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Sample records for all-polyethylene glenoid implant

  1. Hip-inspired implant for revision of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty with severe glenoid bone loss

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    Uri, Ofir; Bayley, Ian; Lambert, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Glenoid reconstruction and inverted glenoid re-implantation is strongly advocated in revisions of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). Nevertheless, severe glenoid deficiency may preclude glenoid reconstruction and may dictate less favorable solutions, such as conversion to hemiarthropasty or resection arthropasty. The CAD/CAM shoulder (Stanmore Implants, Elstree, UK), a hip arthroplasty-inspired implant, may facilitate glenoid component fixation in these challen...

  2. Biomechanical Evaluation of Glenoid Reconstruction With an Implant-Free J-Bone Graft for Anterior Glenoid Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzenberger, Leo; Dyrna, Felix; Obopilwe, Elifho; Heuberer, Philipp R; Arciero, Robert A; Anderl, Werner; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2017-10-01

    The anatomic restoration of glenoid morphology with an implant-free J-shaped iliac crest bone graft offers an alternative to currently widely used glenoid reconstruction techniques. No biomechanical data on the J-bone grafting technique are currently available. To evaluate (1) glenohumeral contact patterns, (2) graft fixation under cyclic loading, and (3) the initial stabilizing effect of anatomic glenoid reconstruction with the implant-free J-bone grafting technique. Controlled laboratory study. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders and J-shaped iliac crest bone grafts were used for this study. J-bone grafts were harvested, prepared, and implanted according to a previously described, clinically used technique. Glenohumeral contact patterns were measured using dynamic pressure-sensitive sensors under a compressive load of 440 N with the humerus in (a) 30° of abduction, (b) 30° of abduction and 60° of external rotation, (c) 60° of abduction, and (d) 60° of abduction and 60° of external rotation. Using a custom shoulder-testing system allowing positioning with 6 degrees of freedom, a compressive load of 50 N was applied, and the peak force needed to translate the humeral head 10 mm anteriorly at a rate of 2.0 mm/s was recorded. All tests were performed (1) for the intact glenoid, (2) after the creation of a 30% anterior osseous glenoid defect parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glenoid, and (3) after anatomic glenoid reconstruction with an implant-free J-bone graft. Furthermore, after glenoid reconstruction, each specimen was translated anteriorly for 5 mm at a rate of 4.0 mm/s for a total of 3000 cycles while logging graft protrusion and mediolateral bending motions. Graft micromovements were recorded using 2 high-resolution, linear differential variable reluctance transducer strain gauges placed in line with the long leg of the graft and the mediolateral direction, respectively. The creation of a 30% glenoid defect significantly decreased glenohumeral

  3. Parametric analysis of glenoid implant design and fixation type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Diogo M; Hansen, Ulrich; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-04-01

    Common post-operative problems in shoulder arthroplasty such as glenoid loosening and joint instability may be reduced by improvements in glenoid design, shape, material choice, and fixation method. A framework for parametric analysis of different implant fixation configurations was developed in order to efficiently sift through potential glenoid component designs. We investigated the influence of design factors such as fixation type, component thickness, and peg position, number, diameter, and length in a multi-factorial design investigation. The proposed method allowed for simultaneous comparison of the mechanical performance of 344 different parametric variations of 10 different reference geometries with either large central fixation features or small peripheral pegs, undergoing four different worst-case scenario loading conditions, and averaging 64.7 s per model. The impact of design parameters were assessed for different factors responsible for post-operative problems in shoulder arthroplasty, such as bone volume preservation, stresses in the implant, central displacement or fixation stability, and the worst performing geometries all relied on conventional central fixation. Of the remaining geometries, four peripheral fixation configurations produced von Mises stresses comfortably below the material's yield strength. We show that the developed method allows for simple, direct, rapid, and repeatable comparison of different design features, material choices, or fixation methods by analyzing how they influence the bone-implant mechanical environment. The proposed method can provide valuable insight in implant design optimization by screening through multiple potential design modifications at an early design evaluation stage and highlighting the best performing combinations according to the failure mechanism to mitigate. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:775-784, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society

  4. Hip-inspired implant for revision of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty with severe glenoid bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Glenoid reconstruction and inverted glenoid re-implantation is strongly advocated in revisions of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). Nevertheless, severe glenoid deficiency may preclude glenoid reconstruction and may dictate less favorable solutions, such as conversion to hemiarthropasty or resection arthropasty. The CAD/CAM shoulder (Stanmore Implants, Elstree, UK), a hip arthroplasty-inspired implant, may facilitate glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions where glenoid reconstruction is not feasible. We questioned (1) whether revision arthroplasty with the CAD/CAM shoulder would alleviate pain and improve shoulder function in patients with failed RSA, not amenable to glenoid reconstruction, (2) whether the CAD/CAM hip-inspired glenoid shell would enable secure and durable glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions. Patients and methods 11 patients with failed RSAs and unreconstructable glenoids underwent revision with the CAD/CAM shoulder and were followed-up for mean 35 (28–42) months. Clinical outcomes included the Oxford shoulder score, subjective shoulder value, pain rating, physical examination, and shoulder radiographs. Results The average Oxford shoulder score and subjective shoulder value improved statistically significantly after the revision from 50 to 33 points and from 17% to 48% respectively. Pain rating at rest and during activity improved significantly from 5.3 to 2.3 and from 8.1 to 3.8 respectively. Active forward flexion increased from 25 to 54 degrees and external rotation increased from 9 to 21 degrees. 4 patients required reoperation for postoperative complications. No cases of glenoid loosening occurred. Interpretation The CAD/CAM shoulder offers an alternative solution for the treatment of failed RSA that is not amenable to glenoid reconstruction. PMID:24650026

  5. Hip-inspired implant for revision of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty with severe glenoid bone loss. Improved clinical outcome in 11 patients at 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, Ofir; Bayley, Ian; Lambert, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Glenoid reconstruction and inverted glenoid re-implantation is strongly advocated in revisions of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). Nevertheless, severe glenoid deficiency may preclude glenoid reconstruction and may dictate less favorable solutions, such as conversion to hemiarthropasty or resection arthropasty. The CAD/CAM shoulder (Stanmore Implants, Elstree, UK), a hip arthroplasty-inspired implant, may facilitate glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions where glenoid reconstruction is not feasible. We questioned (1) whether revision arthroplasty with the CAD/CAM shoulder would alleviate pain and improve shoulder function in patients with failed RSA, not amenable to glenoid reconstruction, (2) whether the CAD/CAM hip-inspired glenoid shell would enable secure and durable glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions. 11 patients with failed RSAs and unreconstructable glenoids underwent revision with the CAD/CAM shoulder and were followed-up for mean 35 (28-42) months. Clinical outcomes included the Oxford shoulder score, subjective shoulder value, pain rating, physical examination, and shoulder radiographs. The average Oxford shoulder score and subjective shoulder value improved statistically significantly after the revision from 50 to 33 points and from 17% to 48% respectively. Pain rating at rest and during activity improved significantly from 5.3 to 2.3 and from 8.1 to 3.8 respectively. Active forward flexion increased from 25 to 54 degrees and external rotation increased from 9 to 21 degrees. 4 patients required reoperation for postoperative complications. No cases of glenoid loosening occurred. The CAD/CAM shoulder offers an alternative solution for the treatment of failed RSA that is not amenable to glenoid reconstruction.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  7. Bone strength and material properties of the glenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Jensen, N.C.; Odgaard, A.

    1997-01-01

    of the cortical bone to the total glenoid strength was assessed by compression tests of pristine and cancellous-free glenoid specimens. Strength decreased by an average of 31% after the cancellous bone was removed. The material properties of the glenoid cancellous bone were determined by axial compression tests......The quality of the glenoid bone is important to a successful total shoulder replacement. Finite element models have been used to model the response of the glenoid bone to an implanted prosthesis. Because very little is known about the bone strength and the material properties at the glenoid......, these models were all based on assumptions that the material properties of the glenoid were similar to those of the tibial plateau. The osteopenetrometer was used to assess the topographic strength distribution at the glenoid. Strength at the proximal subchondral level of the glenoid averaged 66.9 MPa. Higher...

  8. Bone strength and material properties of the glenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Jensen, N.C.; Odgaard, A.

    1997-01-01

    of the cortical bone to the total glenoid strength was assessed by compression tests of pristine and cancellous-free glenoid specimens. Strength decreased by an average of 31% after the cancellous bone was removed. The material properties of the glenoid cancellous bone were determined by axial compression tests...... ratio was 5.2, indicating strong anisotropy. The apparent density was an average 0.35 gr. cm-3, and the Poisson ratio averaged 0.263. According to our findings the anisotropy of the glenoid cancellous bone, details concerning the strength distribution, and the load-bearing function of the cortical shell......The quality of the glenoid bone is important to a successful total shoulder replacement. Finite element models have been used to model the response of the glenoid bone to an implanted prosthesis. Because very little is known about the bone strength and the material properties at the glenoid...

  9. Anterosuperior Glenoid Impingement Syndrome

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    Shelley S. Bath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterosuperior glenoid impingement is a well documented cause of shoulder pain. It occurs when there is deep tearing of the subscapularis, with fibers becoming embedded between the anterosuperior glenoid and humeral head. To our knowledge, this has not been described in radiologic literature and we present MRI findings depicting this entity

  10. The effect of glenoid component version and humeral polyethylene liner rotation on subluxation and impingement in reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeswaran, Vijay N; Caceres, Andrea; Goetz, Jessica E; Anderson, Donald D; Hettrich, Carolyn M

    2017-10-01

    A previously validated finite element modeling approach was used to determine how changes in glenoid component version and polyethylene liner rotation within the humeral component affect the arm abduction angle at which impingement between the inferior glenoid and the polyethylene liner occurs as well as the amount of subluxation generated by that impingement. Five glenoid component versions (5° anteversion; neutral; 5°, 10°, and 20° retroversion) and 7 polyethylene liner rotations (20° and 10° anterior; neutral; 10°, 20°, 30°, and 40° posterior) were considered, resulting in 35 different clinically representative models. The humerus was internally and externally rotated and extended and flexed, and the resulting impingement and subluxation were measured. To further analyze more global trends and to identify implantations least prone to subluxation, polyethylene liner rotation was additionally varied in coarser 30° increments across the entire 360° range. All subluxation caused by impingement occurred during external rotation and extension, and external rotation produced nearly 10-fold more subluxation than extension. Neutral glenoid component version was associated with the least amount of subluxation for all polyethylene liner rotations. Posteriorly rotated polyethylene liners, which place the thick inferior region of the component away from the scapula, produced the least amount of subluxation. The 90° and 120° posterior liner rotations produced no subluxation, whereas the 30° and 60° anterior liner rotations produced the greatest amount of subluxation. These results indicate that rotating modern radially asymmetric humeral polyethylene liners posteriorly can reduce the risk of subluxation leading to dislocation and increase external rotation range of motion. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How to deal with a glenoid fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Larsen, Morten Schultz

    2017-01-01

    The glenoid fossa is involved in approximately 10% of all scapular fractures.Glenoid fossa incongruity is surprisingly well tolerated.Surgery is recommended when 20% or more of the anterior glenoid fossa is involved.Glenoid rim fractures often lead to chronic shoulder instability.Unstable glenoid...

