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Sample records for allanite

  1. Rapid chemical analysis of allanite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Goro; Hayashi, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    Rapid chemical analysis of allanite was studied by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Powdered sample was fused with mixture of sodium carbonate anhydrous and borax (4 : 1 weight) in platinum crucible and sample solution was prepared. SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , MnO and rare earth metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, CaO, MgO and Ce 2 O 3 by titration, ThO 2 by colorimetry, and La 2 O 3 by flame photometry respectively. For sample solution treated with hydrofluoric acid and sulfuric acid. Na 2 O and K 2 O were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, TiO 2 and P 2 O 5 by colorimetry. Chemical analyses for four samples were carried out and gave consistent results. (author)

  2. Preservation of Permian allanite within an Alpine eclogite facies shear zone at Mt Mucrone, Italy: Mechanical and chemical behaviour of allanite during mylonitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenki-Tok, Benedicte; Oliot, E.; Berger, Alfons

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the mechanical and cehmical behavior of allanite during shear zone formation under high-pressure metamorphism. Understanding physico-chemical processes related to the retention or resetting of Pb isotopes in allanite during geological processes is essential for robust petroch...

  3. Origin of allanite in gneiss and granite in the Dabie orogenic belt, Central East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haihao; Xiao, Yilin; Xu, Lijuan; Sun, He; Huang, Jian; Hou, Zhenhui

    2017-03-01

    Allanite is a common accessory mineral phase, representing an important carrier of rare earth elements, Th, U, Sr and other trace elements in most continental rocks. As Th and U can be incorporated into the allanite lattice, the mineral is a good geochronological tool for constraining geological events. Moreover, the trace element features δEu, Th/U ratio and common lead content of allanite are indicators of the forming conditions. Allanite and coexisting epidote-group minerals are abundant in ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks from the Dabie-Sulu orogen in central East China. However, if these minerals formed in the Neoproterozoic as magmatic phases, or in the Triassic as metamorphic phases is a matter of long-standing controversy. We report major and trace element analyses of whole rocks, allanite and coexisting epidote-group minerals, together with U-Th-Pb isotopic compositions of allanite in UHP gneiss from the Dabie-Sulu orogen, and allanite in the adjacent Jingshan granite. The granite is emplaced along the southeastern margin of the North China Craton and considered a product of partial melting of the subducted Dabie-Sulu gneiss. Trace elements (low Th/U and La/Sm, high δEu and high Sr) and high common lead concentrations indicate a metamorphic origin of allanite-epidote in the UHP gneiss. On the other hand, coarse-grained allanite from the Jingshan granite shows a corrosion core and a magmatic rim with common 208Pb up to 70% in the core and less than 30% in the rim. The allanite cores are of peritectic and the rims of magmatic origin with ages of ∼160 Ma, consistent with the granite crystallization age. In combination with previous studies, we conclude that the allanite of the Jingshan granite has form from the subducted and remolten Dabie-Sulu gneiss. Allanite records Triassic UHP metamorphic ages as well as Jurassic peritectic-magmatic ages as a part of the evolution of the Dabie-Sulu orogen.

  4. Rare earth distribution in Peruvian circons, fluorites, apatites, garnets and allanites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, M.J.; Mendoza A, A.

    1981-12-01

    Using spectrographic methods, the distribution of rare earths in different locations of Peru were determinated. La-Ce-Pr-Nd-Pm-Sm-Eu-Gd-Ts-Dy-Ho-Er-Tm-Ys-Lu and their compounds with Y-Sc-Tm in circon, fluorite, apatite, garnet and allanite. Their geochemistry and frequency as well as the economic aspects exploration and applications were analyzed.

  5. LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Dating and Trace Element Geochemistry of Allanite: Implications on the Different Skarn Metallogenesis between the Giant Beiya Au and Machangqing Cu-Mo-(Au Deposits in Yunnan, SW China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The giant Beiya Au skarn deposit and Machangqing porphyry Cu-Mo-(Au deposit are located in the middle part of the Jinshajiang–Ailaoshan alkaline porphyry metallogenic belt. The Beiya deposit is the largest Au skarn deposit in China, whilst the Machangqing deposit comprises a well-developed porphyry-skarn-epithermal Cu-Mo-(Au mineral system. In this paper, we present new allanite U-Th-Pb ages and trace element geochemical data from the two deposits and discuss their respective skarn metallogenesis. Based on the mineral assemblage, texture and Th/U ratio, the allanite from the Beiya and Machangqing deposits are likely hydrothermal rather than magmatic. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS allanite U-Th-Pb dating has yielded Th-Pb isochron ages of 33.4 ± 4.6 Ma (MSWD = 0.22 (Beiya and 35.4 ± 9.8 Ma (MSWD = 0.26 (Machangqing, representing the retrograde alteration and magnetite skarn mineralization age of the two deposits. The Beiya and Machangqing alkali porphyry-related mineralization are synchronous and genetically linked to the magmatic hydrothermal activities of the Himalayan orogenic event. Major and trace element compositions reveal that the Beiya allanite has higher Fe3+/(Fe3+ + Fe2+ ratios, U content and Th content than the Machangqing allanite, which indicate a higher oxygen fugacity and F content for the ore-forming fluids at Beiya. Such differences in the ore-forming fluids may have contributed to the different metallogenic scales and metal types in the Beiya and Machangqing deposit.

  6. Post-magmatic solid solutions of CaCeAl2(Fe3+ 2/3□1/3)[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH), allanite-(Ce) and REE-bearing epidote in miarolitic pegmatites of Permian Baveno granite (Verbania, central-southern alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastoni, Alessandro; Nestola, Fabrizio; Schiazza, Mariangela

    2017-06-01

    CaCeAl2(Fe3+ 2/3□1/3)[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH), allanite-(Ce) and rare earth element (REE)-bearing epidote occur as globular aggregates and platy prismatic crystals in miarolitic cavities in a niobium, yttrium, fluorine (NYF) granitic pegmatite at Baveno, Verbania, Southern Alps, Italy. These samples were investigated by means of an electron probe micro-analyser (EPMA) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Our EPMA results show that the globular aggregates have the highest REE content in the core portion and decreases to REE-bearing epidote towards the rim whereas the prismatic crystals are characterized by marked oscillatory zoning that have the highest REE contents at the rim of the crystal. The unit-cell parameters of "allanites" have an intermediate unit-cell between CaCeAl2(Fe3+ 2/3□1/3)[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH), allanite-(Ce) and REE-free epidote, because reflect the strong chemical heterogeneity of the samples which form complete solid solutions. Hydrothermal fluids control the activity and precipitation of incompatible elements like high field strength elements (HFSE), Sc and REE by hydrous F-rich fluids below the critical temperature which allow to deposit accessory minerals in the cavities with decreasing temperature. The source of REE and Y are the sheet and REE-silicates like siderophyllite-annite, and gadolinite-(Y) which underwent partial to complete decomposition by the activity of aggressive F-rich hydrothermal fluids.

  7. Allanite behaviour during incipient melting in the southern Central Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregory, C.J.; Rubatto, D.; Hermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    86 43 84 24 120 91 181 302 260 Dy 134 219 311 363 147 353 80 499 350 712 1570 1190 Ho 16 30 40 48 16 46 9 64 45 89 231 158 Er 28 55 72 87 26 84 14 120 89 165 394 256 Tm 3 5 7 8 2 8 1 12 10 17 31 20 Yb 13 22 32 39 10 40 5 60 55 87 120 89 Lu 1.8 3 4 5 1.3 5 1 7 7 11 10 8 Hf 0.11 0.77 0.70 0.77 0.15 0...... 196 162 198 288 799 Ho 171 196 57 462 420 24 25 21 23 39 114 Er 351 403 120 1180 1030 45 47 40 43 81 232 Tm 36 41 14 152 131 4 4 4 5 9 26 Yb 175 209 87 920 805 24 23 20 33 58 147 Lu 20 25 12 112 99 3 3 3 4 7 17 Hf 0.80 0.75 0.25 0.32 0.24 0.22 0.48 0.43 0.10 0.24 0.18 Ta 0.02 0.34 0.04 0.05 0.05 0...

  8. Allanite-monazite-xenotime-zircon-apatite assemblage in two-mica granites of the Moldanubian (South Bohemian) batholith

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš

    -, - (2010), s. 460 ISSN 0365-8066. [IMA. 21.08.2010-27.08.2010, Budapest] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME10083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : granite * accessory minerals * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  9. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mar-duraswana-a-we-a-tae... ... r. p.. C. e. As. Locality Evityw Hardness Colour Lustre Cleavage Fracture 2V Sign Pleochroism. Allanite from 3o 95 6 Black Resinous Poor Conchoidal 82° Negative a : Brownish-red. Diguvakonda B: Brownish- party yellow y: Greenish. Allanite from 3.82 6 Dark steel Resinous | Conchoidal 80' ...

  10. Physico-chemical control on the REE minerals in chloritoid-grade metasediments from a single outcrop (Central Alps, Switzerland)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janots, Emilie; Berger, Alfons; Engi, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the effects of fluid, whole-rock composition and oxygen fugacity, on the texture and composition of monazite, allanite, and xenotime. For this purpose, these were investigated in 13 monometamorphic metasediments from a single locality of the Central Alps (Switzerland), which...

  11. Některé informace z koncentrátů těžkých minerálů z melechovského masivu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, V.; Žáček, M.; Chlupáčová, M.; Matějka, D.; Korbelová, Zuzana; Klementová, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, - (2011), s. 172-176 ISSN 0514-8057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : heavy minerals * uraninite * tourmaline * allanite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.geology.cz/zpravy/obsah/2010/zpravy-2010-39.pdf

  12. Petrological and geochemical studies of ultramafic–mafic rocks from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The regional trend of the metamophites and granitoid gneiss is generally .... linear fashion. Allanite is associated with the opaques (≃1%). Ilmenite occurs as very fine to coarse grain associated with hornblende and pyrox- enes. Magnetite occurs as .... biotite and sheared or granulated appearance of the quartzofeldspathic ...

  13. Extraction of Cerium (IV) Using Di–n-butylsulfoxide in Chloroform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    2015-01-12

    Jan 12, 2015 ... Various parameters such as equilibration time, metal ion concentration, effect of temperature and diverse ions on ... Cerium is the most abundant among rare earth metals and is extracted from monazite, allanite ..... The effect of various cations such as uranium, thorium, zinc, lead, aluminum, and sodium on ...

  14. The behaviour of monazite from greenschist facies phyllites to anatectic gneisses: An example from the Chugach Metamorphic Complex, southern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Deta; Bruand, Emilie; Rubatto, Daniela; Stüwe, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Monazite is a common accessory mineral in various metamorphic and magmatic rocks, and is widely used for U-Pb geochronology. However, linking monazite U-Pb ages with the PT evolution of the rock is not always straightforward. We investigated the behaviour of monazite in a metasedimentary sequence ranging from greenschist facies phyllites into upper amphibolites facies anatectic gneisses, which is exposed in the Eocene Chugach Metamorphic Complex of southern Alaska. We investigated textures, chemical compositions and U-Pb dates of monazite grains in samples of differing bulk rock composition and metamorphic grade, with particular focus on the relationship between monazite and other REE-bearing minerals such as allanite and xenotime. In the greenschist facies phyllites, detrital and metamorphic allanite is present, whereas monazite is absent. In lower amphibolites facies schists (~ 550-650 °C and ≥ 3.4 kbar), small, medium-Y monazite is wide-spread (Mnz1), indicating monazite growth prior and/or simultaneous with growth of garnet and andalusite. In anatectic gneisses, new low-Y, high-Th monazite (Mnz2) crystallised from partial melts, and a third, high-Y, low-Th monazite generation (Mnz3) formed during initial cooling and garnet resorption. U-Pb SHRIMP analysis of the second and third monazite generations yields ages of ~ 55-50 Ma. Monazite became unstable and was overgrown by allanite and/or allanite/epidote/apatite coronas within retrograde muscovite- and/or chlorite-bearing shear zones. This study documents polyphase, complex monazite growth and dissolution during a single, relatively short-lived metamorphic cycle.

  15. Rare earth mineralisation in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, northern Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, A. S.; Hughes, H. S. R.; Goodenough, K. M.; Gunn, A. G.; Lacinska, A.

    2012-04-01

    Due to growing global concerns about security of rare earth element (REE) supply, there is considerable interest in identifying new deposits and in understanding the processes responsible for their formation. Ongoing studies by BGS on potential indigenous resources have focused on the Caledonian alkaline intrusive complexes of north-west Scotland. The highest values of total rare earth oxide (TREO) have been found in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Complex in Sutherland. The Loch Loyal Syenite Complex comprises three intrusions: Ben Loyal, Beinn Stumanadh and Cnoc nan Cuilean. The Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion, which covers an area of about 3 km2, can be subdivided into two zones: a Mixed Syenite Zone (MSZ) and a later Massive Leucosyenite Zone (MLZ). Evidence from field mapping and 3D-modelling suggests that the melasyenites were passively emplaced to form a lopolith concordant with the Moine and Lewisian country rocks. A later episode of leucosyenitic magmatism caused mixing and mingling with the melasyenite forming the MSZ. Continued intrusion of leucosyenite melts then formed the MLZ [1]. The melasyenites are enriched in TREO relative to the leucosyenites with average values of 3800 ppm and 1400 ppm respectively. The highest contents, up to 20 000 ppm TREO, are found in narrow biotite-magnetite-rich veins identified in a single stream section near the eastern margin of the intrusion. All lithologies are light rare earth element (LREE) dominated with high concentrations of Ba and Sr and low levels of Nb and Ta. Various REE-bearing minerals are present but allanite is dominant, being present in all major magmatic lithologies and the biotite-magnetite veins. Three generations of allanite have been identified: a late-magmatic phase rimming apatite; allanite micro veinlets cross-cutting the syenite; and a third phase only observed in the biotite-magnetite veins. TREO concentrations of the different allanite generations are similar, averaging 22%. The

  16. Strata-bound Fe-Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE deposits of the Idaho Cobalt Belt: Multistage hydrothermal mineralization in a magmatic-related iron oxide copper-gold system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of strata-bound Fe-Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-rare-earth element (REE) deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt in east-central Idaho provide evidence of multistage epigenetic mineralization by magmatic-hydrothermal processes in an iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) system. Deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt comprise three types: (1) strata-bound sulfide lenses in the Blackbird district, which are cobaltite and, less commonly, chalcopyrite rich with locally abundant gold, native bismuth, bismuthinite, xenotime, allanite, monazite, and the Be-rich silicate gadolinite-(Y), with sparse uraninite, stannite, and Bi tellurides, in a gangue of quartz, chlorite, biotite, muscovite, garnet, tourmaline, chloritoid, and/or siderite, with locally abundant fluorapatite or magnetite; (2) discordant tourmalinized breccias in the Blackbird district that in places have concentrations of cobaltite, chalcopyrite, gold, and xenotime; and (3) strata-bound magnetite-rich lenses in the Iron Creek area, which contain cobaltiferous pyrite and locally sparse chalcopyrite or xenotime. Most sulfide-rich deposits in the Blackbird district are enclosed by strata-bound lenses composed mainly of Cl-rich Fe biotite; some deposits have quartz-rich envelopes.Whole-rock analyses of 48 Co- and/or Cu-rich samples show high concentrations of Au (up to 26.8 ppm), Bi (up to 9.16 wt %), Y (up to 0.83 wt %), ∑REEs (up to 2.56 wt %), Ni (up to 6,780 ppm), and Be (up to 1,180 ppm), with locally elevated U (up to 124 ppm) and Sn (up to 133 ppm); Zn and Pb contents are uniformly low (≤821 and ≤61 ppm, respectively). Varimax factor analysis of bulk compositions of these samples reveals geochemically distinct element groupings that reflect statistical associations of monazite, allanite, and xenotime; biotite and gold; detrital minerals; chalcopyrite and sparse stannite; quartz; and cobaltite with sparse selenides and tellurides. Significantly, Cu is statistically separate from Co and As

  17. Genesis of the central zone of the Nolans Bore rare earth element deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoneveld, Louise; Spandler, Carl; Hussey, Kelvin

    2015-08-01

    The Nolans Bore rare earth element (REE) deposit consists of a network of fluorapatite-bearing veins and breccias hosted within Proterozoic granulites of the Reynolds Range, Central Australia. Mineralisation is divided into three zones (north, central, and south-east), with the north and south-east zones consisting of massive REE-bearing fluorapatite veins, with minor brecciation and carbonate infill. The central zone is distinctively different in mineralogy and structure; it features extensive brecciation, a high allanite content, and a large, epidote-rich enveloping alteration zone. The central zone is a reworking of the original solid apatite veins that formed during the Chewings Orogeny at ca. 1525 Ma. These original apatite veins are thought to derive from phosphate-rich magmatic-hydrothermal fluid exsolved from as-yet unrecognised alkaline magmatic bodies at depth. We define four ore breccia types (BX1-4) in the central zone on the basis of detailed petrological and geochemical analysis of drillcore and thin sections. BX1 ore comprises fluorapatite with minor crackle brecciation with carbonate infill and resembles ore of the north and south-east zones. Breccia types BX2, BX3, and BX4 represent progressive stages of ore brecciation and development of calc-silicate mineral (amphibole, epidote, allanite, calcite) infill. Comparison of bulk ore sample geochemistry between breccia types indicates that REEs were not mobilised more than a few centimetres during hydrothermal alteration and brecciation. Instead, most of the REEs were partitioned from the original REE fluorapatite into newly formed allanite, REE-poor fluorapatite and minor REE carbonate in the breccias. Negative europium (Eu) anomalies in the breccia minerals are accounted for by a large positive Eu anomaly in epidote from the alteration zones surrounding the ore breccias. This observation provides a direct link between ore recrystallisation and brecciation, and the formation of the alteration halo in

  18. Enrichment of Rare Earth Elements during magmatic and post-magmatic processes: a case study from the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, northern Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, A. S.; Goodenough, K. M.; Hughes, H. S. R.; Roberts, N. M. W.; Gunn, A. G.; Rushton, J.; Lacinska, A.

    2013-10-01

    Concern about security of supply of critical elements used in new technologies, such as the Rare Earth Elements (REE), means that it is increasingly important to understand the processes by which they are enriched in crustal settings. High REE contents are found in syenite-dominated alkaline complexes intruded along the Moine Thrust Zone, a major collisional zone in north-west Scotland. The most northerly of these is the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, which comprises three separate intrusions. One of these, the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion, contains two mappable zones: a Mixed Syenite Zone in which mafic melasyenite is mixed and mingled with leucosyenite and a Massive Leucosyenite Zone. Within the Mixed Syenite Zone, hydrothermal activity is evident in the form of narrow altered veins dominated by biotite and magnetite; these are poorly exposed and their lateral extent is uncertain. The REE mineral allanite is relatively abundant in the melasyenite and is extremely enriched in the biotite-magnetite veins, which have up to 2 % total rare earth oxides in bulk rock analyses. An overall model for development of this intrusion can be divided into three episodes: (1) generation of a Light Rare Earth Element (LREE)-enriched parental magma due to enrichment of the mantle source by subduction of pelagic carbonates; (2) early crystallisation of allanite in melasyenite, due to the saturation of the magma in the LREE; and (3) hydrothermal alteration, in three different episodes identified by petrography and mineral chemistry, generating the intense enrichment of REE in the biotite-magnetite veins. Dating of allanite and titanite in the biotite-magnetite veins gives ages of c. 426 Ma, overlapping with previously published crystallisation ages for zircon in the syenite.

