surprising that many unicellular, well-mixed microalgal populations invest in extracellular toxins that confer ecolo...

  8. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga—Competition or Allelopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória B-Béres

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrospermopsin (CYN is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control. Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds.

  9. Regulation of Fatty Acid Production and Release in Benthic Algae: Could Parallel Allelopathy Be Explained with Plant Defence Theories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joey L; Ten-Hage, Loïc; Leflaive, Joséphine

    2018-04-01

    Many organisms produce chemical compounds, generally referred as secondary metabolites, to defend against predators and competitors (allelopathic compounds). Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the interaction between environmental factors and secondary metabolites production. However, microalgae commonly use simple metabolites having a role in primary metabolism as allelopathic compounds. The aim of this study was to determine whether classical theories of plant chemical defences could be applied to microalgae producing allelochemicals derived from the primary metabolism. Our study was designed to investigate how growth phase, algal population density, nutrient limitation and carbon assimilation affect the production and release of allelopathic free fatty acids (FFAs) among other FFAs. The model species used was Uronema confervicolum, a benthic filamentous green alga that produces two allelopathic FFAs (linoleic and α-linolenic acids) inhibiting diatom growth. FFAs have been quantified in algal biomass and in culture medium. Our results were analysed according to two classical plant defence theories: the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) and the optimal defence theory (ODT), based on the metabolic capacities for defence production and on the need for defence, respectively. While a higher production of allelopathic compounds under increased light conditions supports the use of GDBH with this microalga, the observation of a negative feedback mechanism mostly supports ODT. Therefore, both theories were insufficient to explain all the observed effects of environmental factors on the production of these allelochemicals. This highlights the needs of new theories and models to better describe chemical interactions of microalgae.

  10. Prymnesium parvum revisited: relationship between allelopathy, ichthyotoxicity, and chemical profiles in 5 strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blossom, Hannah E.; Rasmussen, Silas Anselm; Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted

    2014-01-01

    (Oncorhynchusmykiss, 10 g) and the microalga Teleaulax acuta. No relationship between median effective concentrations(EC50s) on fish and median lethal concentrations (LC50s) on algae was observed in the 5 strains showingthat a microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity. Fish were more sensitive...... to P.parvum with EC50s ranging from 6 × 103to 40 × 103cells ml−1, compared to the test alga where LC50sranged from 30 × 103to nearly non-toxic at 500 × 103cells ml−1. In addition, the cellular concentrationsof two recently suggested ichthyotoxins produced by P. parvum, the “golden algae toxins”, GAT...

  11. Alelopatia de extratos aquosos de canela-sassafrás (Ocotea odorifera (Vell. Rohwer Allelopathy of Brazilian sassafras (Ocotea odorifera (Vell. Rohwer aqueous extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Maria da Silva Carmo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudos de alelopatia investigam os efeitos positivos e negativos que metabólitos secundários de plantas, microrganismos ou fungos exercem sobre o desenvolvimento de indivíduos vizinhos. Nesse trabalho foram investigados os efeitos de extratos aquosos de folhas, cascas de tronco e cascas de raízes de canela-sassafrás (Ocotea odorifera (Vell. Rowher sobre a germinabilidade das sementes, desenvolvimento do sistema radicular e da parte aérea, teor de clorofila da parte aérea e respiração das células radiculares de plântulas de sorgo (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench cv. Embrapa BR 303. Os extratos foram preparados adicionando o material vegetal seco e moído oriundo de cada órgão à água destilada e deionizada na proporção 1:10 (p/v. Após agitação constante por 24 h, as soluções foram decantadas e filtradas através de papel de filtro sob vácuo, constituindo os extratos testados. Os extratos aquosos de cascas de tronco e de raízes causaram inibição do desenvolvimento do sistema radicular das plântulas de sorgo e a sua parte aérea teve o crescimento estimulado pelo extrato de cascas de raízes. Os extratos de folhas e de cascas de tronco induziram aumento da biomassa fresca do sistema radicular e diminuição significativa do teor de clorofila. Todos os extratos causaram efeitos negativos sobre a respiração radicular das plântulas de sorgo. Concluiu-se que metabólitos secundários da canela-sassafrás causaram alterações metabólicas e morfológicas nas plantas de sorgo e que, portanto, a presença de canela-sassafrás no ambiente pode desencadear efeitos similares sobre outras espécies vegetais na sua vizinhança.Allelopathic studies investigate the positive and negative effects of secondary metabolites of plants, microorganisms and fungi on the development of neighboring individuals. In this work, the allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts of leaves, bark and root bark of Brazilian sassafras (Ocotea odorifera (Vell. Rowher on seed germination, root and shoot growth, chlorophyll content and respiratory activity of the root cells of sorghum seedlings (Sorghum bicolor (L Moench cv. Embrapa BR 303 were analyzed. The extracts were prepared by adding dried, powdered plant material to distilled non-ionized water at 1:10 (w/v. After continuous agitation for 24 h, these solutions were decanted and vacuum-filtered through filter paper, thus constituting the tested extracts. Bark and root bark aqueous extracts caused root growth inhibition in sorghum seedlings while shoot growth was stimulated by the root bark extract. Leaf and bark extracts induced an increase in wet root biomass and a decrease in chlorophyll content. All extracts caused negative effects on sorghum seedling root cell respiration. We concluded that secondary metabolites from Brazilian sassafras caused metabolic and morphological alterations in the sorghum seedlings and the presence of these plants in the environment can cause similar effects on other neighboring plant species.

  12. Phyto chemical study and evaluation of allelopathy in Memora peregrina, 'ciganinha', Bignoniaceae, an invading species in pastures in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Rafaela Ferreira; Resende, Ubirazilda Maria; Silva, Walciane da; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues; Butera, Ana Paola; Tulli, Elayne de Oliveira; Saffran, Francis Paes; Siqueira, Joao Maximo de

    2005-01-01

    Memora peregrina (local name: 'ciganinha' - Bignoniaceae) is a weed that often invades pastures in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. From its leaves and subterranean parts, the following compounds were isolated: allantoin (20.7 w/w in subterranean parts), the iridoid 6β-hydroxyipolamiide, hyperin, 3'-O-methylhyperin, 4-hydroxy-N-methylproline, β-sitosterol, α-amirin and β-amirin, and lupeol. Allantoin exhibited an activity of inducing germination in seeds of Lactuca sativa used as a biological model, and the iridoid showed moderate activity in the larval development of Anagasta kuehniella. These results, associated with this plant's behavior, are suggestive of the occurrence of adaptive and competitive strategies in relation to other plant species. (author)

  13. Effects of soil characteristics, allelopathy and frugivory on establishment of the invasive plant Carpobrotus edulis and a cooccuring native, Malcolmia littorea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novoa, A.; González, L.; Moravcová, Lenka; Pyšek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2012) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0563 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biological invasions * phenotypic plsticity * mediterranean islands * species invasiveness * coastal California * aizoaceae * germination Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  14. Alelopatia em extratos de frutos de juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. - Rhamnaceae Allelopathy caused by fruit extract of juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. - Rhamnaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreya Kalyana de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial alelopático do extrato de frutos de juazeiro (Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. sobre as sementes de alface (Lactuca sativa. O experimento foi conduzido em delineamento inteiramente casualizado com 4 repetições e cinco tratamentos (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% e 100% de concentração do extrato bruto. O extrato bruto foi obtido após a extração manual da polpa do fruto e agitação com água em liquidificador utilizando-se 50g de polpa para 500ml de água, e o mesmo foi feito com a casca do fruto. Os resultados mostraram efeito do extrato dependendo da concentração. As maiores concentrações do extrato (100%, 75% e 50% da polpa dos frutos Z. joazeiro apresentaram efeito alelopático desfavorável sobre a germinação de alface, reduzindo-a em 100%, 98,75% e 82,5% respectivamente. O extrato das cascas dos frutos nas concentrações de 75% e 100% reduziu a germinação da alface em 28,75% e 78,75%.This study aimed to identify the allelopathic activity of extracts obtained from Ziziphus joazeiro fruits on the germination of Lactuca sativa L. A randomized design was used with four replications and five treatments (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% concentration of the crude extract. The crude extract was obtained after manual extration of the fruit pulp and agitation with water in a blender using 50g of pulp in 500ml of water. The same was done with the fruit rind. The results showed the effect of the extract depending on concentration. The greatest extract concentrations (100%, 75% and 50% of Z. joazeiro fruit pulp had an unfavorable allelopathic effect on lettuce germination, having reduced it by 100%, 98.75% and 82.5% respectively. The extract of the fruits rinds in concentrations of 75% and 100% reduced lettuce germination by 28.75% and 78.75%.

  15. A less saline Baltic Sea promotes cyanobacterial growth, hampers intracellular microcystin production, and leads to strain-specific differences in allelopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Brutemark

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the main factors that explain the distribution of species in the Baltic Sea. Increased precipitation and consequent increase in freshwater inflow is predicted to decrease salinity in some areas of the Baltic Sea. Clearly such changes may have profound effects on the organisms living there. Here we investigate the response of the commonly occurring cyanobacterium Dolichospermum spp. to three salinities, 0, 3 and 6. For the three strains tested we recorded growth, intracellular toxicity (microcystin and allelopathic properties. We show that Dolichospermum can grow in all the three salinities tested with highest growth rates in the lowest salinity. All strains showed allelopathic potential and it differed significantly between strains and salinities, but was highest in the intermediate salinity and lowest in freshwater. Intracellular toxin concentration was highest in salinity 6. In addition, based on monitoring data from the northern Baltic Proper and the Gulf of Finland, we show that salinity has decreased, while Dolichospermum spp. biomass has increased between 1979 and 2013. Thus, based on our experimental findings it is evident that salinity plays a large role in Dolichospermum growth, allelopathic properties and toxicity. In combination with our long-term data analyses, we conclude that decreasing salinity is likely to result in a more favourable environment for Dolichospermum spp. in some areas of the Baltic Sea.

  16. Allelopathy in agroforestry systems: the effects of leaf extracts ofCupressus lusitanica and threeEucalyptus spp. on four Ethiopian crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisanework N.; Michelsen, Anders

    1993-01-01

    The potential allelopathic effect ofCupressus lusitanica, Eucalyptus globulus, E. camaldulensis andE. saligna on seed germination, radicle and seedling growth was investigated with four crops:Cicer arietinum (chickpea),Zea mays (maize),Pisum sativum (pea) andEragrostis tef (teff). Aqueous leaf...... extracts of all the tree species significantly reduced both germination and radicle growth of the majority of the crops mostly starting from concentrations of 1% or 2.5%. The shoot and root dry weight increase of the crops was significantly reduced after 10 weeks treatment with leaf extracts. Among...... the four crops, chickpea and teff were most susceptible with respect to germination, and teff with respect to growth. From the overall data the leaf extracts of the four tree species can be arranged according to increasing allelopathic potential:C. lusitanica, E. globulus, E. saligna andE. camaldulensis...

  17. Potencial alelopático de duas neolignanas isoladas de folhas de Virola surinamensis (Myristicaceae Allelopathy potential of two neolignans isolated from Virola surinamensis (Myristicaceae leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Borges

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivos isolar, identificar e caracterizar a atividade alelopática de substâncias químicas presentes nas folhas de Virola surinamensis. O processo de isolamento e identificação das substâncias químicas envolveu o uso de solventes orgânicos e de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear (RMN ¹H, RMN 13C e RMN 13C-DEPT, espectro de COSY e de HETCOR. A avaliação da atividade alelopática foi realizada em bioensaios de germinação de sementes, em condições de 25 ºC de temperatura constante e fotoperíodo de 12 horas, e de desenvolvimento da radícula e do hipocótilo, com 25 ºC de temperatura constante e fotoperíodo de 24 horas, empregando-se concentrações variando de 1,0 a 8,0 mg L-1. Como plantas receptoras, foram utilizadas as espécies daninhas Mimosa pudica, Senna obtusifolia e Senna occidentalis. Foram isoladas e identificadas duas neolignanas: a surinamensina e a virolina. A tendência geral observada nos resultados foi de aumento da intensidade dos efeitos alelopáticos inibitórios em função do aumento da concentração, com inibições máximas obtidas, sempre, na concentração de 8,0 mg L-1. A surinamensina apresentou maior potencial para inibir a germinação e o desenvolvimento da radícula e do hipocótilo do que a virolina, independentemente da espécie receptora e do fator da planta analisado. Considerando-se as intensidades dos efeitos promovidos sobre os três fatores das plantas, o desenvolvimento da radícula e o do hipocótilo foram mais intensamente inibidos pelas duas substâncias do que a germinação das sementes. À exceção dos efeitos verificados sobre o desenvolvimento do hipocótilo, malícia foi a espécie de maior sensibilidade aos efeitos alelopáticos das duas neolignanas, enquanto mata-pasto foi aquela que evidenciou inibições de menor magnitude.The objective of this research was to isolate, identify and characterize the allelopathic activity of chemical compounds in Virola surinamensis leaves. The process of isolation and identification of chemicals compounds involved the use of organic solvents and Magnetic Nuclear Resonance (MNR ¹H, MNR 13C and MNR 13C-DPT, HETCOR and COSY specter. Allelopathic activity was evaluated by bioassays, under constant temperature of 25 ºC and 12-h photoperiod for seed germination and 25 ºC of constant temperature and 24-hour photoperiod for radicle and hypocotyl elongation, at concentrations ranging from 1.0 mg L-1 to 8.0 mg L-1. The receiving plants used were the weeds Mimosa pudica, Senna obtusifolia and Senna occidentalis. Two neolignans were isolated and identified: surinamensin and virolin. The general trend observed was a positive relation between allelopathic effects and the concentration of the compounds, with maximum inhibition obtained at the concentration of 8.0 mg L-1. Surinamensin presented greater potential to inhibit seed germination and radicle/hypocotyl elongation than virolin, regardless of the receiving species or plant parameter. Radicle and hypocotyl elongation were more intensely inhibited than seed germination by the two compounds. Except for the effects promoted on hypocotyl elongation, the species M. pudica was the most sensitive to the allelopathic effects caused by the two neolignans.

  18. Hypothesis: Sparse floor vegetation is on account of Inter-plant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Plant Interactions: Plant Interactions: Allelospoly: Interacting plants Compete for Resources. Allelopathy: Plant releases chemicals for keeping away competitors.

  19. Estudo fitoquímico de folhas de Solanum lycocarpum A. St.-Hil (Solanaceae e sua aplicação na alelopatia Phytochemistry of Solanum lycocarpum A.St.-Hil (Solanaceae leaves and their application in allelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Christina Caldas Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Solanum lycocarpum A.St.-Hil (Solanaceae é um arbusto típico da região central do Brasil (Cerrado. A atividade alelopática do extrato aquoso de folhas e frutos dessa espécie já foi verificada em estudos anteriores. O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar a atividade alelopática de diferentes extratos de S. lycocarpum na germinação e crescimento de quatro espécies-alvo. As folhas foram coletadas, secas e trituradas e submetidas a dois métodos distintos de extração: 1- líquido-líquido (acetato de etila e diclorometano do extrato aquoso das folhas e 2- com solventes em polaridade crescente (hexano, diclorometano, acetato de etila, acetona, metanol e água diretamente das folhas. Cada extração foi realizada com equipamento de ultrassom durante uma hora, filtrado e evaporado. Desses extratos, soluções de 800, 400 e 200 ppm foram preparadas, e água e Logran® foram usados como controle positivo e negativo, respectivamente. Cada solução, bem como os controles, foi dissolvida em DMSO para os bioensaios. As espécies alvo usadas foram: alface, agrião, tomate e cebola. Cada placa era composta de 20 sementes e foi adicionado 1 mL de solução teste com 4 repetições. As placas foram incubadas a 25 ºC no escuro. Posteriormente, as plântulas tiveram suas partes aéreas e raízes medidas e a porcentagem de germinação e inibição calculada para cada extrato. Tomate foi a espécie que mostrou maior sensibilidade para todos os extratos, seguido de agrião, cebola e alface. Os extratos que tiveram maior atividade foram o acetato de etila, acetona e as extrações líquido-líquido, indicando as frações que devem conter os princípios ativos da folha dessa espécie.Solanum lycocarpum A.St.-Hil (Solanaceae is a typical shrub in the Cerrado of central Brazil. The allelopathic activity of aqueous extracts of the leaves and fruits of this species has already been proven in previous studies. The goal of this work was to verify the allelopathic activity of different leaf extracts of S. lycocarpum on the germination and growth of four target species. The leaves were collected, dried, triturated and submitted to two distinct methods of extraction: 1- liquid-liquid (ethyl acetate and dichloromethane from the aqueous extract and 2- with solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, acetone, methanol and water directly from the leaves. Each extraction was made with ultrasound equipment for one hour, filtered and evaporated. From these extracts, solutions of 800, 400 and 200 ppm were prepared, and water and Logran® were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Each solution, as well as the controls, was dissolved in DMSO for the bioassays. The target species used were lettuce, watercress, tomato and onion. To each plate, 20 seeds were added and 1 mL of the tested solutions (with 4 repetitions. The plates were incubated at 25 ºC without light, and the shoots and roots of the seedlings were then measured and the percentage of germination and the inhibition of each extract were calculated. Tomato was the most sensitive to the extracts, followed by watercress, onion and lettuce. The extracts with stronger activity were AcOEt, acetone and the liquid-liquid extraction, indicating the fractions that may contain the active principles of the leaves in this species.

  20. Alelopatia de extratos de diferentes órgãos de mulungu na germinação de alface Allelopathy of extracts of different organs of coral tree on the germination of lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreya K Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O mulungu (Erythrina velutina é uma árvore de crescimento rápido, com propriedades medicinais. O objetivo no presente trabalho foi avaliar o efeito alelopático do extrato aquoso de sementes, flores e cascas de mulungu na germinação e desenvolvimento de plântulas de alface cv. Mônica SF FI. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado com sete tratamentos [extrato de sementes a 100°C, extrato de sementes a 25°C, extrato de cascas a 100°C, extrato de cascas a 25°C, extrato de flores a 100°C, extrato de flores a 25°C e água destilada (testemunha] com quatro repetições. Os extratos obtidos de sementes, independente da temperatura de extração reduziram a porcentagem e velocidade de germinação de sementes de alface e afetaram o desenvolvimento das plântulas. Os demais extratos não afetaram a germinação, mas causaram o aparecimento de plântulas anormais e mortas. Os extratos aquosos de sementes de mulungu têm potencial alelopático sobre as sementes de alface cv. Mônica SF FI.The coral tree (Erythrina velutina is a fast growing tree with medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the allelopathic effects of aqueous extract of seeds, flowers and bark of coral tree on seed germination and seedling development of lettuce cv. Mônica SF FI. The experimental design was completely randomized with seven treatments [seed extract at 100°C, seed extract at 25°C, bark extract at 100°C, bark extract at 25°C, flower extract at 100°C, flower extract at 25°C and distilled water (control] with four replications. The extracts of seeds, independent of the extraction temperature decreased the percentage and speed of germination of lettuce and affected the development of the seedlings. The other extracts did not affect germination, but caused the appearance of abnormal seedlings and dead. The aqueous extract of seeds of coral tree has allelopathic potential in the seeds of lettuce cv. Mônica SF FI.

  1. Alelopatia de Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. sobre a germinação e desenvolvimento de espécies cultivadas = Allelopathy of Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. on the germination and development of cultivated species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasielle Soares Gusman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabótitos secundários produzidos em algumas plantas podem provocaralterações no desenvolvimento de outras plantas ou até mesmo de outros organismos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar possíveis efeitos alelopáticos de extratos aquosos de folhas de Baccharis dracunculifolia na germinação e no crescimento de plântulas de Brassica campestris, B. oleracea cv. Capitata, Citrullus lanatus, Eruca sativa, Lactuca sativa cv. Branca Boston, L. sativa cv. Grand Rapids, L. sativa cv. Simpson, Lycopersicum esculentum, Raphanussativus e Zea mays L. Para a obtenção do extrato aquoso, foram utilizadas folhas previamente secas na concentração de 1 g 10 mL-1 (p/v e utilizadas sete concentrações deste extrato aquoso (100, 90, 70, 50, 30, 10 e 0%, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com cinco repetições de dez sementes das espécies cultivadas. Os extratos aquosos de B. dracunculifolia evidenciaram potencialidades alelopáticas sobre a germinação das sementes e no crescimento da parte aérea e do sistema radicular de todas espécies testadas, sendo que a redução na germinação e no crescimento inicial elevaram-se com o aumento das concentrações dos extratos aquosos utilizados. Os resultados indicam a existência de potencial alelopático de B. dracunculifolia.Secondary metabolites produced in some plant species can cause developmental changes in other plants or even in other organisms. Theobjective of this work was to identify the possible allelopathic effects of the aqueous extracts of Baccharis dracunculifolia leaves in the germination and growth of seedlings of Brassica campestris, B. oleracea cv. Capitata, Citrullus lanatus, Eruca sativa, Lactuca sativa cv. Branca Boston, L. sativa cv. Grand Rapids, L. sativa cv. Simpson, Lycopersicum esculentum, Raphanus sativus and Zea mays. The aqueous extracts were made out of dried leaves at 1g 10mL-1 (p/vconcentration and by using seven of those aqueous extract concentrations (100, 90, 70, 50, 30, 10 and 0%, arranged into a completely randomized design, with five repetitions of ten seeds of each cultivated species. The aqueous extracts of B. dracunculifolia revealed allelopathic potential in the germination of seeds and in the growth of the aerial part of the root system in all tested species, while the reduction in germination and initial growthintensified with the increase in the concentrations of the aqueous extracts used. The results indicate the existence of allelopathic potential in B. dracunculifolia.

  2. Mechanism and active variety of allelochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S.-L.; Wen, J.; Guo, Q.-F.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes allelochemicals' active variety, its potential causes and function mechanisms. Allelochemicals' activity varies with temperature, photoperiod, water and soils during natural processes, with its initial concentration, compound structure and mixed degree during functional processes, with plant accessions, tissues and maturity within-species, and with research techniques and operation processes. The prospective developmental aspects of allelopathy studies in the future are discussed. Future research should focus on: (1) to identify and purify allelochemicals more effectively, especially for agriculture, (2) the functions of allelopathy at the molecular structure level, (3) using allelopathy to explain plant species interactions, (4) allelopathy as a driving force of succession, and (5) the significance of allelopathy in the evolutionary processes.

  3. Role factor defining variability allelopaticheskoy activities of the vegetable celery cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buharov Aleksandr Fedorovič

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of water extracts from seeds four types of the celery cultures on germination seeds from five testers has been studied. It was shown that allelopathy activities depends on interaction of principal components and extract concentrations.

  4. Growth inhibition and colony formation in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa induced by the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mello, M.M.; Soares, M.C.S.; Roland, F.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.