  12. Skeletal development of the glenoid and glenoid-coracoid interface in the pediatric population: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothary, Shefali [Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Radiology Department, NYU Langone Medical Center: Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States); Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Poncinelli, Leonardo L. [NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, Radiology Department, New York, NY (United States); Radiology Department, NYU Langone Medical Center: Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States); Kwong, Steven [School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Radiology Department, NYU Langone Medical Center: Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-09-15

    To assess the MRI appearance of normal skeletal development of the glenoid and glenoid-coracoid interface in the pediatric population. To the best of our knowledge, this has not yet been studied in detail in the literature. An IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective review of 105 consecutive shoulder MRI studies in children, ages 2 months to 18 years was performed. The morphology, MR signal, and development of the following were assessed: (1) scapular-coracoid bipolar growth plate, (2) glenoid and glenoid-coracoid interface secondary ossification centers, (3) glenoid advancing osseous surface. The glenoid and glenoid-coracoid interface were identified in infancy as a contiguous, cartilaginous mass. A subcoracoid secondary ossification center in the superior glenoid was identified and fused in all by age 12 and 16, respectively. In ten studies, additional secondary ossification centers were identified in the inferior two-thirds of the glenoid. The initial concavity of the glenoid osseous surface gradually transformed to convexity, matching the convex glenoid articular surface. The glenoid growth plate fused by 16 years of age. Our study, based on MRI, demonstrated a similar pattern of development of the glenoid and glenoid coracoid interface to previously reported anatomic and radiographic studies, except for an earlier development and fusion of the secondary ossification centers of the inferior glenoid. The pattern of skeletal development of the glenoid and glenoid-coracoid interface follows a chronological order, which can serve as a guideline when interpreting MRI studies in children. (orig.)

  13. Influence of the positioning of a cementless glenoid prosthesis on its interface micromotions.

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    Suárez, D R; van der Linden, J C; Valstar, E R; Broomans, P; Poort, G; Rozing, P M; van Keulen, F

    2009-10-01

    The positioning of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty is complicated by the limited view during operation. Malalignment and/or motion of the glenoid component with respect to the bone can be a cause of, or contribute to, failure of the implant. The aim of this paper is to determine the effect of the positioning of a cementless glenoid component on the micromotions between the implant and the bone during normal loading after surgery. For this study a three-dimensional finite element model of a complete scapula with a cementless glenoid component was used. In total, eight positions of the upper arm in both abduction and anteflexion were chosen to represent the patient's arm movement postoperatively. A previously published musculoskeletal model was used to determine the joint and muscle forces on the scapula with implant in each arm position. Five different alignments of the glenoid component (neutral, anterior, inferior, posterior, and superior inclinations), two different implantation depths ('optimal' and 'deeper' implantations), and two bone qualities (healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) bone) were considered. Inclinations of 10 degrees with respect to a neutral alignment did not affect the overall interface micromotions in the optimal implantation depth. However, when the implantation depth was 3 mm deeper, anterior and inferior inclinations were more favourable than a neutral alignment and other inclinations. Micromotions in RA bone were always larger than in healthy bone.

  14. Economics of All-Polyethylene Versus Metal-Backed Tibial Prosthesis Designs.

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    Chambers, Monique C; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Sayeed, Zain; Anoushiravani, Afshin; Schnur, Anne-Kathrin; Mihalko, William M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-05-01

    With the large number of total knee arthroplasties being performed and expectations that these numbers will be on the rise over the coming decades, efforts to provide cost-efficient care are of greater interest. The preferred design of knee arthroplasty implants has changed over time, with the original all-polyethylene tibial (APT) design being replaced by metal-backed tibial (MBT) components, as well as more recent considerations of newer APT designs. Modern APT components have been shown to have similar or superior outcomes than MBT components. Despite their limitations, APT components can be used to reduce the economic burden to the provider, medical institution, and health care system as a whole. There is a paucity of evidence-based literature directly comparing the cost associated with APT and MBT components. The purpose of this report is to review the literature to assess the available data regarding direct and indirect costs of both designs so that orthopedic surgeons can account for economic differences in everyday practice. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):S61-S66.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Total versus hemiarthroplasty for glenohumeral arthritis according to preoperative glenoid erosion

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    Marc-Frederic Pastor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies on primary osteoarthritis have shown better results of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA compared to hemiarthroplasty (HA regarding the function, revision rate and postoperative pain relief. However, a clear recommendation for implantation of TSA or HA, depending on the glenoid type of erosion, does not exist. The aim of the study was to compare the results of TSA and HA with respect to the preoperative glenoid type. In this study, 41 patients were examined retrospectively; among them, 25 patients were treated with stemmed anatomic TSA and 16 with stemmed anatomic HA. The degree of osteoarthritis was determined according to Samilson and the glenoid erosion was classified according to Walch. The clinical outcome of the patients was determined by using the Constant Score (CS and the Simple Shoulder Test at final follow-up. Patients after TSA demonstrated a significantly improved internal rotation compared to HA patients. Patients with preoperative B1 glenoid showed better pain relief after TSA compared to HA. For patients with preoperative type A2 glenoid a significantly higher CS was found after TSA compared to HA. We were able to show good short-term results after TSA and HA. Our findings suggest a better internal rotation for TSA compared to HA, superior clinical outcome for patients with preoperative A2 glenoid and lower pain level for patients with a preoperative B1 glenoid. However, these results need to be confirmed by further studies.

  16. CT scan evaluation of glenoid bone and pectoralis major tendon: interest in shoulder prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Laurent; Peyron, Christelle; Boyer, Etienne; Menu, Gauthier; Loisel, François; Aubry, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The shoulder arthroplasty brings satisfaction to patients in terms of quality of life and indolence. However whether anatomic implant or reverse, it does not escape from the loosening of the glenoid component. Moreover, optimal implantation is required to ensure the functional outcome without shortening of the arm. The purpose of this study is obtain CT scan evaluation of the glenoid bone stock in order to optimize glenoid component implantation and obtain a reference to determine optimal humeral component placement in case of humeral proximal fracture. Materials and methods: Between 2010 and 2011 we have analyzed 200 intact shoulder’s CT. We measured maximal and minimal width in the transverse plane of the glenoid, the distance from the pectoralis major (PM) tendon to the humeral head, the greater tubercle, change of curvature and the anatomical neck. Results: Mean maximum width was 27.4 ± 3.4 mm and mean minimum width was 15.5 ± 2.8 mm. Distances between upper edge of PM tendon to: humeral head, greater tubercle, change of curvature and anatomical neck were respectively: 67.6 ± 9.98 mm, 57.8 ± 10.3 mm, 28.7 ± 9 mm, and 34.2 ± 9.7 mm. Conclusion: Our study has produced an assessment of glenoid bone stock for optimal positioning of the glenoid implant but also to obtain a reference to determine the ideal location of the humeral component in the case of proximal humerus fracture. PMID:27716461

  17. CT scan evaluation of glenoid bone and pectoralis major tendon: interest in shoulder prosthesis

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    Obert Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The shoulder arthroplasty brings satisfaction to patients in terms of quality of life and indolence. However whether anatomic implant or reverse, it does not escape from the loosening of the glenoid component. Moreover, optimal implantation is required to ensure the functional outcome without shortening of the arm. The purpose of this study is obtain CT scan evaluation of the glenoid bone stock in order to optimize glenoid component implantation and obtain a reference to determine optimal humeral component placement in case of humeral proximal fracture. Materials and methods: Between 2010 and 2011 we have analyzed 200 intact shoulder’s CT. We measured maximal and minimal width in the transverse plane of the glenoid, the distance from the pectoralis major (PM tendon to the humeral head, the greater tubercle, change of curvature and the anatomical neck. Results: Mean maximum width was 27.4 ± 3.4 mm and mean minimum width was 15.5 ± 2.8 mm. Distances between upper edge of PM tendon to: humeral head, greater tubercle, change of curvature and anatomical neck were respectively: 67.6 ± 9.98 mm, 57.8 ± 10.3 mm, 28.7 ± 9 mm, and 34.2 ± 9.7 mm. Conclusion: Our study has produced an assessment of glenoid bone stock for optimal positioning of the glenoid implant but also to obtain a reference to determine the ideal location of the humeral component in the case of proximal humerus fracture.

  18. Ten-year survival and patient-reported outcomes of a medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty incorporating an all-polyethylene tibial component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chloe E H; Wade, Frazer A; MacDonald, Deborah; Nutton, Richard W

    2018-05-01

    Biomechanical studies have suggested that proximal tibial strain is elevated in UKAs incorporating all-polyethylene tibial components with concern that this leads to premature failure. This study reports minimum 10-year outcomes for a UKA incorporating an all-polyethylene tibial component to determine whether these concerns were realised. 109 fixed bearing UKAs (97 patients, mean age 68 (range 48-87), 54/97 (56%) female) with all-polyethylene tibial components were followed up for ≥ 10 years with Oxford Knee Scores, Forgotten Joint Scores and Kaplan-Meier analysis. 106/109 implants were 7 mm, 3 were 9.5 mm. Ten-year survival was 85.5% (78.6-92.4 95% CI) with the end-point failure for any reason. Unexplained pain was the commonest mode of failure (6/17) followed by lateral compartment osteoarthritis (5/17) and tibial subsidence/loosening (4/17). Revision rate was highest at 2-5 years due to revisions for unexplained pain. Ten-year survival was worse in patients  30 (p = 0.017) and in those with postoperative increases in medial tibial sclerosis (p  30 was 2.9 (1.2-6.9 95% CI). In those with intact UKAs at 10 years, mean Oxford Knee Score was 34.8 ± 10.7, Forgotten Joint Score was 37.9 ± 26.7 and 96% were satisfied with their knee. The high rate of early failure between 2 and 5 years in this all-polyethylene tibial component UKA did not persist in the long term. Though medial proximal tibial metabolic changes appear to persist they are not necessarily symptomatic. BMI > 30 and age < 65 years were significant risk factors for revision.