  19. Fluid-induced dissolution breakdown of monazite from Tso Morari complex, NW Himalayas: evidence for immobility of trace elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Dewashish; Pruseth, Kamal Lochan

    2012-08-01

    Primary igneous monazite from the Polokongka La granite of the Tso Morari complex in the western Himalayas has been partially replaced by a three-layered corona of metamorphic fluor-apatite, allanite + U- and Th-bearing phases (huttonite + brabantite), and epidote. The alteration is related to high-pressure amphibolite-facies (10-11 kbar and 587-695 °C) fluid-induced retrogression of the ultra-high-pressure granite during exhumation after India-Asia collision. The corona textures can be explained by pseudomorphic partial replacement of the original monazite to apatite and allanite via a fluid-mediated coupled dissolution-reprecipitation process. Mass balance calculations using the volume proportions and compositions of coronal minerals show that the REE, U, Th, Pb, Ba and P were conserved and not transported outside the alteration corona. The formation of fluor-apatite, allanite, huttonite and coffinite from monazite and the immobility of REE, U and Th require an influx of alkali- and F-bearing, Ca-rich fluid having high Ca/Na into the corona. We are aware of only two other occurrences of such alteration textures, and these have several similarities in terms of geodynamic setting and P-T histories of the host rocks. We suggest that there may be a common mechanism of exhumation style, and source and composition of fluids during retrogression of granitoid rocks in collisional orogens and that such breakdown textures can be used to identify metagranites that have experienced high-P metamorphism in continental collision zones, which is otherwise difficult to constrain due to the high variance of the mineral assemblages in these rocks.

  20. Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in the Nixon Fork mining district, Medfra Quadrangle, central Alaska, 1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Max G.; Stevens, John M.

    1953-01-01

    Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in the Nixon Fork mining district, Medfra quadrangle, central Alaska, in 1949 disclosed the occurrence of allanite in sampled containing as much as 0.05 percent equivalent uranium from the dump of the Whalen mine; the presence of radioactive parisite (a rare-earth fluocarbonate) in a highly altered limestone containing about 0.025 percent equivalent uranium near the Whalen shaft; and radioactive idocrase in samples of altered garnet rock with about 0.025 percent equivalent uranium, form the Crystal shaft of the Nixon Fork mine. This radioactivity is due mostly to thorium rather than uranium. Placer concentrates

  1. Petrology, chronology and sequence of vein systems: Systematic magmatic and hydrothermal history of a major intracontinental shear zone, Canadian Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pe-Piper, Georgia; Piper, David J. W.; McFarlane, Chris R. M.; Sangster, Chris; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Boucher, Brandon

    2018-04-01

    Intra-continental shear zones developed during continental collision may experience prolonged magmatism and mineralization. The Cobequid Shear Zone formed part of a NE-SW-trending, orogen-parallel shear system in the late Devonian-early Carboniferous, where syn-tectonic granite-gabbro plutons and volcanic rocks 4 km thick were progressively deformed. In late Carboniferous to Permian, Alleghanian collision of Africa with Laurentia formed the E-W trending Minas Fault Zone, reactivating parts of the Cobequid Shear Zone. The 50 Ma history of hydrothermal mineralization following pluton emplacement is difficult to resolve from field relationships of veins, but SEM study of thin sections provides clear detail on the sequence of mineralization. The general paragenesis is: albite ± quartz ± chlorite ± monazite → biotite → calcite, allanite, pyrite → Fe-carbonates, Fe-oxides, minor sulfides, calcite and synchysite. Chronology was determined from literature reports and new U-Pb LA-ICPMS dating of monazite and allanite in veins. Vein mineralization was closely linked to magmatic events. Vein emplacement occurred preferentially during fault movement recognised from basin-margin inversion, as a result of fractures opening in the damage zone of master faults. The sequence of mineralization, from ca. 355 Ma riebeckite and albite veins to ca. 327 (-305?) Ma siderite-magnetite and sulfide mineralization, resembles Precambrian iron-oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) systems in the literature. The abundant magmatic Na, halogens and CO2 in veins and some magmatic bodies, characteristic of IOCG systems, were derived from the deeply subducted Rheic Ocean slab with little terrigenous sediment. Regional extension of the Magdalen Basin caused asthenospheric upwelling and melting of the previously metasomatized sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Crustal scale strike-slip faulting facilitated the rise of magmas, resulting in high heat flow driving an active hydrothermal system. Table S2

  2. Accessory mineral U-Th-Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J.I.; Vazquez, J.A.; Renne, P.R.; Schmitt, A.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Reid, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We determined Ar/Ar eruption ages of eight extrusions from the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, a long-lived series of small volume rhyolitic domes in eastern California. Combined with ion-microprobe dating of crystal ages of zircon and allanite from these lavas and from granophyre geothermal well cuttings, we were able to track the range of magma-production rates over the past 650 ka at Coso. In ??? 230 ka rhyolites we find no evidence of protracted magma residence or recycled zircon (or allanite) from Pleistocene predecessors. A significant subset of zircon in the ???85 ka rhyolites yielded ages between ???100 and 200 Ma, requiring that generation of at least some rhyolites involves material from Mesozoic basement. Similar zircon xenocrysts are found in an ???200 ka granophyre. The new age constraints imply that magma evolution at Coso can occur rapidly as demonstrated by significant changes in rhyolite composition over short time intervals (???10's to 100's ka). In conjunction with radioisotopic age constraints from other young silicic volcanic fields, dating of Coso rhyolites highlights the fact that at least some (and often the more voluminous) rhyolites are produced relatively rapidly, but that many small-volume rhyolites likely represent separation from long-lived mushy magma bodies. ?? The Author(s) 2009.

  3. Accessory mineral U-Th-Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Justin I.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Renne, Paul R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Reid, Mary R.

    2009-10-01

    We determined Ar/Ar eruption ages of eight extrusions from the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, a long-lived series of small volume rhyolitic domes in eastern California. Combined with ion-microprobe dating of crystal ages of zircon and allanite from these lavas and from granophyre geothermal well cuttings, we were able to track the range of magma-production rates over the past 650 ka at Coso. In ≤230 ka rhyolites we find no evidence of protracted magma residence or recycled zircon (or allanite) from Pleistocene predecessors. A significant subset of zircon in the ~85 ka rhyolites yielded ages between ~100 and 200 Ma, requiring that generation of at least some rhyolites involves material from Mesozoic basement. Similar zircon xenocrysts are found in an ~200 ka granophyre. The new age constraints imply that magma evolution at Coso can occur rapidly as demonstrated by significant changes in rhyolite composition over short time intervals (≤10’s to 100’s ka). In conjunction with radioisotopic age constraints from other young silicic volcanic fields, dating of Coso rhyolites highlights the fact that at least some (and often the more voluminous) rhyolites are produced relatively rapidly, but that many small-volume rhyolites likely represent separation from long-lived mushy magma bodies.

  4. Petrography of the uranium-bearing minerals of the Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina: phase assemblages and migration of uranium in granitoid rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, J.A.; Solberg, T.N.; Becker, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    Optical petrography, fission track U mapping, and electron microprobe analysis of granitoid rocks from the Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina, show a nonuniform distribution of U in the rocks. In order of abundance, U occurs: in accessory minerals, with U concentrations decreasing in the order: uraninite, coffinite, uranoan thorite, zircon, monazite, titanite, allanite, apatite, zeolites; on altered sulfaces of Fe/sup +2/- and S-bearing minerals; at microcracks filled with carbonate, zeolite, and Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide minerals; on clay minerals of altered feldspars; and in major minerals as a widely dispersed minor component. Thorium has been identified in the accessory minerals thorite, thoroan uraninite, coffinite, allanite, and monazite. Uranium and Th distribution is believed to be of magmatic origin within the major U-Th-Zr phase assemblage: uranoan thorite +zircon /plus or minus/ uraninite. The mechanisms of U retention are similar to those found in sedimentary U deposits. The U-Th-Pb isotope studies of the Liberty Hill pluton show that these mechanisms are effective in retaining the initial concentrations of U. Refs

  5. Rare earths, thorium, and other minor elements in sphene from some plutonic rocks in West-Central Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staatz, M.H.; Conklin, N.M.; Brownfield, I.K.

    1977-01-01

    Sphene is an abundant accessory mineral in some abnormally radioactive plutonic rocks in west-central Alaska. Seven samples of sphene from four different areas in west-central Alaska contained from 20,350 to 39,180 parts per million total rare earths and 390 to 2000 ppM thorium. The lanthanide content in six of the seven sphenes is chiefly the light rare earths and is similar to that of crystal abundance; a seventh sphene from the Darby Mountains, however, contains above average amounts of the heavy rare earths. A comparison of the lanthanide distribution in sphene from several areas indicates that the structure of sphene will accommodate whatever lanthanides are available when the mineral crystallizes. The amount of thorium and rare earths in sphene is also affected by the presence of other accessory minerals. Sphene in rocks containing either allanite or zircon has a lower thorium content than in rocks that do not contain allanite or zircon. Sphene, because of its abundance, may contain the greater part of the rare earths and thorium in some of the plutonic rocks of west-central Alaska

  6. Hunting for eruption ages in accessory minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    A primary goal in geochronology is to provide precise and accurate ages for tephras that serve as chronostratigraphic markers for constraining the timing and rates of volcanism, sedimentation, climate change, and catastrophic events in Earth history. Zircon remains the most versatile accessory mineral for dating silicic tephras due to its common preservation in distal pyroclastic deposits, as well as the robustness of its U-Pb and U-series systems even after host materials have been hydrothermally altered or weathered. Countless studies document that zircon may be complexly zoned in age due to inheritance, contamination, recycling of antecrysts, protracted crystallization in long-lived magma reservoirs, or any combination of these. Other accessory minerals such as allanite or chevkinite can retain similar records of protracted crystallization. If the goal is to date the durations of magmatic crystallization, differentiation, and/or magma residence, then these protracted chronologies within and between accessory minerals are a blessing. However, if the goal is to date the timing of eruption with high precision, i.e., absolute ages with millennial-scale uncertainties, then this age zoning is a curse. Observations from ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of Pleistocene zircon and allanite provide insight into the record of near-eruption crystallization in accessory minerals and serve as a guide for high-precision whole-crystal dating. Although imprecise relative to conventional techniques, ion probe analysis allows high-spatial resolution 238U-230Th dating that can document multi-millennial age distributions at the crystal scale. Analysis of unpolished rims and continuous depth profiling of zircon from small and large volume eruptions (e.g., Coso, Mono Craters, Yellowstone) reveals that the final several micrometers of crystallization often yield ages that are indistinguishable from associated eruption ages from the 40Ar/39Ar or (U-Th)/He methods. Using this approach, we

  7. Formation conditions and REY enrichment of the 2060 Ma phosphorus mineralization at Schiel (South Africa): geochemical and geochronological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Torsten; Klemd, Reiner; Henjes-Kunst, Friedhelm; Goldmann, Simon; Behnsen, Helge; Gerdes, Axel; Dohrmann, Reiner; Barton, Jay M.; Opperman, Rehan

    2018-02-01

    Rocks of the rare-earth element (REY)-enriched apatite deposit in the eastern part of the Schiel Alkaline Complex (SAC; Southern Marginal Zone, Limpopo Belt) were studied for their whole-rock and mineral chemistry, REY mineral distribution and geochronology. Apart from phoscorite (sensu lato), pyroxenite and various syenitic rock types with quite variable apatite contents display P-REY enrichments. Field observations, mineralogical composition as well as major and trace element chemistry of soils make it possible to constrain the distribution of the hidden P-REY-rich rock types in the apatite deposit. Uranium-lead ages of zircon from phoscorite (sensu lato) and syenite are in the range of 2.06-2.05 Ga. Samarium-neodymium (ɛNd(t) -8.6 to -6.0) and in part Rb-Sr (87Sr/86Sr(t) 0.70819-0.70859) isotope data for whole-rock samples and mineral separates indicate an origin from an isotopically enriched and slightly variable source. Fluorapatite, early allanite and titanite are the main REY carriers at Schiel. Fluorapatite dominates the REY budget of pyroxenite and phoscorite, whereas early allanite hosts most of the REY in syenite. Three apatite types are distinguished based on their occurrence in the rocks, REYtotal contents and colouration in cathodoluminescence microscopy. Magmatic apatite in pyroxenite and in phoscorite (sensu lato) as well as early stage type I/II apatite in syenitic rocks have moderate to high REYtotal abundances (up to 3.2 wt%) with the mineral enriched in light REE. Early ferriallanite-(Ce) is strongly enriched in light REE and shows very high REYtotal values (13.7-26.4 wt%), while late allanite has lower REYtotal concentrations (6.9-14.9 wt%). Titanite is abundant in most syenitic rocks (REYtotal 1.7-6.4 wt%); chevkinite-(Ce) occurs locally and contributes to an REY enrichment in contact aureoles between syenite and different lithologies. Apatite-enriched rocks in the SAC in part contain significantly higher REYtotal concentrations in apatite

  8. Thorianite from the Hogatza Placer, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staatz, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    The thorianite in the Hogatza placer was derived from a gneissic monzonite that forms a border facies of the otherwise rather massive granodiorite of the Zane Hills pluton. The border facies is 5 to 10 times as radioactive as the main igneous mass. The uranium content of 11 samples of the gneissic monzonite ranged from 11 to 129 ppM (parts per million) and averaged 47 ppM. The thorium content of these samples ranged from 46 to 268 ppM and averaged 128 ppM. Concentrates of the heavy minerals from these rocks vary somewhat, but amphibole, pyroxene, magnetite, zircon, and sphene are abundant in most. Allanite and biotite occur in many samples, and thorianite, garnet, pyrite, molybdenite, muscovite, goethite, betafite, and thorite occur sparsely in some samples. The thorianite occurs as small cubes similar to those found in the Hogatza placer

  9. Radiatives elements distribution in Serra do Carambei granite, Parana, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto-Coelho, C.V.; Siedlecki, K.N.

    1988-01-01

    In the Serra do Carambei Granite, the uranium present in the rock in anomalous concentration is hosted, preferentially, in accessory mineralogical phases-zircon, xenotime, magnetite and ilmenite, and, in lesser proportion, in the essential minerals of the rock-potassium feldspar and also iron oxydes/hydroxydes and alterated biotite. Optical petrography, autorradiomicrography, scanning electronic microscopy, and the utilization of correlation matrixes and the respective dendrograms revealed a distribution of radioactive elements basically controlled by autometassomatic, tardi/pos-magmatic or supergene processes. Intrusive felsic dikes in the Serra do Carambei Granite have radioelement concentration level approximately four times higher than the enclosing granite, where uranium as well as thorium is preferentially found in metamictized accessory minerals-zircon and allanite. (author) [pt

  10. Structural controls and evolution of gold-, silver-, and REE-bearing copper-cobalt ore deposits, Blackbird district, east-central Idaho: Epigenetic origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, K.; Tysdal, Russell G.; Evans, Karl V.; Kunk, Michael J.; Pillers, Renee M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cu-Co ± Au (± Ag ± Ni ± REE) ore deposits of the Blackbird district, east-central Idaho, have previously been classified as Besshi-type VMS, sedex, and IOCG deposits within an intact stratigraphic section. New studies indicate that, across the district, mineralization was introduced into the country rocks as a series of structurally controlled vein and alteration systems. Quartz-rich and biotite-rich veins (and alteration zones) and minor albite and siderite veinlets maintain consistent order and sulfide mineral associations across the district. Both early and late quartz veins contain chalcopyrite and pyrite, whereas intermediate-stage tourmaline-biotite veins host the cobaltite. Barren early and late albite and late carbonate (generally siderite) form veins or are included in the quartz veins. REE minerals, principally monazite, allanite, and xenotime, are associated with both tourmaline-biotite and late quartz veins. The veins are in mineralized intervals along axial planar cleavage, intrafolial foliation, and shears.

  11. Uranium-lead dating of hydrothermal zircon and monazite from the Sin Quyen Fe-Cu-REE-Au-(U) deposit, northwestern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Chun; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Chen, Wei Terry; Zhao, Xin-Fu; Tran, MyDung

    2018-03-01

    The Sin Quyen deposit in northwestern Vietnam contains economic concentrations of Cu, Au and LREE, and sub-economic concentration of U. In this deposit, massive and banded replacement ores are hosted in Neoproterozoic metapelite. The paragenetic sequence includes sodic alteration (stage I), calcic-potassic alteration and associated Fe-REE-(U) mineralization (stage II), Cu-Au mineralization (stage III), and sulfide-(quartz-carbonate) veins (stage IV). The Sin Quyen deposit experienced an extensive post-ore metamorphic overprint, which makes it difficult to precisely determine the mineralization age. In this study, zircon and monazite U-Pb geochronometers and the Rb-Sr isochron method are used to constrain the timing of mineralization. Zircon grains in the ore are closely intergrown or texturally associated with hydrothermal minerals of stage II (e.g., garnet, allanite, and hedenbergite). They may contain primary fluid inclusions and display irregular zoning in cathodoluminescence (CL) images. Zircon grains are rich in U (688 to 2902 ppm) and poor in Th (0.2 to 2.9 ppm). Their δ18OV-SMOW values range from 11.9 to 14.0‰, higher than those of typical magmatic zircon. These textural and compositional features imply that zircon precipitated from 18O- and U-rich hydrothermal fluids, coeval with the minerals of stage II. Monazite occurs in close association with stage II magnetite and allanite and has low contents of Th (falls within the overall age range (740 to 860 Ma) of the regional Neoproterozoic igneous rocks. This temporal linkage, in combination with the magmatic-like sulfur isotopes of sulfide minerals (δ34SV-CDT = -0.8 to 3.1), indicates that the mineralization may have a close genetic association with the Neoproterozoic igneous activity.