    2012-01-01

    In a tropical reservoir, the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii are the dominant species, with changes in dominance throughout the year. Since allelopathy has been suggested as a factor that could promote or stabilize harmful algal blooms, we investigated

  5. Phytotoxic characterization of various fractions of Launaea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-15

    Nisa, Khan I, Ahmad B. (2010). Cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity of some selected medicinal plants of the family Polygonaceae. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 9(5): 770-774. Inderjit DSO (2003). Ecophysiological aspects of allelopathy. Planta,.

  6. Responses of plants to air pollution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mudd, J. Brian; Kozlowski, T. T

    1975-01-01

    .... KOZLOWSKI Pollution, 1975 ELROY L. RICE. Allelopathy, (Eds.). Fire and Ecosystems, 1974 (Eds.). Responses of Plants to Air Responses of Plants to Air PollutionRESPONSES OF PLANTS TO AIR POLLUTION E...

  7. Root Exudation in Common Ragweed (Ambrosia Artemisiifolia L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Figala, J.; Hohnová, Barbora; Moravcová, Dana; Lvončík, S.; Lojková, L.; Formánek, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2016), s. 1034-1037 ISSN 2278-1862 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : ambrosia artemisiifolia * root exudates * amino acids * aliphatic organic acids * allelopathy Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  8. Potenciação alelopática de extratos vegetais na germinação e no crescimento inicial de picão-preto e alface Allelopathy of plant extracts on germination and initial growth of beggartick (Bidens pilosa L. and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Cristiani Ferreira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O picão-preto (Bidens pilosa L. é uma planta daninha muito agressiva, que está presente em quase todo Brasil. O principal método de controle é o químico, porém apresenta elevado impacto ambiental, risco de intoxicação humana e possibilidade de causar fitotoxicidade as culturas. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito alelopático de extratos etanólicos de Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. e Pinus elliottii L. na germinação e no crescimento inicial de picão-preto e alface (Lactuca sativa L.. Foram testadas quatro concentrações de cada extrato (0,25; 0,50; 1,0 e 2,0 % além do controle (0,0 % água destilada com Tween 20 a 0,08 %. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições em condições de laboratório. O extrato de P. elliottii não causou efeito alelopático sobre o picão-preto e o alface. O extrato de E. citriodora reduziu significativamente o índice de velocidade de germinação (IVG do picão-preto em todas as concentrações testadas quando comparadas com o controle (0,0%, porém para a alface o IVG foi significativo apenas na concentração de 2,0 %. Para o comprimento da raiz não foi possível observar diferença significativa entre os tratamentos para os dois extratos testados tanto para o alface como para o picão preto.Bidens pilosa L. is an aggressive weed found all over Brazil. The main control method for this species is chemical treatment however, causes strong environmental impact, and it has great human contamination risks, and may cause phytotoxity to crops. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanolic extracts of Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. and Pinus elliottii L. on seed germination and initial growth of B. pilosa and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.. Five concentrations of each extract (0.0; 0.25; 0.50; 1.0; 2.0% were tested in laboratory conditions using a randomized complete block design with four replicates. P. elliottii extract had no effect on B. pilosa and lettuce. However, E. citriodora extract, significantly reduced germination index (GI of B. pilosa, in all tested concentrations, when compared with the control composed by distilled water. Lettuce GI was affected only by 2,0% concentration of ethanolic extract. Extracts of both P. elliottii and E. citriodora had no significant effect on the root length parameter of both B. pilosa and lettuce.

  9. Variação sazonal na alelopatia de extratos aquosos de Coleus barbatus (A. Benth. sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento de Lactuca sativa L. Seasonal variation in the allelopathy of aqueous extracts from Coleus barbatus (A. Benth. on the germination and development of Lactuca sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Pelegrini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito alelopático de extratos de Coleus barbatus sobre a germinação e desenvolvimento de plântulas de alface. Os experimentos foram conduzidos em laboratório, em diferentes concentrações de extratos obtidos de folhas de falso-boldo (0; 7,5; 15; 22,5; 30%, coletadas nas quatro estações do ano, obtidos por trituração, maceração, infusão e decocção. As sementes de alface foram distribuídas sobre placas de petri umidecidas com 10 mL de solução. Os resultados mostraram que os extratos de folhas afetaram a germinabilidade de sementes de alface apenas na concentração de 30% do extrato preparado por decocção de folhas coletadas no inverno. O índice de velocidade de germinação apresentou redução significativa nos extratos triturados preparados no outono e inverno; na maceração de folhas coletadas no verão e outono e no extrato de decocção preparado no inverno. Os extratos estimularam o crescimento da parte aérea das plântulas de alface, ao passo que, o comprimento das raízes foi afetado pelos extratos, ora inibindo, ora estimulando o crescimento das mesmas. Os extratos de folhas de falso-boldo coletadas nas quatro estações do ano apresentaram efeito alelopático sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento da alface, sendo que estes variaram em função da sazonalidade da coleta, da forma de obtenção dos extratos e das concentrações testadas.The aim of this study was to evaluate the allelopathic effects of extracts from Coleus barbatus on germination and seedling growth of lettuce. The experiments were conducted in the laboratory using different concentrations (0, 7.5, 15, 22.5, 30% of aqueous extracts from "falso-boldo" leaves harvested in all four seasons; extracts were obtained by grinding, maceration, infusion and decoction. Seeds were distributed on Petri dishes moistened with 10 mL solution. Results showed that the leaf extracts affected the germination of lettuce seeds only at the concentration of 30% extract prepared by decoction of leaves harvested in the winter. Germination speed index showed significant reduction for ground extracts prepared in the fall and winter, as well as for macerated leaves harvested in the summer and fall and for extracts prepared through decoction in the winter. The extracts stimulated the growth of shoots of lettuce seedlings, whereas root length was affected by the extracts, which either stimulated or inhibited its growth. Extracts of "falso-boldo" leaves harvested in all four seasons had allelopathic effect on germination and development of lettuce, and the latter varied depending on the harvest season, the form of preparing the extracts and the tested concentrations.

  10. Estudo fitoquímico e avaliação alelopática de Memora peregrina - "ciganinha" - Bignoniaceae, uma espécie invasora de pastagens em Mato Grosso do Sul Phytochemical study and evaluation of allelopathy in Memora peregrina, 'ciganinha', Bignoniaceae, an invading species in pastures in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Ferreira Grassi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Memora peregrina (local name: 'ciganinha' - Bignoniaceae is a weed that often invades pastures in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. From its leaves and subterranean parts, the following compounds were isolated: allantoin (20.7 w/w in subterranean parts, the iridoid 6beta-hydroxyipolamiide, hyperin, 3'-O-methylhyperin, 4-hydroxy-N-methylproline, beta-sitosterol, alpha-amirin and beta-amirin, and lupeol. Allantoin exhibited an activity of inducing germination in seeds of Lactuca sativa used as a biological model, and the iridoid showed moderate activity in the larval development of Anagasta kuehniella. These results, associated with this plant's behavior, are suggestive of the occurrence of adaptive and competitive strategies in relation to other plant species.

  11. Alelopatia de Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. sobre a germinação e desenvolvimento de espécies cultivadas - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i2.3592 Allelopathy of Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. on the germination and development of cultivated species - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.3592

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Horácio Couto Bittencourt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabótitos secundários produzidos em algumas plantas podem provocar alterações no desenvolvimento de outras plantas ou até mesmo de outros organismos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar possíveis efeitos alelopáticos de extratos aquosos de folhas de Baccharis dracunculifolia na germinação e no crescimento de plântulas de Brassica campestris, B. oleracea cv. Capitata, Citrullus lanatus, Eruca sativa, Lactuca sativa cv. Branca Boston, L. sativa cv. Grand Rapids, L. sativa cv. Simpson, Lycopersicum esculentum, Raphanus sativus e Zea mays L. Para a obtenção do extrato aquoso, foram utilizadas folhas previamente secas na concentração de 1 g 10 mL-1 (p/v e utilizadas sete concentrações deste extrato aquoso (100, 90, 70, 50, 30, 10 e 0%, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com cinco repetições de dez sementes das espécies cultivadas. Os extratos aquosos de B. dracunculifolia evidenciaram potencialidades alelopáticas sobre a germinação das sementes e no crescimento da parte aérea e do sistema radicular de todas espécies testadas, sendo que a redução na germinação e no crescimento inicial elevaram-se com o aumento das concentrações dos extratos aquosos utilizados. Os resultados indicam a existência de potencial alelopático de B. dracunculifolia.Secondary metabolites produced in some plant species can provoke development changes in other plants or even in other organisms. The objective of this work was to identify the possible allelopathic effects of the aqueous extracts of Baccharis dracunculifolia leaves in the germination and growth of Brassica campestris, B. oleracea cv. Capitata, Citrullus lanatus, Eruca sativa, Lactuca sativa cv. Branca Boston, L. sativa cv. Grand Rapids, L. sativa cv. Simpson, Lycopersicum esculentum, Raphanus sativus and Zea mays seedlings. The aqueous extracts were made out of dried leaves at a 1g 10 mL-1 (p/v concentration and by using seven of those aqueous extract concentrations (100, 90, 70, 50, 30, 10 and 0%, arranged into a completely randomized design, with five repetitions of ten seeds of each cultivated species. The aqueous extracts of B. dracunculifolia revealed allelopathic potentialities on the germination of the seeds and in the growth of the aerial part of the root system in all tested species and the reduction in the germination and in the initial growth increased with the increase of the concentrations of the used aqueous extracts. The results indicate the existence of allelopathic potential in B. dracunculifolia.

  12. Phyto chemical study and evaluation of allelopathy in Memora peregrina, 'ciganinha', Bignoniaceae, an invading species in pastures in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil; Estudo fitoquimico e avaliacao alelopatica de Memora peregrina - 'ciganinha' - Bignoniaceae, uma especie invasora de pastagens em Mato Grosso do Sul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Rafaela Ferreira [Mato Grosso do Sul Univ., Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Resende, Ubirazilda Maria [Mato Grosso do Sul Univ., Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia; Silva, Walciane da; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues [Mato Grosso do Sul Univ., Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Butera, Ana Paola; Tulli, Elayne de Oliveira; Saffran, Francis Paes; Siqueira, Joao Maximo de [Mato Grosso do Sul Univ., Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia-Bioquamica]. E-mail: jmaximo@nin.ufms.br

    2005-04-01

    Memora peregrina (local name: 'ciganinha' - Bignoniaceae) is a weed that often invades pastures in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. From its leaves and subterranean parts, the following compounds were isolated: allantoin (20.7 w/w in subterranean parts), the iridoid 6{beta}-hydroxyipolamiide, hyperin, 3'-O-methylhyperin, 4-hydroxy-N-methylproline, {beta}-sitosterol, {alpha}-amirin and {beta}-amirin, and lupeol. Allantoin exhibited an activity of inducing germination in seeds of Lactuca sativa used as a biological model, and the iridoid showed moderate activity in the larval development of Anagasta kuehniella. These results, associated with this plant's behavior, are suggestive of the occurrence of adaptive and competitive strategies in relation to other plant species. (author)

  13. [Effects of Chinese onion' s root exudates on cucumber seedlings growth and rhizosphere soil microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Shou-wei; Pan, Kai; Wu, Feng-zhi

    2013-04-01

    Taking the Chinese onion cultivars with different allelopathy potentials as the donor and cucumber as the accepter, this paper studied the effects of Chinese onion' s root exudates on the seedlings growth of cucumber and the culturable microbial number and bacterial community structure in the seedlings rhizosphere soil. The root exudates of the Chinese onion cultivars could promote the growth of cucumber seedlings, and the stimulatory effect increased with the increasing concentration of the root exudates. However, at the same concentrations of root exudates, the stimulatory effect had no significant differences between the Chinese onion cultivars with strong and weak allelopathy potential. The root exudates of the Chinese onion cultivars increased the individual numbers of bacteria and actinomyces but decreased those of fungi and Fusarium in rhizosphere soil, being more significant for the Chinese onion cultivar with high allelopathy potential (L-06). The root exudates of the Chinese onion cultivars also increased the bacterial community diversity in rhizosphere soil. The cloning and sequencing results indicated that the differential bacteria bands were affiliated with Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Anaerolineaceae, and Anaerolineaceae only occurred in the rhizosphere soil in the treatment of high allelopathy potential Chinese onion (L-06). It was suggested that high concentration (10 mL per plant) of root exudates from high allelopathy potential Chinese onion (L-06) could benefit the increase of bacterial community diversity in cucumber seedlings rhizosphere soil.

  14. Relationship Between Allelopathic Effects and Functional Traits of Different Allelopathic Potential Rice Accessions at Different Growth Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Gaofeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, effects of temperature, light and their interactions on allelopathic effects and the functional traits specific leaf area (SLA and stem mass fraction (SMF of different allelopathic potential rice accessions at different growth stages were analyzed. The main results were as follows: Allelopathic responses to temperature and light varied with different allelopathic potential rice accessions at different growth stages. With the rise of temperature and the extension of photoperiod, allelopathic effect increased firstly and then decreased at 2–3 leaf stage, but increased constantly at the 4–5 and 7–8 leaf stages in strong allelopathic rice accessions [O. longistaminata, F1 (O. longistaminata × RD23, F2 (RL159 and RL169]. Temperature had significant impact on allelopathic effect without considering light factors, but light showed little effect on rice allelopathy at the same temperature conditions. The greatest allelopathic effect was attained with moderate temperature and long photoperiod at 2–3 leaf stage in strong allelopathic rice accessions, but all the rice accessions showed weak allelopathic effects at the low temperature condition (15 °C/10 °C, and the influence of different factors on allelopathy followed a general trend as temperature > leaf stage > light, indicating that among the multiple factors impacting rice allelopathy, temperature was the main factor. Allelopathic characteristics of F1 and F2 to various temperature and light were similar to O. longistaminata, showing that allelopathic genes from wild rice can be expressed in its descendants. Temperature and light also had significant effects on SLA and SMF, and rice allelopathy was closely correlative to SLA in strong allelopathic rice accessions at the 4–5 and 7–8 leaf stages, but there was no correlation between rice allelopathy and SMF at different growth stages. These results suggested that rice adjust the relationship between allelopathy and SLA

  15. Impact of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) leaf, bark, and core extracts on germination of five plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical interaction between plants, which is referred to as allelopathy, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. The objective of this research was to determine the impact of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) plant extracts on the germination and post-germination development ...

  16. Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) impact on post-germination seedling growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical interaction between plants, which is referred to as allelopathy, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. The objective of this research was to determine the impact of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) plant extracts on the post-germination growth of five plant species...

  17. Allelopathic Effect of Meskit (Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC) Aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Allelopathy ecology in natural and agricultural ecosystems has received increasing attention because of the significant reduction of important plants growth and yield reduction of crops. It is an ecological interaction primarily based on the ability of certain plant species to produce secondary chemical compounds, that.

  18. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Maharashtra state of India. In order to manage this obnoxious weed in an ecologically safe and effective manner, therefore, we are searching for plants with an antagonistic potential via the mechanism of allelopathy. Here we evaluate the allelopathic potential of shoot leachates of selected plant species in order to assess ...

  19. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    especially soil texture, CaCO3 and organic carbon, contributed significantly to explaining the distribution of some weed species, but not with that of B. nigra. The allelopathic potential of Brassica nigra reported in previous studies did not seem to play a role in community composition. Keywords: allelopathy, Brassica nigra, ...

  20. Evaluation of allelopathic potential of some selected medicinal species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth of wheat was more enhanced in the aqueous extractions of Gallium aperine and Ageratum conizoides, almost 150% of radicle. But the most inhibitory and retarded effect was observed in case of S. irio, O. corniculata, Rumex dentatus and Parthenium hysterophorus. Key words: Allelopathy, medicinal species, ...

  1. The allelopathic effects of crude water extracts of Annona muricata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annona muricata (sour sop) belongs to the family Annonaceae. This plant inhibits the growth of other plants growing around it, a phenomenon called “allelopathic effect”. Allelopathy is the production of specific biomolecules by plant species mostly secondary metabolites that can induce suffering or give benefit to other plant ...

  2. Allelopathic effect of Salix caprea litter on late successional plants at different substrates of post-mining sites: pot experiment studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Frouz, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2012), s. 311-318 ISSN 1916-2790 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP505/11/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Salix caprea * allelopathy * litter Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.225, year: 2012

  3. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment VI. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm: the natural system interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-05-01

    A review of pertinent literature covered the following: eucalypt background, the candidate species, biomass plantation considerations, effects of site production, leachate and allelopathy, and some exotic flora considerations. The comparative eucalypt field survey covers mined land stands, unmined south Florida stands, and Glade County eucalypt stands. The problem of eucalypt naturalization is discussed.

  4. Activity of some Nile River aquatic macrophyte extracts against the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activity of some Nile River aquatic macrophyte extracts against the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. ... active substances of different concentrations, with P. tomentosum having the highest polyphenols, 1.95% of dry weight. Keywords: algal bloom control, allelopathy, phenolic compounds, toxic cyanobacteria ...

  5. EPCOT, NASA and plant pathogens in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R

    1996-01-01

    Cooperative work between NASA and Walt Disney World's EPCOT Land Pavilion is described. Joint efforts include research about allelopathy in multi-species plant cropping in CELSS, LEDs as light sources in hydroponic systems, and the growth of plant pathogens in space.

  6. Potential phytotoxic and shading effects of invasive Fallopia (Polygonaceae) taxa on the germination of dominant native species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, Lenka; Pyšek, Petr; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Zákravský, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2011), s. 31-48 ISSN 1619-0033 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA AV ČR IAA6005805 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : allelopathy * canopy shading * leaf and rhizom extracts Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  7. Allelopathic activity of extracts from Impatiens species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrchotová, Naděžda; Šerá, Božena; Krejčová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2011), s. 57-60 ISSN 1214-1178 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH72117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Impatiens * allelopathy * inhibitory effect Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.078, year: 2011

  8. Biological control of phytoplankton by the subtropical submerged macrophytes Egeria densa and Potamogeton illinoensis: a mesocosm study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderstukken, M.; Mazzeo, N.; Colen, W.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Muylaert, K.

    2011-01-01

    1. In temperate regions, submerged macrophytes can hamper phytoplankton blooms. Such an effect could arise directly, for instance via allelopathy, or indirectly, via competition for nutrients or the positive interaction between submerged macrophytes and zooplankton grazing. However, there is some

  9. Author Details - African Journals Online

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shao, Hongbo. Vol 9, No 33 (2010) - Articles Allelopathy regulates wheat genotypes performance at the enhancement stage by soil water and prohydrojasmon (PDJ) Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1684-5315. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  10. Allelopathic effect of aqueous extract of fresh leaf castor beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allelopathy defines the production of specific biomolecules (allelochemical) by a plant that can induce positive or negative impacts on another culture. The crop of castor beans (Ricinus communis L.) is being economically valued and receiving attention, mainly by the biodiesel production, castor oil and animal feeding.

  11. Allelopathic effect of aqueous extract of fresh leaf castor beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rukevwe S. Abraka

    2016-12-07

    Dec 7, 2016 ... Allelopathy defines the production of specific biomolecules (allelochemical) by a plant that can induce positive or negative impacts on another culture. The crop of castor beans (Ricinus communis L.) is being economically valued and receiving attention, mainly by the biodiesel production, castor oil and.

  12. Abstract/ introduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-12-29

    Dec 29, 2011 ... Although allelopathy has been extensively studied in terrestrial ecosystems, it has not been investigated as thoroughly in aquatic ecosystems. In aquatic environment, many authors have observed a decrease in the abundance and diversity of macrophyte species in the presence of cyanobacterial blooms in.

  13. Chemical warfare in freshwater. Allelpathic effects of macrophytes on phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field

  14. Searching for allelopathic effects of submerged macrophytes on phytoplankton-state of the art and open questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, E.M.; Hilt (nee Körner), S.; Lombardo, P.; Mulderij, G.

    2007-01-01

    Allelopathy, here defined as biochemical interactions between aquatic primary producers, has always been intriguing as a process explaining the dominance of certain plant or algal species over others. Negative chemical interference has been invoked as one of the steering mechanisms behind mutual

  15. Chemical warfare in freshwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, Gabi

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field

  16. Prymnesium parvum exotoxins affect the grazing and viability of the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sopanen, S.; Koski, Marja; Uronen, P.

    2008-01-01

    The calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis from the northern Baltic Sea was exposed to cell-free filtrates of the toxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum as well as to cell mixtures of P. parvum and Rhodomonas salina. To test the effects of P. parvum exudates and allelopathy on selective grazers, copepods...

  17. Allelopathic appraisal effects of straw extract wheat varieties on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allelopathy is a process in which secondary metabolites produced by plants, micro-organisms, viruses and fungi control growth and development of other biological systems. Some plants may beneficially or antagonistically affect other plants through allelochemical compounds which may be released directly or indirectly ...

  18. Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: organic farming, ecologically-based weed management, cover crops, green manure, allelopathy, Secale cereale, Brassica napus, Medicago sativa Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization. In organic farming systems, weed control is recognized as one of the

  19. Allelochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 51 selections. Some of the titles are: Allelopathy: A potential cause of forest regeneration failure; Allelopathic effects on mycorrhizae: Influence on structure and dynamics of forest ecosystems; Allelopathic interference with regeneration of the allegheny hardwood forest; and Studies on the fulvic and humic acids of Minnesota peat.

  20. Effect of Sugar Maple Root Exudate on Seedlings of Northern Conifer Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Tubbs

    1976-01-01

    It has been shows that a root exudate of sugar maple reduces the growth of yellow birch. A laboratory test indicated that the growth of northern conifers is also reduced in sugar maple root exudate. Allelopathy may play an important role in survival of species on sites where sugar maple is abundant.

  1. Occurence of eugenol, coniferyl alcohol and 3,4,5- trimethoxyphenol in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) and their biological activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalinová, J.; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 5 (2011), s. 1679-1685 ISSN 0137-5881 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Allelopathy * Fagopyrum esculentum * Phenolic compound * Weed * GC-MS analysis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.639, year: 2011

  2. Allelochemicals Effect of Aqueous Leachate from Oudneya Africana R

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nesrine

    2014-03-05

    Mar 5, 2014 ... Phytochemistry, 32:851-857. Swaminathan C, Vinayrai RS, Suresh KK (1989). Allelopathicproctivities of Acacia nilotica. J. Trop. Forest Sci. 2:56-60. Torres A, Oliva RM; Castellano D, Cross P (1996). First world congress on allelopathy. A science of the future. SAI (University of Cadiz). Spain. p. 278.

  3. Assessment of allelopathic potential of Cassia sophera L. on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allelopathy is described as both beneficial and deleterious biochemical interaction between plant and weeds, and/or plant and microorganisms through the production of chemical compounds that escape into the environment and subsequently influence the growth and development of neighbouring plants. The present ...

