WorldWideScience

Sample records for alleged social implications

  1. Darwin and Darwinism: the (alleged) social implications of the origin of species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, H Allen

    2009-11-01

    Most scientific theories, even revolutionary ones, change the practice of a particular science but have few consequences for culture or society at large. But Darwinism, it has often been said, is different in this respect. Since the publication of The Origin of Species, many have claimed that Darwinism has a number of profound social implications. Here, I briefly consider three of these: the economic, the political, and the religious. I suggest that, for the most part, these supposed implications have been misconstrued or exaggerated. Indeed, it is reasonably clear that the chain of implication sometimes primarily ran in the opposite direction-from, for instance, economics and political theory to Darwinism.

  2. 78 FR 22361 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations of Unfairness, Prejudice, Partiality, Bias, Misconduct, or Discrimination by Administrative...

  3. 78 FR 8217 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations of Unfairness, Prejudice, Partiality, Bias, Misconduct, or Discrimination by Administrative...

  4. 78 FR 9987 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations of Unfairness, Prejudice, Partiality, Bias, Misconduct, or Discrimination by Administrative...

  5. A Social Identity Approach to Understanding Responses to Child Sexual Abuse Allegations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minto, Kiara; Hornsey, Matthew J.; Gillespie, Nicole; Healy, Karen; Jetten, Jolanda

    2016-01-01

    Two studies investigated the role of group allegiances in contributing to the failure of institutions to appropriately respond to allegations of child sexual abuse. In Study 1, 601 participants read a news article detailing an allegation of child sexual abuse against a Catholic Priest. Catholics were more protective of the accused–and more skeptical of the accuser—than other participants, an effect that was particularly pronounced among strongly identified Catholics. In Study 2 (N = 404), the tendency for Catholics to be more protective of the accused and more skeptical of the accuser than non-Catholics was replicated. Moreover, these effects held independently of the objective likelihood that the accused was guilty. Overall, the data show that group loyalties provide a psychological motivation to disbelieve child abuse allegations. Furthermore, the people for whom this motivation is strongest are also the people who are most likely to be responsible for receiving and investigating allegations: highly identified ingroup members. The findings highlight the psychological mechanisms that may limit the ability of senior Church figures to conduct impartial investigations into allegations of child abuse within the Church. PMID:27111546

  6. ["Street" medication in Burkina Faso: local names, social relationships, and alleged therapeutic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale, Augustin; Ladner, Joël

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative assessment, based on discussions and discourse collected in interviews with members of the general population, addresses the popular view of pharmaceutical drugs in Burkina Faso. The main results demonstrate a strong preference for drugs sold in the street and their largely "off-label" uses. These drugs not only treat defined diseases but also generate street discussions, popular images and social relationships that lead to their consumption, sometimes excessive. Furthermore, the links between the legal and illegal street markets, related in part to the legal status of different drugs, also leads to questions about good and bad, true and false. These distinctions, considered as labels, influence the population's behavior and attitude concerning street medication.

  7. Implications of social structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Josefine Bohr

    social environment of the individual. In the last two studies, we investigate the role of social structure for cooperation in a classic natural system for behavioural research, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), by means of computer simulations. Cooperation contradicts evolutionary theory......, we investigate empirically the role of the social environment of individuals for their communication patterns. Our study species is a song bird, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus). The results suggest that individual communication in this species is influenced by features of the local...... and requires special explanations. Theory predicts that heterogeneous social structure can support and promote cooperation in populations. Our simulations suggest that social structure may not be able to explain the presence of cooperation in the guppy system. Overall the thesis provides new insights...

  8. Alleged biological father incest: a forensic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Vânia; Jardim, Patrícia; Taveira, Francisco; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo J; Magalhães, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Paternal incest is one of the most serious forms of intrafamilial sexual abuse with clinical, social, and legal relevance. A retrospective study was performed, based on forensic reports and judicial decisions of alleged cases of biological paternal incest of victims under 18 years old (n = 215) from 2003 to 2008. Results highlight that in a relevant number of cases: victims were female; the abuse begun at an early age with reiteration; the alleged perpetrator presented a history of sexual crimes against children; sexual practices were physically poorly intrusive, which associated with a forensic medical evaluation performed more than 72 h after the abuse, explain partially the absence of physical injuries or other evidence-these last aspects are different from extrafamilial cases. In conclusion, observations about paternal incest are likely to exacerbate the psychosocial consequences of the abuse and may explain the difficulty and delay in detect and disclose these cases. Few cases were legally prosecuted and convicted.

  9. Alleged lethal sorcery in East Timor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollanen, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of cultural and social perspectives exists on the concept of sudden and unexpected death. In countries, without a formal system of death investigation, sudden death is shrouded in mysticism often based on traditional belief systems. This cultural perspective on sudden death is often at variance with medical and forensic concepts and may include explanations such as sorcery, magic, and voodoo. In this case report, the postmortem findings in an alleged victim of lethal 'black magic', known as ema halo by the indigenous people of East Timor, is described. The alleged victim died suddenly in front of witnesses. At autopsy, marked dilation of a bicuspid aortic valve with annuloaortic ectasia and a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm was found after exhumation of the body. The findings mitigated the local belief in witchcraft and established a natural manner of death.

  10. Social Implications in Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Kaye Spence

    Such topics as death, divorce, old age, poverty, crime, racism, and handicaps are becoming the subjects of novels for young people and of picture books for children. If these books are to help children deal with social issues, conflicts, and concerns, they should foster realistic rather than stereotypical attitudes. Many books, for example,…

  11. Social implications of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłak, Anna; Raciborski, Filip; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Social consequences of a disease constitute limitations in performing roles relating to working life as well as family and social life caused by the disease, mainly chronic. The aim of the study was to analyze the social consequences of rheumatic diseases in the aspect of disability pensions with respect to incapacity for work and quality of life. The occurrence of rheumatic diseases is related not only to increased risk of different types of organic changes, but above all disability. In Europe almost 50% of persons suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system who are currently unemployed were breadwinners. Nearly 60% of them received legal disability status. The loss of work ability is, among other things, the consequence of progressive disability. In Europe 40% of persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had to stop working due to the disease. Most of the persons diagnosed with RA were of working age. It results in the decrease in the quality of life as well as economic difficulties (decreased incomes and increased disease-related costs). In Poland the results of the analysis of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) of first-time disability recognition issued for the purpose of disability pensions in 2014 showed that the incapacity for work was caused by diseases relating to general health condition (65.5%). Diseases of the musculoskeletal system were the cause of partial inability to work of 21.6% of persons who received a disability pension for the first time (as many as 5,349 certificates were issued). Early diagnosis and implementation of effective treatment are the necessary conditions for a patient to sustain activity, both professional and social, which is of crucial importance to reduce the negative effects of the disease.

  12. Interdisciplinary evaluations of alleged sexual abuse cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudes, P K; Martone, M

    1992-06-01

    Children who are alleged to have been sexually abused often go through gruelling interrogations to relate their experiences to adults and, even then, most are not viewed as reliable sources of information. The Victim Sensitive Interviewing Program (VSIP) was initiated to decrease the number of interviews endured by a child who allegedly had been sexually abused. The program brought together the disciplines involved in the evaluation of these cases: hospital-based social worker and pediatrician, state child protective agency worker, police, and assistant state's attorney. This team established a protocol for an investigative interview to be conducted by a team member. Pre-VSIP sexual abuse evaluations from 1985 and 1986 (38) were compared with VSIP evaluations (226) from 1987 and 1988. There was no significant difference between the two groups in relation to gender or age of victim, physical symptoms, physical findings, sexually transmitted diseases present, age of perpetrator, or length of stay in hospital. However, there were significant differences between the two groups in (1) number of interviews, 11% pre-VSIP vs 79% VSIP receiving only one interview (P less than .001); (2) number of interviewers, 24% pre-VSIP vs 88% VSIP were interviewed by only one interviewer (P less than .001); (3) indicated cases of sexual abuse, 68% pre-VSIP vs 88% VSIP (P less than .006); (4) identification of the perpetrator, 71% pre-VSIP vs 85% VSIP (P less than .035); and (5) charges pressed if perpetrator identified, 33% pre-VSIP vs 60% VSIP (P less than .010). It is concluded that interdisciplinary evaluations of alleged sexual abuse in children not only decreased the number of interviews a child must undergo but also increased the likelihood of indicated cases, identification of the perpetrator, and charges being pressed. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that interdisciplinary teams be formed to assess alleged sexual abuse in children.

  13. False allegation of child abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Kathleen E; Hilts, Mark A; Muirhead, Yvonne E

    2011-05-01

    Cases in which a child has been falsely reported as missing or abducted can be extremely challenging to the law enforcement agencies responsible for their investigation. In the absence of a witnessed abduction or an obvious crime scene, it is difficult to determine whether a child has actually been abducted or has become a victim of a homicide and a false allegation. The purpose of this study was to examine falsely alleged kidnapping cases and identify successful investigative strategies. Sixty-one adjudicated false allegation cases involving 66 victims were analyzed. The mean age of the victim was 5 years. Victims came from generally unstable, high-risk family situations and were killed primarily by biological parents. Victims were killed because they were unwanted or viewed as an obstacle to a desired goal, or they were victims of abuse or maltreatment that ended in fatality.

  14. The social implications of artificial intelligence.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitby, Blay

    2003-01-01

    For 18 years. I have been publishing books and papers on the subject of the social implications of Artificial Intelligence (AI). This is an area which is has been, and remains, in need of more academic attention of a serious nature than it currently receives. It will be useful to attempt a working definition of the field of AI at this stage. There is a considerable amount of disagreement as to what does and does not constitute AI and this often has important consequences for discussions of...

  15. Modern Social Support Structures: Online Social Networks and their Implications for Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kala Chakradhar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mapping and assessing social networks and the quality of their social support is a valuable intervention strategy for social workers. These networks have now spread onto the digital realm in the form of Online Social Networks (OSNs. This study investigated the nature of social support provided by such networks to their users in a rural mid-South University (USA and explored parallels with the current understanding of social support in conventional social networks. A web-based survey administered to college students revealed that users of these online networks were predominantly undergraduate first year students, female, single, unemployed and from a variety of academic disciplines. The examination of the components of OSNs appears to mirror those of offline networks. They also seem to complement the effects of each other while contributing to an individual's support system. The paper concludes with critical implications of such online social networking for University students and social workers in practice and education.

  16. Widening economic & social disparities: implications for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, N J

    2007-10-01

    India is often characterized as an emerging economic super power. The huge demographic dividend, the high quality engineering and management talent, the powerful Indian diaspora and the emerging Indian transnational--kneeling the optimism. In contrast, there is another profile of India which is rather gloomy. This is the country with the largest number of the poor, illiterates and unemployed in the world. High infant mortality, morbidity and widespread anaemia among women and children continue. India suffers from acute economic and social disparities. This article addresses four dimensions of such disparities, viz. regional, rural-urban, social, and gender. There is empirical evidence to indicate that during the last two decades all these disparities have been increasing. As a result of economic reforms, the southern and western States experienced accelerated economic and social development as compared to northern and eastern States. This has led to widening gap in income, poverty and other indicators of development between the two regions. Rural-urban divide also widened in the wake of reforms. While large and medium cities experience unprecedented economic prosperity, the rural areas experience economic stagnation. As a result, there is widespread agrarian distress which results in farmers' suicide and rural unrest. Socially backward sections, especially scheduled castes and tribes (SCs and STs) have gained little from the new prosperity which rewards disproportionately those with assets, skills and higher education. STs have often been victims of development as a result of displacement. The gender gap in social and economic status, traditionally more in India as compared to other societies; has further widened by the economic reforms and globalization. The approach paper to the Eleventh Plan stresses the importance of more inclusive economic growth. It emphasizes the need for bridging the divides discussed in this article. Unless these are achieved in a time

  17. Traumatic brain injury and the Americans with Disabilities Act: implications for the social work profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Portia L; Cecka, Dale Margolin

    2014-07-01

    The practice of social work has been greatly affected by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). Title I of the statute prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities, including the increasing number of workers who are returning to work after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This article examines the extent to which the ADA protects those with TBI from being harassed, being denied reasonable workplace accommodations, or suffering other adverse actions related to perceived discrimination. To do so, it relies on judicial decisions from U.S. federal courts involving alleged workplace discrimination of this population. Implications for social work practice are noted with the intent of increasing ADA awareness among professionals providing services to people who meet the criteria for disability under the ADA as well as to those persons who do not. The authors hope to encourage social workers to rely on case law analysis as a mechanism to provide further evidence of the systematic problems faced by people with TBI and thus increase their visibility.

  18. [Medical and social implications of abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, A; Capra, G

    1988-01-01

    In the course of the evolution of human society the problem or idea of interrupting a pregnancy has been faced many times. Romania has adopted a mixed solution to the termination of pregnancy allowing abortions for medical, eugenic, and social reasons. The 1936 penal code allowed only medical abortion, but recent regulations have offered differing solutions. The old regulation not allowing termination of pregnancy or restricting it was in force with minor modifications until 1957. In 1966 a decree was issued that allowed women with 4 children an abortion for special reasons as determined by an abortion committee, but still therapeutic and strictly medical causes predominated. In 1985 a new regulation of medical law prohibited termination of normal pregnancy up to 28 weeks of gestation and infractions were punishable by law. Illegal induced abortion represents an antisocial manifestation that jeopardizes human relationships in society. Induced abortion occurs often in disintegrated family situations. The social implications of the phenomenon of birth are manyfold. Medical intervention is difficult because of the mutilating effect of abortion. The motives are a matter of reflection for physicians and jurists alike.

  19. Allegations of Sexual Abuse in Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Kathleen Coulborn; DeVoe, Ellen

    1995-01-01

    Examines a clinical sample of 215 cases of allegations of sexual abuse in families involved in divorce. Cases are categorized according to the circumstances surrounding abuse allegations, clinical substantiation, and legal outcomes. Court substantiation rate is about half the clinic substantiation rate. Nearly one-fifth of parents raising concerns…

  20. Alleged allergy to local anaesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M M; Bowey, C J

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of true local anaesthetic allergy in patients with an alleged history of local anaesthetic allergy and whether subsequent exposure to local anaesthetics is safe. Two hundred and eight patients with a history of allergy to local anaesthesia were referred over a twenty-year period to our Anaesthetic Allergy Clinic. In this open study, intradermal testing was performed in three patients and progressive challenge in 202 patients. Four patients had immediate allergy and four patients delayed allergic reactions. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were not allergic to local anaesthetics. In 39 patients an adverse response to additives in local anaesthetic solutions could not be excluded. In all but one patient local anaesthesia has been given uneventfully subsequently. A history of allergy to local anaesthesia is unlikely to be genuine and local anaesthetic allergy is rare. In most instances LA allergy can be excluded from the history and the safety of LA verified by progressive challenge.

  1. Implications of social enterprise for community nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAusland, Scott

    Scott McAusland outlines the key points of the Queen's Nursing Institute briefing paper Social Enterprise and argues that many clinicians need to develop business and financial skills to take up social enterprise opportunities.

  2. Mental Health Recovery Paradigm: Implications for Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jenneth

    2002-01-01

    Article argues that the values and beliefs of the consumer-survivor recovery movement are closely aligned with those of the social work profession, and the movement offers social workers a more promising perspective from which to practice. Primary concepts and values of the evolving recovery paradigm are delineated; implications for direct…

  3. The Implications of Social Neuroscience for Social Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Social disability represents a unifying feature in the diverse group of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Social neuroscience is the study of brain mechanisms supporting interpersonal interaction. In this paper, we review brain imaging studies of the social brain and highlight practical applications of these scientific insights.…

  4. Social implications of arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M Manzurul; Atkins, Peter J; Dunn, Christine E

    2005-11-01

    Besides its toxicity, groundwater arsenic contamination creates widespread social problems for its victims and their families in Bangladesh. There is, for instance, a tendency to ostracise arsenic-affected people, arsenicosis being thought of as a contagious disease. Within the community, arsenic-affected people are barred from social activities and often face rejection, even by their immediate family members. Women with visible arsenicosis symptoms are unable to get married and some affected housewives are divorced by their husbands. Children with symptoms are not sent to school in an effort to hide the problem. This paper employs mainly qualitative methods to interpret people's understandings about the toxic impact of groundwater arsenic poisoning on their social lives. Arsenic-affected patients in southwest Bangladesh were asked to determine their 'own priorities' in measuring arsenic toxicity on their social activities and to explore their perceptions about their own survival strategies. We found that patients' experiences reveal severe negative social impacts, and a sharp difference of perceptions about arsenic and social issues between arsenicosis patients and unaffected people.

  5. Analysis of the alleged Kyshtym disaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soran, D.M.; Stillman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    The alleged Kyshtym disaster has been an intriguing intelligence puzzle for almost 25 years. Zhores Medvedev, a Soviet dissident, has written numerous journal articles as well as two books on the subject. He has argued that a vast contaminated area exists east of the city of Kyshtym in the southern Ural Mountains. Further, he has alleged that a nuclear waste disposal accident in 1957 to 1958 caused the contamination. The authors of this report are in partial disagreement with Medvedev's first allegation and in complete disagreement with his second. A contaminated area does exist east of Kyshtym, but Soviet carelessness coupled with general disregard for the citizenry and the environment are the prime causative factors, not a nuclear waste accident.

  6. SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE INTERNET ADDICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egor Grigoryevich Gaynzev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examined the Internet that turned to be the main communication gear and information transfer tool round the world. Every year a growing number of Internet users appear, many people thereof are prone to Internet addiction. The Internet addiction involves multiple social challenges namely the family issues, workplace constraints, proneness to conflict, negligence in daily pursuits and many other issues. The number of Internet users over the past 10 years grew from 10 million users to 40 million, and every year the quantity of people connected to the Internet increases. In consideration of that, threat of Internet addiction increases along with the raising number of Internet users. Exploring the Internet addiction gets more pressing, and its after-effects and origins as well. The scientists round the world have noted that the challenge grows at a fast pace, and virtually one in five Internet users being unlikely to escape exposure to risk. The major issues are as follows: deterioration of interpersonal relations, failure of young people to adapt to social requirements, personal challenges and other issues on whatsoever relations referred to social adaptation of an individual to the community. Therefore, the studies in Internet addiction phenomenon being one of the main tasks in sociology/ social studies, because the effects of the Internet addiction exert a direct impact on the contemporary society.

  7. Traces of castes and other social strata in the Maldives : a case study of social stratification in a diachronic perspective (ethnographic, historic, and linguistic evidence)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulikov, L.I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the social stratification of Maldivian society, with particular focus on its history and traces of earlier alleged caste systems and slavery as well as their impact on Maldivian society, and the implications this fact had for their social structure. I will argue that some anthrop

  8. SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE INTERNET ADDICTION

    OpenAIRE

    Egor Grigoryevich Gaynzev

    2015-01-01

    The paper examined the Internet that turned to be the main communication gear and information transfer tool round the world. Every year a growing number of Internet users appear, many people thereof are prone to Internet addiction. The Internet addiction involves multiple social challenges namely the family issues, workplace constraints, proneness to conflict, negligence in daily pursuits and many other issues. The number of Internet users over the past 10 years grew from 10 million users to ...

  9. 42 CFR 93.201 - Allegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allegation. 93.201 Section 93.201 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  10. Contemporary social work licensure: implications for macro social work practice and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Linda Plitt; Hill, Katharine; Ferguson, Sarah; Fogel, Sondra; Erickson, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the impact of state licensing on social work practice remains a critical concern for social work academics and professionals alike. Given the complex social problems of our times, social workers need to be prepared to intervene with the individual, in various structural dimensions, and to engage in policy debates at the core of human injustice and suffering. Currently, there is insufficient research on the impact of state licensing on the profession and on accredited social work education. The purpose of this article is to begin to address this by providing an overview of the current state of social work licensing across the United States and to analyze the implications of social work regulations as they relate to the future of macro social work practice and education.

  11. On the normative implications of social neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arleen Salles

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decades, brain science has been offering new insights into the relationship among diverse psychological processes and the neural correlates of our moral thought and behavior. Despite the distinction between the explanatory/descriptive nature of science and the normative nature of morality, some neuroethicists have claimed that neuroscientific findings have normative implications. In this paper, I identify three interpretations of the claim. The first focuses on neuroscience’s role in explaining the origin of morality and of moral values and how neurobiology is the bases of moral behavior. A second version is about the role that neuroscientific knowledge can play in showing the psychological plausibility of the moral psychology underlying some ethical approaches. Finally, a third version advances that neuroscience could play a role in determining the moral plausibility of some normative approaches. My aim is to delineate each version and highlight the issues raised to suggest that while neuroscience might provide information regarding the nature of moral reasoning, its role in the normative discussion itself is still quite limited.

  12. CURRENT STATUS AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS FOR FOSTERING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Doo Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, problems in current status of social entrepreneurs in Korea were examined and further policy issues for them were suggested as well. For the methodology, the study analyzed the drawbacks and policy implication of fostering social entrepreneurs through Focus Group Interview (FGI on analysis of present condition of incubating social entrepreneur and programs for it. First, it should escape from personnel expense-centered one and convert to ecosystem-centered or division-centered project in the direction of the government for fostering social entrepreneurs, putting emphasis on follow-up management and evaluation. Second, it must suggest a standard model for social entrepreneur promotion project. In other words, the projects with low performance should be reduced and education models appropriate for new circumstances and changes must be adopted through not only programs standardized in divisions, categories and local provinces, but also appointing expert instructors and project evaluation. Third, it’s necessary to propose specific guideline for detailed education operation according to education trainee and objectives of social entrepreneur. Fourth, it is needed to have more various contents development and distribution by strengthening support for specialized foundation, management and case studies related to fostering social entrepreneurs. Finally, it is even more required to spread awareness on social economics relating to programs for fostering social entrepreneur. With the long-term perspective, it is needed to render policy and specialization for fostering Korean-model social entrepreneurs, which is able to raise competent social entrepreneurs suitable for each stage of growth such as sourcing, incubation and launching social entrepreneurs.

  13. Social capital: theory, evidence, and implications for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, Patrick L; Heilmann, Anja; Aida, Jun; Tsakos, Georgios; Watt, Richard G

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, there has been increasing application of the concept of social capital in various fields of public health, including oral health. However, social capital is a contested concept with debates on its definition, measurement, and application. This study provides an overview of the concept of social capital, highlights the various pathways linking social capital to health, and discusses the potential implication of this concept for health policy. An extensive and diverse international literature has examined the relationship between social capital and a range of general health outcomes across the life course. A more limited but expanding literature has also demonstrated the potential influence of social capital on oral health. Much of the evidence in relation to oral health is limited by methodological shortcomings mainly related to the measurement of social capital, cross-sectional study designs, and inadequate controls for confounding factors. Further research using stronger methodological designs should explore the role of social capital in oral health and assess its potential application in the development of oral health improvement interventions.

  14. Policy implications of social capital for the Japanese social security system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Jun; Takao, Soshi

    2008-10-01

    We discuss the concept of social capital, which has received much attention recently. Social capital is important for the following 2 key reasons:(1) a highly democratic polity and a strong economic performance that attaches great importance to the public good can be achieved on the basis of high social capital;and (2) social capital can effect health status in the human population, and widening of income inequality harms human health through the erosion of social capital. In addition, there are 3 political implications of social capital for Japanese society:(1) social capital has implications for the political decision of whether Japanese society should adopt a "medium burden for medium welfare" or a "low burden for small welfare" model together with the concept of social overhead capital;(2) reciprocity, which is one of the primary components of social capital, is similar to the philosophy underlying the health care system of Japan;(3) Japanese society needs to change from a society that emphasizes the relationships between its members to a society that is open to outsiders and has sufficient opportunities.

  15. Policy Implications of Social Capital for the Japanese Social Security System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao,Soshi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the concept of social capital, which has received much attention recently. Social capital is important for the following 2 key reasons:(1 a highly democratic polity and a strong economic performance that attaches great importance to the public good can be achieved on the basis of high social capital;and (2 social capital can effect health status in the human population, and widening of income inequality harms human health through the erosion of social capital. In addition, there are 3 political implications of social capital for Japanese society:(1 social capital has implications for the political decision of whether Japanese society should adopt a “medium burden for medium welfare” or a “low burden for small welfare” model together with the concept of social overhead capital;(2 reciprocity, which is one of the primary components of social capital, is similar to the philosophy underlying the health care system of Japan;(3 Japanese society needs to change from a society that emphasizes the relationships between its members to a society that is open to outsiders and has sufficient opportunities.

  16. Topological implications of negative curvature for biological and social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Mobasheri, Nasim

    2014-03-01

    Network measures that reflect the most salient properties of complex large-scale networks are in high demand in the network research community. In this paper we adapt a combinatorial measure of negative curvature (also called hyperbolicity) to parametrized finite networks, and show that a variety of biological and social networks are hyperbolic. This hyperbolicity property has strong implications on the higher-order connectivity and other topological properties of these networks. Specifically, we derive and prove bounds on the distance among shortest or approximately shortest paths in hyperbolic networks. We describe two implications of these bounds to crosstalk in biological networks, and to the existence of central, influential neighborhoods in both biological and social networks.

  17. Evaluating the social and cultural implications of the internet

    OpenAIRE

    Brey, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Since the Internet's breakthrough as a mass medium, it has become a topic of discussion because of its implications for society. At one extreme, one finds those who only see great benefits and consider the Internet a tool for freedom, commerce, connectivity, and other societal benefits. At the other extreme, one finds those who lament the harms and disadvantages of the Internet, and who consider it a grave danger to existing social structures and institutions, to culture, morality and human r...

  18. Social problems and social work in Ghana: Implications for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baffoe M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Social Work practice is a helping profession that provides services aimed at assisting societies work better for their people. It is designed to support people burdened with varying degrees of social problems to function better within society. Meaningful and sustainable development cannot take place in societies afflicted with a host of social problems which receive no meaningful interventions. Ghana is beset with a myriad of social problems that call for professional social work interventions. Using Social work education and practice as a backdrop, this article highlights some of the key and emerging social problems in Ghana. It examines the constraints and unique challenges that the profession face in its efforts to help people develop their full potential and improve their lives. Furthermore, the authors discuss social work education and practice interventions that would bring about social change and help people, especially the poor and the marginalized, to appropriately play their part in society. This article concludes with highlights on the implications of social problems and social work interventions for sustainable development in Ghanaian society.

  19. Ideology and community social psychology: theoretical considerations and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Marisela

    2002-08-01

    This paper addresses the importance of the concept of ideology in community work. The implications of a Marxist approach to ideology in community practice are analyzed in terms of the concepts of problematization (P. Freire, 1979) and consciousness-raising (J. Barreiro, 1976), illustrating the point with some examples. The traditional Marxist perspective is also examined in relation to the perspectives of social constructionism (I. Ibáñez, 1996), cultural studies (A. McRobbie, 1992), post-Marxism (E. Laclau & C. Mouffe, 1985), and feminism (D. Haraway, 1991). It is argued that the concepts of hegemony and habitus (P. Bourdieu, 1985) can be useful to community social psychology theory and practice. A "situated perspective"--in which it is possible to dialogue from different "subject positions," and articulate transformation and political action--is argued. The implications of this shifting in the concept of ideology by means of theoretical developments outside social communitypsychology can help to define the external (outside) agent's position in community practice.

  20. Forensic evaluation in alleged sibling incest against children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Vera; Jardim, Patrícia; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Sibling incest is a serious form of intrafamilial sexual abuse with health, social, and legal relevance. A retrospective study was conducted through the analysis of forensic medical reports of the alleged sibling incest of victims under 18 years old (n = 68) from 2004 to 2011 as well as the respective judicial outcomes. Results demonstrated that sibling's sexual abuse is associated with several circumstances that might exacerbate its severity such as vaginal, anal, and/or oral penetration. Moreover, the victim's young age, the proximity between victim and abuser, and the fact that it is committed at the victim's and/or abuser's home and by using physical violence and verbal threats justify a late detection of these cases.

  1. Family Change and Implications for Family Solidarity and Social Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravanera, Zenaida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishSocial cohesion can be viewed in terms of common projects and networks of social relations that characterize families, communities and society. In the past decades, the basis for family cohesion has shifted from organic to mechanical or from breadwinner to collaborative model. As in many Western countries, data on family change in Canada point to a greater flexibility in the entry and exit from relationships, a delay in the timing of family events, and a diversity of family forms. After looking at changes in families and in the family setting of individuals, the paper considers both intra-family cohesion and families as basis for social cohesion. Implications are raised for adults, children and publicp olicy.FrenchLa cohésion sociale peut se voir à travers les projets communs et les réseaux desrelations sociales qui caractérisent les familles, les communautés et les sociétés.La base de cohésion familiale est passée d’organique à mécanique, pour utiliserles termes de Durkheim, ou vers un modèle de collaboration plutôt qu’unepartage asymétrique de tâches. Comme dans d’autres sociétés orientales, lafamille au Canada est devenue plus flexible par rapport aux entrées et sortiesd’unions, il y a un délais dans les événements familiaux, et une variété deformes de familles. Après un regard sur les changements dans les familles etdans la situation familiale des individus, nous considérons la cohésion intrafamilialeet la famille comme base de cohésion sociale. Nous discutons desimpacts sur les adultes, les enfants et la politique publique.

  2. Were They Tortured or Did They Make that Up? Ethnographic Reflections on Torture Allegations in the Basque Country in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolijn Terwindt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic literature about torture has addressed a wide range of questions. An important facet, however, has not yet received sufficient attention. Given that torture tends to occur in secrecy, how does the lack of information that is perceived to be objective and authoritative affect the societal response to allegations of torture and the social consequences of such allegations?  In this article, the controversy about torture allegations in Spain is used to examine this issue and explore the insidious effects the uncertainty has on society.  The Spanish state is unable to provide a generally accepted account in response to the continuous torture allegations from Basque prisoners accused of terrorism or street violence.   Based on ethnographic research, this article describes how Spanish and Basque society can be divided in believers, non-believers and people who do not care about torture allegations.  Because of the centrality of such allegations in many criminal cases, this division also polarizes public perceptions of the entire criminal justice system.  DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1838392

  3. Cataract related blindness in India & its social implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angra, S K; Murthy, G V; Gupta, S K; Angra, V

    1997-10-01

    The prevalence of blindness in India is 14.9 per 1000. Eighty per cent of this blindness is due to cataract alone. Most of the cataract blinds in the country are in the rural areas while the surgical service delivery network is concentrated in the urban areas. Thus a large proportion of patients in the rural areas continue to remain blind. This situation has many social implications. There is loss of productivity, breakdown of interpersonal relationships, depressive manifestations, loss of self esteem and most patients lead an isolated humiliating life. Patients lack information on the available services and continue to remain blind for years even after being diagnosed as operable. This is unfortunate because cataract surgery is one of the most cost effective health interventions known and most operated patients, irrespective of the surgical technique, are immensely satisfied with the level of visual rehabilitation after surgery.

  4. Social and Economic Implications of Noncommunicable diseases in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs have become a major public health problem in India accounting for 62% of the total burden of foregone DALYs and 53% of total deaths. In this paper, we review the social and economic impact of NCDs in India. We outline this impact at household, health system and the macroeconomic level. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs figure at the top among the leading ten causes of adult (25-69 years deaths in India. The effects of NCDs are inequitable with evidence of reversal in social gradient of risk factors and greater financial implications for the poorer households in India. Out-of-pocket expenditure associated with the acute and long-term effects of NCDs is high resulting in catastrophic health expenditure for the households. Study in India showed that about 25% of families with a member with CVD and 50% with cancer experience catastrophic expenditure and 10% and 25%, respectively, are driven to poverty. The odds of incurring catastrophic hospitalization expenditure were nearly 160% higher with cancer than the odds of incurring catastrophic spending when hospitalization was due to a communicable disease. These high numbers also pose significant challenge for the health system for providing treatment, care and support. The proportion of hospitalizations and outpatient consultations as a result of NCDs rose from 32% to 40% and 22% to 35%, respectively, within a decade from 1995 to 2004. In macroeconomic term, most of the estimates suggest that the NCDs in India account for an economic burden in the range of 5-10% of GDP, which is significant and slowing down GDP thus hampering development. While India is simultaneously experiencing several disease burdens due to old and new infections, nutritional deficiencies, chronic diseases, and injuries, individual interventions for clinical care are unlikely to be affordable on a large scale. While it is clear that "treating our way out" of the NCDs may not be the efficient way, it has

  5. Social Capital Theory: Implications for Women's Networking and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes social capital theory as a framework for exploring women's networking and social capital resources. It presents the foundational assumptions of the theory, the benefits and risks of social capital engagement, a feminist critique of social capital, and the role of social capital in adult learning.

  6. 22 CFR 92.27 - Affiant's allegations in affidavit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Notarizing officers are not required to examine into the truth of the affiant's allegations or to pass upon... may, in certain circumstances, refuse to take an affidavit. (See § 92.9 regarding the types...

  7. Social Capital and Education: Implications for Student and School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagens, Gregory K.

    2011-01-01

    Scholarly work on student and school performance poses a variety of explanations for observed variations. One explanation receiving too little attention is social capital, an intangible resource argued to grow out of social relations and social structure. The seedbed of social capital is argued to reside with John Dewey, who in 1900 used the term…

  8. Metabolic regulation during sport events: factual interpretations and inadequate allegations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Remy Poortmans

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Different fuels are available to generate ATP for muscle activities during sport events. Glycogen from striated muscles and liver stores may be converted to lactic acid or almost completely oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2, triacylglycerol within the muscle itself and fatty acids from adipose tissue could be converted to CO2 in acting muscles, some free amino acids can be released within the muscle itself and from intestinal stores to sustain the amount of ATP generation indispensable for muscle contraction. All single biochemical reactions, but one, need one or several enzymes to activate the conversion of a substrate into a product. The energy transformation in biochemical reactions is led by application of so-called free energy. Reversible and non-reversible reactions within a metabolic pathway are dependent on specific enzymes near or far from equilibrium. Allosteric enzymes are regulatory enzymes that provide the direction in the pathway. A regulatory enzyme is either activated or inhibited by small regulators (ligands. A reversible substrate cycle between A and B is catalyzed by two enzymes with different fluxes. The need of ATP production for muscle contraction is under the leadership of regulatory enzymes and available substrate stores. The improvement of adapted metabolic reactions under sport training depends on the appropriate increase of regulatory enzymes within the glycolytic and oxidative pathways. The amount of some specific enzymes is increased by training in order to improve the maximum activity of the metabolic pathway. Unfortunately, several publications do not precisely implicate the appropriate enzyme(s to explain or reject the adaptation induced by the training schedule. A few examples will illustrate the factual interpretation and the inadequate allegation.

  9. Implications of Common Core State Standards on the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Russell, William B., III.

    2014-01-01

    Social studies teachers have often been on the outside looking in during much of the era billed as the standards-based educational reform (SBER), but with the adoption and implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), social studies teachers seem to have been invited back inside. Yet, how will the standards impact social studies…

  10. A Social Constructionist Approach to Disability: Implications for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of a social model of disability derive their arguments from social constructionism. They combine different disabling conditions under one term: disability. Subsequently, they apply the specific viewpoint of the disability rights social movement of people with physical disabilities to other conditions such as intellectual disabilities,…

  11. Social media processes in disasters: Implications of emergent technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Dhiraj; Gross, Alexander J

    2017-03-01

    This article seeks to extend social science scholarship on social media technology use during disruptive events. Though social media's role in times of crisis has been previously studied, much of this work tends to focus on first-responders and relief organizations. However, social media use during disasters tends to be decentralized and this organizational structure can promote different types of messages to top-down information systems. Using 142,786 geo-tagged tweets collected before and after Hurricane Sandy's US landfall as a case study, this article seeks to explore shifts in social media behavior during disruptive events and highlights that though Sandy disrupted routine life within Twitter, users responded to the disaster by employing humor, sharing photos, and checking into locations. We conclude that social media use during disruptive events is complex and understanding these nuanced behaviors is important across the social sciences.

  12. Bring Back Our Girls, Social Mobilization: Implications for Cross-Cultural Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olutokunbo, Adekalu Samuel; Suandi, Turiman; Cephas, Oluwaseyitan Rotimi; Abu-Samah, Irza Hanie

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a proactive measure for community development that salvages the society from destruction and disaster. From sociological perspective, this paper discusses the concept of social mobilization and its implications for cross-cultural research. To do this, the study uses the "Bring Back Our Girls" Global Campaign, as…

  13. Correlates of Social Work Students' Abortion Knowledge and Attitudes: Implications for Education and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, Stephanie; Bird, Melissa; Ramseyer Winter, Virginia; Massey Combs, Katie; McKay, Kimberly

    2016-07-01

    Researchers have established that individuals' abortion knowledge is positively associated with their support of abortion rights. However, social workers' personal beliefs regarding abortion are under-researched, even though social workers are often employed in health promotion and education roles in which the topic of abortion is encountered. The current study examines the results of a nationwide survey of social work students (N = 504) and explores the relationship between social work students' abortion knowledge and abortion attitudes. Less abortion knowledge was significantly associated with antichoice attitude endorsement. Implications for social work research, training, and education are subsequently discussed.

  14. Canadian identity: Implications for international social work by Canadians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in response to recent calls to conceptualize and articulate Canadian perspectives and experiences in international social work, given that the Canadian standpoint has been lacking in international social work literature. This paper contends that it is imperative, first of all......, to critically examine and unpack our ‘Canadian’ identity in order to practice international work that is socially just and anti-imperialist. Drawing on the work of post-colonial authors, critical race theorists, and those who study national myth-making, this essay revisits Canadian identity because...... it is this identity that Canadian social workers often carry into their international work....

  15. Social Work Education and Global Issues: Implications for Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Beverly L.

    2011-01-01

    If social workers are to become more effectively involved in international organizations and global issues, the international dimension of social work education must be strengthened. Educational programs for social workers around the world give only limited attention to social issues that extend beyond national boundaries. Schools of social work…

  16. AIDS at 30: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews themes and changes in the teaching of HIV/AIDS content in social work programs over the first three decades of the epidemic. Social work education in the first decade of the epidemic was largely focused on helping clients in the death and dying process, while medical and pharmaceutical advancements in the mid-1990s drastically…

  17. Implications of Affective and Social Neuroscience for Educational Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen major advances in cognitive, affective and social neuroscience that have the potential to revolutionize educational theories about learning. The importance of emotion and social learning has long been recognized in education, but due to technological limitations in neuroscience research techniques, treatment of these…

  18. Parent Social Networks and Parent Responsibility: Implications for School Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Katherine A.; Adams, Curt M.

    2014-01-01

    Family-school partnerships are difficult to initiate and sustain in ways that actually promote student learning, especially in high-poverty communities. This quantitative study was designed to better understand how social forces shape parent responsibility in education. Based on social cognitive theory as the conceptual framework, the…

  19. Social Class and Belonging: Implications for College Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrove, Joan M.; Long, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    This study addressed the extent to which social class position structures a sense of belonging at college, and the ways in which belonging informs adjustment to college. Among 322 liberal arts college students, social class background was significantly associated with a sense of belonging at college and was marginally related to academic…

  20. EXPLORING AN EMERGING FIELD: THE IMPLICATIONS OF GLOBAL SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk KIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to advance the empirical understanding of global social entrepreneurship. Specifically, this paper aims to provide a new social entrepreneurship model, particularly on a global scale, introducing and examining two distinctive cases: Ashoka and Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC. The ‘hybrid value chain’ suggested by Ashoka demonstrates that how business organizations and citizen-sector organizations can help each other in developing partnerships for various markets and communities in the world, addressing a variety of social needs. Presenting the ‘holistic approach to development,’ BRAC has been transferring its sustainable model, based on insights from Bangladesh but adapted to the local contexts of the countries, to several countries by creating prospects for the most disadvantaged people to overcome extreme poverty. This paper contributes to the current literature by highlighting how entrepreneurial efforts can create opportunities and launch ventures to satisfy social needs, balancing economic and social imperatives, on a global scale.

  1. The social implications of using drones for biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbrook, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles, or 'drones', appear to offer a flexible, accurate and affordable solution to some of the technical challenges of nature conservation monitoring and law enforcement. However, little attention has been given to their possible social impacts. In this paper, I review the possible social impacts of using drones for conservation, including on safety, privacy, psychological wellbeing, data security and the wider understanding of conservation problems. I argue that negative social impacts are probable under some circumstances and should be of concern for conservation for two reasons: (1) because conservation should follow good ethical practice; and (2) because negative social impacts could undermine conservation effectiveness in the long term. The paper concludes with a call for empirical research to establish whether the identified social risks of drones occur in reality and how they could be mitigated, and for self-regulation of drone use by the conservation sector to ensure good ethical practice and minimise the risk of unintended consequences.

  2. Social capital and health: implications for public health and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, J

    1998-11-01

    Public health and its "basic science", epidemiology, have become colonised by the individualistic ethic of medicine and economics. Despite a history in public health dating back to John Snow that underlined the importance of social systems for health, an imbalance has developed in the attention given to generating "social capital" compared to such things as modification of individual's risk factors. In an illustrative analysis comparing the potential of six progressively less individualised and more community-focused interventions to prevent deaths from heart disease, social support and measures to increase social cohesion faired well against more individual medical care approaches. In the face of such evidence public health professionals and epidemiologists have an ethical and strategic decision concerning the relative effort they give to increasing social cohesion in communities vs expanding access for individuals to traditional public health programs. Practitioners' relative efforts will be influenced by the kind of research that is being produced by epidemiologists and by the political climate of acceptability for voluntary individual "treatment" approaches vs universal policies to build "social capital". For epidemiologists to further our emerging understanding of the link between social capital and health they must confront issues in measurement, study design and analysis. For public health advocates to sensitise the political environment to the potential dividend from building social capital, they must confront the values that focus on individual-level causal models rather than models of social structure (dis)integration. The evolution of explanations for inequalities in health is used to illustrate the nature of the change in values.

  3. Social support in the workplace: nurse leader implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R

    2004-01-01

    The state of the science as it relates to the stress-mediating role of social support in the health care work environment is explored. The ability to build a nursing leadership workforce is dependent upon a type of social support mechanism that mediates the inherent stress that comes along with managerial positions. Independent of the inevitable work-related stress associated with the nurse manager role, social support provided to current and aspiring nurse leaders is assumed to assist with coping and thriving in the work environment.

  4. 45 CFR 150.311 - Responses to allegations of noncompliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responses to allegations of noncompliance. 150.311 Section 150.311 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH... of creditable coverage, advertising material, or any other documents if those documents form...

  5. An Abuse Allegation: The Top Ten Expectations for Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Judith

    1998-01-01

    The majority of child-care-center abuse allegations are proven unfounded, but the experience of an investigation can transform a child-care facility. Survey responses of 28 post-investigation facilities in California provide 10 common facets of an investigation and 8 tips for protecting child care centers from accusations. (LBT)

  6. Polio in Pakistan: Social constraints and travel implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Asim; Mehmood, Sajid; Rehman, Muhammad Ateeq Ur; Younas, Asma; Rehman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Malik, Muhamamd Faheem; Hyder, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in Pakistan has faced failure despite being implemented successfully. Polio cases were successfully reduced by 99% until 2005. However, thereafter, new polio cases were registered, which continue to rise annually. This repeat polio outbreak has placed the country on watch by the World Health Organization (WHO) due to travelers, and Hajj and Umrah pilgrims. The present report reviews the published literature for determining the social constraints to the polio eradication initiative in Pakistan. Religion, politics, awareness, insecurity, inequity, governance, and social responsibility have been identified as key social factors in the failure of any vaccination campaign. Possible interventions have been proposed, which include effectively using modern mass media and educating vaccinators on the social and cultural background of the target community.

  7. Assessing environmental quality: the implications for social justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals experience simultaneous exposure to pollutants and social factors, which cluster to affect human health outcomes. The optimal approach to combining these factors is unknown, therefore we developed a method to model simultaneous exposure using criteria air pollutants, ...

  8. Social gender stereotypes and their implications in Hindi

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This essay looks at the subtle ways in which gender identities are constructed and reinforced in India through social norms of language use. Language itself becomes a medium for perpetuating gender stereotypes, forcing its speakers to confirm to socially defined gender roles. Using examples from a classroom discussion about a film, this essay will highlight the underlying rigid male-female stereotypes in Indian society with their more obvious expressions in language. For the ur...

  9. Evaluating the social and cultural implications of the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Since the Internet's breakthrough as a mass medium, it has become a topic of discussion because of its implications for society. At one extreme, one finds those who only see great benefits and consider the Internet a tool for freedom, commerce, connectivity, and other societal benefits. At the other

  10. Social Learning Theory in the Age of Social Media: Implications for Educational Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Following the research of Albert Bandura, the advent of social media has changed the platform for social interaction and human experience. Educators have a unique opportunity to apply the concepts of Bandura's Social Learning Theory toward enhanced student engagement and learning in a social media context. This article synthesizes current research…

  11. The Essential Need for Research Misconduct Allegation Audits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loikith, Lisa; Bauchwitz, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 90 % of allegations of biomedical research misconduct in the United States are dismissed by responsible institutions without any faculty assessment or auditable record. Recently, members of the U.S. Congress have complained that the penalties for those against whom findings of research misconduct are made are too light and that too few grant funds associated with research misconduct have been recovered for use by other researchers and taxpayers. Here we discuss the laws that empower federal agencies that can oversee investigations of biomedical research misconduct: the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) and the Office of the Inspector General (OIG), both located within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Research misconduct investigations pertaining to U.S. physical sciences funded through the National Science Foundation (NSF) are overseen by the NSF's OIG. While OIGs may provide some improvement over the ORI in the handling of research misconduct, we have found that a much more serious flaw exists which undermines an ability to conduct performance audits of the effectiveness by which allegations of research misconduct are handled in the United States. Specifically, sufficient data do not need to be retained by U.S. research institutions funded by HHS or NSF to allow effective audit of why allegations of research misconduct are dismissed before being seen by faculty inquiry or investigative committees. U.S. federal Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS/Yellow Book), if applied to the research misconduct oversight process, would allow a determination of whether the handling of allegations of biomedical research misconduct actually functions adequately, and if not, how it might be improved. In particular, we propose that independent, external peer review under GAGAS audit standards should be instituted without delay in assessing the performance of ORI, or any other similarly tasked federal agency, in handling allegations of

  12. Same-Gender Marriage: Implications for Social Work Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Fasbinder

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Notably, in 2013, Maryland, Rhode Island, Delaware, and Minnesota became the 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th states, respectively, to legalize same-gender marriage. Without legal recognition or social support from the larger society, the majority of same-gender partnerships in the U.S. are denied privileges and rights that are considered basic for heterosexual marriages. This manuscript draws from a national cross section of published survey data from 1996 to 2013 reporting Americans’ attitudes regarding same-gender marriage and civil unions. Social work practitioners have broad opportunity to apply their skills to the critical needs facing same-gender partners. After an overview of the legal status of same-gender marriages and their accompanying social and policy issues, recommendations are provided that include identification of specific needs for premarital counseling of same-gender partners and ensuring sensitivity to the myriad challenges they face.

  13. A multidirectional communication model: implications for social marketing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L

    2009-04-01

    The landscape of sending and receiving information has changed dramatically in the past 25 years. The communication process is changing from being unidirectional to multidirectional as consumers are becoming active participants by creating, seeking, and sharing information using a variety of channels and devices. The purpose of this article is to describe how this shift in the communication process- where gatekeepers control the creation and content of information and consumers are less active recipients to one that reflects a multidirectional and more dynamic process with participative consumers-will affect the social marketing process. This shift in communication does not represent an option for social marketers so much as a necessity. As professionals respond to this evolving communication model, the practice of social marketing can remain vibrant as a relevant consumer-oriented approach to behavior change.

  14. Social Experience-Dependent Myelination: An Implication for Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Toritsuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is one of the strategies to promote the conduction velocity of axons in order to adjust to evolving environment in vertebrates. It has been shown that myelin formation depends on genetic programing and experience, including multiple factors, intracellular and extracellular molecules, and neuronal activities. Recently, accumulating studies have shown that myelination in the central nervous system changes more dynamically in response to neuronal activities and experience than expected. Among experiences, social experience-dependent myelination draws attention as one of the critical pathobiologies of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of neuronal activity-dependent and social experience-dependent myelination and discuss the contribution of social experience-dependent myelination to the pathology of psychiatric disorders.

  15. Excessive Internet use: implications for sexual behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, M

    2000-01-01

    The Internet appears to have become an ever-increasing part in many areas of people’s day-to- day lives. One area that deserves further examination surrounds sexual behavior and excessive Internet usage. It has been alleged by some academics that social pathologies are beginning to surface in cyberspace and have been referred to as “technological addictions.” Such research may have implications and insights into sexuality and sexual behavior. Therefore, this article examines the concept of “I...