  12. The Lagoa Real subalkaline granitic complex (south Bahia, Brazil): a source for uranium mineralizations associated with Na-Ca metasomatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruejol, P.; Cuney, M.; Poty, B.; Neto, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In the central zone of the Sao Francisco Craton (South Bahia), the lower Proterozoic Lagoa Real granites and orthogneisses overthrust to the West the younger Urandi and Espinhaco metamorphic series, probably a late Brazilian event. This thrust is related to the regional metamorphism (amphibolite facies) of the Lagoa Real granites and induces a reverse HP metamorphism in the over thrusted series. Undeformed granites (sao Timoeto type) present two feldspars, perthitic orthoclase largely predominant over plagioclase (oligoclase ≥ albite), blue quartz, Fe-rich amphibole and biotite ± clinopyroxene assemblages, ilmenite ≥ magnetite, zircon, apatite, allanite and Nb ± Ti-REE oxides and silicates. The crystallization of the granites begins at high temperature and under low fO 2 and P H2O conditions. Fractional crystallization of pyroxene and plagioclase leads to silica enrichment during magmatic differentiation. Increasing fO 2 and P H2O are observed during this evolution. Orthogneisses show strongly recrystallized paragenesis: equal abundance of non-perthitic microcline and plagioclase (oligoclase ≤ albite), quartz, more Al-rich amphibole and biotite, magnetite, sphene, zircon, allanite, Nb ± Ti-REE oxides and silicates, and ± apatite. HT Na and Ca metasomatism occurs 330 Ma later than granite emplacement and is synchronous with important uranium mineralizations. Major elements and trace-elements geochemistry of the granites and orthogneisses indicate subalkaline to alkaline typology. Incompatible behaviour of Th, REE, Y, Zr, Nb, and F points out a convergence with alkaline magmatism. CI, F, Th, Y, REE, NB enrichments and Ba, Sr depletions are also related to a late magmatic stage. U-Th-rich and metamict accessory minerals of the granites represent a favorabl source for the Lagoa Real uranium ore-deposits [pt

  13. Enrichment of trace elements in garnet amphibolites from a paleo-subduction zone: Catalina Schist, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Sorena S.; Grossman, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance, P-T stability, solubility, and element-partitioning behavior of minerals such as rutile, garnet, sphene, apatite, zircon, zoisite, and allanite are critical variables in models for mass transfer from the slab to the mantle wedge in deep regions of subduction zones. The influence of these minerals on the composition of subduction-related magmas has been inferred (and disputed) from inverse modelling of the geochemistry of island-arc basalt, or by experiment. Although direct samples of the dehydration + partial-melting region of a mature subduction zone have not been reported from subduction complexes, garnet amphibolites from melanges of circumpacific and Caribbean blueschist terranes reflect high T (>600??C) conditions in shallower regions. Such rocks record geochemical processes that affected deep-seated, high-T portions of paleo-subduction zones. In the Catalina Schist, a subduction-zone metamorphic terrane of southern California, metasomatized and migmatitic garnet amphibolites occur as blocks in a matrix of meta-ultramafic rocks. This mafic and ultramafic complex may represent either slab-derived material accreted to the mantle wedge of a nascent subduction zone or a portion of a shear zone closely related to the slab-mantle wedge contact, or both. The trace-element geochemistry of the complex and the distribution of trace elements among the minerals of garnet amphibolites were studied by INAA, XRF, electron microprobe, and SEM. In order of increasing alteration from a probable metabasalt protolith, three common types of garnet amphibolite blocks in the Catalina Schist are: (1) non-migmatitic, clinopyroxene-bearing blocks, which are compositionally similar to MORB that has lost an albite component; (2) garnet-amphibolite blocks, which have rinds that reflect local interaction between metabasite, metaperidotite, and fluid; and (3) migmatites that are extremely enriched in Th, HFSE, LREE, and other trace elements. These trace-element enrichments

  14. Petrography, geochemistry, and U-Pb geochronology of pegmatites and aplites associated with the Alvand intrusive complex in the Hamedan region, Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Zagros orogen (Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahi, Ali Asghar; Salami, Sedigheh; Lentz, David; McFarlane, Christopher; Maanijou, Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    The Alvand intrusive complex in the Hamedan area in Iran is in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone of the Zagros orogen. It consists of a wide range of plutonic rocks, mainly gabbro, diorite, granodiorite, granite, and leucogranites that were intruded by aplitic and pegmatitic dykes. At least three successive magmatic episodes generated an older gabbro-diorite-tonalite assemblage, followed by a voluminous granodiorite-granite association, which was then followed by minor leucocratic granitoids. Aplitic and pegmatitic dykes and bodies have truncated both plutonic rocks of the Alvand intrusive complex and its metamorphic aureole. Chemically they belong to peraluminous LCT (Li-, Cs-, and Ta-bearing) family of pegmatites. Mineralogically, they resemble Muscovite (MS) and Muscovite Rare Element (MSREL) classes of pegmatites. High amounts of some elements, such as Sn (up to 10,000 ppm), Rb (up to 936 ppm), Ba (up to 706 ppm), and LREE (up to 404 ppm) indicate the highly fractionated nature of some of these aplites and pegmatites. U-Pb dating of monazite, zircon, and allanite by LA-ICPMS indicate the following ages: monazite-bearing aplites of Heydareh-e-Poshteshahr and Barfejin areas, southwest of Hamedan, give an age range of 162-172 Ma; zircon in Heydareh-e-Poshteshar gives an average age of 165 Ma and for allanite-bearing pegmatites of Artiman area, north of Tuyserkan, an age of 154.1 ± 3.7 Ma was determined. These overlap with previously reported ages (ca. 167-153 Ma) for the plutonic rocks of the Alvand complex. Therefore, these data reveal that the Jurassic was a period of magmatism in the Hamedan region and adjacent areas in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, which was situated at the southern edge of the central Iranian micro-plate (southern Eurasian plate) at this time. Our results also suggest that advective heating in a continental arc setting has caused melting of fertile supracrustal lithologies, such as meta-pelites. These partial melts were then emplaced at much higher

  15. Direct dating and characterization of the Pope's Hill REE Deposit, Labrador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, A. N.; Hanchar, J. M.; Fisher, C.; Piccoli, P. M.; Crowley, J. L.; Dimmell, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Pope's Hill rare earth element (REE) trend (PHT) is located approximately 100 km southwest of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, along the Trans Labrador Highway, in central Labrador. Whole-rock geochemical analyses of the main REE-bearing unit indicate total rare earth element contents ranging from 1 to 22 weight percent (wt%) REE3+. The REE-enriched unit is hosted within a hydrothermally altered syenite, trending northeast and traceable for approximately 2.8km. Samples of ore, host rock, and country rock, were collected from throughout the trend in order to: 1) quantify which phases concentrate the REE and their abundances and distribution in the ore; and 2) use in situ LA-ICPMS and ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology and in situ Sm-Nd isotopes using LA-MC-ICPMS in monazite from the ore and host rock to constrain the timing of mineralization and determine the source of the REE. These data will help develop predictive models for this type of mineral deposit elsewhere. The PHT is defined as the host syenite and REE-enriched segregations; two contrasting lithologies. The rare earth element minerals (REE) occur in millimeter- to centimeter-scale pods that are locally discontinuous. The REE are hosted in a variety of silicate, phosphate, carbonate, and niobate phases; with a majority hosted in allanite(-Ce), titanite(-Ce), monazite(-Ce), britholite(-Ce); and a minor percentage in REE-carbonates and fergusonite(-Nd). Both apatite and titanite occur in two different compositional forms that range in chemistry from end-member stoichiometric apatite and titanite to highly REE-enriched - apatite-britholite and titanite(-Ce), where chemical substitutions, such as Si4+ + REE3+ substitute for Ca2+ + P5+ in apatite and REE3+ + Fe3+ substitute for Ca2+ + Ti4+ in titanite in order to incorporate up to ~40 wt% REE2O3 in both minerals. The U-Pb geochronology indicate that allanite, titanite(-Ce), monazite and fergusonite crystallized from ~1060 to ~940 Ma, a period spanning ~120 Ma. Sm-Nd tracer

  16. New P-T and U-Pb constraints on Alpine Schist metamorphism in south Westland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.M.; Auer, A.; Muhling, J.R.; Czertowicz, T.A.; Cooper, A.F.; Billia, M.A.; Kennedy, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Metamorphic mineral compositions of a staurolite-bearing greyschist from the middle reaches of the Moeraki River valley in south Westland reveal peak equilibration at c. 558±50 degrees C and c. 6.1±1.2 kbar. Two c. 83 Ma U-Pb monazite age populations from the cores of monazite-apatite-allanite-epidote corona structures in mylonitised schists from near Fox Glacier confirm that Alpine Schist metamorphism occurred during the Late Cretaceous. The published spread in Late Cretaceous metamorphic ages indicates that metamorphism was diachronous or was a protracted event. Further dating is required to pin down the cryptic transition into the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous metamorphosed Otago Schist, but the Alpine Schist must extend at least 11 km east of the Alpine Fault in south Westland and overprint the suture between the Pounamu and Rakaia terranes. The P-T-t results imply that the Late Cretaceous crust represented by portions of the Alpine Schist was probably of similar thickness to that beneath the Southern Alps today, but with dehydration and partial melting occurring near the base. The crust under Westland and Otago may be dry and therefore strong. (author).

  17. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss: mineralogy, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology; Ortognaisse Morro do Resende: mineralogia, petrografia, geoquimica e geocronologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Fabiana Franco de; Avila, Ciro Alexandre; Bongiolo, Everton Marques; Camara, Beatriz de Oliveira; Menezes, Victor Hugo Riboura; Cunha, Fernanda Caetano de Mattos, E-mail: fma3003@globo.com, E-mail: avila@mn.ufrj.br, E-mail: ebongiolo@geologia.ufrj.br, E-mail: camara_b@hotmail.com, E-mail: vmenezes92@gmail.com, E-mail: fefemattos@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Neumann, Reiner, E-mail: reiner.neumann@gmail.com [Centro de Tecnologia Mineral (CETEM), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Teixeira, Wilson; Barbosa, Natali, E-mail: wteixeir@usp.br, E-mail: natali@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias

    2017-01-15

    The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is a hololeucocratic to leucocratic, fine-grained body with monzogranitic to granodioritic composition, cropping out near the Volta Grande mine in Nazareno County, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. It bears xenoliths of metamafic rocks of the Rio das Mortes metavolcano-sedimentary sequence and yields a U-Pb SHRIMP crystallization age of 2174 ± 4 Ma, relating it to one of the magmatic pulses of the Mineiro Belt. The primary mineralogy includes quartz, albite, microcline, biotite, allanite, zircon, magnetite, titanite and apatite, while sericite, epidote, zoisite, clinozoisite, carbonate and chlorite are metamorphic minerals. Maghemite, barite, fluorite, monazite, xenotime, garnet and REE fluorides (possibly gagarinite) are hydrothermal, as they fill the fractures, intergrow or replace the primary and metamorphic minerals. Fluid interaction was not homogeneous throughout the body. Metamorphic paragenesis points to greenschist facies conditions, which could be related to the Paleoproterozoic II event of the Mineiro Belt, which lasted from 2131 to 2101 Ma. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is distinguished by significant REE enrichment, as well as a negative Eu anomaly linked to the magmatic crystallization and a negative Ce anomaly related to oxidizing hydrothermal fluids circulation. (author)

  18. Sr and Nd isotopic signature of the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism of the central Ribeira belt: the Sao Pedro Granite in Lumiar, RJ; Assinatura isotopica de Sr e Nd do magmatismo calcio-alcalino de alto-K na Faixa Ribeira central: o exemplo do Granito Sao Pedro em Lumiar, RJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Julio Cezar; Medeiros, Silvia Regina de; Chaves, Eduardo Amorim, E-mail: julio@geologia.ufrj.br, E-mail: silvia@geologia.ufrj.br, E-mail: edupc2@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Geologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (RJ) (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    In the central-northern Ribeira belt there are many granitic to granodioritic bodies showing varied shape and size, characterizing a late- to post-collisional Ca-alkaline, cordilleran I-type province. The Sao Pedro Granite occurs in the mountain region of Rio de Janeiro State as small post-collisional bodies. It presents isotropic fabric, equigranular to seriate inequigranular texture, as well as local concentration of allanite, which gives discrete composition and texture variation to the rock. The granite has a high-K calcalkaline to alkali-calcic character and weakly peraluminous nature. Despite its short geochemical variation, high Ba, Zr and Th contents besides low concentrations of MgO and CaO are noticeable. High REE contents are associated with fractionated REE patterns showing strong negative Eu anomalies. A crustal origin for the granite can be assumed by its very negative and positive .Nd and .Sr values, respectively, as well as by 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios ranging from 0,718 to 0,740. TDM ages point to paleoproterozoic source, which agrees with geological time of intensive crust generation. (author)

  19. The U resources inventory at Tebalungkang sector, west Kalimantan systematic prospection stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soetopo, B.; Suripto; Boman; Sajiyo

    1996-01-01

    The systematic prospection at Tebalungkang sector, West Kalimantan was carried out to characterize the occurrence of U mineralization and to invent the potential U resources at the area. The investigation was done on the basis of previous results, i.e. radiometric anomalous outcrops and boulders of 1000-7000 C/s. The methods for the investigation was systematic geological mapping and radiometric measurements of soil and tranced rocks and supported by mineralogical and geochemical analyses. The results of the investigation show that this area consists of metamorphic rocks, intruded by granite quartz-diorite batholites and dike of andesite and lamprophyre. From geological structure this is 30 o plunging from anticlin NE-SW and NNW-SSE, is crossed by NE-SW and E-W normal faults and NW-SE and WNW-ESE strike slip faults. Uranium mineralization appears in quartz-schist brecciated and quachitite (lamprophyre). The radioactive minerals were thorite and monazite, associated with rutile, ilmenite, magnetite, hematite, pyrite, calcopyrite, muscovite, apatite and allanite. The U content from rock samples has been found to be 4,5-54,75 ppm U

  20. Mode of occurrence of secondary radionuclide-bearing minerals in natural argillized rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimsaite, J.

    1982-01-01

    Three processes that may be activated by the emplacement of radionuclide-bearing waste in natural argilized rock are described: 1. natural decompositon of rock-forming and associated radioactive ore and accessory minerals, such as uraninite, uranothorite, allanite, pyrochlore, apatite, monazite, xenotime, tourmaline, zircon, sulphides and carbonates; 2. mobilization, migration and redeposition of U, Th, REE, Zr, radiogenic lead and other elements along fractures; 3. neoformation of autunite, torbernite, phosphuranylite, coffinite, boltwoodite, kasolite, uranophane, bayleyite, ruthefordine, liebigite, masuyite, anglesite, wulfenite and complex unidentified U, Th, Pb, REE and Zr compounds in clays and in fractures of hydrated rock-forming minerals. The mobilized radionuclides can be fixed by several processes, namely by adsorption, by reacting with other ions, and by entering and capture in the interlayer of swelling mixed-layer clays and hydrated layer silicates. These observations on the natural behaviour of radioactive and radiogenic materials can be applied in evaluating rock formations and planning preventive measures for the escape of nuclear waste from disposal sites

  1. Towards the challenging REE exploration in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Iwan

    2018-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are the seventeen elements, including fifteen from 57La to 71Lu, in addition to 21Sc and 39Y. In rock-forming minerals, rare earth elements typically occur in compounds as trivalent cations in carbonates, oxides, phosphates, and silicates. The REE occur in a wide range of rock types: igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. REE are one of the critical metals in the world. Their occurrences are important to supply the world needs on high technology materials. Indonesia has a lot of potential sources of REE that are mainly from residual tin mining processes in Bangka islands, which are associated with radioactive minerals e.g. monazite and xenotime. However, the REE from monazite and xenotime are difficult to extract and contain high radioactivity. Granitoids are widely distributed in Sumatra, Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua. They also have a very thick weathering crusts. Important REE-bearing minerals are allanite and titanite. Their low susceptibilities during weathering result an economically potential REE concentration. I-/A- type granitoids and their weathered crusts are important REE sources in Indonesia. Unfortunately, their distribution and genesis have not been deeply studied. Future REE explorations challenge are mainly of the granitoids their weathered crusts. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of type of granitoids and their weathered crusts, the hydrothermally altered rocks, and clear REE regulation will help discover REE deposits in Indonesia.

  2. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss: mineralogy, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Fabiana Franco de; Avila, Ciro Alexandre; Bongiolo, Everton Marques; Camara, Beatriz de Oliveira; Menezes, Victor Hugo Riboura; Cunha, Fernanda Caetano de Mattos; Neumann, Reiner; Teixeira, Wilson; Barbosa, Natali

    2017-01-01

    The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is a hololeucocratic to leucocratic, fine-grained body with monzogranitic to granodioritic composition, cropping out near the Volta Grande mine in Nazareno County, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. It bears xenoliths of metamafic rocks of the Rio das Mortes metavolcano-sedimentary sequence and yields a U-Pb SHRIMP crystallization age of 2174 ± 4 Ma, relating it to one of the magmatic pulses of the Mineiro Belt. The primary mineralogy includes quartz, albite, microcline, biotite, allanite, zircon, magnetite, titanite and apatite, while sericite, epidote, zoisite, clinozoisite, carbonate and chlorite are metamorphic minerals. Maghemite, barite, fluorite, monazite, xenotime, garnet and REE fluorides (possibly gagarinite) are hydrothermal, as they fill the fractures, intergrow or replace the primary and metamorphic minerals. Fluid interaction was not homogeneous throughout the body. Metamorphic paragenesis points to greenschist facies conditions, which could be related to the Paleoproterozoic II event of the Mineiro Belt, which lasted from 2131 to 2101 Ma. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is distinguished by significant REE enrichment, as well as a negative Eu anomaly linked to the magmatic crystallization and a negative Ce anomaly related to oxidizing hydrothermal fluids circulation. (author)

  3. Fertility of late Archaean basement granite in the vicinity of U-mineralized Neoproterozoic Bhima basin, peninsular India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthil Kumar, P.; Srinivasan, R.

    2002-01-01

    Late Archaean granitoids constituting the basement for the Neoproterozoic Bhima Group are exposed along the southern margin of the Bhima basin in southern India. These are rich in accessory minerals such as sphene, allanite, apatite and zircon, which are the main carriers of uranium and thorium. In situ gamma-ray spectrometric analysis reveals that these granitoids have higher abundances of Th, U and K (Th range 10-43 ppm, mean 26 ppm; U range 3-21 ppm, mean 8 ppm; K range 1.2-5.2%, mean 4.0%) relative to granitoids occurring farther away from the basin. Thus, they belong to the class of fertile granitoids from the point of view of uranium mineralization. The granitoids have been mylnotized and hydrothermally altered in the Gugi-Ukkinal fault zone, which constitutes the zone of uranium mineralization discovered recently along the southern margin of the Bhima basin. Uranium apparently derived from hydrothermal leaching of basement granitoid rocks may have got deposited in the fault zone at the contact of carbonate rocks, which provided favourable geochemical environment (Eh-pH conditions) for uranium precipitation. (author)

  4. Application of Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy for Characterization of Detrital Minerals in Karst Cave Speleothems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Nina; Miler, Miloš; Šebela, Stanka; Jarc, Simona

    2016-02-01

    Micro-scale observations in karst caves help to identify different processes that shaped local morphology. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy inspection of speleothems from two karst caves in Slovenia, Predjama and Črna Jama, confirmed the presence of sub-angular to sub-rounded detrital fragments of clay minerals, feldspars, quartz, Fe-oxides/hydroxides, rutile and Nb-rutile, xenotime, kassite, allanite, fluorapatite, epidote, ilmenite, monazite, sphene, and zircon, between 2 and 50 μm across. These occur in porous layers separating calcite laminae in the clayey coating on the layer below the surface of the speleothems, and are also incorporated within actual crystals. It is likely that they are derived from the weathered rocks of the Eocene flysch. Probably they were first transported into the caves by floodwaters forming cave sediments. Later, depending upon the climate conditions, they were moved by air currents or by water to the surface of active speleothems. They might also be redeposited from overlying soils enriched with wind-transported minerals from the flysch, or from higher passages filled with weathered flysch sediment, by drip water percolating through the fissured limestone. As some of the identified minerals are carriers of rare earth elements, Ti and Zr, their presence could affect any palaeoclimatic interpretations that are based upon the geochemical composition of the speleothems.

  5. High-resolution tephrochronology of the Wilson Creek Formation (Mono Lake, California) and Laschamp event using 238U-230Th SIMS dating of accessory mineral rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Lidzbarski, Marsha I.

    2012-01-01

    Sediments of the Wilson Creek Formation surrounding Mono Lake preserve a high-resolution archive of glacial and pluvial responses along the eastern Sierra Nevada due to late Pleistocene climate change. An absolute chronology for the Wilson Creek stratigraphy is critical for correlating the paleoclimate record to other archives in the western U.S. and the North Atlantic region. However, multiple attempts to date the Wilson Creek stratigraphy using carbonates and tephras yield discordant results due to open-system effects and radiocarbon reservoir uncertainties as well as abundant xenocrysts. New ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of the final increments of crystallization recorded by allanite and zircon autocrysts from juvenile pyroclasts yield ages that effectively date eruption of key tephra beds and delimit the timing of basal Wilson Creek sedimentation to the interval between 26.8±2.1 and 61.7±1.9 ka. Tephra (Ash 15) erupted during the geomagnetic excursion originally designated the Mono Lake excursion yields an age of 40.8±1.9 ka, indicating that the event is instead the Laschamp excursion. The new ages support a depositional chronology from magnetostratigraphy that indicates quasi-synchronous glacial and hydrologic responses in the Sierra Nevada and Mono Basin to regional climate change, with intervals of lake filling and glacial-snowpack melting that are in phase with peaks in spring insolation.