  4. Unravelling the beneficial role of microbial contributors in reducing the allelopathic effects of weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandhya; Upadhyay, Ram Sanmukh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2013-07-01

    The field of allelopathy is one of the most fascinating but controversial processes in plant ecology that offers an exciting, interdisciplinary, complex, and challenging study. In spite of the established role of soil microbes in plant health, their role has also been consolidated in studies of allelopathy. Moreover, allelopathy can be better understood by incorporating soil microbial ecology that determines the relevance of allelopathy phenomenon. Therefore, while discussing the role of allelochemicals in plant-plant interactions, the dynamic nature of soil microbes should not be overlooked. The occurrence and toxicity of allelochemicals in soil depend on various factors, but the type of microflora in the surroundings plays a crucial role because it can interfere with its allelopathic nature. Such microbes could be of prime importance for biological control management of weeds reducing the cost and ill effects of chemical herbicides. Among microbes, our main focus is on bacteria--as they are dominant among other microbes and are being used for enhancing crop production for decades--and fungi. Hence, to refer to both bacteria and fungi, we have used the term microbes. This review discusses the beneficial role of microbes in reducing the allelopathic effects of weeds. The review is mainly focused on various functions of bacteria in (1) reducing allelopathic inhibition caused by weeds to reduce crop yield loss, (2) building inherent defense capacity in plants against allelopathic weed, and (3) deciphering beneficial rhizospheric process such as chemotaxis/biofilm, degradation of toxic allelochemicals, and induced gene expression.

  5. Sugarcane field residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on vegetable seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical interaction between plants, which is referred to as allelopathy, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) var. ‘HoCP 96-540’ field residue and sugarcane baga...

  6. Sugarcane crop residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on oat (Avena sative L.), morningglory (Ipomoea purpurea L.), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelopathy, the chemical interaction between plants, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development, and can include compounds released from a crop that adversely impact crop or weed species. The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Sacchar...

  7. Impact of sugarcane field residue and mill bagasse on seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research indicates that sugarcane field residue and sugarcane mill bagasse may be allelopathic. Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. Previous research in Louisiana indicated that sugarcane field residue may inhibi...

  8. Allelopathic impact of HoCP 96-540 field residue on seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research indicates that sugarcane field residue and sugarcane mill bagasse may be allelopathic. Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. Previous research in Louisiana indicated that sugarcane field residue may inhibi...

  9. Exudation of Allelopathic Substances in Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalinová, J.; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Tříska, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 16 (2007), s. 6453-6459 ISSN 0021-8561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Allelopathy * Epicatechin * Fagopyrum esculentum * palmitic acid * root exudates Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.532, year: 2007

  10. Level of Catechin, Myricetin, Quercetin and Isoquercitrin in Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench), Changes of Their Levels during Vegetation and Their Effect on The Growth of Selected Weeds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalinová, J.; Vrchotová, Naděžda

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 7 (2009), s. 2719-2725 ISSN 0021-8561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Allelopathy * buckwheat * catechin * quercetin * myricetin * weed Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.469, year: 2009

  11. Soil weed seedbank dynamic and allelopathic potential of Tithonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenomenon of allelopathy is receiving increased attention as a possible alternative weed control method that is environment-friendly when compared with the use of herbicides with a wide range of toxic side effects which pose potential hazards to the environment. This study was designed to estimate the distribution of ...

  12. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef Friedjung, Avital; Choudhary, Sikander Pal; Dudai, Nativ; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds) were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  13. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Yosef Friedjung

    Full Text Available Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  14. Trigoxazonane, a monosubstituted trioxazonane from Trigonella foenum-graecum root exudate, inhibits Orobanche crenata seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidente, Antonio; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Andolfi, Anna; Rubiales, Diego; Motta, Andrea

    2007-10-01

    Orobanche crenata is a major threat to grain legume production. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is an annual legume that has been shown to effectively reduce O. crenata infection when intercropped with grain legumes. In this paper, we point that this can be attributed to allelopathy, through inhibition of the germination of O. crenata by fenugreek root exudates. The main inhibitory metabolite was isolated and characterized. Allelopathy was demonstrated in different bioassays, by inhibition of O. crenata seeds germination both by growing fenugreek and pea plants together (intercropped), and by application of fenugreek root exudates. Fenugreek root exudates were extracted with organic solvent and fractionated giving several fractions, two of which showed moderate (27%) and strong (54%) inhibition of O. crenata seed germination, respectively. The most active metabolite is a new monosubstituted trioxazonane, characterized by spectroscopic methods as the 2-butyl-[1,4,7,2]trioxazonane and named trigoxazonane.

  15. Allelopathic Potential of Jasminum Officinale on Weed Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steliana RODINO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is generally defined as any direct or indirect harmful or beneficial effect of one plant on another mediated by the production allelochemicals. The scope of this study was the evaluation of the potential allelopathic effect of Jasminum officinale against some weed species.  The effects of extracts obtained from root, stem and leaves of J. officinale, were evaluated against ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia, ryegrass (Lolium perenne, and Johnsonn grass (Sorghum halepense. The aqueous leachates of jasmine demonstrated promising allelopathic potential by inhibiting seed germination and radicle elongation of all tested species. The more profound research in the field of allelopathy will eventually lead to the development of bioproducts designed for pest or weed control using allelochemicals.

  16. Mathematical modeling of plant allelopathic hormesis based on ecological-limiting-factor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinghu; Chen, Xiaoqiu; Duan, Shunshan; Feng, Yuanjiao; An, Min

    2010-05-28

    Allelopathy arises from the release of chemicals by one plant species that affect other species in its vicinity, usually to their detriment. Allelopathic effects have been demonstrated to be limiting factors for species distributions and ecological processes in some natural or agricultural communities. Based on the biphasic hormetic responses of plants to allelochemicals, ecological-limiting-factor models were introduced into the An-Johnson-Lovett hormesis model to improve modelling the phenomenon of allelopathic hormesis and to better reflect the nature of allelopathy as a limiting factor in ecological processes. Outcomes of the models have been compared for several sets of experimental data from the literature and good agreement between the models and data was observed, which indicates that the new models give some insight into the ecological mechanisms involved and may provide more options for modelling the allelopathic phenomenon as well as platforms for further research on plant allelopathic hormesis.

  17. Concurrently inhibitory and allelopathic effects of allelochemicals secreted by Myriophyllum spicatum on growth of blue-green algae; Hozakinofusamo ga hoshutsushita areropashi busshitsu no aisorui ni taisuru fukugo sayo oyobi areropashi koka no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, S.; Inoue, Y.; Hosomi, M.; Murakami, A. [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-10

    This paper describes effects of allelochemicals secreted by Myriophyllum spicatum on growth of blue-green algae. In order to propose an effective growth inhibitory method of blue-green algae with less impact on the ecosystem, biological interaction (allelopathy) between large aquatic plants and algae was investigated. Pyrogallic acid, gallic acid, catechin and ellagic acid secreted by M. spicatum provided growth inhibitory effects of blue-green algae (Microcyctis aeruginosa), individually. Complex interaction and allelopathic contribution of these four polyphenols were evaluated. By comparing the actual effects with the expected values, synergetic growth inhibitory effects were recognized by adding four polyphenols at the same time. Furthermore, growth inhibitory effects were evaluated for actual culture solution of M. spicatum and simulated culture solution made by four polyphenols. As a result, it was found that these four polyphenols relate to allelopathy of M. spicatum. 25 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Identification and Phytotoxicity Assessment of Phenolic Compounds in Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (Boneseed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abdullah Yousuf Al Harun

    Full Text Available Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed, a weed of national significance in Australia, threatens indigenous species and crop production through allelopathy. We aimed to identify phenolic compounds produced by boneseed and to assess their phytotoxicity on native species. Phenolic compounds in water and methanol extracts, and in decomposed litter-mediated soil leachate were identified using HPLC, and phytotoxicity of identified phenolics was assessed (repeatedly through a standard germination bioassay on native Isotoma axillaris. The impact of boneseed litter on native Xerochrysum bracteatum was evaluated using field soil in a greenhouse. Collectively, we found the highest quantity of phenolic compounds in boneseed litter followed by leaf, root and stem. Quantity varied with extraction media. The rank of phenolics concentration in boneseed was in the order of ferulic acid > phloridzin > catechin > p-coumaric acid and they inhibited germination of I. axillaris with the rank of ferulic acid > catechin > phloridzin > p-coumaric acid. Synergistic effects were more severe compared to individual phenolics. The litter-mediated soil leachate (collected after15 days exhibited strong phytotoxicity to I. axillaris despite the level of phenolic compounds in the decomposed leachate being decreased significantly compared with their initial level. This suggests the presence of other unidentified allelochemicals that individually or synergistically contributed to the phytotoxicity. Further, the dose response phytotoxic impacts exhibited by the boneseed litter-mediated soil to native X. bracteatum in a more naturalistic greenhouse experiment might ensure the potential allelopathy of other chemical compounds in the boneseed invasion. The reduction of leaf relative water content and chlorophyll level in X. bracteatum suggest possible mechanisms underpinning plant growth inhibition caused by boneseed litter allelopathy. The presence of a substantial

  19. Effects of dissolved microcystins on growth of planktonic photoautotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babica, Pavel; Hilscherová, Klára; Bártová, Kateřina; Bláha, Luděk; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2007), s. 137-142 ISSN 0031-8884 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6005411; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/03/1215 Grant - others:-(CZ) 1M6798593901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : algae * allelopathy * cyanotoxin Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2007

  20. Allelopathic Potential of Jasminum Officinale on Weed Species

    OpenAIRE

    Steliana RODINO; Marian BUTU; Alina BUTU

    2017-01-01

    Allelopathy is generally defined as any direct or indirect harmful or beneficial effect of one plant on another mediated by the production allelochemicals. The scope of this study was the evaluation of the potential allelopathic effect of Jasminum officinale against some weed species.  The effects of extracts obtained from root, stem and leaves of J. officinale, were evaluated against ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and Johnsonn grass (Sorghum halepense). The aq...

  1. Eco-biology of marine diatoms with emphasis on the influence of physico-chemical parameters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.

    .coffeaeformis=N.delicatula A. turgida+ N.delicatula superior competitors ES A. coffeaeformis, A. hyalina, A. turgida+ N.delicatula Nutrient limited, elimination of A. hyalina & A. coffeaeformis Major players: Navicula delicatula, Amphora coffeaeformis, A. hyalina, A. turgida... Co-existence of diverse community ES >Growth rate of N. longissima Major players: N. delicatula, A. coffeaeformis, N. subinflata, Nitzschia closterium, N. longissima Competitive exclusion of N. longissima Role of nutrient adequacy/allelopathy ESMajor...

  2. Effects of Soil Substrate Contaminated by Knotweed Leaves on Seed Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerá, Božena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2012), s. 713-717 ISSN 1230-1485 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC10032; GA MZe QH72117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : seed germination * early growth * hormesis * allelopathy * phytotoxicity * Reynoutria * biotechnology Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 0.462, year: 2012

  3. Metabolomics differentiation of canola genotypes: towards an understanding of canola allelochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md eAsaduzzaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is one crop attribute that could be incorporated in an integrated weed management system as a supplement to synthetic herbicides. However, the underlying principles of crop allelopathy and secondary metabolite production are still poorly understood including in canola. In this study, an allelopathic bioassay and a metabolomic analysis were conducted to compare three non-allelopathic and three allelopathic canola genotypes. Results from the laboratory bioassay showed that there were significant differences among canola genotypes in their ability to inhibit root and shoot growth of the receiver annual ryegrass; impacts ranged from 14% (cv. Atr-409 to 76% (cv. Pak85388-502 and 0% (cv. Atr-409 to 45% (cv. Pak85388-502 inhibition respectively. The root length of canola also differed significantly between genotypes, there being a non-significant negative interaction (r = -0.71; y=0.303x+21.33 between the root length of donor canola and of receiver annual ryegrass. Variation in chemical composition was detected between organs (root extracts, shoot extracts and root exudates and also between canola genotypes. Root extracts contained more secondary metabolites than shoot extracts while fewer compounds were recorded in the root exudates. Individual compound assessments identified a total of 14 secondary metabolites which were identified from the six tested genotypes. However, only Pak85388-502 and Av-opal exuded sinapyl alcohol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 3,5,6,7,8-pentahydroxy flavones in agar growth medium, suggesting that the synergistic effect of these compounds playing a role for canola allelopathy against annual ryegrass in vitro.

  4. PENGARUH EKSTRAK BUNGA FLAMBOYAN (Delonix regia Hook Raf TERHADAP PERKECAMBAHAN DAN PERTUMBUHAN CABAI MERAH BESAR (Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royana Pakpahan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The reach aim to the effect of flamboyant (Delonix regia Hook Raf. flower extract on the growth of large red pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L., for use a land under of flamboyant trees. The research design used was Random Block Design, with five treatments extract concentration, control, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%, each treatment was repeated five time. Observations were made during the 15 weeks. The results showed the percentage of germination and plant height are effect significant, while the number of leaves, root length and dry weight of the plant does not provide effect for the growth of large red pepper plant. Keywords : flamboyant, allelopathy, large red pepper

  5. Kandungan senyawa kimia pada bunga dan daun Chromolaena odorata L RM King dan H Robinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliasri Jamal

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis on the chemical compounds of flowers and leaves of Chromolaena Odorata (L. R.M. King and H. Robinson from Timor island using GCMS, was conducted. Total number of the compound from flowers which can be detected were 18 considered of alkanes, oxygenated hydrocarbon, fatty acid, hydrazine, and alkaloid along with two unidentified compound (1,2. Twenty seven compound detected from leaves were identified as alkanes, fatty acid, alkaloid, hydrazine together with 12 unidentified compound (3-14. Compounds were identified using NIST Library data. Flower and leaves Chromolaena Odorata contained allelopathy compounds such as palmitic aid, linoleic acid, and 2.6-dimetoxy phenol.

  6. Allelochemicals of Pinus halepensis as drivers of biodiversity in Mediterranean open mosaic habitats during the colonization stage of secondary succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Catherine; Santonja, Mathieu; Gros, Raphael; Monnier, Yogan; Chomel, Mathilde; Baldy, Virginie; Bousquet-Mélou, Anne

    2013-02-01

    The Mediterranean region is recognized as a global biodiversity hotspot. However, over the last 50 years or so, the cessation of traditional farming has given way to strong afforestation at the expense of open habitats. Pinus halepensis Miller, known to synthesize a wide range of secondary metabolites, is a pioneer expansionist species colonizing abandoned agricultural land that present high species richness. Here, laboratory bioassays were used to study the potential impact of P. halepensis on plant diversity through allelopathy, and the role of microorganisms in these interactions. Germination and growth of 12 target species naturally present in fallow farmlands were tested according to concentration of aqueous extracts obtained from shoots of young pines (aged about 5 years), with or without the presence of soil microorganisms (autoclaved or natural soil). Under the highest concentrations and autoclaved soil, more than 80 % of target species were germination and/or growth-inhibited, and only two species were non-sensitive. Under more natural conditions (lower extracts concentrations and natural soil with microorganisms), only 50 % of species were still inhibited, one was non-sensitive, and five were stimulated. Thus, microorganisms alter the expression of allelochemicals released into the ecosystem, which highlights their key role in chemical plant-plant interactions. The results of allelopathic experiments conducted in the lab are consistent with the community patterns observed in the field. These findings suggest that allelopathy is likely to shape vegetation composition and participate to the control of biodiversity in Mediterranean open mosaic habitats.

  7. Competitive Exclusion of Parthenium hysterophorus by Other Invasive Species - A Case Study from Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Asha kumari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The abundance, dominance and growth performance of Parthenium hysterophorus in relation to its field associates in extensively large areas was investigated. The preliminary analysis of the data revealed that P. hysterophorus is a weak or poor competitor and hence it fails to grow in the company of any aggressive species. Senna uniflora and a few other plants were identified for the control of this pernicious weed. The ability of other species to control P. hysterophorus was attributed to allelopathy. In order to understand how Hyptis suaveolens and Senna uniflora are capable of arresting the growth of P. hysterophorus, pot culture experiments in de Wit replacement series, field experiments in experimental plots and experimental manipulation of the competitive species under natural conditions during different seasons were carried out for two years in 2004 and 2005. The results clearly revealed that both H. suaveolens and S. uniflora were highly effective in the management of P. hysterophorus. The results further showed that the physical dominance and the ability of the competitive species to deprive P. hysterophorus of light are mainly responsible for the decline of P. hysterophorus. Allelopathy doesn't seem to play any effective role under natural conditions.

  8. Chemical interactions between plants in Mediterranean vegetation: the influence of selected plant extracts on Aegilops geniculata metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiumano, Vittorio; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Esposito, Assunta; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Fiorentino, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Allelopathy is the chemical mediated communication among plants. While on one hand there is growing interest in the field, on the other hand it is still debated as doubts exist at different levels. A number of compounds have been reported for their ability to influence plant growth, but the existence of this phenomenon in the field has rarely been demonstrated. Furthermore, only few studies have reported the uptake and the effects at molecular level of the allelochemicals. Allelopathy has been reported on some plants of Mediterranean vegetation and could contribute to structuring this ecosystem. Sixteen plants of Mediterranean vegetation have been selected and studied by an NMR-based metabolomics approach. The extracts of these donor plants have been characterized in terms of chemical composition and the effects on a selected receiving plant, Aegilops geniculata, have been studied both at the morphological and at the metabolic level. Most of the plant extracts employed in this study were found to have an activity, which could be correlated with the presence of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamate derivatives. These plant extracts affected the receiving plant in different ways, with different rates of growth inhibition at morphological level. The results of metabolomic analysis of treated plants suggested the induction of oxidative stress in all the receiving plants treated with active donor plant extracts, although differences were observed among the responses. Finally, the uptake and transport into receiving plant leaves of different metabolites present in the extracts added to the culture medium were observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Allelopathic sorghum water extract helps to improve yield of sunflower (helianthus annuus l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.; Khan, E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Allelopathy provides eco-friendly environment in managing weeds by reducing the use of synthetic herbicides that cause environmental pollution and herbicide resistance problems. Therefore, weeds have been controlling by plant derived organic compounds as an alternative of inorganic herbicides since the last two decades. In this study, sorghum aqueous extracts were applied individually as well as accumulatively with reduced levels of Dual Gold at the rate (S-Metolachlor) as foliar sprays in sunflower at 50, 70 and 90 DAS. For comparison, standard level of S-Metolachlor was also applied as foliar sprays along with weedy check. The highest reduction of total weed density (93.7%) was recorded by three sprays of sorghum aqueous extracts at rate of 15 L/ha mixed with 1/3rd S-Metolachlor at 1.6 L/ha as foliar applications. This reduction rate was statistically similar to one that was obtained by standard level of S-Metolachlor (1.6 L/ha). The highest achene yield was achieved by applying three foliar sprays of aqueous sorghum extracts along with reduced doses of S-Metolachlor, which was almost similar to full recommended dose of S-Metolachlor. These findings demonstrate that allelopathy offers environment friendly and economical opportunity for weed control in sunflower reducing the dependence and cost of herbicides. (author)

  10. Bryophyte spore germinability is inhibited by peatland substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Zhao-Jun; Li, Zhi; Liu, Li-Jie; Sundberg, Sebastian; Feng, Ya-Min; Yang, Yun-He; Liu, Shuang; Song, Xue; Zhang, Xing-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Bryophyte substrates and species may affect spore germination through allelopathy. Polytrichum strictum is currently expanding in peatlands in north-eastern China - is this an effect of its superior spore germinability or do its gametophytes have a stronger allelopathic effect than do Sphagnum? We conducted a spore burial experiment to test the effect of species identity, substrate and water table depth (WTD) on spore germinability and bryophyte allelopathic effect with P. strictum and two Sphagnum species (S. palustre and S. magellanicum). After 5 months of burial during a growing season, the spores were tested for germinability. Allelopathic effect of bryophyte substrates was assessed by the difference between spore germinability after being stored inside or outside the substrates. After burial, more than 90% of the spores lost their germinability across all three species due to ageing and allelopathy. Spore germinability differed among species, where the spores in S. palustre had a higher germination frequency than those in P. strictum. The three bryophytes maintained a higher germinability in Sphagnum than in Polytrichum hummocks, probably due to a stronger allelopathic effect of P. strictum. Water table drawdown by 10 cm increased germinability by more than 60% across the three species. The study indicates that P. strictum does not possess an advantage regarding spore germination but rather its gametophytes have a stronger allelopathic effect. Due to the weaker inhibitive effect of Sphagnum gametophytes, P. strictum may have a potential establishment superiority over Sphagnum in peatlands, in addition to a better drought tolerance, which may explain its current expansion.

  11. Determination of polyamines in organic extracts from roots of Canavalia ensiformis by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, S; Moraes, M L L; Rezende, M O O

    2010-05-01

    A rapid, selective and specific capillary zone electrophoresis method to determine polyamines in organic extracts from roots of Canavalia ensiformis (Jack Beans) was developed using ultra violet (UV) detection. Canavalia ensiformis is relatively free from diseases and it is used as reference in allelopathy studies. Polyamines are widely distributed in plant and it could be involved in plant pathogen interactions. Optimal separation was achieved using 15 mmol L(-1)formic acid (pH 3.0) + 4 mmol L(-1) imidazole as a background electrolyte. It was possible to identify and quantify the polyamines on herbal samples in the presence of other phytochemical substances and analyze them quickly (up to 6 min). The applicability of this method was evaluated in crude organic extracts from roots of Canavalia ensiformis.

  12. Phytochemical screening, total phenolic content and phytotoxic activity of corn (Zea mays) extracts against some indicator species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hiwa M

    2018-03-01

    Allelopathic effects of corn (Zea mays) extracts was studied, against seed germination and seedling growth of Phalaris minor, Helianthus annuus, Triticumaestivum, Sorghum halepense, Z. mays. Bioassay results showed that aqueous extracts of corn root and shoot, markedly affected seed germination, and other parameters compared with related controls. Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of various phytochemicals such as tannins, phlobatannins, flavonoids, terpenoids and alkaloids in both roots and shoot aqueous extracts. However, saponins were only present in the shoot aqueous extract, while in shoot ethanol extracts, only terpenoids and alkaloids were detected. Additionally, total polyphenolic (TPC) content in aqueous extracts of corn root and shoot, plus ethanol extracts of corn shoot were determined using an Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Results revealed TPC content of the corn shoot aqueous extract showed the highest yield, compared to other extracts. These findings suggest that phytochemicals present in Z. mays extracts may contribute to allelopathy effect.

  13. The effect of environmental parameters and cyanobacterial blooms on phytoplankton dynamics of a Portuguese temperate lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Figueiredo, Daniela R.; P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia; Antunes, Sara C.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters is of great concern due to the ability of many cyanobacteria to produce cyanotoxins. In the present work, the eutrophied Vela Lake (Central Portugal), used for recreational purposes and as a water source for agriculture...... (particularly phosphorus). Diatoms were dominant during winter months (inferior temperatures and higher nutrients availability) followed by green algae in early spring and then cyanobacteria from late spring until early autumn (less nutrient availability and higher temperatures). A massive cyanobacterial bloom...... for the phytoplanktonic assemblage during the study period was increased in about 7% achieving a total of 61.0%, indicating a correlation that may be due to the known competitive advantage and/or allelopathy of the bloom-forming cyanobacteria towards microalgae....