  19. Bone cement penetration pattern and primary stability testing in keeled and pegged glenoid components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiss, Patric; Pape, Guido; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Jäger, Sebastian; Sowa, Boris; Jakubowitz, Eike; Loew, Markus; Bruckner, Thomas; Rickert, Markus

    2011-07-01

    It has been proposed that bone mineral density has an influence on cement penetration in hip and knee arthroplasty. The hypotheses of this study were that: 1) there is a negative correlation between bone mineral density (BMD) and cement penetration in cemented glenoid components; and 2) that implant design has an influence on cement penetration into the glenoid bone. BMD of 10 pairs of fresh frozen scapulas was measured. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans in 3 different sections were analyzed after implantation of keeled and pegged glenoid components using a 3(rd)-generation cementing technique with a vacuum mixing system. Cement penetration was analyzed and correlated with BMD. Pull-out strength testing was performed to analyze primary stability. The overall peak BMD was 0.6 [g/cm(2)] (range, 0.33-0.98). A strong negative correlation between BMD and mean cement penetration was found for the peg (R(2) = -.83; P penetration was 78.4 mm(2) (range, 60.6-94.2) in the keel and 113.9 mm(2) (range, 78.2-143.4) in the peg group (P < .0001). In all cases, the components were pulled out of the cement mantle, whereas the bone-cement interfaces remained intact. The mean pull-out strength was 1093N (764-1343N) for keeled and 884N (650-1264N) for pegged components (P < .05). A modern cementing technique, leading to a deep bonding between bone and cement, is crucial to prevent loosening of glenoid components. The findings of this study might help us to better understand the results of follow-up studies of cemented glenoid implants. Our results could be helpful for the choice of implants in patients with poor bone quality like osteoporosis or rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bony Reconstruction of the Anterior Glenoid Rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemot, Laurent B; Elhassan, Bassem T; Verborgt, Olivier

    2018-04-13

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability is associated with glenohumeral bone loss. Glenoid deficiency compromises the concavity-compression mechanism. Medial Hill-Sachs lesions can result in an off-track humeral position. Anterior glenoid reconstruction or augmentation prevents recurrence by addressing the pathomechanics. In Bristow and Latarjet procedures, the coracoid process is harvested for conjoint tendon transfer, capsular reinforcement, and glenoid rim restoration. Complications and the nonanatomic nature of the procedure have spurred research on graft sources. The iliac crest is preferred for autogenous structural grafts. Tricortical, bicortical, and J-bone grafts have shown promising results despite the historical association of Eden-Hybinette procedures with early degenerative joint disease. Allogeneic osteochondral grafts may minimize the risk of arthropathy and donor site morbidity. Tibial plafond and glenoid allografts more closely match the native glenoid geometry and restore the articular chondral environment, compared with conventional grafts. Graft availability, cost, risk of disease transmission, and low chondrocyte viability have slowed the acceptance of osteochondral allografts.

  1. Accuracy of glenoid component placement in total shoulder arthroplasty and its effect on clinical and radiological outcome in a retrospective, longitudinal, monocentric open study.

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    Thomas M Gregory

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The success of Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA is believed to depend on the restoration of the natural anatomy of the joint and a key development has been the introduction of modular humeral components to more accurately restore the patient's anatomy. However, there are no peer-reviewed studies that have reported the degree of glenoid component mal-position achieved in clinical practice and the clinical outcome of such mal-position. The main purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of glenoid implant positioning during TSA and to relate it to the radiological (occurrence of radiolucent lines and osteolysis on CT and clinical outcomes. METHODS: 68 TSAs were assessed with a mean follow-up of 38+/-27 months. The clinical evaluation consisted of measuring the mobility as well as of the Constant Score. The radiological evaluation was performed on CT-scans in which metal artefacts had been eliminated. From the CT-scans radiolucent lines and osteolysis were assessed. The positions of the glenoid and humeral components were also measured from the CT scans. RESULTS: Four position glenoid component parameters were calculated The posterior version (6°±12°; mean ± SD, the superior tilt (12°±17°, the rotation of the implant relative to the scapular plane (3°±14° and the off-set distance of the centre of the glenoid implant from the scapular plane (6±4 mm. An inferiorly inclined implant was found to be associated with higher levels of radiolucent lines while retroversion and non-neutral rotation were associated with a reduced range of motion. CONCLUSION: this study demonstrates that glenoid implants of anatomic TSA are poorly positioned and that this malposition has a direct effect on the clinical and radiological outcome. Thus, further developments in glenoid implantation techniques are required to enable the surgeon to achieve a desired implant position and outcome.

  2. Three-dimensional assessment of the normal Japanese glenoid and comparison with the normal French glenoid.

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    Mizuno, N; Nonaka, S; Ozaki, R; Yoshida, M; Yoneda, M; Walch, G

    2017-12-01

    In 2014, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was approved in Japan. We were concerned that the base plate might be incompatible with Japanese who were generally smaller than Westerners. Therefore, we investigated the dimensions and morphology of the normal Japanese glenoid and compared with the normal French glenoid. One hundred Japanese shoulders without glenoid lesions (50 men and 50 women) were investigated and compared with 100 French shoulders (50 men and 50 women). Computed tomography was performed with 3-dimensional image reconstruction and images were analyzed using Glenosys software. Glenoid parameters (width, height, retroversion and inclination) were compared between Japanese and French subjects. In Japanese subjects, the mean glenoid width was 25.5mm, height was 33.3mm, retroversion was 2.3° and inclination was 11.6° superiorly. In French subjects, the mean glenoid width was 26.7mm, height was 35.4mm, retroversion was 6.0° and inclination was 10.4° superiorly. Glenoid width and height were significantly smaller in Japanese subjects than French subjects (P=0.001 and PFrench subjects (P<0.001). There was no significant difference of inclination. These findings will help surgeons to identify suitable patients for RSA and perform the procedure with appropriate preoperative planning. IV: retrospective or historical series. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Validation of a computer-assisted method for measurement of radiographic wear in total hip arthroplasty using all polyethylene cemented acetabular components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Jean; Zaoui, Amine; Scemama, Caroline; Martell, John; Bragdon, Charles; Hamadouche, Moussa

    2015-03-01

    Although cemented all polyethylene (PE) cups have been routinely used in total hip arthroplasty for decades, no computer-assisted method for measurement of radiographic wear has ever been specifically validated for these implants. Using a validated hip phantom model, AP plain hip radiographs were obtained consecutively for eight simulated wear positions. A version of Martell's Hip Analysis Suite software dedicated to all polyethylene sockets was used by three different examiners of varied experience. Bias (mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval limit), repeatability (standard deviation and 95% limit) and reproducibility (standard deviation and 95% limit) for two-dimensional wear measurements were assessed, as recommended by the current ASTM guidelines. Using this protocol, the dedicated software showed an overall mean bias of 0.089 ± 0.060 mm (mean ± SD), and 0.118 mm for 95% CI limit. Repeatability (intra examiner) standard deviation and 95% limit were respectively 0.106 mm and 0.292 mm. Reproducibility (inter examiner) standard deviation and 95% limit were respectively 0.112 mm and 0.308 mm. Martell Hip Analysis for all PE cemented cups is a reliable and low-cost instrument in the assessment of wear, despite being less precise than its original version dedicated to cementless components. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reverse total shoulder glenoid baseplate stability with superior glenoid bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise J; Duquin, Thomas R; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2017-10-01

    Superior wear of the glenoid bone is common in patients with rotator cuff arthropathy. This can become a treatment challenge for patients who require shoulder arthroplasty. In reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA), glenoid bone loss may affect the stability of baseplate fixation. The primary purpose of this biomechanical laboratory study was to assess the initial fixation stability of RSA glenosphere baseplates in the presence of variable amounts of superior glenoid bone loss. High-density solid rigid polyurethane foam (30 pounds/cubic foot) was machined to model the glenoid with variable superior defects that provided different levels of support (100%, 90%, 75%, and 50%) for the glenosphere baseplate. The samples were cyclically loaded (0-750 N at 1 Hz for 5000 cycles) at a 60° glenohumeral angle. The micromotion and migration of the baseplate were calculated from displacement data captured during the loading tests with an array of 3 linear variable differential transformers mounted around the baseplate. Micromotion was significantly greater in samples with 50% defects compared with those with smaller defects. Migration was significantly greater after testing for all defect sizes. Initial fixation of RSA glenosphere baseplates was significantly reduced in models with 50% bone loss on the superior edge compared with models with less bone loss in this high-density bone foam model. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Axillary arthrotomography of the glenoid labrum

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    Kleinman, P.K.; Kanzaria, P.K.; Goss, T.P.; Pappas, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    In a study of 67 shoulders evaluated by axillary arthrotomography, tears of the glenoid labrum were accurately detected in all 26 surgically confirmed cases. One false-positive case was identified in the five patients without labral tears; there were no false-negative cases. Only 40% of the patients had clinical evidence of subluxation or dislocation. Axillary arthrotomography provides important information about the integrity of the labrum that may be helpful in planning surgery for patients without clinical subluxation or dislocation but with pain, clicking, or vague shoulder discomfort secondary to labral pathology (functional instability)

  6. Obtaining Glenoid Positioning Data from Scapular Palpable Points In Vitro

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    Jordan H. Trafimow

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both clinical and biomechanical problems affecting the shoulder joint suggest that investigators should study force transmission into and out from the scapula. To analyze force transmission between the humeral head and the glenoid, one must know the position of the glenoid. Studies have analyzed the position of the scapula from the positions of three palpable points, but the position of the glenoid relative to three palpable points has not been studied. Dry scapulae ( were subjected to X-rays and a critical angle, (which relates the plane determined by the three palpable points on the scapula to a plane containing the glenoid center and the first two palpable points was calculated. The mean value for was degrees. The obtained allows us to determine the position of the glenoid from three palpable points. This information could be used in calculation of forces across the shoulder joint, which in turn would allow optimizing the choice of strengthening exercises.

  7. Glenoid Dysplasia in the Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report

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    Hamza Sucuoglu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glenoid dysplasia, which is often ignored, is a rare developmental anomaly. In most cases the patients remain asymptomatic. Although glenoid dysplasia has been diagnosed by incidentally on chest radiograph, also it has been described because of the developing instability of shoulder joint. Our young male patient who has recurrent dislocation of the shoulder-joint 4-5 times a year for last 5 years, dislocation has been reduced in the emergency department and he has been discharged from hospital with shoulder strap and rest. Finally when he admitted to our outpatient clinic with recurrent shoulder dislocation, the diagnosis of glenoid dysplasia is revealed by X-ray examination. We present the diagnose of glenoid dysplasia with clinical and radiological findings which should be kept in mind in patients with recurrent dislocations of shoulder as in our case.

  8. Quantitative assessment of the latarjet procedure for large glenoid defects by computed tomography: a coracoid graft can sufficiently restore the glenoid arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seong Cheol; Cho, Nam Su; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-05-01

    Coracoid transfer to a large glenoid defect is considered an excellent method to restore the surface area of the anteroinferior glenoid. However, there is little quantitative evidence supporting whether a coracoid graft can sufficiently restore the glenoid arc. To assess whether the Latarjet procedure can sufficiently restore the surface area of the glenoid. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 44 patients who underwent a Latarjet operation for a large glenoid defect between February 2009 and July 2011 were enrolled in this study. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to calculate the surface areas of the preoperative glenoid defect size and the reconstructed glenoid. Preoperative and postoperative clinical results also were assessed. At the last follow-up, the mean visual analog scale score for instability during motion improved significantly from 5.1 points (range, 3-10 points) preoperatively to 1.3 points (range, 0-4 points) (PLatarjet procedure, the mean surface area of the reconstructed glenoid was 706±32 mm2 (range, 639-749 mm2). Finally, postoperative glenoid defect size was 5±11 mm2 (range, 3-28 mm2; 1.5%±2% of the intact glenoid surface). The Latarjet procedure can provide satisfactory outcomes, including a low recurrence rate and reliable functional recovery. Defects at the anteroinferior glenoid were restored to nearly normal after coracoid transfer by use of the Latarjet procedure, which is an anatomically matched reconstruction. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Simple method of glenoid bone loss calculation using ipsilateral magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Brett D; Burns, Travis C; Campbell, Scot E; Svoboda, Steven J; Cameron, Kenneth L

    2013-03-01

    Current methods for estimating glenoid bone loss in patients with chronic shoulder instability include computed tomography imaging with 3-dimensional reconstruction, specialized computer software, and imaging of the contralateral shoulder. An ideal method of glenoid measurement would require only magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the injured shoulder. To determine whether MRI measurement of glenoid height, as well as sex, could be used to estimate glenoid width in healthy subjects with no history of shoulder instability. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Bilateral shoulder MRIs were obtained in a healthy cohort of young athletes as part of the baseline assessment in a prospective cohort study. A musculoskeletal radiologist measured glenoid height and width using the sagittal MRI cuts. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine whether demographic and MRI measurements of the glenoid could be used to estimate glenoid width. Of the 1264 shoulder MRIs evaluated, the mean glenoid width was 26.67 mm (±2.49 mm), and the mean glenoid height was 42.15 mm (±3.00 mm). There were significant differences between the 129 female glenoids and the 1035 male glenoids for both width (23.1 mm, 27.1 mm, respectively, P calculation of the amount of glenoid bone loss with only a ruler and an MRI of the injured shoulder.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3680 Section 888.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis is a device that has a glenoid (socket) component...