  6. The association of uranium and skarn development in the Mary Kathleen area, Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruikshank, B.I.; Ferguson, J.; Derrick, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    The genesis of both the Mary Kathleen orebody and the garnet-rich skarns appears to be related to the release of the residual, hydrous phase of the crystallising Burstall Granite and associated rhyolite dykes. The fluid introduced many elements, including uranium, into the metasomatic system and possibly remobilised others. Decomposition of carbonate during alteration of marble gave rise to fluids rich in CO 2 ; it appears likely that these fluids transported uranium and the rare-earth elements to a suitable site of deposition, in this case an open-textured conglomerate. Deposition of uraninite and retrograde reaction of garnet to rare-earth-bearing allanite probably occurred during a period of decreasing CO 2 content of the metasomatic-mineralising fluid. The Cahill Formation in the Pine Creek Geosyncline lacks the high temperature skarn-type uranium enrichment found in the Mary Kathleen area, despite the similarity in metamorphic grade and the development of juxtaposed uranium-enriched granitoids. The main difference in lithology in the uranium host formation in the two areas is the predominance of and calcsilicate rocks in the Mary Kathleen area. The calcareous units in the Cahill Formation are volumetrically small compared with those in the Corella Formation at Mary Kathleen. Other differences between the two areas possibly relate to the compositions of the initial fluids associated with the granitoids and to their interaction with host rocks, as well as the involvement of connate hydrous solutions

  7. Fluid inclusion study of radioactive granite and cherty cataclasite in the Southeastern part of Nanded district, Maharashtra: implications for the uranium mineralisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Rahul; Shivkumar, K.; Thomas, Tresa; Thomas, Jugina; Pandian, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Southeastern part of Nanded district, Maharashtra exposes Palaeoproterozoic granitoids, representing the younger phase of Peninsular Gneissic Complex (PGC), mark the northeastern extension of Eastern Dharwar Craton. These granitoids are predominantly pink/grey granites, which are traversed by younger phosphatic cherty cataclasites close to the Deccan Trap capping. They are also affected by profuse pegmatitic/quartzo-feldspathic, quartz and epidote venations, especially close to fault/shear zones. A number of N-S to NNE-SSW, NE-SW, NW-SE and E-W trending lineaments marked by faults/fractures/shear zones and dykes are delineated in this granitic terrain. Among these, NE-SW and NNE-SSW faults/shear zones affecting granitoids and cherty cataclasites in Shahpur-Sujayatpur and Thadisaoli area have recorded significant uranium anomalies (Granitoids: upto 1% U 3 O 8 and 0.20% ThO 2 ; Cherty cataclasites upto 0.11% U 3 O 8 and <0.005% ThO 2 ) and enrichment in rare metal and rare earth element content (Nb-77ppm, Y-111 ppm, Zr-432ppm; n=9 and total REE-1167ppm; n=3). Presence of discrete uranium/thorium minerals (uraninite, b-uranophane and thorite) and high content of resistates viz., apatite, zircon, allanite, sphene, cerianite, monazite and ilmenite are responsible for radioactivity in granitoids while phosphatic material accounts for radioactivity in cherty cataclasites

  8. Uranium occurrence in major rock types by fission-track mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledger, E.G.; Bomber, B.J.; Schaftenaar, W.E.; Tieh, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopic occurrence of uranium has been determined in about 50 igneous rocks from various location, and in a genetically unrelated sandstone from south Texas. Precambrian granites from the Llano uplift of central Texas contain from a few ppm uranium (considered normal) to over 100 ppm on a whole-rock basis. In granite, uranium is concentrated in: (1) accessory minerals including zircon, biotite, allanite, Fe-Ti oxides, and altered sphene, (2) along grain boundaries and in microfractures by precipitation from deuteric fluids, and (3) as point sources (small inclusions) in quartz and feldspars. Tertiary volcanic rocks from the Davis Mountains of west Texas include diverse rock types from basalt to rhyolite. Average uranium contents increase from 1 ppm in basalts to 7 ppm in rhyolites. Concentration occurs: (1) in iron-titanium-oxides, zircon, and rutile, (2) in the fine-grained groundmass as uniform and point-source concentrations, and (3) as late uranium in cavities associated with banded, silica-rich material. Uranium in ore-grade sandstone is concentrated to more than 3%. Specific occurrences include (1) leucoxene and/or anatase, (2) opaline and calcite cements, (3) mud clasts and altered volcanic rock fragments, and (4) in a few samples, as silt-size uranium- and molybdenum-rich spheres. Uranium content is quite low in pyrite, marcasite, and zeolites

  9. Geology and Geochemistry of the Early Proterozoic Kortejärvi and Laivajoki Carbonatites, Central Fennoscandian Shield, Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nykänen, J.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides for the first time extensive petrological, mineralogical and geochemical data on the early Proterozoic Kortejärvi and Laivajoki carbonatites, northern Finland, which form metamorphosed and highly strained bodies 2 and 4 km long within a Svecokarelian shear zone in central Fennoscandian Shield. They are not exposed, but have been penetrated by a couple of deep drill holes. In terms of modal mineralogy, both intrusions contain calcite carbonatite and dolomite-calcite carbonatite as their main rock types, but Kortejärvi also contains dolomite carbonatite and calcite-dolomite carbonatite, some glimmerite and olivine-magnetite rock and Laivajärvi tremolite-calcite carbonatite, tremolite-dolomite carbonatite, serpentine-talc-dolomite rock and glimmerite. The main country rock is an amphibolite which is not fenitized. No alkaline rocks have been detected in these intrusions. Calcite is most common mineral in both occurrences. Other carbonate minerals include dolomite with minor ankerite and occassional siderite. In addition to low-Ti phlogopite, tetraferriphlogopite is also encountered. Fresh olivine is rare, and its alteration products include titaniferous clinohumite. The amphiboles are mainly calcic amphiboles, including actinolite, tremolite and edenite. The only sodic-calcic amphibole is accessory richterite. Other essential minerals are Ti-poor magnetite with ilmenite exsolutions, fluorapatite (3.95-4.89 wt. % F, monazite, and allanite-(Ce. Geochemically, the Kortejärvi rocks are mostly magnesiocarbonatites, whereas those of Laivajärvi, due to their higher magnetite content, are ferrocarbonatites. Of the trace elements, Nb is much lower (8-30 ppm in proper carbonatites than the average for carbonatites and U and Th (<0.9 ppm and<2.4 pm, respectively lower than average. Sr is typical, but not high (1830-3480 ppm, and Ba is rather low (27-348 ppm. The REEs are hosted by allanite and monazite and their concentrations in the

  10. Trace element mobility in mine waters from granitic pegmatite U–Th–REE deposits, Bancroft area, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbarats, A.J.; Percival, J.B.; Venance, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Small, low-grade, granitic pegmatite U–Th–REE deposits are found throughout the Grenville geological province of eastern Canada. Groundwater quality at historical mining properties in the Bancroft area was investigated in order to better understand the mobility of trace elements that may pose health risks if there is renewed development of this class of mineral deposit. Groundwater samples were obtained from diamond drill holes, flowing adits and flooded mine shafts. Uranium occurs almost entirely in the dissolved (<0.45 μm) phase and is found at concentrations reaching 2579 μg/L. The Canadian maximum acceptable concentration for U in drinking water (0.02 mg/L) was exceeded in 70% of samples. Regulatory limits for 226 Ra (0.5 Bq/L) and for 210 Pb (0.2 Bq/L) were generally exceeded in these samples as well. Speciation modeling indicates that over 98% of dissolved U is in the form of highly mobile uranyl-Ca–carbonate complexes known to inhibit U adsorption. Uranium concentrations in groundwater appear to be correlated with the uranothorite content of the deposits rather than with their U grade. Uranothorite may be more soluble than uraninite, the other ore mineral, because of its non-ideal composition and metamict structure. Thorium, released concomitantly with U during the dissolution of uranothorite and thorian uraninite, exhibits median and maximum total concentrations of only 0.1 and 11 μg/L, respectively. Mass balance and stoichiometric considerations indicate that almost all Th is immobilized very close to its source. The sums of total light REE (La–Gd) concentrations have median and maximum values of 6 and 117 μg/L, respectively. The sums of total heavy REE (Tb–Lu) concentrations have median and maximum values of 0.8 and 21 μg/L, respectively. Light REE are derived mainly from the dissolution of metamict allanite whereas the sources of heavy REE are widely dispersed among accessory minerals. Fractionation patterns of REE in the dissolved

  11. Uranium potential of precambrian rocks in the Raft River area of northwestern Utah and south-central Idaho. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, B.A.

    1980-09-01

    A total of 1214 geochemical samples were collected and analyzed. The sampling media included 334 waters, 616 stream sediments, and 264 rocks. In addition, some stratigraphic sections of Elba and Yost Quartzites and Archean metasedimentary rock were measured and sampled and numerous radiation determinations made of the various target units. Statistical evaluation of the geochemical data permitted recognition of 156 uranium anomalies, 52 in water, 79 in stream sediment, and 25 in rock. Geographically, 68 are located in the Grouse Creek Mountains, 43 in the Raft River Mountains, and 41 in the Albion Range. Interpretation of the various data leads to the conclusion that uranium anomalies relate to sparingly and moderately soluble uraniferous heavy minerals, which occur as sparse but widely distributed magmatic, detrital, and/or metamorphically segregated components in the target lithostratigraphic units. The uraniferous minerals known to occur and believed to account for the geochemical anomalies include allanite, monazite, zircon, and apatite. In some instances samarskite may be important. These heavy minerals contain uranium and geochemically related elements, such as Th, Ce, Y, and Zr, in sufficient quantities to account for both the conspicuous lithologic preference and the generally observed low amplitude of the anomalies. The various data generated in connection with this study, as well as those available in the published literature, collectively support the conclusion that the various Precambrian W and X lithostratigraphic units pre-selected for evaluation probably lack potential to host important Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerate uranium deposits. Moreover it is also doubted that they possess any potential to host Proterozoic unconformity-type uranium deposits

  12. The El Horror uranium anomaly in northeastern Sonora, Mexico: Constraints from geochemical and mineralogical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva-Rodríguez, T.; Valencia-Moreno, M.; Calmus, T.; Del Rio-Salas, R.; Balcázar-García, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work reviews the characteristics of the El Horror uranium prospect in northeastern Sonora, Mexico. It was formerly detected by a radiometric anomaly after airborne gamma ray exploration carried out in the 70's by the Mexican government. As a promising site to contain important uranium resources, the El Horror was re-evaluated by CFE (Federal Electricity Commission) by in situ gamma ray surveys. The study also incorporates rock and stream sediment ICP-MS geochemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectrometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to provide a better understanding of the radiometric anomaly. The results show that, instead of a single anomaly, it comprises at least five individual anomalies hosted in hydrothermally altered Laramide (80-40 Ma) andesitic volcanic rocks of the Tarahumara Formation. Concentrations for elemental uranium and uranium calculated from gamma ray surveys (i.e., equivalent uranium) are not spatially coincident within the anomaly, but, at least at some degree, they do so in specific sites. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry revealed the presence of rutile/anatase, uvite, bukouvskyte and allanite as the more likely mineral phases to contain uranium. SEM studies revealed a process of iron-rich concretion formation, suggesting that uranium was initially incorporated to the system by adsorption, but was largely removed later during incorporation of Fe+3 ions. Stream sediment geochemistry reveals that the highest uranium concentrations are derived from the southern part of the Sierra La Madera batholith (∼63 Ma), and decrease toward the El Horror anomaly.

  13. Geochemistry of the Neoarchaean Volcanic Rocks of the Kilimafedha Greenstone Belt, Northeastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Messo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neoarchaean volcanic rocks of the Kilimafedha greenstone belt consist of three petrological types that are closely associated in space and time: the predominant intermediate volcanic rocks with intermediate calc-alkaline to tholeiitic affinities, the volumetrically minor tholeiitic basalts, and rhyolites. The tholeiitic basalts are characterized by slightly depleted LREE to nearly flat REE patterns with no Eu anomalies but have negative anomalies of Nb. The intermediate volcanic rocks exhibit very coherent, fractionated REE patterns, slightly negative to absent Eu anomalies, depletion in Nb, Ta, and Ti in multielement spidergrams, and enrichment of HFSE relative to MORB. Compared to the other two suites, the rhyolites are characterized by low concentrations of TiO2 and overall low abundances of total REE, as well as large negative Ti, Sr, and Eu anomalies. The three suites have a εNd (2.7 Ga values in the range of −0.51 to +5.17. The geochemical features of the tholeiitic basalts are interpreted in terms of derivation from higher degrees of partial melting of a peridotite mantle wedge that has been variably metasomatized by aqueous fluids derived from dehydration of the subducting slab. The rocks showing intermediate affinities are interpreted to have been formed as differentiates of a primary magma formed later by lower degrees of partial melting of a garnet free mantle wedge that was strongly metasomatized by both fluid and melt derived from the subducting oceanic slab. The rhyolites are best interpreted as having been formed by shallow level fractional crystallization of the intermediate volcanic rocks involving plagioclase and Ti-rich phases like ilmenite and magnetite as well as REE-rich phases like apatite, zircon, monazite, and allanite. The close spatial association of the three petrological types in the Kilimafedha greenstone belt is interpreted as reflecting their formation in an evolving late Archaean island arc.

  14. Petrography and geochemical study of Nezam-Abad area, Southwest of Shazand, Arak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Jafari

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nezam-Abad area is located in southwest of Shazand (Arak which is a part of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone. Major intrusive rocks of Nezam-Abad are quartz diorite and minor amount of granodiorite. Leucogranitic, pegmatite dykes and quartz-tourmaline veins were intruded the quartz diorite. Quartz diorites are mainly composed of plagioclase, hornblende, biotite, quartz and pyroxene as major minerals. Major minerals of leucogranite are microcline, orthoclase, albite, quartz, biotite and muscovite. Accessory minerals consist of apatite, zircon, sphene, epidote, allanite, tourmaline and opaque. The presence of hydrous minerals like hornblende and biotite in these rocks indicate that the corresponding magma initially contained >3 wt% H2O (wet magma. The occurrences of garnet and andalusite minerals suggest assimilation process. Primary textures in these rocks are granular, granophyre, and poikilitic. Secondary textures are perthite, myrmekite, sericitization, chloritization and kaolinitization. Later hydrothermal activities and tectonic strains are factors for presence of perthite texture in leucogranite. K amount for sericitization of feldspars come from the K-feldspars and chloritization of biotite. Transformation of biotite to muscovite indicates the act of K rich fluid in later stages. On the basis of chemical analysis on the intrusive rocks, it is shown that the magma was calc-alkaline, metaluminous-peraluminous and medium-K to high-K. Study of major elements in Harker diagrams indicates Al2O3, FeO, Fe2O3 and CaO decrease with increasing of SiO2 and K2O and Na2O increase indicating that fractional crystallization may have played an important role in the formation of granitoid rocks from Nezam-Abad.

  15. New data on carbonatites of the Il'mensky-Vishnevogorsky alkaline complex, the southern Urals, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosekova, I. L.

    2007-04-01

    Carbonatites that are hosted in metamorphosed ultramafic massifs in the roof of miaskite intrusions of the Il’mensky-Vishnevogorsky alkaline complex are considered. Carbonatites have been revealed in the Buldym, Khaldikha, Spirikha, and Kagan massifs. The geological setting, structure of carbonatite bodies, distribution of accessory rare-metal mineralization, typomorphism of rock-forming minerals, geochemistry, and Sr and Nd isotopic compositions are discussed. Dolomite-calcite carbonatites hosted in ultramafic rocks contain tetraferriphlogopite, richterite, accessory zircon, apatite, magnetite, ilmenite, pyrrhotite, pyrite, and pyrochlore. According to geothermometric data and the composition of rock-forming minerals, the dolomite-calcite carbonatites were formed under K-feldspar-calcite, albite-calcite, and amphibole-dolomite-calcite facies conditions at 575-300°C. The Buldym pyrochlore deposit is related to carbonatites of these facies. In addition, dolomite carbonatites with accessory Nb and REE mineralization (monazite, aeschynite, allanite, REE-pyrochlore, and columbite) are hosted in ultramafic massifs. The dolomite carbonatites were formed under chlorite-sericite-ankerite facies conditions at 300-200°C. The Spirikha REE deposit is related to dolomite carbonatite and alkaline metasomatic rocks. It has been established that carbonatites hosted in ultramafic rocks are characterized by high Sr, Ba, and LREE contents and variable Nb, Zr, Ti, V, and Th contents similar to the geochemical attributes of calcio-and magnesiocarbonatites. The low initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7044-0.7045 and ɛNd ranging from 0.65 to -3.3 testify to their derivation from a deep mantle source of EM1 type.

  16. Microporosity linked fluid focusing and monazite instability in greenschist facies para-conglomerates, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Viswanath, T. A.

    2013-03-01

    In a deformed para-conglomerate (western India), monazites occur as discrete grains (50-250 μm long axis) in tonalite clasts, in the warping chlorite-biotite-calcite schist layers, and as disseminated grains (corona studded with idiomorphic huttonite, Y-xenotime ± allanite. Mass balance calculation in a well-defined alteration zone around monazite in schist layer with P conserved indicate large gain in mass fraction of lower-abundance, less soluble HREEs, Y and Th in the alteration zone was compensated by minor loss in mass fraction of higher abundance elements (LREEs, MREEs) resulting in negligible net mass change. Monazite decomposition was associated with ˜50% dilation strain. Yb, Th and U abundances in alteration zones around decomposed monazites in schist layer are computed to be manifold higher than average schists. The contemporaneous formation of pore microstructures, the chemical homogeneity among ferromagnesian minerals and C-O isotope data in calcite in different textural domains, and results of mass balance calculations are compatible with deformation-aided porosity generation, synchronous fluid-mediated advection transport of elements, and dissolution-re-precipitation of mica-calcite aggregates at upper crustal conditions, ˜500 °C, ˜4 kbar. Monazite instability was induced by strain-focused influx of HREE, Y, Th and U rich fluids from external sources. The better preservation of within-clast monazite relative to the ones in weak-to-shear schist layers is attributed to limited fluid access through fewer porosity networks in actively deforming clasts.

  17. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Granitic rocks within Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, T.; KIM, Y.; Lee, I.; Lee, J.; Woo, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study areas, Lichen Hills and Outback Nunatak are located in the Northern Victoria Land which is close to Pacific Ocean side of Transantarctic Mountain (TAM), Antarctica. According to the study of Zeller and Dreschoff (1990), the radioactivity values of Lichen hills and Frontier Mt. area in the Victoria Land were very high. To identify the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks in these areas, 13 samples of Lichen Hills rocks and 4 samples of Outback Nunatak rocks are analyzed. For mineralogical study, samples were observed in macroscale as well as microscale including microscope electron probe analysis. Rock samples of Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak are mainly leucogranite and granitic pegmatite. These rock samples are composed of quartz, k-feldspar, plagioclase, muscovite, garnet, tourmaline like granite. In SEM-EDS analysis, the observed light colored minerals show relatively high Th, U, Dy, Ce, Nb concentration. This suggests that rock samples may contain minerals such as fergusonite, monazite, thorite, allanite, karnasurtite which are considered to be REE-bearing minerals. Samples of related rocks have been analyzed in terms of major, trace and rare earth element (REE) concentrations using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). As concentration of SiO2 increase, Al2O3, TiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, P2O5 concentration decrease and Na2O, K2O, MnO concentration increase. Analyzed trace elements and REE are normalized using CI Chondrite, Primitive mantle. The normalized data show that LREE are enriched compared to HREE. The distinct negative anomalies of Eu, Sr are observed, indicating that rock-forming melts are fairly processed state of fractional crystallization. It means that Th, U, Nb, Ta are much enriched in the melts.