  14. Phytochemical, pharmacological and ethnobotanical studies in mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.; Zingiberaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Shakeel Ahmad; Kikuchi, Akira; Gilani, Syed Abdullah; Watanabe, Kazuo N

    2007-06-01

    Curcuma amada Roxb. is an important species known as mango ginger due to its characteristic raw-mango aroma. It has a long history of traditional uses ranging from folk medicine to several culinary preparations. The phytochemical, pharmacological and ethnobotanical studies of C. amada are reviewed. The rhizome is rich in essential oils, and more than 130 chemical constituents with biomedical significance have been isolated from it. Its antibacterial, insecticidal, antifungal and antioxidant properties have been investigated. The conservation of indigenous knowledge by proper documentation is suggested. The chemotaxonomy, allelopathy and genetic diversity of C. amada have not yet been explored, and many such studies are possible. This review was compiled to provide consolidated information covering different aspects of the plant, to provide a basis on which to plan future studies and to promote sustainable use of C. amada. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Allelopathic relations of selected cereal and vegetable species during seed germination and seedling growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojović Biljana M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is the direct or indirect harmful effect which one plant produces on another through the production of chemical compounds that escape into the environment. In the presence paper allelopathic relationships were determined in three cereals - wheat (Triticum aestivum L., barley (Hordeum vulgare L., oat (Avena sativa L. and vegetable crops - spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., radish (Raphanus sativus L., pepper (Capsicum annum L.. In addition to the percentage of germination, allelopathic potential was tested measuring root and stem length of tested plant species germinated either alone or in combination with others. The obtained results showed that seed germination and plant growth of cereals and vegetables are depended on the presence of other plants in all tested combinations. In this study has proven largely inhibitory allelopathic effect on germination and plant growth.

  16. Bioactivity effect of two macrophyte extracts on growth performance of two bloom-forming cyanophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Ghobrial

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is a biological phenomenon by which an organism produces one or more biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and can have beneficial (positive allelopathy or detrimental (negative allelopathy effects on the target organisms. The current research aims at using selected brackish water adapted submerged aquatic macrophytes allelopathy to combat bloom-forming cyanophytes, in laboratory bioassay experiments. Dry matters of macrophytes were extracted in solvents and the initial cyanophytes inoculum, derived from unialgal culture media, was used. Therefore, aqueous extracts with 50% and 100% acetone and ethanol solvents of two freshwater macrophytes; Potamogeton pectinatus and Ceratophyllum demersum were used to test their growth performance exhibited on two bloom-forming cyanophytes, Microcystis aeruginosa and Oscillatoria tenuis. The results revealed insignificant difference between the overall total average growth performance at treatment with 50% and 100% Ceratophyllum acetone extracts expressed by optical density (OD as well as chlorophyll a (chl a. Results showed, also, stimulation of M. aeruginosa growth. The highest growth increase in 100 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% acetone extract had a percentage rate (R of 94.66. On the contrary, treatment with ethanol extract recorded the highest inhibitory effect, thus in 1.5 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% Ceratophyllum ethanol extract R recorded −87.54, sustaining LC50 value of 1.12 μl/100 ml. The highest stimulating effect in 105 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% Ceratophyllum acetone extracts against O. tenuis was; R, 169.4. The highest inhibition in 1500 μl/100 ml treatment with 50% Ceratophyllum ethanol extracts against O. tenuis was; R −74.32, with LC50 0.830 μl/100 ml. While, the highest inhibition by 50% and 100% Potamogeton acetone or ethanol extracts against M. aeruginosa was

  17. The influence of extracellular compounds produced by selected Baltic cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates on growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żak, Adam; Kosakowska, Alicja

    2015-12-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants could affect the growth and development of biological and agricultural systems. This natural process that occurs worldwide is known as allelopathy. The main goal of this work was to investigate the influence of metabolites obtained from phytoplankton monocultures on the growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris. We selected 6 species occurring in the Baltic Sea from 3 different taxonomic groups: cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Planktothrix agardhii), diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana; Chaetoceros wighamii) and dinoflagellates (Alexandrium ostenfeldii; Prorocentrum minimum). In this study we have demonstrated that some of selected organisms caused allelopathic effects against microalgae. Both the negative and positive effects of collected cell-free filtrates on C. vulgaris growth, chlorophyll a concentration and fluorescence parameters (OJIP, QY, NPQ) have been observed. No evidence has been found for the impact on morphology and viability of C. vulgaris cells.

  18. Crustose coralline algae and associated microbial biofilms deter seaweed settlement on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Lemos, Luis A.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo

    2017-06-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA), a group of calcifying red algae found commonly in benthic marine ecosystems worldwide, perform essential ecological functions on coral reefs, including creating benthic substrate, stabilizing the reef structure and inducing coral settlement. An important feature of CCA is the ability to keep their surfaces free of epiphytic algae, thereby reducing algal overgrowth and allowing them access to light. However, the mechanisms by which CCA prevent settlement of opportunistic seaweeds (fleshy macroalgae) are not fully understood, nor is whether these mechanisms vary among CCA species. In our study based on the Great Barrier Reef, we demonstrate that three common CCA species ( Titanoderma pustulatum, Porolithon onkodes and Neogoniolithon sp.) have a remarkable ability to deter settlement of seaweed spores. We provide experimental evidence that the CCA use allelopathy and microbial inhibition against the settlement of spores of the brown seaweed Padina boergesenii. Methanol extracts of allelopathic compounds from T. pustulatum, Po. onkodes and Neogoniolithon sp. significantly reduced the settlement of Pa. boergesenii spores by 4.3 times, 3.0 and 3.8 times, respectively. Further, we found that microbial biofilms, while having a lower inhibitory effect than allelopathic compounds, also reduced seaweed settlement of Pa. boergesenii. Our study demonstrates that allelopathy and microbial inhibition, in addition to epithallial tissue sloughing, are mechanisms employed by CCA to prevent the settlement of epiphytic algae. Understanding the mechanisms by which CCA avoid seaweed overgrowth contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of seaweed proliferations on reefs and to the ecological knowledge of this important group of reef-building organisms.

  19. Allelopathic activity of some grass species on Phleum pratense seed germination subject to their density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Lipińska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficient utilization of allelopathy in the agricultural practice requires searching for some species and developmental stages when the allelopathic substances are generated in bioactive concentrations. That also requires the knowledge of allelopathy mechanisms and primarily its separation from the other aspects of plant activity, mainly from competition for environmental resources. This task, however, has remained vital in the studies on plant interference, being extremely difficult to perform under field conditions. Therefore, the studies were conducted in the laboratory. To determine the activity of an allelopathic agent of the selected grass species, the density dependent phytotoxicity model was employed. The model is based on the fact that an increase of acceptor plants density evokes a decrease of their response to the allelopathic compounds, whereas the negative effects of the competition become more intense. A higher rate of acceptor plants growth accompanying their density increase in the given object does not agree with the competition rules and thus, it may imply an allelopathic background of the observed changes. In the presented studies, the allelopathic properties of grasses - donors were evaluated by studying the effect of two densities of the emerging seeds and two- and four weeks aged seedlings of F. arundinacea, L. multiflorum, L. perenne and P. pratensis. The tested species - acceptor Ph. pratensis was sown in the density of 10 and 20 seeds in a pan. The results revealed that the germination of acceptor seeds was differentiated depending on their density in the pan, and on the species, density and the age of the donor. Inhibition of Ph. pratense seed germination in objects with a lover density may prove allelopathic effects of the studied donor grasses.

  20. Interference of allelopathic rice with paddy weeds at the root level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X-F; Kong, C-H

    2017-07-01

    Despite increasing knowledge of the involvement of allelopathy in negative interactions among plants, relatively little is known about its action at the root level. This study aims to enhance understanding of interactions of roots between a crop and associated weeds via allelopathy. Based on a series of experiments with window rhizoboxes and root segregation methods, we examined root placement patterns and root interactions between allelopathic rice and major paddy weeds Cyperus difformis, Echinochloa crus-galli, Eclipta prostrata, Leptochloa chinensis and Oryza sativa (weedy rice). Allelopathic rice inhibited growth of paddy weed roots more than shoots regardless of species. Furthermore, allelopathic rice significantly reduced total root length, total root area, maximum root width and maximum root depth of paddy weeds, while the weeds adjusted horizontal and vertical placement of their roots in response to the presence of allelopathic rice. With the exception of O. sativa (weedy rice), root growth of weeds avoided expanding towards allelopathic rice. Compared with root contact, root segregation significantly increased inhibition of E. crus-galli, E. prostrata and L. chinensis through an increase in rice allelochemicals. In particular, their root exudates induced production of rice allelochemicals. However, similar results were not observed in C. difformis and O. sativa (weedy rice) with either root segregation or root exudate application. The results demonstrate that allelopathic rice interferes with paddy weeds by altering root placement patterns and root interactions. This is the first case of a root behavioural strategy in crop-weed allelopathic interaction. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  1. Photosynthetic electron-transfer reactions in the gametophyte of Pteris multifida reveal the presence of allelopathic interference from the invasive plant species Bidens pilosa.

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    Zhang, Kai-Mei; Shen, Yu; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Fang, Yan-Ming; Liu, Ying; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-05-01

    To date, the response of the fern gametophyte to its environment has received considerable attention. However, studies on the influence of plant invasion on the fern gametophyte are fewer. Allelopathy has been hypothesized to play an important role in biological invasion. Hence, it is necessary to study the allelopathy of invasive plant species to the fern gametophyte and elucidate the mechanisms by which invasive plants cause phytotoxicity. As one of the main invasive plants in China, Bidens pilosa exhibits allelopathic effects on the gametophytic growth of Pteris multifida. The root exudate plays an important role among various allelochemical delivery mechanisms in B. pilosa. The effect invasive plant species has on photosynthesis in native species is poorly understood. To elucidate this effect, the changes in photosynthesis in the gametophytes of P. multifida are analyzed to examine the mechanisms of the root exudates of B. pilosa. Meanwhile, a non-invasive plant, Coreopsis basalis, was also applied to investigate the effects on fluorescence and pigments in P. multifida gametophytes. We found that gametophytes exposed to both B. pilosa and C. basalis had decreased fluorescence parameters in comparison with the control, except for non-photochemical quenching. Furthermore, it was found that these parameters were markedly affected from day 2 to day 10 in the presence of both exudates at a concentration of 25% or above. B. pilosa exudate had a negative dose-dependent effect on chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, and the total chlorophyll in the gametophyte. The inhibitory effects increased with increasing exudate concentrations of both species, exhibiting the greatest inhibition at day 10. In conclusion, B. pilosa irreversibly affected the photosynthesis of P. multifida on both PS I and PS II. Root exudates caused the primary damage with respect to the decrease of the acceptors and donors of photon and electron in photosynthetic units and the production and

  2. Emerging Insights on Brazilian Pepper Tree (Schinus terebinthifolius) Invasion: The Potential Role of Soil Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Karim; Esiobu, Nwadiuto

    2016-01-01

    Invasive plant species constitute a major ecological and economic problem worldwide, often distorting trophic levels and ecosystem balance. Numerous studies implicate factors ranging from environmental plasticity, competition for nutrient and space, and allelopathy in the success of invasive species in general. The Brazilian Pepper tree (BP) was introduced to the United States in the 1800s and has since become a category one invasive plant in Florida. It has aggressively spread to about 3000 km(2) of terrestrial surface, fueled in part by the prevalence of the hybrid genotypes and environmental perturbations. It displays some of the well-established invasive mechanisms but there is a serious dearth of knowledge on the plant-microbe-soil interactions and whether the rhizobiome plays any roles in the displacement of native flora and the range expansion of BP. Several control measures, including chemical, mechanical, and biological antagonism have been used with limited success while restoration of natives in soils from which BP was removed has proved problematic partly due to a poorly understood phenomenon described as the "BP legacy effect." Emerging evidence suggests that allelopathy, selective recruitment of beneficial soil microbes, disruption of microbial community structure and alteration of nutrient cycling, exhibited by many other invasive plant species may also be involved in the case of BP. This brief review discusses the well-established BP invasion mechanisms and highlights the current understanding of the molecular, below-ground processes. It also points out the gaps in studies on the potential role of microbial interactions in the success of BP invasion. These hitherto poorly studied mechanisms could further explain the aggressive spread of BP and could potentially contribute significantly to effective control measures and enable appropriate strategies for restoring native plants. The review advocates for the use of cutting-edge techniques in advancing

  3. Efeito alelopático e toxicidade frente à Artemia salina Leach dos extatos do fruto de Euterpe edulis Martius Allelopathic effects and toxicity against Artemia salina Leach of extracts of the fruit of Euterpe edulis Martius

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    Cristina Peitz de Lima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Alelopatia é um processo envolvendo metabólitos secundários produzidos por plantas que infl uenciam o crescimento e desenvolvimento de sistemas agrícolas. Devido à toxicidade dos herbicidas sintéticos para o meio ambiente e para a saúde humana tem-se aumentado o interesse na exploração da alelopatia como uma alternativa para o controle de plantas daninhas. O presente trabalho avaliou efeito dos extratos dos frutos de Euterpe edulis Martius sobre o desenvolvimento de cipselas e plântulas de Lactuca sativa Linné, foram determinados o índice de velocidade de germinação, o crescimento da radícula e do hipocótilo. Para a avaliação da toxicidade dos extratos foi realizado o ensaio de toxicidade frente ao microcrustáceo Artemia salina Leach determinando-se a CL50 e percentual de mortalidade. A fração remanescente demonstrou efeito alelopático, pois todas as concentrações alteraram os valores do índice de velocidade de germinação e as concentrações de 0,2 e 0,4 mg inibiram tanto o crescimento da radícula quanto o crescimento do hipocótilo. No ensaio de toxicidade todos os extratos apresentaram CL50 superior a 1000 ppm e 0% de mortalidade das artemias, indicando a não toxicidade dos extratos.Allelopathy is a process involving secondary metabolites produced by plants that influence growth and development of agricultural systems. Because of the toxicity of synthetic herbicides to the environment and human health, there has been increased interest in exploiting allelopathy as an alternative for weed control. This study evaluated the eff ect of extracts of Euterpe edulis Martius fruits on the development of cypselae and seedlings of Lactuca sativa Linné; the germination speed index, radicle and hypocotyl growth were determined. To evaluate the toxicity of the extracts the toxicity test against Artemia salina Leach was used, where the LC50 and mortality rate were determined. Th e remaining fraction showed allelopathic effect

  4. Sesquiterpenoids Lactones: Benefits to Plants and People

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    Carol Wagstaff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sesquiterpenoids, and specifically sesquiterpene lactones from Asteraceae, may play a highly significant role in human health, both as part of a balanced diet and as pharmaceutical agents, due to their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This review highlights the role of sesquiterpene lactones endogenously in the plants that produce them, and explores mechanisms by which they interact in animal and human consumers of these plants. Several mechanisms are proposed for the reduction of inflammation and tumorigenesis at potentially achievable levels in humans. Plants can be classified by their specific array of produced sesquiterpene lactones, showing high levels of translational control. Studies of folk medicines implicate sesquiterpene lactones as the active ingredient in many treatments for other ailments such as diarrhea, burns, influenza, and neurodegradation. In addition to the anti-inflammatory response, sesquiterpene lactones have been found to sensitize tumor cells to conventional drug treatments. This review explores the varied ecological roles of sesquiterpenes in the plant producer, depending upon the plant and the compound. These include allelopathy with other plants, insects, and microbes, thereby causing behavioural or developmental modification to these secondary organisms to the benefit of the sesquiterpenoid producer. Some sesquiterpenoid lactones are antimicrobial, disrupting the cell wall of fungi and invasive bacteria, whereas others protect the plant from environmental stresses that would otherwise cause oxidative damage. Many of the compounds are effective due to their bitter flavor, which has obvious implications for human consumers. The implications of sesquiterpenoid lactone qualities for future crop production are discussed.

  5. Colony induction and growth inhibition in Desmodesmus quadrispina (Chlorococcales) by allelochemicals released from the filamentous alga Uronema confervicolum (Ulotrichales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leflaive, Joséphine; Lacroix, Gérard; Nicaise, Yvan; Ten-Hage, Loïc

    2008-06-01

    In biofilms, the competition between microorganisms for light, nutrients and space is extreme. Moreover, planktonic algae can be considered as competitors insofar as they decrease the available light for the benthic algae. One of the strategies employed by microorganisms to eliminate competitors is the release of inhibiting compounds, a process known as allelopathy. Here we demonstrate that a benthic/epiphytic alga, Uronema confervicolum, produces allelopathic compounds that induce oxidative stress and growth inhibition in the planktonic Desmodesmus quadrispina. Some of these compounds can also trigger the formation of colony in D. quadrispina. As colonies have higher sedimentation rates than unicells, their induction by U. confervicolum might decrease shading. This study is the first report of colony induction in the context of alga-alga interaction. Our results also suggest the implication of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in the transduction of the signal leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species in the cells. A comparison with allelochemicals from another planktonic green alga, Monoraphidium aff. dybowski, emphasizes the specificity of colony induction by U. confervicolum, in contrast with oxidative stress which is induced by several compounds. The reciprocal production of inhibiting compounds by D. quadrispina makes this interaction an interesting example of co-evolution between two microorganisms belonging to different compartments of the ecosystem.

  6. Lily Cultivars Have Allelopathic Potential in Controlling Orobanche aegyptiaca Persoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Min; Zhu, Xiaopei; Cui, Hongxia; Jiang, Chuangdao; Zhang, Jinzheng; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    As a devastating holoparasitic weed, Orobanche aegyptiaca Persoon. (Egyptian broomrape) causes serious damage to agricultural production and threatens economic development, which has raised widespread concern. The present study was conducted to determine whether lilies have the potential to be used as 'trap crops' for controlling O. aegyptiaca Persoon. In the experiments, the ability of three popular lily cultivars (Lilium Oriental hybrids 'Sorbonne', Lilium LA (Longiflorum hybrids x Asiatic hybrids) hybrids 'Ceb Dazzle', and Lilium Longiflorum hybrids (L. formosanum x L. longiflorum) 'L. formolongo') to induce O. aegyptiaca Persoon. seed germination was assessed. Parts of the three lily cultivars, including the rhizosphere soil and underground and above-ground organs, all induced "suicidal germination" of parasitic O. aegyptiaca Persoon. seed at four growth stages. Specifically, Sorbonne and Ceb Dazzle behaved with similar allelopathy, and the bulb, scale leaf and aerial stem exhibited stronger allelopathic effects on O. aegyptiaca Pers. germination compared to other organs. Aqueous L. formolongo leaf extracts may contain more stable, effective stimulants given that they induced the highest germination rate at 76.7% even though the extracts were serially diluted. We speculate that these organs may be advantageous in further isolating and purifying economical active substances that can be substitutes for GR24. These results indicate that lilies have the potential to be used as a trap crops or can be processed into green herbicide formulations that can be applied in agriculture production to rapidly deplete the seed bank of O. aegyptiaca Persoon. parasitic weeds in soil.

  7. Lily Cultivars Have Allelopathic Potential in Controlling Orobanche aegyptiaca Persoon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chai

    Full Text Available As a devastating holoparasitic weed, Orobanche aegyptiaca Persoon. (Egyptian broomrape causes serious damage to agricultural production and threatens economic development, which has raised widespread concern. The present study was conducted to determine whether lilies have the potential to be used as 'trap crops' for controlling O. aegyptiaca Persoon. In the experiments, the ability of three popular lily cultivars (Lilium Oriental hybrids 'Sorbonne', Lilium LA (Longiflorum hybrids x Asiatic hybrids hybrids 'Ceb Dazzle', and Lilium Longiflorum hybrids (L. formosanum x L. longiflorum 'L. formolongo' to induce O. aegyptiaca Persoon. seed germination was assessed. Parts of the three lily cultivars, including the rhizosphere soil and underground and above-ground organs, all induced "suicidal germination" of parasitic O. aegyptiaca Persoon. seed at four growth stages. Specifically, Sorbonne and Ceb Dazzle behaved with similar allelopathy, and the bulb, scale leaf and aerial stem exhibited stronger allelopathic effects on O. aegyptiaca Pers. germination compared to other organs. Aqueous L. formolongo leaf extracts may contain more stable, effective stimulants given that they induced the highest germination rate at 76.7% even though the extracts were serially diluted. We speculate that these organs may be advantageous in further isolating and purifying economical active substances that can be substitutes for GR24. These results indicate that lilies have the potential to be used as a trap crops or can be processed into green herbicide formulations that can be applied in agriculture production to rapidly deplete the seed bank of O. aegyptiaca Persoon. parasitic weeds in soil.

  8. Low Light Availability Associated with American Beech Is the Main Factor for Reduced Sugar Maple Seedling Survival and Growth Rates in a Hardwood Forest of Southern Quebec

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    Alexandre Collin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have reported a marked increase in American beech dominance (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. relative to sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh. in late successional forests of North America. However, many factors have been proposed to explain this sudden shift in tree species composition. We investigated the microsite factors responsible for maple regeneration failure under maple-beech stands, focusing on both light availability and soil conditions. The survival and growth of maple seedlings planted in the natural soil and in pots with enriched soil were monitored for two years, as well as foliar nutrition and herbivory damages of natural seedlings. The results indicate that low light availability associated with the presence of beech is the primary factor leading to maple regeneration failures. Soil nutrient availability and foliar nutrition of natural seedlings did not differ between forest types. Yet, the results indicate that factors such as allelopathy and preferential herbivory on maple seedlings under beech could be superimposed effects that hinder maple regeneration. Under similar forests, a control of beech sapling abundance in the understory followed by selection cutting could be one way to promote and maintain maple populations in the longer term.

  9. Investigating a Potential Auxin-Related Mode of Hormetic/Inhibitory Action of the Phytotoxin Parthenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Parthenin is a metabolite of Parthenium hysterophorus and is believed to contribute to the weed's invasiveness via allelopathy. Despite the potential of parthenin to suppress competitors, low doses stimulate plant growth. This biphasic action was hypothesized to be auxin-like and, therefore, an auxin-related mode of parthenin action was investigated using two approaches: joint action experiments with Lactuca sativa, and dose-response experiments with auxin/antiauxin-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. The joint action approach comprised binary mixtures of subinhibitory doses of the auxin 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA) mixed with parthenin or one of three reference compounds [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB)]. The reference compounds significantly interacted with IAA at all doses, but parthenin interacted only at low doses indicating that parthenin hormesis may be auxin-related, in contrast to its inhibitory action. The genetic approach investigated the response of four auxin/antiauxin-resistant mutants and a wildtype to parthenin or two reference compounds (IAA, PCIB). The responses of mutant plants to the reference compounds confirmed previous reports, but differed from the responses observed for parthenin. Parthenin stimulated and inhibited all mutants independent of resistance. This provided no indication for an auxin-related action of parthenin. Therefore, the hypothesis of an auxin-related inhibitory action of parthenin was rejected in two independent experimental approaches, while the hypothesis of an auxin-related stimulatory effect could not be rejected.