  16. Analogical Instruction in Statistics: Implications for Social Work Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Leela

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of analogies in statistics instruction. Much has been written about the difficulty social work students have with statistics. To address this concern, Glisson and Fischer (1987) called for the use of analogies. Understanding of analogical problem solving has surged in the last few decades with the integration of…

  17. Social Class and Belonging: Implications for Graduate Students' Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrove, Joan M.; Stewart, Abigail J.; Curtin, Nicola L.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role that social class background plays in graduate students' career goals. Class background was significantly related to the extent to which students struggled financially in graduate school, which related to their sense of belonging in graduate school. Sense of belonging related to academic self-concept, which predicted students'…

  18. Farm Diversification into Tourism--Implications for Social Identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandth, Berit; Haugen, Marit S.

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with how diversification and transformation of farming into tourism may influence the social identity of farmers. Based on a study of 19 farms run by couples engaged with agritourism, it shows how the development of tourism on the farms can be understood in a perspective of repeasantization; and how the couples draw on their…

  19. Students' Social Positioning in the Language Classroom: Implications for Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul; Kidd, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines some findings of a three-month investigation into the effects of students' interpersonal relationships on communication in two EFL classrooms in a Japanese university. Data was collected to identify and describe the various social subgroups that existed within the classes, and samples of classroom discourse were then analysed…

  20. Open, Connected, Social--Implications for Educational Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couros, Alec

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and implementation of an open access, graduate education course where openness, connectivism, and social learning are guiding principles. The described experience aims to offer insight into developing courses that respond to changes in the manner in which individuals learn, connect, and…

  1. Determinants of Arsenicosis Patients’ Perception and Social Implications of Arsenic Poisoning through Groundwater in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mizanur Rahman Sarker

    2010-01-01

    Adverse human health effects ranging from skin lesions to internal cancers as well as widespread social and psychological problems caused by arsenic contaminated drinking water in Bangladesh may be the biggest arsenic calamity in the world. From an arsenicosis patients survey, this paper empirically analyzes the determinants of arsenicosis patients’ perception about chronic arsenic poisoning and social and psychological implications of arsenicosis. In this study, cross-sectional data were col...

  2. Psychobiology of early social attachment in rhesus monkeys. Clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, G W

    1997-01-15

    "Attachment" has been viewed as the process by which the infant bonds to a caregiver and develops and maintains affiliative social relationships. Whereas past theories suggested that the neurobiological mechanisms that enable the infant to engage in regulated social interactions develop autonomously, the more current view is that the organization of cognitive and emotional systems that regulate social behavior depends on early caregiver-infant attachment. It is well known that disruption of caregiver-infant attachment produces abnormal behavior and increases or decreases the activity of different brain neurochemical systems in rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, it has been suggested that these effects might serve as a model for the etiology of some forms of human psychopathology. Current research indicates that caregiver privation alters the development of usual interrelationships among the activity of several neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems and alters basic cognitive processes. In line with the idea that the caregiver usually exerts a potent organizing effect on the infant's psychobiology, the long-standing effects of caregiver privation on behavior and emotionality are probably attributable to changes in multiple regulatory systems and cognitive-emotional integration rather than restricted effects on the activity of any specific set of neurochemical systems.

  3. 28 CFR 0.29b - Reporting allegations of waste, fraud, or abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting allegations of waste, fraud, or... OF JUSTICE 4-Office of the Inspector General § 0.29b Reporting allegations of waste, fraud, or abuse. Employees shall report evidence and non-frivolous allegations of waste, fraud, or abuse relating to...

  4. Commercial Social Media and the Erosion of the Commons: Implications for Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilburn, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Recent scholarship challenges the celebratory discourse surrounding Web 2.0. This paper engages with this scholarship to examine critically the implications of academic libraries' presence within commercially owned social media spaces. It considers the apparent contradiction between work to promote the principles of open access and the idea of the…

  5. [Special Issue: Critical Social Theory of Jurgen Habermas and Its Implications for Argumentation Theory and Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarefsky, David, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the critical social theory of the German philosopher Jurgen Habermas and its implications for argumentation theory and practice. Topics discussed in the six articles are: the main themes of Habermas' research and their relevance to argumentation, Habermas and the dialectical perspective on argumentation, a…

  6. BSW and MSW Students' Opinions about and Responses to the Death of Freddie Gray and the Ensuing Riots: Implications for the Social Justice Emphasis in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    In April 2015, a Black man, Freddie Gray, died in police custody in Baltimore, Maryland. A day of rioting followed. These events provided the researcher with the opportunity to ascertain social work students' opinions about and actions in response to these occurrences and their implications for the social justice mission of the social work…

  7. Cognitive neuroscience of social emotions and implications for psychopathology: examining embarrassment, guilt, envy, and schadenfreude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Kathryn F; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2014-05-01

    Social emotions are affective states elicited during social interactions and integral for promoting socially appropriate behaviors and discouraging socially inappropriate ones. Social emotion-processing deficits significantly impair interpersonal relationships, and play distinct roles in the manifestation and maintenance of clinical symptomatology. Elucidating the neural correlates of discrete social emotions can serve as a window to better understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disorders. Moral cognition and social emotion-processing broadly recruit a fronto-temporo-subcortical network, supporting empathy, perspective-taking, self-processing, and reward-processing. The present review specifically examines the neural correlates of embarrassment, guilt, envy, and schadenfreude. Embarrassment and guilt are self-conscious emotions, evoked during negative evaluation following norm violations and supported by a fronto-temporo-posterior network. Embarrassment is evoked by social transgressions and recruits greater anterior temporal regions, representing conceptual social knowledge. Guilt is evoked by moral transgressions and recruits greater prefrontal regions, representing perspective-taking and behavioral change demands. Envy and schadenfreude are fortune-of-other emotions, evoked during social comparison and supported by a prefronto-striatal network. Envy represents displeasure in others' fortunes, and recruits increased dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, representing cognitive dissonance, and decreased reward-related striatal regions. Schadenfreude represents pleasure in others' misfortunes, and recruits reduced empathy-related insular regions and increased reward-related striatal regions. Implications for psychopathology and treatment design are discussed.

  8. Re-scaling social preference data: implications for modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleemput, Irina; Kind, Paul; Kesteloot, Katrien

    2004-12-01

    As applied in cost-utility analysis, generic health status indexes require that full health and dead are valued as 1 and 0, respectively. When social preference weights for health states are obtained using a visual analogue scale (VAS), their raw scores often lie on a scale with different endpoints (such as "best" and "worst" health). Re-scaling individual raw scores to a 0-1 scale leads to the exclusion of respondents who fail to value dead or full health. This study examined alternative approaches that do not impose such strict exclusion criteria. The impact of a different timing of re-scaling (before or after aggregation) and a different measure of central tendency (median or mean) is measured. Data from a postal valuation survey (n=722) conducted in Belgium are used. The following models are considered: (a) re-scaling values for EQ-5D health states on a within-respondent basis and using mean re-scaled values as proxies for social preference values, (b) using median re-scaled values as proxies for social preference values, (c) computing the median raw VAS values and then re-scale, and (e) re-scaling mean raw VAS values. Exclusion rates, health state rankings and valuations and incremental value differences between pairs of states are computed for each model. Models that use a different timing of re-scaling, are compared ceteris paribus to evaluate the importance of timing of re-scaling and models that use a different measure of central tendency are compared ceteris paribus to evaluate the importance of the measure of central tendency. The exclusion rates are above 20% in the models that re-scale valuations before aggregation and less than 5% in the models that re-scale after aggregation. Health state valuations are found to be different in all two by two comparisons. Although in some comparisons the incremental values are statistically significantly different between models, they are never clinically significantly different. Differences in health state rankings

  9. Attitudes toward euthanasia: implications for social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alice Ming-Lin; Fok, Shiu-Yeu

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a randomized general household survey that examined the attitudes of 618 Chinese respondents toward different types of euthanasia. The general public is found to agree with active euthanasia and non-voluntary euthanasia, but is neutral about passive euthanasia. Support for euthanasia is predicted by decreasing importance of religious belief, higher family income, experiences in taking care of terminally ill family members, being non-Protestants, and increasing age. Patients were perceived as the chief decision makers in euthanasian decisions. Finally, suggestions on social work practice and professional training are made.

  10. Investments in social capital--implications of social interactions for the production of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Kristian; Lindgren, Björn; Lindström, Martin; Nystedt, Paul

    2003-06-01

    This paper develops a theoretical model of the family as producer of health- and social capital. There are both direct and indirect returns on the production and accumulation of health- and social capital. Direct returns (the consumption motives) result since health and social capital both enhance individual welfare per se. Indirect returns (the investment motives) result since health capital increases the amount of productive time, and social capital improves the efficiency of the production technology used for producing health capital. The main prediction of the theoretical model is that the amount of social capital is positively related to the level of health; individuals with high levels of social capital are healthier than individuals with lower levels of social capital, ceteris paribus. An empirical model is estimated, using a set of individual panel data from three different time periods in Sweden. We find that social capital is positively related to the level of health capital, which supports the theoretical model. Further, we find that the level of social capital (1) declines with age, (2) is lower for those married or cohabiting, and (3) is lower for men than for women.

  11. Pargament's Theory of Religious Coping: Implications for Spiritually Sensitive Social Work Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianbin

    2016-07-01

    This article proposes that Pargament's theory of religious coping can be a theoretical beacon to spiritually sensitive social work practice. It begins with a discussion of the raison d'être of spiritually sensitive social work, which is examined as being able to cast a holistic and positive glow on social work. Then it provides an overview and a critique of Pargament's theory, emphasising that the theory offers a fuller and more impartial picture of religious coping. In addition, it explores the implications of Pargament's theory for spiritually sensitive social work practice with religious clients in terms of engagement, assessment and intervention. This article concludes by discussing how social work practitioners can avoid the pitfalls and limitations of Pargament's theory.

  12. Determinants of arsenicosis patients' perception and social implications of arsenic poisoning through groundwater in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, M Mizanur Rahman

    2010-10-01

    Adverse human health effects ranging from skin lesions to internal cancers as well as widespread social and psychological problems caused by arsenic contaminated drinking water in Bangladesh may be the biggest arsenic calamity in the world. From an arsenicosis patients survey, this paper empirically analyzes the determinants of arsenicosis patients' perception about chronic arsenic poisoning and social and psychological implications of arsenicosis. In this study, cross-sectional data were collected from the Matlab and Hajiganj Upzillas of Chandpur district which are known to be highly contaminated with arsenic in their underground water. Respondents informed that arsenic poisoning causes a wide range of social and psychological problems. Female respondents were less vulnerable in the case of social problems (p arsenic exposure for abating the health burden as well as social and psychological problems.

  13. Laboratory rhesus macaque social housing and social changes: Implications for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Darcy L; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Vandeleest, Jessica; McCowan, Brenda; Capitanio, John

    2017-01-01

    Macaque species, specifically rhesus (Macaca mulatta), are the most common nonhuman primates (NHPs) used in biomedical research due to their suitability as a model of high priority diseases (e.g., HIV, obesity, cognitive aging), cost effective breeding and housing compared to most other NHPs, and close evolutionary relationship to humans. With this close evolutionary relationship, however, is a shared adaptation for a socially stimulating environment, without which both their welfare and suitability as a research model are compromised. While outdoor social group housing provides the best approximation of a social environment that matches the macaque behavioral biology in the wild, this is not always possible at all facilities, where animals may be housed indoors in small groups, in pairs, or alone. Further, animals may experience many housing changes in their lifetime depending on project needs, changes in social status, management needs, or health concerns. Here, we review the evidence for the physiological and health effects of social housing changes and the potential impacts on research outcomes for studies using macaques, particularly rhesus. We situate our review in the context of increasing regulatory pressure for research facilities to both house NHPs socially and mitigate trauma from social aggression. To meet these regulatory requirements and further refine the macaque model for research, significant advances must be made in our understanding and management of rhesus macaque social housing, particularly pair-housing since it is the most common social housing configuration for macaques while on research projects. Because most NHPs are adapted for sociality, a social context is likely important for improving repeatability, reproducibility, and external validity of primate biomedical research. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22528, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Social constructivism and its implications for critical media studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Kempf

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available While media critics maintain that war coverage has a strong bias toward promoting conflict escalation, their opponents claim that the concept of distorted reality cannot be upheld. What seems to be a media-political dispute results from an epistemological issue that tangles the very roots of cultural studies in general: the question of whether the social construction of reality implies the arbitrariness of opinions. The present paper discusses this proposition from a constructivist point of view and shows that it is based on an inadequate and logically incorrect understanding of truth and reality, and on a lack of differentiation between facts and meanings, between truth and beliefs and between objective and subjective realities. Defining a third path between cultural imperialism and a naïve understanding of cultural relativism, the paper finally discusses the methodological basis on which media criticism can build.

  15. Leprosy: Social implications from antiquity to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sak, Jarosław; Pawlikowski, Jakub; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important dermatologic diseases from the sociologic viewpoint has been leprosy. Those with leprosy were isolated, excluded from society, and stigmatized. Such a stigma indicates the strong feeling that a leprosy patient is shameful and should not be accepted by society. During the first millennium, leprosy was rapidly inscribed in the system of religious prohibitions-the disease was a punishment by God for wrongdoing, and the disease was associated with the lower spheres of the society. Social perception of leprosy gradually changed during the time of Crusades. The care for lepers became a Christian obligation, and celebrating Holy Masses as for the dead was forsaken. The sick were forced to stay at leprosaria, particularly from the 14th through the 19th centuries when fear of leprosy was at a high point. Admission to a leprosarium was mandatory not only for patients with leprosy but also even those suspected of having the disease.

  16. Social Presence and Implications for Designing Online Learning Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    With the rapid global proliferation of the Internet and telecommunication networks, online education, one form of distance education is currently becoming the fastest growing trend of domestic and international education. A major challenge to designing online learning is the development of appropriate means to facilitate the social environment that is critical for higher order learning in many disciplines. In many online learning designs, the majority of resources are channeled to web interface design and technology, while little or no resources are devoted to facilitating the teaching and learning process, the negotiation of meaning and the validation of knowledge among peers and instructors that depends on a conducive socio-cultural environment and adequate learner support.

  17. Social Work Values in Human Services Administration: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Larry D.; Hoefer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The perceived wisdom in the social work education community, based on empirical research from the 1990s and the early part of this century, says that the master of social work (MSW) degree is not competitive with the master of business administration or the master of public administration to obtain top-level administration jobs in nonprofit…

  18. Mothers' Perceptions of Social Work Helpgiving Practices: Implications for the Role of the School Social Worker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Kristina S.

    2012-01-01

    The Individual with Disabilities Act has strengthened the role of parents in their children's special education. School social workers are one of the educational professionals in attendance at IEP staffings, yet their role definition continues to be poorly articulated. This qualitative study investigated school social work helpgiving practices…

  19. Social Networks and Social Support: Implications for Natural Helper and Community Level Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Barbara A.

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on the linkage between social support and social networks and health educational programs that involve interventions at the network and community level. Addresses programs enhancing entire networks through natural helpers; and programs strengthening overlapping networks/communities through key opinion and informal leaders who are engaged…

  20. Social Workers' Perspectives Regarding the DSM: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLendon, Tara

    2014-01-01

    There is a decades-old debate in social work regarding the appropriateness of the use of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM) by clinicians in this profession. Despite often contentious perspectives, there has been very little study regarding clinical social workers' experiences, attitudes, and beliefs about…

  1. Implications of the behavioural immune system for social behaviour and human health in the modern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Mark; Murray, Damian R; Bangerter, Adrian

    2015-05-26

    The 'behavioural immune system' is composed of mechanisms that evolved as a means of facilitating behaviours that minimized infection risk and enhanced fitness. Recent empirical research on human populations suggests that these mechanisms have unique consequences for many aspects of human sociality--including sexual attitudes, gregariousness, xenophobia, conformity to majority opinion and conservative sociopolitical attitudes. Throughout much of human evolutionary history, these consequences may have had beneficial health implications; but health implications in modern human societies remain unclear. This article summarizes pertinent ways in which modern human societies are similar to and different from the ecologies within which the behavioural immune system evolved. By attending to these similarities and differences, we identify a set of plausible implications-both positive and negative-that the behavioural immune system may have on health outcomes in contemporary human contexts. We discuss both individual-level infection risk and population-level epidemiological outcomes. We also discuss a variety of additional implications, including compliance with public health policies, the adoption of novel therapeutic interventions and actual immunological functioning. Research on the behavioural immune system, and its implications in contemporary human societies, can provide unique insights into relationships between fitness, sociality and health.

  2. Human genome and the african personality: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickel, Elijah; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    The integration of the human genome with the African personality should be viewed as an interdependent whole. The African personality, for purposes of this article, comprises Black experiences, Negritude, and an Africa-centered axiology and epistemology. The outcome results in a spiritual focused collective consciousness. Anthropologically, historically (and with the Human Genome Project), genetically Africa has proven to be the source of all human life. Human kind wherever they exist on the planet using the African personality must be viewed as interconnected. Although racism and its progeny discrimination preexist the human genome project (HGP), the human genome provides an evidence-based rationale for the end to all policy and subsequent practice based on race and racism. Policy must be based on evidence to be competent practice. It would be remiss if not irresponsible of social work and the other behavioral scientist concerned with intervention and prevention behaviors to not infuse the findings of the HCPs. The African personality is a concept that provides a wholistic way to evaluate human behavior from an African worldview.

  3. HEALTH NETWORKS. STRUCTURE AND MANAGEMENT. IMPLICATIONS FOR SOCIAL ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doru Botezat

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article starts from a systematic analysis of specialized literature on the subject of health care services and networks integration, trying to offer relevant explanations to better understand the organization system of services within the network.To begin with, the article brings forward the institutional and spatial dynamics that leads to the network type configurations. Then, there is an analysis of the processes and measures which can serve as planning instruments available to the policies,shaping some principles for the management of networks within the health area.Finally, the article presents some configuration models of the health networks,recorded by the specialized literature and discusses the link between the natural evolution towards these new management organization forms and the new principles of social economy as a systematic evolution of the state`s organization. From the methodology point of view, the article has resulted from searching, selecting,evaluating and summarizing some works focused on the health systems economy and policies within the area of health.

  4. The molecules of social recognition memory: implications for social cognition, extended mind, and neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickle, John

    2008-06-01

    Social cognition, cognitive neuroscience, and neuroethics have reached a synthesis of late, but some troubling features are present. The neuroscience that currently dominates the study of social cognition is exclusively cognitive neuroscience, as contrasted with the cellular and increasingly molecular emphasis that has gripped mainstream neuroscience over the past three decades. Furthermore, the recent field of molecular and cellular cognition has begun to unravel some molecular mechanisms involved in social cognition, especially pertaining to the consolidation of memories of particular conspecific organisms. Some new experimental techniques for positive interventions into these hypothesized mechanisms offer opportunities for establishing direct causal linkages between intra-neuronal molecular events and the behaviors used to measure social cognitive phenomena. Predicted results from an experiment described below also cast doubt on the application of the "extended mind" approach from recent cognitive science to ground the neuroscience of social cognition. Since neuroethics relies heavily on our best neuroscience of social cognition, that field may soon need to extend its attention beyond cognitive neuroscience, and into neuroscience's cellular and molecular mainstream.

  5. Spirituality and Religion among the General Public: Implications for Social Work Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R

    2015-07-01

    Conceptualizations play a central role in social work discourse, shaping actions in the areas of practice, research, and education. Although many formulations of spirituality and religion have been advanced by social work scholars, the views of members of the general public have been largely absent from the professional conversation. The present article adds to the profession's evolving discussion on spirituality and religion by describing common understandings of spirituality and religion among the general population and by discussing the implication of these views for social work discourse on spirituality and religion. By understanding common views among the public, the social work profession is better positioned to provide ethical and professional services that respect clients' spiritual beliefs and values.

  6. The application of "integrated marketing communications" to social marketing and health communication: organizational challenges and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, G; Cole, G; Kirby, S; Freimuth, V; Caywood, C

    1998-01-01

    Influencing consumer behavior is a difficult and often resource-intensive undertaking, with success usually requiring identifying, describing, and understanding target audiences; solid product and/or service positioning relative to competitors; and significant media and communication resources. Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is a new way of organizing and managing persuasive communication tools and functions which involves realigning communications to consider the flow of information from an organization from the viewpoint of end consumers. Although the application of IMC to social marketing remains relatively unexplored, the IMC literature and recent efforts by the US Centers for Disease Prevention and Control suggest that integrated communication approaches have much to offer social marketing and health communication efforts. IMC, IMC and social marketing, and implications of IMC for public and private sector social marketing programs are discussed.

  7. Future trends in health and health care: implications for social work practice in an aging society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, William J; Davidson, Kay W

    2013-01-01

    Major economic, political, demographic, social, and operational system factors are prompting evolutionary changes in health care delivery. Of particular significance, the "graying of America" promises new challenges and opportunities for health care social work. At the same time, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, evolution of Accountable Care Organizations, and an emphasis on integrated, transdisciplinary, person-centered care represent fundamental shifts in service delivery with implications for social work practice and education. This article identifies the aging shift in American demography, its impact on health policy legislation, factors influencing fundamentally new service delivery paradigms, and opportunities of the profession to address the health disparities and care needs of an aging population. It underscores the importance of social work inclusion in integrated health care delivery and offers recommendations for practice education.

  8. Social Workers in Combat: Application of Advanced Practice Competencies in Military Social Work and Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Michael W.; Weiss, Eugenia L.

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the types of situations that U.S. uniformed social workers have experienced in combat deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan with the purpose of preparing current and future social workers to effectively serve military and veteran clients in either military or civilian settings. Vignettes demonstrate the application of the…

  9. "They just don't have a clue": transgender aging and implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverskog, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This article explores transgender aging, drawing from life story interviews with transgender adults aged 62-78. The analysis focuses on 3 themes: intersections of age and gender during the life course, lack of knowledge of transgender issues, and how previous experiences of accessing care and social services matter in later life. It illustrates how older transgendered adults carry physical and mental scars from previously encountered transphobia, which affect various aspects of later life. Implications for social work are discussed and client-centered care, with a biographical approach, is suggested to better meet the needs of transgendered older adults.

  10. [Social representations on HIV/AIDS among adolescentes: implications for nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiengo, Maria Aparecida; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Rodrigues, Benedita Maria Rêgo Deusdará

    2005-03-01

    With the objective of discussing the implications of the social representations of HIV/AIDS for the interpersonal relations and the practices for protection among adolescents, 15 semidirective interviews were carried out with adolescents, both with and without HIV, assisted at a Hospital School in Rio de Janeiro. The software ALCESTE 4.5 was used for the data analysis. It was observed that the social representation of AIDS is structured around cognitions connected to prevention, revealing a contradiction between the knowledge and the practices reported by the group. It is suggested that the nursing practices should be directed towards the reduction of the distance between practices, representations and scientific knowledge.

  11. Retrospective evaluation of the consequence of alleged patch test sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte D; Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus E

    2006-01-01

    consequences in cases of possible patch test sensitization. Among 7619 consecutively tested eczema patients in a 14-year period 26 (0.3%) were identified in the database as having had a late patch test reaction, which may be an indication of patch test sensitization. 9 of these cases were not suitable....... For the remaining 11 patients we could not rule out that they were patch test sensitized, and they were investigated further. 1 was diseased and 10 were interviewed regarding the possible consequences of the alleged patch test sensitization. 9 had not experienced any dermatitis problems, and 1 could not exclude...

  12. Flight into sanity. Jones's allegation of Ferenczi's mental deterioration reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, C

    1999-06-01

    In 'The Life and Work of Sigmund Freud', Volume III, Ernest Jones explained Ferenczi's final contributions as the product of a mental deterioration based on a progressive psychosis. Erich Fromm collected various testimonies by witnesses of Ferenczi's last years, all contrasting with Jones's assertions, and challenged Jones's manner of writing history. However, since Fromm was himself a dissident, and his witnesses were pupils, relatives or friends of Ferenczi's, they were discarded as 'partisans'. The present study aims at reconsidering the question of Ferenczi's insanity on the basis of many unpublished documents. The consulted documents do not support Jones's allegation of Ferenczi's insanity. At the same time, they show that Jones's allegation was not a one-man fabrication, but reflected a shared belief, eliciting many questions about the nature of this belief, the lack of scrutiny that characterised its spreading, and its possible function within the psychoanalytic community. It is suggested that Ferenczi's personality and teaching, especially his emphasis on the need to accept the patient's criticism, contrasted with the dominant conception of psychoanalysis, based on the analyst's infallibility.

  13. Disparities in the geography of mental health: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Christopher G

    2012-04-01

    This article reviews recent theory and research on geographic disparities in mental health and their implications for social work. It focuses on work emerging from the fields of mental health geography, psychiatric epidemiology, and social work, arguing that a wide range of spatial disparities in mental health are important to understand but that of greatest relevance are inequities, or disparities, that violate fundamental norms of fairness and social justice. Research is reviewed on geographic variations in subjective well-being and mental health, on personality (using the five-factor model), and on psychopathology as well as several studies on the disparate implementation of mental health policy and services. Critical is the need to simultaneously assess, on the one hand, differential patterns of mental health conditions and, on the other, the services and policies designed to address them--the fact that considering only one dimension often leads to unintended consequences. Many of the most outstanding disparities have been found to exist at the local level, between towns and neighborhoods, and are based on socioeconomic conditions. This review concludes by discussing the implications of geographic disparities in mental health for allocation decisions and for social work practice, including decisions about the most efficacious mix of services at both the community and clinical practice levels.

  14. Dynamic social networks and the implications for the spread of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jonathan M; Eames, Ken T D; Edmunds, W John

    2008-09-06

    Understanding the nature of human contact patterns is crucial for predicting the impact of future pandemics and devising effective control measures. However, few studies provide a quantitative description of the aspects of social interactions that are most relevant to disease transmission. Here, we present the results from a detailed diary-based survey of casual (conversational) and close contact (physical) encounters made by a small peer group of 49 adults who recorded 8,661 encounters with 3,528 different individuals over 14 non-consecutive days. We find that the stability of interactions depends on the intimacy of contact and social context. Casual contact encounters mostly occur in the workplace and are predominantly irregular, while close contact encounters mostly occur at home or in social situations and tend to be more stable. Simulated epidemics of casual contact transmission involve a large number of non-repeated encounters, and the social network is well captured by a random mixing model. However, the stability of the social network should be taken into account for close contact infections. Our findings have implications for the modelling of human epidemics and planning pandemic control policies based on social distancing methods.

  15. Suit alleges cosmetology school targeted gays for removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-08

    A former executive at the [name removed] School of Beauty Culture has filed a lawsuit alleging that the school identifies employees who have higher than average health-care costs and then initiates a harassment campaign against these employees. According to the executive, [name removed], the school president discussed a plan to reduce expenses by decreasing health care insurance benefits. The suit states that the Philadelphia-based company follows a policy of identifying cancer patients and homosexuals and then targets these individuals for harassment and abuse. When Mr. [Name removed] was diagnosed with a brain tumor, he was subjected to a range of tactics that encouraged him to quit, including a barrage of verbal abuse, being barred from meetings of his peers, and an expanded workload. The former executive charges the school and its president with violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Discovery in the litigation has begun, but no trial date has been scheduled.

  16. The Alleged Crisis and the Illusion of Exact Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebe, Wolfgang; Strack, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing criticism of the way psychologists conduct and analyze studies. These critiques as well as failures to replicate several high-profile studies have been used as justification to proclaim a "replication crisis" in psychology. Psychologists are encouraged to conduct more "exact" replications of published studies to assess the reproducibility of psychological research. This article argues that the alleged "crisis of replicability" is primarily due to an epistemological misunderstanding that emphasizes the phenomenon instead of its underlying mechanisms. As a consequence, a replicated phenomenon may not serve as a rigorous test of a theoretical hypothesis because identical operationalizations of variables in studies conducted at different times and with different subject populations might test different theoretical constructs. Therefore, we propose that for meaningful replications, attempts at reinstating the original circumstances are not sufficient. Instead, replicators must ascertain that conditions are realized that reflect the theoretical variable(s) manipulated (and/or measured) in the original study.

  17. Determinants of Arsenicosis Patients’ Perception and Social Implications of Arsenic Poisoning through Groundwater in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, M. Mizanur Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Adverse human health effects ranging from skin lesions to internal cancers as well as widespread social and psychological problems caused by arsenic contaminated drinking water in Bangladesh may be the biggest arsenic calamity in the world. From an arsenicosis patients survey, this paper empirically analyzes the determinants of arsenicosis patients’ perception about chronic arsenic poisoning and social and psychological implications of arsenicosis. In this study, cross-sectional data were collected from the Matlab and Hajiganj Upzillas of Chandpur district which are known to be highly contaminated with arsenic in their underground water. Respondents informed that arsenic poisoning causes a wide range of social and psychological problems. Female respondents were less vulnerable in the case of social problems (p < 0.01) and more vulnerable for the psychological problems (p < 0.001) of arsenicosis than male respondents. The results based on logit analysis showed that education (p < 0.01) and household income (p < 0.05) were significantly correlated to respondents’ perception about arsenicosis. The arsenicosis related special program (s) needs a clear understanding of people’s perception about arsenic exposure for abating the health burden as well as social and psychological problems. PMID:21139854

  18. The Affordable Care Act, Substance Use Disorders, and Low-Income Clients: Implications for Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Heather A; Wahler, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Social workers are leaders in the substance abuse services field and may often work in substance use disorder (SUD) education, prevention, assessment, treatment, or resource coordination and case management roles. As the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (2010) drives changes in the fields of health and behavioral health, social workers have an opportunity to lead structural changes at the micro and macro levels that will have a positive impact on low-income clients with SUDs. In this article, authors examine the current state of SUDs and health care access, the impact of the ACA on the field, and implications for social work practice and education. Social workers should seek specialized education and credentialing in SUD services, know how to help clients apply for health care coverage, and advocate for integrated substance abuse treatment and health care programs and an expansion of Medicaid in their local communities. Social workers are well positioned to be a voice for clients to ensure that the current structural changes result in a better, integrated system of care that is able to respond to the needs of low-income clients with SUDs.

  19. Determinants of Arsenicosis Patients’ Perception and Social Implications of Arsenic Poisoning through Groundwater in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mizanur Rahman Sarker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Adverse human health effects ranging from skin lesions to internal cancers as well as widespread social and psychological problems caused by arsenic contaminated drinking water in Bangladesh may be the biggest arsenic calamity in the world. From an arsenicosis patients survey, this paper empirically analyzes the determinants of arsenicosis patients’ perception about chronic arsenic poisoning and social and psychological implications of arsenicosis. In this study, cross-sectional data were collected from the Matlab and Hajiganj Upzillas of Chandpur district which are known to be highly contaminated with arsenic in their underground water. Respondents informed that arsenic poisoning causes a wide range of social and psychological problems. Female respondents were less vulnerable in the case of social problems (p < 0.01 and more vulnerable for the psychological problems (p < 0.001 of arsenicosis than male respondents. The results based on logit analysis showed that education (p < 0.01 and household income (p < 0.05 were significantly correlated to respondents’ perception about arsenicosis. The arsenicosis related special program (s needs a clear understanding of people’s perception about arsenic exposure for abating the health burden as well as social and psychological problems.

  20. THE FARTHEST MOSQUE OR THE ALLEGED TEMPLE AN ANALYTIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia Hassan Wazeri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Farthest Mosque (Al-Masjid Al-Aqsa in Jerusalem has been associated in the consciousness of the Muslims, with The Sacred Mosque (Al-Masjid Al-Haram in Makkah through a spiritual bond since the event of Isra’ (Night Journey and Mi`raj (Ascension to Heaven. The objective of this study is to determine the orientation of the Farthest Mosque and illustrate the similarity in geometric shape (plan and proportions, between the Farthest Mosque in Jerusalem and the sacred mosque (Al-Ka`bah in Makkah, in the first part of the research. The second part of the research involves a study of some texts from the Old Testament that address the architectural and structural descriptions of the alleged temple, with the purpose of exposing whether glaring contradictions exist between the texts of the Old Testament themselves or between them and the real architectural and structural facts acknowledged by specialists in this field. Keywords: The Farthest mosque, the Alleged Temple, Al-Ka`bah, geometric similarity     Abstrak Masjid tertua (Masjid al-Aqsa di Jarusalem telah dihubungkan dalam kesadaran umat muslim, dengan masjid suci (Masjidil Haram di Mekah melalui ikatan spiritual sejak kejadian Isra’ (perjalanan malam dan Mi’raj (kenaikan  ke  surga.  Tujuan  dari  kajian  ini  adalah  untuk  menentukan  orientasi  masjid  tertua  and menggambarkan kesamaan bentuk geometri (denah dan proporsi, antara masjid tertua di Jarusalem dan masjid suci (Ka’bah di Mekah, di bagian pertama penelitian. Bagian kedua penelitian melibatkan kajian beberapa tulisan dari surat wasiat kuno yang mengarah kepada deskripsi arsitektural dan struktural kuil, dengan tujuan mengekspos baik kontradiksi yang mencolok antara tulisan surat wasiat kuno itu sendiri maupun di antara mereka, dan fakta arsitektural dan struktural yang nyata diakui oleh spesialis di lapangan   Kata kunci: masjid tertua, kuil, ka’bah, kesamaan geometri

  1. Social Network Analysis of the Irish Biotech Industry: Implications for Digital Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egeraat, Chris; Curran, Declan

    This paper presents an analysis of the socio-spatial structures of innovation, collaboration and knowledge flow among SMEs in the Irish biotech sector. The study applies social network analysis to determine the structure of networks of company directors and inventors in the biotech sector. In addition, the article discusses the implications of the findings for the role and contours of a biotech digital ecosystem. To distil these lessons, the research team organised a seminar which was attended by representatives of biotech actors and experts.

  2. 76 FR 42707 - Amendment of OIG Hotline Allegation System (EPA-30)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... AGENCY Amendment of OIG Hotline Allegation System (EPA-30) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... records by changing the name of the system from the Office of Inspector General (OIG) Hotline Allegation System (EPA-30) to the Inspector General Enterprise Management System (IGEMS) Hotline Module....

  3. 13 CFR 101.301 - Who should receive information or allegations of waste, fraud, and abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Who should receive information or allegations of waste, fraud, and abuse? 101.301 Section 101.301 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION Inspector General § 101.301 Who should receive information or allegations of waste, fraud, and abuse?...

  4. Manufactured Memory, Altered Belief and Self Report Mirage: The Alleged False Memory of Jean Piaget Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Frank

    1999-01-01

    It is argued that a Jean Piaget anecdote about an alleged memory implanted in a young child leading to both a visual and semantic memory that persists despite disconfirming evidence is entirely different than the recovered memory debate, which is about the alleged introduction of memories to grown adults. (CR)

  5. The Polygraph, Its Use in Cases of Alleged Sexual Abuse: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Kathleen Coulborn

    1997-01-01

    This exploratory study of 42 cases with sexual abuse allegations and polygraph results found that polygraph findings were unrelated to other evidence of likelihood of sexual abuse, including the child's statements, medical evidence, psychological symptoms, or indicators of sexual abuse. When alleged offenders passed polygraphs, criminal…

  6. 32 CFR 507.18 - Processing complaints of alleged breach of policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Processing complaints of alleged breach of... Program § 507.18 Processing complaints of alleged breach of policies. The Institute of Heraldry may revoke or suspend the certificate of authority to manufacture if there are breaches of quality...

  7. Young Children's References to Temporal Attributes of Allegedly Experienced Events in the Course of Forensic Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Developmental differences in references to temporal attributes of allegedly experienced events were examined in 250 forensic interviews of 4- to 10-year-old alleged victims of sexual abuse. Children's ages, the specific temporal attributes referenced, and the types of memory tapped by the interviewers' questions significantly affected the quantity…

  8. Strategic content in third sector organizations: possibilities and implications of social research in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Cesar Marins Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reflection on themes related to strategy, either in theoretical or empirical, has strong relationship with its applicability. However, this condition applied to Third Sector organizations emphasizes his preference for studies that avoid the application techniques and approaches developed on organizational studies. Thus, this paper seeks to promote the research possibilities and study of strategic content implications on third sector organizations such as reflection and contribution to the paradox presented above, with the following empirical possibilities: i. The possibilities present on interorganizational relations at strategic content framework and organizational outcomes; ii. The observation of strategic practices of organizations in this sector and their social network constitutions; and iii. The consequences of decisions at the strategic content to legitimize the actors social practices.

  9. Exploring the implications of social change for human development: perspectives, issues and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyin

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have investigated the implications of social change for human development from different perspectives. The studies published in this special section were conducted within Greenfield's theoretical framework (2009). The findings concerning links between specific sociodemographic features (e.g., commercial activities, schooling) and individual cognition and social behaviour are particularly interesting because they tap the underlying forces that drive human development. To further understand the issues in these studies and in the field, a pluralist-constructive perspective is discussed, which emphasises the integration of diverse values and practices in both Western and non-Western societies and its effects on the development of sophisticated competencies in individual adaptation to the changing global community. In addition, several issues are highlighted and some suggestions are provided for future explorations in this field.

  10. Using Social Robots in Health Settings: Implications of Personalization on Human-Machine Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Tam and Rajiv Khosla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In view of the shortage of healthcare workers and a growing aging population, it is worthwhile to explore the applicability of new technologies in improving the quality of healthcare and reducing its cost. However, it remains a challenge to deploy such technologies in environments where individuals have limited knowledge about how to use them. Thus, this paper explores how the social robots designed for use in health settings in Australia have sought to overcome some of the limitations through personalization. Deployed in aged care and home-based care facilities, the social robots are person-centered, emphasizing the personalization of care with human-like attributes (e.g., human appearances to engage in reciprocal communication with users. While there have been debates over the advantages and disadvantages of personalization, this paper discusses the implications of personalization on the design of the robots for enhancing engagement, empowerment and enablement in health settings.

  11. The impact of illness on social networks: implications for transmission and control of influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kerckhove, Kim; Hens, Niel; Edmunds, W John; Eames, Ken T D

    2013-12-01

    We expect social networks to change as a result of illness, but social contact data are generally collected from healthy persons. Here we quantified the impact of influenza-like illness on social mixing patterns. We analyzed the contact patterns of persons from England measured when they were symptomatic with influenza-like illness during the 2009 A/H1N1pdm influenza epidemic (2009-2010) and again 2 weeks later when they had recovered. Illness was associated with a reduction in the number of social contacts, particularly in settings outside the home, reducing the reproduction number to about one-quarter of the value it would otherwise have taken. We also observed a change in the age distribution of contacts. By comparing the expected age distribution of cases resulting from transmission by (a)symptomatic persons with incidence data, we estimated the contribution of both groups to transmission. Using this, we calculated the fraction of transmission resulting from (a)symptomatic persons, assuming equal duration of infectiousness. We estimated that 66% of transmission was attributable to persons with symptomatic disease (95% confidence interval: 0.23, 1.00). This has important implications for control: Treating symptomatic persons with antiviral agents or encouraging home isolation would be expected to have a major impact on transmission, particularly since the reproduction number for this strain was low.

  12. A social network analysis of social cohesion in a constructed pride: implications for ex situ reintroduction of the African lion (Panthera leo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Abell

    Full Text Available Animal conservation practices include the grouping of captive related and unrelated individuals to form a social structure which is characteristic of that species in the wild. In response to the rapid decline of wild African lion (Panthera leo populations, an array of conservational strategies have been adopted. Ex situ reintroduction of the African lion requires the construction of socially cohesive pride structures prior to wild release. This pilot study adopted a social network theory approach to quantitatively assess a captive pride's social structure and the relationships between individuals within them. Group composition (who is present in a group and social interaction data (social licking, greeting, play was observed and recorded to assess social cohesion within a released semi-wild pride. UCINET and SOCPROG software was utilised to represent and analyse these social networks. Results indicate that the pride is socially cohesive, does not exhibit random associations, and the role of socially influential keystone individuals is important for maintaining social bondedness within a lion pride. These results are potentially informative for the structure of lion prides, in captivity and in the wild, and could have implications for captive and wild-founder reintroductions.

  13. A social network analysis of social cohesion in a constructed pride: implications for ex situ reintroduction of the African lion (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Jackie; Kirzinger, Morgan W B; Gordon, Yvonne; Kirk, Jacqui; Kokeŝ, Rae; Lynas, Kirsty; Mandinyenya, Bob; Youldon, David

    2013-01-01

    Animal conservation practices include the grouping of captive related and unrelated individuals to form a social structure which is characteristic of that species in the wild. In response to the rapid decline of wild African lion (Panthera leo) populations, an array of conservational strategies have been adopted. Ex situ reintroduction of the African lion requires the construction of socially cohesive pride structures prior to wild release. This pilot study adopted a social network theory approach to quantitatively assess a captive pride's social structure and the relationships between individuals within them. Group composition (who is present in a group) and social interaction data (social licking, greeting, play) was observed and recorded to assess social cohesion within a released semi-wild pride. UCINET and SOCPROG software was utilised to represent and analyse these social networks. Results indicate that the pride is socially cohesive, does not exhibit random associations, and the role of socially influential keystone individuals is important for maintaining social bondedness within a lion pride. These results are potentially informative for the structure of lion prides, in captivity and in the wild, and could have implications for captive and wild-founder reintroductions.

  14. Are the alleged remains of Johann Sebastian Bach authentic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, Richard H C; Maas, Mario; Koopman, A Ton G; Maat, George J R

    2009-02-16

    A skeleton alleged to be that of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was exhumed from a graveyard in Leipzig, Germany, in 1894, but its authenticity is not established. In 1895, anatomist Wilhelm His concluded from his examination of the skeleton and reconstruction of the face that it most likely belonged to Bach. In 1949, surgeon Wolfgang Rosenthal noticed exostoses on the skeleton and on x-rays of 11 living organists and proposed a condition, Organistenkrankheit, which he interpreted as evidence that the skeleton was Bach's. However, our critical assessment of the remains analysis raises doubts: the localisation of the grave was dubious, and the methods used by His to reconstruct the face are controversial. Also, our study of the pelvic x-rays of 12 living professional organists failed to find evidence for the existence of Organistenkrankheit. We believe it is unlikely that the skeleton is that of Bach; techniques such as DNA analysis might help resolve the question but, to date, church authorities have not approved their use on the skeleton.

  15. Lawsuits allege price fixing by generic drug makers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Two years after high generic drug prices became a public controversy, Reuters is reporting that 20 states filed a lawsuit Thursday against Mylan, Teva Pharmaceuticals and four other generic drug makers (1. The suit alleges the companies conspired to fix prices or allocated markets to prop up prices. The civil lawsuit, led by antitrust investigators in Connecticut, comes one day after the U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges against two former executives of the generic drug maker, Heritage. The states attorneys general asked the court to order the companies to disgorge ill-gotten gains, which were not defined, pay attorneys' fees and stop collusion. Of the states in the Southwest only Nevada is participating in the lawsuit. The cases are part of a broader generic drug pricing probe that remains under way at the state and federal level, as well as in the U.S. Congress. In 2014, media reports of …

  16. IS MISS SYMPATHY A CREDIBLE DEFENDANT ALLEGING INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN A TRIAL FOR MURDER?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Expósito

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Current research has postulated that judicial inferencing and judgement-making are subject to biased appraisals. This study assessed the factors reported in the literature associated to the appraisal of criminality in a mock case of a battered woman standing trial for murdering her husband, and who pleaded legitimate self-defence in response to an instance of intimate partner violence. A nationwide sample of 169 police officers from different cities in Spain freely volunteered to participate in the study. Using a mock trial design, the defendant´s prototypicality (prototypical vs. non-prototypical, and physical attractiveness (attractive vs. unattractive were manipulated. Participants were required to assess the criminality (credibility, responsibility, and controllability of a battered woman accused of murdering her husband, and who alleged legitimate self-defence in response to an incident of intimate partner violence. The results showed that a defendant perceived as the prototype of a battered woman was judged as having less or no control of the situation; physical attractiveness increased the perception of the defendant´s responsibility in committing the crime; and an interaction between prototypicality and attractiveness in assigning credibility to the defendant´s testimony. Moreover, hostile sexism mediated the relationship between the defendant´s prototypicality and controllability. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for judicial judgement making in cases of battered women who kill their aggressors.

  17. The social context of assimilation: testing implications of segmented assimilation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Greenman, Emily

    2011-05-01

    Segmented assimilation theory has been a popular explanation for the diverse experiences of assimilation among new waves of immigrants and their children. While the theory has been interpreted in many different ways, we emphasize its implications for the important role of social context: both processes and consequences of assimilation should depend on the local social context in which immigrants are embedded. We derive empirically falsifiable hypotheses about the interaction effects between social context and assimilation on immigrant children's well-being. We then test the hypotheses using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our empirical analyses yield two main findings. First, for immigrant adolescents living in non-poverty neighborhoods, we find assimilation to be positively associated with educational achievement and psychological well-being but also positively associated with at-risk behavior. Second, there is little empirical evidence supporting our hypotheses derived from segmented assimilation theory. We interpret these results to mean that future research would be more fruitful focusing on differential processes of assimilation rather than differential consequences of assimilation.

  18. Blowing in the (social) wind: implications of extrinsic esteem contingencies for terror management and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jamie; Cox, Cathy R; Goldenberg, Jamie L; Vess, Matthew; Routledge, Clay; Cooper, Douglas P; Cohen, Florette

    2009-06-01

    In 4 studies, the role of extrinsic esteem contingencies in adjusting to shifting health-relevant standards when managing existential fears was examined. Study 1 demonstrated that after reminders of death, higher dispositional focus on extrinsic self-esteem contingencies predicted greater interest in tanning. Using a more domain-specific approach, Study 2 showed that, after being reminded of death, the more individuals smoke for social esteem reasons, the more compelling they find an antismoking commercial that exposes adverse social consequences of smoking. Study 3 explored how situational factors (i.e., priming a contingent relational schema) that implicate extrinsic contingencies facilitated the impact of shifting standard primes on tanning intentions after mortality salience. Finally, Study 4 found that mortality salience led to increased endorsement of exercise as a basis of self-worth when participants who derive self-esteem from extrinsic sources visualized someone who exercises. Together, these studies demonstrate that reminders of death interact with prevalent social standards to influence everyday health decisions.

  19. Social ‘wanting’ dysfunction in autism: neurobiological underpinnings and treatment implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohls Gregor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most behavioral training regimens in autism spectrum disorders (ASD rely on reward-based reinforcement strategies. Although proven to significantly increase both cognitive and social outcomes and successfully reduce aberrant behaviors, this approach fails to benefit a substantial number of affected individuals. Given the enormous amount of clinical and financial resources devoted to behavioral interventions, there is a surprisingly large gap in our knowledge of the basic reward mechanisms of learning in ASD. Understanding the mechanisms for reward responsiveness and reinforcement-based learning is urgently needed to better inform modifications that might improve current treatments. The fundamental goal of this review is to present a fine-grained literature analysis of reward function in ASD with reference to a validated neurobiological model of reward: the ‘wanting’/’liking’ framework. Despite some inconsistencies within the available literature, the evaluation across three converging sets of neurobiological data (neuroimaging, electrophysiological recordings, and neurochemical measures reveals good evidence for disrupted reward-seeking tendencies in ASD, particularly in social contexts. This is most likely caused by dysfunction of the dopaminergic–oxytocinergic ‘wanting’ circuitry, including the ventral striatum, amygdala, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Such a conclusion is consistent with predictions derived from diagnostic criteria concerning the core social phenotype of ASD, which emphasize difficulties with spontaneous self-initiated seeking of social encounters (that is, social motivation. Existing studies suggest that social ‘wanting’ tendencies vary considerably between individuals with ASD, and that the degree of social motivation is both malleable and predictive of intervention response. Although the topic of reward responsiveness in ASD is very new, with much research still needed, the current data

  20. Open-cut coal mining in Australia's Hunter Valley: Sustainability and the industry's economic, ecological and social implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Cottle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article questions the sustainability of open-cut coal mining in the Hunter Valley region of Australia. The issue of sustainability is examined in relation to the economic, ecological and social implications of the Hunter Valley’s open-cut coal mining industry. The article demonstrates that critical social and ecological ramifications have been overshadowed by the open-cut coal mining industry’s importance to the economy of the Hunter region and of New South Wales.

  1. Understanding the relational impact of the health care marketing exchange: a review of the social implications of therapeutic communicator style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B C

    1987-09-01

    Though the benefits derived from verbal communication between practitioner and patient often are beyond the control of most health care marketers, this encounter includes nearly all of the personality and social appeals that are critical to the development of a successful and long-lasting marketing exchange. To enable marketers of health care to understand more fully the communication context in which practitioners operate, the author reviews the social implications of therapeutic communicator style.