  18. A detrital heavy mineral viewpoint on sediment provenance and tropical weathering in SE Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevastjanova, Inga; Hall, Robert; Alderton, David

    2012-12-01

    Understanding heavy mineral preservation is important for interpreting generation, pathways, provenance and geochemistry of sediments. Despite this, many assumptions about heavy mineral stability are based on ancient strata and few studies consider modern sediments, particularly those in tectonically active tropical areas such as SE Asia. We report new heavy mineral data on 69 river sand samples from the Malay Peninsula and Sumatra, in which one aim was to find provenance indicators specific to these areas. Identifications were performed using optical microscopy and confirmed with SEM-EDS. In the Malay Peninsula heavy minerals record granitic and contact metamorphic provenance. Variable amounts of zircon, tourmaline, hornblende, andalusite, epidote, monazite, rutile and titanite, and minor amounts of pyroxene, apatite, anatase, garnet, diaspore, colourless spinel, cassiterite and allanite are typical of this source area. The composition of assemblages from Sumatra indicates contributions from two major sources: the modern volcanic arc (I) and the basement (II). Abundant pyroxene, particularly hypersthene (up to 70%), is diagnostic of the volcanic arc source. Vesuvianite, garnet, andalusite, tourmaline, chrome spinel, rutile, anatase and corundum, are present only in small amounts (< 3%), and are interpreted as recycled from the basement. Zircon, apatite, hornblende, epidote, and olivine are also common in Sumatra and are likely to have a mixed provenance. Abundance of ferromagnesian silicate minerals suggests mild weathering, possibly reflecting several processes: dilution of natural etching fluids by heavy rainfall, high erosion rates, rapid transport and short grain residence time in the river. The heavy mineral assemblages of modern rivers are very different from those recorded by the few previous studies of Cenozoic sediments of the Malay Peninsula and Sumatra. Assemblages in the Cenozoic basins are significantly more mature than those of modern rivers. The

  19. The alkaline peralkaline granitic post-collisional Tin Zebane dyke swarm (Pan-African Tuareg shield, Algeria): prevalent mantle signature and late agpaitic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Kaddour, Zakia; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Demaiffe, Daniel; Caby, Renaud

    1998-12-01

    The Tin Zebane dyke swarm was emplaced at the end of the Pan-African orogeny along a mega-shear zone separating two contrasting terranes of the Tuareg shield. It is located along the western boundary of the Archaean In Ouzzal rigid terrane, but inside the adjacent Tassendjanet terrane, strongly remobilized at the end of the Precambrian. The Tin Zebane swarm was emplaced during post-collisional sinistral movements along the shear zone at 592.2±5.8 Ma (19WR Rb-Sr isochron). It is a dyke-on-dyke system consisting of dykes and stocks of gabbros and dykes of metaluminous and peralkaline granites. All rock types have Sr and Nd isotopic initial ratios (Sr i=0.7028 and ɛNd=+6.2) typical of a depleted mantle source, similar to the prevalent mantle (PREMA) at that period. No crustal contamination occurred in the genesis of the Tin Zebane swarm. Even the samples showing evidence of fluid interaction (essentially alkali mobility) have the same isotopic signature. The peralkaline granites have peculiar geochemical characteristics that mimic subduction-related granites: this geochemical signature is interpreted in terms of extensive differentiation effects due to late cumulates comprising aegirine, zircon, titanite, allanite and possibly fergusonite, separated from the liquid in the swarm itself due to magmatic flow turbulence. The Tin Zebane dyke swarm is thus of paramount importance for constraining the differentiation of mantle products to generate highly evolved alkaline granites without continental crust participation, in a post-collisional setting.

  20. Preliminary geological assessment for rare earths at Ombo Area, San Vicente, Northern Palawan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Angelito F.; Santos, Gabriel Jr.; Magsambol, Wilfred N.; Castillo, Marilyn K.; Tabora, Estrelita U.

    2001-04-01

    A preliminary geological assessment for rare earths was conducted along Ombo beach area, San Vicente, northern Palawan to evaluate the potential geologic reserve and to determine the relative concentration of REE, thorium and uranium. This investigation also aims to establish the distribution of heavy minerals. The study area, covering, about 6500 m 2 is comprised of the undisturbed beach sand deposits confined between the high tide line and the base of the mountains that borders the coastline. The investigation involved the establishment of shallow test pits with depths varying from one meter ot less than three meters. A total of 23 heavy mineral panned concentrates were collected. All the samples were analyzed for REE, Th and U using the portable X-MET 820 x-ray fluorescence and GR-320 gamma ray spectrometer. Radiometric measurements were also taken along the stretch of Ombo beach to establish the natural background radioactivity. The radiometric values vary from 27 cps to 420 cps. The high readings could be attributed to the presence of radioactive rare earth bearing minerals, principally allanite. This initial investigation indicates a positive geologic reserve of approximately 19,000 metric tons beach sand deposits, containing an average grade of 22.19% REE (Ce, La), 0.85% Th and 0.55% U. The average distribution of heavy minerals is 3600 gm heavies per cubic meter. Moreover, a probable geologic reserve of about 41,000 metric tons with an average grade of 22.13% REE (Ce, La), 0.85% Th and 0.55% U was also determined. The average distribution of heavy minerals is about 3300 gm heavies per cubic meter. (Author)

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Saudi Arabia occupies most of the Arabian Peninsula and has an area of 872,722 sq miles, or 2,260,350 sq km. The ancient Arabian Shield of igneous and metamorphic rocks comprises most of the western third of the country. The shield contains many extinct volcanoes surrounded by lava beds. Sloping eastwards are the newer sedimentary areas in which rich oil fields are found. In Saudi Arabia oil is paramount and less effort has been put into searching for mineral deposits than in other countries of similar size and geology. Pour aerial radiometric surveys have been undertaken and some of the anomalies discovered in the earlier ones were ground checked by an IAEA expert in 1963-64. Two anomalies warranted more detailed work, these were the Jabal Said anomaly in the Central Shield area and the Al Ghrayyat in Wadi Sawawin about 70 miles from the Jordan border. The Jabal Said anomaly consists of a zone of altered rocks consisting largely of pegmatite and pegmatite granite= Allanite, pyrochlore, cyrtolite, xenotime and monazite are the ore minerals,, The deposit was estimated to have 2.2 million tons of ore grading 0.2 - 0.3 percent Nb 2 O 5 and 0.03 - 0,05% U 3 O 8 . The other occurrence at Al Ghrayyat is similar but with much lower grade uranium content. In view of the huge size of Saudi Arabia, the existence of many geologically favourable rock types and the poor coverage by sophisticated uranium exploration techniques, the Speculative Potential is placed between 10,000 and 50,000 Tonnes uranium. (author)

  2. Los granitos peraluminosos de las Sierras de Vinquis, Cerro Negro y Zapata (Sierras Pampeanas, provincia de Catamarca, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina, M. E.

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The studied plutons are close to several batholiths of this region, as Sierra de Mazán and other, but with some mineralogical peculiarities. The magmatic cordierite, common in proximate places, is scarce, as sillimanite, while the andalusite is very rare, with few tourmaline. Fluorite and allanite are also typical accasories only in the granites of the Sierra de Zapata. All plutons are peraluminous of potassic tendency, with cortical affinity.The interpretation of the geochemical values distinguishes between granites of different maturity, emplaced under a predominant influence of active margin for Cerro Negro and Vinquis, while the batholith of Zapata has, below these concepts, a marked feature of within plate.The mineralogical associations suggest that the granites of Cerro Negro and Vinquis were emplaced to pressures of 2 kb or less and temperature of 650º C, while the granites of Zapata had done under conditions of lesser pressure, between 1.5 and 2.0 kb and lower temperature, 600-650º C.A grandes rasgos, los plutones estudiados tienen semejanzas con otros del entorno regional, tal como los de la Sierra de Mazán, pero con peculiaridades mineralógicas. La cordierita magmática, que en lugares próximos es muy abundante, es aquí escasa, al igual que la sillimanita, mientras que la andalucita es muy rara y la turmalina poco frecuente. La fluorita y allanita son accesorios comunes y de cierta abundancia sólo en los granitos de la Sierra de Zapata.Todos los plutones son peralumínicos y de tendencia potásica, con neta afinidad cortical. El estudio estadístico de datos geoquímicos seleccionados, permite diferenciar agrupaciones que tienen un reflejo satisfactorio en los plutones caracterizados, por encima de las variaciones de facies. La interpretación de los valores geoquímicos distingue granitos de desigual madurez, emplazados bajo una influencia predominante de margen activo o intraplaca de características continentales, en

  3. Geochemistry of the Serifos calc-alkaline granodiorite pluton, Greece: constraining the crust and mantle contributions to I-type granitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouraiti, C.; Baziotis, I.; Asimow, P. D.; Downes, H.

    2017-11-01

    The Late Miocene (11.6-9.5 Ma) granitoid intrusion on the island of Serifos (Western Cyclades, Aegean Sea) is composed of syn- to post-tectonic granodiorite with quartz monzodiorite enclaves, cut by dacitic and aplitic dikes. The granitoid, a typical I-type metaluminous calcic amphibole-bearing calc-alkaline pluton, intruded the Cycladic Blueschists during thinning of the Aegean plate. Combining field, textural, geochemical and new Sr-Nd-O isotope data presented in this paper, we postulate that the Serifos intrusion is a single-zoned pluton. The central facies has initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70906 to 0.7106, ɛNd(t) = - 5.9 to - 7.5 and δ18Οqtz = + 10 to + 10.6‰, whereas the marginal zone (or border facies) has higher initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.711 to 0.7112, lower ɛ Nd(t) = - 7.3 to - 8.3, and higher δ18Οqtz = + 10.6 to + 11.9‰. The small range in initial Sr and Nd isotopic values throughout the pluton is paired with a remarkable uniformity in trace element patterns, despite a large range in silica contents (58.8 to 72 wt% SiO2). Assimilation of a crustally derived partial melt into the mafic parental magma would progressively add incompatible trace elements and SiO2 to the evolving mafic starting liquid, but the opposite trend, of trace element depletion during magma evolution, is observed in the Serifos granodiorites. Thermodynamic modeling of whole-rock compositions during simple fractional crystallization (FC) or assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) processes of major rock-forming minerals—at a variety of pressure, oxidation state, and water activity conditions—fails to reproduce simultaneously the major element and trace element variations among the Serifos granitoids, implying a critical role for minor phases in controlling trace element fractionation. Both saturation of accessory phases such as allanite and titanite (at SiO2 ≥ 71 wt%)(to satisfy trace element constraints) and assimilation of partial melts from a metasedimentary component (to

  4. Microstructural record vs chemical and geochronological preservation in muscovite: implications for P-T-t estimates in deformed metapelites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airaghi, Laura; Lanari, Pierre; Warren, Clare J.; de Sigoyer, Julia; Guillot, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Pressure-temperature-deformation (P-T-ɛ) paths for metamorphic rocks commonly relies on the link between successive metamorphic assemblages and the microstructures. However, with increasing P-T conditions, metamorphic minerals in an early microstructure can re-equilibrate by changing their chemical composition. The direct link between deformation phases and mineral compositions for thermobarometry purposes can therefore be distorted. This study focuses on a series of garnet-biotite metapelites from the Longmen Shan (Sichuan, China) that preserve muscovite of different chemistry in distinct microstructures. To quantify the degree of re-equilibration of muscovite, a microstructural study was coupled with high-resolution chemical mapping. Then, the chemical evolution of muscovite (Si4+ and XMg) was modeled using Gibbs free energy minimization along a P-T loop previously constrained by phase equilibria calculations, semi-empirical and empirical thermobarometry. Our results show that the studied metapelites experienced a "typical" three stages metamorphic history: (1) heating and burial up to 11 kbar, 530˚ C, (2) minor decompression and heating up to 6 kbar, 580˚ C and (3) decompression and cooling down to 4-5 kbar, 380-450˚ C. However, muscovite has been partially or completely re-equilibrated during the three stages by idiomorphic replacement, although it is mainly observed in prograde microstructures preceding the pressure peak. The main factors controlling the degree of re-equilibration are the intensity of the deformation and the fluid availability during metamorphism. The P-T conditions of metamorphic assemblages thus reflect pulses of fluids release that enhanced mineral resorption and local replacement. The metamorphic peak (2) was dated by in situ 40Ar/39Ar on biotite porphyroblasts and by in situ (U-Pb)/Th laser ablation on allanite (REE-rich epidote) at 185±15 Ma. Muscovite grains preserved in prograde microstructures and partially re-equilibrated during

  5. Synkinematic emplacement of the magmatic epidote bearing Major Isidoro tonalite-granite batholith: Relicts of an Ediacaran continental arc in the Pernambuco-Alagoas domain, Borborema Province, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thyego R. da; Ferreira, Valderez P.; Lima, Mariucha M. Correia de; Sial, Alcides N.; Silva, José Mauricio R. da

    2015-12-01

    The Neoproterozoic Major Isidoro batholith (˜100 km2), composed of metaluminous to slightly peraluminous magmatic epidote-bearing tonalite to granite, is part of the Águas Belas-Canindé composite batholith, which intruded the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain of the Borborema Province, northeastern Brazil. These rocks contain biotite, amphibole, titanite and epidote that often shows an allanite core as key mafic mineral phases. K-diorite mafic enclaves are abundant in this pluton as well as are amphibole-rich clots. The plutonic rocks are medium-to high-K calc-alkaline, with SiO2 varying from 59.1 to 71.6%, Fe# from 0.6 to 0.9 and total alkalis from 6.1 to 8.5%. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are moderately fractionated, show (La/Lu)N ratios from 13.6 to 31.8 and discrete negative Eu anomalies (0.48-0.85). Incompatible-element spidergrams exhibit negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies. This batholith was emplaced around 627 Ma (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age) coevally with an amphibolite-facies metamorphic event in the region. It shows Nd-model age varying from 1.1 to 1.4 Ga, average ɛNd(627Ma) of -1.60 and back-calculated (627 Ma) initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7069 to 0.7086. Inherited zircon cores that yielded 206Pb/238U ages from 800 to 1000 Ma are likely derived from rocks formed during the Cariris Velhos (1.1-0.9 Ga) orogenic event. These isotopic data coupled with calculated δ18O(w.r.) value of +8.75‰ VSMOW indicate an I-type source and suggest a reworked lower continental crust as source rock. A granodioritic orthogneiss next to the Major Isidoro pluton, emplaced along the Jacaré dos Homens transpressional shear zone, yielded a U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 642 Ma, recording early tectonic movements along this shear zone that separates the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain to the north, from the Sergipano Domain to the south. The emplacement of the Major Isidoro pluton was synkinematic, coeval with the development of a regional flat-lying foliation, probably during the peak of

  6. Uranium cycle and tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Lufilian Pan-African orogenic belt (Zambia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglinger, Aurelien

    2013-01-01

    tectonic accretion in the internal zone of the Lufilian orogenic belt. During these syn-metamorphic fluid-rock interactions, uranium has been leached from U-bearing minerals such as allanite or monazite hosted by the reworked and partially molten gneissic basement. (author) [fr

  7. High-K granites of the Rum Jungle Complex, N-Australia: Insights into the Late Archean crustal evolution of the North Australian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüppel, K.; McCready, A. J.; Stumpfl, E. F.

    2009-08-01

    The Late Archean (c. 2.54-2.52 Ga) high-K granitoids of the Rum Jungle Complex, Northern Australia, display the igneous mineral assemblage of K-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase, biotite, and magnetite, and accessories such as zircon, monazite, titanite, allanite, apatite, and ilmenite. The granites underwent a variably severe greenschist facies alteration and associated deformation during the Barramundi Orogeny (1.88-1.85 Ga). The K-rich granitoids have variable compositions, mainly comprising syenogranite and quartz-monzonite. They can be subdivided into two major groups, (1) felsic granites and (2) intermediate to felsic granites, quartz-monzonites, and diorite. The felsic group (69-76 wt.% SiO 2) shares many features with typical Late Archean potassic granites. They are K- and LILE-rich and show marked depletion in Sr and Eu and the high field strength elements (HFSE), particularly Nb and Ti, relative to LILE and LREE. Compared to the average upper crust they have anomalously high Th (up to 123 ppm) and U (up to 40 ppm). The intermediate to felsic group (56-69 wt.% SiO 2) differs from the felsic group in having weakly lower Th and U but higher Mg#, Ti, Ba, Sr, Ni, Cr and REE, with a less pronounced negative Eu anomaly. This group displays well-defined trends in Harker diagrams, involving a negative correlation of Si with Sr, Ca, Na, and P whereas K, Rb, and Ba increase in the same direction, suggesting fractional crystallization of feldspar was more prominent than in the felsic suite. The mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the felsic group are consistent with granite formation by intracrustal melting of plagioclase-rich igneous protoliths, probably of tonaltic to granodioritic composition, at moderate crustal levels. The intermediate to felsic granites, on the other hand, appear to be the products of mantle-crust interaction, possibly by melting of or mixing with more mafic igneous rocks. As evidenced by the presence of older inherited zircons crustal

  8. NİĞDE, ELMALI GÜNEYİ S-TİPİ BİYOTİT GRANİTOİDLERİ VE ANKLAVLARININ PETROLOJİSİ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Biyotit granitoidler başlıca kuvars, biyotit, plajiyoklas, K-feldispat, muskovit nadiren amfibol içerirler. Tali bileşen olarak apatit, zirkon, allanit ve ikincil olarak klorit ve serisit içerirler. Anklavlar başlıca plajiyoklas, amfibol, ojit, biyotit, tali bileşen olarak sfen, zirkon ve ikincil olarak kalsit ve epidot minerallerini içerirler. Metalumino bileşimli anklav içeren, granitoidler S-tip granitlere ait kimyasal ve mineralojik özellikler gösterirler: peralumino (A/CNK oranı >1.15 bileşim ve muskovit minerali. Granitoidler büyük iyonlu litofil element (BİLE ve hafif nadir toprak elementlerce (HNTE zenginleşme ve ağır nadir toprak elementlerce fakirleşme (ANTE sunarlar. Bu durum granitoidlerin kabuk ergimesiyle oluştuğunu, negatif Eu anomalisi ve büyük iyon litofil elementlerince zenginlik göstermeleri plajiyoklasların fraksiyonlaşmada etkisini göstermektedir. Anklavlarda büyük iyonlu litofil element (BİLE zenginleşmesi, yüksek alan enerjili elementlerde (YAEE fakirleşme, nadir toprak element (NTE dağılımlarında yataya yakın desen vermeleri ve negatif Eu anomalisi göstermeleri, anklavların litosferik mantodan kaynaklandığını ve hornblend, plajiyoklasların fraksiyonlaşmada etkisini göstermektedir. Arazi, petrografik ve jeokimyasal verilere dayanarak, volkanik yay özellikli granitlerin mafik magmanın kabuğa sokulması ve muhtemelen kabuk kalınlaşması ile oluştuğu ve mafik magma ile fiziksel olarak karışarak anklavları oluşturduğu ileri sürülmüştür.