  10. Allelopathic potential of oil seed crops in production of crops: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adnan Noor; Iqbal, Javaid; Ullah, Abid; Yang, Guozheng; Yousaf, Muhammad; Fahad, Shah; Tanveer, Mohsin; Hassan, Waseem; Tung, Shahbaz Atta; Wang, Leishan; Khan, Aziz; Wu, Yingying

    2016-08-01

    Agricultural production enhancement has been realized by more consumption of fossil energy such as fertilizer and agrochemicals. However, the production provides the present human with sufficient and diversified commodities, but at the same time, deprives in some extent the resources from the future human as well. In the other hand, it is known that synthetic herbicides face worldwide threats to human's health and environment as well. Therefore, it is a great challenge for agricultural sustainable development. The current review has been focussed on various oilseed crop species which launch efficient allelopathic intervention, either with weeds or other crops. Crop allelopathic properties can make one species more persistent to a native species. Therefore, these crops are potentially harmful to both naturalized as well as agricultural settings. On the other side, allelopathic crops provide strong potential for the development of cultivars that are more highly weed suppressive in managed settings. It is possible to utilize companion plants that have no deleterious effect on neighbor crops and can be included in intercropping system, thus, a mean of contributing to agricultural sustainable development. In mixed culture, replacement method, wherein differing densities of a neighbor species are planted, has been used to study phytotoxic/competitive effects. So, to use alternative ways for weed suppression has become very crucial. Allelochemicals have the ability to create eco-friendly products for weed management, which is beneficial for agricultural sustainable development. Our present study assessed the potential of four oilseed crops for allelopathy on other crops and associated weeds.

  11. Interspecific variation in the allelopathic potential of the family Myrtaceae

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    Maristela Imatomi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is a type of biotic interference wherein a plant releases bioactive metabolites into an environment, thereby affecting the adjacent biota. Stressful environments stimulate the production of these metabolites. The present study tests the novel weapons hypothesis, which postulates that species belonging to the same genus and from the same environment have similar allelopathic effects. The aim of this study was to assess the allelopathic effects that the aqueous leaf extracts of 15 species belonging to five genera of the Myrtaceae family have on the seed germination and initial seedling growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L., tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. and onion (Allium cepa L.. Germination rates, average germination times, informational entropy of germination and allelopathic effects, as quantified with a response index, were calculated. A taxonomic distance matrix based on Gower dissimilarity and a Euclidean distance matrix were constructed. The results revealed that all extracts from donor species significantly increased average germination time or reduced the germination rate of eudicotyledonous plant species. The only extracts that showed no effect on monocotyledonous seeds were those of Campomanesia pubescens O. Berg and Psidium cinereum Mart. We conclude that eudicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants were both significantly affected by the presence of all extracts tested. Our results make it clear that each species behaves distinctly in relation to allelopathic activity, with no apparent grouping by genus or subtribe. Therefore, the hypothesis was rejected, because plants from the same environment and with taxonomic proximity do not necessarily display similar production of secondary metabolites.

  12. The fascinating facets of plant selenium accumulation - biochemistry, physiology, evolution and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2017-03-01

    Contents 1582 I. 1582 II. 1583 III. 1588 IV. 1590 V. 1592 1592 References 1592 SUMMARY: The importance of selenium (Se) for medicine, industry and the environment is increasingly apparent. Se is essential for many species, including humans, but toxic at elevated concentrations. Plant Se accumulation and volatilization may be applied in crop biofortification and phytoremediation. Topics covered here include beneficial and toxic effects of Se on plants, mechanisms of Se accumulation and tolerance in plants and algae, Se hyperaccumulation, and ecological and evolutionary aspects of these processes. Plant species differ in the concentration and forms of Se accumulated, Se partitioning at the whole-plant and tissue levels, and the capacity to distinguish Se from sulfur. Mechanisms of Se hyperaccumulation and its adaptive significance appear to involve constitutive up-regulation of sulfate/selenate uptake and assimilation, associated with elevated concentrations of defense-related hormones. Hyperaccumulation has evolved independently in at least three plant families, probably as an elemental defense mechanism and perhaps mediating elemental allelopathy. Elevated plant Se protects plants from generalist herbivores and pathogens, but also gives rise to the evolution of Se-resistant specialists. Plant Se accumulation affects ecological interactions with herbivores, pollinators, neighboring plants, and microbes. Hyperaccumulation tends to negatively affect Se-sensitive ecological partners while facilitating Se-resistant partners, potentially affecting species composition and Se cycling in seleniferous ecosystems. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Allelopathic Effects of Aqueous Extract of Leaf Stem and Root of Sorghum bicolor on Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Vigna radiata L.

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    Amir MOOSAVI

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Seed germination under field conditions is highly influenced by the presence of other plants. Allelopathy is an important mechanism of plant competition, by producing phytotoxins to the plant environment in order to decline other plants growth. Soil sickness problem in farm lands is also known as an allelopathic effect or even autotoxicity. The toxicity of released allelochemicals by a plant in the environment is attributed to its function of concentration, age and metabolic stage. In this study we investigate the effect (5, 20, 35 and 50 g l-1 of leaf, stem and root water extract of sorghum on seed germination and seedling growth of mung bean. The results of the experiment showed that allelopathic effect of different concentrations was not significant for germination percentage, but germination rate and mean germination time decreased significantly by increasing the concentration of allelopathic extracts; also, there was a clear allelopathic effect of sorghum extract on seedling growth of mung bean. 50 g l-1 sorghum stem extract exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on root and shoot growth of mung bean. Among all parts of sorghum, stem extracts showed the highest allelopatic effect on seedling growth. Root extract showed higher inhibitory effect than leaf extracts.

  14. Isolation and Identification of Potential Allelochemicals from Aerial Parts of Avena fatua L. and Their Allelopathic Effect on Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingang; Tian, Fajun; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yanbing; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-05-11

    Five compounds (syringic acid, tricin, acacetin, syringoside, and diosmetin) were isolated from the aerial parts of wild oats (Avena fatua L.) using chromatography columns of silica gel and Sephadex LH-20. Their chemical structures were identified by means of electrospray ionization and high-resolution mass spectrometry as well as (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses. Bioassays showed that the five compounds had significant allelopathic effects on the germination and seedling growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The five compounds inhibited fresh wheat as well as the shoot and root growth of wheat by approximately 50% at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, except for tricin and syringoside for shoot growth. The results of activity testing indicated that the aerial parts of wild oats had strong allelopathic potential and could cause different degrees of influence on surrounding plants. Moreover, these compounds could be key allelochemicals in wild-oat-infested wheat fields and interfere with wheat growth via allelopathy.

  15. Effects of different nitrogen levels on phytotoxicity of some allelopathic crops

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    Y. NOROUZI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intensive usage of herbicides can result in the serious negative impacts on environment. Allelopathy by reducing seed germination and early seedling growth can play a fundamental role in suppressing weeds in crop fields. The effectiveness of allelochemicals is governed by different factors such as soil nutrient status, pH and microorganisms. Outdoor pot experiments were conducted at the Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources of Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran, in 2013, to evaluate the effects of different levels of N fertilizer (0, 150, 300 kg ha-1 on the suppressing effects of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. plant materials on emergence and growth parameters of some weed species including Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense (L. Pers., barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L. Beauv. and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.. Results indicated that adding plant materials of tobacco, sorghum, and alfalfa substantially reduced seed germination and early growth of the tested weeds. However, the weed species responded differently to the presence of the allelopathic plant materials. The use of N fertilizer had significant effects on the inhibitory potentials of the allelopathic plants. However, we didn't find consistent trends regarding the responses of the allelopathic crops to elevated N fertilizer levels in related to the traits under study.

  16. Reduction of nutrient contaminants into shallow eutrophic waters through vegetated treatment beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, P; Vijayaraghavan, K; Reuben, S; Estrada, E S; Joshi, U M

    2013-01-01

    One of the most effective mitigative approaches to eutrophication is the reduction of nutrient loading into water bodies. Bioremediation presents an economically viable and ecologically sustainable technology to nutrient pollution control taking advantage of the remarkable ability of plants and their associated microbial community to assimilate and remove nutrients from the environment. In this study, four emergent macrophytes (Cyperus haspan, Pandanus amaryllifolius, Pontederia cordata and Thalia geniculata) and two floating plants (Hygroryza aristata and Pistia stratiotes) were deployed in bank-side treatment beds and comparatively assessed for their remediative capabilities for nutrient control. P. stratiotes exhibited the highest removal efficiency for both nitrate and phosphate among the six plant species studied. Emergent macrophytes, P. amaryllifolius, C. haspan and P. cordata, were also found to be highly effective in nutrient uptake exhibiting removal efficiencies up to 100%. With the exception of T. geniculata, depletion of nutrients as a result of plant uptake significantly impeded the natural colonization of algae invariably leading to improvements in water quality in terms of turbidity and pH. Suppression of algae proliferation by T. geniculata was not preceded by a reduction in nutrient concentrations suggesting that T. geniculata may be directly inhibiting algal growth through allelopathy.

  17. Biosynthesis and molecular actions of specialized 1,4-naphthoquinone natural products produced by horticultural plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Rhodes, David

    2016-01-01

    The 1,4-naphthoquinones (1,4-NQs) are a diverse group of natural products found in every kingdom of life. Plants, including many horticultural species, collectively synthesize hundreds of specialized 1,4-NQs with ecological roles in plant–plant (allelopathy), plant–insect and plant–microbe interactions. Numerous horticultural plants producing 1,4-NQs have also served as sources of traditional medicines for hundreds of years. As a result, horticultural species have been at the forefront of many basic studies conducted to understand the metabolism and function of specialized plant 1,4-NQs. Several 1,4-NQ natural products derived from horticultural plants have also emerged as promising scaffolds for developing new drugs. In this review, the current understanding of the core metabolic pathways leading to plant 1,4-NQs is provided with additional emphasis on downstream natural products originating from horticultural species. An overview on the biochemical mechanisms of action, both from an ecological and pharmacological perspective, of 1,4-NQs derived from horticultural plants is also provided. In addition, future directions for improving basic knowledge about plant 1,4-NQ metabolism are discussed. PMID:27688890

  18. Effets allélopathiques des Brassicacées via leurs actions sur les agents pathogènes telluriques et les mycorhizes : analyse bibliographique. Partie 1

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    Reau Raymond

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Brassicas contain glucosinolates (GSL which decomposition is able to reduce the growth of populations of soil-borne fungi, bacterias or nematodes. These biocid effects on soil-borne microorganisms make a form of allelopathy phenomenon. The allelopathic properties depends on the GLS composition of the Brassicas: Indian mustard and in a lower extend Oilseed rape could have the most powerfull action, White mustard would have a weaker action. These properties also depends on crop residues: green manure with quick decomposition would result with a higher action than crop residues after grain harvest. The main mechanisms are known. In vitro, isothiocyanates obtained from the GSL decomposition inhibit all the phases of the cycle of Aphanomyces eutiches, the fungus responsible for root rot of peas. The mycelian growth of Gaeumannomyces graminis tritici, the fungus responsible for the wheat take all is inhibited by some isothyocyanates at low concentration. Furthermore, several studies give the evidence that the incorporation of Brassicas residues into the soil does inhibit the growth of both soil-borne pathogens. At last, the presence of roots of Brassicas inhibits the germination of the mycorhizes known to improve the mineral nutrition of its host plant. This phenomenon could explain the depressive effect of oilseed rape on the nutrition of a subsequent maize. This knowledge of Brassicas effects into cropping systems offers issues for a better management of precedent effects of Brassicas; these effects being positive (integrated cop protection or negative (management of subsequent crop nutrition after Brassicas.

  19. Effets allélopathiques des Brassicacées via leurs actions sur les agents pathogènes telluriques et les mycorhizes : analyse bibliographique. Partie II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reau Raymond

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Brassicas contain glucosinolates (GSL which decomposition is able to reduce the growth of populations of soil-borne fungi, bacterias or nematodes. These biocid effects on soil-borne microorganisms make a form of allelopathy phenomenon. The allelopathic properties depends on the GLS composition of the Brassicas: Indian mustard and in a lower extend Oilseed rape culd have the most powerfull action, White mustard would have a weaker action. These properties also depends on crop residues: green manure with quick decomposition would result with a higher action than crop residues after grain harvest.The main mechanisms are known. In vitro, isothiocyanates obtained from the GSL decomposition inhibit all the phases of the cycle of Aphanomyces eutiches, the fungus responsible for root rot of peas. The mycelian growth of Gaeumannomyces graminis tritici, the fungus responsible for the wheat take all is inhibited by some isothyocyanates at low concentration. Furthermore, several studies give the evidence that the incorporation of Brassicas residues into the soil does inhibit the growth of both soil-borne pathogens. At last, the presence of roots of Brassicas inhibits the germination of the mycorhizes known to improve the mineral nutrition of its host plant. This phenomenon could explain the depressive effect of oilseed rape on the nutrition of a subsequent maize.This knowledge of Brassicas effects into cropping systems offers issues for a better management of precedent effects of Brassicas; these effects being positive (integrated cop protection or negative (management of subsequent crop nutrition after Brassicas.

  20. The Effect of Dissolved Polyunsaturated Aldehydes on Microzooplankton Growth Rates in the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Lavrentyev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is wide spread among marine phytoplankton, including diatoms, which can produce cytotoxic secondary metabolites such as polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA. Most studies on diatom-produced PUA have been dedicated to their inhibitory effects on reproduction and development of marine invertebrates. However, little information exists on their impact on key herbivores in the ocean, microzooplankton. This study examined the effects of dissolved 2E,4E-octadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal on the growth rates of natural ciliate and dinoflagellate populations in the Chesapeake Bay and the coastal Atlantic waters. The overall effect of PUA on microzooplankton growth was negative, especially at the higher concentrations, but there were pronounced differences in response among common planktonic species. For example, the growth of Codonella sp., Leegaardiella sol, Prorodon sp., and Gyrodinium spirale was impaired at 2 nM, whereas Strombidium conicum, Cyclotrichium gigas, and Gymnodinium sp. were not affected even at 20 nM. These results indicate that PUA can induce changes in microzooplankton dynamics and species composition.

  1. The Effect of Dissolved Polyunsaturated Aldehydes on Microzooplankton Growth Rates in the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentyev, Peter J.; Franzè, Gayantonia; Pierson, James J.; Stoecker, Diane K.

    2015-01-01

    Allelopathy is wide spread among marine phytoplankton, including diatoms, which can produce cytotoxic secondary metabolites such as polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA). Most studies on diatom-produced PUA have been dedicated to their inhibitory effects on reproduction and development of marine invertebrates. However, little information exists on their impact on key herbivores in the ocean, microzooplankton. This study examined the effects of dissolved 2E,4E-octadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal on the growth rates of natural ciliate and dinoflagellate populations in the Chesapeake Bay and the coastal Atlantic waters. The overall effect of PUA on microzooplankton growth was negative, especially at the higher concentrations, but there were pronounced differences in response among common planktonic species. For example, the growth of Codonella sp., Leegaardiella sol, Prorodon sp., and Gyrodinium spirale was impaired at 2 nM, whereas Strombidium conicum, Cyclotrichium gigas, and Gymnodinium sp. were not affected even at 20 nM. These results indicate that PUA can induce changes in microzooplankton dynamics and species composition. PMID:25955757

  2. Study of Seed Germination and Morphological Characteristics of Wild Oat(Avena ludoviciana and Mustard (Sinapis arvensis Seedling, Affected by Aqueous Extracts of Black Cumin (Bunium persicum L, Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L and Mixed of Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Moradi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to evaluate the effects of shoot aqueous extracts of chickpea, black cumin and their mixed aqueous extracts on seed germination and seedling morphological characteristics of wild oat and mustard as two common weed, an experiment was conducted with a factorial arrangement based on completely randomized design with three replications. The experimental treatments were aqueous extracts in five levels (0, 10, 20, 40 and 60 percentage, Weed species in two levels (wild oat and mustard and extract concentration in five levels (0, 10, 20. 40 and 60 percentage. Result indicated that the highest and the lowest percentage and seed germination rate, length of radicle and hypocotyle, dry weight of radicle and hypocotyle and radicle / hypocotyle ratio (R/H, were obtained in control treatment and 60% concentration, respectively. Aqueous extract of black cumin and mixed extracts had the highest and the lowest effect on percentage and seed germination rate, length of radicle and hypocotyle, dry weight of radicle and hypocotyle and radicle / hypocotyle ratio, respectively. Between two weed species, wild oat had the lowest percentage of seed germination and length of radicle compared with mustard. Mustard had the lowest seed germination rate, dry weight of radicle and hypocotyle and length of hypocotyle compare with wild oat. Generally, it was concluded that chickpea and black cumin aqueous extracts have highly inhibitory in terms of weed control that can be useful for sustainable agriculture. Keywords: Allelopathy, Black cumin, Chickpea, Extract, Mustard, Wild oat

  3. Allelopathic Potential of Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) on Perennial Ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) and Alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Junfeng; An, Yu; Ma, Yongqing; Ichizen, Nobumasa

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated allelopathy and its chemical basis in nine switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) accessions. Perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) and alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.) were used as test species. Undiluted aqueous extracts (5 g plant tissue in 50 ml water) from the shoots and roots of most of the switchgrass accessions inhibited the germination and growth of the test species. However, the allelopathic effect of switchgrass declined when extracts were diluted 5- or 50-fold. Seedling growth was more sensitive than seed germination as an indicator of allelopathic effect. Allelopathic effect was related to switchgrass ecotype but not related to ploidy level. Upland accessions displayed stronger allelopathic potential than lowland accessions. The aqueous extract from one switchgrass accession was separated into phenols, organic acids, neutral chemicals, and alkaloids, and then these fractions were bioassayed to test for allelopathic potential. Alkaloids had the strongest allelopathic effect among the four chemical fractions. In summary, the results indicated that switchgrass has allelopathic potential; however, there is not enough evidence to conclude that allelopathic advantage is the main factor that has contributed to the successful establishment of switchgrass on China’s Loess Plateau.

  4. Allelopathic effects of leaf extracts of three agroforestry trees on germination and early seedling growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

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    Abdul Majeed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the growth promotory or inhibitory allelopathic effects of agroforestry trees on other plants is necessary for selection of suitable crops to be cultivated in their vicinity. In this experiment, aqueous leaf extracts of three agroforestry trees (Populus deltoides, Melia azedarach and Morus alba were evaluated on germination and seedling growth of wheat applied at concentration 1, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 g L-1 while distilled water was used as control treatment. Lower concentration of extracts (1 and 1.5 g L-1 of P. deltoides stimulated percent germination, root and stem height and dry biomass while higher concentration (2 and 2.5 g L-1 had no effect on these parameters. Mean germination time (MGT was not affected by the extract and its concentration. Aqueous extracts of M. azedarach and M. alba at concentration > 1 g L-1 significantly lowered the studied parameters except MGT which was significantly prolonged. Negative allelopathy was more evident at the highest aqueous extract concentration (2.5 g L-1 of the two trees. Extracts of M. alba were found more growth inhibitory than those of M. azedarach. The study suggests that lower concentration of leaf extracts of P. deltoides imparts stimulatory while M. azedarch and M. alba have negative allelopathic effects on wheat germination.

  5. ALELOPATIA DO NIM NOS ASPECTOS FISIOLÓGICOS DA GERMINAÇÃO DE SEMENTES DE MARACUJÁ EM DISTINTOS PERÍODOS DE ARMAZENAMENTO

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    Naedja Nara de Araujo Neves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The passion fruit tree (Passiflora edulis Sims f. flavicarpa Deg. is a fruitful tree whose the propagation usually is made for seeds. With the objective to study the possible effects allelopathy of neem in the physiologic aspects in germination of seeds of passion fruit in the different periods of storage. Was carried at UFERSA. For the acquisition of powder of neem, it was used plants located in institution. In the obtaining of seeds of passion fruits, it was used in natura fruits bought in the local supermarket; this seeds were extracted of fruits for fermentation. It was placed 50g of seeds of passion fruits together with each measure of powder of leaves of neem (0; 0,25; 0,50; 0,75; 1,0 g of powder of leaves of neem / 50 g of seeds of passion fruits. It was utilized the randomized design in esquire of portions subdivides, where the portions was composed of five dosages of powder of leaves neem.

  6. Study of freshwater red tide control measures; Tansui akashio taisaku ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, M.; Hatamochi, K. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-09-30

    Basic research of biological measures for which the accumulation of basic findings is mandatory and the applied research of chemical and physical measures that are higher in feasibility are conducted for the establishment of measures to counter freshwater red tides. In the basic research, natural enemies, algaecidal microbes, conjugation inhibiting substances, and allelopathy are studied, but none of them is found feasible at the current stage. In the basic research, however, factors are discovered that inhibit the multiplication of Peridinium bipes or perish the same. In the applied research, chemical algaecidal methods, UV-aided algaecidal methods, and various red-tide constituent collection methods are studied. Collection methods are compared, and it is concluded that a method of Toray Industries, Inc., efficiently collects red-tide constituents. In this method, red-tide constituents are screened by and condensed on a cloth filter provided on the internal wall of a drum, and are dehydrated and then transferred. The applied research further involves the prediction of red tide outbreak and the raising of fish on a food containing substances extracted from red tides, and it is suggested that these are feasible. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. [Allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts from Panax notoginseng on three maize varieties (Zea mays)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Long; Hou, Jun-Ling; Wang, Wen-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Shi-Xiu

    2014-02-01

    It has been showed that there were obvious obstacle effects of Panax notoginseng replanting. Crop rotation was the main effective technique to overcome the obstacle. To find a reasonable crop rotation system for P. notoginseng, aqueous extracts from root, stem and leaf of P. notoginseng were analyzed for allelopathic effect on three maize varieties (which are often grown in regions where P. notoginseng grown). The main results were as follows: (1) Allelopathic effect of P. notoginseng stem and leaf extracts on the three other tested plants was stronger than that of root extracts; (2) Corn was more vulnerable to the effects of allelochemicals at seedling stage than at germination stage, and the corn root was more sensitive than aerial part to allelochemicals; (3) Lusan No. 3 and Yunrui No. 1 showed resistance to P. notoginseng allelopathy, with respective comprehensive sensitivity indexes (M3) of - 0.089 3 and -0.159 2, while Bainuo No. 1 is sensitive at M3 = -0.261 0. It then can be concluded that Lusan No. 3 and Yunrui No. 1 may be an alternative rotation plants for overcoming P. notoginseng continuous cropping obstacle.