  11. Latarjet procedure: is the coracoid enough to restore the glenoid surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Paolo; Singla, Rohit; Merolla, Giovanni; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether anterior glenoid bone loss in patients with large glenoid rim defects can be restored with a coracoid graft (Latarjet procedure). A total of 143 consecutive patients with chronic anterior shoulder instability and glenoid bone deficiency were treated in 2013. A pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scan using the PICO method was obtained to estimate anterior glenoid rim erosion. The 23 patients with anterior glenoid deficiency exceeding 20 % were included in the study. A post-operative CT scan was obtained to establish whether coracoid transfer had fully restored the glenoid surface. Mean bone loss was 26 ± 3.9 % of the glenoid surface (range 20-34 %) compared with the contralateral glenoid. Mean coracoid dimensions were 26.3 ± 2.9 mm × 7.6 ± 0.65 mm. The graft successfully restored the glenoid surface in all patients (mean filling, 102.4 ± 0.8 %). The Latarjet procedure is a valuable approach to treat patients with chronic shoulder instability and glenoid deficiency. Coracoid transfer restored the glenoid surface even in patients with large defects. The Eden-Hybinette technique seems to be more appropriate for revision surgery and for patients with a failed Latarjet procedure.

  12. Arthroscopy-Assisted Reduction and Fixation of a Transversal Glenoid Fracture: About a Case

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    David Zbili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An articular glenoid fracture is an uncommon injury. Usually significantly displaced intra-articular glenoid fractures are treated with open reduction surgery. Conventional open surgery techniques involve high morbidity. Here we describe an arthroscopy-assisted reduction and fixation method of an Ideberg type III glenoid fracture. This method provides good articular reduction without extensive exposure or soft tissue dissection and without nerve and/or vascular lesion.

  13. Quantitative and Computed Tomography Anatomic Analysis of Glenoid Fixation for Superior Capsule Reconstruction: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Jason M; Katthagen, J Christoph; Dupre, Cameron N; Mitchell, Justin J; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Adams, Christopher R; Denard, Patrick J; Millett, Peter J

    2017-06-01

    To investigate glenoid fixation for superior capsule reconstruction (SCR) and evaluate anchor positions, intraosseous trajectories, and proximity to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) and glenoid fossa. The secondary purpose was to provide technical pearls and pitfalls for anchor insertion on the superior glenoid during SCR. Three beath pins were arthroscopically inserted into 12 (n = 12) nonpaired human cadaveric shoulders through Neviaser, anterior, and posterior portals to simulate anchor placement on the superior glenoid during SCR. Computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate anchor positioning and insertion trajectories. Specimens were then dissected to delineate the anatomic relations of the beath pins to the SSN and glenoid fossa. The superior glenoid anchor position was a mean 15.0 ± 4.0 mm to the SSN and 6.5 ± 1.7 mm to the glenoid fossa. The posterior glenoid anchor position was a mean 11.8 ± 2.1 mm to the SSN and 2.9 ± 2.9 mm to the glenoid fossa. On average, the superior pin was placed at 12:30 ± 0:30 (left-sided glenoid clock face) and inserted at 19° ± 9° with respect to the sagittal plane of the glenoid, the anterior pin was placed at 11:00 ± 0:30 and inserted 40° ± 17° off the glenoid, and the posterior pin was placed at 3:00 ± 1:00 and inserted at 52° ± 12° off the glenoid. The results of the present cadaveric study showed that glenoid fixation was safe with respect to the SSN and delineated technical guidelines and trajectories for inserting 3 anchors into the glenoid. This study shows that 3 anchors can be inserted into the glenoid without a risk of SSN damage and delineates technical guidelines for anchor insertion. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interest in the glenoid hull method for analyzing humeral subluxation in primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacida, Soufyane; Gauci, Marc-Olivier; Coulet, Bertrand; Lazerges, Cyril; Cyteval, Catherine; Boileau, Pascal; Chammas, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Posterior humeral subluxation is the main cause of failure of total shoulder arthroplasty. We aimed to compare humeral head subluxation in various reference planes and to search for a correlation with retroversion, inclination, and glenoid wear. We included 109 computed tomography scans of primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis and 97 of shoulder problems unrelated to shoulder osteoarthritis (controls); all computed tomography scans were reconstructed in the anatomic scapular plane and the glenoid hull plane that we defined. In both planes, we measured retroversion, inclination, glenohumeral offset (Walch index), and scapulohumeral offset. Retroversion in the scapular plane (Friedman method) was lower than that in the glenoid hull plane for controls and for arthritic shoulders. The threshold of scapulohumeral subluxation was 60% and 65% in the scapular plane and glenoid hull plane, respectively. The mean upward inclination was lower in the scapular plane (Churchill method) than in the glenoid hull plane (Maurer method). In the glenoid hull plane, 35% of type A2 glenoids showed glenohumeral offset greater than 75%, with mean retroversion of 25.6° ± 6° as compared with 7.5° ± 7.2° for the "centered" type A2 glenoids (P < .0001) and an upward inclination of -1.4° ± 8° and 6.3° ± 7° (P = .03), respectively. The correlation between retroversion and scapulohumeral offset was r = 0.64 in the glenoid hull plane and r = 0.59 in the scapular plane (P < .05). Measurement in the glenoid hull plane may be more accurate than in the scapular plane. Thus, the glenoid hull method allows for better understanding type B3 of the modified Walch classification. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Progressive glenoid bone loss caused by erosion in humeral head resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B S; Stehle, J; Abdelkawi, A; Plumhoff, P; Hudek, R; Gohlke, F

    2017-12-01

    Cementless surface replacement of the shoulder represents an alternative to conventional stemmed anatomic prostheses. Glenoid erosion is a well-known complication in hemiarthroplasty. However, there is limited data concerning radiographic evaluation and prognostic factors for this phenomenon. The aim of our study was to determine the development of glenoid erosion following shoulder resurfacing using a new measurement technique and detect potential prognostic factors. We performed a retrospective analysis on 38 shoulders undergoing humeral head resurfacing with a mean follow-up of 65.4 ± 43 months. Clinical and radiographic evaluation followed a standardized protocol including pre- and postoperative Constant score, active range of motion, and X‑rays in true anteroposterior view. Three independent observers performed measurements of glenoid erosion. We found good interobserver reliability for glenoid erosion measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.74-0.78). Progressive glenoid erosion was present in all cases, averaging 5.5 ± 3.9 mm at more than 5 years' follow-up. Male patients demonstrated increased glenoid bone loss within the first 5 years (p erosion was 37%. Glenoid erosion can be routinely expected in patients undergoing humeral head resurfacing. Painful glenoid erosion leads to deterioration in functional outcome and necessitates revision surgery in a high percentage of cases.

  16. Intraoperative CT navigation for glenoid component fixation in reverse shoulder arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok S Gavaskar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CT navigation has been shown to improve component positioning in total shoulder arthroplasty. The technique can be useful in achieving strong initial fixation of the metal backed glenoid in reverse shoulder arthroplasty. We report a 61 years male patient who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty for rotator cuff arthropathy. CT navigation was used intraoperatively to identify best possible glenoid bone and to maximize the depth of the fixation screws that anchor the metaglene portion of the metal backed glenoid component. Satisfactory positioning of screws and component was achieved without any perforation or iatrogenic fracture in the scapula. CT navigation can help in maximizing the purchase of the fixation screws that dictate the initial stability of the glenoid component in reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The technique can be extended to improve glenoid component position [version and tilt] with the availability of appropriate software.

  17. A modification to the Walch classification of the glenoid in primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis using three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercik, Michael J; Kruse, Kevin; Yalizis, Matthew; Gauci, Marc-Olivier; Chaoui, Jean; Walch, Gilles

    2016-10-01

    Since Walch and colleagues originally classified glenoid morphology in the setting of glenohumeral osteoarthritis, several authors have reported varying levels of interobserver and intraobserver reliability. We propose several modifications to the Walch classification that we hypothesize will increase interobserver and intraobserver reliability. We propose the addition of the B3 and D glenoids and a more precise definition of the A2 glenoid. The B3 glenoid is monoconcave and worn preferentially in its posterior aspect, leading to pathologic retroversion of at least 15° or subluxation of 70%, or both. The D glenoid is defined by glenoid anteversion or anterior humeral head subluxation. The A2 glenoid has a line connecting the anterior and posterior native glenoid rims that transects the humeral head. Using 3-dimensional computed tomography glenoid reconstructions, 3 evaluators used the original Walch classification and the modified Walch classification to classify 129 nonconsecutive glenoids on 4 separate occasions. Reliabilities were assessed by calculating κ coefficients. Interobserver reliabilities improved from an average of 0.391 (indicating fair agreement) using the original classification to an average of 0.703 (substantial agreement) using the modified classification. Intraobserver reliabilities improved from an average of 0.605 (moderate agreement) to an average of 0.882 (nearly perfect agreement). When 3-dimensional glenoid reconstructions and the modified Walch classification described herein are used, improved interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities are obtained. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Unilateral Glenoid Hypoplasia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Ashish Suryawanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glenoid hypoplasia is a relatively rare alteration that in most cases involves the pectoral girdle in a bilateral and symmetrical manner. In general, glenoid hypoplasia is associated with skeletal changes such as hypoplasia of the humeral head or changes in the morphology of the acromion and of the coracoid. We describe a rare case of unilateral glenoid hypoplasia without instability and not involving humeral head. The patient was managed effectively with nonoperative measures that featured specific rehabilitation exercises for the shoulder.

  19. Reconstruction Of Glenoid Bone Deficiency With Porous Titanium Nickelide In Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

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    Prokhorenko Valery M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the main causes of recurrent shoulder instability is a bone defect of the front edge of the glenoid. The available techniques for reconstruction of this bone defect, however, have some disadvantages.

  20. The relationship of glenoid and humeral version with supraspinatus tendon tears

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    Tokgoz, Nil; Kadioglu Voyvoda, Nuray; Gultekin, Serap; Tali, E.T. [Gazi University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Kanatli, Ulunay; Bolukbasi, Selcuk [Gazi University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of glenohumeral anatomic measurements on MR imaging with supraspinatus tendon tears. The study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from each subject. Forty-two patients (mean age 55.5 years; age range 40-73 years) with supraspinatus tendon tears and 50 asymptomatic shoulders of 32 controls (mean age 43 years; age range 17-69 years) without rotator cuff tears were included. The acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles were measured on coronal images, the glenoid and humeral head version as well as the bicipital-humeral distance on axial images. Significant differences were found between the patients and controls for both glenoid version and bicipital-humeral distance, which are considered to influence the distribution of forces placed on the cuff (p < 0.05). The patients had a decreased glenoid version by an average of 2.3 (-7.1 {+-} 7.8 vs. -4.8 {+-} 5.6 ), and a decreased bicipital-humeral distance by an average of 2.7 mm (12.1 {+-} 3.7 mm vs. 14.8 {+-} 4.1 mm). No significant differences were found between these groups for humeral head version and the acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles, which might contribute to extrinsic impingement by narrowing the supraspinatus tendon outlet. Differences in glenoid and humeral version may be responsible for RC tears by changing the orientation of the rotator cuff and thus increasing shearing stress. (orig.)