  9. Metasedimentary, granitoid, and gabbroic rocks from central Stewart Island, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allibone, A.H.; Tulloch, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    A NNE-NE trending strip, 3-8 km wide, extending from the Freshwater valley across Mt Rakeahua Table Hill, and Mt Allen to the northern end or the Tin Range was mapped at a scale of 1:12,500 to locate and investigate the boundary between the Median Tectonic Zone (MTZ) and Western Province on Stewart Island. A NNE-trending fault, herein termed the Escarpment Fault, separates predominantly ductily deformed rocks on its south side from essentially undeformed rocks to the north. North of the Escarpment Fault, a small (2-3 km 2 ) pluton of alkali-feldspar granite (Freds Camp) intruded gabbroic rocks tentatively considered to be associated with gabbro/anorthosite/diorite of the Rakeahua pluton, centred on Mt Rakeahua. Both units were subsequently intruded by I-type biotite granite of the South West Arm pluton. South of the Escarpment Fault the oldest intrusions are biotite tonalite-granite orthogneisses (Ridge and Table Hill plutons) intercalated with the sillimanite-cordierite-bearing Pegasus Group metasedimentary rocks, considered to represent the Western Province. They contain titanite, allanite, and magmatic epidote-bearing assemblages, implying affinities with I-type granitoids. These older granitoids have been affected by at least three phases of ductile deformation. Immediately south of the Escarpment Fault, the Escarpment pluton (hornblende, biotite, quartz, monzonite-quartz monzodiorite) only exhibit effects of the third phase of deformation. Minor gabbroic intrusives concordant with the S 3 fabric intrude the Pegasus Group and intercalated orthogneisses. Plutons of two-mica, garnet ±cordierite granite (Blaikies and Knob) and younger biotite-titanite-magmatic epidote granite (Campsite) cut fabrics associated with the third phase of ductile deformation. Preliminary U-Pb dating indicate Devonian-Carboniferous, Jurassic, and Early Cretaceous emplacement ages for Ridge Orthogneiss, Freds Camp pluton, South West Arm pluton, and Blaikies pluton, respectively. South

  10. REE enrichment due to fenitization of Devonian granites, Rodeo de Los Molles, Central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, M.; Altenberger, U.; Trumbull, R. B.; Lira, R.; Lopez De Luchi, M. G.; Viñas, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Rodeo de Los Molles rare earth element (REE) mineralization is characterized by an uncommon REE-bearing assemblage located within a fenitized biotite-monzogranite. The fenitization is found in a NNE-SSW trending, possibly fault related elliptical body in the northern margin of the Devonian Las Chacras-Piedras Coloradas Batholith, San Luis province, Central Argentina. The fenite was produced by the metasomatic addition of K and Na, as well as the loss of Ca and Sr, leading to the transformation of monzogranite to (quartz) alkali-feldspar syenite composition. Whole-rock geochemistry revealed a local enrichment in light rare earth elements within the fenitized zone. Drill-core samples from a mineral exploration campaign (Lira et al., 1999) and new surface samples are the basis for the present investigation, which aims to decipher the fluid evolution and REE-mineralization. REE-bearing minerals are located in irregularly patches and nodules ranging from a few millimeters to more than one meter in diameter. The REE-rich assemblage comprises an intergrowth of primary britholite (Ce,Ca)5(SiO4, PO4)3(OH,F), allanite and apatite with aegirine-augite, titanite, fluorite, bastnaesite and, quartz as well as complex thorium-rich accessory minerals. In more intensely altered areas clinochlore, spherolitic quartz, calcite, kaolinite, hematite and phlogopite also occur. Britholite is an extraordinary mineral belonging to the apatite group, usually described as an accessory mineral. Aside from being one of only three localites in the world where it occurs in ore quantities, Rodeo de Los Molles further contains atypical huge aggregates of the rare mineral. In general, britholite is thought to form by late-magmatic crystallization or alteration of primary minerals in alkali-rich granites (Uher et al., 2015). Its origin as an abundant phase in the Rodeo de Los Molles mineralization is one focus of this study. Lira, R., Barbieri, M., Ripley, E.M., Viñas, N.A. (1999) Actas II South

  11. The rapakivi granite plutons of Bodom and Obbnäs, southern Finland: petrography and geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosunen, P.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The Obbnäs and Bodom granite plutons of southernmost Finland show the typical petrographic and geochemical features of the Proterozoic rapakivi granites in Finland and elsewhere: they cut sharply across the 1900 Ma Svecofennian metamorphic bedrock and have the geochemical characteristics of subalkaline A-type granites. The Bodom pluton is composed of porphyritic granites (hornblende-, hornblende-biotite-, and biotite-bearing varieties and an even-grained granite that probably represent two separate intrusive phases. This lithologic variation does not occur in the Obbnäs pluton, which is almost entirely composed of porphyritic hornblende-biotite granite that gradually becomes more mafic to the southwest. Three types of hybrid granitoids resulting from magma mingling and mixing occur on the southwestern tip of the Obbnäs peninsula. The Bodom granites are syenogranites, whereas the composition of the Obbnäs granite varies from syeno- to monzogranite. The main silicates of both the Bodom and Obbnäs granites are quartz, microcline, plagioclase (An1541, biotite (siderophyllite, and generally also amphibole (ferropargasite or hastingsite. Plagioclase-mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts are absent or rare. The accessory minerals are fluorite, allanite, zircon, apatite, and iron-titanium oxides; the Obbnäs granite also contains titanite. The Bodom and Obbnäs granites are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous, with average A/CNK of 1.00 and 1.05, respectively, have high Fe/Mg (average FeOtot/[FeOtot+MgO] is 0.94 for the Bodom and 0.87 for the Obbnäs granites, and high Ga/Al (3.78 to 5.22 in Bodom and 2.46 to 4.18 in Obbnäs. The REE contents are high with LREE-enriched chondrite-normalized patterns and moderate (Obbnäs to relatively strong (Bodom negative Eu-anomalies. The Obbnäs granite is enriched in CaO, TiO2, MgO, and FeO, and depleted in SiO2 and K2O compared to the Bodom granites. Also, there are differences in the Ba, Rb, and Sr contents of

  12. Geochronology of granulite, charnockite and gneiss in the poly-metamorphosed Gaozhou Complex (Yunkai massif), South China: Emphasis on the in-situ EMP monazite dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Hong; Liu, Yung-Hsin; Lee, Chi-Yu; Xiang, Hua; Zhou, Han-Wen

    2012-07-01

    The in-situ EMP (electron microprobe) monazite age dating performed directly in the polished sections, in addition to the conventional U-Pb zircon and EMP monazite age dating on grains from heavy mineral concentrates, has been applied to the granulite, charnockite and gneiss in the Gaozhou Complex of the Yunkai massif in South China. While the conventional dating systems all give Caledonian ages, the in-situ EMP monazite ages provide more information to reveal not only detailed age groups pertaining to the Caledonian orogeny but also traces of later thermal events overprinting these rocks. For granulites, although some monazites present zoning (concentric, patchy and complex) in the BSE images, no discernable age differences are observed. Resetting of the Th-U-Pb monazite dating system under the high temperature condition could be the reason. Ages of homogeneous monazite in garnet porphyroblast (ca. 440 Ma) of the garnet-cordierite granulite that match nicely with the U-Pb zircon ages are systematically older than those in the matrix (ca. 430 Ma). The same case of two age groups is also present in the orthopyroxene-biotite granulite as revealed by monazite inclusions in plagioclase and orthopyroxene and those in quartz, respectively. For charnockites, despite similar ages of ca. 430 Ma are given by monazite in biotite and zircon in the rock, significant younger ages are obtained from monazites with particular features. Relict monazites with a breakdown texture to form successive layers of apatite and allanite in the rim as well as those which are close to the biotite-chlorite microvein always show a similar age of ca. 230 Ma. Moreover, tiny monazites in close association with the garnetiferous corona mainly surrounding orthopyroxene give rise to another age group around 370 Ma. For gneissic rocks, monazites enclosed by quartz give 434 Ma and those setting in the chlorite-epidote microvein of a paragneiss yield 237 Ma, consistent with the U-Pb zircon core-rim age

  13. W-Au skarns in the Neo-Proterozoic Seridó Mobile Belt, Borborema Province in northeastern Brazil: an overview with emphasis on the Bonfim deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Neto, João Adauto; Legrand, Jean Michel; Volfinger, Marcel; Pascal, Marie-Lola; Sonnet, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    The Seridó Mobile Belt (SMB) is located in the Borborema Province in northeastern Brazil and consists of a gneiss basement (Archean to Paleo-Proterozoic), a metasedimentary sequence (marble, quartzites, and schists), and the Brasiliano igneous suite (both of Neo-Proterozoic age). In this region, skarns occur within marble and at the marble-schist contact in the metasedimentary sequence. Most of the skarn deposits have been discovered in the early 1940s, and since then, they have been exploited for tungsten and locally gold. Recently, the discovery of gold in the Bonfim tungsten skarn has resulted in a better understanding of the skarn mineralization in this region. The main characteristics of the SMB skarns are that they are dominantly oxidized tungsten skarns, with the exception of the Itajubatiba and Bonfim gold-bearing skarns, which are reduced based on pyrrhotite as the dominant sulfide, garnet with high almandine and spessartine component, and elevated gold contents. In the Bonfim deposit, pressure estimates indicate that the skarns formed at 10- to 15-km depth. The mineralized skarns present the prograde stage with almandine, diopside, anorthite, and actinolite-magnesio-hornblende, and titanite, apatite, allanite, zircon, and monazite as accessory minerals. The retrograde stage is characterized by alkali feldspar, clinozoisite-zoisite-sericite, calcite, and quartz. Scheelite occurs in four ore-shoots distributed within the marble and at the marble-schist contact. The main ore body is 5-120 cm wide and contains an average of 4.8-wt.% WO3, which occurs in the basal marble-schist contact. Fold hinges appear to control the location of high-grade scheelite. The late-stage gold mineralization contains bismite (Bi2O3), fluorine-bearing bismite, native bismuth, bismuthinite (Bi2S3), and joseite [Bi4(Te,S)3], and also chlorite, epidote, prehnite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite. This gold-bismuth-tellurium mineralization exhibits a typical late character and occurs as a

  14. Geology, petrology and U-Pb geochronology of Serra da Rajada Granitic Pluton: implications about ediacaran magmatic evolution in NE portion of the Rio Piranhas-Serido Domain (NE of Borborema Province); Geologia, petrologia e geocronologia U-Pb do Pluton Granitico Serra da Rajada: implicacoes sobre a evolucao magmatica ediacarana na porcao do Dominio Rio Piranhas-Serido (NE da Provincia Borborema)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Alan Pereira da; Dantas, Alexandre Ranier, E-mail: alan.costa@cprm.gov.br, E-mail: alexandre.dantas@cprm.gov.br [Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM), Natal, RN (Brazil). Nucleo de Apoio de Natal/Superintendencia Regional de Recife; Nascimento, Marcos Antonio Leite do; Galindo, Antonio Carlos, E-mail: marcos@geologia.ufrn.br, E-mail: galindo@geologia.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia

    2015-12-15

    The Ediacaran plutonic activity, related to the Brazilian/Pan-African orogeny, is one of the most important geological features in the Borborema Province, formed by batholiths, stocks and dikes. The Serra da Rajada Granitic Pluton (SRGP), located in the central portion of the Rio Piranhas-Serido Domain, is an example of these bodies. This site is the target of cartographic, petrographic, lithochemical and geochronological studies. Its rocks are described as monzogranites consisting of K-feldspar, plagioclase (oligoclase-An{sub 23-24%}), quartz and biotite (main mafic), having as accessory minerals opaque, titanite, allanite, apatite and zircon. Chlorite, white mica and carbonate are alteration minerals. Lithochemical data from 15 samples show quite evolved rocks (SiO{sub 2} , 69% to 75%), rich in alkalis (Na{sub 2}O + K{sub 2}O ≥ 8.0%), depleted in MgO (≤ 0.45%), CaO (≤ 1.42%) and TiO{sub 2} (≤ 0.36%), and displaying moderate levels of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} t (2.16 to 3.53%). These rocks present a transitional nature between metaluminous and peraluminous (predominance of the latter) and have subalkaline/monzonitic affinity (high-K Calc-alkaline). Harker diagrams represent negative correlations in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}t, MgO and CaO, indicating fractionation of mafic and plagioclase. The REE spectrum show enrichment of light in relation to heavy REE (LaN/YbN = 23.70 to 10.13), with negative anomaly in Eu (Eu/ Eu* = 0.70 to 10.13) suggesting fractionation or accumulation in the feldspars source (plagioclase). Data integration allows correlating the SRGP rocks with those described as Equigranular high-K Calc-alkaline Suite. The U-Pb geochronology and Sm-Nd isotope dating indicate that the biotite monzogranite have a crystallization age of 557 ± 13 Ma and TDM model age of 2.36 Ga, respectively, and ε{sub Nd} value of - 20.10 for the crystallization age, allowing to infer a crustal source for the magma generated in the Paleoproterozoic age. (author)

  15. Localized ductile deformation in the Rieserferner Pluton (Eastern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, Alberto; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    are consistent with an WNW-ESE extension. The orientation and kinematics of the shear zones within the Rieseferner pluton record a change in the (regional?) shortening direction. The recorded deformation sequence of shearing and switch in orientation of stress field occurred between 32 and 26 Ma, concomitant to the onset of orogen-parallel extension in the Eastern Alps. References Romer, R. L., & Siegesmund, S. (2003). Why allanite may swindle about its true age. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 146(3), 297-307. Steenken, A., Siegesmund, S., & Heinrichs, T. (2000). The emplacement of the Rieserferner Pluton (Eastern Alps, Tyrol): constraints from field observations, magnetic fabrics and microstructures. Journal of Structural Geology, 22(11), 1855-1873.

  16. Evaluating the controls on Tourmaline Crystallization in the mylonitic granite-gneiss pluton in the Northeastern of Jan mine (Lorestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Moradi

    2017-02-01

    represents the formation of the tourmaline mineral from the melt is along with the progress of the differentiation (Jolliff et al., 1987; Kontak et al., 2002. Also the average composition of tourmaline – bearing mylonitic granite-gneiss pluton normalized spider diagram for the studied tourmaline shows positive anomaly and negative anomaly in Eu that indicates tourmaline minerals surrounded by quartz and feldspar grains (Copjakova et al., 2013. Secondary phases such as zircon and allanite very much effect on the REE patterns (Rollinson, 1993. Therefore, in the final stages of differentiation, allanite appeared earlier than it appeared in areas without tourmaline crystalliziation and LREE soon after tourmaline crystalized and they are deposited (Cuney and Friedrich, 1987. Using a combination of phase diagrams, the controlling factors of creation of tourmaline associated with biotite-tourmaline can be assessed, and the relationship between tourmaline and associated minerals, chemistry of tourmaline – bearing granitoid pluton, and location of petrological minerals tourmaline can be sought (Pesquera et al., 2005. Discussion The results of LA-ICP-MS on tourmalines of mylonitic granite-gneiss body in the north east of Jan mine in Sanandaj – Sirjan Zone represents tourmaline crystallization from the melt along with the progress of the differentiation. Also, the average composition of tourmaline – bearing mylonitic granite-gneiss pluton normalized spider diagram for the studied tourmaline shows positive anomaly and negative anomaly in Eu that indicates that tourmalines are surrounded by quartz and feldspar grains. According to petrographic evidence of tourmaline and biotite, it can be seen with muscovite. Therefore, where tourmaline is dominant, biotite and associated minerals are limited or do not exist. Using a combination of phase diagrams controlling factors of tourmaline crystallization associated with biotite-tourmaline can be assessed, and the relationship between

  17. Environmental review of the Mary Kathleen uranium minesite, Northwest Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costelloe, M.T.; Lottermoser, B.G.; Ashley, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Mary Kathleen uranium deposit, in northwest Queensland, was discovered in 1954 and mined in 19561963 and 1976-1982. Rehabilitation of the site was completed in 1985 and the work won an award for environmental excellence. In 1999 gamma-ray data, plus stream sediment, soil, rock chip, mineral efflorescence, vegetation and water samples were collected from selected sites to assist in the examination of the current environmental status of the rehabilitated area. This paper presents preliminary results and interpretations. In the Mark Kathleen open pit, skarn type U-Th-REE mineralisation is hosted in amphibolite grade metamorphosed calc-silicate, mafic to intermediate igneous and sedimentary rocks. Remnant ore zones are composed of medium to coarse grained garnet and clinopyroxene, with accessory allanite, plagioclase, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and uraninite. Later retrograde alteration to chlorite, calcite, sericite, epidote and scapolite occurs. Fine grained uraninite is enclosed in allanite, and is partly replaced by metamict products nd traces of galena. Elevated gamma-ray readings in the open pit correspond to exposed ore lenses, the former haul road and abandoned ore stockpiles (up to 16 mSv/year). Surficial oxidation of ore and adjacent sulphide-bearing calc-silicate rocks has led to contemporary precipitation of yellow, orange, green and white mineral efflorescences on the pit walls. Wallrock oxidation of reactive sulphides (mainly pyrrhotite breakdown) produces acidic solutions, however, buffering reactions of these fluids with gangue calc-silicates and carbonate phases prevent low pH conditions from developing. The open pit lake is approximately 40m deep and contains saline (0.15%) surface waters which are Ca-, SO 4 -rich with elevated Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, U and Zn at a pH of 6.11. Waste rock piles are up to 30m thick and have been covered by a thin veneer of benign waste. However, there are high radiation levels on several waste rock piles (up to 20

  18. The Long-term deformation of the Longmen Shan (Sichuan, China), a key to understand the present structure of the eastern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airaghi, Laura; de Sigoyer, Julia; Guillot, Stéphane; Lanari, Pierre; Warren, Clare J.; Robert, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    The Longmen Shan thrust belt, at the eastern border of Tibetan plateau, is a tectonically active region as demonstrated by the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan (2008) and Mw 6.6 Lushan (2013) earthquakes. The Moho discontinuity deepens across the Longmen Shan (below the along-strike Wenchuan fault) from ˜40 km beneath the Sichuan basin to more than 60 km beneath the Songpan-Ganze block. Such a thickness is not compatible with the only ˜35 km of shortening estimated at the front of the belt during the Cenozoic-Quaternary compressive reactivation. The geological inheritance may thus play a key role in the present structure of the Longmen Shan. However the long-term history of the belt is still poorly documented. The major Wenchuan fault separates medium-grade metamorphic rocks to the West (internal domain of the Longmen Shan) to the greenschist metamorphic rocks to the East (external domain). In the hanging and footwall of the fault the South China basement also crops out. Metamorphic rocks, exhumed from depth, offer the opportunity to investigate the deep processes occurred in the Longmen Shan. We have characterized and dated the metamorphism in the central part of the belt by combining structural and microstructural observations with high-resolution X-ray mapping and chemical analyses of metamorphic minerals related to the different stages of deformation. In situ 40Ar/39Ar dating on mica and in situ U-Pb/Th dating on allanite (REE-rich epidote) allowed the different phases of metamorphism and deformation to be dated. Our results show that the Longmen Shan underwent a complex Mesozoic tectono-metamorphic history, articulated in a succession of pulses of deformation (burial or uplifting) and periods of quiescence. A first phase of rapid thin-skinned deformation occurred about 200 Ma ago. Internal sedimentary units were strongly deformed and buried down to 11±1 kbar, 550±30˚ C. This phase was followed by a period of slow exhumation between 200 and 170 Ma. A second pulse of

  19. Metallogeny of Mesoproterozoic Sedimentary Rocks in Idaho and Montana - Studies by the Mineral Resources Program, U.S. Geological Survey, 2004-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, J. Michael