  2. Do social networking website have an implication on millenial´s academic and/or occupational performance?

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify if there are any implications of Social Networking Website use on academic and/or occupational performance given the staggering number of users of such platforms. An online survey assessed the proposed determinants of Social Networking Websites (SNW) Addiction and if it has any repercussions on the user’s academic and/or occupational performance. The collected data (n=451) includes respondents of the Millennial generation from the U.S.A. an...

  3. The Impact of Immigration Legislations on Latino Families: Implications for Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Romero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Under the Obama administration, approximately 1.2 million undocumented immigrants have been deported, (around 400,000 in 2011, placing children (who are often American citizens at risk of unnecessary mental anguish as well as financial hardship. With republican and democratic leadership tied up in ideological debates addressing the issue of comprehensive immigration reform, many states are left in a dire position and we as a nation end up with draconian anti-immigrant legislation that places more Latino immigrant families at risk. Enforcement-only initiatives leave children and families of immigrants in our country vulnerable. Comprehensive immigration reform is necessary. This article discusses the prevalence of such policy initiatives and their implications for social work education, practice, research, and policy.

  4. Caregivers of veterans with "invisible" injuries: what we know and implications for social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bina R

    2015-01-01

    Today, as a result of the longest volunteer-fought conflict in U.S. history, there are many wounded coming home not only with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but also with traumatic brain injury (TBI), which together have been called the "signature" or "invisible" injuries of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Caregivers are an important part of their recovery, yet little is known about them, as previous research on caregivers mostly focused on geriatric populations. According to one estimate 275,000 to 1 million people are currently caring or have cared for loved ones who have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan. These caregivers are unique in that they are younger, some with children, and they are caring for a unique under-studied population for longer periods of time. This article summarizes literature on caregivers of veterans who suffer from PTSD, TBI, or both; provides a theoretical framework; and discusses implications for social workers in assisting caregivers and their families.

  5. We Recognize Ourselves as Being Similar to Others: Implications of the “Social Brain Hypothesis” for the Biological Evolution of the Intuition of Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckart Voland

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with and in extension of the “social brain hypothesis,” I discuss the idea that the intuition of free will emerged during the course of primate social evolution. If, as the “social brain hypothesis” alleges, the main selective pressure among primates is on generating social knowledge about one's cooperators and competitors, then it is the knowledge about others and not the knowledge about oneself that is the scarce cognitive resource. It is beneficial to make the others predictable and to form hypotheses about their probable behavioral tendencies. This is done by behavior reading and mind reading and by classifying the recurring stochastic patterns in everyday language as the “will.” Thus, the idea of free will emerged first as a social attribution and not as an introspectively gained insight. The fact that ego applies the idea of freedom also to itself and considers itself to be as free as it considers the social partners to be free, i.e. unpredictable, is in this view a non-selected by-product of social intelligence.

  6. Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing: Review of Ethical, Legal and Social Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidar, Hazar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA from maternal blood has recently entered clinical practice in many countries, including Canada. This test can be performed early during pregnancy to detect Down syndrome and other conditions. While NIPT promises numerous benefits, it also has challenging ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI. This paper reviews concerns currently found in the literature on the ELSI of NIPT. We make four observations. First, NIPT seems to exacerbate some of the already existing concerns raised by other prenatal tests (amniocentesis and maternal serum screening such as threats to women’s reproductive autonomy and the potential for discrimination and stigmatization of disabled individuals and their families. This may be due to the likely upcoming large scale implementation and routinization of NIPT. Second, the distinction between NIPT as a screening test (as it is currently recommended and as a diagnostic test (potentially in the future, has certain implications for the ELSI discussion. Third, we observed a progressive shift in the literature from initially including mostly conceptual analysis to an increasing number of empirical studies. This demonstrates the contribution of empirical bioethics approaches as the technology is being implemented into clinical use. Finally, we noted an increasing interest in equity and justice concerns regarding access to NIPT as it becomes more widely implemented.

  7. Social equity and livelihood implications of REDD+ in rural communities – a case study from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Poudel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite growing international consensus that the use of the policy instrument REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation in developing countries could be an effective way to reduce carbon emissions from the forestry sector and support bio-diversity with livelihood benefits, there are a range of unresolved issues, including potential implications for rural livelihoods. This paper presents results from recent research that examines social equity and livelihood implications of the piloting of REDD+ through Nepal’s community forestry system, within selected villages in the Gorkha district of Nepal. The research reveals the varying experiences of households, closely correlated to the socio-economic attributes of the households. Despite the ‘no harm and equitable’ policy, this research indicates that not everyone is experiencing the anticipated benefits of REDD+. Although poorer, women-headed and marginalized households are targeted in some ways (e.g. seed grants, the support is limited, and inadequately compensates the loss they have experienced in other ways (e.g. limited access to forests. Households bundling by caste may not necessarily address equity, but is likely to increase intra-caste marginalization.

  8. Reassessment of the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    On July 6, 1993, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Executive Director for Operations established a review team to reassess the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation. The team evaluated the current system, and solicited comments from various NRC offices, other Federal agencies, licensees, former allegers, and the public. This report is subject to agency review. The report summarizes current processes and gives an overview of current problems. It discusses: (1) ways in which licensees can promote a quality-conscious work environment, in which all employees feel free to raise concerns without fear of retaliation; (2) ways to improve the NRC`s overall handling of allegations; (3) the NRC`s involvement in the Department of Labor process; (4) related NRC enforcement practices; and (5) methods other than investigation and enforcement that may be useful in treating allegations of potential or actual discrimination. Recommendations are given in each area.

  9. Results of the 2010 Statewide New Mexico School Social Work Survey: Implications for Evaluating the Effectiveness of School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey-Jerome, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Today's school social workers are facing unique challenges in the workplace. The results of the 2009 New Mexico School Social Work Survey reinforced the idea that school social workers must be able to prove their effectiveness. Building on the school social work literature on practice outcomes evaluation, a more extensive statewide survey of…

  10. Bioethics methods in the ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebecca L; Morrissey, Clair

    2014-11-01

    While bioethics as a field has concerned itself with methodological issues since the early years, there has been no systematic examination of how ethics is incorporated into research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Yet ELSI research may bear a particular burden of investigating and substantiating its methods given public funding, an explicitly cross-disciplinary approach, and the perceived significance of adequate responsiveness to advances in genomics. We undertook a qualitative content analysis of a sample of ELSI publications appearing between 2003 and 2008 with the aim of better understanding the methods, aims, and approaches to ethics that ELSI researchers employ. We found that the aims of ethics within ELSI are largely prescriptive and address multiple groups. We also found that the bioethics methods used in the ELSI literature are both diverse between publications and multiple within publications, but are usually not themselves discussed or employed as suggested by bioethics method proponents. Ethics in ELSI is also sometimes undistinguished from related inquiries (such as social, legal, or political investigations).

  11. Social and academic implications of acoustically hostile classrooms for hard of hearing children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Janet R.

    2005-04-01

    The correlation between lowered academic achievement and classroom noise has been demonstrated for normally hearing children (Shield and Dockrell, 2003). However, the implications of poor classroom acoustics on the socialization and academic performance of children who are hard of hearing have not been examined. Eleven hard of hearing students in one school district, ranging from kindergarten to grade 7, were the foci of the present study. Acoustic measurements of each of the 11 classrooms in both unoccupied and occupied conditions revealed that all classrooms were acoustically challenging for the hard of hearing students, particularly at transition times, when ventilation was operational, and in the primary grades, when language learning needs are greatest. Interviews with parents and teachers underscored the difficulty these students experienced in comprehending teacher instructions and participating in group work. The students seldom initiated conversation or seatwork independently, but, rather, followed the lead of their peers. The hard of hearing students experienced frequent difficulties in understanding or participating in informal peer-to-peer conversations in the classroom, and parents and teachers attributed the children's frequent social isolation and withdrawal at school to the combined effects of poor hearing abilities and hostile classroom acoustics. [Work supported by Hampton Research Fund.

  12. [Machismo, made in Mexico? Social implications of the masculine hegemony in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ortega, Adriana; Rivas-Zivy, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Hegemonic masculinity may be considered a public health problem in that it promotes aggressive behavior, violence towards men and women, and self-injury. "Being a man" within such a pattern implies stress, tension and anxiety to prove one's own masculinity. This article proposes that it is necessary to understand how dominant masculinity is individually and socially connected with the exercise of power over women and its implications in legislation and rights, to go beyond it. This text reviews these connections both through interviews with men and through examining how literature on masculinities presents the rarely discussed connections among power, law, legislation and dominant notions of masculinity. It explores the notion of power present both in literature and in men's perceptions, as a way to understand which perceptions of authority are culturally and socially legitimated by men. It is concluded that masculinities are in a process of transformation in Mexico, but that important vacuums persist which arrest the eradication of dominant masculinity. The analysis is based on a bibliographic revision, together with group and individual interviews with men. Results show how in the men's perceptions and reflections on the exercise of power, there persists a lack of criticism.

  13. THE SOCIAL-ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF THE CLIMATE CHANGES IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe ZAMAN

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The social-economic implication of climatic changes in Romania are analysed under the following viewpoints: causes and effects; prevention and abatement; adjustment; institutional aspects of environmental management. The main reason of climatic changes is generated by the greenhouse effect (GE that determines the heating of the terrestrial surface, melt-down of icebergs, tornados, draughts and flooding more frequently and of increasing intensity. These extreme meteorological phenomena determine, over time, increasing human and material losses, which imposes measures with effects on short-, medium- and long-term for diminishing the greenhouse effect in accordance with the commitments and provisions of the Kyoto Protocol and the requirements for the sustainable development of the country. Proposals are made with respect to integrating environmental issues into economic and social development strategies, emphasising the need for increasing environment financing and attaching more importance to the Ministry of Environment which must couple its policy with the acquis communautaire and the EU programme for combating and preventing GE impact.

  14. Dinosaur demise in light of their alleged perennial polar residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewy, Zeev

    2016-12-01

    disarticulated. Accordingly, the alleged `polar dinosaurs' do not challenge the logical conclusion that the non-avian dinosaurs were cold-blooded, as a result of which they became inactive and subjected to predation during the end-Cretaceous dark period.

  15. Students’ Understanding of the Concept of Democracy and Implications for Teacher Education in Social Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Elise Hesby Mathé

    2016-04-01

    be actively encouraged and maintained also in successful democracies. Little is known, however, about how students understand and explain democracy as a subject-specific concept. Such knowledge may be valuable for social studies teachers and teacher educators to fulfil the purpose of the social studies curriculum. The present article investigates 16-year-old students’ understanding of the concept of democracy. In social studies, the concept of democracy is essential not only for disciplinary understanding and discourse, but also for students’ out-of-school democratic participation. To investigate students’ understanding of this concept, semi-structured group interviews were conducted with a total of 23 students at three different Norwegian upper secondary schools. A central finding is that students primarily expressed a liberal understanding of democracy focusing on voting in elections as the main political activity. Students also demonstrated more or less limited or elaborate understanding. In addition to presenting and discussing students’ understandings of the concept of democracy, this article considers implications for teacher education in social studies. One implication is that teacher educators need to engage actively in discussing and defining core concepts with their students. This is related to supporting student teachers’ professional development and in turn developing adolescents’ opportunities for democratic participation. Such a dual focus can provide a knowledge base to help student teachers in their professional development in their first years as practicing teachers.Keywords: democracy, concepts, understanding, teacher education, social studies, democratic theory

  16. Spanish Language Self-Efficacy Beliefs among Spanish-Speaking Social Workers: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Limited research exists about Spanish-speaking social workers that provide bilingual social work services. To date, studies have not exclusively focused on actual language competence of bilingual social workers or even their self-perceived language beliefs. This study reviews the results of a cross-sectional Internet-based survey exploring…

  17. An unbiased Bayesian approach to functional connectomics implicates social-communication networks in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Archana; Duncan, James S; Yang, Daniel Y-J; Pelphrey, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) studies reveal a complex pattern of hyper- and hypo-connectivity in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Whereas rsfMRI findings tend to implicate the default mode network and subcortical areas in ASD, task fMRI and behavioral experiments point to social dysfunction as a unifying impairment of the disorder. Here, we leverage a novel Bayesian framework for whole-brain functional connectomics that aggregates population differences in connectivity to localize a subset of foci that are most affected by ASD. Our approach is entirely data-driven and does not impose spatial constraints on the region foci or dictate the trajectory of altered functional pathways. We apply our method to data from the openly shared Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) and pinpoint two intrinsic functional networks that distinguish ASD patients from typically developing controls. One network involves foci in the right temporal pole, left posterior cingulate cortex, left supramarginal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus. Automated decoding of this network by the Neurosynth meta-analytic database suggests high-level concepts of "language" and "comprehension" as the likely functional correlates. The second network consists of the left banks of the superior temporal sulcus, right posterior superior temporal sulcus extending into temporo-parietal junction, and right middle temporal gyrus. Associated functionality of these regions includes "social" and "person". The abnormal pathways emanating from the above foci indicate that ASD patients simultaneously exhibit reduced long-range or inter-hemispheric connectivity and increased short-range or intra-hemispheric connectivity. Our findings reveal new insights into ASD and highlight possible neural mechanisms of the disorder.

  18. Research Review: Social Motivation and Oxytocin in Autism--Implications for Joint Attention Development and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Katherine K. M.; Carver, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Scope: The social motivation hypothesis (SMH) suggests that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are less intrinsically rewarded by social stimuli than their neurotypical peers. This difference in social motivation has been posited as a factor contributing to social deficits in ASD. Social motivation is thought to…

  19. Data Mining and Privacy of Social Network Sites' Users: Implications of the Data Mining Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saggaf, Yeslam; Islam, Md Zahidul

    2015-08-01

    This paper explores the potential of data mining as a technique that could be used by malicious data miners to threaten the privacy of social network sites (SNS) users. It applies a data mining algorithm to a real dataset to provide empirically-based evidence of the ease with which characteristics about the SNS users can be discovered and used in a way that could invade their privacy. One major contribution of this article is the use of the decision forest data mining algorithm (SysFor) to the context of SNS, which does not only build a decision tree but rather a forest allowing the exploration of more logic rules from a dataset. One logic rule that SysFor built in this study, for example, revealed that anyone having a profile picture showing just the face or a picture showing a family is less likely to be lonely. Another contribution of this article is the discussion of the implications of the data mining problem for governments, businesses, developers and the SNS users themselves.

  20. Social implications of knowing Yahweh: A study of Jeremiah 9:22�23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm J. Wessels

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the brief passage of Jeremiah 9:22�23, wisdom, might and riches are explicitly rejected as reasons for boasting. The only true reason for boasting is if a person �knows Yahweh�. In verse 23, this is linked with three other concepts: steadfast love, justice and righteousness. Jeremiah described the society of his day as corrupt in every sense of the word. People were stubborn, refused to acknowledge Yahweh and showed no signs of truly knowing him. They had, in fact, deserted the Torah of Yahweh. To know Yahweh has social implications. The rhetorical appeal of Jeremiah 9:22�23 to readers and hearers of this oracle is quite clear. To know Yahweh is not to claim to be wise or be the strongest or have the most possessions but to respond to Yahweh�s way of acting. This implies an understanding of his loving�kindness and acting in a morally correct way.

  1. Health and social impacts of a flood disaster: responding to needs and implications for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Bob; Balogh, Ruth; Morbey, Hazel; Araoz, Gonzalo

    2010-10-01

    Carlisle in northwest England suffered its worse floods for more than 180 years in 2005. A study, reported here, was undertaken to assess the health and social impacts of these floods via in-depth, taped individual and focus-group interviews with people whose homes had been flooded and with agency workers who helped them. Respondents spoke of physical health ailments, psychological stress, water health-and-safety issues related to the floods, and disputes with insurance and construction companies, which they felt had caused and exacerbated psychological health problems. Support workers also suffered from psychological stress. Furthermore, it was found that people had low expectations of a flood and were not prepared. The findings are presented in five sections covering flood risk awareness, water contamination issues, physical health, mental health, and impact on frontline support workers. The discussion focuses on the implications of the findings for policy and practice vis-à-vis psychological health provision, contamination issues, training and support for frontline support workers, matters relating to restoration, and preparation for flooding.

  2. [Psychiatry during National Socialism: historical knowledge, implications for present day ethical debates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelcke, V

    2010-11-01

    This contribution is a synthesis of the results of historical research on psychiatry during the Nazi period and some implications for present day debates in medical ethics. The focus is on three issues: the relationship between physicians and the state, the impact of eugenically and economically motivated health and social policies for psychiatry (e.g. forced sterilization, patient killing/euthanasia) and psychiatric research. Three myths are deconstructed: 1) that medical atrocities were imposed from above by Nazi politicians on apolitical physicians, 2) that mass sterilization and patient killing had nothing to do with contemporary state of the art of medical reasoning and practice and 3) that ethically unacceptable research on psychiatric patients had nothing to do with the contemporary state of the art of biomedical sciences. It is argued that the findings on these issues of Nazi medicine are not specific to Germany and the period between 1933 and 1945 but they were the extreme manifestations of some potential problems implicit in modern medicine in general.

  3. From "Personalized" to "Precision" Medicine: The Ethical and Social Implications of Rhetorical Reform in Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengst, Eric; McGowan, Michelle L; Fishman, Jennifer R; Settersten, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Since the late 1980s, the human genetics and genomics research community has been promising to usher in a "new paradigm for health care"-one that uses molecular profiling to identify human genetic variants implicated in multifactorial health risks. After the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, a wide range of stakeholders became committed to this "paradigm shift," creating a confluence of investment, advocacy, and enthusiasm that bears all the marks of a "scientific/intellectual social movement" within biomedicine. Proponents of this movement usually offer four ways in which their approach to medical diagnosis and health care improves upon current practices, arguing that it is more "personalized," "predictive," "preventive," and "participatory" than the medical status quo. Initially, it was personalization that seemed to best sum up the movement's appeal. By 2012, however, powerful opinion leaders were abandoning "personalized medicine" in favor of a new label: "precision medicine." The new label received a decisive seal of approval when, in January 2015, President Obama unveiled plans for a national "precision medicine initiative" to promote the development and use of genomic tools in health care.

  4. The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute: reflections on an ongoing experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Jean E; Boyer, Joy T; Sun, Kathie Y; Rothenberg, Karen H; Lockhart, Nicole C; Guyer, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute has supported empirical and conceptual research to anticipate and address the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomics. As a component of the agency that funds much of the underlying science, the program has always been an experiment. The ever-expanding number of issues the program addresses and the relatively low level of commitment on the part of other funding agencies to support such research make setting priorities especially challenging. Program-supported studies have had a significant impact on the conduct of genomics research, the implementation of genomic medicine, and broader public policies. The program's influence is likely to grow as ELSI research, genomics research, and policy development activities become increasingly integrated. Achieving the benefits of increased integration while preserving the autonomy, objectivity, and intellectual independence of ELSI investigators presents ongoing challenges and new opportunities.

  5. The Social Network: Homeless Young Women, Social Capital, and the Health Implications of Belonging outside the Nuclear Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Vanessa; Cheff, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the means through which homeless young women are able to improve their flow of social capital by attaining a sense of belonging and forming positive attachments to supportive people and places. In so doing, they also develop relationships with health and social services and improve their overall physical and mental health…

  6. Differentiating between genuine damage and falsified damage to a garment following an alleged sexual assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Graham; Haider, Imran

    2012-11-01

    An allegation of sexual assault was made in which a bra was torn off by the assailant causing extensive damage; however, it was observed that the hook and eye fastening was still intact. It was felt that it was not possible for a garment to receive such damage without damage to the hook and eye fastening, thus indicating that the complainant caused the damage to the bra herself to support a false allegation. Reconstruction experiments were conducted in which the conditions of the allegation were simulated utilizing a range of similar bras. Following the infliction of damage, the hook and eye fastenings were examined. In eight of nine experiments, the hook and eye fastening were intact, despite the application of enough force to cause separation of the bra cups in five of the experiments. This shows that bras may suffer extensive damage without damage to the hook and eye fastening.

  7. Implications of Social Media on African-American College Students' Communication Regarding Sex Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrovani, Massomeh; Desai, Mayur S.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of mobile phone technologies and the emergence of new social media websites created a new platform for social interactions. This new phenomenon has positive features that allow individuals to interact socially and to conduct business. The use of social media also allows its users to share or exchange valuable knowledge and information,…

  8. Hotline Allegations Regarding Defense Contract Management Agency Contracting Officer Actions on Several Business System Audit Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-20

    2 0 , 2 0 1 4 Report No. DODIG-2014-084 Hotline Allegations Regarding Defense Contract Management Agency Contracting Officer Actions on...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 20 JUN 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hotline Allegations...i l / h o t l i n e HOTLINE Department of Defense F r a u d , W a s t e , & A b u s e Mission Our mission is to provide independent, relevant, and

  9. Subclinical social anxiety and academic performance in adolescence: analysis of theoretical and practical implications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses the relationship between self-reported social anxiety and academic performance in a sample of 1,616 Spanish students (52.1% males) in compulsory secondary education, aged 12 to 16 years old. Social anxiety was assessed by the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) and academic performance was measured with school grades and failing grades. Results reveal that adolescents with social anxiety show a similar academic performance to adolescents without social anxiety. Alth...

  10. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-04-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to produce the "Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases" to promote the exceptional competence and diligence required when the consequence is life or death. This article summarizes the "Supplementary Guidelines," with implications for social work practice--that is, professional responsibility, competence, interviewing skill, knowledge of behavioral and mental impairment, records review, life history compilation, data interpretation, witness support, law-related knowledge, and testimony. The social work, which is scrutinized in a court of law, requires cultural competence, diverse oral and written communication skills, diligence, and the highest ethical standards.

  11. From 'human being' to 'social subject': "unfreezing" ergonomics and the implications for understanding and intervening health-disease process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Karen Lange; García-Acosta, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Ergonomics has been successful in increasing productivity and comfort in the work arena. It has also contributed to reducing occupational accidents. Despite this, ergonomics is frequently limited to understanding the health-disease process related to human-technology interactions, as this process is more complex than what can be understood from an ergonomic evaluation. Recognising this limit, this work ontologically and epistemologically contrasts the notions of 'human being' and 'social subject', and concludes that the study object of ergonomics, or human-technology interaction, greatly depends on social aspects that nowadays are not tackled explicitly: route (history), project, structure, agency, motivations and power. It also analyses how participatory ergonomics tacitly includes many of these aspects, including some implications that the change of notion, from 'human being' to 'social subject', brings to the understanding of the health-disease process and the reduction of associated risks during human activities.

  12. The Influence of Ethnic Diversity on Social Network Structure in a Common-Pool Resource System: Implications for Collaborative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Barnes-Mauthe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Social networks have recently been identified as key features in facilitating or constraining collaborative arrangements that can enhance resource governance and adaptability in complex social-ecological systems. Nonetheless, the effect of ethnicity on social network structure in an ethnically diverse common-pool resource system is virtually unknown. We characterize the entire social network of Hawaii's longline fishery, an ethnically diverse competitive pelagic fishery, and investigate network homophily, network structure, and cross-scale linkages. Results show that ethnicity significantly influences social network structure and is responsible for a homophily effect, which can create challenges for stakeholder collaboration across groups. Our analysis also suggests that ethnicity influences the formation of diverse network structures, and can affect the level of linkages to outside industry leaders, government or management officials, and members of the scientific community. This study provides the first empirical examination of the impact of ethnic diversity on resource user's social networks in the common-pool resource literature, having important implications for collaborative resource management.

  13. Health implications of social networks for children living in public housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; Schwartz, Heather L; Griffin, Beth Ann; Burkhauser, Susan; Green, Harold D; Kennedy, David P; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to examine whether: (1) the health composition of the social networks of children living in subsidized housing within market rate developments (among higher-income neighbors) differs from the social network composition of children living in public housing developments (among lower-income neighbors); and (2) children's social network composition is associated with children's own health. We found no significant differences in the health characteristics of the social networks of children living in these different types of public housing. However, social network composition was significantly associated with several aspects of children's own health, suggesting the potential importance of social networks for the health of vulnerable populations.

  14. Food and eating as social practice--understanding eating patterns as social phenomena and implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delormier, Treena; Frohlich, Katherine L; Potvin, Louise

    2009-03-01

    Globally, public health agencies recognise obesity trends among populations as a priority. Explanations for population obesity patterns are linked to obesogenic environments and societal trends which encourage patterns of overeating and little physical activity. However, obesity prevention and nutrition intervention focus predominantly on changing individual level eating behaviours. Disappointingly, behaviour-based nutrition education approaches to changing population eating patterns have met with limited success. Sociological perspectives propose that underlying social relations can help explain collective food and eating patterns, and suggest an analysis of the sociocultural context for understanding population eating patterns. We propose a theoretical framework for the examination of eating patterns as social phenomena. Giddens' structuration theory, in particular his concept of social practices understood as an interplay of 'agency' and 'social structure' (rules and resources), is used to study food choice patterns. We discuss the application of these concepts for understanding routine food choice practices of families, elaborating how rules and resources configure the enabling or constraining conditions under which actors make food choices. The framework assists in characterising how social structural properties are integral to food choice practices, and could direct attention to these when considering nutrition interventions aimed at changing population eating patterns.

  15. The historical social positioning of nursing and medicine: implications for career choice, early socialization and interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sheri; Doucet, Shelley; Hall, Linda McGillis

    2014-03-01

    For almost half a century, research has identified that effective teamwork is essential in order to enhance care provision and health outcomes for patients. Although the value of teamwork is well-recognized in healthcare, the historically rooted dynamics of workplace relationships create a myriad of challenges to creating collaborative teams. Understanding the history of interpersonal dynamics between health professionals can provide direction for future interprofessional education and collaboration strategies. The aim of this paper is to provide a historical overview of the social positioning of nursing and medicine in the context of interprofessional collaboration. Few professions work as closely as nursing and medicine. Despite the well-recognized benefits of interprofessional collaboration, these two professions are often socially positioned in opposition to one another and depicted as adversarial. This analysis will seek to advance our understanding of the historical roots between these two professions and their relationships with and among each other in relation to career choice, early socialization and patient care delivery. An exploration of the historical social positioning of nursing and medicine can provide an enhanced understanding of the barriers to interprofessional collaboration and inform future successes in interprofessional education and practice among all health and social care professions.

  16. Plagiarism Allegations Account for Most Retractions in Major Latin American/Caribbean Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Renan Moritz V R; de Albuquerque Rocha, Karina; Catelani, Fernanda; Fontes-Pereira, Aldo José; Vasconcelos, Sonia M R

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on retraction notices from two major Latin American/Caribbean indexing databases: SciELO and LILACS. SciELO includes open scientific journals published mostly in Latin America/the Caribbean, from which 10 % are also indexed by Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge Journal of Citation Reports (JCR). LILACS has a similar geographical coverage and includes dissertations and conference/symposia proceedings, but it is limited to publications in the health sciences. A search for retraction notices was performed in these two databases using the keywords "retracted", "retraction" "withdrawal", "withdrawn", "removed" and "redress". Documents were manually checked to identify those that actually referred to retractions, which were then analyzed and categorized according to the reasons alleged in the notices. Dates of publication/retraction and time to retraction were also recorded. Searching procedures were performed between June and December 2014. Thirty-one retraction notices were identified, fifteen of which were in JCR-indexed journals. "Plagiarism" was alleged in six retractions of this group. Among the non-JCR journals, retraction reasons were alleged in fourteen cases, twelve of which were attributed to "plagiarism". The proportion of retracted articles for the SciELO database was approximately 0.005 %. The reasons alleged in retraction notices may be used as signposts to inform discussions in Latin America on plagiarism and research integrity. At the international level, these results suggest that the correction of the literature is becoming global and is not limited to mainstream international publications.

  17. Frequency of traumatic lesions alleged by victims of assault during police custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, G; Houssaye, C; Bourokba, N; Durigon, M

    2007-08-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to determine the frequency of traumatic lesions found in individuals alleging police brutality during official custody in the département of Hauts-de-Seine, located in the west suburbs of Paris. All medical certificates relating to the examination of 11,653 individuals detained during the year 2004 were analysed. From this population, there were 119 cases where victimized individuals alleged police assault and 245 revealed aggressive police manhandling, as indicated by traces of tight handcuffs. Among the individuals alleging police violence, most of them showed recent traumatic lesions (n=91). The majority of lesions were superficial contusions frequently located in the cervico-cephalic area. All traumatic lesions were compatible with the allegations of police assault. Neurological complications secondary to the application of handcuffs were encountered in less than 2% of the cases. Although no death was recorded in police custody during the period of the study, approximately 5% of the population that had encountered some form of police violence was found to require emergency hospitalization.

  18. Between Scylla and Charybdis: A literature review of sexual abuse allegations in divorce proceedings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.E.; Antokolskaia, M.V.; Bijleveld, C.C.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, international literature is reviewed on allegations of child sexual abuse (CSA) during divorce proceedings. It aims to build upon the existing knowledge on this topic by combining empirical findings from various disciplines. The study attempts to answer four research questions that fo

  19. Repeated Interviews with Children Who Are the Alleged Victims of Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Carmit; Hershkowitz, Irit

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to test the effects of repeated retrievals in the course of forensic investigations with children who are the alleged victims of sexual abuse. Method: Using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development protocol, 56 children participated in a first free-recall interview that was followed by…

  20. 45 CFR 73.735-1302 - Responsibility for reporting allegations of misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibility for reporting allegations of misconduct. 73.735-1302 Section 73.735-1302 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... of misconduct. An employee who has information which he or she reasonably believes indicates...

  1. 28 CFR 0.29c - Reporting allegations of employee misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... misconduct. 0.29c Section 0.29c Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 4-Office of the Inspector General § 0.29c Reporting allegations of employee misconduct. (a... administrative misconduct by Department employees shall be reported to the OIG, or to a supervisor or...

  2. Investigating Allegations of Inappropriate Physical Punishment of Students by School Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Alexis C.

    1992-01-01

    Any complaint against a school employee regarding inappropriate physical punishment should be taken seriously by administrators and pursued vigorously by an investigating attorney. The standards (especially regarding probable cause and obtaining warrants) for investigating such allegations are less stringent than those imposed in criminal…

  3. Custody Evaluators' Beliefs about Domestic Violence Allegations during Divorce: Feminist and Family Violence Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselschwerdt, Megan L.; Hardesty, Jennifer L.; Hans, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately, 20% of divorcing couples in the United States require judicial intervention to reach a custody agreement. In such cases, courts often call on child custody evaluators to conduct comprehensive evaluations and recommend custody agreements and services that meet children's best interests. Estimates suggest that allegations of domestic…

  4. Presidential address: self-image and compassionate goals and construction of the social self: implications for social and personality psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jennifer

    2011-11-01

    Interpersonal dynamics of self-esteem are explored. The author proposes that the desire to be seen as having positive qualities and avoid being seen as having dreaded qualities paradoxically leads to lowered self-esteem and lowered regard from others through its adverse effects on interpersonal relationships. The author also argues that the human capacity to transcend concerns with the images others hold of oneself, through caring about the well-being of other people, paradoxically leads to higher self-esteem and regard from others through its salutary effects on relationships. Data from two recent studies demonstrate these paradoxical effects and prompt questions about the nature of persons and situations, research methods, and the union between personality and social psychology. Accordingly, the author reflects more broadly on how people create their social situations, which in turn create the self, and what that means about the methods scholars use to understand social behavior.

  5. Interethnic Contact Online: Contextualising the Implications of Social Media Use by Second-Generation Migrant Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Dekker (Rianne); W. Belabas (Warda); P.W.A. Scholten (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSome studies suggest that social media encourage interethnic contact by removing social and spatial boundaries between ethnic communities while offering new spaces for communication and redefinition of ethnic identities. Others contend that social media add an online dimension to intra-e

  6. Interethnic Contact Online : Contextualising the Implications of Social Media Use by Second-Generation Migrant Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Rianne; Belabas, Warda; Scholten, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Some studies suggest that social media encourage interethnic contact by removing social and spatial boundaries between ethnic communities while offering new spaces for communication and redefinition of ethnic identities. Others contend that social media add an online dimension to intra-ethnic bondin

  7. Self-Concept in Arab American Adolescents: Implications of Social Support and Experiences in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbah, Rhonda; Miranda, Antoinette Halsell; Wheaton, Joe E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate three domains (Scholastic Competence, Social Acceptance, and Global Self-Worth) of self-concept in Arab American adolescents in relation to their school experiences, including discrimination, self-perceived teacher social support, and self-perceived classmate social support. Half of the sample either…

  8. The Changing Context of Australian Youth and Its Implications for Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyn, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to monitor and improve young people's school-to-work transitions have not generated a discernable change in patterns of social inclusion among young people. Educational approaches that promote social inclusion need to take account of the changing social and economic realities with which all young Australians engage, and address important…

  9. The State of Gerontological Social Work Education in California: Implications for Curricula Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Goodman, Catherine; Ranney, Molly; Min, Jong Won; Takahashi, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    California has actively engaged in the Hartford Geriatric Social Work Initiative. Subsequently, the California Social Work Education Center Aging Initiative conducted a university survey of gerontology education in California graduate social work schools ("N"?=?17). In 2005, students taking aging courses were 12% in comparison to a…

  10. Implications of free will beliefs for basic theory and societal benefit: critique and implications for social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonasch, Andrew J; Baumeister, Roy F

    2013-06-01

    Greater belief in free will is associated with greater empathy towards the working poor, support for social mobility, greater desire for socio-economic equality, and less belief that poor people are fated to live in poverty. We found no sign that belief in free will led to prejudice or discrimination against poor people or undercut justice. These findings from an online survey flatly contradict the claims made by James Miles (2013). Belief in a just world did produce many of the patterns Miles attributed to belief in free will. We also question the reasoning and the strength of the purported evidence in his article, and we recommend that future writers on the topic should cultivate cautious, open-minded consideration of competing views. Miles' article is a useful reminder that to some writers, the topic of free will elicits strong emotional reactions.

  11. Mechanisms and functional implications of social buffering in infants: Lessons from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Regina M; Perry, Rosemarie E

    2015-01-01

    Social buffering, which is the attenuation of stress hormone release by a social partner, occurs in many species throughout the lifespan. Social buffering of the infant by the caregiver is particularly robust, and animal models using infant rodents are uncovering the mechanisms and neural circuitry supporting social buffering. At birth, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress system is functional but is suppressed via extended social buffering by the mother: the profound social buffering effects of the mother can last for 1-2 hours when pups are removed from the mother. At 10 days of age, pups begin to mount a stress response immediately when separated from the mother. The stimuli from the mother supporting social buffering are broad, for tactile stimulation, milk, and an anesthetized mother (no maternal behavior) all sufficiently support social buffering. The mother appears to produce social buffering by blocking norepinephrine (NE) release into the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), which blocks HPA activation. Since the infant amygdala relies on the presence of corticosterone (CORT), this suggests that social buffering of pups by the mother attenuates the neurobehavioral stress response in infancy and prevents pups from learning about threat within mother-infant interactions.

  12. Effect of sociality and season on gray wolf (Canis lupus foraging behavior: implications for estimating summer kill rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Metz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how kill rates vary among seasons is required to understand predation by vertebrate species living in temperate climates. Unfortunately, kill rates are only rarely estimated during summer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For several wolf packs in Yellowstone National Park, we used pairs of collared wolves living in the same pack and the double-count method to estimate the probability of attendance (PA for an individual wolf at a carcass. PA quantifies an important aspect of social foraging behavior (i.e., the cohesiveness of foraging. We used PA to estimate summer kill rates for packs containing GPS-collared wolves between 2004 and 2009. Estimated rates of daily prey acquisition (edible biomass per wolf decreased from 8.4±0.9 kg (mean ± SE in May to 4.1±0.4 kg in July. Failure to account for PA would have resulted in underestimating kill rate by 32%. PA was 0.72±0.05 for large ungulate prey and 0.46±0.04 for small ungulate prey. To assess seasonal differences in social foraging behavior, we also evaluated PA during winter for VHF-collared wolves between 1997 and 2009. During winter, PA was 0.95±0.01. PA was not influenced by prey size but was influenced by wolf age and pack size. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that seasonal patterns in the foraging behavior of social carnivores have important implications for understanding their social behavior and estimating kill rates. Synthesizing our findings with previous insights suggests that there is important seasonal variation in how and why social carnivores live in groups. Our findings are also important for applications of GPS collars to estimate kill rates. Specifically, because the factors affecting the PA of social carnivores likely differ between seasons, kill rates estimated through GPS collars should account for seasonal differences in social foraging behavior.

  13. Studying fish social behavior and cognition: implications for fish welfare and conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Rui F

    2015-01-01

    Within vertebrates teleost fish are the most diverse and plastic taxa in terms of social behavior. With over 29,000 species described so far, one can find all different types of social organization, mating systems and parental care types. Moreover, it is relatively common to find variation of these characters within closely related species, which makes them suitable for comparative studies on the evolution of social behavior (e.g. variation in mating systems and parental care type in African ...

  14. Social capital and health: implication for health promotion by lay citizens in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Keiko; Iwakuma, Miho; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-12-01

    A non-profit organization was formed in 2009 by lay citizens of Nagahama, Japan in response to a community-based genome-epidemiologic study, the 'Nagahama Zero(0)-ji Prevention Cohort Project (N0PCP)'. This organization aims to promote health by taking advantage of citizens' social networks. The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion affirms the importance of creating supportive environments and coordinating social relationships. Supportive environments (infrastructure) and social relationships (resources) work together as aspects of social capital. This study sought to examine the association between self-rated health and social capital, at both individual and neighborhood levels, and to discuss suitable health promotion strategies for local circumstances.A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011, using a self-administered postal questionnaire. Social capital indicators included aspects of support in the environment (social support, neighborhood connectedness, informal social controls, neighborhood trust, general trust, and attachment to place) and social relationships (number of activities; participation in neighborhood activities; participation in recreational activities; and social leverage regarding physical health, mental health, and acquisition of health information). Neighborhood-level social capital was calculated as the percentage of individuals in a neighborhood in the 'high social capital' category. At the individual level, participation in recreational activities, high general trust, and discussion regarding mental health problems with family members were associated with self-rated health positively, whereas discussion of mental health problems with acquaintances had a negative correlation. At the neighborhood level, a highly supportive environment did not contribute to good health, whereas aggregated attachment to place had a positive correlation. There were no significant inter-regional health differences.The results of this study suggest that

  15. Social life of captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Southern India: implications for elephant welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanitha, Varadharajan; Thiyagesan, Krishnamoorthy; Baskaran, Nagarajan

    2011-01-01

    Asian elephants in the wild live in complex social societies; in captivity, however, management often occurs in solitary conditions, especially at the temples and private places of India. To investigate the effect of social isolation, this study assessed the social group sizes and the presence of stereotypies among 140 captive Asian elephants managed in 3 captive systems (private, temple, and forest department) in Tamil Nadu, India, between 2003 and 2005. The majority of the facilities in the private (82%) and temple (95%) systems held a single elephant without opportunity for social interaction. The forest department managed the elephants in significantly larger groups than the private and temple systems. Among the 3 systems, the proportion of elephants with stereotypies was the highest in temple (49%) followed by private system (26%) and the forest department facility (6%); this correlates with the social isolation trend observed in the 3 systems and suggests a possible link between social isolation and abnormal elephant behavior separate from other environmental factors. The results of this study indicate it would be of greater benefit to elephant well being to keep the patchily distributed solitary temple and private elephants who are socially compatible and free from contagious diseases in small social groups at "common elephant houses" for socialization.

  16. Social diversity in humans: implications and hidden consequences for biological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duster, Troy

    2014-05-01

    Humans are both similar and diverse in such a vast number of dimensions that for human geneticists and social scientists to decide which of these dimensions is a worthy focus of empirical investigation is a formidable challenge. For geneticists, one vital question, of course, revolves around hypothesizing which kind of social diversity might illuminate genetic variation-and vice versa (i.e., what genetic variation illuminates human social diversity). For example, are there health outcomes that can be best explained by genetic variation-or for social scientists, are health outcomes mainly a function of the social diversity of lifestyles and social circumstances of a given population? Indeed, what is a "population," how is it bounded, and are those boundaries most appropriate or relevant for human genetic research, be they national borders, religious affiliation, ethnic or racial identification, or language group, to name but a few? For social scientists, the matter of what constitutes the relevant borders of a population is equally complex, and the answer is demarcated by the goal of the research project. Although race and caste are categories deployed in both human genetics and social science, the social meaning of race and caste as pathways to employment, health, or education demonstrably overwhelms the analytic and explanatory power of genetic markers of difference between human aggregates.

  17. Multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary approach in Social Work Education and its implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reverda, Nol

    2010-01-01

    A definition of the concepts ‘multidisciplinairy and transdisciplinary work’ and the different types of reaction of social work towards the emergence of multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches.

  18. Integrating Public Health and Deliberative Public Bioethics: Lessons from the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Karen M; Lee, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Public health policy works best when grounded in firm public health standards of evidence and widely shared social values. In this article, we argue for incorporating a specific method of ethical deliberation--deliberative public bioethics--into public health. We describe how deliberative public bioethics is a method of engagement that can be helpful in public health. Although medical, research, and public health ethics can be considered some of what bioethics addresses, deliberative public bioethics offers both a how and where. Using the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications program as an example of effective incorporation of deliberative processes to integrate ethics into public health policy, we examine how deliberative public bioethics can integrate both public health and bioethics perspectives into three areas of public health practice: research, education, and health policy. We then offer recommendations for future collaborations that integrate deliberative methods into public health policy and practice.

  19. School Psychologists Ethical Decision Making: Implications from Selected Social Psychological Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser, Jon; Klose, Laurie McGarry

    2007-01-01

    School psychologists routinely engage in ethical decision making, and existing models have served as useful tools for systematically approaching ethical dilemmas. However, a few of these models have taken account of the rich and salient body of social psychology research. This article reviews social psychological phenomena that present clear…

  20. Studying fish social behavior and cognition: implications for fish welfare and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui F Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates teleost fish are the most diverse and plastic taxa in terms of social behavior. With over 29,000 species described so far, one can find all different types of social organization, mating systems and parental care types. Moreover, it is relatively common to find variation of these characters within closely related species, which makes them suitable for comparative studies on the evolution of social behavior (e.g. variation in mating systems and parental care type in African cichlids. Fish are also champions of social plasticity, as can be illustrated by the flexible patterns of sexual expression, as in the case of protrandrous and protogynous sex-change, simultaneous hermaphroditism and intra-sexual variation in the form of discrete alternative male phenotypes. Complex cognitive abilities used in social interactions have also evolved in fish, such as individual recognition, transitive inference and social learning. Therefore, teleosts offer unique opportunities to study both the evolution and the function of social behavior and cognition. In this talk I will summarize the work that our lab has been doing to establish zebrafish as a model organism for the study of social behavior and cognition and I will illustrate how knowledge on this are can be applied to fish welfare and to conservation issues.

  1. Dimensions of Library Anxiety and Social Interdependence: Implications for Library Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study of graduate students that examined the relationship between library anxiety and social interdependence. Discusses use of the Library Anxiety Scale and Social Interdependence Scale; and considers the effects of barriers with staff, comfort with the library, knowledge of the library, individual attitudes, affective barriers, and…

  2. On the Rapid Rise of Social Networking Sites: New Findings and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Sonia; Brake, David R

    2010-01-01

    Social networking sites have been rapidly adopted by children and, especially, teenagers and young people worldwide, enabling new opportunities for the presentation of the self, learning, construction of a wide circle of relationships, and the management of privacy and intimacy. On the other hand, there are also concerns that social networking…

  3. The Relationship between Social Leisure and Life Satisfaction: Causality and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchetti, Leonardo; Giachin Ricca, Elena; Pelloni, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Social leisure is generally found to be positively correlated with life satisfaction in the empirical literature. We ask if this association captures a genuine causal effect by using panel data from the GSOEP. Our identification strategy exploits the change in social leisure brought about by retirement, since the latter is an event after which the…

  4. Promoting Resilience through Social Work Practice with Groups: Implications for the Practice and Field Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Alex; Knight, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The realities of contemporary social work practice often push social workers toward a deficit-focused orientation. The article begins with an overview of the major tenets of resiliency and adversarial growth theories and related research findings. We suggest that the group modality epitomizes the application of resiliency theory and adversarial…

  5. Social Justice and Multicultural Issues: Implications for the Practice and Training of Counselors and Counseling Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Madonna G.; Hage, Sally M.; Kindaichi, Mai M.; Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss the historical and contemporary connection to social justice issues in the fields of counseling and counseling psychology via the multicultural counseling movement. In addition, the authors present ways in which social justice issues can be addressed in counselors' and counseling psychologists' work with clients from diverse…

  6. Social Media Use of Cooperative Extension Family Economics Educators: Online Survey Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Barbara; Zumwalt, Andrew; Bechman, Janet

    2011-01-01

    This article describes results of an online survey conducted by the eXtension Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) to determine the social media capacity and activity of its members. The survey was conducted to inform two subsequent FSA CoP programs: an archived webinar on social media programs and impact evaluation methods…

  7. Chinese and Taiwanese International College Students' Participation in Social Organizations: Implications for College Counseling Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chun; Wong, Y. Joel

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative focus group study explored the meaning of Chinese and Taiwanese international students' lived experiences in social organizations. Participants were 9 Chinese and Taiwanese international college students in a midwestern U.S. university. The analyses uncovered 7 themes: social support, recreation, emotional support, practical…

  8. Extracurricular Activity Participation of Hispanic Students: Implications for Social Capital Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Gonzalez, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated whether participation in school-based extracurricular activities would predict social and behavioral outcomes (school membership, peer prosocial orientation, and prosocial behavior) associated with school social capital in a group of Hispanic middle school students from the United States of America. Results of hierarchical…

  9. Social Media Adoption and Use among Information Technology Professionals and Implications for Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl Philpot, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This sequential, mixed methods research addressed emerging social media use practices among IT professionals and explored lived experiences of senior IT leaders relative to successful organizational social media adoption and use. The study was informed by structuration theory and elements from the universal technology adoption and use (UTAUT)…

  10. Buyer social responsibility: a general concept and its implications for marketing management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Meulenberg, M.T.G.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of sustainability concerns in consumer decision-making poses new challenges to marketing. The existing literature contains a variety of concepts and definitions that pertain to social issues in consumption but lacks an overarching conceptualisation of buyer social responsibility (BSR)

  11. Implications of Social Capital for the Inclusion of People with Disabilities and Families in Community Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Lesley; Stehlik, Daniela

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to ascertain the usefulness of the theory of social capital as a framework for developing and sustaining the inclusion of people with disabilities and families in community life. We discuss the theoretical elements of social capital and assess its relevance when understanding both the experiences of people with disabilities and…

  12. Legal and Ethical Implications of Using Social Media in Human Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Now more than ever we live in a society saturated with technology and media.  We are captured by the technology whirlwind such as the internet, instant messages, emails, and social media such as Twitter and Facebook.  Technologies not only are changing the way people live, work, and interact with each other but also the way companies conduct their businesses.  Social media no doubt is one of such technologies that enables companies to market their products and services in new and unique dimensions.  Beyond marketing, social media is also changing the way human resource professionals recruit and select employees.   Recruiting and selecting potential new employees using social media, is gaining popularity.  There are even software programs that capitalize on the information available on social media sites to assist human resources professionals to source, screen, and track job applicants.  Although there are many advantages in using social media networks to assist HR to select and filter job candidates, there are reasons for concerns.  In this paper, we’ll examine the legal and ethical consequences of using social media in the area of human resource management.   Keywords: Social Media, Facebook, Human Resources, Management.

  13. Andragogy and Social Capital Theory: The Implications for Human Resource Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Joseph W.M.; Poell, Rob F.

    2004-01-01

    The problem and the solution. This article portrays a perspective from andragogy, individual learning, and social capital theory as a contribution to the discussion on the relationship between adult learning theory and human resource development (HRD). Andragogy and social capital theory may offer a

  14. Privacy Practices of Health Social Networking Sites: Implications for Privacy and Data Security in Online Cancer Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Deborah H

    2016-08-01

    While online communities for social support continue to grow, little is known about the state of privacy practices of health social networking sites. This article reports on a structured content analysis of privacy policies and disclosure practices for 25 online ovarian cancer communities. All of the health social networking sites in the study sample provided privacy statements to users, yet privacy practices varied considerably across the sites. The majority of sites informed users that personal information was collected about participants and shared with third parties (96%, n = 24). Furthermore, more than half of the sites (56%, n = 14) stated that cookies technology was used to track user behaviors. Despite these disclosures, only 36% (n = 9) offered opt-out choices for sharing data with third parties. In addition, very few of the sites (28%, n = 7) allowed individuals to delete their personal information. Discussions about specific security measures used to protect personal information were largely missing. Implications for privacy, confidentiality, consumer choice, and data safety in online environments are discussed. Overall, nurses and other health professionals can utilize these findings to encourage individuals seeking online support and participating in social networking sites to build awareness of privacy risks to better protect their personal health information in the digital age.