  8. Relaxation of herbivore-mediated selection drives the evolution of genetic covariances between plant competitive and defense traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Akane; Connallon, Tim; Kessler, André; Monro, Keyne

    2017-06-01

    Insect herbivores are important mediators of selection on traits that impact plant defense against herbivory and competitive ability. Although recent experiments demonstrate a central role for herbivory in driving rapid evolution of defense and competition-mediating traits, whether and how herbivory shapes heritable variation in these traits remains poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the structure and evolutionary stability of the G matrix for plant metabolites that are involved in defense and allelopathy in the tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima. We show that G has evolutionarily diverged between experimentally replicated populations that evolved in the presence versus the absence of ambient herbivory, providing direct evidence for the evolution of G by natural selection. Specifically, evolution in an herbivore-free habitat altered the orientation of G, revealing a negative genetic covariation between defense- and competition-related metabolites that is typically masked in herbivore-exposed populations. Our results may be explained by predictions of classical quantitative genetic theory, as well as the theory of acquisition-allocation trade-offs. The study provides compelling evidence that herbivory drives the evolution of plant genetic architecture. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. How do bryophytes govern generative recruitment of vascular plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; Graae, Bente J; Douma, Jacob C; Grau, Oriol; Milbau, Ann; Shevtsova, Anna; Wolters, Loes; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2011-06-01

    Interactions between vascular plants and bryophytes determine plant community composition in many ecosystems. Yet, little is known about the importance of interspecific differences between bryophytes with respect to their effects on vascular plants. We compared the extent to which species-specific bryophyte effects on vascular plant generative recruitment depend on the following underlying mechanisms: allelopathy, mechanical obstruction, soil moisture and temperature control. We sowed 10 vascular plant species into monospecific mats of six chemically and structurally diverse bryophytes, and examined 1-yr seedling recruitment. Allelopathic effects were also assessed in a laboratory phyto-assay. Although all bryophytes suppressed vascular plant regeneration, there were significant differences between the bryophyte species. The lack of interactions indicated the absence of species-specific adaptations of vascular plants for recruitment in bryophyte mats. Differences between bryophyte species were best explained by alterations in temperature regime under bryophyte mats, mostly by reduced temperature amplitudes during germination. The temperature regime under bryophyte mats was well predicted by species-specific bryophyte cushion thickness. The fitness of established seedlings was not affected by the presence of bryophytes. Our results suggest that climatically or anthropogenically driven changes in the species' composition of bryophyte communities have knock-on effects on vascular plant populations via generative reproduction. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts of leaves of tree marigold (Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl. A. Gray on seed germination and seedling growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Laynez Garsaball

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Some chemical compounds released by plants can to control the presence of other plants in their environment both of their own species and different ones, allelopathy is an important factor in regulating the structure of plant communities, a better understanding of these relationships is critical for appropriate agricultural development. The objective was to determine the effects of aqueous extracts of leaves of tree marigold (Tithonia diversifolia on seed germination and seedling growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cultivar Parris Island. A 15% w/v extract was prepared with leaves of tree marigold gold, it was allowed to stand for 48 h. After, diluting extracts at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% w/v were obtained and pH and electrical conductivity (S.cm-1 were determined. Sowing was carried out in trays covered with a double layer of absorbent paper on which were placed 25 seeds/tray. Irrigation was applied twice per day using leaf extracts. The control treatment received tap water. A randomized complete block design was used with four replications. Seedlings were harvested at 14 days after sowing. pH decreased and electrical conductivity increased with increases in the concentration of leaf extracts. The germination was negatively affected by extracts. A lowering effect was observed on the overall growth of lettuce seedlings.

  11. Allelopathic interactions between the opportunistic species Ulva prolifera and the native macroalga Gracilaria lichvoides.

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    Dong Xu

    Full Text Available Allelopathy, one type of direct plant competition, can be a potent mechanism through which plant communities are structured. The aim of this study was to determine whether allelopathic interactions occur between the opportunistic green tide-forming species Ulva prolifera and the native macroalga Gracilaria lichvoides, both of which were collected from the coastline of East China sea. In laboratory experiments, the presence of G. lichvoides at 1.25 g wet weight L(-1 significantly inhibited growth and photosynthesis of U. prolifera at concentrations of 1.25, 2.50, and 3.75 g wet weight L(-1 (p0.05. Culture medium experiments further confirmed that some allelochemicals may be released by both of the tested macroalgae, and these could account for the observed physiological inhibition of growth and photosynthesis. Moreover, the native macroalgae G. lichvoides was a stronger competitor than the opportunistic species U. prolifera. Collectively, the results of the present study represent a significant advance in exploring ecological questions about the effects of green tide blooms on the macroalgal community.

  12. ATIVIDADE ALELOPÁTICA DE EXTRATOS DE PLANTAS DE COBERTURA SOBRE SOJA, PEPINO E ALFACE

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    JOSELI VIVIANE DITZEL NUNES

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy can be defined as any effect , direct or indirect, beneficial or harmful, a plant on the other, through the release of chemical compounds into the environment. Thus, this study aimed at evaluat- ing, in the laboratory, allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts from cover crops as canola (Brassica napus L. var, crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst, sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea, linseed (Linum usitatissimum L. and forage turnip (Raphanus sativus L. at 0, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100% concentrations. The plants used in aqueous extracts were collected during their flowering period of each studied species. Germination tests were performed on seeds gerbox, fresh and dry seedlings biomass, root and shoots seedlings length. The experimental design was completely randomized (CRD in factorial (5x5 with four replicates per treatment. According to these results, it can be concluded that the tested extracts showed allelopathic effect on seedlings of lettuce, cucumber and soybean on almost all parameters, but for soybean germination and dry mass percentage, this effect was not significant. The sunn hemp extract, despite concentration, contributed the most to increased germination and seedling growth. However, linseed extract showed opposite effect for these parameters in 100% concentrations.

  13. Allelopathic Effects of Aqueous Extract of Leaf Stem and Root of Sorghum bicolor on Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Vigna radiata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir MOOSAVI

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Seed germination under field conditions is highly influenced by the presence of other plants. Allelopathy is an important mechanism of plant competition, by producing phytotoxins to the plant environment in order to decline other plants� growth. Soil sickness problem in farm lands is also known as an allelopathic effect or even autotoxicity. The toxicity of released allelochemicals by a plant in the environment is attributed to its function of concentration, age and metabolic stage. In this study we investigate the effect (5, 20, 35 and 50 g l-1 of leaf, stem and root water extract of sorghum on seed germination and seedling growth of mung bean. The results of the experiment showed that allelopathic effect of different concentrations was not significant for germination percentage, but germination rate and mean germination time decreased significantly by increasing the concentration of allelopathic extracts; also, there was a clear allelopathic effect of sorghum extract on seedling growth of mung bean. 50 g l-1 sorghum stem extract exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on root and shoot growth of mung bean. Among all parts of sorghum, stem extracts showed the highest allelopatic effect on seedling growth. Root extract showed higher inhibitory effect than leaf extracts.

  14. Reduced herbicide doses in combination with allelopathic plant extracts suppress weeds in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, R.A.; Khan, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Allelopathy is gaining popularity worldwide probably for decreasing the cost of production and environment friendly weed suppressing approach. Repeated field studies conducted during 2011-12 and 2012-13 at Agricutural Research Institute Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan where allelopathic water extracts of Oryza sativa, Parthenium hysterophorus, Phragmites australis and Datura alba along with reduced doses of phenoxaprop-p-ethyl and bromoxinil+MCPA were tested for controlling weeds in wheat. It was observed that weed density was encouragly suppressed whereas spike length (cm), number of spikelets spike-1 and 1000 grain weight (g) of the wheat were improved when the allelopathic plant water extracts were used in combination with lower doses of herbicides. Thus, allelochemicals provide weed suppressing option in wheat. However, more studies are required to fully explore the possibility of weed management and isolation of the chemicals involved in weed suppression for environment friendly weed management in wheat. Such studies may decrease the cost of crop production and total use of herbicides. (author)

  15. Efeito de cascas de café e de arroz dispostas nas camadas do solo sobre a germinação e o crescimento inicial do caruru-de-mancha Allelopathic effect of coffee and rice husks arranged in soil layers on the germination and initial growth of Amaranthus viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.F. Santos

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Estudos dos efeitos dos resíduos de plantas pela utilização de coberturas mortas no controle das plantas daninhas têm apresentado dificuldade de determinar a diferenciação entre alelopatia e competição. Atualmente, muitas pesquisas têm se referido a critérios que propõem evidência à alelopatia. Este trabalho em casa de vegetação visou determinar os efeitos alelopáticos proporcionados pelas cascas de café e de arroz sobre o caruru-de-mancha, por meio das disposições desses resíduos nas camadas do solo. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos casualizados, com os tratamentos em quatro repetições e organizados num esquema fatorial (3x3, sendo cascas de café e de arroz e vermiculita expandida como um fator e suas disposições, com resíduos depositados no topo, incorporados na superfície e incorporados no fundo, como segundo fator. Como testemunha foi usado um tratamento adicional sem cobertura. De modo geral, resíduos de cascas proporcionaram inibição da germinação e estímulo ao crescimento do caruru-de-mancha. A casca de arroz proporcionou menor índice de velocidade de emergência e germinação de sementes do que a casca de café. A casca de café depositada no topo proporcionou maior crescimento e maior peso da matéria seca do caruru-de-mancha, seguido pela mesma casca incorporada na superfície do solo.Studies of plant residue effects involving mulches to control weeds in perennial crops are difficult to carry out due to the need to differentiate between allelopathy and competition. Many researches, nowadays, refer to criteria proving allelopathy. This work was established under greenhouse conditions to determine the allelopathic effects of coffee and rice husks on Amaranthus viridis through their arrangements in soil layers. The experimental design was a randomized block with four replications, arranged in a 3 x 3 factorial scheme, with coffee and rice husks and expanded vermiculite being one factor and

  16. Gene expression patterns of the coral Acropora millepora in response to contact with macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, T. L.; Rasher, D. B.; Snell, T. W.; Hay, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Contact with macroalgae often causes coral mortality, but the roles of abrasion versus shading versus allelopathy in these interactions are rarely clear, and effects on gene expression are unknown. Identification of gene expression changes within corals in response to contact with macroalgae can provide insight into the mode of action of allelochemicals, as well as reveal transcriptional strategies of the coral that mitigate damage from this competitive interaction, enabling the coral to survive. Gene expression responses of the coral Acropora millepora after long-term (20 days) direct contact with macroalgae ( Chlorodesmis fastigiata, Dictyota bartayresiana, Galaxaura filamentosa, and Turbinaria conoides) and short-term (1 and 24 h) exposure to C. fastigiata thalli and their hydrophobic extract were assessed. After 20 days of exposure, T. conoides thalli elicited no significant change in visual bleaching or zooxanthellae PSII quantum yield within A. millepora nubbins, but stimulated the greatest alteration in gene expression of all treatments. Chlorodesmis fastigiata, D. bartayresiana, and G. filamentosa caused significant visual bleaching of coral nubbins and reduced the PSII quantum yield of associated zooxanthellae after 20 days, but elicited fewer changes in gene expression relative to T. conoides at day 20. To evaluate initial molecular processes leading to reduction of zooxanthella PSII quantum yield, visual bleaching, and coral death, short-term exposures to C. fastigiata thalli and hydrophobic extracts were conducted; these interactions revealed protein degradation and significant changes in catalytic and metabolic activity within 24 h of contact. These molecular responses are consistent with the hypothesis that allelopathic interactions lead to alteration of signal transduction and an imbalance between reactive oxidant species production and antioxidant capabilities within the coral holobiont. This oxidative imbalance results in rapid protein degradation

  17. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Mahdavi-Arab

    Full Text Available Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance

  18. Ryecyanatines A and B and ryecarbonitrilines A and B, substituted cyanatophenol, cyanatobenzo[1,3]dioxole, and benzo[1,3]dioxolecarbonitriles from rye (Secale cereale L.) root exudates: Novel metabolites with allelopathic activity on Orobanche seed germination and radicle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Alessio; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Avolio, Fabiana; Yoneyama, Koichi; Rubiales, Diego; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Orobanche and Phelipanche species (the broomrapes) are root parasitic plants, some of which represent serious weed problems causing heavy yield losses on important crops. Current control relies on the use of certain agronomic practices, resistant crop varieties, and herbicides, albeit success has been marginal. Agronomic practices such as the use of allelopathic species in intercropping or cover crops, or the use of direct seedling over residues of allelopathic species incorporate the principle of allelopathy exerted by molecules exuded from roots or released by crop residues to control broomrapes. In addition, the isolation of natural substances from root exudates of plants with potential to inhibit broomrape development opens the door to the design of new herbicides based on natural and benign sources. Ryecyanatines A and B and ryecarbonitrilines A and B, the first new substituted cyanatophenol, substituted cyanatobenzo[1,3]dioxole, and the latter two new substituted benzo[1,3]dioxolecarbonitriles were isolated from rye (Secale cereale L.) root exudates. They were characterized as 4-cyanato-2-methoxyphenol, 2-cyanato-benzo[1,3]dioxole, 2-methoxybenzo[1,3]dioxole-5-carbonitrile and benzo[1,3]dioxole-2-carbonitrile by spectroscopic (essentially NMR and HRESI MS spectra) methods. These compounds were investigated for allelopathic activity on Orobanche germination and development. Ryecarbonitriline A induced germination of Orobanche cumana seeds, and this germination can be considered as suicidal because O. cumana does not parasite rye roots and cannot survive without host resources beyond germination stage. In addition, ryecyanatine A promotes a rapid cessation of O. cumana, Orobanche crenata and Orobanche minor radicle growth with the promotion of a layer of papillae at the radicle tip in O. cumana and O. crenata hampering the contact of the parasite to the host. Ryecarbonitriline B also displayed the same activity although being less active than ryecyanatine A and

  19. Bio-guided optimization of the ultrasound-assisted extraction of compounds from Annona glabra L. leaves using the etiolated wheat coleoptile bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Sadao; Varela, Rosa M; Palma, Miguel; Molinillo, José M G; Lima, Inês S; Barroso, Carmelo G; Macías, Francisco A

    2014-07-01

    A bio-guided optimization of the extraction of bioactive components from Annona glabra leaves has been developed using the etiolated wheat coleoptile bioassay as the control method. The optimization of an ultrasound-assisted extraction of bioactive compounds using allelopathy results as target values has been carried out for the first time. A two-level fractional factorial experimental design was applied to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction. The solvent was the extraction variable that had the most marked effect on the resulting bioactivity of the extracts in the etiolated wheat coleoptile bioassay. Extraction time, extraction temperature and the size of the ultrasonic probe also influenced the bioactivity of the extracts. A larger scale extraction was carried out in the next step in the allelopathic study, i.e., the isolation of compounds from the bioactive extract and chemical characterization by spectroscopic techniques, including NMR. Eight compounds were isolated and identified from the active extracts, namely two steroids (β-sistosterol and stigmasterol), five diterpenes with the kaurane skeleton (ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, ent-19-methoxy-19-oxokauran-17-oic acid, annoglabasin B, ent-17-hydroxykaur-15-en-19-oic acid and ent-15β,16β-epoxy-17-hydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid) and the acetogenin asimicin. The most active compound was annoglabasin B, which showed inhibition with values of -95% at 10(-3) M, -87% at 5×10(-4) M and greater than -70% at 10(-4) M in the etiolated wheat coleoptile bioassay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Vermicomposting eliminates the toxicity of Lantana (Lantana camara) and turns it into a plant friendly organic fertilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, N.; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S.A., E-mail: prof.s.a.abbasi@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • It is shown for the first time that Lantana can lose its toxicity when vermicomposted. • The Lantana vermicompost is shown to be a good organic fertilizer. • FTIR studies identified Lantana’s toxic constituents destroyed by vermicomposting. • The findings have far-reaching implications in the gainful use of harmful weeds. - Abstract: In evidently the first study of its kind, vermicompost derived solely from a weed known to possess plant and animal toxicity was used to assess its impact on the germination and early growth of several plant species. No pre-composting or supplementation of animal manure was done to generate the vermicompost in order to ensure that the impact is clearly attributable to the weed. Whereas the weed used in this study, Lantana (Lantana camara), is known to possess strong negative allelopathy, besides plant/animal toxicity in other forms, its vermicompost was seen to be a good organic fertilizer as it increased germination success and encouraged growth of all the three botanical species explored by the authors – green gram (Vigna radiata), ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In terms of several physical, chemical and biochemical attributes that were studied, the vermicompost appeared plant-friendly, giving best results in general when employed at concentrations of 1.5% in soil (w/w). Fourier transform infrared spectrometry revealed that the phenols and the sesquiterpene lactones that are responsible for the allelopathic impact of Lantana were largely destroyed in the course of vermicomposting. There is also an indication that lignin content of Lantana was reduced during its vermicomposting. The findings open up the possibility that the billions of tons of phytomass that is generated annually by Lantana and other invasives can be gainfully utilized in generating organic fertilizer via vermicomposting.

  1. Lily Cultivars Have Allelopathic Potential in Controlling Orobanche aegyptiaca Persoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongxia; Jiang, Chuangdao; Zhang, Jinzheng; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    As a devastating holoparasitic weed, Orobanche aegyptiaca Persoon. (Egyptian broomrape) causes serious damage to agricultural production and threatens economic development, which has raised widespread concern. The present study was conducted to determine whether lilies have the potential to be used as ‘trap crops’ for controlling O. aegyptiaca Persoon. In the experiments, the ability of three popular lily cultivars (Lilium Oriental hybrids ‘Sorbonne’, Lilium LA (Longiflorum hybrids x Asiatic hybrids) hybrids ‘Ceb Dazzle’, and Lilium Longiflorum hybrids (L. formosanum x L. longiflorum) ‘L. formolongo’) to induce O. aegyptiaca Persoon. seed germination was assessed. Parts of the three lily cultivars, including the rhizosphere soil and underground and above-ground organs, all induced “suicidal germination” of parasitic O. aegyptiaca Persoon. seed at four growth stages. Specifically, Sorbonne and Ceb Dazzle behaved with similar allelopathy, and the bulb, scale leaf and aerial stem exhibited stronger allelopathic effects on O. aegyptiaca Pers. germination compared to other organs. Aqueous L. formolongo leaf extracts may contain more stable, effective stimulants given that they induced the highest germination rate at 76.7% even though the extracts were serially diluted. We speculate that these organs may be advantageous in further isolating and purifying economical active substances that can be substitutes for GR24. These results indicate that lilies have the potential to be used as a trap crops or can be processed into green herbicide formulations that can be applied in agriculture production to rapidly deplete the seed bank of O. aegyptiaca Persoon. parasitic weeds in soil. PMID:26565398

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the invasion of Solidago canadensis L. in southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruyi; Zhou, Gang; Zan, Shuting; Guo, Fuyu; Su, Nannan; Li, Jing

    2014-11-01

    The significance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the process of plant invasion is still poorly understood. We hypothesize that invasive plants would change local AMF community structure in a way that would benefit themselves but confer less advantages to native plants, thus influencing the extent of plant interactions. An AMF spore community composed of five morphospecies of Glomus with equal density (initial AMF spore community, I-AMF) was constructed to test this hypothesis. The results showed that the invasive species, Solidago canadensis, significantly increased the relative abundance of G. geosperum and G. etunicatum (altered AMF spore community, A-AMF) compared to G. mosseae, which was a dominant morphospecies in the monoculture of native Kummerowia striata. The shift in AMF spore community composition driven by S. canadensis generated functional variation between I-AMF and A-AMF communities. For example, I-AMF increased biomass and nutrient uptake of K. striata in both monocultures and mixtures of K. striata and S. canadensis compared to A-AMF. In contrast, A-AMF significantly enhanced root nitrogen (N) acquisition of S. canadensis grown in mixture. Moreover, mycorrhizal-mediated 15N uptake provided direct evidence that I-AMF and A-AMF differed in their affinities with native and invading species. The non-significant effect of A-AMF on K. striata did not result from allelopathy as root exudates of S. canadensis exhibited positive effects on seed germination and biomass of K. striata under naturally occurring concentrations. When considered together, we found that A-AMF facilitated the invasion of S. canadensis through decreasing competitiveness of the native plant K. striata. The results supported our hypothesis and can be used to improve our understanding of an ecosystem-based perspective towards exotic plant invasion.

  3. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Arab, Nafiseh; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance to investigate both

  4. Evaluation of allelopathic potential of safflower genotypes (Carthamus tinctorius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motamedi Marzieh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Forty safflower genotypes were grown under normal irrigation and drought stress. In the first experiment, the allelopathic potential of shoot residues was evaluated using the sandwich method. Each genotype residue (0.4 g was placed in a sterile Petri dish and two layers of agar were poured on that. Radish seeds were placed on agar medium. The radish seeds were cultivated without safflower residues as the controls. The length of the radicle, hypocotyl, and fresh biomass weight and seed germination percentages were measured. A pot experiment was also done on two genotypes with the highest and two with the lowest allelopathic activity selected after screening genotypes in the first experiment. Before entering the reproductive phase, irrigation treatments (normal irrigation and drought stress were applied. Shoots were harvested, dried, milled and mixed with the topsoil of new pots and then radish seeds were sown. The pots with safflower genotypes were used to evaluate the effect of root residue allelopathy. The shoot length, fresh biomass weight, and germination percentage were measured. Different safflower genotypes showed varied allelopathic potential. The results of the first experiment showed that Egypt and Iran-Khorasan genotypes caused maximum inhibitory responses and Australia and Iran-Kerman genotypes resulted in minimum inhibitory responses on radish seedling growth. Fresh biomass weight had the most sensitivity to safflower residues. The results of the pot experiment were consistent with the results of in vitro experiments. Residues produced under drought stress had more inhibitory effects on the measured traits. Safflower root residue may have a higher level of allelochemicals or different allelochemicals than shoot residue.

  5. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species. PMID

  6. Establishment and persistence of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) in disturbed soil as a function of an urban-rural macro-environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZISKA, L. H.; GEORGE, K.; FRENZ, D. A.

    2006-09-28

    No data are available on whether rising carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] or increased air temperature can alter the establishment and persistence of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) within a plant community following soil disturbance. To determine ragweed longevity, we exposed disturbed soil with a common seed bank population to an in situ temperature and [CO2] gradient along an urban-rural transect beginning in early 2002. No other consistent differences in meteorological variables (e.g. wind speed, humidity, PAR, tropospheric ozone) as a function of urbanization were documented over the course of the study (2002-2005). Above-ground measurements of biomass over this period demonstrated that ragweed along the transect responded to urban induced increases in [CO2]/temperature with peak biomass being observed at this location by the end of 2003. However, by the Fall of 2004, and continuing through 2005, urban ragweed populations had dwindled to a few plants. The temporal decline in ragweed populations was not associated with increased disease, herbivory or auto-allelopathy, but was part of a demographic reduction in the total number of annual plant species observed for the urban location. In a separate experiment, we showed that such a demographic shift is consistent with CO2/temperature induced increases in biomass and litter accumulation, with a subsequent reduction in germination / survival of annual plant species. Overall, these data indicate that [CO2]/temperature differences associated with urbanization may increase initial ragweed productivity and pollen production, but suggest that long-term, multi-year persistence of ragweed in the urban macro-environment may be dependent on other factors.