    2007-01-01

    -central Idaho are integrated and summarized by Bookstrom and others (chapter B, this volume). In particular, their field investigations and analysis of evidence and previous arguments for synsedimentary versus epigenetic mineral deposit types, both of which have been postulated by earlier workers, led them to conclude that both processes were likely instrumental in forming the ore deposits of the Blackbird district. Finally, this report supplies new data on isotopic ratios of sulfur, oxygen, carbon, and helium in minerals associated with cobalt-bearing ores of the cobalt belt. Slack (chapter C, this volume) identified several previously unrecognized rare-earth-element minerals in Blackbird ores: monazite (Ce,La,Y,Th)PO4, xenotime (YPO4), allanite (CaCe)2(Al,Fe)3Si3O12(OH), and gadolinite (Be2FeY2Si2O10). Light rare-earth elements reside mostly in monazite, whereas yttrium and heavy rare-earth minerals reside mostly in xenotime. Dated monazite, which in the Blackbird district is interstitial to cobaltite, is Cretaceous. This date brings into question the otherwise geologically convincing interpretation of Blackbird ores as being of Mesoproterozoic age and synsedimentary origin. This volume consists of three summary articles: A. Great Divide megashear, Montana, Idaho, and Washington: An intraplate crustal-scale shear zone recurrently active since the Mesoproterozoic by J. Michael O'Neill, Edward T. Ruppel, and David A. Lopez B. Blackbird Fe-Cu-Co-Au-REE deposits by Arthur A. Bookstrom, Craig A. Johnson, Gary P. Landis, and Thomas P. Frost C. Geochemical and mineralogical studies of sulfide and iron oxide deposits in the Idaho cobalt belt by John F. Slack

  20. Petrography, mineral chemistry and lithochemistry of the albitite and granite-gneissics rocks of anomaly 35 from Lagoa Real uranium province; Petrografia, quimica mineral e litoquimica do albitito e das rochas granito-gnaissicas da anomalia 35, provincia uranifera de Lagoa Real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Camila Marques dos

    2016-07-01

    albitites and gneisses are macroscopically gradational, however, in the garnet albitites replacement of granitic mineral facies by the albitite facies were observed petrographically, implying a granitic protolith for this rock. On the other hand, magnetite albitites do not have clear relationship with granites. Albitites usually have porphyroblastic texture with granoblastic polygonal matrix and chessboard texture in albite porphyroclasts. The garnet albitites comprise hedenbergite, hastingsite, garnet, magnetite and sphena. Magnetite albitites, in turn, have hedenbergite, Fe-edenite, biotite, martitized magnetite, allanite and sphene. The diopside+actinolite+eastonita association is late, and in these rocks, it is restricted to more deformed portions or filling voids. The biotite albitites comprise biotite, zircon and apatite hedenbergite (?). Mineralization occurs in magnetite albitites as thin lenses composed by sphene, magnetite, carbonate and zircon. The uranium mineral is the uraninite, which occurs filling spaces between crystals and sphene or albite granules. In comparison to granites, albitites have a higher content of Na{sub 2}O, MgO, V, W, Zr, Pb and Sr for and lower K{sub 2}O, SiO{sub 2} and F. They have a geochemical REE pattern that is identical to that of granite. The similarity between macroscopic granites and albitites, the presence of vazios, feldspar hematitization and sericitization causing macroscopical reddening in transitional portions and the replacement of potassic feldspar by albite and oligoclase are suggestive of episyenitization processes. The metasomatic perthites and presence of chessboard texture in porphyroclasts indicate successive albitization processes prior to deformation. The comparison between albitite samples of different drill cores and anomalies shows that there are differences in the formation and mineralization of these rocks. The V and Mg enrichment in some albitites suggests that these rocks may result from the interaction of

  1. Petrography, mineral chemistry and lithochemistry of the albitite and granite-gneissics rocks of anomaly 35 from Lagoa Real uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Camila Marques dos

    2016-01-01

    albitites and gneisses are macroscopically gradational, however, in the garnet albitites replacement of granitic mineral facies by the albitite facies were observed petrographically, implying a granitic protolith for this rock. On the other hand, magnetite albitites do not have clear relationship with granites. Albitites usually have porphyroblastic texture with granoblastic polygonal matrix and chessboard texture in albite porphyroclasts. The garnet albitites comprise hedenbergite, hastingsite, garnet, magnetite and sphena. Magnetite albitites, in turn, have hedenbergite, Fe-edenite, biotite, martitized magnetite, allanite and sphene. The diopside+actinolite+eastonita association is late, and in these rocks, it is restricted to more deformed portions or filling voids. The biotite albitites comprise biotite, zircon and apatite hedenbergite (?). Mineralization occurs in magnetite albitites as thin lenses composed by sphene, magnetite, carbonate and zircon. The uranium mineral is the uraninite, which occurs filling spaces between crystals and sphene or albite granules. In comparison to granites, albitites have a higher content of Na 2 O, MgO, V, W, Zr, Pb and Sr for and lower K 2 O, SiO 2 and F. They have a geochemical REE pattern that is identical to that of granite. The similarity between macroscopic granites and albitites, the presence of vazios, feldspar hematitization and sericitization causing macroscopical reddening in transitional portions and the replacement of potassic feldspar by albite and oligoclase are suggestive of episyenitization processes. The metasomatic perthites and presence of chessboard texture in porphyroclasts indicate successive albitization processes prior to deformation. The comparison between albitite samples of different drill cores and anomalies shows that there are differences in the formation and mineralization of these rocks. The V and Mg enrichment in some albitites suggests that these rocks may result from the interaction of fluids with

  2. Microchemistry, geochemistry and geochronology of the Lagoa Real Uranium Province (BA) magmatic association: petrological and evolutionary significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Lucas Eustaquio Dias

    2016-01-01

    characterized by low content of U, Sr, and Ba. Based on the chemical-compositional data of titanite in granites and albite gneisses and mineral reactions, it was possible to distinguish three hydrothermal events that affected the rocks of magmatic association. These events promoted, in a sequential but separately way, the formation of various minerals which composition reflect the chemistry of these events. A first event, tardi to post-magmatic, is comprised by a fluid rich in F and Cl, generated amphibole and biotite at the expense of pyroxene. The second hydrothermal event, is post-magmatic and characterized by presenting a fluid with F, HREE, Th and ± V. During this event occurred a 11 reaction between ilmenite, plagioclase and hornblende/biotite resulting in the crystallization of titanite. Finally, the last hydrothermal event which is also post-magmatic, is characterized by the presence of F, ±CO 3 2- , PO 4 3- ±, LREE, Th, U, Zr. During this last event, the formation of a second generation of titanite and allanite has occurred, both in expense of the previously titanite. Also during this event fluoro-carbonates and REE phosphates, thorite and a second generation of zircon were precipitated. Finally, isotopic studies, geochronological and chemistry mineral data allowed to contribute to a better understanding of the petrological/temporal evolution occurred in the Lagoa Real magmatic association and in the crust segment which the PULR is located. (author)

  3. Caracterización petrográfica y geoquímica del batolito Cerro Aspero-Alpa Corral (32°34'-32°42' LS y 64°43'-64°52' LO, provincia de Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porta, G.

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cerro Aspero-Alpa Corral (CA-AC batholith is a 440 km2 granite body present in the Southern edge of the Eastern Pampean Ranges, Córdoba province, central Argentina. The intrusive body of probably paleozoic age shows both post-tectonic and epizonal character. Country rocks include Upper Precambrian-Lower Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks mainly represented by mica-schists, gneisses and migmatites, locally interrupted by minor amphibolite and marble outcrops.This paper deals with representative petrographic and geochemical data that characterize a 150 km2 central stripe between 32°34'-32°42'S and 64°43'-64°52'W.Three granitic facies have been distinguished based on their distinctive modal mineralogy and texture, and upon well known chemical parameters.A K-feldspar megacryst porphydic-type is the areally prevalent facies, but dykes of micro- leucogranites and biotite-phenocryst bearing granite are also well represented. They are all monzogranites of subalkaline and peraluminous chemistry. Their mineralogy shows variable proportions of QAP constituents and micas, with minor phases represented by Fe-Ti oxides, apatite (Ap, titanite (Tt, allanite (Aln.Microgranular enclaves, abundantly distributed in the porphydic facies, provide valuable information for a better understanding of parental magma evolution.The high-Ca content of the melt makes this body quite distinctive compared to its larger northern neighbour, the Achala batholith.Pegmatite and aplite bodies, as well as fluorite bearing breccias and quartz veins, barren or mineralized, are also present within the CA-AC batholith.El batolito Cerro Aspero-Alpa Corral (CA-AC es un cuerpo granítico que aflora en el extremo sur de las Sierras Pampeanas Orientales, en la provincia de Córdoba, República Argentina, cubriendo una superficie cercana a los 440 km2.Es un cuerpo intrusivo postcinemático de probable edad paleozoica. Las rocas encajantes son metamorfitas correspondientes al Prec

  4. U-Pb, Re-Os, and Ar/Ar geochronology of rare earth element (REE)-rich breccia pipes and associated host rocks from the Mesoproterozoic Pea Ridge Fe-REE-Au deposit, St. Francois Mountains, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Selby, David; Slack, John F.; Day, Warren C.; Pillers, Renee M.; Cosca, Michael A.; Seeger, Cheryl; Fanning, C. Mark; Samson, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE)-rich breccia pipes (600,000 t @ 12% rare earth oxides) are preserved along the margins of the 136-million metric ton (Mt) Pea Ridge magnetite-apatite deposit, within Mesoproterozoic (~1.47 Ga) volcanic-plutonic rocks of the St. Francois Mountains terrane in southeastern Missouri, United States. The breccia pipes cut the rhyolite-hosted magnetite deposit and contain clasts of nearly all local bedrock and mineralized lithologies.Grains of monazite and xenotime were extracted from breccia pipe samples for SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology; both minerals were also dated in one polished thin section. Monazite forms two morphologies: (1) matrix granular grains composed of numerous small (Os on fine-grained molybdenite and 40Ar/39Ar on muscovite, biotite, and K-feldspar.Ages (±2σ errors) obtained by SHRIMP U-Pb analysis are as follows: (1) zircon from the two host rhyolite samples have ages of 1473.6 ± 8.0 and 1472.7 ± 5.6 Ma; most zircon in late felsic dikes is interpreted as xenocrystic (age range ca. 1522–1455 Ma); a population of rare spongy zircon is likely of igneous origin and yields an age of 1441 ± 9 Ma; (2) pale-yellow granular monazite—1464.9 ± 3.3 Ma (no dated xenotime); (3) reddish matrix granular monazite—1462.0 ± 3.5 Ma and associated xenotime—1453 ± 11 Ma; (4) coarse glassy-yellow monazite—1464.8 ± 2.1, 1461.7 ± 3.7 Ma, with rims at 1447.2 ± 4.7 Ma; and (5) matrix monazite (in situ)—1464.1 ± 3.6 and 1454.6 ± 9.6 Ma, and matrix xenotime (in situ)—1468.0 ± 8.0 Ma. Two slightly older ages of cores are about 1478 Ma. The young age of rims on the coarse glassy monazite coincides with an Re-Os age of 1440.6 ± 9.2 Ma determined in this study for molybdenite intergrown with quartz and allanite, and with the age of monazite inclusions in apatite from the magnetite ore (Neymark et al., 2016). A 40Ar/39Ar age of 1473 ± 1 Ma was obtained for muscovite from a breccia pipe sample.Geochronology and trace element

  5. Microchemistry, geochemistry and geochronology of the Lagoa Real Uranium Province (BA) magmatic association: petrological and evolutionary significance; Microquimica, geoquimica e geocronologia da associacao magmatica da provincia uranifera de Lagoa Real, BA: significado petrologico e evolutivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Lucas Eustaquio Dias

    2016-07-01

    characterized by low content of U, Sr, and Ba. Based on the chemical-compositional data of titanite in granites and albite gneisses and mineral reactions, it was possible to distinguish three hydrothermal events that affected the rocks of magmatic association. These events promoted, in a sequential but separately way, the formation of various minerals which composition reflect the chemistry of these events. A first event, tardi to post-magmatic, is comprised by a fluid rich in F and Cl, generated amphibole and biotite at the expense of pyroxene. The second hydrothermal event, is post-magmatic and characterized by presenting a fluid with F, HREE, Th and ± V. During this event occurred a 11 reaction between ilmenite, plagioclase and hornblende/biotite resulting in the crystallization of titanite. Finally, the last hydrothermal event which is also post-magmatic, is characterized by the presence of F, ±CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ±, LREE, Th, U, Zr. During this last event, the formation of a second generation of titanite and allanite has occurred, both in expense of the previously titanite. Also during this event fluoro-carbonates and REE phosphates, thorite and a second generation of zircon were precipitated. Finally, isotopic studies, geochronological and chemistry mineral data allowed to contribute to a better understanding of the petrological/temporal evolution occurred in the Lagoa Real magmatic association and in the crust segment which the PULR is located. (author)

  6. Subduction-related shoshonitic and ultrapotassic magmatism: a study of Siluro-Ordovician syenites from the Scottish Caledonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. N.; Fowler, M. B.

    1986-12-01

    Syenites are important or predominant components of several plutonic complexes, emplaced between 456 and 415 Ma along the NW margin of the Caledonian orogenic belt, adjacent to the Lewisian foreland, in W and NW Scotland. Although there are, in detail, chemical differences between the syenites from each centre, they form a well-defined compositional group overall. Ratios amongst their trace elements (especially very high values of La/Nb) are quite different from those trachytes and syenites formed by fractional crystallisation of ocean-island basalts and their continental equivalents, emplaced in regions of anorogenic crustal tension. Instead, the Scottish Caledonian syenites closely resemble chemically the fractional-crystallisation residua of potassic subduction-related magmas, such as the shoshonitic series. A comendite minor intrusion from a swarm associated with the Loch Borralan and Loch Ailsh syenitic complexes is remarkably similar in composition to Recent obsidian from the shoshonitic volcano of Lipari, in the Aeolian Arc. Published Sr- and Pb-isotopic ratios preclude a significant component of either upper (Proterozoic Moine schists) or lower crust (granulite-facies Archaean Lewisian or Proterozoic Grenvillian gneisses) in all these syenites, except in local syenitic facies of the Glenelg-Ratagain complex. Fractional crystallisation appears to be the mechanism by which the liquids which formed these syenites evolved from basic parental magmas. The phases involved in this process may have included plagioclase, alkali feldspar, pyroxene, amphibole, biotite, garnet, Fe-Ti oxide, sphene, allanite, apatite, zircon and zirconolite, and therefore all the ratios amongst even the so-called incompatible elements may have changed during the evolution of the leucocratic magmas. Nevertheless, a detailed study of the Glen Dessarry complex shows that the changes are insufficient to disguise the geochemical nature of the parental magmas. These appear to be picritic

  7. Geologic history of the Blackbird Co-Cu district in the Lemhi subbasin of the Belt-Purcell Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Box, Stephen E.; Cossette, Pamela M.; Frost, Thomas P.; Gillerman, Virginia; King, George; Zirakparvar, N. Alex

    2016-01-01

    The Blackbird cobalt-copper (Co-Cu) district in the Salmon River Mountains of east-central Idaho occupies the central part of the Idaho cobalt belt—a northwest-elongate, 55-km-long belt of Co-Cu occurrences, hosted in grayish siliciclastic metasedimentary strata of the Lemhi subbasin (of the Mesoproterozoic Belt-Purcell Basin). The Blackbird district contains at least eight stratabound ore zones and many discordant lodes, mostly in the upper part of the banded siltite unit of the Apple Creek Formation of Yellow Lake, which generally consists of interbedded siltite and argillite. In the Blackbird mine area, argillite beds in six stratigraphic intervals are altered to biotitite containing over 75 vol% of greenish hydrothermal biotite, which is preferentially mineralized.Past production and currently estimated resources of the Blackbird district total ~17 Mt of ore, averaging 0.74% Co, 1.4% Cu, and 1.0 ppm Au (not including downdip projections of ore zones that are open downward). A compilation of relative-age relationships and isotopic age determinations indicates that most cobalt mineralization occurred in Mesoproterozoic time, whereas most copper mineralization occurred in Cretaceous time.Mesoproterozoic cobaltite mineralization accompanied and followed dynamothermal metamorphism and bimodal plutonism during the Middle Mesoproterozoic East Kootenay orogeny (ca. 1379–1325 Ma), and also accompanied Grenvilleage (Late Mesoproterozoic) thermal metamorphism (ca. 1200–1000 Ma). Stratabound cobaltite-biotite ore zones typically contain cobaltite1 in a matrix of biotitite ± tourmaline ± minor xenotime (ca. 1370–1320 Ma) ± minor chalcopyrite ± sparse allanite ± sparse microscopic native gold in cobaltite. Such cobaltite-biotite lodes are locally folded into tight F2 folds with axial-planar S2 cleavage and schistosity. Discordant replacement-style lodes of cobaltite2-biotite ore ± xenotime2 (ca. 1320–1270 Ma) commonly follow S2fractures and fabrics

  8. Origin of the Ciomadul Dacite, Carpathian-Pannonian Region, Eastern-Central Europe: Rejuvenation of a Pre-Existing Crystal Mush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, B.; Harangi, S.; Molnar, K.; Jankovics, E. M.; Lukacs, R.; Ntaflos, T.