  15. The Coordination of Independently-Owned Vacuum Tube Patents in the Alleged Early Radio Patent Thicket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John; Ron D, Katznelson

    of the relevant historical record, patent claims, litigation records and other relevant law, how the ‘overlapping’ patent rights were resolved by the courts and by the immunity of suppliers to the Government from patent infringement liability. We trace the cross-licensing agreements between the different radio......It has been proposed that when multiple, independently-owned and ‘over-lapping’ patents must be licensed for legal technology development the difficulty of negotiating cross-licenses may lead entrepreneurs to hold-up or deter that development. Our literature review finds these features allegedly...... present in radio development, 1905-1920, with numerous allegations of an impasse in bargaining the necessary patent rights for legal development. This paper seeks to determine with new precision how entrepreneurs and managers actually managed patent rights in this scenario. Accordingly, this paper re...

  16. Forensic odontological examinations of alleged torture victims at the University of Copenhagen 1997-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Sára Oladóttir; Hansen, Steen Holger; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical forensic examinations of alleged torture victims have been performed by forensic pathologists at the University of Copenhagen since 1995. In 13.2%/33 of these cases the examinations were supplemented by a forensic odontological clinical examination. In this study the forensic...... odontological cases from the years 1997-2011 are presented and discussed. METHODS: This study includes 33 reports from alleged torture victims (4 females, 29 males) who have been examined by a forensic odontologist at the Copenhagen School of Dentistry in the years 1997-2011.The material available consisted...... of copies of medical forensic reports and the forensic odontological reports including x-rays. BACKGROUND data, anamnestic data and results of the forensic odontological clinical examinations were registered as well as the conclusion of the clinical examinations. FINDINGS: The forensic odontological...

  17. Effects of amphetamine on pro-social ultrasonic communication in juvenile rats: Implications for mania models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, K-Alexander; Fuchs, Eberhard; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Communication is the act of information transfer between sender and receiver. In rats, vocal communication can be studied through ultrasonic vocalizations (USV). 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations, most notably juvenile play, likely expressing the sender׳s positive affective state. Such appetitive 50-kHz USV serve important pro-social communicative functions and elicit social exploratory and approach behavior in the receiver. Emission of 50-kHz USV can be induced pharmacologically by the administration of psychostimulant drugs, such as amphetamine. However, it is unknown whether amphetamine affects the pro-social communicative function of 50-kHz USV in the receiver. We therefore assessed dose-response effects of amphetamine (0.0mg/kg, 0.5mg/kg, 1.0mg/kg, 2.5mg/kg, 5.0mg/kg) on pro-social ultrasonic communication on both, sender and receiver, in juvenile rats. We found an inverted U-shaped effect of amphetamine on 50-kHz USV emission, with 50-kHz USV levels being strongly enhanced by moderate doses, yet less prominent effects were seen following the highest dose. Likewise, amphetamine exerted inverted U-shaped effects on social exploratory and approach behavior induced by playback of appetitive 50-kHz USV. Social approach was enhanced by moderate amphetamine doses, but completely abolished following the highest dose. Amphetamine further dose-dependently promoted the emission of 50-kHz USV following playback of appetitive 50-kHz USV, indicating more vigorous attempts to establish social proximity. Our results support an important role of dopamine in closing a perception-and-action-loop through linking mechanisms relevant for detection and production of social vocalizations. Moreover, our approach possibly provides a new means to study mania-like aberrant social interaction and communication in animal models for bipolar disorder.

  18. Key sources of SOE profitability and their implications for social welfare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩朝华; 周晓艳

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of the sources of profit growth for China’s state-owned industry since 1999 indicates that the key source of profit growth is not the high productivity of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) but rather their monopoly position and pricing power in some basic industries. From an overall social perspective, such high profitability means an inefficient allocation of industrial resources and a potential loss of social welfare. Therefore, further expanding and deepening the reform of SOE property rights, encouraging the development of non-SOEs and boosting the competitiveness of basic industries will significantly improve the resource allocation efficiency of the Chinese industry and enhance overall social welfare.

  19. Impacting sexism through social justice prevention: implications at the person and environmental levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jonathan P; Lindley, Lori D

    2009-01-01

    Sexism in our society leads to multiple negative outcomes for women. Although traditional therapeutic approaches as well as preventive interventions address the specific negative outcomes of sexism, they rarely utilize a social justice approach. The deleterious effects of sexism occur complexly; sexist interpersonal events often occur within family systems that may endorse traditional gender roles, which exist within a societal and cultural context that contains sexist norms and formalized sexist policies. These multifaceted, ingrained circumstances delineate the need for preventive social justice to address sexism on multiple levels. A prevention/social justice model will be used to critique existing interventions and identify avenues for change in research and practice.

  20. The legal and ethical implications of social media in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Rachel; Reinisch, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Social media is a growing and popular means of communication. It is understandable that health care providers may not share identifying information on patients through these sources. Challenges arise when patients and family members wish to record the care provided in the emergency department. The health care provider may be faced with an ethical and possibly legal dilemma when social media is present in the emergency department. This article seeks to discuss the legal and ethical principles surrounding social media in the emergency department.

  1. How leaders cultivate social capital and nurture employee vigor: implications for job performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Abraham; Ben-Hador, Batia; Waldman, David A; Rupp, Deborah E

    2009-11-01

    This study examined how leader relational behaviors (i.e., relational leadership) cultivate bonding social capital among organizational members and the way bonding social capital augments feelings of vigor at work. In addition, the authors examined how vigor enhances employee job performance. Using a sample of 209 participants in Israeli community centers, the results of structural equation modeling indicate a 2-stage mediation model in which leader relational behaviors are positively related to bonding social capital; this, in turn, results in feelings of vigor, which are positively associated with manager ratings of employee job performance.

  2. Regina v John Terry: The discursive construction of an alleged racist event

    OpenAIRE

    Gavins, J.; Simpson, P

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the conformation in discourse of a verbal exchange and its subsequent mediatised and legal ramifications. The event concerns an allegedly racist insult directed by high profile English professional footballer John Terry towards another player, Anton Ferdinand, during a televised match in October 2011. The substance of Terry’s utterance, which included the noun phrase ‘fucking black cunt’, was found by a Chief Magistrate not to be a racist insult, although the fact that t...

  3. Health Insecurity and Social Protection: Pathways, Gaps, and Their Implications on Health Outcomes and Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Elvis

    2015-11-27

    Health insecurity has emerged as a major concern among health policy-makers particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It includes the inability to secure adequate healthcare today and the risk of being unable to do so in the future as well as impoverishing healthcare expenditure. The increasing health insecurity among 150 million of the world's poor has moved social protection in health (SPH) to the top of the agenda among health policy-makers globally. This paper aims to provide a debate on the potential of social protection contribution to addressing health insecurity, poverty, and vulnerability brought by healthcare expenditure in low-income countries, to explore the gaps in current and proposed social protection measures in healthcare and provide suggestions on how social protection intervention aimed at addressing health insecurity, poverty, and vulnerability may be effectively implemented.

  4. Entre Représentations Sociales et Intentions de Pratiques : l'Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Lheureux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We are interested in the influence of social representations (RS; Moscovici, 1976 on social practices. We hypothesize that the "cultural" involvement of an individual (Rouquette, 1997 towards the represented object mediatizes, at least partially, this influence. We so try to explain by which process a SR incites an individual to personally implement a social practice. 147 French students were questioned about social representation, involvement and practices concerning the object "globalization". Results confirmed our hypothesis of mediation. It also illustrates the relevance of the distinction between "cultural" and "circumstantial" involvements (Rouquette, 1997, in order to formalize circumstantial involvement as a factor generating SR, and cultural involvement as a factor placed under their influence.

  5. Stress and social support among Hispanic student nurses: implications for academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maville, J; Huerta, C G

    1997-01-01

    This article describes two studies examining the effects of stress and social support on the academic achievement of Hispanic associate degree nursing students. The first study investigated stress, measured by the Life Experiences Survey (LES), and its relationship to academic achievement. Data analysis revealed a relationship between negative stress and academic achievement. Student level and ethnic origin were found to be predictive of stress. Ethnic origin and age also had an effect on academic achievement. Qualitative data indicated that students experienced stresses as a result of the academic environment. The second study investigated the effect of social support, measured by the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (NSSQ), on student persistence. No significant relationship was found. Qualitative data revealed less than desired social support in lower achieving students. Conclusions from these studies form the basis for identification of the high risk student and strategies to remediate the academically handicapped Hispanic student.

  6. Student's Work: Social Capital in the Czech Republic and Public Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Vodrážka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Social capital in Eastern Europe has received a fair amount of scholarly attention in recent years, including in the Czech Republic. This paper examines the stock of macro-level social capital in the Czech Republic in comparative European perspective. The notions of “missing” social capital and corruption as negative social capital are explored. The corruption situation in the Czech Republic and the progress in curbing it that was made in the last decade are evaluated. Regressions run with data from the World Value Survey and the Corruption Perception Index show that economic growth does not translate into correspondingly lower levels of corruption in the Czech case. State bureaucracy is identified as a possible reason for the failure to curb corruption successfully. Public policy recommendations and their usefulness for the Czech Republic are debated and a civil service reform is proposed as the most appropriate policy for addressing the situation.

  7. Seagrass meadows globally as a coupled social-ecological system: implications for human wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne C; Nordlund, Lina Mtwana; Paddock, Jessica; Baker, Susan; McKenzie, Len J; Unsworth, Richard K F

    2014-06-30

    Seagrass ecosystems are diminishing worldwide and repeated studies confirm a lack of appreciation for the value of these systems. In order to highlight their value we provide the first discussion of seagrass meadows as a coupled social-ecological system on a global scale. We consider the impact of a declining resource on people, including those for whom seagrass meadows are utilised for income generation and a source of food security through fisheries support. Case studies from across the globe are used to demonstrate the intricate relationship between seagrass meadows and people that highlight the multi-functional role of seagrasses in human wellbeing. While each case underscores unique issues, these examples simultaneously reveal social-ecological coupling that transcends cultural and geographical boundaries. We conclude that understanding seagrass meadows as a coupled social-ecological system is crucial in carving pathways for social and ecological resilience in light of current patterns of local to global environmental change.

  8. Social Work Practice with Arab Families: The Implications of Spirituality vis-à-vis Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Hall

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, spiritualism has become apparent as critical to social work practice with Arab families. Regrettably, research on Arab families today is all but non-existent.Their belief in Islam is the fastest growing form of spirituality in Central Asia. Social workers who do not acknowledge this fact will be at a severe disadvantage in their attempts to treat Arab clientele. It is not compulsory that practitioners endorse client belief systems or other aspects of their spirituality, but practitioners should acknowledge said systems as a critical point in the client’s frame of reference. In the interest of social justice, social workers are thus challenged to develop creative treatment strategies less confined to Western bias.

  9. Social networks usage implications at the level of medical services consumption in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adrian Gardan

    2017-03-01

    The research results reveal key issues from the perspective of emotional involvement within consumption for the patients and the influence of key variables such as level of education, personality and lifestyle within social networks usage context.

  10. Paternity analysis in special fatherless cases without direct testing of alleged father.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixich, Francisc; Ioana, Mihai; Mixich, Vlad A

    2004-12-02

    The ability to establish the biological father, in which the father of a person is not available, named "reverse paternity determination", is based on the determination of STR alleles in mother and her child, other children and brothers of the alleged father, and deduction of genetic constitution of the father by the basis of genetic laws. Presented herein are two cases of reverse paternity determinations. Mother and parenthood DNA was isolated from 300 microl of fresh blood collected into tubes containing the EDTA, using Wizard Genomic DNA purification kit (Promega). DNA amplification was performed using GenePrint STR System (CTT, FFv, and Silver STR III multiplex) (Promega). Amplification results were read on 0.4 mm thick sequencing size polyacrilamide gel (4% for CTT and FFv, and 6% for Silver STR III). Gels were silver stained using Silver Sequence DNA Staining Reagents (Promega). Possible alleles of the alleged father for the loci CSF1PO, TPOX, TH01, F13A01, FESFPS, vWA, D16S539, D7S820, D13S317, LPL, F13B, and HPRTB were established by the selection from alleles determined in mother and parenthood, as to as obligate alleles with which the alleged father contributes to the genetic constitution of investigated child. Probability of paternity was calculated using population data on STR allele frequencies for Romanian population established by our laboratory. These are the first cases of litigious reverse paternity determinations in Romania.

  11. Using outcomes to inform social decision-making in schizophrenia: Implications for motivation and functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Campellone, Timothy Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of decisions we make are integral for guiding our behavior. In this study, we investigated if and how people with and without schizophrenia use positive and negative social outcomes and social partners’ emotional displays to inform decisions to trust as well as whether they could detect reversals in behavior even as emotion displays remained unchanged. Thirty-two people with schizophrenia and 29 control participants completed a task where they decided how much trust to place in s...

  12. Expansion of gambling in Canada: implications for health and social policy

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Canada experienced a dramatic increase in legalized gambling in the 1990s, primarily because of governments' need to increase revenue without additional taxation. This article examines gambling from a public health perspective. The major public health issues include gambling addiction, family dysfunction and gambling by youth. Debates have emerged about the health, social and economic costs and benefits of gambling. Stakeholder and social policy groups have expressed concern about the impact ...

  13. Replacing Trains with Coaches: Implications for Social Inclusion in Rural New South Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Gray

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the future of New South Wales (NSW regional train services under question, concern has been expressed that replacement of trains with coaches will diminish levels of mobility and raise social exclusion for some people. Provision has been made on coaches for people considered to be disabled, but without recognition of the needs of people who do not fit either able or disabled categorisation. All train services offer better accessibility and therefore mobility to all people. The issue of regional train service cessation and replacement raises questions regarding the reliability of existing Australian studies about train service replacement, the degree to which health and illness are affected, as well as the potential for the exacerbation of existing social exclusion. An examination of the literature and some historical investigation undertaken by the authors highlights these limitations amid the ableism/disablism dualism in existing research and rural transport policy. The paper further suggests that the absence of Australian evidence of mobility loss should not be taken to indicate the reality of regional mobility and social inclusion. Instead the paper argues that further independent mobility loss and social exclusion may occur if coaches are further substituted for regional train services. Keywords: Public transport, disability, rural Australia, regional Australia, social inclusion, social policy, transport history

  14. Policy gaps and technological deficiencies in social networking environments: Implications for information sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Mutula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the growing adoption and acceptance of social networking, there are increased concerns about the violation of the users’ legitimate rights such as privacy, confidentiality, trust, security, safety, content ownership, content accuracy, integrity, access and accessibility to computer and digital networks amongst others.Objectives: The study sought to investigate the following research objectives to: (1 describe the types of social networks, (2 examine global penetration of the social networks, (3 outline the users’ legitimate rights that must be protected in the social networking sites (SNS, (4 determine the methods employed by SNS to protect the users’ legitimate rights and (5 identify the policy gaps and technological deficiencies in the protection of the users’ legitimate rights in the SNS.Method: A literature survey and content analysis of the SNS user policies were used to address objective four and objective five respectively.Results: The most actively used sites were Facebook and Twitter. Asian markets were leading in participation and in creating content than any other region. Business, education, politics and governance sectors were actively using social networking sites. Social networking sites relied upon user trust and internet security features which however, were inefficient and inadequate.Conclusion: Whilst SNS were impacting people of varying ages and of various professional persuasions, there were increased concerns about the violation and infringement of the users’ legitimate rights. Reliance on user trust and technological security features SNS to protect the users’ legitimate rights seemed ineffectual and inadequate.

  15. Stigma and social support in substance abuse: Implications for mental health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtel, Michèle D; Wood, Lisa; Kempa, Nancy J

    2017-02-20

    Individuals with substance abuse may suffer from severe public and internalized stigma. Little is known about how social support can reduce stigma and improve mental health and well-being for them. This research examined how perceived stigma influences individuals in treatment for substance abuse, and whether internalized stigma and shame are mechanisms which link social support with better mental health and well-being. Sixty-four participants in treatment for substance abuse (alcohol, drugs), aged between 18 and 64, completed an online survey measuring perceived stigma, internalized stigma, shame, perceived social support, and mental health and well-being (self-esteem, depression and anxiety, sleep). We found that perceived stigma was associated with lower self-esteem, higher depression and anxiety, and poorer sleep. Furthermore, perceived social support followed the opposite pattern, and was associated with higher self-esteem, lower depression and anxiety, and better sleep. The effects of perceived stigma and of perceived social support on our outcome measures were mediated by internalized stigma and by internalized shame. Helping individuals with substance abuse to utilize their social support may be fruitful for combatting the negative impact of internalized stigma and shame on mental health and well-being.

  16. Obesity as a Socially Defined Disease: Philosophical Considerations and Implications for Policy and Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2016-03-01

    Obesity has generated significant worries amongst health policy makers and has obtained increased attention in health care. Obesity is unanimously defined as a disease in the health care and health policy literature. However, there are pragmatic and not principled reasons for this. This warrants an analysis of obesity according to standard conceptions of disease in the literature of philosophy of medicine. According to theories and definitions of disease referring to (abnormal functioning of) internal processes, obesity is not a disease. Obesity undoubtedly can result in disease, making it a risk factor for disease, but not a disease per se. According to several social conceptions of disease, however, obesity clearly is a disease. Obesity can conflict with aesthetic, moral, or other social norms. Making obesity a "social disease" may very well be a wise health policy, assuring and improving population health, especially if we address the social determinants of obesity, such as the food supply and marketing system. However, applying biomedical solutions to social problems may also have severe side effects. It can result in medicalization and enhance stigmatization and discrimination of persons based on appearance or behavior. Approaching social problems with biomedical means may also serve commercial and professionals' interests more than the health and welfare of individuals; it may make quick fix medical solutions halt more sustainable structural solutions. This urges health insurers, health care professionals, and health policy makers to be cautious. Especially if we want to help and respect persons that we classify and treat as obese.

  17. Policy gaps and technological deficiencies in social networking environments: Implications for information sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Mutula

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the growing adoption and acceptance of social networking, there are increased concerns about the violation of the users’ legitimate rights such as privacy, confidentiality, trust, security, safety, content ownership, content accuracy, integrity, access and accessibility to computer and digital networks amongst others.Objectives: The study sought to investigate the following research objectives to: (1 describe the types of social networks, (2 examine global penetration of the social networks, (3 outline the users’ legitimate rights that must be protected in the social networking sites (SNS, (4 determine the methods employed by SNS to protect the users’ legitimate rights and (5 identify the policy gaps and technological deficiencies in the protection of the users’ legitimate rights in the SNS.Method: A literature survey and content analysis of the SNS user policies were used to address objective four and objective five respectively.Results: The most actively used sites were Facebook and Twitter. Asian markets were leading in participation and in creating content than any other region. Business, education, politics and governance sectors were actively using social networking sites. Social networking sites relied upon user trust and internet security features which however, were inefficient and inadequate.Conclusion: Whilst SNS were impacting people of varying ages and of various professional persuasions, there were increased concerns about the violation and infringement of the users’ legitimate rights. Reliance on user trust and technological security features SNS to protect the users’ legitimate rights seemed ineffectual and inadequate.

  18. Development of the Adolescent Brain: Implications for Executive Function and Social Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Choudhury, Suparna

    2006-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of considerable development at the level of behaviour, cognition and the brain. This article reviews histological and brain imaging studies that have demonstrated specific changes in neural architecture during puberty and adolescence, outlining trajectories of grey and white matter development. The implications of brain…

  19. The Contingent Constructed Nature of Social Life: Suggested Implications for Library and Information Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Peter M.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses a variety of topics and their implications for library and information science professionals and their education. Highlights include the nature of science; contingency theories; the assumptions of sociology; the approach of symbolic interaction; recent scholarship on organizations; and the advantages of qualitative research methods.…

  20. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy induces misfolding of alleged prion-resistant species cellular prion protein without altering its pathobiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Fondevila, Dolors; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-05-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions were responsible for an unforeseen epizootic in cattle which had a vast social, economic, and public health impact. This was primarily because BSE prions were found to be transmissible to humans. Other species were also susceptible to BSE either by natural infection (e.g., felids, caprids) or in experimental settings (e.g., sheep, mice). However, certain species closely related to humans, such as canids and leporids, were apparently resistant to BSE. In vitro prion amplification techniques (saPMCA) were used to successfully misfold the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) of these allegedly resistant species into a BSE-type prion protein. The biochemical and biological properties of the new prions generated in vitro after seeding rabbit and dog brain homogenates with classical BSE were studied. Pathobiological features of the resultant prion strains were determined after their inoculation into transgenic mice expressing bovine and human PrP(C). Strain characteristics of the in vitro-adapted rabbit and dog BSE agent remained invariable with respect to the original cattle BSE prion, suggesting that the naturally low susceptibility of rabbits and dogs to prion infections should not alter their zoonotic potential if these animals became infected with BSE. This study provides a sound basis for risk assessment regarding prion diseases in purportedly resistant species.

  1. Social implications and workforce issues in the oral health of an ageing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Fac

    2015-03-01

    A functional and socially acceptable level of oral health is an integral part of healthy ageing! More teeth, more sophisticated dental technology and increasing co-morbidities of an ageing Australian society will have significant impacts on oral health professionals and their capacities to work within expanded teams of health, education and social organizations. Society is adapting its perspective on the social role of older citizens; replacing its perception of the elderly as an economic social burden, to one of senior citizens as being a respected and active source of social and economic benefit. Maintaining general and oral health for older Australians will bring into sharp focus the need for recognizing and managing not only the biological markers associated with ageing and frailty, but also the potential mediators on health outcomes associated with changing health and social behaviours. Increasing social capital of older Australians through national policy initiatives such as the Living Longer Living Better reforms, and greater involvement of allied health and carers' organizations in oral health education and health promotion will set a new scene for the roles of dental professionals. Issues of equity will drive the service delivery agenda, and a socio-cultural shift to 'consumer-directed' health outcomes will shape the range of services, quality of care and support required by an older Australian population. Formal education and training modules for aged care workers, allied health practitioners and geriatricians will develop. The challenge for the dental profession is the coordination and integration of these changes into new models of dental and general health care.

  2. Sex and the community: the implications of neighbourhoods and social networks for sexual risk behaviours among urban gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian C; Carpiano, Richard M; Easterbrook, Adam; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2012-09-01

    Gay neighbourhoods have historically served as vital places for gay socialising, and gay social networks are important sources of social support. Yet, few studies have examined the influence of these forms of community on sexual health. Informed by theoretical frameworks on neighbourhoods and networks, we employ multi-level modelling to test hypotheses concerning whether gay neighbourhoods and social network factors are associated with five sexual risk behaviours: receptive and insertive unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), barebacking identity, recent internet use for finding sexual partners, and 'Party and Play' (PnP). Our analyses of a community-based sample of gay men in New York City reveal little evidence for the direct effect of gay enclaves on sexual risk with the exception of PnP, which was more likely among gay enclave residents. Having a network composed predominantly of other gay men was associated with insertive UAI, PnP, and internet use for meeting sexual partners. This network type also mediated the association between gay neighbourhoods and higher odds of insertive UAI as well as PnP. Our findings highlight the sexual health implications of two important facets of gay community and, in doing so, indicate the need to better contextualise the sexual health risks faced by gay men.

  3. The social adjustment of patients with schizophrenia: implications to the mental health policy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Paulo R.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A sample (n=124 of schizophrenic patients from a defined catchment area of the city os S.Paulo, Brazil, who had been consecutively admitted to hospital, was assessed for psychopathological status and social adjustment levels. Sociodemographic, socio-economic and occupational characteristics were recorded: almost 30% of the subjects had no occupation and received no social benefit, more than two-thirds had a monthly per capita income of US$ 100.00 or less. Sixty-five percent presented with Schneiderian firstrank symptoms. Nearly half the sample showed poor or very poor social adjustment in the month prior to admission. The most affected areas of social functioning were participation in the household activities, work and social withdrawal. The current mental health policy of promoting extra-mural care as an alternative to the previous hospital-based model will then mean the investment in a network of new community-based services, that give effective treatment and support to patients and their families. The need of further research into the current picture of mental disorders in the country is stressed.

  4. The social nature of engineering and its implications for risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Allison; Athanassoulis, Nafsika

    2010-03-01

    Making decisions with an, often significant, element of risk seems to be an integral part of many of the projects of the diverse profession of engineering. Whether it be decisions about the design of products, manufacturing processes, public works, or developing technological solutions to environmental, social and global problems, risk taking seems inherent to the profession. Despite this, little attention has been paid to the topic and specifically to how our understanding of engineering as a distinctive profession might affect how we should make decisions under risk. This paper seeks to remedy this, firstly by offering a nuanced account of risk and then by considering how specific claims about our understanding of engineering as a social profession, with corresponding social values and obligations, should inform how we make decisions about risk in this context.

  5. The anatomy of urban social networks and its implications in the searchability problem

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Yagüe, C; Couronné, T; Smoreda, Z; Benito, R M; Zufiria, P J; González, M C

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of large geolocated communication datasets has recently increased our understanding of how social networks relate to their physical space. However, many recurrently reported properties, such as the spatial clustering of network communities, have not yet been systematically tested at different scales. In this work we analyze the social network structure of over 25 million phone users from three countries at three different scales: country, provinces and cities. We consistently find that this last urban scenario presents significant differences to common knowledge about social networks. First, the emergence of a giant component in the network seems to be controlled by whether or not the network spans over the entire urban border, almost independently of the population or geographic extension of the city. Second, urban communities are much less geographically clustered than expected. These two findings shed new light on the widely-studied searchability in self-organized networks. By exhaustive sim...

  6. Investigating the health implications of social policy initiatives at the local level: study design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Gemma E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we present the research design and methods of a study that seeks to capture local level responses to an Australian national social policy initiative, aimed at reducing inequalities in the social determinants of health. Methods/Design The study takes a policy-to-practice approach and combines policy and stakeholder interviewing with a comparative case study analysis of two not-for-profit organisations involved in the delivery of federal government policy. Discussion Before the health impacts of broad-scale policies, such as the one described in this study, can be assessed at the population level, we need to understand the implementation process. This is consistent with current thinking in political science and social policy, which has emphasised the importance of investigating how, and if, policies are translated into operational realities.

  7. Children discharged from neonatal intensive care: implications for the social care networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Licele do Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: tounderstand the social care networks of children discharged from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Methods: qualitative study conducted in the home of six families of seven children. In data collection, authors used the triangulation of techniques with thematic content analysis. Results: family composition is nuclear, social networks are formed by the support of family, leisure and spiritual ties, by school and hospital institutions. The families reported the challenges of caring for a premature baby, and the main care demands were respiratory, motor and cognitive. The non-effective communication between professionals and family showed negative impact on hospitalization and home care. Conclusion:social care networks for children discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care unit proved to be disjointed and health care for children and family proved to be fragmented.

  8. Eugenics, genetics, and the minority group model of disabilities: implications for social work advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Gerald V

    2011-10-01

    In the United States, genetic research, as well as policy and practice innovations based on this research, has expanded greatly over the past few decades. This expansion is indicated, for example, by the mapping of the human genome, an expansion of genetic counseling, and other biogenetic research. Also, a disability rights movement that in many ways parallels other "minority" rights campaigns has expanded. The coexistence of these developments poses intriguing challenges for social work that the profession has yet to address in a meaningful way. These issues are especially pertinent for social work professionals in the crucial role as advocates for marginalized populations. This article describes some ofthe concerns of disability rights activists relative to genetic innovations and goals as well as the instrumental role of the social work community in this important debate.

  9. Scientific literacy as social practice: Implications for reading and writing in science classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gard Ove Sørvik

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an introduction to what it means to adopt a view of literacy as social practice for science education. This view of literacy builds on the idea that reading and writing are best regarded as situated social practices involving text, not as a set of decontextualised and universally applicable skills. First, we draw on sociocultural perspectives on literacy to show how these perspectives inform our understanding of literacy when the context is science. Second, we use related research literature, mainly concerning the role of text in science education, to present a framework for approaching literacy in science classrooms from a sociocultural perspective. Finally, we discuss how a social view of literacy enables us to consider how literacy occurs in contexts relevant to a transcending science subject for scientific literacy.

  10. Social impacts of civil aviation and implications for R and D policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt was made to identify social impacts, both beneficial and detrimental, which would or could flow from the introduction of advanced civil aviation systems. A broad range of social impact areas was investigated which included economic, environmental, political, sociological, psychological, legal, and urban/regional developmental factors. Data are arranged into two major parts. In the first part, a series of Major Policy Issues are identified and discussed which appear, on the basis of the social impact study, to merit serious consideration. The discussion of each "Issue' is presented both to explain its relevance and to raise considerations which will bear on its satisfactory resolution. The second part views the same overall body of information in a different manner: a series of "Findings' are pointed out from which more concrete guidance for R and D policy can be derived, and a set of "Candidate Basic Federal Undertakings' thus derived are presented.

  11. Social Studies Textbooks for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers: Implications for Literacy and ELL Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. BENNETT

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine elementary social studies methods texts, specifically focusing on literacy content (reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary strategies, and literacy activities for the general education population and English Language Learners (ELLs. Eight elementary social studies methods texts were examined. Analysis of the texts found that while a limited number of reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies and activities were found in each text, half of the texts did not detail how to use the strategies in the classroom or how to differentiate instruction for ELL’s. Thus, collaboration between social studies educators, literacy educators and ESOL educators is needed in order to fully prepare our pre-service teachers to teach across content areas.

  12. Couples’ Notions About Preconception Health: Implications for Framing Social Marketing Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Megan A.; Mitchell, Elizabeth W.; Levis, Denise M.; Isenberg, Karen; Kish-Doto, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand couples’ notions of preconception health (PCH) and to inform the development of social marketing plans focused on PCH. Approach/Design We used a social marketing perspective to understand how couples considered PCH as a product, its potential price, how it should be promoted, and in what type of places it should be promoted. These variables are typically referred to as the four social marketing P’s. Setting Telephone interviews with couples recruited from a national database. Participants A total of 58 couples (116 individuals) were segmented by five couple segments based on pregnancy planning intention and current parental status in which the wife or partner was 18 to 44 years of age. The five segments were combined into three categories: couples who were planning pregnancies, couples who were not planning pregnancies, or couples who were recent parents (interconception). Method Couple-based structured interviews lasting approximately 45 to 60 minutes were conducted via telephone. Questions inquired about couples’ experience with PCH and the four social marketing P’s. Results Commonalities existed across the four social marketing P’s for the different couple segments. Notable couple-related themes that emerged included the importance of couple communication, support, and relationship quality. PCH was more relevant for couples planning a pregnancy, but nonplanning couples understood the benefits of PCH and related behaviors. Conclusion Couples may be an important target audience when considering social marketing approaches for PCH. Many couples perceived the relevance of the issue to important aspects of their lives, such as health, family, and their relationships. PMID:23286659

  13. Technology, Consciousness, and the Transitional Symbolic Self: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of literature is focused on hypertechnology in curriculum and culture. This article contributes to that literature. Taking the perspective of social work education that human reality emerges from the interaction of biological, psychological, and socio-cultural forces, the reader is invited to consider the possibility that in this…

  14. Consumer adoption of social networking sites: implications for theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzo-Romero, Carlota; Constantinides, Efthymios; Alarcon-del-Amo, Maria-del-Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study factors affecting the acceptance of social networking sites (SNS), analyze users' practices and behavior in these environments and assess the degree of acceptance of SNS in The Netherlands. Design/methodology/approach – An extended technology accepta

  15. Mobile communication and ethics: implications of everyday actions on social order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Ling

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Of the many opportunities and affordances that mobile technologies bring to our day-to-day lives, the ability to cheat physical separation and remain accessible to each other—in an instant—also brings pressure to bear on well-established social conventions as to how we should act when we are engaged with others in shared spaces. In this paper we explore some ethical dimensions of mobile communication by considering the manner in which individuals in everyday contexts balance interpretations of emergent social conventions with personal desires to connect in the moment. As we later discuss, the decisions made in response to a ringing mobile phone or flashing text message emerge from consequential versus deontological ethical frames used to determine what to do versus what we ought to do. This is particularly true in western and North American cultural contexts from which our data are collected. Using Goffman's dramaturgy, we suggest that these conflicts occurring on an individual level provide evidence of social structure, and are simultaneously entwined with our less obvious ruminations on the maintenance of social order.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v4i2.1760

  16. "It's making contacts": notions of social capital and implications for widening access to medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, S; Cleland, J A

    2016-11-14

    In the UK widening access (WA) activities and policies aim to increase the representation from lower socio-economic groups into Higher Education. Whilst linked to a political rhetoric of inclusive education such initiatives have however failed to significantly increase the number of such students entering medicine. This is compounded by a discourse that portrays WA applicants and students as lacking the essential skills or attributes to be successful in medical education. Much of the research in this area to date has been weak and it is critical to better understand how WA applicants and students negotiate medical admissions and education to inform change. To address this gap we amalgamated a larger dataset from three qualitative studies of student experiences of WA to medicine (48 participants in total). Inductively analysing the findings using social capital as a theoretical lens we created and clustered codes into categories, informed by the concepts of "weak ties" and "bridging and linking capital", terms used by previous workers in this field, to better understand student journeys in medical education. Successful applicants from lower socio-economic groups recognise and mobilise weak ties to create linking capital. However once in medical school these students seem less aware of the need for, or how to create, capital effectively. We argue WA activities should support increasing the social capital of under-represented applicants and students, and future selection policy needs to take into account the varying social capital of students, so as to not overtly disadvantage some social groups.

  17. Humanity in the Digital Age: Cognitive, Social, Emotional, and Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Junko; Ananou, Simeon

    2015-01-01

    Even though technology has brought great benefits to current society, there are also indications that the manner in which people use technology has undermined their humanity in some respects. In this article the authors frame human nature in terms of four dimensions: cognition, social interaction, emotion, and ethics. We argue that while basic…

  18. Social Connectedness and Its Implication on Student-Teacher Relationships and Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Dawn X.; Guy, Breonte

    2017-01-01

    Out-of-school suspension (OSS) disconnects students from accessing important school relationships and academic and social support. OSS contributes to a significant number of ethnic minority and economically disadvantaged students receiving short-term suspensions. Community-based organizations may step in as alternative spaces for short-term…

  19. Anchoring and Estimation of Alcohol Consumption: Implications for Social Norm Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Megan M.; Choplin, Jessica M.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the impact of anchors on students' estimates of personal alcohol consumption to better understand the role that this form of bias might have in social norm intervention programs. Experiments I and II found that estimates of consumption were susceptible to anchoring effects when an open-answer and a scale-response…

  20. The Performance Implications of Fit among Environment, Strategy, Structure, Control System and Social Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Fauzi

    2009-12-01

    domain will be contingent upon strategic behaviors, which are behaviors of members in an organization. The paper integrates the contextual variables including business environment, strategy, organization structure, and control system with corporate performance by using corporate social performance as moderating variable by means of a recent literatures study from strategic management and accounting field.

  1. Technology Acceptance in Social Work Education: Implications for the Field Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Alex Don; Bullock, Angela N.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth and sophistication of new information and computer technology (ICT) have greatly influenced human interactions and provided new metaphors for understanding the world. The acceptance and integration of ICT into social work field education are examined here using the technological acceptance model. This article also explores…

  2. The Perception and Fear of Crime: Implications for Neighborhood Cohesion, Social Activity, and Community Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnagel, Timothy F.

    1979-01-01

    Data collected from interviews with residents of a western Canadian city did not support the hypothesis that the perception and fear of crime would be inversely related to neighborhood cohesion and social activity. But as hypothesized, the fear of crime was negatively related to affect for the community. (RLV)

  3. Predictors of Peer Victimization among Hispanic Adolescent Girls: Implications for School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne; Jenson, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Aggressive behavior aimed at peers in school settings is a persistent problem for students, teachers, parents, and school social workers. Peer victimization is particularly troubling for adolescent girls in light of recent increases in aggression and violence among female adolescents. However, most studies of peer victimization, particularly among…

  4. Social Pathways for Ebola Virus Disease in Rural Sierra Leone, and Some Implications for Containment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, P.; Amara, J.; Ferme, M.C.; Kamara, P.; Mokuwa, E.; Sheriff, A.I.; Suluku, R.; Voors, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The current outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in Upper West Africa is the largest ever recorded. Molecular evidence suggests spread has been almost exclusively through humanto- human contact. Social factors are thus clearly important to understand the epidemic and ways in which it might be stopped, bu

  5. Net Generation at Social Software: Challenging Assumptions, Clarifying Relationships and Raising Implications for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Teemu; Dillon, Patrick; Hacklin, Stina; Vaisanen, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    This paper takes as its starting point assumptions about use of information and communication technology (ICT) by people born after 1983, the so called net generation. The focus of the paper is on social networking. A questionnaire survey was carried out with 1070 students from schools in Eastern Finland. Data are presented on students' ICT-skills…

  6. Social and Nonsocial Functions of Rostral Prefrontal Cortex: Implications for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the role of rostral prefrontal cortex (approximating Brodmann Area 10) in two domains relevant to education: executive function (particularly prospective memory, our ability to realize delayed intentions) and social cognition (particularly our ability to reflect on our own mental states and the mental states of others).…

  7. Implications of food patch distribution on social foraging in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Liat Romme; Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2010-01-01

    Feeding behaviour of social animals can be influenced by the spatial distribution of resources. In domestic housing facilities growing pigs will often be fed from feeding sites confined to a small area, i.e. effectively a clumping of food resources. In the present experiment we investigated how f...

  8. Marketing of Academic Library Services through Social Networking Sites: Implications of Electronic Word-of-Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddike, Md. Abul Kalam; Kiran, K.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the perceptions of academic librarians towards the marketing of library services through social networking sites (SNSs) and their understanding of using electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) as a marketing tool in academic libraries. This study follows a qualitative data-gathering approach of structured…

  9. The Culture of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the Academic Framework: Some Literary Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya Rao

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is swiftly emerging as an integral part of corporate culture and discourse. Associated with notions of responsibility, accountability and community involvement, it remains privileged with concerns that increasingly define the new millennium. Less developed, however, is the relevance of CSR ideas to academic…

  10. Principals Learning from Veteran Teachers Serving Impoverished Students: Social Justice Implications for Professors of Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosine, Dale

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study of ten elementary veteran teachers used Hargrove's single, double, and triple-loop thinking to understand their perceptions regarding knowledge new principals need to be social justice leaders working in impoverished schools. Findings in three categories revealed the importance of principals learning to identify their…

  11. Integrating Military and Veteran Culture in Social Work Education: Implications for Curriculum Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Julie; Weiss, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the conceptual question of how to best integrate military culture and issues into social work education. Military service members, veterans, and their families are returning to civilian communities with the ending of conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and seeking community-based providers for health and mental health…

  12. Sexuality Education: Implications for Health, Equity, and Social Justice in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, John P.; Tokunaga, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how school-based sexuality education has had a long and troubled history of exclusionary pedagogical practices that have negatively affected such populations as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer (LGBTQ) individuals, people of color, and the disabled. The social ecological model is introduced as a…

  13. Mothers' and Fathers' Racial Socialization in African American Families: Implications for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Burton, Linda M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Dotterer, Aryn M.; Swanson, Dena P.

    2006-01-01

    Mothers' and fathers' cultural socialization and bias preparation with older (M=13.9 years) and younger (M=10.31 years) siblings were studied in 162 two-parent, African American families. Analyses examined whether parental warmth and offspring age and gender were linked to parental practices and whether parents' warmth, spouses' racial…

  14. Sexuality and Life-Threatening Illness: Implications for Social Work and Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, John G.; Bolte, Sage

    2009-01-01

    Social workers in hospice and palliative care settings have been charged with the responsibility of addressing sexuality with their patients and families. However, little direction has been offered as to how to approach this difficult subject within the context of palliative care. This article provides a critical analysis of the previous…

  15. Assortative social learning and its implications for human (and animal?) societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, Edith; Lotem, Arnon; Feldman, Marcus W

    2014-07-01

    Choosing from whom to learn is an important element of social learning. It affects learner success and the profile of behaviors in the population. Because individuals often differ in their traits and capabilities, their benefits from different behaviors may also vary. Homophily, or assortment, the tendency of individuals to interact with other individuals with similar traits, is known to affect the spread of behaviors in humans. We introduce models to study the evolution of assortative social learning (ASL), where assorting on a trait acts as an individual-specific mechanism for filtering relevant models from which to learn when that trait varies. We show that when the trait is polymorphic, ASL may maintain a stable behavioral polymorphism within a population (independently of coexistence with individual learning in a population). We explore the evolution of ASL when assortment is based on a nonheritable or partially heritable trait, and when ASL competes with different non-ASL strategies: oblique (learning from the parental generation) and vertical (learning from the parent). We suggest that the tendency to assort may be advantageous in the context of social learning, and that ASL might be an important concept for the evolutionary theory of social learning.

  16. Communication inequalities and public health implications of adult social networking site use in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Emily Z; Emmons, Karen M; Puleo, Elaine; Viswanath, K

    2010-01-01

    Social media, and specifically social networking sites (SNSs), are emerging as an important platform for communication and health information exchange. Yet, despite the increase in popularity and use, only a limited number of empirical studies document which segments of the adult population are and are not using social networking sites and with what, if any, affect on health. The purpose of this study is to identify potential communication inequalities in social networking site use among a representative sample of U.S. adults and to examine the association between SNS use and psychological well-being. We analyzed data from the National Cancer Institute's 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Thirty-five percent of online adults reported SNS use within the past 12 months, and there were no significant differences in SNS use by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic position. Younger age (p = .00) was the most significant predictor of SNS use, while being married (p = .02) and having a history of cancer (p = .02) were associated with a decreased odds of SNS use. SNS use was significantly associated with a 0.80 (p = .00) increment in psychological distress score after controlling for other factors. The absence of inequalities in adult SNS use across race/ethnicity and class offers some support for the continued use of social media to promote public health efforts; however, issues such as the persisting digital divide and potential deleterious effects of SNS use on psychological well-being need to be addressed.

  17. Parenting Across the Social Ecology Facilitated by Information and Communications Technology: Implications for Research and Educational Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Walker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To inform parenting research and aid educators seeking to deliver programs that support effective parenting, this study explored types of information and communications technology (ICT used to fulfill childrearing goals. Mothers’ (N = 1,804 reports of ICT activity frequency were examined from data collected from an online survey. Results suggest that mothers’ ICT use for parenting is less frequent than general use in adulthood. Mothers employ ICT to fulfill parenting goals within and across five domains of the parenting social ecology: (a parent development, (b parent-child relationships, (c child development, (d, family development, and (e culture and community. Several types of ICT activities may strengthen parenting in a single domain, and a single ICT activity may help fulfill multiple domains. Implications for research and for promoting and selecting ICT for effective parent learning and education design are discussed.

  18. Policy Contexts of Social Work in Britain: the wider implications of 'New' Labour and the 'New Legal Regime'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Several commentators have expressed disappointment with New Labour's apparent adherence to the policy frameworks of the previous Conservative administrations. The employment orientation of its welfare programmes, the contradictory nature of the social exclusion initiatives, and the continuing obsession with public sector marketisation, inspections, audits, standards and so on, have all come under critical scrutiny (c.f., Blyth 2001; Jordan 2001; Orme 2001. This paper suggests that in order to understand the socio-economic and political contexts affecting social work we need to examine the relationship between New Labour's modernisation project and its insertion within an architecture of global governance. In particular, membership of the European Union (EU, International Monetary Fund (IMF and World Trade Organisation (WTO set the parameters for domestic policy in important ways. Whilst much has been written about the economic dimensions of 'globalisation' in relation to social work rather less has been noted about the ways in which domestic policy agenda are driven by multilateral governance objectives. This policy dimension is important in trying to respond to various changes affecting social work as a professional activity. What is possible, what is encouraged, how things might be done, is tightly bounded by the policy frameworks governing practice and affected by those governing the lives of service users. It is unhelpful to see policy formulation in purely national terms as the UK is inserted into a network governance structure, a regulatory framework where decisions are made by many countries and organisations and agencies. Together, they are producing a 'new legal regime', characterised by a marked neo-liberal policy agenda. This paper aims to demonstrate the relationship of New Labour's modernisation programme to these new forms of legality by examining two main policy areas and the welfare implications they are enmeshed in. The first is

  19. Service needs among Latino immigrant families: implications for social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayón, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to learn from Latino immigrant families what services they need to promote their families' well-being within a context of stringent anti-immigrant legislation. Fifty-two Latino immigrant parents participated in focus groups. Focus groups took place following the passage of Senate Bill 1070. Findings reveal five major categories of need: mental health, physical health care, education, information and support services, and community efforts. Participants' experiences as immigrants played a significant role in their narratives. The narratives reveal that families need assistance navigating systems of care, coping with discrimination and oppressive environments, strengthening ties among community members, and advocating for policy change. Social workers are called to address the needs of this community and advocate for human rights and social justice.

  20. “Degenerated” Leadership of Social Movements: Implications from the Tharu Movement in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Social movements and protest activities in contemporary Nepalese society have been a common phenomenon. They are becoming intermediary power to challenge the State-led political mainstream and development affairs. With a long history, Tharu movement is a part of such movement discourse in Nepal. The leadership, however, has not been dealt in detail for scholarly research. This paper analyses how the leadership of Tharu movement is becoming degenerated and elite-centric in representing the poo...

  1. Australia’s Indigenous ill–health and national social policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    März, Angelika

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the current state of health and socio-economic status of the Indigenous people of Australia and reports and discusses social policy measures that have been taken by the Commonwealth government to improve Indigenous health since the late 1980s. The health of Indigenous people is far worse than that of other Australians. Immediate causes of Indigenous ill–health are a poor environmental health infrastructure and housing conditions, inadequate access to health services and a...

  2. Implications of emotion regulation strategies for empathic concern, social attitudes, and helping behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Matthew S; Dovidio, John F

    2015-04-01

    Empathic concern-a sense of caring and compassion in response to the needs of others-is a type of emotional response to the plights and misfortunes of others that predicts positive social attitudes and altruistic interpersonal behaviors. One psychological process that has been posited to facilitate empathic concern is the ability to regulate one's own emotions. However, existing research links some emotion-regulation approaches (e.g., suppression) to social outcomes that would appear at odds with empathic concern, such as decreased interpersonal closeness. In the present research, we tested whether relying on suppression to regulate one's emotions would lead to decreases in empathic concern-and related downstream variables, such as negative social attitudes and unwillingness to engage in altruistic behavior-when learning about another person's misfortune. In Study 1, dispositional and instructionally induced suppression was negatively associated with empathic concern, which led to increased stigmatizing attitudes. By contrast, instructing participants to use another emotion-regulation strategy examined for comparison-reappraisal-did not decrease empathic concern, and dispositional reliance on reappraisal was actually positively associated with empathic concern. In Study 2, the findings of Study 1 regarding the effects of habitual use of reappraisal and suppression were replicated, and reliance on suppression was also found to be associated with reluctance to engage in helping behaviors. These findings are situated within the existing literature and employed to shed new light on the interpersonal consequences of intrapersonal emotion-regulation strategies.

  3. The neuroscience of social conformity: implications for fundamental and applied research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirre eStallen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of closer ties between researchers and practitioners in the domain of behavior and behavioral change offers useful opportunities for better informing public policy campaigns via a deeper understanding of the psychological processes that operate in real-world decision-making. Here, we focus on the domain of social conformity, and suggest that the recent emergence of laboratory work using neuroscientific techniques to probe the brain basis of social influence can prove a useful source of data to better inform models of conformity. In particular, we argue that this work can have an important role to play in better understanding the specific mechanisms at work in social conformity, in both validating and extending current psychological theories of this process, and in assessing how behavioral change can take place as a result of exposure to the judgments of others. We conclude by outlining some promising future directions in this domain, and indicating how this research could potentially be usefully applied to policy issues.

  4. The neuroscience of social conformity: implications for fundamental and applied research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallen, Mirre; Sanfey, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    The development of closer ties between researchers and practitioners in the domain of behavior and behavioral change offers useful opportunities for better informing public policy campaigns via a deeper understanding of the psychological processes that operate in real-world decision-making. Here, we focus on the domain of social conformity, and suggest that the recent emergence of laboratory work using neuroscientific techniques to probe the brain basis of social influence can prove a useful source of data to better inform models of conformity. In particular, we argue that this work can have an important role to play in better understanding the specific mechanisms at work in social conformity, in both validating and extending current psychological theories of this process, and in assessing how behavioral change can take place as a result of exposure to the judgments of others. We conclude by outlining some promising future directions in this domain, and indicating how this research could potentially be usefully applied to policy issues.