  7. Allelopathic assessment of selected common weeds in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Ain, M. B.; Nornasuha, Y.; Ismail, B. S.

    2016-11-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the allelopathic potential of eight common weed species in Malaysia, namely, Ageratum conyzoides, Tridax procumbens, Cyperus iria, Fimbristylis miliacea, Eleusine indica, Imperata cylindrica, Lygodium flexuosum and Nephrolepis biserrata of different morphological characteristics (broadleaves, sedges, grasses and ferns). The allelopathic study of these weeds was carried out by testing the leaf litter leachate through the Sandwich method and the volatile compounds of these weeds through the Dish pack method with three replicates for each donor species. The results obtained from both methods were statistically analyzed and the means had converted to percentage growth inhibition to determine the inhibition pattern on the radicle and hypocotyl growth of lettuce seedlings. Among the eight weed species tested, Ageratum conyzoides showed the strongest growth inhibition on lettuce radicle elongation (86%) in the sandwich bioassay compared to the control, followed by Tridax procumbens (71%), which both species being broadleaves weeds. In the dish pack bioassay Lygodium flexuosum (fern) demonstrated maximum inhibition on the growth the radicle and hypocotyl for each different distance from the source well. On the other hand, two weed species exhibited enhanced on the growth radicle and hypocotyl when compared to that of the control in dish pack bioassay. Nephrolepis biserrata and Fimbristylis miliacea were the species that showed the highest growth stimulatory effect. The results presented can be utilized as benchmark information for further research on the elucidation of leachates and volatile chemicals involved in allelopathy in nature. The information can also be helpful in the development of new bioactive chemicals from natural products in weed control strategies.

  8. Modifications of the chemical structure of phenolics differentially affect physiological activities in pulvinar cells of Mimosa pudica L. II. Influence of various molecular properties in relation to membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocher, Françoise; Roblin, Gabriel; Chollet, Jean-François

    2017-03-01

    Early prediction of compound absorption by cells is of considerable importance in the building of an integrated scheme describing the impact of a compound on intracellular biological processes. In this scope, we study the structure-activity relationships of several benzoic acid-related phenolics which are involved in many plant biological phenomena (growth, flowering, allelopathy, defense processes). Using the partial least squares (PLS) regression method, the impact of molecular descriptors that have been shown to play an important role concerning the uptake of pharmacologically active compounds by animal cells was analyzed in terms of the modification of membrane potential, variations in proton flux, and inhibition of the osmocontractile reaction of pulvinar cells of Mimosa pudica leaves. The hydrogen bond donors (HBD) and hydrogen bond acceptors (HBA), polar surface area (PSA), halogen ratio (Hal ratio), number of rotatable bonds (FRB), molar volume (MV), molecular weight (MW), and molar refractivity (MR) were considered in addition to two physicochemical properties (logD and the amount of non-dissociated form in relation to pKa). HBD + HBA and PSA predominantly impacted the three biological processes compared to the other descriptors. The coefficient of determination in the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models indicated that a major part of the observed seismonasty inhibition and proton flux modification can be explained by the impact of these descriptors, whereas this was not the case for membrane potential variations. These results indicate that the transmembrane transport of the compounds is a predominant component. An increasing number of implicated descriptors as the biological processes become more complex may reflect their impacts on an increasing number of sites in the cell. The determination of the most efficient effectors may lead to a practical use to improve drugs in the control of microbial attacks on plants.

  9. SAR analysis and bioactive potentials of freshwater and terrestrial cyanobacterial compounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, M; Maruthanayagam, V; Sundararaman, M

    2013-05-01

    Freshwater and terrestrial cyanobacteria resemble the marine forms in producing divergent chemicals such as linear, cyclic and azole containing peptides, alkaloids, cyclophanes, terpenes, lactones, etc. These metabolites have wider biomedical potentials in targeting proteases, cancers, parasites, pathogens and other cyanobacteria and algae (allelopathy). Among the various families of non-marine cyanobacterial peptides reported, many of them are acting as serine protease inhibitors. While the micropeptin family has a preference for chymotrypsin inhibition rather than other serine proteases, the aeruginosin family targets trypsin and thrombin. In addition, cyanobacterial compounds such as scytonemide A, lyngbyazothrins C and D and cylindrocyclophanes were found to inhibit 20S proteosome. Apart from proteases, metabolites blocking the other targets of cancer pathways may exhibit cytotoxic effect. Colon and rectum, breast, lung and prostate are the worst affecting cancers in humans and are deduced to be inhibited by both peptidic and non-peptidic compounds. Moreover, the growth of infections causing parasites such as Plasmodium, Leishmania and Trypanosoma are well controlled by peptides: aerucyclamides A-D, tychonamides and alkaloids: nostocarboline and calothrixins. Likewise, varieties of cyanobacterial compounds tend to inhibit serious infectious disease causing bacterial, fungal and viral agents. Interestingly, portoamides, spiroidesin, nostocyclamide and kasumigamide are the allelopathic peptides determined to suppress the growth of toxic cyanobacteria and nuisance algae. Thus cyanobacterial compounds have a broad bioactive spectrum; the analysis of SAR studies will not only assist to find out the mode of action but also reveal bioactive key components. Thereby, developing the drugs bearing these bioactive skeletons to treat various illnesses is wide open. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  11. Vermicomposting eliminates the toxicity of Lantana (Lantana camara) and turns it into a plant friendly organic fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, N.; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • It is shown for the first time that Lantana can lose its toxicity when vermicomposted. • The Lantana vermicompost is shown to be a good organic fertilizer. • FTIR studies identified Lantana’s toxic constituents destroyed by vermicomposting. • The findings have far-reaching implications in the gainful use of harmful weeds. - Abstract: In evidently the first study of its kind, vermicompost derived solely from a weed known to possess plant and animal toxicity was used to assess its impact on the germination and early growth of several plant species. No pre-composting or supplementation of animal manure was done to generate the vermicompost in order to ensure that the impact is clearly attributable to the weed. Whereas the weed used in this study, Lantana (Lantana camara), is known to possess strong negative allelopathy, besides plant/animal toxicity in other forms, its vermicompost was seen to be a good organic fertilizer as it increased germination success and encouraged growth of all the three botanical species explored by the authors – green gram (Vigna radiata), ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In terms of several physical, chemical and biochemical attributes that were studied, the vermicompost appeared plant-friendly, giving best results in general when employed at concentrations of 1.5% in soil (w/w). Fourier transform infrared spectrometry revealed that the phenols and the sesquiterpene lactones that are responsible for the allelopathic impact of Lantana were largely destroyed in the course of vermicomposting. There is also an indication that lignin content of Lantana was reduced during its vermicomposting. The findings open up the possibility that the billions of tons of phytomass that is generated annually by Lantana and other invasives can be gainfully utilized in generating organic fertilizer via vermicomposting

  12. Allelopatic effect of different caster bean organs (Ricinus communis L. on reducing germination and growth of dodder (Cuscuta campestris Yuncker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M Seyyedi

    2016-05-01

    inflorescence and their aqueous extract concentrations in 5 levels (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10%. The third experiment was conducted with caster bean organs at 4 levels (root, stem, leaf and total plant without inflorescence and decay durations at 8 levels (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 days of decay and control. All experimental data were analyzed by ANOVA and the means were separated by Duncan's multiple range test at 5% probability level. Results and discussion The results of the first and the second experiment showed that aqueous extract of caster bean organs has a significant effect on dry weight, length of seedling and germination of dodder. From the third experiment, decay duration had a significant effect on the mentioned traits. Leaf aqueous extract in comparison with other organs had the most effect on the studied traits. The complete suppression of emergence was observed in 0, 15, 30 and 45 days of decay by using caster bean leaves. In conclusion, caster bean residues showed great potential for reducing germination and growth of dodder. Therefore, allelopatic potential of caster bean can be considered as a sustainable approach in integrated dodder management systems. In the future, the effective concentrations of aqueous extracts of caster bean organs may be useful as sources for producing biological herbicides. References Batish, D.R., Tung, P., Singh, H.P., and Kohli, R.K. 2002. Phytotoxicity of sunflower residues against some summer season crops. Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science 188: 19-24. Bhowmik, P.C., and Inderjit, I. 2003. Challenges and opportunities in implementing allelopathy for natural weed management. Crop Protection 22: 661-671. Jamil, M., Cheema, Z.A., Mushtaq, M.N., Farooq, M., and Cheema, M.A. 2009. Alternative control of wild oat and canary grass in wheat fields by allelopathic plant water extracts. Agronomy for Sustainable Development 29: 475-482. Lanini, W.T., and Kogan, M. 2005. Biology and management of Cucuta in crops. Ciencia e Investigaci

  13. De novo sequencing and analysis of the Ulva linza transcriptome to discover putative mechanisms associated with its successful colonization of coastal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaowen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The green algal genus Ulva Linnaeus (Ulvaceae, Ulvales, Chlorophyta is well known for its wide distribution in marine, freshwater, and brackish environments throughout the world. The Ulva species are also highly tolerant of variations in salinity, temperature, and irradiance and are the main cause of green tides, which can have deleterious ecological effects. However, limited genomic information is currently available in this non-model and ecologically important species. Ulva linza is a species that inhabits bedrock in the mid to low intertidal zone, and it is a major contributor to biofouling. Here, we presented the global characterization of the U. linza transcriptome using the Roche GS FLX Titanium platform, with the aim of uncovering the genomic mechanisms underlying rapid and successful colonization of the coastal ecosystems. Results De novo assembly of 382,884 reads generated 13,426 contigs with an average length of 1,000 bases. Contiguous sequences were further assembled into 10,784 isotigs with an average length of 1,515 bases. A total of 304,101 reads were nominally identified by BLAST; 4,368 isotigs were functionally annotated with 13,550 GO terms, and 2,404 isotigs having enzyme commission (EC numbers were assigned to 262 KEGG pathways. When compared with four other full sequenced green algae, 3,457 unique isotigs were found in U. linza and 18 conserved in land plants. In addition, a specific photoprotective mechanism based on both LhcSR and PsbS proteins and a C4-like carbon-concentrating mechanism were found, which may help U. linza survive stress conditions. At least 19 transporters for essential inorganic nutrients (i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulphur were responsible for its ability to take up inorganic nutrients, and at least 25 eukaryotic cytochrome P450s, which is a higher number than that found in other algae, may be related to their strong allelopathy. Multi-origination of the stress related proteins

  14. Potencial alelopático de espécies nativas na germinação e crescimento inicial de Lactuca sativa L. (Asteraceae Allelopathic potential of native species in Lactuca sativa L. (Asteraceae germination and initial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Maraschin-Silva

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A alelopatia caracteriza-se pelos efeitos danosos ou benéficos sobre o desenvolvimento da vegetação, causados por substâncias químicas produzidas e liberadas para o ambiente por uma planta. Com o objetivo de avaliar o potencial alelopático de espécies brasileiras, foram testados extratos foliares de Cecropia pachystachya Trec. (Urticaceae, Peltophorum dubium (Spreng. Taub. (Fabaceae, Psychotria leiocarpa Cham. & Schltdl (Rubiaceae, Sapium glandulatum (Vell. Pax (Euphorbiaceae e Sorocea bonplandii (Baill. Burg., Lanj. & Boer (Moraceae, utilizando-se bioensaios de germinação e crescimento e alface (Lactuca sativa L. como planta alvo. Nesses bioensaios, foram usados extratos foliares aquosos nas concentrações de 2 e 4%, preparados por maceração estática com água fria e quente. Os extratos das cinco espécies causaram atraso na germinação dos aquênios da alface, bem como efeitos tóxicos no crescimento das plântulas, com redução e enfraquecimento das raízes. Os resultados obtidos mostraram a presença de substâncias químicas inibidoras nos extratos, revelando potencial alelopático para as cinco espécies avaliadas.Allelopathy is characterized by harmful or beneficial effects on vegetation development, caused by chemical substances produced and released into the environment by the plant. Aiming to assess the allelopathic potential of Brazilian species, aqueous leaf extracts of Cecropia pachystachya Trec. (Urticaceae, Peltophorum dubium (Spreng. Taub. (Fabaceae, Psychotria leiocarpa Cham. & Schltdl (Rubiaceae, Sapium glandulatum (Vell. Pax (Euphorbiaceae, and Sorocea bonplandii (Baill. Burger, Lanj. & Boer (Moraceae were tested on lettuce using germination and growth bioassays. In these bioassays, aqueous leaf extracts were used at concentrations of 2 and 4%, prepared by static maceration with cold and hot water. The five species extracts delayed lettuce germination and produced toxic effects on seedling growth, with root

  15. Resveratrol as a growth substrate for bacteria from the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Zohre; Minoia, Marco; Spain, Jim C

    2018-03-09

    Resveratrol is among the best-known secondary plant metabolites because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. It also is an important allelopathic chemical widely credited with protection of plants from pathogens. The ecological role of resveratrol in natural habitats is difficult to establish rigorously because it does not seem to accumulate outside of plant tissue. It is likely that bacterial degradation plays a key role in determining the persistence, and thus the ecological role, of resveratrol in soil. Here we report the isolation of an Acinetobacter species that can use resveratrol as a sole carbon source from the rhizosphere of peanut plants. Both molecular and biochemical techniques indicate that the pathway starts with the conversion of resveratrol to 3,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. The aldehydes are oxidized to substituted benzoates that subsequently enter central metabolism. The gene that encodes the enzyme responsible for the oxidative cleavage of resveratrol was cloned, and expressed in E. coli to establish its function. Its physiological role in the resveratrol catabolic pathway was established by knockouts and by RT-qPCR demonstration of expression during growth on resveratrol. The results establish the presence and capabilities of resveratrol degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere of the peanut plants and set the stage for studies to evaluate the role of the bacteria in plant allelopathy. IMPORTANCE In addition to its antioxidant properties, resveratrol is an example of a broad array of allelopathic chemicals produced by plants to inhibit competitors, herbivores and pathogens. Bacterial degradation of such chemicals in the rhizosphere would reduce the effects of the chemicals. Therefore, it is important to understand the activity and ecological role of bacteria that biodegrade resveratrol near the plants that produce it. This study describes the isolation from the peanut rhizosphere of bacteria that can

  16. De novo sequencing and analysis of the Ulva linza transcriptome to discover putative mechanisms associated with its successful colonization of coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Liang, Chengwei; Mou, Shanli; Fan, Xiao; Xu, Jianfang; Xu, Dong; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2012-10-25

    The green algal genus Ulva Linnaeus (Ulvaceae, Ulvales, Chlorophyta) is well known for its wide distribution in marine, freshwater, and brackish environments throughout the world. The Ulva species are also highly tolerant of variations in salinity, temperature, and irradiance and are the main cause of green tides, which can have deleterious ecological effects. However, limited genomic information is currently available in this non-model and ecologically important species. Ulva linza is a species that inhabits bedrock in the mid to low intertidal zone, and it is a major contributor to biofouling. Here, we presented the global characterization of the U. linza transcriptome using the Roche GS FLX Titanium platform, with the aim of uncovering the genomic mechanisms underlying rapid and successful colonization of the coastal ecosystems. De novo assembly of 382,884 reads generated 13,426 contigs with an average length of 1,000 bases. Contiguous sequences were further assembled into 10,784 isotigs with an average length of 1,515 bases. A total of 304,101 reads were nominally identified by BLAST; 4,368 isotigs were functionally annotated with 13,550 GO terms, and 2,404 isotigs having enzyme commission (EC) numbers were assigned to 262 KEGG pathways. When compared with four other full sequenced green algae, 3,457 unique isotigs were found in U. linza and 18 conserved in land plants. In addition, a specific photoprotective mechanism based on both LhcSR and PsbS proteins and a C4-like carbon-concentrating mechanism were found, which may help U. linza survive stress conditions. At least 19 transporters for essential inorganic nutrients (i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulphur) were responsible for its ability to take up inorganic nutrients, and at least 25 eukaryotic cytochrome P450s, which is a higher number than that found in other algae, may be related to their strong allelopathy. Multi-origination of the stress related proteins, such as glutamate dehydrogenase, superoxide

  17. Time-dependent alterations in growth, photosynthetic pigments and enzymatic defense systems of submerged Ceratophyllum demersum during exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin anatoxin-a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Mi-Hee; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We examined time-dependent metabolic changes in C. demersum exposed to anatoxin-a. •Biotransformation and antioxidative defense mechanisms responded positively to anatoxin-a. •Decline in chlorophylls contents was detected in company with irreversible plant growth inhibition during exposure to anatoxin-a. •Anatoxin-a exhibits phytotoxic allelopathy by provoking oxidative stress. •Macrophytes may have interactions with anatoxin-a in aquatic environments. -- Abstract: Recently, aquatic macrophytes have been considered as promising tools for eco-friendly water management with a low running cost. However, only little information is available thus far regarding the metabolic capacity of macrophytes for coping with cyanobacterial toxins (cyanotoxins) in the aquatic environment. Cyanotoxins have become emerging contaminants of great concern due to the high proliferation of cyanobacteria (cyanobacterial bloom) accelerated by eutrophication and climate change. Anatoxin-a, one of the common and major cyanotoxins, is suggested as a high priority water pollutant for regulatory consideration owing to its notoriously rapid mode of action as a neurotoxin. In this study, the time-course metabolic regulation of the submerged macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum (C. demersum) was investigated during exposure to anatoxin-a at an environmentally relevant concentration (15 μg/L). Biotransformation and antioxidative systems in C. demersum responded positively to anatoxin-a through the promoted synthesis of most of the involved enzymes within 8 h. Maximum enzyme activities were exhibited after 24 or 48 h of exposure to anatoxin-a. However, an apparent decline in enzyme activities was also observed at longer exposure duration (168 and 336 h) in company with high steady-state levels of cell internal H 2 O 2 , which showed its highest level after 48 h. Meanwhile, irreversible inhibitory influence on chlorophyll content (vitality) was noticed, whereas the ratio of

  18. Modelling the effects of PSII inhibitor pulse exposure on two algae in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2018-03-01

    A weakness of standard testing procedures is that they do not consider interactions between organisms, and they focus only on single species. Furthermore, these procedures do not take into account pulse exposure. However, pulse exposure is of particular importance because in streams, after crop application and during and after precipitation, herbicide concentrations fluctuate widely and can exceed the Annual Average Environmental Quality Standards (AA-EQS), which aim to protect the aquatic environment. The sensitivity of the algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in a co-culture exposed to pulses is thus analysed in this study. As a first step, the growths of the algae in co-culture are investigated. For initial cell densities fixed, respectively, to 100,000 and 50,000 cells/mL, the growth of each alga is exponential over at least 48 h. S. vacuolatus seems to influence the growth of P. subcapitata negatively. Allelopathy is a possible explanation for this growth inhibition. The toxicity of the herbicide isoproturon is later tested on the algae S. vacuolatus and P. subcapitata cultured alone and in the co-culture. Despite the supplementary stress on the algae in the co-culture competing for nutrients, the toxicity of the herbicide is lower for the two algae when they are in the co-culture than when they are in separated culture. A model is adapted and used to predict the cell-density inhibition on the alga S. vacuolatus in the co-culture with the alga P. subcapitata exposed to a pulse concentration of isoproturon. Four laboratory experiments are performed to validate the model. The comparison between the laboratory and the modelled effects shows good agreement. The differences can be considered minor most of time. For future studies, it is important to ensure that the cell count is precise, as it is used to determine the parameters of the model. The differences can be also induced by the fact that the cell number of the alga P

  19. Allelopathic potential of rice residues of selected rice varieties (Oryza sativa L. against Echinochloa crus-galli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Ranagalage

    2014-12-01

    2.0g by 12%. Therefore, it could be suggested that the allelopathic potential of rice residue significantly changes with cultivar and amount of residue mix with soil. Knowledge of rice allelophathic properties of rice residue will offer several possibilities for ecological management of weeds in paddy fields of Sri Lanka. Keywords: -      Allelopathy, Echinocloa crus-galli,  Inhibition, Oryza sativa

  20. Cover crop management in the weed control and productive performance in cornManejo de plantas de cobertura no controle de plantas daninhas e desempenho produtivo da cultura do milho

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    Pedro Valério Dutra de Moraes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar espécies vegetais com potencial alelopático, associados às práticas de manejo e ao uso de herbicida nicosulfuron, no controle de plantas daninhas e nos componentes de produtividade da cultura do milho. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi em blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. O experimento foi composto por três fatores: espécies de cobertura, manejo das coberturas e aplicação ou não de herbicida nicosulfuron em pós-emergência. As variáveis avaliadas foram: número de plantas daninhas, número de fileiras de grãos, número de grãos por fileira, número de grãos por espiga e produtividade de grãos de milho. A cobertura de azevém, em geral, reduz o número de plantas daninhas emergidas e favorece o desempenho produtivo do milho. O manejo das plantas de cobertura com roçada e retirada da palha reduz a produtividade do milho. A maior produtividade do milho, foi observada com a aplicação de nicosulfuron em pós-emergência, independente da cultura de cobertura ou do manejo adotado. The objective of the study was evaluate the allelopathy of cover species, associated to management practices and use of nicosulfuron herbicide on the productive performance of corn. The experimental design consisted of complete randomized block with four replications. The treatments were: cover species, cover management and application or not of post-emergence herbicide. The variables evaluated were: number of weeds, number of rows kernels, number of kernels rows, number of kernels ear and grain yield of corn. Lolium multiflorum, reduced the number of emerged weeds and provides the best results in productive performance. The management simulated grazing, does not favor the yield of corn. The application of nicosulfuron in post-emergence, along with the allelopathic activity increases the productive performance of corn, regardless of cover crop or soil management.

  1. Allelopathic evidence in Brachiaria decumbens and its potential to invade the Brazilian Cerrados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Gorgone Barbosa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to look for evidence of allelochemicals in B. decumbens, in parts of the plant from where they could easily be released to the environment. The germination inhibition of Phalaris canariensis, Lactuca sativa (standard species and Melinis minutiflora, another invasive African grass, was tested using B. decumbens germinating seeds and aqueous leachates of the roots, green and senescent leaves, at 5, 10 and 20% w/v. Both the germinating seeds and the aqueous leachates of B. decumbens reduced the germination of the species tested; the effectiveness of the aqueous leachates increased according to concentration. Apparently, the competitive advantage of B. decumbens in the cerrados could be amplified via allelopathy.Invasão biológica é uma das maiores causas atuais da perda de biodiversidade. Várias espécies que se tornam invasoras produzem substâncias fitotóxicas que aumentam sua capacidade competitiva; assim, a alelopatia é uma estratégia capaz de potencializar o sucesso de invasão. Brachiaria decumbens, uma gramínea africana, invadiu os cerrados brasileiros e representa, atualmente, uma séria ameaça à biota regional. Neste ensaio, verificamos a presença de aleloquímicos em partes de B. decumbens das quais poderiam ser facilmente liberados para o ambiente. Testamos a inibição da germinação de Phalaris canariensis, Lactuca sativa (espécies padrão e Melinis minutiflora (outra gramínea africana invasora usando sementes de B. decumbens e soluções aquosas lixiviadas de suas raízes, folhas verdes e folhas senescentes, a 5, 10 e 20% de peso do material por volume de água. Tanto as sementes como as soluções lixiviadas de decumbens reduziram a germinação das outras espécies; a eficiência dos lixiviados aumentou de acordo com a concentração da solução. Acreditamos que a grande vantagem competitiva de B. decumbens no cerrado possa ser amplificada pela alelopatia.