    2012-12-01

    Dacitic composite volcanoes and calderas worldwide have many common specific characters. Notably, their activities are fairly unpredictable since the repose time between the active phases could be rather long, i.e. even several tens or hundreds ka. This nature might be related to the origin of such magmas. Petrological observations indicate that relatively old, cool, highly crystalline magma body (i.e., a crystal mush) could be present beneath the seemingly inactive dacitic volcanoes before reawakening. Reactivation of such locked magma chambers could occur due to the upwelling and intrusion of mafic magma and recent calculations suggest that this process takes place rather fast. Understanding the nature and time-scale of such remobilization events is crucial to explain the reason of the change in volcanic behaviour from dormant to active phase (i.e., the reawakening of the volcano). In this study, we show the role and the character of a pre-existing near-solidus granodioritic crystal mush to generate the eruptible dacitic magma in the Ciomadul volcano. The Ciomadul dacite is a crystal-rich rock with ubiquitous plagioclases and amphiboles. They form viscous lava domes and pumices generated by sub-plinian explosive eruptions. Combined, mineral-scale textural and geochemical investigations indicate a complex origin of these minerals, formed partly in a low temperature dioritic-granodioritic crystal mush body, partly in higher temperature hybrid magma. In addition, biotite, titanite, apatite, allanite, zircon, K-feldspar and quartz occur in various amounts and are interpreted also as antecrysts derived from the remobilized mushy body. High-Mg olivines and clinopyroxenes represent basaltic magma intruded into the mush. The nature of the crystal mush was closely investigated through the detailed analysis of the crystal clots found often in the Ciomadul dacites. Their texture resembles plutonic rocks, but they contain interstitial vesiculated glasses. The glass could

  9. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Paleo-Proterozoic granitoids from Mahakoshal Supracrustal Belt (MSB), CITZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhupendra; Ahmad, Talat; Kaulina, Tatiana; Bayanova, Tamara

    2015-04-01

    Voluminous granitic magmatism of Proterozoic age occupies a vast expanse at the southern margin of Mahakoshal Supracrustal Belt (MSB), CITZ. The present study focuses on eastern part of this belt and discusses possible crustal evolution processes based on the geochemical, geochronological and Sm-Nd isotopic constraints on these rocks. The rocks present are predominantly granites and gneisses viz. grey to pink granite gneiss and leuco- to mesocratic granites. In general these rocks are medium to coarse grained and microscopically show typical granitic assemblages with apatite, titanite, zircon and allanite as accessories. Mineralogically these rocks are grouped into three categories viz. Hbl-Bt granite gneiss, Bt- granite gneiss and Bt-granite. Major oxide characteristics show that the Hbl-Bt granite Gneiss are metaluminous (ASI~0.98), whereas Bt- granite gneiss (ASI=1.05-1.22) and Bt- granite (ASI=1.03-1.21) are weakly peraluminous to strongly peraluminous. In terms of Fe* number and alkali-lime index these rocks belong to magnesian and calc-alkalic series respectively. Overall these rocks range from 59.43 to 72.01 wt.% SiO2 and have low Na2O content (average ~2.60 wt.%) with average ~4.02 wt.% K2O and high K2O/Na2O ratio. On Harker variation diagrams, all rock types show negative correlation for TiO2, P2O5, CaO, MnO, MgO, Fe2O3T and Al2O3 against SiO2 suggesting fractionation of Pl-Hbl-Ttn-Mag-Ap during evolution of these rocks. On chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) plot, the Bt-granite is enriched in LREE ((La/Sm)N ~10.21) and show negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu*=0.39) with depleted HREE ((Gd/Yb)N ~4.38). The Hbl-Bt granite gneiss shows LREE ((La/Sm)N ~6.68) depletion and enriched HREE ((Gd/Yb)N ~2.05) patterns compared to Bt-granite, with negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu*=0.44). Whereas Bt-gneiss is moderate in comparison with LREE enrichment ((La/Sm)N ~9.17) and HREE depletion ((Gd/Yb)N ~3.02) with weak negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu*=0.60). Multi-elemental plot

  10. Felsic magmatism and uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The strongly incompatible behaviour of uranium in silicate magmas results in its concentration in the most felsic melts and a prevalence of granites and rhyolites as primary U sources for the formation of U deposits. Despite its incompatible behavior, U deposits resulting directly from magmatic processes are quite rare. In most deposits, U is mobilized by hydrothermal fluids or ground water well after the emplacement of the igneous rocks. Of the broad range of granite types, only a few have U contents and physico-chemical properties that permit the crystallization of accessory minerals from which uranium can be leached for the formation of U deposits. The first granites on Earth, which crystallized uraninite, dated at 3.1 Ga, are the potassic granites from the Kaapval craton (South Africa) which were also the source of the detrital uraninite for the Dominion Reef and Witwatersrand quartz pebble conglomerate deposits. Four types of granites or rhyolites can be sufficiently enriched in U to represent a significant source for the genesis of U deposits: per-alkaline, high-K met-aluminous calc-alkaline, L-type peraluminous and anatectic pegmatoids. L-type peraluminous plutonic rocks in which U is dominantly hosted in uraninite or in the glass of their volcanic equivalents represent the best U source. Per-alkaline granites or syenites are associated with the only magmatic U-deposits formed by extreme fractional crystallization. The refractory character of the U-bearing minerals does not permit their extraction under the present economic conditions and make them unfavorable U sources for other deposit types. By contrast, felsic per-alkaline volcanic rocks, in which U is dominantly hosted in the glassy matrix, represent an excellent source for many deposit types. High-K calc-alkaline plutonic rocks only represent a significant U source when the U-bearing accessory minerals (U-thorite, allanite, Nb oxides) become metamict. The volcanic rocks of the same geochemistry may be

  11. Felsic magmatism and uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium strongly incompatible behaviour in silicate magmas results in its concentration in the most felsic melts and a prevalence of granites and rhyolites as primary U sources for the formation of U deposits. Despite its incompatible behaviour, U deposits resulting directly from magmatic processes are quite rare. In most deposits, U is mobilized by hydrothermal fluids or ground water well after the emplacement of the igneous rocks. Of the broad range of granite types, only a few have have U contents and physico-chemical properties that permit the crystallization of accessory minerals from which uranium can be leached for the formation of U deposits. The first granites on Earth which crystallized uraninite appeared at 3.1 Ga, are the potassic granites from the Kaapval craton (South Africa) which were also the source of the detrital uraninite for the Dominion Reef and Witwatersrand quartz pebble conglomerate deposits. Four types of granites or rhyolites can be sufficiently enriched in U to represent a significant source for the genesis of U deposits: peralkaline, high-K metaluminous calc-alkaline, L-type peraluminous ones and anatectic pegmatoids. L-type peraluminous plutonic rocks in which U is dominantly hosted in uraninite or in the glass in their volcanic equivalents represent the best U source. Peralkaline granites or syenites represent the only magmatic U-deposits formed by extreme fractional crystallization. The refractory character of the U-bearing minerals does not permit their extraction at the present economic conditions and make them unfavourable U sources for other deposit types. By contrast, felsic peralkaline volcanic rocks, in which U is dominantly hosted in the glassy matrix, represent an excellent source for many deposit types. High-K calc-alkaline plutonic rocks only represent a significant U source when the U-bearing accessory minerals [U-thorite, allanite, Nb oxides] become metamict. The volcanic rocks of the same geochemistry may be also a

  12. Genesis of a zoned granite stock, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Travis

    1977-01-01

    A composite epizonal stock of biotite granite has intruded a diverse assemblage of metamorphic rocks in the Serpentine Hot Springs area of north-central Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The metamorphic rocks include amphibolite-facies orthogneiss and paragneiss, greenschist-facies fine-grained siliceous and graphitic metasediments, and a variety of carbonate rocks. Lithologic units within the metamorphic terrane trend generally north-northeast and dip moderately toward the southeast. Thrust faults locally juxtapose lithologic units in the metamorphic assemblage, and normal faults displace both the metamorphic rocks and some parts of the granite stock. The gneisses and graphitic metasediments are believed to be late Precambrian in age, but the carbonate rocks are in part Paleozoic. Dating by the potassium-argon method indicates that the granite stock is Late Cretaceous. The stock has sharp discordant contacts, beyond which is a well-developed thermal aureole with rocks of hornblende hornfels facies. The average mode of the granite is 29 percent plagioclase, 31 percent quartz, 36 percent K-feldspar, and 4 percent biotite. Accessory minerals include apatite, magnetite, sphene, allanite, and zircon. Late-stage or deuteric minerals include muscovite, fluorite, tourmaline, quartz, and albite. The stock is a zoned complex containing rocks with several textural facies that are present in four partly concentric zones. Zone 1 is a discontinuous border unit, containing fine- to coarse-grained biotite granite, that grades inward into zone 2. Zone 2 consists of porphyritic biotite granite with oriented phenocrysts of pinkish-gray microcline in a coarse-grained equigranular groundmass of plagioclase, quartz, and biotite. It is in sharp, concordant to discordant contact with rocks of zone 3. Zone 3 consists of seriate-textured biotite granite that has been intruded by bodies of porphyritic biotite granite containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite in an

  13. Mianningite, (□,Pb,Ce,Na) (U{sup 4+},Mn,U{sup 6+}) Fe{sup 3+}{sub 2}(Ti,Fe{sup 3+}){sub 18}O{sub 38}, a new member of the crichtonite group from Maoniuping REE deposit, Mianning county, southwest Sichuan, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Xiangkun; Fan, Guang; Chen, Zhangru; Ai, Yujie [Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology, Beijing (China); Li, Guowu [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China). Lab. of Crystal Structure; Shen, Ganfu [Chengdu Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources, Chengdu (China)

    2017-05-15

    Mianningite (IMA 2014-072), ideally (□,Pb,Ce,Na)(U{sup 4+},Mn,U{sup 6+}) Fe{sup 3+}{sub 2}(Ti,Fe{sup 3+}){sub 18}O{sub 38}, is a new member of the crichtonite group from the Maoniuping REE deposit, Mianning county, Sichuan province, China. It was found in fractures of lamprophyre veins and in the contact between lamprophyre and a later quartz-alkali feldspar syenite dyke with REE mineralization, and is named after its type locality. Associated minerals are microcline, albite, quartz, iron-rich phlogopite, augite, muscovite, calcite, baryte, fluorite, epidote, pyrite, magnetite, hematite, galena, hydroxylapatite, titanite, ilmenite, rutile, garnet-group minerals, zircon, allanite-(Ce), monazite-(Ce), bastnaesite-(Ce), parisite-(Ce), maoniupingite-(Ce), thorite, pyrochlore-group minerals and chlorite. Mianningite occurs as opaque subhedral to euhedral tabular crystals, up to 1-2 mm in size, black in color and streak, and with a submetallic luster. Mianningite is brittle, with a conchoidal fracture. Its average micro-indentation hardness is 83.8 kg/mm{sup 2} (load 0.2 kg), which is equivalent to ∝6 on the Mohs hardness scale. Its measured and calculated densities are 4.62 (8) g/cm{sup 3} and 4.77 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Under reflected light, mianningite is grayish white, with no internal reflections. It appears isotropic and exhibits neither bireflectance nor pleochroism. The empirical formula, calculated on the basis of 38 O atoms per formula unit (apfu), is [□{sub 0.322}(Pb{sub 0.215}Ba{sub 0.037}Sr{sub 0.036}Ca{sub 0.010}){sub Σ0.298}(Ce{sub 0.128}La{sub 0.077}Nd{sub 0.012}){sub Σ0.217} (Na{sub 0.127}K{sub 0.036}){sub Σ0.163}]{sub Σ01.000}(U{sup 4+}{sub 0.447}Mn{sub 00.293}U{sup 6} {sup +}{sub 0.112}Y{sub 0.091}Zr{sub 0.023}Th{sub 0.011}){sub Σ0.977}(Fe{sup 3+}{sub 1.224}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 0.243}Mg{sub 0.023}P{sub 0.008}Si{sub 0.006} □{sub 0.496}){sub Σ2.000}(Ti{sub 12.464}Fe{sup 3+}{sub 5.292}V{sup 5+}{sub 0.118}Nb{sub 0.083}Al{sub 0.026}Cr{sup 3

  14. Black and red granites in the Egyptian Antiquity Museum of Turin. A minero-petrographic and provenance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, M.; Borghi, A.; Vaggelli, G.; D'Amicone, E.; Vigna, L.

    2009-04-01

    materials used for two of the best known masterpieces of Egyptian art. As regards to red granites, it has been observed that most of the exposed sculptures were made of rocks closely akin to Aswan granite. Just in one case, the Ram headed sphinx (cat. 836), macroscopic differences in colour index, grain size and isoorientation of feldspar phenocrysts, suggested a different provenance of the source material and determined the choice of picking up a small fragment for minero-petrographic analysis. The sample collected from the sarcophagus of Nefertari (suppl. 5153) during the recent restoration of the sculpture, was analysed in order to test the accuracy of the results, as the provenance of the material used for its realization was already certain. Petrographic observations and chemical analysis were undertaken by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer. Minero-petrographic data primarily showed that all samples vary in composition from granite (red granites) to granodiorite and tonalite (black granites). The main sialic phases are represented by plagioclase (albite to oligoclase), alkali-feldspar (microcline) and quartz, while femic phases are amphibole (green horneblende) and biotite (Fe- to Mg-biotite), always coexisting in variable relative percentages. Minor amount of apatite (≈ 1 wt.%), magnetite, ilmenite, often associated to sphene, zircon, pyrite and allanite also occur. The identification of some compositional markers in all samples suggested a common provenance for all the rocks used for the sculptures. Thus, it was supposed that they could all have been quarried in the famous district of Aswan, well known at least since Dynastic period. This provenance hypothesis was confirmed by geological literature and archeological evidences, considering the relative proximity of Aswan quarries to Nile river and to the key centres of power in the New Kingdom. Therefore, several geological samples were collected in Aswan area, in order

  15. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Papua New Guinea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    prospective rocks. The Permian or Triassic granite and Triassic acidic volcanics are possible source rocks for uranium in the Mesozoic sediments, although the uranium levels are unknown. Granitic rocks of similar age, exposed in the western part of Irian Jaya (Rirdshead) are accompanied by radiometric anomalies and are known to contain monazite, allanite, xenotime, zircon, and thorite. Miocene and younger intrusions - principally diorite, tonalite, and granodiorite - in the central range, contain up to 4 ppm U and 16 ppm Th, while Tertiary intrusives in New Britain and the Solomon Islands contain less than 2.5 ppm U and 7 ppm Th. Quaternary volcanics in New Britain and on islands off the North New Guinea coast have low levels of U and Th similar to those of the Tertiary intrusives in the area. Some of the tertiary limestone deposits in Papua New Guinea could be potential host rocks to uranium. The most favourable rock unit is Miocene basinal limestone on the platform; it consists of argillaceous micrite and biomicrite, and calcareous mudstone, and is a source and (locally) a reservoir rock of petroleum. Apart, from the inherent difficulties of exploration of a remote region an added problem is the difficulty of airborne surveying in areas of rugged topography and terrain covered by dense forest. In lowland areas there are the additional problems of permanent water cover, leaching of the surface rocks, and heavy soil cover

  16. Gneiss wastes as secondary raw material for the ceramic industry: an example from the Verbano Cusio Ossola district (Piedmont, north-western Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    The Verbano Cusio Ossola province (VCO, Piedmont, north-western Italy) is one of the most important Italian quarrying districts, due to the peculiarity and variety of its exploited rock types, mainly orthogneisses such as Serizzo and Beola, and subordinately granites, marbles and other rocks. The most important and extensively exploited ornamental stone from the VCO province is surely the Serizzo, commercialized in four main varieties, and representing about 70% of all the stone production from the VCO area. The protholith of the Serizzo is a Permian granite - granodiorite metamorphosed during the alpine events, and the rock-forming minerals are mainly quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase (andesine), biotite, with variable amounts of muscovite and epidote (allanite). The other important ornamental stone of the VCO province is the Beola, a series of heterogeneous materials (mainly orthogneisses) with marked (mylonitic) foliation and strong mineralogical lineation, occurring in the median Ossola Valley; its production (15% of the whole stones of the VCO) is subordinated with respect to that of Serizzo. The mineralogical composition of the Beola varieties is similar to Serizzo, consisting of quite homogeneous quartz, K-feldspar (orthoclase or microcline), plagioclase, biotite and muscovite. The main differences relate to the grain size, the rock fabric (generally mylonitic) and to the presence of accessory/secondary minerals. Recent regulatory developments and the growing environmental awareness, require an increasing reuse of wastes deriving from the extraction and processing of dimension stones (up to 50 % of the extracted gross volume). Granite wastes from the VCO (Baveno pink granite and Montorfano white granite), after specific industrial treatments (crushing, sieving, drying, magnetic separation of biotite and hornblende), are used successfully as quartz-feldspars mix in the ceramic industry, with very low FeOtot content. On the other hand, other quartzose

  17. Origin of the magmatic varieties of the Serdán-Oriental Basin, eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, L.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Becerra Torres, E.; Landa-Piedra, L.

    2013-12-01

    metasomatic agent involved in the petrogenesis is a partial melt of the eclogite-facies subducting oceanic plate. Specifically, strong HREE depletions and fractionations, high Nb/Ta ratios and negative Zr-Hf anomalies in these rocks provide evidence for the presence of residual garnet and rutile in the slab; whereas preferential breakdown of white mica and allanite/monazite may account for the marked LILE-LREE enrichments. The contribution of this high-pressure subduction agent is consistent with the steep geometry and great depth of the Cocos plate beneath the SOB. In lower proportions, this slab melt component also appears to contribute to the genesis of the typical calc-alkaline rocks that coexist with the high-K suite at the arc front; and it becomes progressively more diluted in the transitional products emplaced along the central and northern sectors of the basin. On the other hand, the high-Nb suite was likely produced by low degrees of decompression melting of a drier mantle, with negligible contributions from the deeply subducting slab. Work supported by PAPIIT-UNAM IB100912-2 grant.

  18. Mid-Tertiary magmatism of the Toquima caldera complex and vicinity, Nevada: development of explosive high-K, calc-alkaline magmas in the central Great Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, David R.

    1994-04-01

    The Toquima caldera complex (TCC) lies near the middle of a west-northwest-trending belt of Oligocene to early Miocene volcanic rocks that stretches from southwestern Utah to west-central Nevada. Three overlapping to eccentrically nested calderas, called Moores Creek, Mt. Jefferson, and Trail Canyon, comprise the TCC. The calderas formed due to eruption of the tuffs of Moores Creek, Mt. Jefferson, and Trail Canyon at 27.2 Ma, 26.4 Ma, and 23.6 Ma, respectively. In total, 900+ km3 of magma was erupted from the complex. The high-silica rhyolite tuff of Moores Creek is the least strongly zoned in silica (78.0 76.8 wt% SiO2), and the tuff of Mt. Jefferson is the most strongly zoned (77.5 65.3 wt% SiO2); the tuff of Trail Canyon is moderately zoned (75.9 70.4 wt% SiO2). All eruptive products contain plagioclase, sanidine, quartz, biotite, Fe-Ti oxides, and accessory zircon, allanite, and apatite. Amphibole and clinopyroxene join the assemblage where compositions of bulk tuff are ≲ 74 wt% SiO2 and ≲ 70 wt% SiO2 respectively. Proportions and compositions of phenocrysts vary systematically with composition of the host tuff. Compositional zoning trends of sanidine and biotite suggest the presence of a high Ba-bearing magmatic component at depth or its introduction into the Mt. Jefferson and Trail Canyon magma chambers at a late stage of magmatic evolution. Rocks of the complex constitute a high-K, calc-alkaline series. Empirical data from other systems and results of published phase-equilibria and thermo-chemical studies suggest that magma erupted from the TCC was oxidized (˜ 1.5 to 2.0 log units above NNO), thermally zoned (˜ 700 730° C for high-silica rhyolite to ˜800 840° C for dacite) and water-rich (5.0 5.5. wt% H2O for highsilica rhyolite to ˜ 4.0 wt% H2O for dacite). Geologic relations and amphibole compositional data are consistent with total pressures of 1.5 to 2 kbars. Onset of mid-Tertiary magmatism in vicinity of the TCC began with intrusion of a small

  19. Geochemistry of mylonitic tourmaline-bearing granite- gneiss pluton in the northeast of June mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Moradi

    2017-07-01

    , allanite, apatite, and magnetite. The mylonitic gneiss-granite has a mantled porphyroclast texture that may be characterized by large asymmetrical porphyroclasts of K-feldspar and plagioclase with a mantle which includes white-mica, biotite, quartz and feldspar aggregates. Some of the petrographic evidence show dynamic deformation during the crystallization such as grain boundary migration (GBM or sub-grain rotation (SGR, patchy perthite. Evidence of strain, such as deformation twins, bent or curved twins, undulatory extinction occur characteristically in plagioclase and display dynamic deformation in solid state. The rocks exhibit identical compositional ranges with 71.24–78.35 wt.% SiO2; high levels of alkalies (Na2O ranges from 3.07 to 4.02 %, K2O varies from 4.18 to 5.53 %; low levels of Fe2O3tot (0.80 to 2.60 %. Also, the trace element compositions display significant variations, such as Zr (157.7-330.5 ppm, Eu (0.07-0.28 ppm, Nb (40.9-77.3 ppm, Ga (19.7-25.97 ppm. The studied rocks are strongly enriched in LREE and HFSE and show a strong depletion in Ba, Sr, Eu and Ti and enrichment in Rb and Zr. The element contents are also similar to typical A-type granite (Whalen et al., 1987. The rocks are alkali to alkali-calcic, metaluminous to mildly peraluminous granite and ferroan in new geochemical classification scheme for granitoids (proposed by Frost et al., 2001. Discussion The chondrite-normalized rare-earth element patterns of the mylonitic gneiss- granitic rocks indicate the LREE over HREE fractionation with significant negative Eu anomalies. Primitive-mantle-normalized spidergrams (Sun and McDonough, 1989 normalized trace element patterns with negative Ba and Nb anomalies, and positive Rb, Th and Ce anomalies, simulate the collisional and post-collisional granitoids of Pearce et al (Pearce et al., 1984. All of the samples fall in the A2 group in Eby classification (Eby, 1992. On the tectonic discrimination plots, the granites show a within-plate granite (WPG