  1. The relationship of glenoid and humeral version with supraspinatus tendon tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokgoz, Nil; Kadioglu Voyvoda, Nuray; Gultekin, Serap; Tali, E.T.; Kanatli, Ulunay; Bolukbasi, Selcuk

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of glenohumeral anatomic measurements on MR imaging with supraspinatus tendon tears. The study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from each subject. Forty-two patients (mean age 55.5 years; age range 40-73 years) with supraspinatus tendon tears and 50 asymptomatic shoulders of 32 controls (mean age 43 years; age range 17-69 years) without rotator cuff tears were included. The acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles were measured on coronal images, the glenoid and humeral head version as well as the bicipital-humeral distance on axial images. Significant differences were found between the patients and controls for both glenoid version and bicipital-humeral distance, which are considered to influence the distribution of forces placed on the cuff (p < 0.05). The patients had a decreased glenoid version by an average of 2.3 (-7.1 ± 7.8 vs. -4.8 ± 5.6 ), and a decreased bicipital-humeral distance by an average of 2.7 mm (12.1 ± 3.7 mm vs. 14.8 ± 4.1 mm). No significant differences were found between these groups for humeral head version and the acromio-glenoid and supraspinatus-glenoid angles, which might contribute to extrinsic impingement by narrowing the supraspinatus tendon outlet. Differences in glenoid and humeral version may be responsible for RC tears by changing the orientation of the rotator cuff and thus increasing shearing stress. (orig.)

  2. Arthrosonography of the shoulder joint for evaluation of the glenoid labrum, glenoid rim and humeral head: comparison with conventional ultrasonography and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Soo; Lee, Kwang Won; Han, Taej Il; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Yun sun; Han Hyun Young; Han, Dong Bok; Rho, Ji Young; Park, Choong Ki

    2003-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic role of arthrosonography, conventional ultrasonography and MR arthrography in the assessment of glenoid labral tear, glenoid rim fracture and humeral head fracture of the shoulder joint. The findings of arthrosonography, conventional ultrasonography and MR arthrography were prospectively evaluated in 62 consecutive patients with chronic pain or a history of recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint. The glenoid labrum was arbitrarily divided into four quadrants: anterosuperior, anteroinferior, posterosuperior, and posteroinferior, and for each, visibility at arthrosonography and conventional ultrasonography was subjectively scored as one of four grades. By means of statistical analysis, the two techniques were then compared. Twenty-six patients subsequently underwent arthroscopy, and the presence or absence of labral tear, glenoid rim fracture and humeral head fracture was determined. The sensitivity and specificity of each modality were separately calculated for each of the three types of shoulder joint injury, and observed differences in these findings were statistically analysed. For all individual quadrants of the labrum, visibility at arthrosonography was high than at conventional ultrasonography (p .05), though its specificity was significantly higher (p=.003). In this respect, there was no significant difference in sensitivity of specificity between arthrasonography and MR arthrography (p>.05). For the detection of glenoid rim and humeral head fracture, there were no statistical differences in sensitivity and specificity between the three imaging modalities (p>.05). Compared with conventional ultrasonography, arthrosonography provides higher visibility of the labrum, thus improving the capacity of ultrasonography to detect labral tear. Arthrosonography could there fore be useful in the diagnosis of labral tear, glenoid rim fracture and humeral head fracture, and may thus partially replace MR arthrography

  3. Glenoid fossa position in Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Cristina; Giuntini, Veronica; Defraia, Efisio; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2009-04-01

    Our aim in this study was to investigate the position of the glenoid fossa in subjects with Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion to better clarify the role of this craniofacial component in Class III skeletal disharmony. A sample of 30 subjects, aged 8 years +/- 6 months, with skeletal and dental Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion, normal skeletal vertical relationships, and normal mandibular dimensions, was compared with a control group of 33 subjects with skeletal and dental Class I relationships. The comparisons between the Class III group and the control group on the cephalometric measures for the assessment of glenoid fossa position were performed with the Mann-Whitney U test at P <0.05. Subjects with Class III malocclusion had a significantly more mesial position of the glenoid fossa, when compared with the control group as measured with 3 parameters. An anterior position of the glenoid fossa is a possible diagnostic anatomic feature of Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion. An effective measurement to evaluate glenoid fossa position in craniofacial relationships is the cephalometric distance from the glenoid fossa to the frontomaxillary-nasal suture.

  4. Glenoid fossa position in Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Veronica; De Toffol, Laura; Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-09-01

    To assess the position of the glenoid fossa in subjects with Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion and normal mandibular size in the mixed dentition. A sample of 30 subjects (16 male, 14 female), age 9 years +/- 6 months, with skeletal and dental Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion, normal skeletal vertical relationships, and normal mandibular dimensions, was compared with a matched group of 37 subjects (18 male, 19 female) with skeletal and dental Class I relationships. The comparisons between the Class II group and the control group on the cephalometric measures for the assessment of glenoid fossa position were performed by means of a nonparametric test for independent samples (Mann-Whitney U-test, P < .05). Subjects with Class II malocclusion presented with a significantly more distal position of the glenoid fossa, when compared with the control group as measured by means of three parameters (GF-S on FH, GF-Ptm on FH, and GF-FMN). A posteriorly displaced glenoid fossa is a possible diagnostic feature of Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion. An effective cephalometric measurement to evaluate glenoid fossa position is the distance from the glenoid fossa to the frontomaxillonasal suture (GF-FMN).

  5. Anterior glenoid rim fracture: the value of helical CT with threedimensional reconstruction and electronic humeral disarticulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverton César de Oliveira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To show a new three-dimensional reconstructiontechnique based on helical computed tomography images withelectronic humeral disarticulation in anterior glenoid rim fractures,correlating the anatomic specimen with simulation of an anteriorglenoid rim fracture, as well as evaluating the extension of thefracture, the bone fragment position and distance in relation to theglenoid cavity in six patients. Methods: One scapula and onehumerus with no signs of fracture or congenital malformationswere placed in anatomical position using an adhesive tape aftersimulating an anterior glenoid rim fracture made by an osteotome.Helical CT imaging was acquired and three-dimensionalreconstructions were made based on these images, with andwithout electronic humeral disarticulation. The bone fragment waslocated, measured and its position in relation to the glenoid cavitywas assessed. Six patients with anterior glenoid rim fracture weresubmitted to CT of the shoulder using the same parameters asthose applied to the anatomic specimen. Results: In the anatomicspecimen and in all six patients the bone fragment was clearlydemonstrated; bone fragment measurements in the anatomicspecimen and in three-dimensional reconstructions wereequivalent. The fragment was better demonstrated in the imagestaken with electronic humeral disarticulation, particularly in thefrontal view of the glenoid cavity as observed in all six patients.Conclusion: We concluded that our experiment with the anatomicspecimen and the study of six patients allow us to state that thistechnique is safe and accurate to demonstrate the extension, sizeand location of the bone fragment in anterior glenoid rim fractures,and it provides essential elements for therapeutic planning.

  6. Intra- and interobserver reliability of glenoid fracture classifications by Ideberg, Euler and AO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, F; Eden, L; Meffert, R; Konietschke, F; Lotz, J; Bauer, L; Staab, W

    2018-03-27

    Representing 3%-5% of shoulder girdle injuries scapula fractures are rare. Furthermore, approximately 1% of scapula fractures are intraarticularfractures of the glenoid fossa. Because of uncertain fracture morphology and limited experience, the treatment of glenoid fossa fractures is difficult. The glenoid fracture classification by Ideberg (1984) and Euler (1996) is still commonly used in literature. In 2013 a new glenoid fracture classification was introduced by the AO. The purpose of this study was to examine the new AO classification in clinical practice in comparison with the classifications by Ideberg and Euler. In total CT images of 84 patients with glenoid fossa fractures from 2005 to 2018 were included. Parasagittal, paracoronary and axial reconstructions were examined according to the classifications of Ideberg, Euler and the AO by 3 investigators (orthopedic surgeon, radiologist, student of medicine) at three individual time settings. Inter- and intraobserver reliability of the three classification systems were ascertained by computing Inter- and Intraclass (ICCs) correlation coefficients using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, 95%-confidence intervals as well as F-tests for correlation coefficients. Inter- and intraobserver reliability for the AO classification showed a perspicuous coherence (R = 0.74 and R = 0.79). Low to moderate intraobserver reliability for Ideberg (R = 0.46) and Euler classification (R = 0.41) was found. Furthermore, data show a low Interobserver reliability for both Ideberg and Euler classification (R reliability using AO is significantly higher than those using Ideberg and Euler (p reliable grading of glenoid fossa fractures with high inter- and intraobserver reliability in 84 patients using CT images. It should possibly be applied in order to enable a valid, reliable and consistent academic description of glenoid fossa fractures. The established classifications by Euler and Ideberg are not capable of

  7. Collagenous microstructure of the glenoid labrum and biceps anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A M; Hoerning, E J; Brook, K; Smith, C D; Moss, J; Ryder, T; Wallace, A L; Bull, A M J

    2008-06-01

    The glenoid labrum is a significant passive stabilizer of the shoulder joint. However, its microstructural form remains largely unappreciated, particularly in the context of its variety of functions. The focus of labral microscopy has often been histology and, as such, there is very little appreciation of collagen composition and arrangement of the labrum, and hence the micromechanics of the structure. On transmission electron microscopy, significant differences in diameter, area and perimeter were noted in the two gross histological groups of collagen fibril visualized; this suggests a heterogeneous collagenous composition with potentially distinct mechanical function. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated three distinct zones of interest: a superficial mesh, a dense circumferential braided core potentially able to accommodate hoop stresses, and a loosely packed peri-core zone. Confocal microscopy revealed an articular surface fine fibrillar mesh potentially able to reduce surface friction, bundles of circumferential encapsulated fibres in the bulk of the tissue, and bone anchoring fibres at the osseous interface. Varying microstructure throughout the depth of the labrum suggests a role in accommodating different types of loading. An understanding of the labral microstructure can lead to development of hypotheses based upon an appreciation of this component of material property. This may aid an educated approach to surgical timing and repair.