  5. Assessing vaccination sentiments with online social media: implications for infectious disease dynamics and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Salathé

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in the dynamics of health behaviors in social networks and how they affect collective public health outcomes, but measuring population health behaviors over time and space requires substantial resources. Here, we use publicly available data from 101,853 users of online social media collected over a time period of almost six months to measure the spatio-temporal sentiment towards a new vaccine. We validated our approach by identifying a strong correlation between sentiments expressed online and CDC-estimated vaccination rates by region. Analysis of the network of opinionated users showed that information flows more often between users who share the same sentiments - and less often between users who do not share the same sentiments - than expected by chance alone. We also found that most communities are dominated by either positive or negative sentiments towards the novel vaccine. Simulations of infectious disease transmission show that if clusters of negative vaccine sentiments lead to clusters of unprotected individuals, the likelihood of disease outbreaks is greatly increased. Online social media provide unprecedented access to data allowing for inexpensive and efficient tools to identify target areas for intervention efforts and to evaluate their effectiveness.

  6. Expansion of gambling in Canada: implications for health and social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, D A

    2000-07-11

    Canada experienced a dramatic increase in legalized gambling in the 1990s, primarily because of governments' need to increase revenue without additional taxation. This article examines gambling from a public health perspective. The major public health issues include gambling addiction, family dysfunction and gambling by youth. Debates have emerged about the health, social and economic costs and benefits of gambling. Stakeholder and social policy groups have expressed concern about the impact of expanded gambling on the quality of life of individuals, families and communities. Epidemiological studies show that the prevalence of gambling in the general adult population is low but increasing. Of particular concern is the high though steady prevalence of gambling among youth. New technologies have been linked to gambling-related problems such as addiction to gambling by video lottery terminals. Gambling by means of the Internet represents another emerging issue. The article concludes with recommendations for health and social policy related to gambling. These recommendations incorporate a broad public health approach to create a strong research program and to balance risks and benefits.

  7. Are empathic abilities learnable? Implications for social neuroscientific research from psychometric assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Erik; Petermann, Franz; Schipper, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Empathy is defined as an individually varying but stable personality trait. To our knowledge this notion seems questionable considering recent studies proving neuronal plasticity not only in childhood and adolescence but over the whole lifespan. We propose a model in which an individual's basic empathic abilities-arising from genetic factors, brain maturation, and early attachment experiences -are continually modulated by the intensity, continuity, and frequency of interpersonal socio-emotional stimulation and challenges. We assume neural processes and their underlying neural structures being modified by social and socio-emotional stimulation. Continuous social interactions should produce noticeable effects on the empathic abilities of an individual independent of age or brain maturation level. In particular, empathic abilities should be learnable and expandable beyond specific developmental windows. To elucidate this hypothesis we surveyed empathy measures of students of various professions with the help of a new instrument, the Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy (QCAE) categorizing them into three different groups depending on their subsequent occupational fields: medical students, students of academic social professions, and a control group. Results indicate that continuous socio-emotional stimulation could increase empathic abilities potentially leading to learning effects.

  8. Religious and Ethnic Discrimination: Differential Implications for Social Support Engagement, Civic Involvement, and Political Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Ysseldyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social identity threats, depending on the content of the identity targeted, may evoke varying socio-political responses. In this regard, religious discrimination may be especially threatening, challenging both the social group and its belief system, thereby promoting more active collective responses. This research examined how religious and ethnic identification differentially evoked engagement with support resources (ingroup and spiritual, civic involvement (including individual and collective action-taking, and political participation (voting or political consciousness following group-based threats. Study 1 drew from the Canadian Ethnic Diversity Survey (N = 1806. Participants who reported religious discrimination demonstrated greater religious identification, ingroup social engagement, and civic involvement—comparable associations were absent for ethnic discrimination. Study 2 (N = 287 experimentally primed participants to make salient a specific incident of religious or ethnic discrimination. Although ethnic discrimination elicited greater ingroup support-seeking and political consciousness, religious discrimination was perceived as especially harmful and evoked more individual and collective action-taking. Further to this, religious high-identifiers’ responses were mediated by engagement with ingroup or spiritual support in both studies, whereas no mediated relations were evident for ethnic identification. Findings are discussed in terms of distinct socio-political responses to threats targeting identities that are grounded in religious belief systems.

  9. The anatomy of urban social networks and its implications in the searchability problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Yagüe, C; Schneider, C M; Couronné, T; Smoreda, Z; Benito, R M; Zufiria, P J; González, M C

    2015-06-02

    The appearance of large geolocated communication datasets has recently increased our understanding of how social networks relate to their physical space. However, many recurrently reported properties, such as the spatial clustering of network communities, have not yet been systematically tested at different scales. In this work we analyze the social network structure of over 25 million phone users from three countries at three different scales: country, provinces and cities. We consistently find that this last urban scenario presents significant differences to common knowledge about social networks. First, the emergence of a giant component in the network seems to be controlled by whether or not the network spans over the entire urban border, almost independently of the population or geographic extension of the city. Second, urban communities are much less geographically clustered than expected. These two findings shed new light on the widely-studied searchability in self-organized networks. By exhaustive simulation of decentralized search strategies we conclude that urban networks are searchable not through geographical proximity as their country-wide counterparts, but through an homophily-driven community structure.

  10. Social implications arise in embodied music cognition research which can counter musicological "individualism".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    The agenda in music research that is broadly recognized as embodied music cognition has arrived hand-in-hand with a social interpretation of music, focusing on the real-world basis of its performance, and fostering an empirical approach to musician movement regarding the communicative function and potential of those movements. However, embodied cognition emerged from traditional cognitivism, which produced a body of scientific explanation of music-theoretic concepts. The analytical object of this corpus is based on the particular imagined encounter of a listener responding to an idealized "work." Although this problem of essentialism has been identified within mainstream musicology, the lingering effects may spill over into interdisciplinary, empirical research. This paper defines the situation according to its legacy of individualism, and offers an alternative sketch of musical activity as performance event, a model that highlights the social interaction processes at the heart of musical behavior. I describe some recent empirical work based on interaction-oriented approaches, arguing that this particular focus - on the social interaction process itself - creates a distinctive and promising agenda for further research into embodied music cognition.

  11. Social implications arise in embodied music cognition research which can counter musicological ‘individualism’.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki eMoran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The agenda in music research that is broadly recognized as embodied music cognition has arrived hand-in-hand with a social interpretation of music, focusing on the real-world basis of its performance, and fostering an empirical approach to musician movement regarding the communicative function and potential of those movements. However, embodied cognition emerged from traditional cognitivism, which produced a body of scientific explanation of music-theoretic concepts. The analytical object of this corpus is based on the particular imagined encounter of a listener responding to an idealised ‘work’. Although this problem of essentialism has been identified within mainstream musicology, the lingering effects may spill over into interdisciplinary, empirical research. This paper defines the situation according to its legacy of individualism, and offers an alternative sketch of musical activity as performance event, a model that highlights the social interaction processes at the heart of musical behaviour. I describe some recent empirical work based on interaction-oriented approaches, arguing that this particular focus – on the social interaction process itself – creates a distinctive and promising agenda for further research into embodied music cognition.

  12. Social implications arise in embodied music cognition research which can counter musicological “individualism”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    The agenda in music research that is broadly recognized as embodied music cognition has arrived hand-in-hand with a social interpretation of music, focusing on the real-world basis of its performance, and fostering an empirical approach to musician movement regarding the communicative function and potential of those movements. However, embodied cognition emerged from traditional cognitivism, which produced a body of scientific explanation of music-theoretic concepts. The analytical object of this corpus is based on the particular imagined encounter of a listener responding to an idealized “work.” Although this problem of essentialism has been identified within mainstream musicology, the lingering effects may spill over into interdisciplinary, empirical research. This paper defines the situation according to its legacy of individualism, and offers an alternative sketch of musical activity as performance event, a model that highlights the social interaction processes at the heart of musical behavior. I describe some recent empirical work based on interaction-oriented approaches, arguing that this particular focus – on the social interaction process itself – creates a distinctive and promising agenda for further research into embodied music cognition. PMID:25101011

  13. A molecular phylogeny of the Australian huntsman spiders (Sparassidae, Deleninae): implications for taxonomy and social behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Rayor, Linda S

    2013-12-01

    Huntsman spiders (Sparassidae) are a diverse group with a worldwide distribution, yet are poorly known both taxonomically and phylogenetically. They are particularly diverse in Australia where an endemic lineage, Deleninae, has diversified to form nearly 100 species. One unusual species, Delena cancerides, has been believed to be the sole group-living sparassid. Unlike all of the other subsocial and social spiders which are capture-web based or live in silken tunnels, D. cancerides are non-web building spiders that live in large matrilineal colonies of a single adult female and her offspring from multiple clutches of under the bark of dead trees. Here we report the discovery of two additional prolonged subsocial sparassid species, currently in Eodelena but here formally proposed as a synonomy of Delena (new synonoymy), Delena (Eodelena) lapidicola and D. (E.) melanochelis. We briefly describe their social demographics, behavior, and habitat use. In order to understand the evolutionary relationships among these species, and thus origin of sociality and other traits in this group, we also offer the first molecular phylogeny of Deleninae and relatives. We employ model based phylogenetic analyses on two mtDNA and three nuDNA loci using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, including both 'classical' concatenation approach as well as coalescent-based analysis of species trees from gene trees. Our results support the hypothesis that the delenine huntsman spiders are a monophyletic Australian radiation, approximately 23 million year old, and indicate that the current ten genera should be merged to six genera in four clades. Our findings are inconsistent with some relatively recent changes in the taxonomy of Deleninae. The three known group-living delenine species are related and likely represent a single origin of sociality with a single reversal to solitary life-styles. Our results provide strong support for the classical Isopeda, but not for the recent splitting of

  14. Resources and strategies to integrate the study of ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics into the undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Jinnie M; Triman, Kathleen L

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy, genetically modified organisms, and the privacy of an individual's genetic information are just a few of the developments emerging from recent advances in molecular genetics that are controversial. Oversight and regulation of emerging technologies are the responsibility of both experts and the general public who both need to understand the science and the societal impact of its use. The study of ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of advances in genetics provides a very powerful pedagogical tool to accomplish two goals. These are, first of all, to interest nonscientists in genetics and engage them in learning the science behind the ELSI developments they are considering, and secondly, to broaden the perspective of science students to consider the history and social consequences of the science they are studying. The resources and strategies presented in this chapter for teaching ELSI issues that arise in modern genetics are designed to aid in accomplishing these goals throughout the undergraduate curriculum. This chapter provides (1) a set of nine ELSI topic modules that can be incorporated into courses for both majors (from introductory to graduate level) and nonmajors and (2) examples of course pedagogy for specific classes.

  15. Guangzhou’s African Migrants: Implications for China’s Social Stability and China-Africa Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Elochukwu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently migration was treated like a footnote in the Africa-China discourse. Previously researchers and the media had focused attention on the “cost-benefit analysis” of China‘ s economic penetration of the continent. However, since 2008 when over a hundred African migrants blocked a major street in Guangzhou protesting the death of a Nigerian in an immigration raid, researchers and the media have been falling over themselves to unpack the phenomenon of migrant exchange in the relationship. There are now about one million Chinese migrants in Africa as against about two hundred and fifty thousand African migrants in China. Migration is a two-edged sword. On the credit side, migration can be a bridge between peoples as well as a major contributor to economic development. On the debit side, it can be a source of dispute between peoples and a threat to the hosts’ social stability. This paper discusses the implications of Guangzhou’s African migrants for China’s social stability and China’s relationship with Africa.

  16. The importance of distinguishing illegality from guilt in trials for alleged medical malpractice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernando Díaz Brousse

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A proper analysis of the essential elements that comprise a criminal offense that falls under the purview of medical negligence is fundamental in order to rule, in justice, cases of alleged malpractice. It is necessary to properly distinguish between accusations of illegality and those of guilt. Open legal essays and precedents about such illicit acts provide judges with great latitude in determining when acts are consistent or not with standard care. This power mandates that judges should ground their convictions on objective infringements of the law rather than subjective criteria.

  17. Lsamp is implicated in the regulation of emotional and social behavior by use of alternative promoters in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Mari-Anne; Lilleväli, Kersti; Heinla, Indrek; Luuk, Hendrik; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Kongi, Karina; Vanaveski, Taavi; Tekko, Triin; Innos, Jürgen; Vasar, Eero

    2015-01-01

    Limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP) is a neural cell adhesion molecule involved in neurite formation and outgrowth. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the distribution of alternatively transcribed Lsamp isoforms in the mouse brain and its implications on the regulation of behavior. Limbic system-associated membrane protein 1b transcript was visualized by using a mouse strain expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of Lsamp 1b promoter. The distribution of Lsamp 1a transcript and summarized expression of the Lsamp transcripts was investigated by non-radioactive in situ RNA hybridization analysis. Cross-validation was performed by using radioactive in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to study correlations between the expression of Lsamp isoforms and behavioral parameters. The expression pattern of two promoters differs remarkably from the developmental initiation at embryonic day 12.5. Limbic system-associated membrane protein 1a promoter is active in "classic" limbic structures where the hippocampus and amygdaloid area display the highest expression. Promoter 1b is mostly active in the thalamic sensory nuclei and cortical sensory areas, but also in areas that regulate stress and arousal. Higher levels of Lsamp 1a transcript had significant correlations with all of the measures indicating higher trait anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test. Limbic system-associated membrane protein transcript levels in the hippocampus and ventral striatum correlated with behavioral parameters in the social interaction test. The data are in line with decreased anxiety and alterations in social behavior in Lsamp-deficient mice. We propose that Lsamp is involved in emotional and social operating systems by complex regulation of two alternative promoters.

  18. ELSI Bibliography: Ethical legal and social implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesley, M.S. [comp.

    1993-11-01

    This second edition of the ELSI Bibliography provides a current and comprehensive resource for identifying publications on the major topics related to the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Since the first edition of the ELSI Bibliography was printed last year, new publications and earlier ones identified by additional searching have doubled our computer database of ELSI publications to over 5600 entries. The second edition of the ELSI Bibliography reflects this growth of the underlying computer database. Researchers should note that an extensive collection of publications in the database is available for public use at the General Law Library of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  19. Social Media, Big Data, and Mental Health: Current Advances and Ethical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Mike; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Mental health (including substance abuse) is the fifth greatest contributor to the global burden of disease, with an economic cost estimated to be US $2.5 trillion in 2010, and expected to double by 2030. Developing information systems to support and strengthen population-level mental health monitoring forms a core part of the World Health Organization's Comprehensive Action Plan 2013-2020. In this paper, we review recent work that utilizes social media "big data" in conjunction with associated technologies like natural language processing and machine learning to address pressing problems in population-level mental health surveillance and research, focusing both on technological advances and core ethical challenges.

  20. Social-Ecological Innovation in Purposeful Organizations: Implications & Impacts in an Age of Wicked Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær; Blahova, Michaela

    Purpose: This present age is one that is human-made, rather than defined by geologic strata. As such it has come to be called the Anthropocene Age. It is an age fraught with wicked social, ecological, and environmental challenges for which no clear resolutions exist. While many means of warfare...... that span societal, ecological, and economic dimensions. Findings: Edmund Husserl cited intentionality as central to human consciousness. Most certainly intentionality is equally central to conscious enterprise consideration and combat of wicked global challenges we face – ones that threaten people, planet...

  1. Evaluation of Unacademic Behaviour and its Implications on Economic and Social Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorel ANDREI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of corruption and its effects on the social and economic development of a country is a difficult task. A series of studies have estimated the effects of corruption on the economic development of a sector of activity. This article presents the results obtained at the level of a sample with regard to a series of aspects related to the measurement of corruption and the identification of its causes and of the role played by certain institutions in the growth or reduction of corruption. The statistical information was obtained by means of a statistical questionnaire intended for public administration employees. The data were processed in SPSS.

  2. Increased drinking following social isolation rearing: implications for polydipsia associated with schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Hawken

    Full Text Available Primary polydipsia, excessive drinking without known medical cause, is especially associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. We used animal models of schizophrenia-like symptoms to examine the effects on schedule-induced polydipsia: post-weaning social isolation rearing, subchronic MK-801 treatment (an NMDA-receptor antagonist or the two combined. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats reared in groups or in isolation beginning at postnatal day 21 were further divided to receive subchronic MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg twice daily or saline for 7 days beginning on postnatal day 62. Following a 4-day withdrawal period, all groups were trained on a schedule-induced polydipsia paradigm. Under food-restriction, animals reared in isolation and receiving food pellets at 1-min intervals developed significantly more drinking behavior than those reared with others. The addition of subchronic MK-801 treatment did not significantly augment the amount of water consumed. These findings suggest a predisposition to polydipsia is a schizophrenia-like behavioral effect of post-weaning social isolation.

  3. Social pathways for Ebola virus disease in rural Sierra Leone, and some implications for containment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Richards

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The current outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in Upper West Africa is the largest ever recorded. Molecular evidence suggests spread has been almost exclusively through human-to-human contact. Social factors are thus clearly important to understand the epidemic and ways in which it might be stopped, but these factors have so far been little analyzed. The present paper focuses on Sierra Leone, and provides cross sectional data on the least understood part of the epidemic-the largely undocumented spread of Ebola in rural areas. Various forms of social networking in rural communities and their relevance for understanding pathways of transmission are described. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between marriage, funerals and land tenure. Funerals are known to be a high-risk factor for infection. It is suggested that more than a shift in awareness of risks will be needed to change local patterns of behavior, especially in regard to funerals, since these are central to the consolidation of community ties. A concluding discussion relates the information presented to plans for halting the disease. Local consultation and access are seen as major challenges to be addressed.

  4. Investigation of an alleged mechanism of finger injury in an automobile crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Stephen; Kent, Richard

    2006-07-01

    This investigation centers on the case of an adult male whose finger was allegedly amputated by the steering wheel of his car during a crash. The subject claimed to have been driving with his left index finger inserted through a hole in the spoke of his steering wheel and was subsequently involved in an offset frontal collision with a tree. The finger was found to be cleanly severed at the mid-shaft of the proximal phalanx after the crash. This injury was alleged to have been caused by inertial loading from the rotation of the steering wheel during the crash. To determine whether this injury mechanism was plausible, three laboratory tests representing distinct loading scenarios were carried out with postmortem human surrogates loaded dynamically by the subject's steering wheel. It was found that the inertial loads generated in this loading scenario are insufficient to amputate the finger. Additionally, artificially constraining the finger to force an amputation to occur revealed that a separation at the proximal interphalangeal joint occurs rather than a bony fracture of the proximal phalanx. Based on these biomechanical tests, it can be concluded that the subject's injury did not occur during the automobile crash in question. Furthermore, it can be shown that the injury was self-inflicted to fraudulently claim on an insurance policy.

  5. Special Report on "Allegations of Conflict of Interest Regarding Licensing of PROTECT by Argonne National Laboratory"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-08-01

    In February 2009, the Office of Inspector General received a letter from Congressman Mark Steven Kirk of Illinois, which included constituent allegations that an exclusive technology licensing agreement by Argonne National Laboratory was tainted by inadequate competition, conflicts of interest, and other improprieties. The technology in question was for the Program for Response Options and Technology Enhancements for Chemical/Biological Terrorism, commonly referred to as PROTECT. Because of the importance of the Department of Energy's technology transfer program, especially as implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act matures, we reviewed selected aspects of the licensing process for PROTECT to determine whether the allegations had merit. In summary, under the facts developed during our review, it was understandable that interested parties concluded that there was a conflict of interest in this matter and that Argonne may have provided the successful licensee with an unfair advantage. In part, this was consistent with aspects of the complaint from Congressman Kirk's constituent.

  6. Two brothers' alleged paternity for a child: who is the father?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Muhammed; Kara, Umut; Emre, Ramazan; Fung, Wing Kam; Canturk, Kemal Murat

    2015-06-01

    In paternity cases where individuals are close relatives, it may be necessary to evaluate mother's DNA profile (trio test) and to increase the number of polymorphic STR loci that are analyzed. In our case, two alleged fathers who are brothers and the child (duo case) were analyzed based on 20 STR loci; however, no exclusions could be achieved. Then trio test (with mother) was performed using the Identifiler Plus kit (Applied Biosystems) and no exclusions could be achieved again. Analysis performed with the ESS Plex Plus kit (Qiagen), the paternity of one of the two alleged fathers was rejected only on 2 STR loci. We made the calculations of power of exclusion values to interpret our results more properly. The probability of exclusion (PE) is calculated as 0.9776546 in 15 loci of Identifiler Plus kit without mother. The PE is calculated as 0.9942803, if 5 additional loci from ESS Plex Plus kit are typed. The PE becomes 0.9961048 for the Identifiler Plus kit in trio analysis. If both Identifiler Plus and ESS Plex Plus kits are used for testing, the PE is calculated as 0.999431654, which indicates that the combined kits are highly discriminating.

  7. Molecular variation at a candidate gene implicated in the regulation of fire ant social behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Gotzek

    Full Text Available The fire ant Solenopsis invicta and its close relatives display an important social polymorphism involving differences in colony queen number. Colonies are headed by either a single reproductive queen (monogyne form or multiple queens (polygyne form. This variation in social organization is associated with variation at the gene Gp-9, with monogyne colonies harboring only B-like allelic variants and polygyne colonies always containing b-like variants as well. We describe naturally occurring variation at Gp-9 in fire ants based on 185 full-length sequences, 136 of which were obtained from S. invicta collected over much of its native range. While there is little overall differentiation between most of the numerous alleles observed, a surprising amount is found in the coding regions of the gene, with such substitutions usually causing amino acid replacements. This elevated coding-region variation may result from a lack of negative selection acting to constrain amino acid replacements over much of the protein, different mutation rates or biases in coding and non-coding sequences, negative selection acting with greater strength on non-coding than coding regions, and/or positive selection acting on the protein. Formal selection analyses provide evidence that the latter force played an important role in the basal b-like lineages coincident with the emergence of polygyny. While our data set reveals considerable paraphyly and polyphyly of S. invicta sequences with respect to those of other fire ant species, the b-like alleles of the socially polymorphic species are monophyletic. An expanded analysis of colonies containing alleles of this clade confirmed the invariant link between their presence and expression of polygyny. Finally, our discovery of several unique alleles bearing various combinations of b-like and B-like codons allows us to conclude that no single b-like residue is completely predictive of polygyne behavior and, thus, potentially causally

  8. Socio-economic changes, social capital and implications for climate change in a changing rural Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Anja; Herslund, Lise Byskov

    2016-01-01

    what circumstances people can make use of their ties. The use of different kinds of ties varies with context and is not as clear cut as suggested in the literature. For example families closer to the city are in a better position to take advantage of new opportunities. Using a combination of ties...... people have engaged in high-input agriculture, business and paid employment. Diversification of livelihoods has made many people less sensitive to climate change, but this does not translate into decreased vulnerability for the community. Intensive agriculture and lower community cohesion seems...... unsustainable in the long run. Thus, decreased vulnerability at the household level may come at the price of increased vulnerability at higher levels and negative consequences for the wider social–ecological system. Evaluating vulnerability and the role of social ties depends on the unit and sector of analysis...

  9. The Social Costs of Gender Nonconformity for Transgender Adults: Implications for Discrimination and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa R; Grollman, Eric Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Research suggests that transgender people face high levels of discrimination in society, which may contribute to their disproportionate risk for poor health. However, little is known about whether gender nonconformity, as a visible marker of one's stigmatized status as a transgender individual, heightens trans people's experiences with discrimination and, in turn, their health. Using data from the largest survey of transgender adults in the United States, the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (N = 4,115), we examine the associations among gender nonconformity, transphobic discrimination, and health-harming behaviors (i.e., attempted suicide, drug/alcohol abuse, and smoking). The results suggest that gender nonconforming trans people face more discrimination and, in turn, are more likely to engage in health-harming behaviors than trans people who are gender conforming. Our findings highlight the important role of gender nonconformity in the social experiences and well-being of transgender people.

  10. Posting behaviour patterns in an online smoking cessation social network: implications for intervention design and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Healey

    Full Text Available Online Cessation Support Networks (OCSNs are associated with increased quit success rates, but few studies have examined their use over time. We identified usage patterns in New Zealand's largest OCSN over two years and explored implications for OCSN intervention design and evaluation.We analysed metadata relating to 133,096 OCSN interactions during 2011 and 2012. Metrics covered aggregate network activity, user posting activity and longevity, and between-user commenting. Binary logistic regression models were estimated to investigate the feasibility of predicting low user engagement using early interaction data.Repeating periodic peaks and troughs in aggregate activity related not only to seasonality (e.g., New Year, but also to day of the week. Out of 2,062 unique users, 69 Highly Engaged Users (180+ interactions each contributed 69% of all OCSN interactions in 2012 compared to 1.3% contributed by 864 Minimally Engaged Users (< = 2 items each. The proportion of Highly Engaged Users increased with network growth between 2011 and 2012 (with marginal significance, but the proportion of Minimally Engaged Users did not decline substantively. First week interaction data enabled identification of Minimally Engaged Users with high specificity and sensitivity (AUROC= 0.94.Results suggest future research should develop and test interventions that promote activity, and hence cessation support, amongst specific user groups or at key time points. For example, early usage information could help identify Minimally Engaged Users for tests of targeted messaging designed to improve their integration into, or re-engagement with, the OCSN. Furthermore, although we observed strong growth over time on varied metrics including posts and comments, this change did not coincide with large gains in first-time user persistence. Researchers assessing intervention effects should therefore examine multiple measures when evaluating changes in network dynamics over time.

  11. Absolute chronology of the Beaker phenomenon North of the Tagus estuary: demographic and social implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso, João Luís

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the Beaker phenomenon in the Tagus estuary does not fit well with the model of three successive groups (International, Palmela and Incised Groups. The above seems to result from the nature of the settlements rather than from its chronology, as all three groups are present during the second half of the 3rd millennium BC. Therefore while artefacts of the International Group predominate in the fortified sites, the Incised Group appears almost exclusively in open sites. The Palmela Group seems of minor importance, at least in the north region of the Tagus River estuary. The remarkable antiquity of Beaker pottery found in the FM hut at Leceia (which dates from the 2nd quarter of the 3rd millennium BC, re-confirmed by AMS dating has parallels both in the North and South of Portugal, as well as in Spain. Thus we conclude that in the Lower Estremadura (one of the most important regions in Europe for the discussion of the origin and diffusion of Beaker “phenomenon”, the Beaker social formation with its own distinct cultural characteristics, coexisted with local Chalcolithic cultures, although never merged with them.La complejidad del fenómeno campaniforme en el estuario del Tajo no encaja bien con el modelo de los tres Grupos sucesivos Internacional, Palmela e Inciso. Dicho modelo parece resultar de la naturaleza de los asentamientos más que de su cronología, ya que los tres grupos están presentes durante la segunda mitad del III milenio a.C. Mientras los artefactos del Grupo Internacional predominan en los sitios fortificados, los del Grupo Inciso se encuentran casi en exclusiva en yacimientos al aire libre. El Grupo Palmela parece menos importante, al menos en la región septentrional del estuario del Tajo. La notable antigüedad de la cerámica campaniforme hallada en la cabaña FM de Leceia (segundo cuarto del III milenio a. C., confirmada por datación AMS tiene paralelos al Norte y Sur de Portugal, así como en España. En

  12. Environmental and Social Impacts of Oil Palm Plantations and their Implications for Biofuel Production in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystof Obidzinski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the development of oil palm with linkages to biofuel in Indonesia and analyzes the associated environmental and socioeconomic impacts. We selected three plantation study sites in West Papua (Manokwari, West Kalimantan (Kubu Raya, and Papua (Boven Digoel to assess the impacts. Research findings indicate that the development of oil palm in all three sites has caused deforestation, resulting in significant secondary external impacts such as water pollution, soil erosion, and air pollution. In terms of social impacts, many stakeholder groups, i.e., employees, out-growers, and investing households, report significant gains. However, we found these benefits were not evenly distributed. Other stakeholders, particularly traditional landowners, experienced restrictions on traditional land use rights and land losses. We observed increasing land scarcity, rising land prices, and conflicts over land in all sites. Three major trade-offs are associated with the development of oil palm plantations, including those related to biofuels: unevenly distributed economic benefits are generated at the cost of significant environmental losses; there are some winners but also many losers; and economic gains accrue at the expense of weak rule of law. To reduce the negative impacts and trade-offs of oil palm plantations and maximize their economic potential, government decision makers need to restrict the use of forested land for plantation development, enforce existing regulations on concession allocation and environmental management, improve monitoring of labor practices, recognize traditional land use rights, and make land transfer agreements involving customary land more transparent and legally binding.

  13. ELSI Bibliography: Ethical, legal and social implications of the Human Genome Project. 1994 Supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesley, M.S.; Ossorio, P.N. [comps.

    1994-09-01

    This report updates and expands the second edition of the ELSI Bibliography, published in 1993. The Bibliography and Supplement provides a comprehensive resource for identifying publications on the major topics related to the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. The Bibliography and Supplement are extracted from a database compiled at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the support of the Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy. The second edition of the ELSI Bibliography was dated May 1993 but included publications added to the database until fall 1993. This Supplement reflects approximately 1,000 entries added to the database during the past year, bringing the total to approximately 7,000 entries. More than half of the new entries were published in the last year, and the remainder are earlier publications not previously included in the database. Most of the new entries were published in the academic and professional literature. The remainder are press reports from newspapers of record and scientific journals. The topical listing of the second edition has been followed in the Supplement, with a few changes. The topics of Cystic Fibrosis, Huntington`s Disease, and Sickle Cell Anemia have been combined in a single topic, Disorders. Also, all the entries published in the past year are included in a new topic, Publications: September 1993--September 1994, which provides a comprehensive view of recent reporting and commentary on the science and ELSI of genetics.

  14. The Role of Social Novelty in Risk Seeking and Exploratory Behavior: Implications for Addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Simon; Gao, Jennifer; Hallett, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Novelty preference or sensation seeking is associated with disorders of addiction and predicts rodent compulsive drug use and adolescent binge drinking in humans. Novelty has also been shown to influence choice in the context of uncertainty and reward processing. Here we introduce a novel or familiar neutral face stimuli and investigate its influence on risk-taking choices in healthy volunteers. We focus on behavioural outcomes and imaging correlates to the prime that might predict risk seeking. We hypothesized that subjects would be more risk seeking following a novel relative to familiar stimulus. We adapted a risk-taking task involving acceptance or rejection of a 50:50 choice of gain or loss that was preceded by a familiar (pre-test familiarization) or novel face prime. Neutral expression faces of males and females were used as primes. Twenty-four subjects were first tested behaviourally and then 18 scanned using a different variant of the same task under functional MRI. We show enhanced risk taking to both gain and loss anticipation following novel relative to familiar images and particularly for the low gain condition. Greater risk taking behaviour and self-reported exploratory behaviours was predicted by greater right ventral putaminal activity to novel versus familiar contexts. Social novelty appears to have a contextually enhancing effect on augmenting risky choices possibly mediated via ventral putaminal dopaminergic activity. Our findings link the observation that novelty preference and sensation seeking are important traits predicting the initiation and maintenance of risky behaviours, including substance and behavioural addictions.

  15. Social Media Self-Efficacy of Health Education Specialists: Training and Organizational Development Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Julia M; Paige, Samantha; Stellefson, Michael; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2016-11-01

    A growing number of public health organizations are applying the power of social media (SM) for health promotion and behavior change. This cross-sectional study of health education specialists (n = 353) examined which demographic and occupational factors were associated with SM self-efficacy, and evaluated SM self-efficacy related to each of the Seven Areas of Responsibility. A series of one-way analyses of variance were conducted to determine whether differences in SM self-efficacy existed by sex, age, years of work experience, and SM access at work. A multiple linear regression examined the relationship between SM self-efficacy and SM experience when controlling for demographic and occupational factors. Statistically significant differences in SM self-efficacy existed by age, F(2, 289) = 6.54, p = .002. SM experience (β = 1.43, t = 11.35, p < .001) was a statistically significant predictor of SM self-efficacy, even after controlling for age, sex, years of work experience, and level of SM access, F(5, 290) = 30.88, p < .001, R(2) = .35. Results revealed statistically significant differences in mean SM self-efficacy scores by the Areas of Responsibility, F(4.69, 1425.46) = 22.46, p < .001. Professional health organizations should have policies in place and trainings that are conducive to learning and applying SM for health education research and practice.

  16. The Link Between Mental Illness and Firearm Violence: Implications for Social Policy and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozel, John S; Mulvey, Edward P

    2017-03-30

    The United States has substantially higher levels of firearm violence than most other developed countries. Firearm violence is a significant and preventable public health crisis. Mental illness is a weak risk factor for violence despite popular misconceptions reflected in the media and policy. That said, mental health professionals play a critical role in assessing their patients for violence risk, counseling about firearm safety, and guiding the creation of rational and evidence-based public policy that can be effective in mitigating violence risk without unnecessarily stigmatizing people with mental illness. This article summarizes existing evidence about the interplay among mental illness, violence, and firearms, with particular attention paid to the role of active symptoms, addiction, victimization, and psychosocial risk factors. The social and legal context of firearm ownership is discussed as a preface to exploring practical, evidence-driven, and behaviorally informed policy recommendations for mitigating firearm violence risk. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Volume 13 is May 7, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  17. Complex Urban Simulations and Sustainable Urban Planning with Spatial and Social Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T.; Boschert, S.; Hempel, L.; Höffken, S.; Obst, B.

    2013-09-01

    Cities can be seen as complex systems of heterogeneous processes with a high variety of different influences (e.g. social, infrastructural, economic, and political impacts). This especially applies for tasks concerning urban development of existing assets. The optimization of traffic flows, reduction of emissions, improvement of energy efficiency, but also urban climate and landscape planning issues require the involvement of many different actors, balancing different perspectives, and divergent claims. The increasing complexities of planning and decision processes make high demands on professionals of various disciplines, government departments, and municipal decision-makers. In the long term, topics like urban resilience, energy management, risk and resource management have to be taken into account and reflected in future projects, but always related to socio-spatial and governmental aspects. Accordingly, it is important to develop models to be able to understand and analyze the outcomes and effects of governmental measures and planning to the urban environment. Thus, a more systematic approach is needed - going away from welldefined city models to city system models. The purpose is to describe urban processes not only quantitatively, but to grasp their qualitative complexity and interdependencies, by modeling and simulating existing urban systems. This contribution will present the City System Model (CSM) concept closely related to an Urban Energy Planning use case, will highlight the methodology, and focus on first results and findings from an ongoing interdisciplinary research project and use case to improve the basis of information for decision-makers and politicians about urban planning decisions.

  18. Removing barriers to promote more positive thinking for people with diabetes: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardian, Jana; Sun, Fei

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand changes in thinking in patients with diabetes and factors related to the health care providers and significant others that would mediate changes in thinking. Cross-sectional data were collected from three sites. Adults age 21 and older with type 2 diabetes were asked about their thinking regarding diabetes at diagnosis and the present time. In addition, respondents were asked questions about their perceptions of health care providers (that is, physicians, nurses, diabetes educators), significant others, and manage- ment of diabetes. Significant other blame and self-efficacy were found to be partial mediators in thinking about diabetes; the model explained 29 percent of the variance. Social workers are uniquely trained in the person-in-environment framework, which allows flexibility in creating interventions to provide patients with diabetes the support necessary to have a more positive orientation toward diabetes self-management, increase self-efficacy, and reduce feelings of blame from significant others. Improving the support of significant others and the patients' level of self-efficacy can provide mediation of negative thinking, which may result in an environment that supports improved diabetes self-management behaviors.

  19. Social inclusion in workplaces where people with intellectual disabilities are employed: implications for supported employment professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillary, Rose; Pernice, Regina

    2006-03-01

    This research investigated elements of workplace culture across eight New Zealand workplaces where people with intellectual disability were employed. Using a semi-structured interview format, eight employers were surveyed, and variations in job entry procedures, orientation and training, company policies, job design, customs and practice, and social opportunities were examined. Factors influencing inclusion in the workplace culture of a total of 16 employees, eight supported employees and eight co-workers without disabilities, were identified and compared. The findings indicated that supported workers had a lower level of inclusion than co-workers. Several factors influencing inclusion of employees in the workplace culture were identified; full-time vs. part-time, level of employment support, limiting expectations and employer/co-worker attitudes. The use of a workplace culture survey by supported employment professionals has several benefits, including the identification of potentially inclusive workplaces, the facilitation of a good person and workplace environment match, the possibility of monitoring inclusion levels, encouragement of full work shift placements, and the provision of effective support on the job.

  20. The Ruggie Framework: Polycentric regulation and the implications for corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B. Taylor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ Framework,developed by the U.N. Special Representative JohnRuggie, brings together social expectations and law into anemerging policy framework of direct relevance to corporatesocial responsibility, CSR. The principle source of theFramework’s significance for the policy and practice of CSRis its definition of the theory of business responsibility forhuman rights as arising from business activities and relationships,and its deployment of due diligence for humanrights risk as the core operational concept of this theory ofresponsibility. The article considers the responsibility torespect human rights in light of theories about polycentricregulatory regimes and draws the conclusion that the RuggieFramework creates a regulator dynamic in which bothvoluntarism and law have relevant and reinforcing roles toplay in governing business behavior. In the wake of theadaptation of the Framework by the UN, the challenge forthe field of CSR will be to adapt to an emerging reality inwhich business responsibility for ‘the social’ is increasinglya question of compliance and beyond.

  1. The social meanings behind male sex work: implications for sexual interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, J; Minichiello, V

    1995-12-01

    This qualitative study explores the meanings of the commercial sexual encounter between male sex workers and their clients. The study highlights the various social meanings male sex workers attribute to having sex, their typologies of clients, the psychic contexts of male commercial sex, safer sex interactions, and how these issues inform sexual behaviour. The data shows that the meaning attached to the act of having sex is an important aspect of the way in which participants perceive their partners, conduct themselves during sexual encounters, and engage in safe sex practices. Clients are categorized by sex workers according to their perceptions of 'them', which include 'marrieds', 'easy trade', 'undesirables', 'sugar daddies' and 'heaven trade'. Different types of clients pose alternate levels of risk to the safe sex practices of sex workers. The sex worker's definition of commercial sex as work enables him to separate work and personal sex and define work sex as 'not real sex', in which safe sex practices symbolize both the degree of self that is shared and protective work equipment. It was also found that this sample of sex workers do not negotiate safe sex. Rather they use 'modes of interaction' which direct the encounter either towards safe sex, or they refuse to continue with the transaction. The interactive modes identified are 'natural', 'educative', 'challenge', 'other options' and 'walk-out'. These modes of interaction are effective strategies for ensuring safe sex, and can be used by the broader community to gain partner compliance in safe sex practices.

  2. Global maize trade and food security: implications from a social network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Felicia; Guclu, Hasan

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a social network model of the global trade of maize: one of the most important food, feed, and industrial crops worldwide, and critical to food security. We used this model to analyze patterns of maize trade among nations, and to determine where vulnerabilities in food security might arise if maize availability was decreased due to factors such as diversion to nonfood uses, climatic factors, or plant diseases. Using data on imports and exports from the U.N. Commodity Trade Statistics Database for each year from 2000 to 2009 inclusive, we summarized statistics on volumes of maize trade between pairs of nations for 217 nations. There is evidence of market segregation among clusters of nations; with three prominent clusters representing Europe, Brazil and Argentina, and the United States. The United States is by far the largest exporter of maize worldwide, whereas Japan and the Republic of Korea are the largest maize importers. In particular, the star-shaped cluster of the network that represents U.S. maize trade to other nations indicates the potential for food security risks because of the lack of trade these other nations conduct with other maize exporters. If a scenario arose in which U.S. maize could not be exported in as large quantities, maize supplies in many nations could be jeopardized. We discuss this in the context of recent maize ethanol production and its attendant impacts on food prices elsewhere worldwide.

  3. Health-care reforms in the People's Republic of China--strategies and social implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, V C; Chiu, S W

    1998-01-01

    Analyses the features, strategies and characteristics of health-care reforms in the People's Republic of China. Since the 14th Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party held in 1992, an emphasis has been placed on reform strategies such as cost recovery, profit making, diversification of services, and development of alternative financing strategies in respect of health-care services provided in the public sector. Argues that the reform strategies employed have created new problems before solving the old ones. Inflation of medical cost has been elevated very rapidly. The de-linkage of state finance bureau and health service providers has also contributed to the transfer of tension from the state to the enterprises. There is no sign that quasi-public health-care insurance is able to resolve these problems. Finally, cooperative medicine in the rural areas has been largely dismantled, though this direction is going against the will of the state. Argues that a new balance of responsibility has to be developed as a top social priority between the state, enterprises and service users in China in order to meet the health-care needs of the people.

  4. The Coordination of Independently-Owned Vacuum Tube Patents in the Early Radio Alleged Patent “Thicket”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John; Ron D, Katznelson

    and entrepreneurial exploitation of patents on early vacuum tube technology where Fleming’s diode patent was alleged to have ”overlapped” with De Forest’s triode patents. We show, by means of the relevant historical record, patent claims, litigation records and other relevant law, how patent rights were resolved......It has been proposed that difficulties in negotiating cross-licenses under multiple, independently-owned and ”overlapping” patents may lead entrepreneurs to hold-up or deter development of technology covered by such patents. The literature alleges these features were present in radio development...... during 1905-1920, with numerous allegations of an impasse in bargaining the necessary patent rights for development. This paper seeks to determine with new precision how entrepreneurs and managers actually managed patent rights in this scenario. Accordingly, we re-examine the legal trajectories...

  5. A Typology of Indigenous Engagement in Australian Environmental Management: Implications for Knowledge Integration and Social-ecological System Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Hill

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous peoples now engage with many decentralized approaches to environmental management that offer opportunities for integration of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge (IEK and western science to promote cultural diversity in the management of social-ecological system sustainability. Nevertheless, processes of combining IEK with western science are diverse and affected by numerous factors, including the adaptive co-management context, the intrinsic characteristics of the natural resources, and the governance systems. We present a typology of Indigenous engagement in environmental management, derived through comparative analysis of 21 Australian case studies, and consider its implications for the integration of IEK with western science. Sociological and rational choice institutionalism underpin our analytical framework, which differentiates on three axes: (1 power sharing, incorporating decision making, rules definition, resource values and property rights; (2 participation, incorporating participatory processes, organizations engaged, and coordination approaches; (3 intercultural purpose, incorporating purposes of environmental management, Indigenous engagement, Indigenous development and capacity building. Our typology groups engagement into four types: Indigenous governed collaborations; Indigenous-driven co-governance; agency-driven co-governance; and agency governance. From our analysis of manifestations of knowledge integration across the types, we argue that Indigenous governance and Indigenous-driven co-governance provides better prospects for integration of IEK and western science for sustainability of social-ecological systems. Supporting Indigenous governance without, or with only a limited requirement for power sharing with other agencies sustains the distinct Indigenous cultural purposes underpinning IEK, and benefits knowledge integration. We conclude by advocating that the typology be applied to test its general effectiveness in

  6. Anthropogenic changes to the tidal channel network, sediment rerouting, and social implications in southwest Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Sams, S.; Small, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tidal channel network in southwest Bangladesh has been undergoing major adjustment in response to anthropogenic modification over the past few decades. Densely inhabited, agricultural islands that have been embanked to protect against inundation by tides, river flooding, and storm surges (i.e., polders) preclude tidal exchange and sedimentation. Studies reveal this results in elevation deficits relative to mean high water, endangering local communities when embankment failures occur (e.g., during storms, lateral channel erosion). In addition, many studies suggest that the decrease in tidal prism and associated change in hydrodynamics from poldering causes shoaling in remaining tidal channels, which can cause a disruption in transportation. The widespread closure and conversion of tidal channel areas to profitable shrimp aquaculture is also prevalent in this region. In this study, we quantify the direct closure of tidal channels due to poldering and shrimp aquaculture using historical Landsat and Google Earth imagery, and analyze the morphologic adjustment of the tidal channel network due to these perturbations. In the natural Sundarbans mangrove forest, the tidal channel network has remained relatively constant since the 1970s. In contrast, construction of polders removed >1000 km of primary tidal creeks and >90 km2 has been reclaimed outside of polders through infilling and closure of formerly-active, higher order conduit channels now used for shrimp aquaculture. Field validation confirm tidal restriction by large sluice gates is prevalent, favoring local channel siltation at rates up to 20cm/yr. With the impoundment of primary creeks and closure of 30-60% of conduit channels in the study area, an estimated 1,400 x 106 m3 of water has been removed from the tidal prism and potentially redirected within remaining channels. This has significant implications for tidal amplification in this region. Further, we estimate that 12.3 x 106 MT of sediment annually

  7. Investigation of Socially Responsible Investment Markets (SRI Using Dynamic Conditional Correlation (DCC Method: Implications for Diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudeo Anand Tularam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Over the last ten years there has been a phenomenal growth in the amount of funds placed in SRI globally estimated to be around US$6.5 trillion while around US$55 billion in the Australian market. Accurate knowledge of correlation of the Australian SRI market with other SRI markets overseas is crucially important for Australian (SRI investors for international portfolio diversification since portfolio diversification theory posits that the lower (higher the correlation between markets, the higher (lower the gains to be made. The study examines the relationship of the Australian SRI market with fourteen other markets-Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and the United States. Approach: The relationships of the Australian Socially Responsible Investment (SRI market with other SRI markets worldwide during the period 1994-2009 are examined based on the dynamic conditional correlation multivariate GARCH model (DCCMVGarch. In the DCC method, the multivariate conditional variance estimation is simplified by estimating univariate GARCH models for each market. Using the transformed residuals resulting from the first stage, the authors can estimate a conditional correlation estimator. The standard errors for the first stage parameters remain while the standard errors for the correlation parameters are modified. Results: Our results showed that the Australian market experienced a surge in correlation with all other markets during the global financial crisis. During the period of study, the correlation of Australia with Canada, Denmark, Norway and the United Kingdom increased over time while its correlation with other countries remained stationary. This implies that the Australian SRI market is becoming more integrated with those of Canada, Denmark, Norway and the United Kingdom. Therefore, these overseas markets provide less

  8. The Role of Social Novelty in Risk Seeking and Exploratory Behavior: Implications for Addictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Mitchell

    Full Text Available Novelty preference or sensation seeking is associated with disorders of addiction and predicts rodent compulsive drug use and adolescent binge drinking in humans. Novelty has also been shown to influence choice in the context of uncertainty and reward processing. Here we introduce a novel or familiar neutral face stimuli and investigate its influence on risk-taking choices in healthy volunteers. We focus on behavioural outcomes and imaging correlates to the prime that might predict risk seeking. We hypothesized that subjects would be more risk seeking following a novel relative to familiar stimulus. We adapted a risk-taking task involving acceptance or rejection of a 50:50 choice of gain or loss that was preceded by a familiar (pre-test familiarization or novel face prime. Neutral expression faces of males and females were used as primes. Twenty-four subjects were first tested behaviourally and then 18 scanned using a different variant of the same task under functional MRI. We show enhanced risk taking to both gain and loss anticipation following novel relative to familiar images and particularly for the low gain condition. Greater risk taking behaviour and self-reported exploratory behaviours was predicted by greater right ventral putaminal activity to novel versus familiar contexts. Social novelty appears to have a contextually enhancing effect on augmenting risky choices possibly mediated via ventral putaminal dopaminergic activity. Our findings link the observation that novelty preference and sensation seeking are important traits predicting the initiation and maintenance of risky behaviours, including substance and behavioural addictions.

  9. Biomedical scientists' perceptions of ethical and social implications: is there a role for research ethics consultation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer B McCormick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Research ethics consultation programs are being established with a goal of addressing the ethical, societal, and policy considerations associated with biomedical research. A number of these programs are modelled after clinical ethics consultation services that began to be institutionalized in the 1980s. Our objective was to determine biomedical science researchers' perceived need for and utility of research ethics consultation, through examination of their perceptions of whether they and their institutions faced ethical, social or policy issues (outside those mandated by regulation and examination of willingness to seek advice in addressing these issues. We conducted telephone interviews and focus groups in 2006 with researchers from Stanford University and a mailed survey in December 2006 to 7 research universities in the U.S. FINDINGS: A total of 16 researchers were interviewed (75% response rate, 29 participated in focus groups, and 856 responded to the survey (50% response rate. Approximately half of researchers surveyed (51% reported that they would find a research ethics consultation service at their institution moderately, very or extremely useful, while over a third (36% reported that such a service would be useful to them personally. Respondents conducting human subjects research were more likely to find such a service very to extremely useful to them personally than respondents not conducting human subjects research (20% vs 10%; chi(2 p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that biomedical researchers do encounter and anticipate encountering ethical and societal questions and concerns and a substantial proportion, especially clinical researchers, would likely use a consultation service if they were aware of it. These findings provide data to inform the development of such consultation programs in general.