  2. Miscanthus plants used as an alternative biofuel material. The basic studies on ecology and molecular evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chang-Hung [Graduate Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, College of Life Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung 404 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Miscanthus Anderss, widely distributed in Asia and Pacific Islands, possesses 20 species. Of which 8 species and 1 variety were recorded in Chinese Mainland; 6 species and 1 variety found in Japan; 5 species and 3 varieties distributed in Taiwan; 3 species documented in the Philippines; and rest of species have been recorded in Jawa, eastern Himalaya, and Sikkim. The plant is a C{sub 4} perennial grass with high productivity of biomass. In the 19th and early 20th centuries in Taiwan, Miscanthus was a very important crop used for forage grass, clothing, and shelter, etc. The relatively high germination, and high yield of biomass made the plant available for people of Taiwan including aboriginal. The taxonomic study of Miscanthus plants was much done by several scientists, and its ecological study has been only taken by the present author since 1972. Chou and his associates paid a great attention to elucidate the mechanism of dominance of Miscanthus vegetation and found that allelopathy plays an important role. In addition, the population biology of Miscanthus taxa by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses technique to examine the patterns of peroxidase and esterase among populations (over 100) of Miscanthus in Taiwan were conducted. They also elucidated the phylogenetic relationship among species and varieties in Taiwan. Chou and Ueng proposed an evolutionary trend of Miscanthus species, indicating that the Miscanthus sinensis was assumed to be the origin of Miscanthus Anderss, which evolved to M. sinensis var. formosana, and M. sinensis var. flavidus, and M. sinensis var. transmorrisonensis, and Miscanthus floridulus was thought to be an out group of M. sinensis complex. Moreover, molecular phylogeny was attempted to clarify the population heterogeneity of M. sinensis complex, resulting in a substantial information. It would be available for making hybridization between Miscanthus species and its related species, such as Saccharum (sugar cane) spp. which is a

  3. Time-dependent alterations in growth, photosynthetic pigments and enzymatic defense systems of submerged Ceratophyllum demersum during exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin anatoxin-a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Mi-Hee; Pflugmacher, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.pflugmacher@tu-berlin.de

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •We examined time-dependent metabolic changes in C. demersum exposed to anatoxin-a. •Biotransformation and antioxidative defense mechanisms responded positively to anatoxin-a. •Decline in chlorophylls contents was detected in company with irreversible plant growth inhibition during exposure to anatoxin-a. •Anatoxin-a exhibits phytotoxic allelopathy by provoking oxidative stress. •Macrophytes may have interactions with anatoxin-a in aquatic environments. -- Abstract: Recently, aquatic macrophytes have been considered as promising tools for eco-friendly water management with a low running cost. However, only little information is available thus far regarding the metabolic capacity of macrophytes for coping with cyanobacterial toxins (cyanotoxins) in the aquatic environment. Cyanotoxins have become emerging contaminants of great concern due to the high proliferation of cyanobacteria (cyanobacterial bloom) accelerated by eutrophication and climate change. Anatoxin-a, one of the common and major cyanotoxins, is suggested as a high priority water pollutant for regulatory consideration owing to its notoriously rapid mode of action as a neurotoxin. In this study, the time-course metabolic regulation of the submerged macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum (C. demersum) was investigated during exposure to anatoxin-a at an environmentally relevant concentration (15 μg/L). Biotransformation and antioxidative systems in C. demersum responded positively to anatoxin-a through the promoted synthesis of most of the involved enzymes within 8 h. Maximum enzyme activities were exhibited after 24 or 48 h of exposure to anatoxin-a. However, an apparent decline in enzyme activities was also observed at longer exposure duration (168 and 336 h) in company with high steady-state levels of cell internal H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which showed its highest level after 48 h. Meanwhile, irreversible inhibitory influence on chlorophyll content (vitality) was noticed, whereas the ratio of

  4. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa). These steppes show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure. Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). On the other hand in "resource islands" and in surrounding bare soil exists the belowground zone of influence. The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). Secondary compounds and allelopathy restrict other species growth and contribute to patchy plant distribution. Active root segregation affects not only neighbourś growth but also soil microbial activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration; net nitrogen mineralization). The experimental plots were located in the province Almería in Sierra de los Filabres Mountains near the village Gérgal (southeast Spain) in the small catchment which is situated between 1090 - 1165 m a.s.l. The area with extent of 82 000 m2 is affected by soil degradation. The climate is semiarid Mediterranean. The mean annual rainfall is of about 240 mm mostly concentrated in autumn and spring. The mean annual temperature is 13.9° C. The studied soil has a loam to sandy clay texture and is classified as Lithosol (FAO-ISRIC and ISSS, 1998). The vegetation of these areas is an

  5. Estudo fitoquímico e alelopático do extrato de caule de sucupira-branca (Pterodon emarginatus Phytochemistry and allelophatic study of Pterodon emarginatus stem extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Hernández-Terrones

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A alelopatia é um dos fenômenos pouco estudados no Cerrado. Trata-se de uma ocorrência natural, resultante da liberação de substâncias capazes de estimular ou inibir o desenvolvimento de outras plantas. Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar a ação alelopática de extratos da sucupira-branca (Pterodon emarginatus sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento da raiz e parte aérea do capim-colonião (Panicum maximum. Bioensaios de germinação realizados em placas de Petri comprovaram que o extrato metanólico do tronco dessa planta, a 150 ppm, inibiu 83% do desenvolvimento da raiz, 75% da parte aérea e 30% da germinação de sementes de capim-colonião. Em casa de vegetação, os resultados de inibição foram de 83% para a parte aérea, 80% para a raiz e 63% para a germinação, mas somente na concentração de 400 ppm. Frações do extrato metanólico bruto obtidas por cromatografia de coluna cromatográfica não reproduziram os resultados de inibição obtidos inicialmente. A fração mais ativa (diclorometano/clorofórmio foi analisada por CG/EM. Ela é constituída fundamentalmente por substâncias alifáticas de cadeia longa: fitol (13,5%, ácido oléico (12,8%, linoleiladato de metila (10,9% e ácido palmítico (6,9%. Foram detectados, também, os compostos 1,2,4-trimetil e isopropilbenzenos (12,2% e as cetonas isoméricas isopropenilmetilcetona e 3-penten-2-ona (7,3%. Três compostos desconhecidos também se destacaram: um de baixa massa molar (98 Da, 13,5% e dois de massa molar elevada (13,6%.Allelopathy is one of the natural phenomena little studied in the cerrado. It is the result of the release of substances capable of stimulating or inhibiting the growth of other plants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the allelophatic action of the white sucupira (Pterodon emarginatus stem extract on the germination and development of colonião grass (Panicum maximum under germination, root and aerial part development of coloni

  6. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and

  7. Potential phytotoxic and shading effects of invasive Fallopia (Polygonaceae taxa on the germination of native dominant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Moravcová

    2011-08-01

    riparian-like habitats where it often encounters U. dioica populations, while F. ×bohemica tends to occur more often in ruderal sites with a high representation of C. epigejos; this might imply that each of the knotweed species exhibits a stronger effect on native species that are dominant in habitats they typically invade. The weakest phytotoxic effect of F. japonica corresponds to the results of previous studies that found this species to be generally a weaker competitor than its two congeners. Although the results of our experiments cannot be taken as a direct evidence for allelopathic effects acting in the field, the demonstrated potential phytotoxic effect of invasive Fallopia species on the germination of native species suggests that allelopathy may play a role in the strong impact of knotweed invasion on species diversity of invaded communities observed in the field.

  8. Allelopathic effect of aqueous extracts of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and of Casearia sylvestris Sw. on cropsEfeito alelopático de extratos aquosos de Eucalyptus globulus Labill. e de Casearia sylvestris Sw. sobre espécies cultivadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasielle Soares Gusman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is characterized by the harmful or benefic effects caused by secondary metabolites, that are produced by plants, microorganisms or fungi and are released in the environment, on the development of natural biological systems or implemented ones. This study aimed to evaluate the allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts of eucalypt (Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and wild coffee (Casearia sylvestris Sw. on the germination and initial development of mustard (Brassica campestris L., cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. cv. capitata, broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. cv. italica, kale (Brassica pekinensis L., lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. grand rapids, tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Miller, turnip (Brassica rapa L., rucola (Eruca sativa L. and radish (Raphanus sativus L.. Six concentrations of each aqueous extract were tested (10, 30, 50, 70, 90 and 100% and compared to control (distilled water, with five replicates of each concentration, being ten seeds of each crop distributed in each replicate. The aqueous extracts of E. globulus and C. sylvestris reduced significantly the percentage of seed germination, the index of germination speed and the initial growth of the above ground part and roots of all cultivated species, being the reduction of these parameters higher with the increment of the aqueous extracts concentration, which led to thicker and atrophied roots with a higher number of absorbent hairs. Therefore, the results indicate an existence of allelopathic potential of E. globulus and C. sylvestris.A alelopatia caracteriza-se pelos efeitos danosos ou benéficos que metabólitos secundários produzidos por plantas, microrganismos ou fungos liberados no ambiente exercem sobre o desenvolvimento de sistemas biológicos naturais ou implantados. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito alelopático de extratos aquosos de eucalipto (Eucalyptus globulus Labill. e guaçatonga (Casearia sylvestris Sw. na germinação e no crescimento inicial de

  9. Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative Final Scientific/Technical Report Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, B. L. [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Roelke, Daniel [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Brooks, Bryan [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Grover, James [Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-10-11

    blooms. Our numerical modeling results support the idea that cyanobacteria, through allelopathy, control the timing of golden algae blooms in Lake Granbury. The in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco also revealed that as golden algae blooms develop, there are natural enemies (a species of rotifer, and a virus) that help slow the population growth. Again, better characterization of these organisms is a high priority as it may be key to managing golden algae blooms. Our laboratory and in-lake experiments and field monitoring have shown that nutrient additions will remove toxicity and prevent golden algae from blooming. In fact, other algae displace the golden algae after nutrient additions. Additions of ammonia are particularly effective, even at low doses (much lower than what is employed in fish hatchery ponds). Application of ammonia in limited areas of lakes, such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. The laboratory experiments and field monitoring also show that the potency of toxins produced by P. parvum is greatly reduced when water pH is lower, closer to neutral levels. Application of mild acid to limited areas of lakes (but not to a level where acidic conditions are created), such as in coves, should be explored as a management option. Finally, our field monitoring and mathematical modeling revealed that flushing/dilution at high enough levels could prevent P. parvum from forming blooms and/or terminate existing blooms. This technique could work using deeper waters within a lake to flush the surface waters of limited areas of the same lakes, such as in coves and should be explored as a management option. In this way, water releases from upstream reservoirs would not be necessary and there would be no addition of nutrients in the lake.

  10. Chemical Composition and Allelopathyc Activity of Essential Oil of Lippia sidoides Cham Composición química y actividad alelopática del aceite esencial de Lippia sidoides Cham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Araújo Marco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The allelopathy is a process for which products of the secondary metabolism, as terpenes phenolic, of a certain vegetal intervene significantly, generally of antagonistic form, in the development of other species of plants. The objective of this work was to chemically characterize the essential oil of Lippia sidoides Cham. growing in the Cariri cearense region, Brazil, and evaluate the allelopathyc effect of this oil on the germination of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L., arugula (Eruca sativa Mill., and cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L., in pre-plantation application. The monoterpene thymol (84.90% has been identified as the principal constituent in the essential oil. The experiment was done in randomized complete block, in 4 x 3 factorial; being used four essential oil combinations applied in three different species in pre-plantation applications. Emergence velocity index (EVI, germination percentage and mean time to germination (MTG, had been analyzed through daily counting carried out until the 14th day after sowing. Through qualitative analysis performed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS were identified seven chemical constituents representing 97.82% of essential oil of L. sidoides, being that the constituent present in greater concentration in oil was the thymol (84.90%. Could be verified the occurrence of the negative allelopathyc effect of lettuce crop, because its present low EVI and greater MTG, for the other vegetable species there were no allelopathic effect.La alelopatía es un proceso mediante el cual productos metabólicos secundarios, tales como terpenos fenoles, producidos por una planta en particular interfieren significativamente, y de manera antagónica, en el desarrollo de otras especies vegetales. Nuestros objetivos fueron caracterizar químicamente el aceite esencial de Lippia sidoides Cham., cultivada en la región de Cariri Ceará, y evaluar el efecto alelopático del aceite aplicado en pre-siembra en

  11. Atividade alelopática de extratos de diferentes orgãos de Caesalpinia ferrea na germinação de alface Allelopathic activity of extracts from different organs of Caesalpinia ferrea on lettuce germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreya Kaliana de Oliveira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A alelopatia pode afetar muitos aspectos da ecologia das plantas, incluindo a ocorrência, crescimento, sucessão de plantas, estrutura das comunidades, dominância, diversidade e produtividade. Neste trabalho, o objetivo foi avaliar o potencial alelopático de diversos órgãos de jucá (Caesalpinea ferrea sobre a germinação de sementes e desenvolvimento de plântulas de alface (Lactuca sativa. Foi usado o delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado no esquema fatorial 2x5, com dois métodos de extração (25 e 100°C e cinco concentrações do extrato bruto (0, 25, 50, 75 e 100% para cada órgão avaliado: folhas, cascas e vagens maduras de C. ferrea, em quatro repetições de 25 sementes da alface 'Mônica SF FI'. As características avaliadas foram porcentagem de germinação (PG, índice de velocidade de germinação (IVG, porcentagem de plântulas normais (PN e anormais (PA, comprimentos da parte aérea (CPA e da raiz (CR de plântulas de alface. Os extratos de folhas e de vagens de C. ferrea obtidos a quente (100°C reduziram a porcentagem de germinação de L. sativa em relação à testemunha (0%. Nas maiores concentrações dos extratos de todos os órgãos, houve alta PA (atrofiamento da raiz, queima e escurecimento da radícula, encurvamento do caulículo, geotropismo negativo e menor CPA e CR, comparado à testemunha. Os extratos dos diferentes órgãos de C. ferrea apresentam atividade alelopática inibindo o desenvolvimento de plântulas de alface.Allelopathy can affect many aspects of plant ecology, including the occurrence, growth, plant succession, community structure, dominance, diversity and productivity of plants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the allelopathic potential of various organs of jucá (Caesalpinea ferrea on seed germination and seedling development of lettuce (Lactuca sativa. It was used in a completely randomized 2x5 factorial arrangement, with two extraction methods (25 and 100°C and

  12. Strategies of Transition to Sustainable Agriculture in Iran II- Inputs Replacement and Designing Agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Koocheki

    2018-02-01

    the allelopathy, reduced and conservation tillage, crop rotation and intercropping were the main approaches for inputs replacement. In section of agro-ecosystem designing, we designed the replaced systems based on increasing inputs efficiency approach (first step and also replacement of conventional inputs with ecological inputs (second step. We considered the parameters about water, soil, pest management, biodiversity, climate change, low inputs systems, margin regions and environmental hazards in designing section. In designing sustainable agroecosystems, the designing of each component was considered in relation to others components and finally designed the total of agroecosystem as on society. Results and Discussion The results of studies showed that in most cases, mechanical control of weed in addition to environmental benefits can be most effective than chemical control. Crop rotation can be considered as a suitable replacement method than chemical herbicides. Intercropping was found as an appropriate approach for pest control. Using the allelophatic properties of plants had a positive role for pest and weed control in Iran. Increasing the biodiversity must be considered in transition to sustainable agriculture. Crop rotation, organic fertilizers and intercropping were found the effective approaches for improving biodiversity in agro-ecosystems. Sustainability of agro-ecosystem is closed with soil sustainability. The studies showed that using organic chemical, remaining residual on soil, conservation tillage, crop rotation and intercropping spatially with legumes are the improving approaches for physical-chemical characteristics of soil and replacement for chemical fertilizers. Based on the researches, one main goal for achieving to sustainable agriculture was found minimizing energy consumption. Efficient use of energy in agriculture will prevent destruction of natural resources, and promote sustainable agriculture as an economical production system. Thus

  13. Efeito alelopático de folhas de Solanum lycocarpum A. St.-Hil. (Solanaceae na germinação e crescimento de Sesamum indicum L. (Pedaliaceae sob diferentes temperaturas Allelopathic effect of Solanum lycocarpum A. St.-Hil. leaves on the germination and growth of Sesamum indicum L.(Pedaliaceae under different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Caldas Oliveira

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Alelopatia pode ser definida como o efeito maléfico ou benéfico que uma planta exerce sobre a outra por meio de compostos químicos liberados no ambiente. Diversas espécies do gênero Solanum apresentam evidências de propriedades alelopáticas. S. lycocarpum A. St.-Hil (lobeira é espécie de ampla distribuição em ambientes perturbados do Cerrado. No presente trabalho foram investigados efeitos alelopáticos de extratos de folhas de lobeira na germinação e no crescimento do gergelim (Sesamum indicum L.. Extratos aquosos das folhas foram preparados nas concentrações de 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% e 5% (p/v. A osmolaridade dos extratos foi medida e soluções de polietileno glicol (PEG 6000, de osmolaridade similar, foram preparadas para avaliar possíveis efeitos osmóticos dos extratos aquosos. Nos testes de germinação, as sementes de gergelim foram colocadas em placas de Petri forradas com papel de filtro com a solução a ser testada e observadas a cada 8h. Para os experimemtos de crescimento, sementes de gergelim foram germinadas em água e posteriormente dispostas para crescimento nos extratos. Após 5 dias, foram medidos os comprimentos da parte aérea e radicular das plântulas. Todos os experimentos foram conduzidos a 22 ºC, 30 ºC e 38 ºC. Observou-se que os extratos de folhas não afetaram a germinabilidade, mas aumentaram o tempo médio de germinação em uma relação próxima à dose-dependente, nas três temperaturas. Quanto ao crescimento, a parte radicular foi a mais afetada pelos extratos aquosos, apresentando redução no tamanho, necroses, ausência de pêlos absorventes e formação de raízes laterais. Os efeitos dos extratos no crescimento das plântulas foram mais evidentes a 38 ºC. Os experimentos conduzidos com soluções de PEG 6000 mostraram que os efeitos observados na presença dos extratos não são de natureza osmótica.Allelopathy should be defined as any stimulatory or inhibitory effect by one plant on another

  14. Padrão de resposta de Mimosa pudica e Senna obtusifolia à atividade potencialmente alelopática de espécies de Poaceae Response pattern of Mimosa pudica e Senna obtusifolia to potentially allelopathic activity of Poaceae species

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    A.P.S. Souza Filho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A alelopatia é um importante mediador de interferências que alteram a dinâmica de espécies de plantas em sistemas agrícolas. Neste trabalho, procurou-se determinar a existência de padrão de respostas das plantas daninhas Mimosa pudica e Senna obtusifolia a espécies da família Poaceae, via interação entre espécies e frações e ordenamento dos efeitos. Bioensaios de germinação de sementes e alongamento da radícula e do hipocótilo foram desenvolvidos, em condições controladas. Os testes foram realizados utilizando-se extratos hidroalcoólicos na concentração de 1,0% das frações folha, raiz e sementes de quatro espécies de Poaceae. Diferenças na intensidade dos efeitos para os fatores espécie e fração foram verificadas. O padrão de atividade observado foi de Paspalum maritimum apresentar as inibições mais intensas. Entre as espécies de Brachiaria, as inibições mais intensas foram produzidas por B. brizantha. Houve resposta efetiva para a especificidade entre espécies e fração para a germinação e alongamento da radícula, especialmente na espécie Mimosa pudica. Apenas para os extratos de P. maritimum foram observadas especificidade e efetividade em relação à germinação de sementes e alongamento da radícula da espécie Senna obtusifolia. A fração folha foi mais efetiva nas inibições, sobretudo na espécie P. maritimum. Comparativamente, a espécie Mimosa pudica foi mais sensível aos efeitos dos extratos, especialmente em relação ao desenvolvimento da radícula e do hipocótilo. A intensidade dos efeitos alelopáticos variou na seguinte ordem: alongamento da radícula > germinação de sementes > alongamento do hipocótilo. A ordenação dos resultados, para os indicadores de inibição, indicou discriminação no padrão para as espécies receptoras, o que sugere especificidade dos extratos.Allelopathy is an important device to measure interferences affecting the dynamics of plant species in

  15. Análise comparativa do potencial alelopático do extrato hidroalcoólico e do óleo essencial de folhas de cipó-d'alho (Bignoniaceae Comparative analyses of the allelopathic potential of the hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of "Cipo-d'alho" (Bignoniaceae leaves

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    A.P.S. Souza Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A alelopatia é um importante mecanismo que influencia a estabilidade de agroecossistemas. A identificação desse caráter, em muitos casos, realiza-se via análise dos efeitos de extratos brutos polares. No presente trabalho, caracterizou-se a atividade alelopática do cipó-d'alho (Mansoa standleyi - Bignoniaceae, analisando-se, comparativamente, o extrato hidroalcoólico e o óleo essencial das folhas da planta, procurando-se estabelecer a necessidade de se considerar, em estudos dessa natureza, a abordagem envolvendo extratos apolares. Realizaram-se bioensaios de germinação e desenvolvimento da radícula e do hipocótilo de malícia (Mimosa pudica, em períodos de dez dias, empregando-se concentrações de 0,5%, 1,0% e 2,0%. Foram identificados, ainda, os principais constituintes químicos do óleo essencial. Os resultados indicaram que tanto o extrato hidroalcoólico como o óleo essencial apresentaram potencial para inibir a germinação e o desenvolvimento da radícula e do hipocótilo. O extrato hidroalcoólico manifestou maior potencial inibitório sobre a germinação, enquanto o óleo essencial promoveu inibições mais expressivas sobre o desenvolvimento da radícula e do hipocótilo. Os efeitos estiveram positivamente associados à concentração, com efeitos máximos e mínimos obtidos nas concentrações de 2,0% e 0,5%, respectivamente. Compostos sulfurados, como o dissulfeto de dialila (42,15% e o trissulfeto de dialila (11,25%, isoladamente ou em associação, estão envolvidos nos efeitos alelopáticos promovidos pelo óleo essencial. Adicionalmente, os resultados obtidos apontam para a necessidade de se considerar a utilização de extratos apolares quando da análise da atividade alelopática de uma dada planta, especialmente se não houver informações sobre a produção de óleo essencial pela planta prospectada.Allelopathy is an important mechanism that affects the stability of agro-eco systems. The identification of