  8. All-polyethylene tibial components in distal femur limb-salvage surgery: a finite element analysis based on promising clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fan; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Wenli; Min, Li; Shi, Rui; Luo, Yi; Duan, Hong; Tu, Chongqi

    2017-04-04

    Whether all-polyethylene tibial (APT) components are beneficial to patients who received distal femur limb-salvage surgery lacks high-quality clinical follow-up and mechanical evidence. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanics of the distal femur reconstructed with APT tumor knee prostheses using finite element (FE) analysis based on our previous, promising clinical outcome. Three-dimensional FE models that use APT and metal-backed tibial (MBT) prostheses to reconstruct distal femoral bone defects were developed and input into the Abaqus FEA software version 6.10.1. Mesh refinement tests and gait simulation with a single foot both in the upright and 15°-flexion positions with mechanical loading were conducted. Stress distribution analysis was compared between APT and MBT at the two static positions. For both prosthesis types, the stress was concentrated on the junction of the stem and shaft, and the maximum stress in the femoral axis base was more than 100 Mpa. The stress on the tibial surface was relatively distributed, which was 1-19 MPa. The stress on the tibial bone-cement layer of the APT prosthesis was approximately 20 times higher than that on the MBT prosthesis in the same region. The stress on the proximal tibial cancellous bone and cortical bone of the APT prosthesis was 3-5 times greater than that of the MBT prosthesis, and it was more distributed. Although the stress of bone-cement around the APT component is relatively high, the stress was better distributed at the polyethylene-cement-bone interface in APT than in MBT prosthesis, which effectively protects the proximal tibia in distal femur tumor knee prosthesis replacement. These results should be considered when selecting the appropriate tibial component for a patient, especially under the foreseeable conditions of osteoporosis.

  9. Recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability: the quantification of glenoid bone loss using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins e Souza, Patricia [Fleury Medicina e Saude and Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brandao, Bruno Lobo; Motta, Geraldo; Monteiro, Martim [Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brown, Eduardo [Grupo Fleury Medicina Diagnostica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    To investigate the accuracy of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the severity of glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior shoulder dislocation by comparing the results with arthroscopic measurements. Institutional review board approval and written consent from all patients were obtained. Thirty-six consecutive patients (29 men, seven women; mean age, 34.5 [range, 18-55] years) with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation (≥3 dislocations; mean, 37.9; range, 3-200) and suspected glenoid bone loss underwent shoulder MRI before arthroscopy (mean interval, 28.5 [range, 9-73] days). Assessments of glenoid bone loss by MRI (using the best-fit circle area method) and arthroscopy were compared. Inter- and intrareader reproducibility of MRI-derived measurements was evaluated using arthroscopy as a comparative standard. Glenoid bone loss was evident on MRI and during arthroscopy in all patients. Inter- and intrareader correlations of MRI-derived measurements were excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.80-0.82; r = 0.81-0.86). The first and second observers' measurements showed strong (r = 0.76) and moderate (r = 0.69) interreader correlation, respectively, with arthroscopic measurements. Conventional MRI can be used to measure glenoid bone loss, particularly when employed by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. (orig.)

  10. Three-dimensional positional assessment of glenoid fossae and mandibular condyles in patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos, Juliana Macêdo; Palomo, Juan Martin; de Oliveira Ruellas, Antonio Carlos; Cheib, Paula Loureiro; Eliliwi, Manhal; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga

    2017-11-01

    To test the null hypotheses that the positions of the glenoid fossae and mandibular condyles are identical on the Class I and Class II sides of patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion. Retrospective three-dimensional (3D) assessments of the positions of the glenoid fossae and mandibular condyles were made in patients with Class II malocclusion. Relative to a fiducial reference at the anterior cranial base, distances from the glenoid fossae and condyles were calculated in pretreatment cone beam computed tomographic scans of 82 patients: 41 with Class II and 41 with Class II subdivision malocclusions. The 3D distances from glenoid fossae to sella turcica in the X (right-left), Y (anterior-posterior), Z (inferior-superior) projections were calculated. Patients with Class II malocclusion displayed a symmetric position of the glenoid fossae and condyles with no statistically significant differences between sides (P > .05), whereas patients with Class II subdivision showed asymmetry in the distance between the glenoid fossae and anterior cranial base or sella turcica (P Class II side. (P .05). The null hypotheses were rejected. Patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion displayed asymmetrically positioned right- and left-side glenoid fossae, with a distally and laterally positioned Class II side, although the condyles were symmetrically positioned within the glenoid fossae.

  11. Three-dimensional MRI of the glenoid labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehr, S.P.; Pope, T.L. Jr.; Martin, D.F.; Link, K.M.; Monu, J.U.V.; Hunter, M.; Reboussin, D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reformation in the evaluation of tears of the glenoid labrum complex (GLC). Fifty-five shoulders were evaluated by MRI using standard spin-echo sequences. Gradient-refocused-echo axial projections were used to assess the GLC on the two-dimensional (2D) studies. Three-dimensional Fourier transform multiplanar gradient-recalled imaging with a resolution of 0.7 mm was also performed in all patients. Independent analyses of the anterior and posterior labra were performed in a blinded manner for both the 2D and 3D studies by three experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Observations of the imaging studies were compared with the videoarthroscopic findings. The appearance of the GLC was rated on a scale of 0 to 4 (0-2=normal, 3, 4=abnormal or torn). The diagnostic confidence was averaged from the three reader's scores. Anterior labral tears were effectively detected with sensitivities of 89% and 96% and specificities of 96% and 100% (P<0.0001) for the 2D and 3D studies, respectively. For posterior labral tears, the sensitivity and specificity of the 2D method were 47% and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the 3D volume sequence were 53% and 98%, respectively. The lower sensitivity of both imaging methods for detecting posterior labral tears may be influenced by the smaller number (n=5) of arthroscopically confirmed cases in our study and reflects the difficulty of visualizing the posteroinferior borders of the GLC with present MRI techniques. (orig.)

  12. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Glenoid in a Major League Baseball Prospect: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Luis Carlos; Jose, Jean; Sama, Andrew Joseph; Baraga, Michael Gerald

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old Major League Baseball prospect presented with persistent shoulder pain associated with throwing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large osteochondritis dissecans lesion in the posterosuperior aspect of the glenoid. The patient was restricted from throwing and underwent therapy to improve range of motion and throwing mechanics. Eight months after initiating nonoperative treatment, an MRI arthrogram demonstrated a healed lesion. At follow-up 2 years after treatment, full relief of symptoms had persisted. Osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the glenoid are extremely rare, but have the potential to heal in overhead-throwing athletes. To our knowledge, this is the only case reported in the literature that demonstrates a healed osteochondritis dissecans lesion of the glenoid following nonoperative treatment.

  13. Comparison of Glenoid Version and Posterior Humeral Subluxation in Patients With and Without Posterior Shoulder Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Stephen A; Eichinger, Josef K; Dumont, Guillaume D; Burton, Lauren E; Coats-Thomas, Maggie S; Daniels, Stephen D; Sinz, Nathan J; Provencher, Matthew T; Higgins, Laurence D; Warner, Jon J P

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate glenoid version and humeral subluxation on preoperative multiplanar imaging of patients who underwent surgery for posterior glenohumeral instability compared with a matched group of patients who had shoulder surgery for other pathology. All patients over a 2-year period who underwent surgery for posterior instability had preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or MR arthrogram reviewed. Patients undergoing shoulder surgery for reasons other than instability were identified as a control group and matched by sex, laterality, and age. Measurement of glenoid version and percentage of humeral subluxation was performed by 2 reviewers after completing a tutorial. Reviewers were blinded to diagnosis and to whether or not the patients were in the experimental or control group. There were 41 patients in each group. The average glenoid version in the control group was 5.6° of retroversion (standard deviation [SD] 3.0), and the average humeral subluxation was 54% (SD 5.1%). In the experimental group, the average glenoid version was 8.1° of retroversion (SD 5.0). The average humeral subluxation in the experimental group was 56% (SD 6.8%). Student t test revealed a statistically significant difference in glenoid version (P = .009) but not humeral subluxation (P = .25). Intra- and inter-rater reliability was measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient and found to have an excellent Fleiss rating with regard to both measurements. Glenoid retroversion is significantly increased in patients with symptomatic posterior labral tears compared with a control group. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups with regard to posterior humeral subluxation and, therefore, is not a reliable indicator of the presence or absence of symptomatic posterior shoulder instability. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Distal Clavicular Osteochondral Autograft Augmentation for Glenoid Bone Loss: A Comparison of Radius of Restoration Versus Latarjet Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapisz, Adam; Fitzpatrick, Kelly; Cook, Jay B; Athwal, George S; Tokish, John M

    2018-04-01

    Bone loss in shoulder instability is a well-recognized cause of failure after stabilization surgery. Many approaches have been described to address glenoid bone loss, including coracoid transfer. This transfer can be technically difficult and has been associated with high complication rates. An ideal alternative to coracoid transfer would be an autologous source of fresh osteochondral graft with enough surface area to replace significant glenoid bone loss. The distal clavicle potentially provides such a graft source that is readily available and low-cost. To evaluate distal clavicular autograft reconstruction for instability-related glenoid bone loss, specifically comparing the width of the clavicular autograft with the width of an ipsilateral coracoid graft as prepared for a Latarjet procedure. Further, we sought to compare the articular cartilage thickness of the distal clavicle graft with that of the native glenoid. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-seven fresh-frozen cadaver specimens were dissected, and an open distal clavicle excision was performed. The coracoid process in each specimen was prepared as has been described for a classic Latarjet coracoid transfer. In each specimen, the distal clavicle graft was compared with the coracoid graft for size and potential of glenoid articular radius of restoration. The distal clavicle graft was also compared with the native glenoid for cartilage thickness. In all specimens, the distal clavicle grafts provided a greater radius of glenoid restoration than the coracoid grafts ( P Latarjet procedure and has the additional benefit of restoring articular cartilage to the glenoid. The articular cartilage thickness of the distal clavicle is within 1.4 mm of that of the native glenoid. The distal clavicular autograft may be a suitable option for reconstruction of instability-related glenoid bone loss. This graft provides a structural osteochondral autograft with a broader radius of reconstruction than that of a coracoid

  15. Factors affecting fixation of the glenoid component of a reverse total shoulder prothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebli, Caroline; Huber, Philippe; Watling, Jonathan; Bertelsen, Alexander; Bicknell, Ryan T; Matsen, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    The semiconstrained design of the reverse arthroplasty allows loads from the humerus to challenge the fixation of the glenoid component to the scapula. We examined some of the factors affecting the quality of glenoid screw fixation, including the density of the material into which the screws are placed, the purchase of individual screws, and the direction of loading in relation to screw placement. Loads were applied by the humeral component to glenoid components with different conditions of fixation. The load to failure for each set of conditions was measured and compared statistically. Load to failure was less when the glenoid component was fixed to material of lesser density. Each screw contributed to the quality of fixation; the screw nearest the point of load application made the largest contribution. Load to failure was less when the load was colinear with a line through the nonlocking holes in the base plate compared to colinear with a line through the locking holes. In performing a reverse total shoulder, surgeons should emphasize secure intraosseous placement of the fixation screws in the best quality bone available. The placement of the inferior screw appears to be the most critical.

  16. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolas G Garbis

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear.