  10. [The economic and social implications of the decline in fertility in Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecaillon, J

    1994-01-01

    The rhythm and extent of fertility decline in Europe varies with the country. Fewer marriages, later marriages, more divorces, and increased contraceptive use are responsible for the fertility decline. Children are no longer perceived as an investment in the future but, more and more, as a means of personal satisfaction, a means to assure comfort in one's own existence. Socioeconomic effects of demographic aging include economic inflexibility and generational conflicts. The family is very beneficial and must be integrated by all persons wanting a realistic economy. The family is the first economic reality (i.e., society's smallest unit). It brings human resources to economic life. Parental activity has economic value. When it is a question of implementing concrete family policy measures, the argument of too high costs arises. So one is content with good proclaimed intentions. Few persons ask: Does the existence of families or of large families influence economic activity? Demographic balance would justify increased aid for the minority of large families, which would liberate couples not wanting children. This balance and good performance of economies are needed to put families as a top priority. Ethical, spiritual, or philosophical aspects have a great importance and must not be neglected. It is useful to be familiar with the point of view of economists reaching clarity, precision, and completeness as regards to all that is seen elsewhere. The disappearance of large families risks being detrimental to economic dynamics and a source of social tensions, of which it would be equally necessary to estimate costs. The problems of suburbs comes immediately to mind. But more deeply, does this disappearance not reveal an absence of all future visions? Economic analysis is at a crossroads. One must promote ethical economics, which means that it is not necessary to be satisfied with good management.

  11. Testing a social cognitive theory-based model of indoor tanning: implications for skin cancer prevention messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Myrick, Jessica Gall; Zeitany, Alexandra; Kelley, Dannielle; Morales-Pico, Brenda; Thomas, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a theory-based understanding of indoor tanning is a major impediment to the development of effective messages to prevent or reduce this behavior. This study applied the Comprehensive Indoor Tanning Expectations (CITE) scale in an analysis of indoor tanning behavior among sorority women (total N = 775). Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that CITE positive and negative expectations were robust, multidimensional factors and that a hierarchical structure fit the data well. Social cognitive theory-based structural equation models demonstrated that appearance-oriented variables were significantly associated with outcome expectations. Outcome expectations were, in turn, significantly associated with temptations to tan, intention to tan indoors, and indoor tanning behavior. The implications of these findings for the development of messages to prevent and reduce indoor tanning behavior are discussed in two domains: (a) messages that attempt to change broader societal perceptions about tan skin, and (b) messages that focus more narrowly on indoor tanning-challenging positive expectations, enhancing negative expectations, and encouraging substitution of sunless tanning products.

  12. Social networks: a new source of psychological stress or a way to enhance self-esteem? Negative and positive implications in bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, G; Cecchi, L; Liccardi, G; Pellegrino, F; D'Amato, M; Sofia, M

    2012-01-01

    The Internet and, in particular, social networks are an increasingly important part of daily life for both adolescents and adults who maintain a virtual relationship with others sharing interests and goals. Very often, they disclose more about themselves online than they do in person. However, cyberbullying and cyberostracism can be problematic for adolescents and sensitive individuals, who might be negatively affected by social networks. Some studies have shown an increased risk of depression, whereas others suggest beneficial effects through enhanced communication, social connection, and self-esteem. Bronchial asthma is an increasingly frequent disease in the industrialized world, and psychological implications play a role in increasing or in reducing its severity. One year after the case report of an asthma exacerbation that may have been triggered by Facebook, it seems reasonable to analyze the effects of social networks on bronchial asthma.

  13. Dimensions of population policy in India: the psycho-social implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, A; Mouli, A S

    1978-01-01

    attracted in-migrants. India's efforts to delay the age at marriage either through law or persuasion have been futile as most of the young girls are neither in school nor gainfully employed. Laws governing inheritance should provide equal status for daughters whereby the preference to sons would undergo a change. Recently, India took a step in this direction by providing daughters with a share of their ancestral property, but this law gained little momentum in a society where daughters are deprived of any right over their ancestral or parental property. It appears that only a fraction of Indian women would welcome the provision of equal rights because nearly 80% of Indian women live in villages, which do not encourage a departure from the expected traditional role. When formulating population policy, attention should be given to its feasibility in the given social context.

  14. Failures of foreseeability: Risk management considerations in reducing allegations of sexual violence in psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banja, John D

    2017-01-01

    This article begins with a brief discussion of findings on causal factors leading to allegations of sexual violence in health care facilities and then offers the author's account of 4 such cases that he reviewed, 3 of which occurred in psychiatric units. These cases show remarkably similar variables, especially involving decisions to allow male and female patients to commingle, the inadequate physical layout of the units, poor or absent video surveillance, and staff unacquainted with institutional policies on patient safety or refusing to enforce relevant rules. These variables arguably amount to "failures of foreseeability" that reasonably cautious health care personnel should recognize as facilitating or enabling sexual violence. As such, the proactive message of this article for health care risk management urges critical and robust attention paid to a unit's environmental/physical design as well as to performance factors among personnel so as to prevent sexual attacks and diminish the probability of malpractice actions.

  15. Evaluation of Defense Hotline Allegations at the Defense Contract Audit Agency Santa Barbara Suboffice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-08

    No. DODIG-2015-005 O C T O B E R 8 , 2 0 1 4 Evaluation of Defense Hotline Allegations at the Defense Contract Audit Agency Santa Barbara...inside back cover. I N T E G R I T Y  E F F I C I E N C Y  A C C O U N T A B I L I T Y  E X C E L L E N C E dodig.mil/ hotline |800.424.9098... HOTLINE Department of Defense F r a u d , W a s t e & A b u s e FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY DODIG-2015-005 (Project No. D2009

  16. Custody evaluators' beliefs about domestic violence allegations during divorce: feminist and family violence perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselschwerdt, Megan L; Hardesty, Jennifer L; Hans, Jason D

    2011-05-01

    Approximately, 20% of divorcing couples in the United States require judicial intervention to reach a custody agreement. In such cases, courts often call on child custody evaluators to conduct comprehensive evaluations and recommend custody agreements and services that meet children's best interests. Estimates suggest that allegations of domestic violence (DV) are raised and substantiated in about 75% of these cases. Custody evaluators are thus in a position to ensure that divorcing parents with DV receive effective services and enter into safe custody agreements. They are also in a position to minimize or deny the seriousness of DV and its relevance to custody decisions. The present study uses grounded theory methods to examine how custody evaluators' theoretical perspectives on DV and beliefs about custody disputes in the context of DV are related to their evaluation process and recommendations.

  17. The Coordination of Independently-Owned Vacuum Tube Patents in the Alleged Early Radio Patent Thicket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John; Ron D, Katznelson

    present in radio development, 1905-1920, with numerous allegations of an impasse in bargaining the necessary patent rights for legal development. This paper seeks to determine with new precision how entrepreneurs and managers actually managed patent rights in this scenario. Accordingly, this paper re......-examines the legal trajectories and entrepreneurial exploitation of these patents with a focus on vacuum tube technology where Fleming’s diode patent ‘overlapped’ with earlier prior art and, dependent on court decisions, with later commercial implementations of De Forest’s triode patents. We show, by means...... of the relevant historical record, patent claims, litigation records and other relevant law, how the ‘overlapping’ patent rights were resolved by the courts and by the immunity of suppliers to the Government from patent infringement liability. We trace the cross-licensing agreements between the different radio...

  18. Alleged Detrimental Mutations in the SMPD1 Gene in Patients with Niemann-Pick Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosima Rhein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 gene are associated with decreased catalytic activity of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM and are the cause of the autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease (NPD types A and B. Currently, >100 missense mutations in SMPD1 are listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database. However, not every sequence variation in SMPD1 is detrimental and gives rise to NPD. We have analysed several alleged SMPD1 missense mutations mentioned in a recent publication and found them to be common variants of SMPD1 that give rise to normal in vivo and in vitro ASM activity. (Comment on Manshadi et al. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 6668–6676.

  19. An empirical study of self-efficacy and social support in diabetes self-management: implications for home healthcare nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Caralise W; Grant, Joan S; Pritchard, David A

    2012-04-01

    This pilot study was conducted to evaluate relationships among self-efficacy, social support, social problem solving, and diabetes self-management in people living with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Self-efficacy, social support, and social problem solving were significantly correlated with diabetes self-management. These relationships indicate the importance of including interventions to promote self-efficacy, social support, and social problem solving in diabetes self-management programs.

  20. social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Falero Cirigliano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo parte de considerar al neoliberalismo y su cristalización en América Latina como un patrón de poder regional, esto es, un formato específico de acumulación dentro de la reproducción polarizante centro-periferia. Desde este ángulo, se aborda la expansión y naturalización de prácticas sociales mercantilizadas a partir de dos ejes: el de la construcción ideológica y su relación con la política económica, y el de la subjetividad social. Finalmente, se examinan dos escenarios potenciales en la coyuntura actual: el de un neoliberalismo con "rostro humano" o, alternativamente, el de ampliación de grietas sociales hacia la conformación de otro patrón de poder.

  1. 30 CFR 291.102 - May I call the MMS Hotline to informally resolve an allegation that open and nondiscriminatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I call the MMS Hotline to informally... Hotline to informally resolve an allegation that open and nondiscriminatory access was denied? Before... and nondiscriminatory access by calling the toll-free MMS Hotline at 1-888-232-1713. (a) MMS...

  2. 18 CFR 2.300 - Statement of policy concerning allegations of fraud, abuse, or similar grounds under section 601...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statement of policy concerning allegations of fraud, abuse, or similar grounds under section 601(c) of the NGPA. 2.300 Section 2.300 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  3. Base Rates, Multiple Indicators, and Comprehensive Forensic Evaluations: Why Sexualized Behavior Still Counts in Assessments of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Mark D.; Faller, Kathleen Coulborn

    2012-01-01

    Developmentally inappropriate sexual behavior has long been viewed as a possible indicator of child sexual abuse. In recent years, however, the utility of sexualized behavior in forensic assessments of alleged child sexual abuse has been seriously challenged. This article addresses a number of the concerns that have been raised about the…

  4. Report of the South Texas Project Allegations Review Team. Docket Nos. 50-498 and 50-499, Houston Lighting and Power Company et al.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokajko, L.; Skay, D.; Wang, H.; Murphy, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report provides the results of the South Texas Project Allegations Review Team of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This team was formed to obtain and review allegations from individuals represented by three attorneys who had contacted Congressional staff members. The allegers were employed in various capacities at South Texas Project Electric Generating Station, licensed by Houston Lighting and Power Company, et al.; therefore, the allegations are confined to this site. The South Texas Project Allegations Review Team reviewed, referred, and dispositioned concerns related to discriminatory issues (harassment and intimidation), falsification of records and omission of information, and various technical issues. The team was able to substantiate certain technical issues of minor safety significance or regulatory concern at the South Texas Project facility, but it did not find widespread discriminatory practices such as harassment and intimidation.

  5. Are Social-Cognitive Ability and Narrative Writing Skill Related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Brant R.; Rowan, Katherine E.

    1985-01-01

    Reports findings of one study that reanalyzed research data allegedly demonstrating a substantial relationship between social cognitive ability and narrative writing skill, and another that collected original data. Reveals no relationship between social cognitive ability and rated quality of narrative essays. Discusses finding in terms of a…

  6. Shirley Jackson’s Literary Discourse and the Allegation of Feminism as Socio-Cultural Subversion in Mid-Twentieth Century America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vargas Cohen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Shirley Jackson (1916-1965 managed to combine the dual role of being a woman and a writer in mid-twentieth century American society. This article seeks to unravel some of the intricacies behind this brittle balance. Despite and/or because of her condition as mother and professional her literary achievements as a chronicler of the “Age of Anxiety” were laudable and therefore worthy of further investigation. To better understand the historical experience of professional women in that context, a review of post-war US, especially regarding gender roles, ensues not only as historical background but as methodological hotbed for literary analysis. Ms. Jackson’s literary practice helped raise the charges of feminism against her under the allegation of cultural subversion and social sedition. Finally, the question of whether she was indeed a feminist is debated taking intoconsideration her literary discourse, particularly the representations of female characters as discerningly portrayed in her fictional works, correlated to her social and historical milieu.

  7. The predictive value of measures of social cognition for community functioning in schizophrenia : Implications for neuropsychological assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenborg, G. H. M.; Withaar, F. K.; Evans, J. J.; van den Bosch, R. J.; Timmerman, M. E.; Brouwer, W. H.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the unique contribution of social cognition to the prediction of community functioning and to explore the relevance of social cognition for clinical practice. Forty-six schizophrenia patients and 53 healthy controls were assessed with tests of social cognit

  8. On the definition and identifiability of the alleged "hiatus" in global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowsky, Stephan; Risbey, James S; Oreskes, Naomi

    2015-11-24

    Recent public debate and the scientific literature have frequently cited a "pause" or "hiatus" in global warming. Yet, multiple sources of evidence show that climate change continues unabated, raising questions about the status of the "hiatus". To examine whether the notion of a "hiatus" is justified by the available data, we first document that there are multiple definitions of the "hiatus" in the literature, with its presumed onset spanning a decade. For each of these definitions we compare the associated temperature trend against trends of equivalent length in the entire record of modern global warming. The analysis shows that the "hiatus" trends are encompassed within the overall distribution of observed trends. We next assess the magnitude and significance of all possible trends up to 25 years duration looking backwards from each year over the past 30 years. At every year during the past 30 years, the immediately preceding warming trend was always significant when 17 years (or more) were included in the calculation, alleged "hiatus" periods notwithstanding. If current definitions of the "pause" used in the literature are applied to the historical record, then the climate system "paused" for more than 1/3 of the period during which temperatures rose 0.6 K.

  9. Research records and the resolution of misconduct allegations at research universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kenneth; Schreier, Alan; Griffin, Angel; Resnik, David

    2007-01-01

    Accurate record keeping is an important part of the responsible conduct of research. However, there is very little empirical research on scientific record keeping. No one knows the incidence of serious problems with research records, the types of problems that occur, nor their consequences. In this study, we examined the role of research records in the resolution of misconduct allegations as a useful barometer for the incidence and types of problems that occur with records. We interviewed Research Integrity Officers (RIOs) at 90 major research universities and conducted focus groups with active research faculty. RIOs reported problems with research records in 38% of the 553 investigations they conducted. Severe problems with research records often prevented completion of investigations while problems that are more typical lengthened them by 2 to 3 weeks. Five types of poor record keeping practices accounted for 75 % of the problems with incomplete/inadequate records being the most common (30%). The focus groups concurred with the findings from the interviews with RIOs, stressed the importance of the research group leader in setting and maintaining record practices, and offered additional insights. While university officials and faculty members have suspected for many years that there are serious problems with research record keeping, our study provides empirical evidence for this belief. By documenting some of the problems with record keeping in university-based research, the results of our study provide information that will be useful for policy development at academic institutions.

  10. 杜威社會控制主張的教育涵義 John Dewey’s Thoughts on Social Control and its Implications for Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    單文經 Wen-Jing Shan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 在全球化變遷日劇的時代, 教育社會學界似較關注新右派( New Right)教育改革所引發的社會公平問題,對於這些變遷可能蘊含的社會控制(social control)議題,則較少人探討。本研究乃以曾在教育語境中討論此一議題的杜威(John Dewey, 1895-1952)為對象,以其著作及有關的研究文獻為據,探討其社會控制的主張及所蘊含的教育意義。本研究在說明杜威主張社會控制係社會力量的適切運用、闡釋其所主張的教育旨在助人轉化社會控制為自制,並以其與社會控制有關的概念為依託,反思其主張的教育涵義後,於結論中提出兩項建議:一、吾人應廣義看待控制及社會控制的意義,以便理解杜威社會控制主張的教育涵義;二、吾人應以其所提倡之廣義社會控制主張為基礎的真實教育,補救新右派偏重經濟速效造成的虛假教育之失。最後,本研究並指出四個未來可進一步探討的方向。 In the context of the dramatic changes taking place in the era of globalization, issues of social justice arising from reforms initiated by the New Right movement have been much discussed by sociologists; issues of social control, however, have received much less attention. In this paper, John Dewey’s thoughts on social control and their implications for education are investigated by reviewing his writings and related literature. The paper is divided into six sections. After discussing Dewey’s view of social control as the appropriate use of social power, explaining his argument that the goal of education is to direct individuals to transform social control into self control, and reflecting on the educational implications of his arguments related to his concept of social control, two suggestions are made in the final section. They are, firstly, that we should adopt a broad conception of the meanings of control and social

  11. Social network recruitment for Yo Puedo: an innovative sexual health intervention in an underserved urban neighborhood—sample and design implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, Alexandra M; vanDommelen-Gonzalez, Evan; Luecke, Ellen; Cheng, Helen; Dow, William; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Padian, Nancy S

    2015-02-01

    Most existing evidence-based sexual health interventions focus on individual-level behavior, even though there is substantial evidence that highlights the influential role of social environments in shaping adolescents' behaviors and reproductive health outcomes. We developed Yo Puedo, a combined conditional cash transfer and life skills intervention for youth to promote educational attainment, job training, and reproductive health wellness that we then evaluated for feasibility among 162 youth aged 16-21 years in a predominantly Latino community in San Francisco, CA. The intervention targeted youth's social networks and involved recruitment and randomization of small social network clusters. In this paper we describe the design of the feasibility study and report participants' baseline characteristics. Furthermore, we examined the sample and design implications of recruiting social network clusters as the unit of randomization. Baseline data provide evidence that we successfully enrolled high risk youth using a social network recruitment approach in community and school-based settings. Nearly all participants (95%) were high risk for adverse educational and reproductive health outcomes based on multiple measures of low socioeconomic status (81%) and/or reported high risk behaviors (e.g., gang affiliation, past pregnancy, recent unprotected sex, frequent substance use; 62%). We achieved variability in the study sample through heterogeneity in recruitment of the index participants, whereas the individuals within the small social networks of close friends demonstrated substantial homogeneity across sociodemographic and risk profile characteristics. Social networks recruitment was feasible and yielded a sample of high risk youth willing to enroll in a randomized study to evaluate a novel sexual health intervention.

  12. Terrorists and Fair Trial: The Right to a Fair Trial for Alleged Terrorists Detained in Guantánamo Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Ambos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper inquires into whether the right to a fair trial can be restricted with regard to alleged terrorists within the framework of the ‘war on terror’. After briefly identifying the relevant sources of this right and its content, possible restrictions are analysed. The paper elaborates, in particular, on international humanitarian law, such as the Third and Fourth Geneva Convention, and international human rights law, such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man. It further deals with US constitutional law. We conclude that the right to a fair trial fully applies to alleged terrorists irrespective of the context of their detention (armed conflict or peace or the qualification of these terrorists (de facto or unlawful combatants and thus amounts to a general principle of transnational criminal law.

  13. The New World of Human Genetics: A dialogue between Practitioners & the General Public on Ethical, Legal & Social Implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, Amy

    2014-12-08

    The history and reasons for launching the Human Genome project and the current uses of genetic human material; Identifying and discussing the major issues stemming directly from genetic research and therapy-including genetic discrimination, medical/ person privacy, allocation of government resources and individual finances, and the effect on the way in which we perceive the value of human life; Discussing the sometimes hidden ethical, social and legislative implications of genetic research and therapy such as informed consent, screening and preservation of genetic materials, efficacy of medical procedures, the role of the government, and equal access to medical coverage.

  14. Forensic Interviews for Child Sexual Abuse Allegations: An Investigation into the Effects of Animal-Assisted Intervention on Stress Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Gulick, Elsie E

    2015-01-01

    The use of therapy animals during forensic interviews for child sexual abuse allegations is a recommendation by the Therapy Animals Supporting Kids Program to help ease children's discomfort during the forensic interview process. Based on this recommendation, this study incorporated a certified therapy canine into the forensic interview process for child sexual abuse allegations. This study investigated changes in salivary cortisol, immunoglobulin A, blood pressure, and heart rate as a result of forensic interview phenomenon (e.g., outcry) incorporating animal-assisted intervention versus a control condition in children (N = 42) interviewed for alleged child sexual abuse. The results supported significantly greater heart rate values for the control group (n = 23) who experienced sexual contact and/or indecency than the experience of aggravated sexual assault compared to no difference in HR for the intervention group (n = 19). The results suggest that the presence of the canine in the forensic interview may have acted as a buffer or safeguard for the children when disclosing details of sexual abuse. In the intervention group, children's HR was lower at the start of the forensic interview compared to the control group. Finding an effect of having a certified handler-canine team available during the forensic interview on physiological measures of stress has real-world value for children, child welfare personnel, and clinical therapists. It is suggested that animal-assisted intervention be expanded to children facing other types of trauma and to treatment programs for child survivors of sexual abuse.

  15. Relieving Burnout and the "Martyr Syndrome" among Social Justice Education Activists: The Implications and Effects of Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Activist burnout, which causes activists to disengage from their activism, is a formidable barrier to the sustainability of social justice movements, including those focused on social justice in educational contexts. However, the cultures of these movements often disregard the importance of self-care, seeing it as self-indulgence, putting…

  16. Plurality and Fragmentation in Social Work: Analyzing the Implications of Flexner Using a Philosophy of Science Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Shane R.; Moxley, David

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine how the profession's adaptation to Flexner's criteria influences the emergence of the neomedical model as the majoritarian paradigm within social work even in the face of a pluralism manifest by the existence of other competing paradigms. One endorses empowerment in social work, and the other embraces societal transformation in…

  17. The Use of Social Marketing to Influence the Development of Problem Gambling in the UK: Implications for Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jane E.; Tapp, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the authors present and debate the theoretical case for the use of social marketing to help reduce problem gambling in the public health context of the UK. Is triangulated between the key theories and principles of social marketing, the key literature and its theoretical application to the debate about reducing problem gambling in…

  18. Changing Aging Competency Following a GeroRich Intervention Initiative: Implications for Bachelor's and Master's Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Theresa A.; Nelson-Becker, Holly; Chapin, Rosemary K.; Landry, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of a GeroRich effort to increase age-specific content throughout bachelor and master-level social work curricula. A total of 426 students (128 BSWs and 298 MSWs) completed pre and posttests in 2004-2005, self-rating their aging competency using the Social Work with Aging Skill Competency Scale II (New York…

  19. Hegemonic transitions and global shifts in social metabolism: Implications for resource-rich countries. Introduction to the special section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muradian Sarache, R.P.; Walter, M.; Martinez-Alier, J.

    2012-01-01

    This introductory paper to the special section of Global Environmental Change entitled "Global transformations, social metabolism and the dynamics of socio-environmental conflicts" argues that the emergence of new global economic centers is inducing a major expansion in the global social metabolism

  20. Sex-specific relationships among attachment security, social values, and sensation seeking in early adolescence: implications for adolescents' externalizing problem behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarracino, Diego; Presaghi, Fabio; Degni, Silvia; Innamorati, Marco

    2011-06-01

    In early adolescence, attachment security reflects not only the quality of ongoing relationships with parents, but also how adolescents process social relationships with "others" - that is, their "social value orientation" - with possible implications for adolescents' risk-taking. In this study, a sample of Italian early adolescents were administered self-report measures in order to examine the relationships (a) between early adolescents' perceived attachment security to mothers and fathers, social values (related to family and the socio-cultural context), and sensation seeking (as a temperamental predisposition to risk-taking), and (b) between these variables and adolescents' externalizing problem behaviour. Adolescents were more securely attached to the same-sexed parent. Further, attachment security with the opposite-sexed parent predicted more conservative social value orientations, and lower levels of problem behaviour. In contrast, sensation seeking predicted self-enhancement and openness-to-change values to a greater extent, and, in girls, lower levels of attachment security to mothers and fathers.

  1. The Social Environment and Childbearing Expectations: Implications for Strength-Based Sexual Health Interventions for Latino Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanDommelen-Gonzalez, Evan; Deardorff, Julianna; Herd, Denise; Minnis, Alexandra M

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, adolescent childbearing is disproportionately higher among Latino youth, a growing population facing substantial social exclusion. Exploring the relationship between the social environment and sexual health outcomes among Latino youth may offer insights into the development of novel interventions. In this study, Latino youth in partnerships were recruited from neighborhood venues in San Francisco and completed in-depth interviews. Youth reported a desire to complete higher education goals prior to starting a family to improve future opportunities and further personal development. Youth stated that social network members, family and partners, were supportive of their individual childbearing expectations. Social environment barriers tied to poverty, immigration status, and gang violence hindered educational attainment. Some differences were noted by gender and immigrant generation. Building on protective social ties and creating avenues in poor, urban neighborhoods for Latino youth to fully access educational opportunities may counter early childbearing and improve sexual health.

  2. IMPLICACIONES, ALCANCES Y LÍMITES DE LA ACCIÓN SOCIAL DE LAS EMPRESAS PYMES - IMPLICATIONS, SCOPE AND LIMITS OF THE ENTERPRISES’ PYMES SOCIAL ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN ALICIA ALGARÍN BLANCO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn the Small and Medium Enterprises (PYME, the issue of social responsibility is new and unclear. This fact does not allow us to visualize it as a factor for competitiveness and sustainability; therefore, it causes fear and rejection, demanding reorganization in its current management model. To provide tools that promote a social responsible action into the PYME Enterprises, there is a program posed as a strategy in order to strengthen human talent management, the area responsible for sustainable human development, therefore, a basicaspect of corporate social responsibility. A training program was carried out, articulating theoretical and practical elements that would encourage a self participative diagnosis, as well as making managers aware of this need; after a change of perception and a process of opening, trust and respect towards it.ResumenEn la Pequeña y Mediana Empresa (PYME, el tema de la responsabilidad social es incipiente y poco claro. Esto impide visualizarlo como factor de competitividad y sostenibilidad, y genera temor y resistencia, pues en últimas exige replantear su actual modelo de gestión. Con el fin de proporcionar herramientas que promuevan la acción social responsable al interior de estas empresas, se planteó como estrategia un programa encaminado a fortalecer la gestión deltalento humano, área responsable del desarrollo humano sostenible y, por tanto, un aspecto básico de la responsabilidad social empresarial. Concretamente, se ejecutó un programa de capacitación articulando elementos teórico-prácticos que estimularan un autodiagnósticoparticipativo y que, además, sensibilizara a un grupo de pequeños empresarios frente al tema, en pos de un cambio de percepción y un proceso de apertura, confianza y respeto hacia el mismo.

  3. Positive Social Interactions in a Lifespan Perspective with a focus on Opioidergic and Oxytocinergic systems: Implications for Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonnello, Valentina; Petrocchi, Nicola; Farinelli, Marina; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2016-08-16

    In recent years, a growing interest has emerged in the beneficial effects of positive social interactions on health. The present work aims to review animal and human studies linking social interactions and health throughout the lifespan, with a focus on current knowledge of the possible mediating role of opioids and oxytocin. During the prenatal period, a positive social environment contributes to regulating maternal stress response and protecting the fetus from exposure to maternal active glucocorticoids. Throughout development, positive social contact with the caregiver acts as a "hidden regulator" and promotes infant neuro affective development. Postnatal social neuro protection interventions involving caregiver-infant physical contact seem to be crucial important for rescuing preterm infants at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Attachment figures and friendships in adulthood continue to have a protective role for health and brain functioning, counteracting brain aging. In humans, implementation of meditative practices that promote compassionate motivation and prosocial behavior appears beneficial for health in adolescents and adults. Human and animal studies suggest the oxytocinergic and opioidergic systems are important mediators of the effects of positive social interactions. However, most of the studies focus on a specific phase of life (i.e., adulthood). Future studies should focus on the role of opioids and oxytocin in positive social interactions adopting a lifespan perspective.

  4. 78 FR 6168 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... (including English language ability), religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or in retaliation..., national origin (including English language ability), religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability... discrimination based on their race, color, national origin (including English language ability), religion,...

  5. Marketing meets Web 2.0, social media, and creative consumers:Implications for international marketing strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Berthon, Pierre; Pitt, Leyland; Plangger, Kirk; Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The 21st century has brought both opportunities and challenges in our global, boundaryless world. Importantly, managers face a dynamic and intercon- nected international environment. As such, 21st century managers need to consider the many opportunities and threats that Web 2.0, social media, and creative con- sumers present and the resulting respective shifts in loci of activity, power, and value. To help managers understand this new dispensation, we propose five axioms: (1) social media are...

  6. An Overview of ICT Integration in Nigerian Colleges of Education and the Implications on Social Studies Pre-Service Teacher Training Programme: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sani Alhaji Garba

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of digital technology in society has made ICT literacy a basic requirement needed by all to survive the challenge of living in the 21st. The education industry is now faced with the challenge of helping learners to acquire this literacy. Coping with this challenge requires breeding teachers’ with high level of proficiency in ICT literacy and competence. This study investigates the readiness of Nigerian Colleges of Education toward breeding social studies teachers with ICT literacy and competence. It is an exploratory conceptual study that is literature-based (document-based qualitative study approach. The study therefore explore literature to find out the benefit of ICT integration in social studies teacher education; the preparedness of Nigerian Colleges of Education for ICT integration; and the implications of the current state of technology integration on social studies objectives. Findings from this study indicated that, Colleges of education in Nigeria are not readily prepared for effective technology integration; much is still needed in terms of infrastructure and manpower development.

  7. At the intersection of culture and religion: a cultural analysis of religion's implications for secondary control and social affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Joni Y; Kim, Heejung S

    2011-08-01

    Religion helps people maintain a sense of control, particularly secondary control-acceptance of and adjustment to difficult situations--and contributes to strengthening social relationships in a religious community. However, little is known about how culture may influence these effects. The current research examined the interaction of culture and religion on secondary control and social affiliation, comparing people from individualistic cultures (e.g., European Americans), who tend to be more motivated toward personal agency, and people from collectivistic cultures (e.g., East Asians), who tend to be more motivated to maintain social relationships. In Study 1, an analysis of online church mission statements showed that U.S. websites contained more themes of secondary control than did Korean websites, whereas Korean websites contained more themes of social affiliation than did U.S. websites. Study 2 showed that experimental priming of religion led to acts of secondary control for European Americans but not Asian Americans. Using daily diary methodology, Study 3 showed that religious coping predicted more secondary control for European Americans but not Koreans, and religious coping predicted more social affiliation for Koreans and European Americans. These findings suggest the importance of understanding sociocultural moderators for the effects of religion.

  8. Longitudinal relationships among internalization of the media ideal, peer social comparison, and body dissatisfaction: implications for the tripartite influence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; McLean, Siân A; Paxton, Susan J

    2015-05-01

    Sociocultural theory of body dissatisfaction posits that internalization of the media ideal and appearance comparison are predictors of body dissatisfaction, a key risk factor for eating disorders. However, no data exist regarding the longitudinal relationships between these variables. The aim of this study was to explore longitudinal relationships among internalization of the media-ideal, social appearance comparison, and body dissatisfaction. A sample of 277 Grade 7 school girls (M age = 12.77 years, SD = 0.44) completed measures of internalization of the media ideal, social appearance comparison, and body dissatisfaction at baseline, 8 months, and 14 months. Path analyses indicated that baseline internalization of the media ideal predicted social appearance comparison and body dissatisfaction at 8 months, and social appearance comparison at 8 months predicted body dissatisfaction at 14 months. A reciprocal effect emerged with body dissatisfaction at 8 months predicting internalization of the media ideal at 14 months. The findings inform sociocultural theory of body dissatisfaction, suggesting that internalization of the media ideal precedes and predicts appearance comparison and that body image interventions that target internalization of the media ideal, and social appearance comparison as well as body dissatisfaction are likely to be effective.

  9. Implications of social media use on health information technology engagement: Data from HINTS 4 cycle 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Devlon N; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Coa, Kisha I; Oh, April; Hesse, Bradford

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the association between Internet/social media use and health information technology (HIT) engagement. This study examines patterns of social media use and HIT engagement in the U.S.A. using data from the 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 3,164). Specifically, predictors of two HIT activities (i.e., communicating with a healthcare provider using the Internet or email and tracking personal health information electronically) are examined. Persons who were females, higher education, non-Hispanic others, having a regular healthcare provider, and ages 35-44 were more likely to participate in HIT activities. After controlling for sociodemographics and health correlates, social media use was significantly associated with HIT engagement. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to systematically examine the use and relationships across multiple types of health-related online media.

  10. Mingling, observing, and lingering: everyday public spaces and their implications for well-being and social relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Vicky; Dines, Nick; Gesler, Wil; Curtis, Sarah

    2008-09-01

    The rejuvenation of public spaces is a key policy concern in the UK. Drawing on a wide literature and on qualitative research located in a multi-ethnic area of East London, this paper explores their relationship to well-being and social relations. It demonstrates that ordinary spaces are a significant resource for both individuals and communities. The beneficial properties of public spaces are not reducible to natural or aesthetic criteria, however. Social interaction in spaces can provide relief from daily routines, sustenance for people's sense of community, opportunities for sustaining bonding ties or making bridges, and can influence tolerance and raise people's spirits. They also possess subjective meanings that accumulate over time and can contribute to meeting diverse needs. Different users of public spaces attain a sense of well- being for different reasons: the paper calls for policy approaches in which the social and therapeutic properties of a range of everyday spaces are more widely recognised and nurtured.

  11. Ukraine and the International Criminal Court: Implications of the Ad Hoc Jurisdiction Acceptance and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchuk, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    during the 2014 Maydan protests (Declaration I) and the alleged war crimes committed in eastern Ukraine and Crimea (Declaration II). It provides an in-depth analysis of constitutional law issues linked to the acceptance of the jurisdiction by Ukraine and discusses its possible implications...

  12. Exploring Different Perspectives of Social Pedagogy: Towards a Complex and Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Some characterizations describe social pedagogy as a broad, complex, ambiguous and problematic concept that applies to very different things. This is due to the simplicity of the tools used to approach such a complex area. A change of perspective to interpret social pedagogy as a hybrid and complex subject may transform the alleged deficiencies…

  13. Social Media and Big Data – Cracks in the Crystal Ball?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Westera, W. (2013, 14 October). Social Media and Big Data – Cracks in the Crystal Ball? Invited e-paper at ESOMAR RW Connect. http://rwconnect.esomar.org/using-social-media-for-market-analysis-cracks-in-the-alleged-crystal-ball/

  14. Mapping social values for urban green spaces using Public Participation GIS: the influence of spatial scale and implications for landscape planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Measuring social values for landscapes is an emerging field of research and is critical to the successful management of urban ecosystems. Green open space planning has traditionally relied on rigid standards and metrics without considering the physical requirements of green spaces that are valued for different reasons and by different people. Relating social landscape values to key environmental variables provides a much stronger evidence base for planning landscapes that are both socially desirable and environmentally sustainable. This study spatially quantified residents' values for green space in the Lower Hunter Valley of New South Wales, Australia by enabling participants to mark their values for specific open spaces on interactive paper maps. The survey instrument was designed to evaluate the effect of spatial scale by providing maps of residents' local area at both suburb and municipality scales. The importance of open space values differed depending on whether they were indicated via marker dots or reported on in a general aspatial sense. This suggests that certain open space functions were inadequately provided for in the local area (specifically, cultural significance and health/therapeutic value). Additionally, all value types recorded a greater abundance of marker dots at the finer (suburb) scale compared to the coarser (municipality) scale, but this pattern was more pronounced for some values than others (e.g. physical exercise value). Finally, significant relationships were observed between the abundance of value marker dots in parks and their environmental characteristics (e.g. percentage of vegetation). These results have interesting implications when considering the compatibility between different functions of green spaces and how planners can incorporate information about social values with more traditional approaches to green space planning.

  15. Impaired Neurocognitive Functions Affect Social Learning Processes in Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder: Implications for Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthys, W.C.H.J.; Vanderschuren, L.J.M.J.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Lochman, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, a conceptualization of oppositional defiant (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) is presented according to which social learning processes in these disorders are affected by neurocognitive dysfunctions. Neurobiological studies in ODD and CD suggest that the ability to make associations be

  16. Impaired Neurocognitive Functions Affect Social Learning Processes in Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder: Implications for Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthys, Walter; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.; Schutter, Dennis J. L. G.; Lochman, John E.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, a conceptualization of oppositional defiant (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) is presented according to which social learning processes in these disorders are affected by neurocognitive dysfunctions. Neurobiological studies in ODD and CD suggest that the ability to make associations between behaviors and negative and positive…

  17. Does Emotional Intelligence Depend on Gender? The Socialization of Emotional Competencies in Men and Women and Its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Nunez, M. Trinidad; Fernandez-Berrocal, Pablo; Montanes, Juan; Latorre, Jose Miguel

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to justify gender differences found for the main factors that comprise emotional intelligence from the standpoint of the Mayer and Salovey Skill Model (1997). In order to do so, we carry out a review of the different emotional socialization patterns used by parents on the basis of their children's gender and look into their…

  18. Sexual response of male Drosophila to honey bee queen mandibular pheromone: implications for genetic studies of social insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Justin R; Liu, Tom; Camiletti, Alison L; Simon, Anne F; Thompson, Graham J

    2017-02-01

    Honey bees secrete a queen mandibular pheromone that renders workers reproductively altruistic and drones sexually attentive. This sex-specific function of QMP may have evolved from a sexually dimorphic signaling mechanism derived from pre-social ancestors. If so, there is potential for pre-social insects to respond to QMP, and in a manner that is comparable to its normal effect on workers and drones. Remarkably, QMP applied to female Drosophila does induce worker-like qualities [Camiletti et al. (Entomol Exp Appl 147:262, 2013)], and we here extend this comparison to examine the effects of bee pheromone on male fruit flies. We find that male Drosophila melanogaster consistently orient towards a source of queen pheromone in a T-maze, suggesting a recruitment response comparable to the pheromone's normal effect on drones. Moreover, exposure to QMP renders male flies more sexually attentive; they display intensified pre-copulatory behavior towards conspecific females. We can inhibit this sexual effect through a loss-of-olfactory-function mutation, which suggests that the pheromone-responsive behavioral mechanism is olfactory-driven. These pheromone-induced changes to male Drosophila behavior suggest that aspects of sexual signaling are conserved between these two distantly related taxa. Our results highlight a role for Drosophila as a genetically tractable pre-social model for studies of social insect biology.

  19. Perceptions of Risk and Sex-Specific Social Norms in Explaining Alcohol Consumption among College Students: Implications for Campus Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Todd F.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to expand the assessment of two explanatory models of drinking behavior--perceptions of risk and social norms--and determine their relationship to dimensions of alcohol involvement in a multivariate evaluation. The Alcohol and Drug Survey was administered to a sample (N = 235) of college students from a university in the…

  20. The Nexus of Reading, Writing and Researching in the Doctoral Undertaking of Humanities and Social Sciences: Implications for Literature Reviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Becky S.C.

    2008-01-01

    One indispensable task in the doctoral undertaking in the humanities and social sciences is that of reviewing the literature. To many graduate students, finding the "right" direction of reviewing is a particularly grueling experience, a practical concern seldom addressed in thesis manuals and studies of the doctoral thesis. This paper is an…

  1. Implications of Overweight Onset and Persistence for Social and Behavioral Development between Kindergarten Entry and Third Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Sara; Krull, Jennifer L.; Chang, Yiting

    2009-01-01

    The current study examines the social and behavioral development of school-age children with different histories of overweight onset. Eight thousand children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) participated. Three groups of children were identified for analysis: (1) those who were persistently overweight from…

  2. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-01-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to…

  3. Suicide Terrorism in America?: The Complex Social Conditions of This Phenomenon and the Implications for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-05

    AND ABBREVIATIONS CPOST Chicago Project on Security and Terrorism LTTE Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam PKK Kurdistan Workers’ Party SIT Social... Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK-Partiy Karkeren Kurdistan ) in order to understand whether there is a universal or location-dependent explanation for

  4. Audience Perception of Hate Speech and Foul Language in the Social Media in Nigeria: Implications for Morality and Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terfa T. Alakali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the phenomenon of hate speech and foul language on social media platforms in Nigeria, and assessed their moral and legal consequences in the society and to journalism practice. It used both quantitative and qualitative methodology to investigate the phenomenon. In the first place, the paper employed the survey research methodology to sample 384 respondents using questionnaire and focus group discussion as instruments for data collection. Findings from the research indicate that promoting hate speech and foul language on social media have moral and legal consequences in the society and to journalism practice. Findings also show that although, the respondents understand that hate speech and foul language attract legal consequences, they do not know what obligations are created by law against perpetrators of hate speech and foul language in Nigeria. The paper therefore, adopted the qualitative, doctrinal and analytical methodology to discuss the legal consequences and obligations created against perpetrators of hate speech and foul language in Nigeria. The paper concluded based on the findings that hate speech and foul language is prevalent on social media platforms in Nigeria and that there are adequate legal provisions to curb the phenomenon in Nigeria. It recommends among others things that the Nigerian government and NGOs should sponsor monitoring projects like the UMATI in Kenya to better understand the use of hate speech and that monitoring agencies set up under the legal regime should adopt mechanisms to identify and remove hate speech content on social media platforms in Nigeria.

  5. Use of Peer Tutoring, Cooperative Learning, and Collaborative Learning: Implications for Reducing Anti-Social Behavior of Schooling Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskay, M.; Onu, V. C.; Obiyo, N.; Obidoa, M.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the use of peer tutoring, cooperative learning, and collaborative learning as strategies to reduce anti-social behavior among schooling adolescents. The study is a descriptive survey study. The area of study was Nsukka education zone in Enugu State of Nigeria. The sample of the study was 200 teachers randomly sampled from…

  6. Social Skills Interventions for Students with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism: Research Findings and Implications for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Christopher B.

    2007-01-01

    More than a decade ago, Asperger syndrome (AS) was added to the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-4th Edition" (DSM-IV) (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1994). Although there is much debate over the differentiation between high-functioning autism (HFA) and AS, social skills deficits are a hallmark of both disorders (Klin, 2000). These…

  7. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands--stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, R. de; Brakel, W.H. Van; Vries, H.J. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  8. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands - stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, R.; van Brakel, W.H.; de Vries, H.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  9. A review of social sustainability considerations among EU-approved voluntary schemes for biofuels, with implications for rural livelihoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    German, L.A.; Schoneveld, G.C.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid expansion of biofuel production and consumption has raised concerns over the social and environmental sustainability of biofuel feedstock production, processing and trade. The European Union (EU) has thus balanced its commitment to biofuels as one option for meeting its renewable energy ta

  10. Gender differences in material, psychological, and social domains of the income gradient in mortality: implications for policy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Muennig

    Full Text Available We set out to examine the material, psychological, and sociological pathways mediating the income gradient in health and mortality. We used the 2008 General Social Survey-National Death Index dataset (N = 26,870, which contains three decades of social survey data in the US linked to thirty years of mortality follow-up. We grouped a large number of variables into 3 domains: material, psychological, and sociological using factor analysis. We then employed discrete-time hazard models to examine the extent to which these three domains mediated the income-mortality association among men and women. Overall, the gradient was weaker for females than for males. While psychological and material factors explained mortality hazards among females, hazards among males were explained only by social capital. Poor health significantly predicted both income and mortality, particularly among females, suggesting a strong role for reverse causation. We also find that many traditional associations between income and mortality are absent in this dataset, such as perceived social status.

  11. Rôle central de l’Ocytocine dans la neurophysiologie de la personnalité sociale : interaction avec la sérotonine et implication dans la pathologie de l’autisme

    OpenAIRE

    Mottolese, Raphaëlle

    2013-01-01

    Interacting with others is crucial for human fitness. In the past decade, there has been a growing interest for oxytocin (OXT) and its implication in social behavior. In the first section of this work we show that peripheral and central concentrations of OXT are correlated. Peripheral and central OXT are also correlated with subjects’ extraversion and with the volume of amygdala and hippocampus, two brain regions important for the regulation of social behavior. Interestingly, we show that OXT...

  12. Social implications of the Human Genome Project: Policy roundtable series and journals. Final progress report, March 15, 2001 - March 15, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiguer, Erica

    2002-12-30

    This report reflects the activities of the Harvard Health Caucus at Harvard Medical School that were supported, in part, by the Department of Energy. The following policy roundtables and panels were held: Spring 2001 Policy Roundtable Series: The social implications of the Human Genome Project; Spring 2002 Policy Roundtable Series: Managing globalization to improve health; 13 February 2002 Keynote Address: The globalization of health; 25 February 2002 Healthier or Wealthier: Which comes first in the new global era?; 28 February 2002 The crisis of neglected diseases: Creating R&D incentives for diseases of developing countries; 7 March 2002 Health care education in the developing world: Bridging global and local health care practices; 20 March 2002 Building a legal framework for global health: How can the US and UN work to reduce global disparities?; 25 April 2002 The role of mass media and tobacco control efforts. Caucus organizational information is also included.

  13. Biological mercury measurements before and after administration of a chelator (DMPS) and subjective symptoms allegedly due to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurs, A; Exterkate, R; ten Cate, J M; ten Cate, B

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore multivariately the relationship between subjective symptoms allegedly due to amalgam and mercury measurements before and after administration of a chelator. Of 120 participants, the mercury concentrations in urine (U-Hg) and plasma (P-Hg) before and after a chelating agent or placebo were determined as were the numbers of fillings and symptoms allegedly due to subjective symptoms. The dental status was charted. Blood was analysed on 13 parameters. The analysis revealed neither the parameters in blood nor the subjective symptoms to be associated with a dimension dominated by 'mercury indicators'. The final analysis was therefore performed with 'number of subjective symptoms' and enabled to distinguish two subsamples. One subsample was characterised by > 2 subjective "symptoms", highest scores for U-Hg, P-Hg and filled surfaces, and chewing gum for > 1 h a day. The other subsample comprised the subjects with few filled surfaces and low U-Hg and P-Hg, but was not characterised by "no subjective symptoms". The chelator was considered neither to invalidate nor to improve these findings and was concluded not to be helpful in diagnosing "symptoms". The chelator caused side effects in 42% of the subjects and the placebo in 27%. A relationship between amalgam fillings and subjective symptoms could not be shown. Therefore, the mere fact of knowing to have amalgam fillings was assumed to be the reason why subjective symptoms were attributed to amalgam and side effects were ascribed to the treatment.

  14. Intelligence, previous convictions and interrogative suggestibility: a path analysis of alleged false-confession cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, R; Gudjonsson, G H

    1993-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between interrogative suggestibility and previous convictions among 108 defendants in criminal trials, using a path analysis technique. It was hypothesized that previous convictions, which may provide defendants with interrogative experiences, would correlate negatively with 'shift' as measured by the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale (Gudjonsson, 1984a), after intelligence and memory had been controlled for. The hypothesis was partially confirmed and the theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  15. Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sayama, Hiroki; Yammarino, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Collective, especially group-based, managerial decision making is crucial in organizations. Using an evolutionary theory approach to collective decision making, agent-based simulations were conducted to investigate how collective decision making would be affected by the agents' diversity in problem understanding and/or behavior in discussion, as well as by their social network structure. Simulation results indicated that groups with consistent problem understanding tended to produce higher utility values of ideas and displayed better decision convergence, but only if there was no group-level bias in collective problem understanding. Simulation results also indicated the importance of balance between selection-oriented (i.e., exploitative) and variation-oriented (i.e., explorative) behaviors in discussion to achieve quality final decisions. Expanding the group size and introducing non-trivial social network structure generally improved the quality of ideas at the cost of decision convergence. Simulations with ...

  16. End-of-Life Issues in the United States after Terri Schiavo: Implications for Social Work Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrel Montero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The very public death of Terri Schiavo in 2005 alerted Americans to what is a growing ethical, medical, and social crisis: the status of end-of-life issues and decisions in the United States. Currently, Oregon is the only state to give terminally ill patients the right to end their lives, with physicians’ help, if they so choose. Public opinion data from 1977 to the present show that Americans support greater rights for individuals facing end-of-life decisions--up to and including physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. This paper considers the status of end-of-life issues in the United States after Terri Schiavo’s death and examines the opportunities for advocacy by social workers who serve clients and families encountering this complex and controversial issue.