  17. Relationship Between Glenoid Defects and Hill-Sachs Lesions in Shoulders With Traumatic Anterior Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Iuchi, Ryo; Mae, Tatsuo

    2015-11-01

    While the combination of a glenoid defect and a Hill-Sachs lesion in a shoulder with anterior instability has recently been termed a bipolar lesion, their relationship is unclear. To investigate the relationship of the glenoid defect and Hill-Sachs lesion and the factors that influence the occurrence of these lesions as well as the recurrence of instability. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. The prevalence and size of both lesions were evaluated retrospectively by computed tomography scanning in 153 shoulders before arthroscopic Bankart repair. First, the relationship of lesion prevalence and size was investigated. Then, factors influencing the occurrence of bipolar lesions were assessed. Finally, the influence of these lesions on recurrence of instability was investigated in 103 shoulders followed for a minimum of 2 years. Bipolar lesions, isolated glenoid defects/isolated Hill-Sachs lesions, and no lesion were detected in 86, 45, and 22 shoulders (56.2%, 29.4%, and 14.4%), respectively. As the glenoid defect became larger, the Hill-Sachs lesion also increased in size. However, the size of these lesions showed a weak correlation, and large Hill-Sachs lesions did not always coexist with large glenoid defects. The prevalence of bipolar lesions was 33.3% in shoulders with primary instability and 61.8% in shoulders with recurrent instability. In relation to the total events of dislocations/subluxations, the prevalence was 44.2% in shoulders with 1 to 5 events, 69.0% in shoulders with 6 to 10 events, and 82.8% in shoulders with ≥11 events. Regarding the type of sport, the prevalence was 58.9% in athletes playing collision sports, 53.3% in athletes playing contact sports, and 29.4% in athletes playing overhead sports. Postoperative recurrence of instability was 0% in shoulders without lesions, 0% with isolated Hill-Sachs lesions, 8.3% with isolated glenoid defects, and 29.4% with bipolar lesions. The presence of a bipolar lesion significantly influenced the

  18. Three-dimensional analysis of the proximal humeral and glenoid geometry using MicroScribe 3D digitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owaydhah, Wejdan H; Alobaidy, Mohammad A; Alraddadi, Abdulrahman S; Soames, Roger W

    2017-07-01

    To understand the geometry of the proximal humerus and glenoid fossa to facilitate the design of components used in shoulder arthroplasty. The aim is to evaluate the geometry of the proximal humerus and glenoid fossa and their relationship using a MicroScribe 3D digitizer. Scans and measurements were obtained from 20 pairs of dry proximal humeri and scapulae [10 female and 10 male cadavers: median age 81 years (range 70-94 years)] using a MicroScribe 3D digitizer and Rhinoceros software. Means (±SD) of humeral inclination, medial wall angle of the bicipital groove, and radius of the humeral head values were 135 ± 11°, 39 ± 19°, and 14 ± 3 mm, respectively. Means (±SD) of glenoid height and width were 35 ± 4 and 26 ± 4 mm, while the means (±SD) of the angles of glenoid inclination, retroversion, and rotation were 87 ± 32°, 96 ± 10°, and 9 ± 6°, respectively. A significant difference in glenoid height (P ≤ 0.002) and width (P ≤ 0.0001) was observed between males and females, despite them having almost an identical radius of the humeral head, glenoid inclination, retroversion, and angle of rotation. There was also a significant difference (P ≤ 0.01) in the angle of glenoid retroversion between the right and left sides. Using a MicroScribe 3D digitizer, the glenoid fossa was observed to be significantly smaller in females than males; furthermore, there was a difference in glenoid retroversion between the right and left sides.

  19. Use of 3D MR reconstructions in the evaluation of glenoid bone loss: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Beltran, Luis S.; Yemin, Avner; Recht, Michael P.; Strauss, Eric; Meislin, Robert; Jazrawi, Laith

    2014-01-01

    To assess the ability of 3D MR shoulder reconstructions to accurately quantify glenoid bone loss in the clinical setting using findings at the time of arthroscopy as the gold standard. Retrospective review of patients with MR shoulder studies that included 3D MR reconstructions (3D MR) produced using an axial Dixon 3D-T1W-FLASH sequence at our institution was conducted with the following inclusion criteria: history of anterior shoulder dislocation, arthroscopy (OR) performed within 6 months of the MRI, and an estimate of glenoid bone loss made in the OR using the bare-spot method. Two musculoskeletal radiologists produced estimates of bone loss along the glenoid width, measured in mm and %, on 3D MR using the best-fit circle method, which were then compared to the OR measurements. There were a total of 15 patients (13 men, two women; mean age, 28, range, 19-51 years). There was no significant difference, on average, between the MRI (mean 3.4 mm/12.6 %; range, 0-30 %) and OR (mean, 12.7 %; range, 0-30 %) measurements of glenoid bone loss (p = 0.767). A 95 % confidence interval for the mean absolute error extended from 0.45-2.21 %, implying that, when averaged over all patients, the true mean absolute error of the MRI measurements relative to the OR measurements is expected to be less than 2.21 %. Inter-reader agreement between the two readers had an IC of 0.92 and CC of 0.90 in terms of percentage of bone loss. 3D MR reconstructions of the shoulder can be used to accurately measure glenoid bone loss. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and clinical features of glenoid labral flap tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Jessica K.; Vinson, Emily N. [Duke University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Taylor, Dean C. [Duke University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Displaced flaps of glenoid labral tissue are an uncommonly encountered finding on MRI of the shoulder, and are of unclear clinical significance. The purpose of this study is to describe the imaging characteristics of displaced glenoid labral flaps, evaluate for any common concomitant injuries, and identify the typical clinical presentation and management of patients with this lesion. This retrospective, observational study was approved by the institutional review board. Nineteen patients with flap-type tears of the labrum on preoperative MRI were identified. Each examination was retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists for size, location, and signal intensity of the displaced flap of tissue, in addition to any co-existing labrum or cartilage pathological conditions and clinical information. All displaced flaps extended from the inferior margin of the glenoid into the axillary recess. The average size of the visualized flap was 10.9 by 6.0 by 2.6 mm. Seventy percent of the flaps had signal intensity isointense to labrum and hypointense to hyaline cartilage on T2-weighted images. All 19 patients had concomitant labral pathological conditions and 63% had cartilage defects, visualized on MRI. Clinical evidence of shoulder instability was seen in 83% of patients, and 67% were managed surgically. Glenoid labral flap tears have distinct imaging characteristics that may aid in their identification. Their presence should prompt careful evaluation of the glenoid articular cartilage. Recognition of a labral flap tear may have clinical importance, as 83% of patients with this finding demonstrated clinical evidence of shoulder instability, often requiring surgical intervention. (orig.)

  1. The glenoid track: a review of the clinical relevance, method of calculation and current evidence behind this method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younan, Yara; Wong, Philip K.; Umpierrez, Monica; Gonzalez, Felix; Singer, Adam Daniel [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Karas, Spero [Emory University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jose, Jean [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2017-12-15

    In the setting of bipolar bone injury, orthopedic surgeons are currently making use of the glenoid track method to guide surgical management. Using preoperative CT or MR imaging, this method allows the identification of patients who are more likely to fail a primary capsuloligamentous Bankart repair. As the glenoid track method becomes increasingly used in preoperative planning, it is important for the radiologist to become familiar with its concept and method of calculation. This review article aims to concisely summarize the current literature and the clinical implications of the glenoid track method. (orig.)

  2. Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder with large Hillsach's lesion & deficient glenoid: Treated by autogenous bone graft & modified Latarjet procedure☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshin, Chetan; Jangira, Vivek; Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Jindal, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder is rare in spite of the fact that the anterior dislocation of the shoulder is seen in around 90% of the acute cases. Most of the series of neglected dislocation describe posterior dislocation to be far more common.1,2 We hereby report a case of the neglected anterior shoulder dislocation in a 15 year old boy who had a history of epilepsy. There was a large Hill Sachs lesion in humeral head which was impacted in glenoid inferiorly and glenoid was eburnated at that margin. The humeral head was reconstructed with a tricortical iliac graft. Glenoid was reconstructed by transfer of coracoids process of scapula to antero-inferior glenoid (modified Latarjet procedure). This case is unique because management of humeral head defect with bone graft is not mentioned in anterior dislocation. PMID:26566343

  3. Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder with large Hillsach's lesion & deficient glenoid: Treated by autogenous bone graft & modified Latarjet procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshin, Chetan; Jangira, Vivek; Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Jindal, Rohit

    2015-12-01

    Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder is rare in spite of the fact that the anterior dislocation of the shoulder is seen in around 90% of the acute cases. Most of the series of neglected dislocation describe posterior dislocation to be far more common.(1) (,2) We hereby report a case of the neglected anterior shoulder dislocation in a 15 year old boy who had a history of epilepsy. There was a large Hill Sachs lesion in humeral head which was impacted in glenoid inferiorly and glenoid was eburnated at that margin. The humeral head was reconstructed with a tricortical iliac graft. Glenoid was reconstructed by transfer of coracoids process of scapula to antero-inferior glenoid (modified Latarjet procedure). This case is unique because management of humeral head defect with bone graft is not mentioned in anterior dislocation.

  4. Glenoid version by CT scan: an analysis of clinical measurement error and introduction of a protocol to reduce variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bunt, F.; Pearl, M.L.; Lee, E.K.; Peng, L.; Didomenico, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have challenged the accuracy of conventional measurements of glenoid version. Variability in the orientation of the scapula from individual anatomical differences and patient positioning, combined with differences in observer measurement practices, have been identified as

  5. Cyclic loading biomechanical analysis of the pullout strengths of rotator cuff and glenoid anchors: 2013 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical and design characteristics of newer suture anchors under cyclic loading. Suture anchors were tested in fresh porcine cortical and cancellous bone by cyclic loading (10 to 100 N for 200 cycles) followed by destructive testing parallel to the insertion axis at 12.5 mm per second. End points included ultimate failure load, displacement at 100 and 200 cycles, failure mode, and stiffness. Anchors tested included ReelX (Stryker Endoscopy, San Jose, CA); Footprint Ultra PK (4.5 and 5.5 mm) (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA); TwinFix (4.5, 5.5, and 6.5 mm made from polyether ether ketone [PEEK], hydroxyapatite [HA], and titanium [Ti]) (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA); Morphix (2.5 and 5.5 mm) (MedShape Solutions, Atlanta, GA); CrossFT BC (ConMed-Linvatec, Largo, FL); JuggerKnot (1.5 and 2.8 mm) (Biomet Sports Medicine, Warsaw, IN); Healicoil (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA); Quattro (X, Link, and GL) (Cayenne Medical, Scottsdale, AZ); Healix (Biocryl Rapide [BR], PEEK, and Ti) (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA); Twin Loop (3.5 mm, PEEK) (Stryker Endoscopy, San Jose, CA); PressFT (2.1 and 2.6 mm) (ConMed Linvatec, Largo FL); Y-Knot (ConMed Linvatec, Largo FL); Gryphon (BR and PEEK) (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA); and Iconix (1, 2, and 3) (Stryker Endoscopy, San Jose, CA). Rotator cuff anchors showed greater failure loads than did glenoid anchors in metaphyseal bone (rotator cuff anchors 448 N v glenoid anchors 296 N) (P = .001) and cancellous bone (rotator cuff anchors 435 N v glenoid anchors 225 N) (P strengths than did glenoid anchors, regardless of bone type. TwinFix anchors showed more cyclic displacement than did other rotator cuff anchors (except the ReelX and Morphix anchors) and the glenoid anchors tested. The failure mode was dependent on the specific anchor. Suture anchor constructs tested showed that failure load is dependent on anchor type (rotator cuff anchor or glenoid anchor) but not on anchor location