  17. Molecular variation in AVP and AVPR1a in New World monkeys (Primates, Platyrrhini: evolution and implications for social monogamy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongren Ren

    Full Text Available The neurohypophysial hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP plays important roles in fluid regulation and vascular resistance. Differences in AVP receptor expression, particularly mediated through variation in the noncoding promoter region of the primary receptor for AVP (AVPR1a, may play a role in social phenotypes, particularly social monogamy, in rodents and humans. Among primates, social monogamy is rare, but is common among New World monkeys (NWM. AVP is a nonapeptide and generally conserved among eutherian mammals, although a recent paper demonstrated that some NWM species possess a novel form of the related neuropeptide hormone, oxytocin. We therefore characterized variation in the AVP and AVPR1a genes in 22 species representing every genus in the three major platyrrhine families (Cebidae, Atelidae and Pitheciidae. For AVP, a total of 16 synonymous substitutions were detected in 15 NWM species. No non-synonymous substitutions were noted, hence, AVP is conserved in NWM. By contrast, relative to the human AVPR1a, 66 predicted amino acids (AA substitutions were identified in NWM. The AVPR1a N-terminus (ligand binding domain, third intracellular (G-protein binding domain, and C-terminus were variable among species. Complex evolution of AVPR1a is also apparent in NWM. A molecular phylogenetic tree inferred from AVPR1a coding sequences revealed some consensus taxonomic separation by families, but also a mixed group composed of genera from all three families. The overall dN/dS ratio of AVPR1a was 0.11, but signals of positive selection in distinct AVPR1a regions were observed, including the N-terminus, in which we identified six potential positive selection sites. AA substitutions at positions 241, 319, 399 and 409 occurred uniquely in marmosets and tamarins. Our results enhance the appreciation of genetic diversity in the mammalian AVP/AVPR1a system, and set the stage for molecular modeling of the neurohypophyseal hormones and social behavior in

  18. Tropical forest monitoring, combining satellite and social data, to inform management and livelihood implications: Case studies from Indonesian West Timor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rohan

    2012-06-01

    Deforestation in the world's tropics is an urgent international issue. One response has been the development of satellite based monitoring initiatives largely focused on the carbon rich forests of western Indonesia. In contrast this study focuses on one eastern Indonesian district, Kabupaten Kupang, which has some of the largest and least studied tracts of remaining forest in West Timor. A combination of remote sensing, GIS and social science methods were used to describe the state of forests in Kabupaten Kupang, how and why they are changing. Using satellite imagery, case studies and on-ground interviews, this study explores the proposition that transdisciplinary local social, cultural and biophysical knowledge is important for effectively using remotely sensed data as a tool to inform local management policies. When compared to some other parts of Indonesia, the rate and extent of deforestation in West Timor was found to be relatively small and a satellite based assessment alone could conclude that it is not a critical issue. However this study showed that when on-ground social data are coupled with (such) satellite-based data a more complex picture emerges, related to key livelihood issues. The causes of forest cover change were found to be multivariate and location specific, requiring management approaches tailored to local social issues. This study suggests that integrative research can maximise the utility of satellite data for understanding causation and thus informing management strategies. In addition, the satellite based assessment found that at the time of the study less than 4% of forested land was within national parks and nature reserves and less than a third of the protected catchment forest zone was forested. These data suggest considerable scope for upland re-forestation activities or the redrawing of protected forest boundaries.

  19. The role of research in higher education: implications and challenges for an active future contribution to human and social development

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Mankind is on the brink of a tragic era, in which the anarchic forces of the market and the incessant pressures upon natural resources on the verge of exhaustion will push sovereign states to increasingly dangerous rivalries. What will the role of research in higher education be, in response to the challenge of an active future contribution to human and social development? A good balance must be reached in the basic functions of research in order to avoid governance risks. While focusing on...

  20. Psychological and social aspects of infertility in men:an overview of the evidence and implications for psychologically informed clinical care and future research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jane RW Fisher; Karin Hammarberg

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the psychosocial aspects of infertility and infertility treatment focuses more often on women than men.The aim of this review was to synthesize the English-language evidence related to the psychological and social aspects of infertility in men and discuss the implications of these reports for clinical care and future research.A structured search identified 73 studies that reported data concerning the desire for fatherhood and the psychological and social aspects of diagnosis,assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and unsuccessful treatment among men with fertility difficulties.The studies are diverse in conceptualisation,design,setting and data collection,but the findings were reasonably consistent.These studies indicated that fertile and infertile childless men of reproductive age have desires to experience parenthood that are similar to those of their female counterparts; in addition,diagnosis and initiation of treatment are associated with elevated infertility-specific anxiety,and unsuccessful treatment can lead to a state of lasting sadness.However,rates of clinically significant mental health problems among this patient population are no higher than in the general population.Infertile men who are socially isolated,have an avoidant coping style and appraise stressful events as overwhelming,are more vulnerable to severe anxiety than men without these characteristics.Men prefer oral to written treatment information and prefer to receive emotional support from infertility clinicians rather than from mental health professionals,self-help support groups or friends.Nevertheless,structured,facilitated psycho-educational groups that are didactic but permit informal sharing of experiences might be beneficial.There are gaps in knowledge about factors governing seeking,persisting with and deciding to cease treatment; experiences of invasive procedures; parenting after assisted conception; adoption and infertility-related grief and shame among

  1. Nursing assistant beliefs about their roles and nursing home residents: implications for nursing home social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gawon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine beliefs and assumptions held by nursing assistants working in nursing homes using a qualitative approach. Unchallenged notions about residents and the roles held by nursing assistants influence their way of interacting with residents, which inevitably influences quality of care in nursing homes. When nursing assistants have an opportunity to be heard and mentored by social workers, they can address and resolve the dilemma of providing informal care as a formal caregiver by discussing what is acceptable and appropriate in nursing home care.

  2. Quality of life of Ethiopian women after fistula repair: implications on rehabilitation and social reintegration policy and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Kyla; Oliveras, Elizabeth; Tilahun, Yewondwossen; Belachew, Mehari; Asnake, Mengistu

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing recognition of the importance of linking obstetric fistula prevention and treatment strategies with rehabilitation and social reintegration programmes, little research and programming has been oriented toward this goal. Using in-depth interviews, this study aimed to examine the experiences of 51 Ethiopian women after fistula repair surgery to identify priority post-repair interventions that could maximise their quality of life. The results showed that the majority of women felt a dramatic sensation of relief and happiness following repair, yet some continued to experience mental anguish, stigma, and physical problems regardless of the outcome of the procedure. All women suffered intense fear of developing another fistula, most commonly from sex or childbirth. Despite this, the majority of women had sex or planned to do so, while a smaller cohort avoided intercourse and childbearing, thus subjecting them to isolation, marital conflict, and/or economic vulnerability. Our findings suggest that obstetric fistula programmes should integrate (1) post-repair counselling about fistula and risk factors for recurrence, (2) community-based follow-up care, (3) linkages to income-generating opportunities, (4) engagement of women affected by fistula for community outreach, and (5) metrics for evaluating rehabilitation and social reintegration efforts to ensure women regain healthy, productive lives.

  3. Social behavior and the superorganism: Implications for disease and stability in complex animal societies and Colony Collapse Disorder in Honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolo Caldararo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sociability, mass response to threat, food production and food sharing and an adaptable communication system are a suite of traits involved in the evolution of complex society in animals. Cycles of interaction characterize members of such societies and those of species in association that can affect disease structure in time and virulence. Colony Collapse Disorder (in North America, Honey Bee Depopulation Syndrome, or HBDS elsewhere shows similarity to a number of mass behavioural responses in other social animals, especially in ants. A number of questions regarding the cause of CCD continues to make progress in fighting the disease difficult. Here information is provided that may result in an isolation of factors to identify the syndrome of effects that lead to the disease, based on studies of disease avoidance and illness behaviour in other animal species. Most of the work to date to discover a cause has focused on a direct relationship between a pathogen or parasite or environmental condition and the Disorder. Dysfunctional mass behaviour is even seen in humans, as during the Black Plague. Disease avoidance is an important survival tactic for many animals and if the mechanism is modified by a pathogen or toxin unusual outcomes may result. In complex animal societies the opportunity for other forms of disruption of social life are numerous.

  4. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of Ox1r-/- mice showed implication of orexin receptor-1 in mood, anxiety and social behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Golam Abbas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B, which are exclusively produced by neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, play an important role in the regulation of a wide range of behaviors and homeostatic processes, including regulation of sleep/wakefulness states and energy homeostasis. The orexin system has close anatomical and functional relationships with systems that regulate the autonomic nervous system, emotion, mood, the reward system and sleep/wakefulness states. Recent pharmacological studies using selective antagonists have suggested that orexin receptor-1 (OX1R is involved in physiological processes that regulate emotion, the reward system and autonomic nervous system. Here, we examined Ox1r-/- mice with a comprehensive behavioral test battery to screen additional OX1R functions. Ox1r-/- mice showed increased anxiety-like behavior, altered depression-like behavior, slightly decreased spontaneous locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, increased startle response and decreased prepulse inhibition. These results suggest that OX1R plays roles in social behaviour and sensory motor gating in addition to roles in mood and anxiety.

  5. Critical Discourse Analysis: Hegemony of the Social Media Twitter About National Issues in Indonesia and its Implications to the Discourse Analysis Subject in Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvi Susanti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research is linked with Twitter, as one of social media services on the Internet that are extremely popular in the world, including in Indonesia. This research is important because Twitter is effective in quickly and accurately delivering messages. In fact, everyone can act as a 'reporter' and form quick opinions through this social media. This research is aimed to investigate the emergence of the roots of hegemony based on text analysis that is linked with representation, relation, identity, and transformation of national issues that become trending topics on Twitter. Moreover, the research is to discuss the social media's discourse practice that influences media workers in producing news, and to see how it implicates the research on the study of discourse analysis. By using the Fairclough theory, especially on text analysis that is linked with representation, relation, and identity, the researcher attempts to explore how the roots of hegemony emerge in the national issues that become trending topics on Twitter. The researcher also offers a new function to complete the approach of Fairclough in text analysis on social media: transformation – which is an attempt to see the change in roles of news participants and amateur readers as 'reporters' and participate in forming opinions. Abstrak Penelitian ini berhubungan dengan twitter, sebagai salah satu media sosial di internet yang sangat populer di dunia, termasuk di indonesia. Penelitian ini penting karena twitter efektif dalam menyampaikan pesan dengan cepat dan akurat. Faktanya, semua orang dapat bertindak sebagai "reporter" dan membuat opini yang cepat melalui sosial media tersebut. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menyelidiki kemunculan dari akar hagemoni berdasarkan analisis teks yang berhubungan dengan representasi, hubungan, identitas, dan transformasi isu-isu nasional yang menjadi topik yang sedang tren di twitter. Selain itu, penelitian ini juga untuk mendiskusikan praktik

  6. A Review of HIV Prevention Studies that Use Social Networking Sites: Implications for Recruitment, Health Promotion Campaigns, and Efficacy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jamal; Salazar, Laura F

    2016-11-01

    This review describes the use of social networking sites (SNS) in the context of primary prevention of HIV. A review was conducted to assess the published literature for HIV interventions using SNS. Sixteen articles describing twelve interventions were included. SNS were instrumental in recruiting hard-to-reach populations within a short amount of time; were able to reach wide audiences beyond the targeted population for HIV prevention campaigns; and helped to significantly reduce sexual risk behaviors and increase HIV testing. SNS are a viable option to recruit hidden populations, engage the target audience, and disseminate HIV prevention messages. Researchers should use SNS to generate sampling frames that can be used to select participants. Practitioners should use SNS to post images of preventive behavior within health promotion campaigns. Researchers should use multiple SNS platforms to engage participants. As more studies are published using SNS for HIV prevention, meta-analyses will be needed.

  7. Dengue vector dynamics (Aedes aegypti influenced by climate and social factors in Ecuador: implications for targeted control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Stewart Ibarra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011, conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in

  8. Dengue Vector Dynamics (Aedes aegypti) Influenced by Climate and Social Factors in Ecuador: Implications for Targeted Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart Ibarra, Anna M.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Beltrán, Efrain; Mejía, Raúl; Silva, Mercy; Muñoz, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti) population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. Methods/Principal findings We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011), conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. Conclusions These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in Spanish. PMID:24324542

  9. Some issues regarding regulatory policy, political participation, and social implications of geothermal resource development in the Imperial Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.S.; Steinberger, M.F.

    1976-02-01

    The early stages of geothermal resource development in the Imperial Valley have been characterized by an emphasis on the technological expertise of private developers and government officials. Government officials have created a complex array of Federal, state and county regulations to monitor the development. Local control is under the jurisdiction of the Imperial County government. The County has as its responsibility the protection of the general welfare of its residents, including any potentially adverse social, economic, or environmental impacts caused by geothermal resource development. Private developers and government officials are interested in the resources as a source of water desalination and electric power generation. An assessment of the interests and concerns of the public was made early in the development stage. In view of all these interests, it is essential in a democratic society that the various interests be identified so government can be representative of, and responsive to, those interests. Therefore, the four issues discussed in the paper are: (1) regulatory problems faced by local government officials in determining the course of development; (2) the social and political context in which the development is taking place; (3) the potential of geothermal development as perceived by community leaders and local government officials; and (4) the desirability of expanding citizen participation in geothermal decision-makingduring a period in which, as public opinion polls indicated, many citizens feel separated from government actions which may significantly affect their lives. Recommendations for regulations of geothermal resources and recommendations for improving public input into geothermal regulation are summarized in depth. (MCW)

  10. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the extan

  11. The Coordination of Independently-Owned Vacuum Tube Patents in the Early Radio Alleged Patent ‘Thicket’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John; Katznelson, RD

    present in radio development, 1905-1920, with numerous allegations of an impasse in bargaining the necessary patent rights for legal development. This paper seeks to determine with new precision how entrepreneurs and managers actually managed patent rights in this scenario. Accordingly, this paper re......-examines the legal trajectories and entrepreneurial exploitation of these patents with a focus on vacuum tube technology where Fleming’s diode patent ‘overlapped’ with earlier prior art and, dependent on court decisions, with later commercial implementations of De Forest’s triode patents. We show, by means...... of the relevant historical record, patent claims, litigation records and other relevant law, how the ‘overlapping’ patent rights were resolved by the courts and by the immunity of suppliers to the Government from patent infringement liability. We trace the cross-licensing agreements between the different radio...

  12. A review of literature on drug use in Sub-Saharan Africa countries and its economic and social implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affinnih, Y H

    1999-02-01

    The drug problem in Africa cannot be seen as an isolated phenomenon but rather as part of the larger narcoscape which partakes of the fluid yet disjunctive qualities of Appadurai's landscapes. In this volatile environment, the transformation of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) nations from transit points in an international drug network to consumer countries seems inevitable. At the same time, Africa has undergone rapid economic and social changes that have facilitate this shift. A review of the literature reveals that there is a pressing need to investigate current trends and patterns of drug use in the countries of SSA. These nations, struggling with the consequences of AIDS, famine, refugees, and political unrest, could ill afford to address the consequences of widespread drug use. It is critical, therefore, that they address the drug problem before it reaches crisis proportions. To do so, they need information describing the magnitude of the problem as well as a firm understanding of the relationships between drug use and crime, unemployment, violence, and the breakdown of family life. The more that is known about the nature and complexity of drug use in Africa, the better policymakers can formulate a sound and effective strategy to curtail the drug "epidemic."

  13. The Long-Term Health Implications of Marital Disruption: Divorce, Work Limits, and Social Security Disability Benefits Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Kenneth A; Tamborini, Christopher R; Reznik, Gayle L

    2015-10-01

    We provide new evidence on the long-term impact of divorce on work disability among U.S. men. Using data from the 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation linked to U.S. Social Security Administration records, we assess the relationship between divorce and subsequent self-reports of work limitations and the receipt of federal disability benefits. The examination of self-reports and administrative records of medically qualified benefits provides dual confirmation of key relationships. We compare men who experienced a marital dissolution between 1975 and 1984 with continuously married men for 20 years following divorce using fixed-effects and propensity score matching models, and choose a sample to help control for selection into divorce. On average, we find that divorce is not associated with an increased probability of self-reported work limitations or receipt of disability benefits over the long run. However, among those who do not remarry, we do find that divorce increases men's long-term probability of both self-reported work limitations and federal disability benefit receipt. Lack of marital resources may drive this relationship. Alternative estimates that do not control for selection into divorce demonstrate that selection bias can substantially alter findings regarding the relationship between marital status changes and subsequent health.

  14. Micronutrient deficiencies in maternity and child health: a review of environmental and social context and implications for Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Natalie; Macpherson, Gordon; Hursthouse, Andrew S; Atkinson, John

    2009-04-01

    It is well documented that micronutrient malnutrition is of increasing concern in the developing world, resulting in poor health and high rates of mortality and morbidity. During pregnancy, deficiency of iron and zinc can produce cognitive and growth impairment of the foetus, which may continue into infancy. Iron and zinc are essential micronutrients for both plant growth and human nutrition. Despite significant work in the areas of soil fertility, crop biofortification and dietary interventions, the problems of micronutrient deficiencies persist in Africa. There is a need to examine why communities have not embraced intervention strategies which may offer health benefits. Bottom-up, interdisciplinary approaches are required to effectively study the relationships between local communities and their environment, and to assess the impact their behaviour has on the cycling of micronutrients within the soil-plant-human system. From a detailed consideration of diverse influencing factors, a methodological model is suggested for studying the barriers to improving micronutrient uptake within rural communities. It combines environmental understanding with health and social factors, emphasising the need for and potential benefits of understanding and coherence in true interdisciplinary working.

  15. Social context and drivers of intimate partner violence in rural Kenya: implications for the health of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Abigail M; Romito, Patrizia; Odero, Merab; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Onono, Maricianah; Turan, Janet M

    2013-01-01

    More than half of rural Kenyan women experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime. Beyond physical consequences, IPV indirectly worsens maternal health because pregnant women avoid antenatal care or HIV testing when they fear violent reprisal from partners. To develop an intervention to mitigate violence towards pregnant women, we conducted qualitative research in rural Kenya. Through eight focus group discussions, four with pregnant women and four with male partners, and in-depth interviews with service providers, we explored the social context of IPV using an ecological model. We found that women experienced physical and sexual IPV, but also economic violence such as forced exile from the marital home or losing material support. Relationship triggers of IPV included perceived sexual infidelity or transgressing gender norms. Women described hiding antenatal HIV testing from partners, as testing was perceived as a sign of infidelity. Extended families were sometimes supportive, but often encouraged silence to protect the family image. The broader community viewed IPV as an intractable, common issue, which seemed to normalise its use. These results resonate with global IPV research showing that factors beyond the individual - gender roles in intimate partnerships, family dynamics and community norms - shape high rates of violence.

  16. The organizational social context of mental health medicaid waiver programs with family support services: implications for research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisson, Charles; Williams, Nathaniel J; Green, Philip; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Peer family support specialists (FSS) are parents with practical experience in navigating children's mental health care systems who provide support, advocacy, and guidance to the families of children who need mental health services. Their experience and training differ from those of formally trained mental health clinicians, creating potential conflicts in priorities and values between FSS and clinicians. We hypothesized that these differences could negatively affect the organizational cultures and climates of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and mental health clinicians, and lower the job satisfaction and organizational commitment of FSS. The Organizational Social Context measure was administered on site to 209 FSS and clinicians in 21 mental health programs in New York State. The study compared the organizational-level culture and climate profiles of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and formally trained clinicians to national norms for child mental health clinics, assessed individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment as a function of job (FSS vs. clinician) and other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics, and tested whether FSS and clinicians job attitudes were differentially associated with organizational culture and climate. The programs organizational culture and climate profiles were not significantly different from national norms. Individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment were unrelated to position (FSS vs. clinician) or other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics except for culture and climate. Both FSS' and clinicians' individual-level work attitudes were associated similarly with organizational culture and climate.

  17. μ and κ opioid receptor distribution in the monogamous titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus): implications for social behavior and endocrine functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragen, B J; Freeman, S M; Laredo, S A; Mendoza, S P; Bales, K L

    2015-04-02

    The opioid system is involved in infant-mother bonds and adult-adult bonds in many species. We have previously shown that μ opioid receptors (MORs) and κ opioid receptors (KORs) are involved in regulating the adult attachment of the monogamous titi monkey. The present study sought to determine the distribution of MOR and KOR in the titi monkey brain using receptor autoradiography. We used [(3)H][D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) to label MORs and [(3)H]U69,593 to label KORs. MOR binding was heterogeneous throughout the titi monkey brain. Specifically, MOR binding was observed in the cingulate gyrus (CG), striatum, septal regions, diagonal band, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and thalamus. Binding was particularly dense in the septum, medial amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, mediodorsal thalamus with moderate binding in the nucleus accumbens. Consistent with other primate species, MOR were also observed in "neurochemically unique domains of the accumbens and putamen" (NUDAPs). In general KOR binding was more homogenous. KORs were primarily found in the CG, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus. Dense KOR binding was observed in the claustrum. Relative MOR and KOR binding in the titi monkey striatum was similar to other humans and primates, but was much lower compared to rodents. Relative MOR binding in the titi monkey hypothalamus was much greater than that found in rodents. This study was the first to examine MOR and KOR binding in a monogamous primate. The location of these receptors gives insight into where ligands may be acting to regulate social behavior and endocrine function.

  18. Monograph "IV Internet, Law and Politics Congress. Social Software and Web 2.0: Legal and Political Implications"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Padró-Solanet

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    L'impacte del Web 2.0 en els camps del dret i de la política ha estat el fil conductor que ha lligat sessions i ponències del IV Congrés d'IDP celebrat el passat mes de juny a la seu de la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya. La denominació Web 2.0 és una forma críptica d'indicar que Internet, en els darrers anys, ha sofert un canvi revolucionari. Les diferents versions del programari s'ordenen amb un número que només canvia quan es refà el programa, mentre que les millores parcials s'indiquen amb un número posterior a un punt decimal. Web 2.0 destaca que Internet ha fet un salt qualitatiu respecte a la Internet primitiva, el Web 1.0. Aquest canvi prové, no només de l'increment de la difusió de l'ús d'un nou mitjà de comunicació, Internet (aquest seria encara un canvi merament quantitatiu; sinó del desenvolupament d'aplicacions (blogs, wikis, Flickr, YouTube, Facebook, MySpace... que han abaratit els costos d'utilitzar la Xarxa de forma interactiva i creativa, han generat comunitats col·laboratives, i han permès que tant la producció com la difusió de continguts es trobin efectivament descentralitzats. Aquesta transformació està començant a afectar radicalment els entorns dels sistemes socials, econòmics i polítics.

  19. Populism vs. elitism: social consensus and social status as bases of attitude certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prislin, Radmila; Shaffer, Emily; Crowder, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of social consensus and social status on attitude certainty that is conceptualized multi-dimensionally as perceived clarity and correctness of one's attitude. In a mock opinion exchange about a social issue, participants were either supported (high consensus) or opposed (low consensus) by most of the confederates. They were informed that their opinion (high status) or their opponents' opinion (low status) had the alleged psychological significance indicative of future success. Post-experimental attitude clarity was significantly greater when attitudinal position was associated with high rather than low status. Attitude correctness was interactively affected by social status and social consensus. Supporting the compensatory effect hypothesis, attitude correctness was comparable across the levels of social consensus as long as they were associated with high status, and across the levels of social status as long as they were associated with high social consensus.

  20. A theoretical and practical critique of Social Facilitation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loriente Zamora, Cristóbal

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Social facilitation theory is one of the most paradigmatic examples of social psychology, understood as an experimental science. However, in this paper we intend to demonstrate that the research that allegedly supports it suffers from a number of defects. It uses biased population samples, and the tasks it sets its experimental subjects are limited to the practical or productive, ignoring the broader range of everyday activities such as conversing or, indeed, urinating. Social facilitation theory, far from being objective, is a microcosm of American social psychology ideology insofar as it ignores basic human functions, and fails to include stigmatized communities such as stutterers and people with bladder problems.

  1. Time representations in social science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvan

    2012-12-01

    Time has long been a major topic of study in social science, as in other sciences or in philosophy. Social scientists have tended to focus on collective representations of time, and on the ways in which these representations shape our everyday experiences. This contribution addresses work from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology and history. It focuses on several of the main theories that have preoccupied specialists in social science, such as the alleged "acceleration" of life and overgrowth of the present in contemporary Western societies, or the distinction between so-called linear and circular conceptions of time. The presentation of these theories is accompanied by some of the critiques they have provoked, in order to enable the reader to form her or his own opinion of them.

  2. Diagnosis of torture after 32 years: assessment of three alleged torture victims during the 1980 military coup in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unuvar, Umit; Ulas, Halis; Fincanci, Sebnem Korur

    2014-11-01

    Torture is a crime against humanity and it is frequently encountered in countries that have a history of military intervention such as Turkey. Torture still exists despite absolute prohibition by human rights and humanitarian law. More than 1 million people were tortured in Turkey since 1980 coup d'état. Documentation of medical evidence is a prominent step for prevention of torture. Manual on the Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Istanbul Protocol) provides international standards for medical documentation of torture. A holistic approach to trauma stories together with physical and psychological findings has been the main frame of the Protocol. The aim of this study is to discuss physicians' responsibility for prevention of torture, and to emphasize the importance of holistic approach to the assessment of particularly chronic patients. A team of two forensic medicine experts and a psychiatrist examined three male patients, who allegedly had been tortured severely during the 1980 military coup. The team arranged necessary referrals and diagnostic examinations. After conducting a comprehensive medical examination, some physical and psychological findings of trauma were observed and documented even after 32 years. The medico-legal evaluation and documentation of these cases many years after torture under the guidance of Istanbul Protocol were presented and significance of psychological assessment was especially emphasized. Furthermore, possible evidence of torture after a long period and physicians' responsibility for prevention of torture is discussed.

  3. Student Speech--The First Amendment and Qualified Immunity Under 42 U.S.C. Section 983: Conduct Implications for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araux, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the conduct implications of qualified immunity in allegations of deprivation of civil rights by public school administrators regarding the First Amendment-student speech. Methodology: Data were collected using the LexisNexis and JuriSearch online legal research systems, which…

  4. An evaluation of 'confirmatory' medical opinion given to English courts in 14 cases of alleged child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Mary

    2007-11-01

    Fourteen cases of alleged child sexual abuse, where the medical opinion rated a high degree of concordance with the history or suspicion of abuse given to the doctor, were reviewed to evaluate the objectivity and reliability of the medical evidence. It was common practice for physicians conducting the medical examination to form conclusions that the child had been sexually abused on the basis of the examiner's willingness to accept statements by the child, the adolescent, the caregiver or the investigator without determining if this information was accurate and obtained through the use of appropriate interviewing techniques. In the prepubertal children, evaluation of the examination findings revealed anatomical descriptions that were normal or non-specific, rather than supportive of abuse. In the teenagers, inadequate consideration was made of the behavioural and physical differences that occur with adolescence. The physical findings were not interpreted using research derived knowledge concerning the variations of "normal" and the particular conditions that may be mistaken as abuse. The medical reports of these examinations suggest to this author a possibility of the significance and relevance of physical findings being unduly and unwittingly over-emphasised, despite the cases all having occurred post the Cleveland Inquiry [Butler Sloss E. Report into the Child Abuse Enquiry in Cleveland, 1987. London, HMSO] and some as recently as 2005. This may reflect emotional involvement in the case and the doctor taking on a role of advocacy for the child. It is sometimes difficult for physicians to step out of the medical role where they do have the responsibility to diagnose and into a role where their information is only a piece of the puzzle and it is the work of the court to determine if sexual abuse has occurred. The role confusion between medicine and forensics must be sorted out in order for physicians to provide an objective assessment. The main conclusion of this

  5. LIST OF PROBLEMS LEADING DRIVERS THE COMMIT OFFENSES TRAFFIC ACROSS THE ALLEGATIONS OF CHARGES FILED IN TRANSIT FUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIANCA DA ROCHA OLIVEIRA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the condition of drivers regarding traffic education, which, throughout the ages, has become chaotic due to failures in the transit system. The aim of this study was to examine the records of traffic infraction against owners and drivers of vehicles and found the allegations in the suits filed by them to justify the violation in order to verify that led them to circumvent the law and therefore suggest that measures act directly on the point that pushes you to disobey the law, which often entails risks to other users of the transit system. The current transit system is flawed, both by population and by the government, which in many cases is absent or ineffective. The methodology used for conducting this study was analytical research involving literature review and documentary, and also interviewed with the chief of transit in southeastern Brazil, with the police and the deputy chairman of the Joint Administrative Appeals against infractions. With the analysis made in the tax assessment notices Transit and resources, we could identify most of the offenses committed, and also found that the inconsistent claims have litigated in the appeals. It was possible to realize also that traffic education is not as even touches the driver as it should, it is notable that despite being aware of legislation often the driver commits the offense knowingly. Education is not only to educate the population, but to make her obey and respect the law is necessary to invest more in that area, since all are users of the transit system.

  6. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; DAVID J. LANGLEY

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the extant literature on the effects of social media use for health related reasons on patients and their relationship with healthcare professionals. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review on em...

  7. Making space for belonging: critical reflections on the implementation of personalised adult social care under the veil of meaningful inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    This paper critically reflects on the way in which recent adult social care reform has been evolving beneath the alleged policy goal of prioritising the cultivation of meaningful inclusion and 'belonging' in the community. With this goal, there has been a focus away from 'services' for persons with intellectual disabilities, to supporting natural connections within the community. This paper draws on a grounded theory study of the perspectives of those responsible for overseeing community living arrangements for persons with disabilities, drawing on interviews and focus groups with service providers and relevant government officials. It examines the socio-spatial implications of the gradual shift towards 'belonging' as a disability policy goal, as it has evolved in two discrete settings - British Columbia, Canada and Ireland. The findings identify the complexities involved in facilitating active community connection for persons with intellectual disabilities and reveal important cautionary lessons for other jurisdictions where community living policy has arguably been moving away from communal services towards self-managed supports in 'real' communities through personal budgets in an effort to remove barriers to participation. The paper thus critically reflects on the rapid pursuit for transformation in personalised adult social care in government policy, arguing that the process of fostering meaningful community inclusion will and should take time.

  8. As implicações sociais da deficiência auditiva adquirida em adultos Social implications of acquired hearing impairment in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Aparecida Silva Francelin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar as implicações da surdez adquirida em adultos, na vida familiar, social e no trabalho, com uma abordagem qualitativa. Foram selecionadas 27 pessoas residentes em Bauru-SP, com diagnóstico de perda auditiva de manifestação súbita na faixa etária de 18 a 60 anos, matriculados no Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais (HRAC/USP entre janeiro de 2000 e fevereiro de 2005, sendo entrevistados 16. Utilizaram-se a entrevista e a análise de conteúdo. Constatou-se: a perda auditiva ocorreu entre os 40 e 44 anos, 37,5%; 62,5% dos que perderam a audição eram do sexo masculino, 62,5% não tinham o ensino fundamental; 62,5% eram da classe Baixa Superior; 75% apresentaram perda auditiva bilateral, 18,75% de grau moderado/profundo. Dos 13 que estavam trabalhando quando perderam a audição, 30,77% pararam de trabalhar e 15,38% mudaram de profissão. Foram relatadas situações como: afastamento do trabalho, demissão a pedido e demissão pelo empregador, dificuldade de aceitação, cobranças, falta de esclarecimentos e desconhecimento dos próprios profissionais de saúde. Os dados sugerem a necessidade dos recursos de reabilitação, de apoio terapêutico, respeito e alternativas de conhecimentos.This study aimed at analyzing, by means of a qualitative approach, the implications of acquired deafness in adults with regard to family life, social life and work. Twenty-seven individuals residing in the city of Bauru, State of São Paulo, were selected. All of them had been diagnosed with hearing impairment of sudden onset at the age range of 18 to 60 years and were registered at the Hospital for Craniofacial Anomaly Rehabilitation (HRAC/USP between January 2000 and February 2005. Sixteen of such individuals were interviewed, and content analysis was used. It was found that, for 37.5% of the subjects, hearing impairment occurred between the ages of 40 and 44 years; 62.5% were males; 62.5% had not

  9. Special Education as a Social Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, M. Stephen; Smith, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Social movements are defined, the extent to which special education fits common definitions of social movements is assessed, and the life cycle of social movements is examined with particular focus on implications for special education. (Author)

  10. Social Data Analytics Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Abid; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, development and demonstrative case studies of the Social Data Analytics Tool, SODATO. Adopting Action Design Framework [1], the objective of SODATO [2] is to collect, store, analyze, and report big social data emanating from the social media engagement of and social...... media conversations about organizations. We report and discuss results from two demonstrative case studies that were conducted using SODATO and conclude with implications and future work....

  11. Social impacts of hazardous and nuclear facilities and events: Implications for Nevada and the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository; [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenburg, W.R. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Carter, L.F.; Willard, W. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Lodwick, D.G. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); Hardert, R.A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Levine, A.G. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Sociology; Kroll-Smith, S. [New Orleans Univ., LA (United States); Couch, S.R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Edelstein, M.R. [Ramapo College, Mahwah, NJ (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Social impacts of a nuclear waste repository are described. Various case studies are cited such as Rocky Flats Plant, the Feed Materials Production Center, and Love Canal. The social impacts of toxic contamination, mitigating environmental stigma and loss of trust are also discussed.

  12. Dosage Effects of X and Y Chromosomes on Language and Social Functioning in Children with Supernumerary Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies: Implications for Idiopathic Language Impairment and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L.; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I.; Lopez, Katherine C.; Blumenthal, Jonathan D.; Clasen, Liv S.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies (X/Y-aneuploidies), the presence of extra X and/or Y chromosomes, are associated with heightened rates of language impairments and social difficulties. However, no single study has examined different language domains and social functioning in the same sample of children with tri-, tetra-, and…

  13. Implicações da ética profissional do assistente social no espaço educacional = Professional ethics implications of the social assistant in the educational space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, Eliana Bolorino Canteiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A vertente temática do presente artigo refere-se ao desafio da materialização dos princípios ético-políticos do Serviço Social na efetivação do trabalho profissional desenvolvido, especificamente nos espaços sócio-ocupacionais do Serviço Social no âmbito da Política de Educação Pública. Inicialmente, traz uma breve referência teórica sobre a ética e a ética profissional do assistente social; em seguida, aborda a relação deste conhecimento com a experiência profissional desenvolvida pela autora no Projeto de Extensão Universitária intitulado Serviço Social na área da Educação, promovido pela Faculdade de Serviço Social da Fundação Educacional “Antônio Eufrásio de Toledo” – Presidente Prudente/SP. O principal objetivo desta reflexão é provocar o debate sobre a concretização dos princípios ético-políticos do Serviço Social no trabalho efetuado neste campo de atuação profissional do assistente social. The thematic slope of the actual article refers to the challenge of materialization of the ethic-political principles of the Social Service in the realization of the professional work developed, specifically, in the social-occupational spaces of the Social Service in the Public Education Politics extent. Initially brings a brief theoretical reference about the Social Assistant ethics and Professional ethics, following, approaches the relation between this knowledge and the Professional experience developed by the author in the University Extension Project titled: Social Service in the Education area, promoted by the Social Service University of the Educational Foundation “Antonio Eufrâsio de Toledo” – Presidente Prudente/SP. The main aim of this reflection is to provoke the debate about the realization of the ethic-political principles of the Social Service in the work, accomplished in this social assistant professional acting field.

  14. The Impacts and Implications of Social Media on Luxury Brand Marketing%社会化媒体对奢侈品品牌营销的影响及启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段晓慧

    2012-01-01

    社会化媒体因其界面直观友好、及时互动响应的特点正成为一支重要的广告媒介力量。在阐述社会化媒体特征的基础上,分析社会化媒体对品牌营销的优势和劣势,结合奢侈品的消费特点和营销方式,提出基于社会化媒体的奢侈品品牌营销的建议。%Because of its intuitive, friendly interface and timely interactive response characteristics, social media is becoming an important advertising medium strength. Based on the elaborate social media features, this paper analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of social media on brand marketing. Combined with consumer characteristics and marketing of luxuries, the suggestions of brand marketing implications and recommendations of social media on luxury brands will be proposed.

  15. The Impacts and Implications of Social Media on Luxury Brand Marketing%合理教师权威的特点、构成因素及类型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高媛媛

    2012-01-01

    Because of its intuitive, friendly interface and timely interactive response characteristics, social media is becoming an important advertising medium strength. Based on the elaborate social media features, this paper analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of social media on brand marketing. Combined with consumer characteristics and marketing of luxuries, the suggestions of brand marketing implications and recommendations of social media on luxury brands will be proposed.%合理教师权威的特点是“育人”、促进学生自主发展,尽可能给学生一个自由开放的空间,具有内隐性、暂时性,情境性;其构成要素包括榜样力量、文化先知、人文关怀。合理教师权威的类型从权威的操作层面上划分为形式权威和实质权威;从精神层面上划分则包括合理行使的理性权威和充满魅力的人格权威。

  16. Changes in college attainment and the economic returns to a college degree in urban China, 2003-2010: implications for social equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anning; Hibel, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    Expansion of higher education is expected to reduce social inequality under the conditions that (1) higher education should become increasingly egalitarian; (2) educational attainment should be the main determinant of class destinations; and (3) individuals from different social backgrounds should benefit from higher education homogeneously. Using representative data collected in mainland China from 2003 to 2010, we find (1) social background factors, especially parents' education, are significantly associated with the opportunity of completing college across periods; (2) the economic returns to a college degree have been longitudinally increasing; and (3) for both 2003 and 2010, people from different social origins benefit from higher education attainment in a homogeneous way. An overall assessment of the findings suggests that changes in college attainment and the returns to higher education in urban China are not in favor of the promotion of general social equality, but maintain the existing extent of inequality.

  17. Involvement of serotonin and oxytocin in neural mechanism regulating amicable social signal in male mice: Implication for impaired recognition of amicable cues in BALB/c strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Social signals play a primary role in regulating social relationships among male mice. The present series of experiments investigated the neural mechanisms underlying an induction of amicable cues that facilitate social approach in male mice of the C57BL/6 (B6) and BALB/c (BALB) strains. Male mice exhibit approach behavior and suppression of territorial scent marking toward amicable counterparts. Exposure of a group-housed mouse that maintains an amicable relationship induced social approach in B6 recipient mice, as expressed by increased preference of stay in proximity and decreased scent marks relevant to those of a single-housed mouse. Nasal administration of oxytocin (OT) to stimulus mice appeared to enhance social approach in B6 recipient mice. Systemic administration of buspirone (5-HT1A agonist) to stimulus mice also increased approach in B6 recipient mice, whereas a nasal OT antagonist infusion followed by systemic buspirone injection of stimulus mice blocked this buspirone-induced approach in B6 recipient mice. BALB mice likely possess an intact signaling system as shown in B6 mice, in which the 5-HT → OT pathway is a primary modulator for social amicable signals. However, BALB mice could not exhibit signal-dependent change in approach behavior. No impairment in olfactory discrimination or approach behavior toward social stimuli was found in BALB mice. It is concluded that social cues for facilitating social approach are eliminated via the 5-HT → OT pathway, and BALB mice as a low social strain have a deficit in recognition of specific signals associated with amicability. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. The Contemporary Implication and Social Justice Theory of Classical Writers%经典作家社会公平理论及其当代启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡芳

    2011-01-01

    马克思恩格斯科学的社会公平理论为社会发展提供了愿景,经典作家的社会实践和社会公平理论丰富并发展了这一理论。针对我国社会不公平现象突显,其危机令人堪忧问题,根据马克思主义经典作家的社会公平理论提出“转变经济发展方式是解决社会公平的基本前提、还富于民是解决社会公平问题的根本”的思路。%Marx and Engels put forward the scientific theory on social justice, which provides a vision for social development. The social practice and the theory on social justice by classical writers have greatly enriched and developed the theory. Based on the worrying problem embodied in social inequities in China, and on the theories on social justice by the classical writers specialized in Marxism, the present paper puts forward the view that " the transformation of economic development pattern is the basic premise to achieve social equity ; while dividend to the community is the fundamental issue to achieve this goal. "

  19. 'Faking til you make it': social capital accumulation of individuals on low incomes living in contrasting socio-economic neighbourhoods and its implications for health and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne-Yung, Kathryn; Ziersch, Anna; Baum, Fran

    2013-05-01

    People on low-income living in low socio-economic neighbourhoods have poorer health in comparison with those living in advantaged neighbourhoods. To explore neighbourhood effects on health and social capital creation, the experiences of low-income people living in contrasting socio-economic neighbourhoods were compared, in order to examine how low-income status and differing levels of neighbourhood resources contributed to perceived health and wellbeing. Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed: survey data from 601 individuals living in contrasting socio-economic areas and in-depth interviews with a new sample of 24 individuals on low-incomes. The study was guided by Bourdieu's theory of practice, which examines how social inequalities are created and reproduced through the relationship between individuals' varying resources of economic, social and cultural capital. This included an examination of individual life histories, cultural distinction and how social positions are reproduced. Participants' accounts of their early life experience showed how parental socio-economic position and socially patterned events taking place across the life course, created different opportunities for social network creation, choice of neighbourhood and levels of resources available throughout life, all of which can influence health and wellbeing. A definition of poverty by whether an individual or household has sufficient income at a particular point in time was an inadequate measure of disadvantage. This static measure of 'low income' as a category disguised a number of different ways in which disadvantage was experienced or, conversely, how life course events could mitigate the impact of low-income. This study found that the resources necessary to create social capital such as cultural capital and the ability to socially network, differed according to the socio-economic status of the neighbourhood, and that living in an advantaged area does not automatically guarantee

  20. Processing of fair and unfair offers in the ultimatum game under social observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterburs, Jutta; Voegler, Rolf; Liepelt, Roman; Schulze, Anna; Wilhelm, Saskia; Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Straube, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Social context influences social decisions and outcome processing, partially depending on inter-individual differences. The present study investigated social context-dependent modulation of behavior and feedback processing in the ultimatum game (UG) in relation to inter-individual differences in social anxiety. Thirty-two healthy adults completed the UG both under social observation and without observation. Offers were allegedly either randomly generated by the computer or drawn from a pool of offers from previous human players. Overall, fewer unfair than fair offers were accepted. Observation decreased acceptance rates for unfair offers. The feedback-locked feedback-related negativity (FRN) but not the P3 was modulated by observation and fairness, with stronger differential coding of unfair/fair under observation. This effect was strongly correlated with individual levels of social anxiety, with higher levels associated with stronger differential fairness coding in the FRN under observation. Behavioral findings support negative reciprocity in the UG, suggesting that (implicit) social norms overwrite explicit task instructions even in the absence of (alleged) social interaction. Observation enhances this effect. Fairness coding in the FRN was modulated by observation as a function of social anxiety, supporting the notion that altered sensitivity to equality in a social context may contribute to social avoidance in socially anxious individuals. PMID:28276510

  1. De-novo mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A in alleged vaccine encephalopathy : a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkovic, SF; Harkin, L; McMahon, JM; Pelekanos, JT; Zuberi, SM; Wirrell, EC; Gill, DS; Iona, [No Value; Mulley, JC; Scheffer, IE

    2006-01-01

    Background Vaccination, particularly for pertussis, has been implicated as a direct cause of an encephalopathy with refractory seizures and intellectual impairment. We postulated that cases of so-called vaccine encephalopathy could have mutations in the neuronal sodium channel alpha 1 subunit gene (

  2. Spaces for the Social Shaping of Information Technology and Work. A reassessment of Scandinavian action research and its implications for action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    30 years. The paper provides an overview of Scandinavian research within technology and working life form a Danish perspective. A major contribution is con-cerned with a variety of strategies employed by social actors involved in action research pro-jects and their role in the social shaping......This contribution explores a range of social spaces where unions and workers have played or potential can play a role in the local social shaping of IT and work. It will mainly be based on the authors own research and experiences within Scandinavian research on technology and working from the past...... of technology. The point is made that no single strat-egy have proved to provide an uncontested route for union or workers influence. Instead the Scandinavian experiences indicate, that a range of spaces, players and positions have been developed, providing opportunities for addressing questions related...

  3. Citizenship and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.J. Bernts (Ton); L. d' Anjou (Leo); D. Houtman (Dick)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDiscussions on the problems of the welfare state are increasingly framed in terms of citizenship rather than social justice. The popularity of the concept of citizenship raises the question of its implications for social justice theory and research. In this article it is argued that wher

  4. Corruption and Social Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2003-01-01

    I examine the causal relation between social capiatl and corruption. A simple model illustrates potential mechanisms and yields testable implications, which I estimate in a sample of European countries. The estimated effect of social capital on corruption is found to be robust to the inclusion...... redistribution, which in turn reduces corruption....

  5. The moderating role of an oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism in the relation between unsupportive social interactions and coping profiles: Implications for depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opal Arilla Mcinnis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a hormone that is thought to influence prosocial behaviors and may be important in modulating responses to both positive and negative social interactions. Indeed, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR has been associated with decreased trust, empathy, optimism and social support seeking, which are important components of coping with stressors. In the current study, conducted among undergraduate students (N=225, it was shown that parental and peer social support was related to fewer depressive symptoms through elevated problem-focused coping and lower emotion-focused coping, and these effects were independent of the OXTR polymorphism. Unsupportive social interactions from parents were associated with more severe depressive symptoms through the greater use of emotion-focused coping, and this relation was moderated by the OXTR genotype. Specifically, individuals who carried the polymorphism on one or both of their alleles demonstrated increased emotion-focused coping following unsupportive responses compared to those without the polymorphism. Likewise, lower problem-focused coping mediated the relation between parental and peer unsupportive responses to depressive symptoms, but this mediated relation was only evident among carriers of the polymorphism. These findings suggest that carrying this OXTR polymorphism might favor disadvantageous coping styles in the face of negative social interactions, which in turn are linked to poor mood. Regardless of genotype, parental and peer social support are fundamental in determining stress-related coping and well-being.

  6. Hippocampal Y2 receptor-mediated mossy fiber plasticity is implicated in nicotine abstinence-related social anxiety-like behavior in an outbred rat model of the novelty-seeking phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Cigdem; Oztan, Ozge; Isgor, Ceylan

    2014-10-01

    Experimentally naïve outbred rats display varying rates of locomotor reactivity in response to the mild stress of a novel environment. Namely, some display high rates (HR) whereas some display low rates (LR) of locomotor reactivity. Previous reports from our laboratory show that HRs, but not LRs, develop locomotor sensitization to a low dose nicotine challenge and exhibit increased social anxiety-like behavior following chronic intermittent nicotine training. Moreover, the hippocampus, specifically hippocampal Y2 receptor (Y2R)-mediated neuropeptide Y signaling is implicated in these nicotine-induced behavioral effects observed in HRs. The present study examines the structural substrates of the expression of locomotor sensitization to a low dose nicotine challenge and associated social anxiety-like behavior following chronic intermittent nicotine exposure during adolescence in the LRHR hippocampi. Our data showed that the expression of locomotor sensitization to the low dose nicotine challenge and the increase in social anxiety-like behavior were accompanied by an increase in mossy fiber terminal field size, as well as an increase in spinophilin mRNA levels in the hippocampus in nicotine pre-trained HRs compared to saline pre-trained controls. Furthermore, a novel, selective Y2R antagonist administered systemically during 1 wk of abstinence reversed the behavioral, molecular and neuromorphological effects observed in nicotine-exposed HRs. These results suggest that nicotine-induced neuroplasticity within the hippocampus may regulate abstinence-related negative affect in HRs, and implicate hippocampal Y2R in vulnerability to the behavioral and neuroplastic effects of nicotine in the novelty-seeking phenotype.

  7. Physiological responses to social and nonsocial stimuli in neurotypical adults with high and low levels of autistic traits: implications for understanding nonsocial drive in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Clarence J; Ashwin, Chris; Brosnan, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have suggested that the two primary cognitive features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a drive toward nonsocial processing and a reduced drive toward social processing, may be unrelated to each other in the neurotypical (NT) population and may therefore require separate explanations. Drive toward types of processing may be related to physiological arousal to categories of stimuli, such as social (e.g., faces) or nonsocial (e.g., trains). This study investigated how autistic traits in an NT population might relate to differences in physiological responses to nonsocial compared with social stimuli. NT participants were recruited to examine these differences in those with high vs. low degrees of ASD traits. Forty-six participants (21 male, 25 female) completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) to measure ASD traits before viewing a series of 24 images while skin conductance response (SCR) was recorded. Images included six nonsocial, six social, six face-like cartoons, and six nonsocial (relating to participants' personal interests). Analysis revealed that those with a higher AQ had significantly greater SCR arousal to nonsocial stimuli than those with a low AQ, and the higher the AQ, the greater the difference between SCR arousal to nonsocial and social stimuli. This is the first study to identify the relationship between AQ and physiological response to nonsocial stimuli, and a relationship between physiological response to both social and nonsocial stimuli, suggesting that physiological response may underlie the atypical drive toward nonsocial processing seen in ASD, and that at the physiological level at least the social and nonsocial in ASD may be related to one another.

  8. Significance of grooming behavior in two polygynous groups of western black crested gibbons: Implications for understanding social relationships among immigrant and resident group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhen-Hua; Huang, Bei; Ning, Wen-He; Ni, Qing-Yong; Sun, Guo-Zheng; Jiang, Xue-Long

    2013-12-01

    In primates, grooming is considered among the most common behaviors for maintaining social bonds; however, to date, few studies have examined grooming behavior in gibbon species in detail. We used both a 5-min interval scan method and social network analysis to study grooming in two groups of polygynous western black-crested gibbon (Nomascus concolor) in Wuliang Mountain, Central Yunnan, China. Individuals in both groups spent little time in social grooming (1.45% and 1.97% of active time). We compared the two groups' grooming networks and found that the group that maintained a more stable social unit had a more complex grooming network while the group with new immigrants had a grooming network characterized by fewer grooming pairs. Females in both groups played important roles in the grooming network. A newly immigrant female spent the most time grooming others and chose the resident adult female as her main adult grooming partner. Other females from both groups chose the adult male as their primary grooming partner (except their offspring). A sub-adult male who had resided in his natal group for 2 years after maturing into an adult also groomed more and was at the center of the network. This male finally replaced the breeding male in his group 3 years after our data collection period ended. We hypothesize that the immigrant female and the resident young adult male engaged in more extensive grooming interactions as a behavioral strategy to gain tolerance from long-term residents. Our results suggest that female gibbons in polygynous groups actively cooperate in maintaining social relationships rather than co-exist through tolerance or avoidance. Our observations indicate that grooming networks in crested gibbons reflect individual dynamics and partly support the social cohesion hypothesis for primate grooming. In this regard, we suggest that changes in gibbon grooming networks can be used to predict social change.

  9. Rethinking Empirical Social Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Ruppert, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    I consider some arguments of social science and humanities researchers about the challenge that Big Data presents for social science methods. What they suggest is that social scientists need to engage with Big Data rather than retreat into internal debates about its meaning and implications. Instead, understanding Big Data requires and provides an opportunity for the interdisiciplinary development of methods that innovatively, critically and reflexively engage with new forms of data. Unlike d...

  10. Social Cohesion Among Sex Workers and Client Condom Refusal in a Canadian Setting: Implications for Structural and Community-Led Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, Elena; Duff, Putu; Bingham, Brittany; Chapman, Jules; Nguyen, Paul; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Shannon, Kate

    2016-06-01

    Community empowerment can be a powerful determinant of HIV risk among sex workers (SWs). This study modeled the impact of social cohesion on client condom refusal among SWs in Vancouver. Longitudinal data were drawn from a prospective cohort of SWs (2010-2013). Lippman and colleagues' Social Cohesion Scale measured SWs' connectedness (i.e., perception of mutual aid, trust, support). Multivariable logistic regression examined the independent effect of social cohesion on client condom refusal. Of 654 SWs, 22 % reported baseline client condom refusal and 34 % over 3 years. The baseline median social cohesion score was 24 (IQR 20-29, range 4-45). In the final confounding model, for every one-point increase in the social cohesion score, average odds of condom refusal decreased by 3 % (AOR 0.97; 95 % CI 0.95-0.99). Community empowerment can have a direct protective effect on HIV risk. These findings highlight the need for a legal framework that enables collectivization and SW-led efforts in the HIV response.

  11. Social Set Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vatrapu, Ravi; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hussain, Abid

    2016-01-01

    this limitation, based on the sociology of associations and the mathematics of set theory, this paper presents a new approach to big data analytics called social set analysis. Social set analysis consists of a generative framework for the philosophies of computational social science, theory of social data......, conceptual and formal models of social data, and an analytical framework for combining big social data sets with organizational and societal data sets. Three empirical studies of big social data are presented to illustrate and demonstrate social set analysis in terms of fuzzy set-theoretical sentiment...... analysis, crisp set-theoretical interaction analysis, and event-studies-oriented set-theoretical visualizations. Implications for big data analytics, current limitations of the set-theoretical approach, and future directions are outlined....

  12. SOCIAL WELFARE AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Fox

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the links and connections between social work and restorative justice. After a brief description of social work, restorative justice and family group conferencing, I will explore some the complementary theoretical links and practice applications, critically examining the potential implications and opportunities for social work practitioners and academics in relation to practice.

  13. The Legal Implications of Student Use of Social Networking Sites in the UK and US: Current Concerns and Lessons for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mark R.; Lee, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative snapshot of the current state of the law in the US and UK with respect to potential liability of university and college students for use (and misuse) of social networking sites. It reviews the limited case law on this topic, highlights the differences in the two nations' laws of defamation and the various possible…

  14. Social and political implications of great hydroelectric projects on the native and country population; Implicacoes politicas e sociais de grandes projetos hidroeletricos sobre as populacoes indigenas e camponesas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigaud, Lygia [Rio de Janeiro Univ., RJ (Brazil). Museu Nacional

    1993-03-01

    The power generation policy adopted in Brazil for the construction of large hydroelectric power plants and its social impacts are analysed. It is stressed the importance of the participation of the society in the definition of this policy. This can be achieved now with the re democratization of the country and a more active participation of the people in the future of the nation.

  15. Childhood Trauma Exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan War Era Veterans: Implications for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Adult Functional Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E.; Dedert, Eric A.; Calhoun, Patrick S.; Brancu, Mira; Runnals, Jennifer; Beckham, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship among childhood trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and adult social support in a large sample of veterans who served in the military after 09/11/2001, with a specific focus on the potential role of the PTSD avoidance and numbing cluster as intervening in the association between…

  16. Social and Affective Concerns High-Ability Adolescents Indicate They Would Like to Discuss with a Caring Adult: Implications for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Enyi; Wu, Jiaxi; Gentry, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the social and affective concerns of 280 high-ability students in Grades 5 through 12 who participated in a summer residential program. Content analysis of responses from an open-ended survey indicated that high-ability adolescents expressed concerns regarding feelings and emotions, future aspirations, and…

  17. Don’t Judge a (Face)Book by its Cover: A Critical Review of the Implications of Social Networking Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Society, 1-8. Fogel, J. & Nehman, E. (2009). Internet social network communities: Risk taking, trust, and privacy concerns. Computers in Human Behavior , 25...associated with Facebook use. Computers in Human Behavior , 25, 578-586. Schneier, B. (2009, August 11). The consequences of trusting our

  18. Students' Perceptions of the Social/Emotional Implications of Participation in Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Programs. Research Monograph Series. RM09238

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Regan Clark; Hertberg-Davis, Holly; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Using qualitative methods, the researchers explored student perceptions of the social and emotional advantages and disadvantages of Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) program participation, differences between the AP and IB programs in those perceptions, and whether or not students report experiencing a "forced-choice…

  19. How Single-Parent Children Speak about Poverty and Social Exclusion: Policy Implications from a Comparative, Qualitative, Cross-National Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Spyros

    2013-01-01

    This article presents some of the key findings from a comparative, qualitative research study carried out in the United Kingdom, Greece, and Cyprus. The main goal of the study was to investigate single-parent children's experiences and understandings of poverty and social exclusion in their everyday lives and to make relevant policy…

  20. Hearing, Cognition, and Healthy Aging: Social and Public Health Implications of the Links between Age-Related Declines in Hearing and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen; Mick, Paul; Reed, Marilyn

    2015-08-01

    Sensory input provides the signals used by the brain when listeners understand speech and participate in social activities with other people in a range of everyday situations. When sensory inputs are diminished, there can be short-term consequences to brain functioning, and long-term deprivation can affect brain neuroplasticity. Indeed, the association between hearing loss and cognitive declines in older adults is supported by experimental and epidemiologic evidence, although the causal mechanisms remain unknown. These interactions of auditory and cognitive aging play out in the challenges confronted by people with age-related hearing problems when understanding speech and engaging in social interactions. In the present article, we use the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Selective Optimization with Compensation models to highlight the importance of adopting a healthy aging perspective that focuses on facilitating active social participation by older adults. First, we examine epidemiologic evidence linking ARHL to cognitive declines and other health issues. Next, we examine how social factors influence and are influenced by auditory and cognitive aging and if they may provide a possible explanation for the association between ARHL and cognitive decline. Finally, we outline how audiologists could reposition hearing health care within the broader context of healthy aging.

  1. SABERES DEL DOCENTE Y REPRESENTACIONES SOCIALES: IMPLICANCIAS PARA LA ENSEÑANZA DE LAS CIENCIAS NATURALES (KNOWLEDGE OF THE TEACHER AND SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR TEACHING OF NATURAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Aguilar Susana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:En este artículo presentamos un análisis comparativo de tres estudios realizados con docentes de distintos niveles educativos de la provincia de San Juan (Argentina y en los que, a través de técnicas de evocación y jerarquización de palabras, identificamos la estructura de sus representaciones sociales sobre distintos aspectos vinculados a la enseñanza y al aprendizaje de las Ciencias Naturales. Para analizar las estructuras e identificar los elementos comunes que atraviesan estos estudios, consideramos la clasificación de saberes del docente de Braslavsky y Birgin (sustantivo, pedagógico e institucional. Los resultados obtenidos nos han permitido acceder a información importante acerca de los significados compartidos por este grupo profesional. Así, la similitud entre las estructuras de los distintos grupos nos muestra que existe una representación que permite describir lo que son y lo que hacen los docentes, correspondiéndose con los postulados educativos tradicionales, marcando las diferencias con otros grupos y otras actividades profesionales. Las categorías que se presentan de modo constante, más allá de las temáticas planteadas en cada caso particular, se vinculan con el hecho de “educar”, es decir, formar sujetos escolarizados para el mundo social en el cual se está inserto. De esta manera, podemos pensar que aunque las demandas sociales ejercen una fuerte presión sobre los docentes e intentan desviarlos en su desempeño profesional hacia otras funciones (asistenciales, sanitarias o de contención social, éstas no constituyen la esencia de la función social que ellos se auto-atribuyen y pretenden conservar a lo largo del tiempo.Abstract: This article presents a comparative analysis of three studies made with teachers from different educational levels in the province of San Juan (Argentina, in which we identified the structure of their social representations - through techniques of evocation and

  2. Statement on access to relevant medical and other health records and relevant legal records for forensic medical evaluations of alleged torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alempijevic, D.; Beriashvili, R.; Beynon, J.

    2013-01-01

    In some jurisdictions attempts have been made to limit or deny access to medical records for victims of torture seeking remedy or reparations or for individuals who have been accused of crimes based on confessions allegedly extracted under torture. The following article describes the importance o...... professionals in acts of torture and other ill-treatment is discussed. A summary of international law and medical ethics surrounding the right of access to personal information, especially health information in connection with allegations of torture is also given....

  3. Geneletter: An Internet-based newsletter on the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics. Final report to the Department of Energy [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Philip; Wertz, Dorothy C.

    2001-05-01

    The GeneLetter (http://www.geneletter.org) is an Internet newsletter on ethical, legal, and social issues in genetics, designed for a wide and varied audience, some of whom may not be familiar with genetic science. It appears every two months, with a variety of long and short feature articles on ethics and on genetic disorders, a section on new federal and state legislation, an international section, a student corner, book and video reviews, a summary of genetics in the news, and a list of upcoming conferences. Feature articles have ventured into an area of wide general concern, behavioral genetics. The newsletter also has an interactive chatbox and the opportunity of more private communications with the editors via email. The purpose of the GeneLetter is to help fill a communication and knowledge gap on ethical, legal and social issues surrounding genetics.

  4. Pre-Service Teachers' Conceptions on Use of Social Media in Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Nihat Gürel

    2015-01-01

    The use of social media is tremendously increasing trend for personal use. At the same time, social media are penetrating to the educational settings as well. Thus purpose of this study is to investigate pre-service social studies teachers' conceptions on use of social media in social studies education; it is possible implications on social…

  5. Complex and Conflicting Social Norms: Implications for Implementation of Future HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP Interventions in Vancouver, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Knight

    Full Text Available HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP has been found to be efficacious in preventing HIV acquisition among seronegative individuals in a variety of risk groups, including men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs. To date, however, it remains unclear how socio-cultural norms (e.g., attitudes towards HIV; social understandings regarding HIV risk practices may influence the scalability of future PrEP interventions. The objective of this study is to assess how socio-cultural norms may influence the implementation and scalability of future HIV PrEP interventions in Vancouver, Canada.We conducted 50 interviews with young men (ages 18-24 with a variety of HIV risk behavioural profiles (e.g., young men who inject drugs; MSM. Interviews focused on participants' experiences and perceptions with various HIV interventions and policies, including PrEP.While awareness of PrEP was generally low, perceptions about the potential personal and public health gains associated with PrEP were interconnected with expressions of complex and sometimes conflicting social norms. Some accounts characterized PrEP as a convenient form of reliable protection against HIV, likening it to the female birth control pill. Other accounts cast PrEP as a means to facilitate 'socially unacceptable' behaviour (e.g., promiscuity. Stigmatizing rhetoric was used to position PrEP as a tool that could promote some groups' proclivities to take 'risks'.Stigma regarding 'risky' behaviour and PrEP should not be underestimated as a serious implementation challenge. Pre-implementation strategies that concomitantly aim to improve knowledge about PrEP, while addressing associated social prejudices, may be key to effective implementation and scale-up.

  6. Hearing, Cognition, and Healthy Aging: Social and Public Health Implications of the Links between Age-Related Declines in Hearing and Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Pichora-Fuller, M. Kathleen; Mick, Paul; Reed, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Sensory input provides the signals used by the brain when listeners understand speech and participate in social activities with other people in a range of everyday situations. When sensory inputs are diminished, there can be short-term consequences to brain functioning, and long-term deprivation can affect brain neuroplasticity. Indeed, the association between hearing loss and cognitive declines in older adults is supported by experimental and epidemiologic evidence, although the causal mecha...

  7. Representações sociais de mulheres mastectomizadas e suas implicações para o autocuidado Representaciones sociales de mujeres sometidas a mastectomía y las implicaciones para el autocuidado Social representations of women submitted to mastectomy and the implications for self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvio Éder Dias da Silva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivos identificar as representações sociais de mulheres mastectomizadas sobre a mama e analisar as implicações dessas representações sociais no autocuidado. Tratou-se de um estudo qualitativo segundo o referencial Teoria das Representações Sociais. Para coleta de dados empregou-se duas técnicas: a associação livre de idéias e a observação livre. Para a análise das informações empregou-se a técnica de análise temática. A pesquisa teve como resultado duas unidades temáticas: a mama e suas representações sociais de mudança no corpo e representações sociais de mulheres mastectomizadas: implicações sobre o cuidado de si. No estudo, observou-se que as mulheres objetivaram o cuidado das mamas por meio da realização do autoexame.Esta investigación tuve como objetivos: identificar las representaciones sociales de las mujeres después de la mastectomía de mama y analizar las implicaciones de estas representaciones sociales en el autocuidado. Este es un estudio cualitativo que utilizó la Teoría de las Representaciones Sociales. Para la recolección de datos se emplearon dos técnicas: la libre asociación de ideas y la observación. Para análisis de datos la técnica de análisis temático fue utilizada. La investigación presentó dos unidades temáticas: el de mama y sus representaciones del cambio social en el cuerpo y las representaciones sociales de las mujeres mastectomía: implicaciones para el cuidado personal. En el estudio, mostraron que las mujeres se opuso el cuidado de los senos a través de la realización de la autoexploración.The purposes of this research was to identify the social representations of women on breast mastectomy and to analyze the implications of these social representations to care for self-care. This is a qualitative study using the Theory of Social Representations as theoretical reference. For data collection it was employed two techniques: the free

  8. One Coin has Two Sides: A Comparative Appraisal of New York Times and China Daily’s News Coverage of Alleged Internet Hacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is always some debate as to whether news reporting is objective and emotionless. Under the guidance of engagement system, a sub-system of Appraisal Theory, concerning the conveyance of ideology, the present study attempts to make a comparative study of different ideological attitudes by news coverage in New York Times and China Daily’s (English version on alleged internet hacking. The findings suggest that similar distributions of engagement resources in the news reports are adopted when engaged in an ideological attitude. Additionally, China Daily and New York Times hold different attitudes to Internet hacking. The attitude by China Daily changes before and after Snowden Event, while New York Times remains the same.

  9. New Constraints on the Asteroid 298 Baptistina, the Alleged Family Member of the K/T Impactor

    CERN Document Server

    Majaess, Daniel J; Molnar, Larry A; Haegert, Melissa J; Lane, David J; Turner, David G; Nielsen, Inga

    2008-01-01

    In their study Bottke et al. (2007) suggest that a member of the Baptistina asteroid family was the probable source of the K/T impactor which ended the reign of the Dinosaurs 65 Myr ago. Knowledge of the physical and material properties pertaining to the Baptistina asteroid family are, however, not well constrained. In an effort to begin addressing the situation, data from an international collaboration of observatories were synthesized to determine the rotational period of the family's largest member, asteroid 298 Baptistina (P_r = 16.23+-0.02 hrs). Discussed here are aspects of the terrestrial impact delivery system, implications arising from the new constraints, and prospects for future work.

  10. The social adjustment of patients with schizophrenia: implications to the mental health policy in Brazil O ajustamento social de pacientes com esquizofrenia: implicações para a política de saúde mental no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R. Menezes

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available A sample (n=124 of schizophrenic patients from a defined catchment area of the city os S.Paulo, Brazil, who had been consecutively admitted to hospital, was assessed for psychopathological status and social adjustment levels. Sociodemographic, socio-economic and occupational characteristics were recorded: almost 30% of the subjects had no occupation and received no social benefit, more than two-thirds had a monthly per capita income of US$ 100.00 or less. Sixty-five percent presented with Schneiderian firstrank symptoms. Nearly half the sample showed poor or very poor social adjustment in the month prior to admission. The most affected areas of social functioning were participation in the household activities, work and social withdrawal. The current mental health policy of promoting extra-mural care as an alternative to the previous hospital-based model will then mean the investment in a network of new community-based services, that give effective treatment and support to patients and their families. The need of further research into the current picture of mental disorders in the country is stressed.A esquizofrenia é um importante problema de saúde pública em países desenvolvidos, afetando em média 0,5/1000 pessoas adultas e causando altos custos econômicos para a sociedade. Em países menos desenvolvidos não há muitas informações disponíveis, mas projeções baseadas nas taxas de incidência e tendências demográfica sugerem que o número de casos nesses países deve aumentar em 87% de 1975 ao ano 2000. No Brasil o diagnóstico de esquizofrenia representa cerca de um terço de todas as internações psiquiátricas, e até o presente existe uma falta de informações sobre as condições reais desses pacientes. Com esse objetivo, uma amostra (n=124 de pacientes esquizofrênicos residentes em uma região geográfica de captação definida na cidade de São Paulo, Brasil, e que haviam sido internados consecutivamente em hospitais

  11. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II and folate deficiencies result in reciprocal protection against cognitive and social deficits in mice: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaevitz, Laura R; Picker, Jonathan D; Rana, Jasmine; Kolodny, Nancy H; Shane, Barry; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E; Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-06-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors underlie a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and autism (AD). Due to the complexity and multitude of the genetic and environmental factors attributed to these disorders, recent research strategies focus on elucidating the common molecular pathways through which these multiple risk factors may function. In this study, we examine the combined effects of a haplo-insufficiency of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) and dietary folic acid deficiency. In addition to serving as a neuropeptidase, GCPII catalyzes the absorption of folate. GCPII and folate depletion interact within the one-carbon metabolic pathway and/or of modulate the glutamatergic system. Four groups of mice were tested: wild-type, GCPII hypomorphs, and wild-types and GCPII hypomorphs both fed a folate deficient diet. Due to sex differences in the prevalence of SZ and AD, both male and female mice were assessed on a number of behavioral tasks including locomotor activity, rotorod, social interaction, prepulse inhibition, and spatial memory. Wild-type mice of both sexes fed a folic acid deficient diet showed motor coordination impairments and cognitive deficits, while social interactions were decreased only in males. GCPII mutant mice of both sexes also exhibited reduced social propensities. In contrast, all folate-depleted GCPII hypomorphs performed similarly to untreated wild-type mice, suggesting that reduced GCPII expression and folate deficiency are mutually protective. Analyses of folate and neurometabolite levels associated with glutamatergic function suggest several potential mechanisms through which GCPII and folate may be interacting to create this protective effect.

  12. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex damage does not impair the development and use of common ground in social interaction: implications for cognitive theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupa; Tranel, Daniel; Duff, Melissa C

    2012-01-01

    During conversation, interactants draw on their shared communicative context and history ("common ground") to help decide what to say next, tailoring utterances based on their knowledge of what the listener knows. The use of common ground draws on an understanding of the thoughts and feelings of others to create and update a model of what is known by the other person, employing cognitive processes such as theory of mind. We tested the hypothesis that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), a neural region involved in processing and interpreting social and emotional information, would be critical for the development and use of common ground. We studied seven patients with bilateral vmPFC damage and seven age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy comparison participants, each interacting with a familiar partner. Across 24 trials, participants verbally directed their partners how to arrange a set of 12 abstract tangram cards. Our hypothesis was not supported: the vmPFC and healthy comparison groups showed similar development and use of common ground, evident in reduction in time and words used to describe the cards, similar increases in the use of definite references (e.g., the horse), and comparable use of verbal play (playful language) in their interactions. These results argue against the idea that the vmPFC is critical for the development and use of common ground in social interaction. We propose that a cognitive and neuroanatomical bifurcation in theory of mind processes may explain this outcome. The vmPFC may be important for affective theory of mind (the ability to understand another's feelings); however, the development and use of common ground in social interaction may place higher demands on the ability to understand another's knowledge, or cognitive theory of mind, which may not require the vmPFC.

  13. Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Social Phobia KidsHealth > For Teens > Social Phobia Print A A ... anxiety condition called social phobia. What Is Social Phobia? Social phobia (also called social anxiety ) is a ...

  14. Pre-service teachers’ conceptions on use of social media in social studies education

    OpenAIRE

    Kahveci, Nihat Gürel

    2015-01-01

    The use of social media is tremendously increasing trend for personal use. At the same time, social media are penetrating to the educational settings as well. Thus purpose of this study is to investigate pre-service social studies teachers’ conceptions on use of social media in social studies education; it is possible implications on social studies teacher education, social studies classroom and consequently citizenship education. Data were collected through open- ended interviews with 12 (6 ...

  15. Social defeat protocol and relevant biomarkers, implications for stress response physiology, drug abuse, mood disorders and individual stress vulnerability: a systematic review of the last decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mailton Vasconcelos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social defeat (SD in rats, which results from male intraspecific confrontations, is ethologically relevant and useful to understand stress effects on physiology and behavior.Methods: A systematic review of studies about biomarkers induced by the SD protocol and published from 2002 to 2013 was carried out in the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Knowledge and ScienceDirect. The search terms were: social defeat, rat, neurotrophins, neuroinflammatory markers, and transcriptional factors.Results: Classical and recently discovered biomarkers were found to be relevant in stress-induced states. Findings were summarized in accordance to the length of exposure to stress: single, repeated, intermittent and continuous SD. This review found that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a distinct marker of stress adaptation. Along with glucocorticoids and catecholamines, BDNF seems to be important in understanding stress physiology.Conclusion: The SD model provides a relevant tool to study stress response features, development of addictive behaviors, clinic depression and anxiety, as well as individual differences in vulnerability and resilience to stress.

  16. Neonatal intrahippocampal injection of lipopolysaccharide induces deficits in social behavior and prepulse inhibition and microglial activation in rats: Implication for a new schizophrenia animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Furong; Zhang, Lulu; Ding, Yu-qiang; Zhao, Jingping; Zheng, Yingjun

    2014-05-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that the dysregulation of immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Microglia are the resident macrophage of the brain and the major player in innate immunity in the brain. We hypothesized that microglia activation may be closely associated with the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Neonatal intrahippocampal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an activator of microglia, was performed in rats at postnatal day 7 (PD7), and they were separately treated with saline or minocycline for consecutive 3days. Behavioral changes (locomotor activity, social interaction and prepulse inhibition) were examined in adulthood, and the number of microglia was assessed using immunohistochemistry at PD9, PD21 and PD67. The adult rats in LPS-injected group showed obvious behavioral alterations (deficits in social behavior and prepulse inhibition) and a persistently dramatic increase of number of activated microglial cells in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and thalamus compared to those in saline-injected group. Interestingly, pretreatment with minocycline could significantly rescue the behavioral deficits and prevent microglia activation. Our results suggest that neonatal intrahippocampal LPS injection may serve as a potential schizophrenia animal model, and inhibition of microglia activation may be a potential treatment strategy for schizophrenia.

  17. How do we think machines think? An fMRI study of alleged competition with an artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaminade, Thierry; Rosset, Delphine; Da Fonseca, David; Nazarian, Bruno; Lutcher, Ewald; Cheng, Gordon; Deruelle, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Mentalizing is defined as the inference of mental states of fellow humans, and is a particularly important skill for social interactions. Here we assessed whether activity in brain areas involved in mentalizing is specific to the processing of mental states or can be generalized to the inference of non-mental states by comparing brain responses during the interaction with an intentional and an artificial agent. Participants were scanned using fMRI during interactive rock-paper-scissors games while believing their opponent was a fellow human (Intentional agent, Int), a humanoid robot endowed with an artificial intelligence (Artificial agent, Art), or a computer playing randomly (Random agent, Rnd). Participants' subjective reports indicated that they adopted different stances against the three agents. The contrast of brain activity during interaction with the artificial and the random agents didn't yield any cluster at the threshold used, suggesting the absence of a reproducible stance when interacting with an artificial intelligence. We probed response to the artificial agent in regions of interest corresponding to clusters found in the contrast between the intentional and the random agents. In the precuneus involved in working memory, the posterior intraparietal suclus, in the control of attention and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, in executive functions, brain activity for Art was larger than for Rnd but lower than for Int, supporting the intrinsically engaging nature of social interactions. A similar pattern in the left premotor cortex and anterior intraparietal sulcus involved in motor resonance suggested that participants simulated human, and to a lesser extend humanoid robot actions, when playing the game. Finally, mentalizing regions, the medial prefrontal cortex and right temporoparietal junction, responded to the human only, supporting the specificity of mentalizing areas for interactions with intentional agents.

  18. How do we think machines think? An fMRI study of alleged competition with an artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaminade, Thierry; Rosset, Delphine; Da Fonseca, David; Nazarian, Bruno; Lutcher, Ewald; Cheng, Gordon; Deruelle, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Mentalizing is defined as the inference of mental states of fellow humans, and is a particularly important skill for social interactions. Here we assessed whether activity in brain areas involved in mentalizing is specific to the processing of mental states or can be generalized to the inference of non-mental states by comparing brain responses during the interaction with an intentional and an artificial agent. Participants were scanned using fMRI during interactive rock-paper-scissors games while believing their opponent was a fellow human (Intentional agent, Int), a humanoid robot endowed with an artificial intelligence (Artificial agent, Art), or a computer playing randomly (Random agent, Rnd). Participants' subjective reports indicated that they adopted different stances against the three agents. The contrast of brain activity during interaction with the artificial and the random agents didn't yield any cluster at the threshold used, suggesting the absence of a reproducible stance when interacting with an artificial intelligence. We probed response to the artificial agent in regions of interest corresponding to clusters found in the contrast between the intentional and the random agents. In the precuneus involved in working memory, the posterior intraparietal suclus, in the control of attention and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, in executive functions, brain activity for Art was larger than for Rnd but lower than for Int, supporting the intrinsically engaging nature of social interactions. A similar pattern in the left premotor cortex and anterior intraparietal sulcus involved in motor resonance suggested that participants simulated human, and to a lesser extend humanoid robot actions, when playing the game. Finally, mentalizing regions, the medial prefrontal cortex and right temporoparietal junction, responded to the human only, supporting the specificity of mentalizing areas for interactions with intentional agents. PMID:22586381

  19. Forced Dependency and Legal Barriers: Implications of the UK’s Immigration and Social Security Policies for Minoritized Women Living in Abusive Intimate Relationships in Northern Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica McWilliams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the complexities of the help-seeking process of minoritized women (primarily asylum-seekers and immigrants experiencing domestic violence in Northern Ireland. The term ‘minoritized’ is used here to emphasize that “minority” status is not a static or innate trait of certain groups but instead is the outcome of a process of being positioned as a minority. The paper addresses the intersections of ethnicity, nationality, class and gender and shows how state policies in relation to immigration and social security reinforce inequalities in gendered power relations. Despite attempts to improve the social security and immigration systems, the findings from a Northern Ireland study show how recent policy changes have not addressed the systemic institutional racism and institutionalised patriarchy in these agencies. Where avenues for action are undermined by such practices, the policies raise concerns about the safety and protection of minoritized women living in abusive relationships. We argue that the UK is failing to meet its human rights responsibilities to provide adequate support and assistance to minoritized women in abusive relationships and conclude that delivering state accountability alongside a human rights framework based on security, autonomy, liberty and equality is what is needed. Este artículo analiza las complejidades del proceso de búsqueda de ayuda en Irlanda del Norte para mujeres pertenecientes a minorías (principalmente solicitantes de asilo e inmigrantes que sufren violencia doméstica. El término 'minoritarizadas' se utiliza aquí para hacer hincapié en que la situación de "minoría" no es un rasgo estático o innato de ciertos grupos, sino que es el resultado de un proceso de ser posicionado como una minoría. El artículo aborda las intersecciones de origen étnico, nacionalidad, clase y género y muestra cómo las políticas estatales en relación a la inmigración y la seguridad social

  20. Cultural evolution over the last 40 years in China: using the Google Ngram Viewer to study implications of social and political change for cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong; Greenfield, Patricia M

    2015-02-01

    Chinese people have held collectivistic values such as obligation, giving to other people, obedience and sacrifice of personal interests for thousands of years. In recent decades, China has undergone rapid economic development and urbanisation. This study investigates changing cultural values in China from 1970 to 2008 and the relationship of changing values to ecological shifts. The conceptual framework for the study was Greenfield's (2009) theory of social change and human development. Changing frequencies of contrasting Chinese words indexing individualistic or collectivistic values show that values shift along with ecological changes (urbanisation, economic development and enrollment in higher education), thereby adapting to current sociodemographic contexts. Words indexing adaptive individualistic values increased in frequency between 1970 and 2008. In contrast, words indexing less adaptive collectivistic values either decreased in frequency in this same period of time or else rose more slowly than words indexing contrasting individualistic values.

  1. [Analysis of type 2 diabetes-induced late effects based on administrative data of social insurance in Austria and implications for the evaluation of the DMP diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großschädl, Franziska; Freidl, Wolfgang; Stronegger, Willibald J; Burkert, Nathalie T; Muckenhuber, Johanna; Rásky, Éva

    2014-08-01

    The present study analyses administrative data of medical services related to the distribution of diabetes mellitus type 2-induced late effects. Pseudonymous statutory health insurance data of all Austrian social security institutions for the years 2006/2007 in outpatient and inpatient (performance and diagnostic data) setting were used. Type 2 diabetics have been identified by prescribed medication. The specific late effects were defined as endpoints and the respective diagnoses and health performances were extracted. The study population included 7,945,774 insured. The percentage of the defined late effects was significantly higher in diabetics than in persons from the general population, with exception for kidney transplantation. The risk of a late effect was greatest among diabetics for an amputation. The results of this study can be used as a baseline for the evaluation of DMP diabetes. The administrative data used are limited for answering the defined research questions. Anyway, the data quality must be improved and unified in Austria.

  2. Social determinants of long lasting insecticidal hammock use among the Ra-glai ethnic minority in Vietnam: implications for forest malaria control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Peeters Grietens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-lasting insecticidal hammocks (LLIHs are being evaluated as an additional malaria prevention tool in settings where standard control strategies have a limited impact. This is the case among the Ra-glai ethnic minority communities of Ninh Thuan, one of the forested and mountainous provinces of Central Vietnam where malaria morbidity persist due to the sylvatic nature of the main malaria vector An. dirus and the dependence of the population on the forest for subsistence--as is the case for many impoverished ethnic minorities in Southeast Asia. METHODS: A social science study was carried out ancillary to a community-based cluster randomized trial on the effectiveness of LLIHs to control forest malaria. The social science research strategy consisted of a mixed methods study triangulating qualitative data from focused ethnography and quantitative data collected during a malariometric cross-sectional survey on a random sample of 2,045 study participants. RESULTS: To meet work requirements during the labor intensive malaria transmission and rainy season, Ra-glai slash and burn farmers combine living in government supported villages along the road with a second home at their fields located in the forest. LLIH use was evaluated in both locations. During daytime, LLIH use at village level was reported by 69.3% of all respondents, and in forest fields this was 73.2%. In the evening, 54.1% used the LLIHs in the villages, while at the fields this was 20.7%. At night, LLIH use was minimal, regardless of the location (village 4.4%; forest 6.4%. DISCUSSION: Despite the free distribution of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs and LLIHs, around half the local population remains largely unprotected when sleeping in their forest plot huts. In order to tackle forest malaria more effectively, control policies should explicitly target forest fields where ethnic minority farmers are more vulnerable to malaria.

  3. What happens after the cutting of the umbilical cord? Breastfeeding as a central symbol of the early mother-child relationship and its social implications in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsbeth Kneuper

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Les nouvelles techniques biomédicales ont un impact profond, voire révolutionnaire, sur nos conceptions de la parenté, de la famille ou de nos rapports sociaux de sexe, constat qui a reçu une attention croissante de la part des sciences sociales au cours de la dernière décennie. Les progrès technologiques dans le domaine de la technique et de l’analyse médicales, par exemple, ont une influence directe sur ce qu’on peut globalement appeler le « discours sur l’allaitement », et indirecte sur la représentation du rôle de la femme dans une société particulière. Dans cet article, nous cherchons à montrer que ce discours traduit plutôt des effets conservateurs de la pratique et de la théorie actuelles dans le domaine biomédical et que la nourriture, la science et la technologie contribuent ensemble à restaurer ou renforcer les conceptions traditionnellement perçues au sein de la société allemande.The fact that new biomedical technologies have a profound and sometimes revolutionary impact on our concepts of kinship, family or gender roles has attracted increasing attention from social scientists over the past decade. Technological advances in medical techniques and analysis, for instance, have had a direct influence on what could broadly be called the “breastfeeding discourse” and an indirect effect on the notion of the woman’s role in a given society. The present article will show that what this discourse actually reflects are the conservative effects of today’s biomedical practice and theory and that food, science and technology combine together to restore or reinforce traditionally held representations in German society.

  4. Social Impact, a Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Onyx

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper constructs a theoretical model of social impact as it applies to civil society organisations. It does so by drawing on the recent literature on the topic as well as recently completed empirical studies. First, the relationship between impact and evaluation is examined. This is followed by an exploration of the capitals, notably social, human, and cultural capital and their interrelationships, as a theoretical base for the explication of social impact. A formal model of social impact is then identified together with a set of basic principles that may be said to define social impact. Finally the implications of the model are discussed for social policy and organisational management.

  5. 教育與社會改革:George S. Counts社會重建論的實踐意涵 Education and Social Reform: The Practical Implications of George S. Counts’ Social Reconstructionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    鍾鴻銘 Hung-Ming Chung

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 本文旨在探討G. S. Counts以教育導引社會改革的教育論述。本文首先分析Counts對於教育的見解。Counts認為教育固須考量兒童,但亦應有明確的發展方向。其次,Counts認為教育並無普遍的本質而是依於文化脈絡的一種社會制度。再者,Counts認為教育目的應是社會性的。在Counts的理論中,民主倫理與工業主義是兩大重心。Counts主張重建民主倫理的根基,以適應工業時代的來臨。Counts認為相對於農業時代以個人主義為基調,工業時代則是以集體主義為特徵,集體主義在強調追求總體的福利同時,亦鼓勵 團體的合作。在以教育引領社會改革的期許中,Counts賦予教師相當大的職責與期待。 This paper explored Counts’ educational discourses of social reform by education. Firstly, it analyzed Counts’ views on education. Counts thought that educational process should have a clear direction to follow besides taking children into account. Secondly, Counts believed that there was no universal essence of education; indeed, it was a contextual institution. Thirdly, Counts contended that the purpose of education was fundamentally social. According to his theory, democratic ethic and industrialism were two key points. He thought that the basis of American democracy must be rebuilt in order to meet the challenges of industrial era. He indicated that collectivism was the characteristic of industrial era as contrasted with individualism, which was exalted in agricultural era. Collectivism promoted the pursuit of general welfare and the cooperation among groups. Looking forward to social reform led by education, teachers were invested with great responsibility and anticipation.

  6. The private security in Brazil: Some aspects related to the motivations, regulation and social implications of the sector/La seguridad privada en Brasil: Algunos aspectos relacionados con las motivaciones, reglamento y las implicaciones sociales del sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Zanetic (Brasil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of private security verified in many countries in the middle of twentieth century displays important questions about state responsibility in relation to the security. In Brazil, where the growth is very significant mainly in the last two decades, not much is possible to know about the real dimension of the sector and about the conditions that carried out this appearance and expansion. Taking into consideration approaches observed in the international literature and the data relative to this sector, this work analyze the Brazilian regulatory framework, showing the implications about some more problematic features. El crecimiento de la seguridad privada ha crecido en muchos países en pleno siglo XX, donde muestra importantes cuestiones sobre la responsabilidad del Estado en relación con la seguridad. En Brasil, donde el crecimiento es muy importante principalmente en las últimas dos décadas, no es posible conocer sobre la dimensión real del sector y sobre las condiciones que llevan a cabo este aspecto y expansión. Teniendo en consideración criterios observados en la literatura internacional y los datos en relación con este sector, este trabajo analiza el marco regulador brasileño, mostrando las implicaciones acerca de algunas de las características más problemáticas.

  7. How do we think machines think? An fMRI study of alleged competition with an artificial intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry eChaminade

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans are particularly skilled in mentalizing, the inference of other agents’ hidden mental states. Here we question whether activity in brain areas involved in mentalizing is specific to the processing of mental states or can be generalized to the inference of non-mental states by investigating brain responses during the interaction with an artificial agent. Participants were scanned using fMRI during interactive rock-paper-scissors games while believing the opponent was a fellow human (Intentional agent, a humanoid robot endowed with an algorithm developed to win the game (Artificial agent, or a laptop playing randomly (Random agent. Subjective reports indicated that participants perceived differences between the three opponents. No brain area responded specifically to interaction with the robot, suggesting the absence of reproducible stance when interacting with an artificial agent. We probed response to the artificial agent in clusters activated during the interaction with the intentional agent. A highly significant increase from robot to human in all clusters, including the precuneus involved in working memory, the posterior intraparietal suclus, in the control of attention and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, in executive functions, supports the intrinsically engaging nature of social interactions. Mentalizing regions, the medial prefrontal cortex and right temporoparietal junction, responded to the human only, supporting that humans do not adopt an intentional stance when interacting with an artificial agent. In contrast, left premotor cortex and anterior intraparietal sulcus involved in motor resonance were activated when interacting with the intentional and artificial agent, suggesting that participants also simulated the embodied humanoid robot’s actions in the game. Results support the specificity of mentalizing areas for interactions with intentional agents, while motor resonance generalizes to interactions with

  8. Influences of family structure dynamics on sexual debut in Africa: implications for research, practice and policies in reproductive health and social development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defo, Barthelemy Kuate; Dimbuene, Zacharie Tsala

    2012-06-01

    There is no research on the timing, sequencing and number of changes in family environment and their influences on sexual and reproductive health outcomes in Africa. Using a population-based survey with data on family structure at three points in the life course, this paper examines the influences of these family structure dynamics on the timing of first sex among unmarried males and females aged 12-24 years in Cameroon. The number and timing of family transitions significantly impacted the timing of sexual debut for both males and females. The median age at first sex (18.7 years) is higher among young people without family transition than among those with one transition (18.2 years) or two transitions (17.7 years). Family transitions occurring during childhood were significantly associated with premature sexual initiation for females but not for males. Reproductive health and social development interventions for young people in Africa should integrate the changing contexts and transitions in family structure.

  9. What’s in a Dog’s Breakfast? Considering the Social, Veterinary and Environmental Implications of Feeding Food Scraps to Pets Using Three Australian Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly Thompson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diverting food waste away from landfills is one way to minimise its serious environmental impact. Given that over a third of Australian households have at least one pet, the feeding of food waste to dogs constitutes one potentially significant waste diversion path. However, the proportion of dog owners that feed food waste to their pets is unknown. Moreover, there has been no investigation into any relationship between practices of feeding scraps to pets and the animals’ body condition, living arrangements (inside or outside and exercise regime. To provide some insight, this paper presents findings from three surveys across two Australian studies. The first reports both pet and dog-specific findings from two surveys within a wider food waste research project (n = 1017, establishing that 28% of respondents fed leftovers to pets as a main food waste minimization strategy, yet in only 5% of households did this constitute more than half of the household’s food scraps. This modest diversion of food scraps from landfill to feeding pets was reflected in the finding that there was no significant difference seen in the claimed level of food discards to the waste stream for households feeding food scraps to dogs and those that did not. The second—a dog owner specific study (n = 355—found that almost half (44% of respondents reported feeding table scraps to dogs. They were more likely to be females, owners of medium sized dogs, and in larger households. There was no significant difference in self-rated dogs’ body condition scores between respondents who fed table scraps to their dog and those who did not. Further multidisciplinary research is recommended to reconcile the social, veterinary and environmental risks and benefits of feeding food waste to animals.

  10. Building a Marketing Curriculum to Support Courses in Social Entrepreneurship and Social Venture Competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Curren, Mary T.; Harich, Katrin R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the implications of the increased popularity of social enterprise programs and social venture competitions for the marketing curriculum. Social enterprise programs and competitions are often offered outside the school of business and target students from a variety of academic backgrounds. Although social enterprises use…

  11. Mortalidad evitable en los estados de la frontera del norte de México: posibles implicaciones sociales y para los servicios de salud / Avoidable mortality in the border states of northern Mexico: potential implications for social determinants and health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. López J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Objetivo: analizar la mortalidad evitable en los estados de la frontera del norte de México entre 1998 y 2007 para indirectamente evaluar la calidad de los servicios de salud en la región. Metodología: se analizó la información sobre mortalidad del Sistema Nacional de Información en Salud (sinais. La unidad de análisis fue la causa básica de la defunción codificada según la décima revisión de la CIE. La mortalidad evitable fue clasificada según el catálogo de causas de muerte propuesto por Gómez. Se hizo un análisis exploratorio de la relación entre la mortalidad evitable y la derechohabiencia y el nivel socioeconómico de los municipios correspondientes a las muertes. Resultados: la tasa de mortalidad evitable global fue de 350,2 muertes por mil habitantes en la región. La mortalidad evitable por diagnóstico y tratamiento médico precoz, violencia y VIH/SIDA tuvo tasas de 223, 60 y 5 por mil habitantes, respectivamente, presentando variaciones de magnitud, sociodemográficas y por derechohabiencia entre estados. Discusión y conclusiones: las poblaciones de los estados de la frontera norte de México se caracterizan por tener una dinámica sociodemográfica y de los servicios de salud muy intensa. Los resultados sugieren que el sistema de salud está siendo rebasado en su respuesta a una alta frecuencia de enfermedades no transmisibles. En el aspecto social existen condiciones estructurales en México que favorecen la presencia de narcotráfico y su consecuente causa de violencia y consumo de drogas ilegales que podrían estar relacionadas con la frecuencia de muertes violentas y en forma subsidiaria con las causadas por el VIH/SIDA. / ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze avoidable mortality between 1998 and 2007 in the border states of Northern Mexico to evaluate, indirectly, the quality of the region's health care services. Methodology: the information on mortality provided by the National Health Information System

  12. Further analysis of the neuropharmacological profile of 9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine (THA), and alleged drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukarch, B.; Leysen, J.E.; Stoof, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    In a recent study the authors have documented the acetylcholinesterase and outward K+-current inhibiting activity of 9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine (THA), a drug reportedly active in the treatment of Alzheimer patients. In the present study they have investigated the effects of THA on the uptake and release of radiolabeled NA, DA and 5-HT. THA concentration-dependently inhibited the uptake of these monoamines with IC-50 values of approximately 1, 7 and 2 ..mu..M respectively. Release studies of these radiolabeled monoamines from control and reserpine pretreated tissue revealed that the THA-induced uptake inhibition does not occur at the level of the axonal membrane but at the level of the monoaminergic storage granules. In addition the affinity of THA for alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta-adrenoceptors, for D-2 dopamine, S-la and S-2 serotonin and for muscarinic receptors was investigated. It appeared that in concentrations up to 1 ..mu..M THA did not display any affinity towards these receptors. It is concluded from these experiments that the effects of THA on monoaminergic neurotransmission might contribute to the alleged therapeutic action of THA in Alzheimer's disease. 17 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  13. Rural Social Change in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turowski, Jan, Ed.; Szwengrub, Lili Maria, Ed.

    Addressing the question of economic growth, this book focuses on the implications of industry re: Polish social structure, organization of farms, and changes in rural culture and large social groups. Emphasizing way and quality of life, this book includes the following major sections and article titles: (1) Industrialization and Changes in the…

  14. Youth Homelessness and Social Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A.

    2007-01-01

    Building upon previous exploratory qualitative research (Kidd S.A. (2003) "Child Adol. Social Work J." 20(4):235-261), this paper examines the mental health implications of social stigma as it is experienced by homeless youth. Surveys conducted with 208 youths on the streets and in agencies in New York City and Toronto revealed significant…

  15. Social Inclusion and Metrolingual Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuji, Emi; Pennycook, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the implications of metrolingual language practices for how we understand social inclusion. A vision of social inclusion that includes bi- and multilingual capacities may comprise an appreciation of a diversity of languages other than English, and the skills and capabilities of multilingual language users, yet it is all…

  16. Social responsibility of nursing: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Barry, Donna M; Hoyt, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Davis, Sheila M

    2009-05-01

    This study addresses social responsibility in the discipline of nursing and implications for global health. The concept of social responsibility is explicated and its relevance for nursing is examined, grounded in the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and the International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics. Social justice, human rights, nurse migration, and approaches to nursing education are discussed within the framework of nursing's social responsibility. Strategies for addressing nursing workforce issues and education within a framework of social responsibility are explored.

  17. Social Impact Assessment in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sanne Vammen; Hansen, Anne Merrild; Lyhne, Ivar

    2015-01-01

    cases, which are characterised by debates and conflicts on social issues. Analysis of the EA statements shows inclusion of a broad range of social impacts. However, the EAs do not fully match the concerns of the public, and social impacts are not always analysed in depth, mitigation measures...... are not suggested or are postponed and the geographical distribution of impacts assessed is biased towards including negative local impacts. We discuss the scope and handling of social impacts, and possible implications. Based on this, we conclude with the view that EA might do the job of handling social impacts...

  18. Social opdrift - social arv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Morten; Gabrielsen, G.; Nørrung, Per

    "Social opdrift - social arv" stiller på flere måder spørgsmål ved begrebet social arv. Bogen konkluderer blandt andet, at langt de fleste børn, der opvokser i en socialt belastet familie, bliver velfungerende voksne. Professionelle, der møder socialt belastede familier, har derfor et stort ansvar....... Naturligvis skal der tages hånd om udsatte børn, men det kræver samtidig stor opmærksomhed at sørge for, at fokuseringen på den sociale arv ikke tager overhånd, så det bliver en selvopfyldende profeti."Social opdrift - social" arv viser, hvordan forskningsresultater er blevet fremlagt på en måde, som har...... medvirket til at skabe en skæv opfattelse af, at forældrenes problemer er hovedårsag til børns sociale problemer. I selvstændige analyser vises, hvordan data, der normalt bruges som "bevis" for den sociale arvs betydning, tydeligt illustrerer, at det er en undtagelse, at børn får sociale problemer af samme...

  19. The social dimension of entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrative framework to conceptualize important social dimensions of entrepreneurship. The paper reviews and evaluates the current status of research dealing with entrepreneurship, social capital and trust. The proposed framework rests on the recognition that entrepreneurial...... activities are results of social interactions and mechanisms. In consequence, entrepreneurship cannot merely be understood in terms of 'personality characteristics' or in sterile economic terms. The paper addresses by concluding implications for practitioners and for research....

  20. The social dimensions of entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrative framework to conceptualize important social dimensions of entrepreneurship. The paper reviews and evaluates the current status of research dealing with entrepreneurship, social capital and trust. The proposed framework rests on the recognition that entrepreneurial...... activities are results of social interactions and mechanisms. In consequence, entrepreneurship cannot merely be understood in terms of "personality characteristics" or in sterile economic terms. In closing, the paper addresses implications for practitioners and for research. Udgivelsesdato: AUG...