  6. The Effect of Scapula Tilt and Best-Fit Circle Placement When Measuring Glenoid Bone Loss in Shoulder Instability Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroder, Philipp; Plachel, Fabian; Huettner, Anna; Ernstbrunner, Lukas; Minkus, Marvin; Boehm, Elisabeth; Gerhardt, Christian; Scheibel, Markus

    2018-02-01

    To analyze the effect of lack of standardization on the reliability of current measurement techniques for glenoid bone loss in clinical practice. Ten consecutive patients with anterior glenoid bone loss due to recurrent anterior shoulder instability and available computed tomographic (CT) scans of the affected shoulder were included in this study. One hundred seventy 3-dimensional en-face view images of the 10 glenoids with up to 20° degrees of tilt in the anterior, posterior, superior, and inferior direction were rendered. Three independent observers first identified the en-face view images and subsequently performed measurements of the defect surface and diameter as well as the glenoid surface and diameter on all 170 images. Measurements were completed based on the conventional best-fit circle technique using the edge of the visible glenoid bone as reference and additionally based on the so-called spoon technique, which places the best-fit circle on the edge of the visible glenoid concavity. The overall agreement regarding en-face view image selection between the observers was 30% (K-alpha = 0.10, 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.22). Tilt of the en-face view in any direction resulted in significant alterations of all 4 measurement parameters as well as the relative defect area and diameter (P techniques rendered significantly different results regarding all 4 measurement parameters as well as the relative defect area (P best-fit circle placement significantly alter glenoid defect size measurement results. Because the glenoid defect size plays an important role in the choice of treatment for anterior shoulder instability, measurement techniques need to be as precise as possible. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sequential 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis of implant position following total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchetti, Eric T; Jun, Bong-Jae; Cain, Richard A; Youderian, Ari; Rodriguez, Eric J; Kusin, David; Subhas, Naveen; Patterson, Thomas E; Iannotti, Joseph P

    2018-02-07

    Detection of postoperative component position and implant shift following total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) can be challenging using routine imaging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glenoid component position over time using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis with minimum 2-year follow-up. Twenty patients underwent primary TSA with sequential CT scanning of the shoulder: a preoperative study, an immediate postoperative study within 2 weeks of surgery, and a postoperative study performed at minimum 2-year follow-up (CT3). Postoperative glenoid component position and central peg osteolysis were assessed across the immediate postoperative CT scan and CT3. Glenoids with evidence of component shift and/or grade 1 central peg osteolysis on CT3 were considered at risk of loosening. Of the patients, 7 (35%) showed evidence of glenoid components at risk of loosening on CT3, 6 with component shift (3 with increased inclination alone, 1 with increased retroversion alone, and 2 with both increased inclination and retroversion). Significantly more patients with glenoid component shift had grade 1 central peg osteolysis on CT3 compared with those without shift (83% vs 7%, P = .002). One clinical failure occurred, with the patient undergoing revision to reverse TSA for rotator cuff deficiency. Three-dimensional CT imaging analysis following TSA identified changes in glenoid component position over time, with inclination being the most common direction of shift and grade 1 central peg osteolysis commonly associated with shift. These findings raise concern for glenoids at risk of loosening, but further follow-up is needed to determine the long-term clinical impact of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Glenoid neck Hounsfield units on computed tomography can accurately identify patients with low bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappo, Kyle E; Christensen, Daniel L; Wolfe, Jared A; Tintle, Scott M

    2018-01-31

    Osteoporosis is a costly and morbid disease with the first presentation often with a fragility fracture. The purpose of this study was to assess whether Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on shoulder computed tomography could identify patients at risk of osteoporosis and aid in its diagnosis. We identified patients who had both a computed tomography scan of the glenoid and a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry results and HU measurements of the patients' glenoid were recorded. Differences in HU measurements between patients with normal and abnormal central bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed. Correlations were calculated, and receiver operating characteristics were examined. A total of 51 glenoids met the criteria. The mean glenoid HU measurement was 140.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 120.1-161.1) in the osteoporotic group, 168.1 (95% CI, 152.7-183.5) in the osteopenic group, and 233.2 (95% CI, 210.1-256.4) in the normal BMD group (P operating characteristic curve was 0.918. With 197 HUs used as the cutoff for diagnosis of abnormal BMD, the positive predictive value was 96.6%. With 257.1 HUs used as the cutoff, the negative predictive value was 100%. A patient with an HU measurement below 197 has a 97% chance of having low BMD, and a patient with a measurement over 257 likely has normal BMD. In patients with measurements between these values, a definitive diagnosis should be aggressively pursued. Opportunistic screening for a modifiable disease that has significant morbidity and mortality rates at no additional cost, radiation, or time is of great value. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Anatomical Glenoid Reconstruction Using Fresh Osteochondral Distal Tibia Allograft After Failed Latarjet Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Anthony; Ferrari, Marcio B.; Akamefula, Ramesses A.; Frank, Rachel M.; Sanchez, George; Provencher, Matthew T.

    2017-01-01

    In the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability, the Latarjet procedure has been shown to fail. This results in a need for viable revisional procedures for patients who present with this challenging pathology. We report our preferred technique for anatomical glenoid reconstruction using a fresh osteochondral distal tibia allograft after a failed Latarjet procedure. This bony augmentation technique employs a readily available dense, weight-bearing osseous tissue source that has...

  10. Bare spot of the glenoid fossa in children: incidence and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Emery, Kathleen H.; Salisbury, Shelia R.

    2010-01-01

    The bare spot of the glenoid fossa is a normal cartilage defect seen frequently in adults. It has been used on arthroscopy as a landmark for the center of the glenoid fossa. There are no reports of this variant in children, but we have noted it on some pediatric clinical shoulder MRI studies. Our main purpose is to evaluate the incidence of the bare spot in children and define location and MRI features. Shoulder MRI studies (total 570) from 2004 to 2008 were reviewed. Children were divided into two age groups: group 1, 0-10 years (n=200), group 2, 11-20 years (n=370). A total of 12 bare spots (2.1%) were identified; all were seen in group 2. Eight (67%) were central and four were eccentric in the glenoid fossa. All showed a well-marginated focal cartilage defect containing hyperintense joint fluid or contrast agent. Three also had air. The bare spot is seen in children. The absence in children younger than 10 years and the low incidence in the second decade support the proposed acquired nature. Familiarity with this finding is important so as not to misinterpret it as a pathologic condition. (orig.)

  11. The Glenoid Labral Articular Teardrop Lesion: A Chondrolabral Injury With Distinct Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Evan S; Flores, Stephen; Stevens, Christopher; Richardson, Damien; Lund, Pamela

    2018-02-01

    Evaluation and description of a pathognomonic lesion identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a chondrolabral injury of the glenohumeral joint. Patients were prospectively identified at the time of MRI by a characteristic teardrop appearance of a pedicled displaced chondrolabral flap in the axillary recess on coronal imaging and retrospectively reviewed. In a sample of 36 patients, there were 30 males (83%), and the average age was 27 years (14-75 years). Twenty-four (67%) were noted to have sustained an instability episode or had findings of instability on physical examination; 19 patients (53%) were playing a sport at the time of injury. The characteristic teardrop lesion measured 3.36 mm (1-9 mm) in the coronal plane, 6.98 mm (2-20 mm) sagittal and 11.78 mm (1-25 mm) longitudinal. The lesion was located in the anterior inferior quadrant of the glenoid. The glenoid labral articular teardrop (GLAT) lesion represents a pathognomonic lesion in the spectrum of chondral labral injury, indicating articular cartilage damage to the glenoid. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of glenohumeral contact pressures and contact areas after glenoid reconstruction with latarjet or distal tibial osteochondral allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S; Gupta, Deepti; Ghodadra, Neil; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Shewman, Elizabeth; Wang, Vincent M; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Provencher, Matthew T

    2013-08-01

    Glenoid reconstruction with distal tibial allografts offers the theoretical advantage over Latarjet reconstruction of improved joint congruity and a cartilaginous articulation for the humeral head. Hypothesis/ To investigate changes in the magnitude and location of glenohumeral contact areas, contact pressures, and peak forces after (1) the creation of a 30% anterior glenoid defect and subsequent glenoid bone augmentation with (2) a flush Latarjet coracoid graft or (3) a distal tibial osteochondral allograft. It was hypothesized that the distal tibial bone graft would best normalize glenohumeral contact areas, contact pressures, and peak forces. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissues and randomly tested in 3 static positions of humeral abduction with a 440-N compressive load: 30°, 60°, and 60° of abduction with 90° of external rotation (ABER). Glenohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and peak force were determined sequentially using a digital pressure mapping system for (1) the intact glenoid, (2) the glenoid with a 30% anterior bone defect, and (3) the glenoid after reconstruction with a distal tibial allograft or a Latarjet bone block. Glenoid reconstruction with distal tibial allografts resulted in significantly higher glenohumeral contact areas than reconstruction with Latarjet bone blocks in 60° of abduction (4.87 vs. 3.93 cm2, respectively; P Latarjet reconstruction in the ABER position (2.39 vs. 2.61 N, respectively; P Latarjet reconstruction also followed this same pattern, but differences in contact areas and peak forces between the defect model and Latarjet reconstruction in the ABER position were not statistically significant (P > .05). Reconstruction of anterior glenoid bone defects with a distal tibial allograft may allow for improved joint congruity and lower peak forces within the glenohumeral joint than Latarjet reconstruction at 60° of abduction and the ABER position

  13. Arthroscopic perspective of the axillary nerve in relation to the glenoid and arm position: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Kim, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Seok Hyun

    2007-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the morphologic features of the axillary nerve and its relation to the glenoid under an arthroscopic setup, and to determine the changes in nerve position according to different arm positions. Twenty-three fresh-frozen fore-quarter cadaveric shoulder specimens were used for evaluations in an arthroscopic setup with the lateral decubitus position. The main trunk of the axillary nerve with or without some of its branches was exposed after careful arthroscopic dissection. Morphologic features and the course of the axillary nerve from the anterior and posterior portals were documented. The closest distances from the glenoid rim were measured with a probe by use of a distance range system. The changes in nerve position were determined in 4 different arm positions. At the end of arthroscopic examination, the nerves were marked and verified by open dissections. The axillary nerve appeared in the joint near the inferior edge of the subscapularis muscle. With reference to the inferior glenoid rim horizontally, the nerve had a mean running angle of 23 degrees (range, 14 degrees to 41 degrees; SD, 8 degrees ). The closest points from the glenoid were between the 5:30- and 6:00-o'clock position (right) or 6:00- and 6:30-o'clock position (left). The closest distance range varied from 10 to 25 mm in the neutral arm position. The abduction-neutral position resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. The abduction-neutral rotation position was the optimal position for minimizing axillary nerve injuries, because it resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. Knowledge of the anatomy of the axillary nerve aids the shoulder surgeon in avoiding nerve injury during arthroscopic procedures. Abduction-neutral rotation may be more helpful for arthroscopic surgeons performing procedures in the anteroinferior glenoid with the nerve being farther away from the working field.

  14. Reliability of a set of protractors for direct anatomical measurements around the glenoid and humeral head rims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadi, Hippolite O; Fogg, Quentin A; Ugbolue, Ukadike C; Emery, Roger J H; Bull, Anthony M J

    2012-05-01

    Functional biomechanics studies of the glenohumeral (GH) soft tissues require an understanding of their sites of bony attachment. Anatomical positions of GH capsular structures have often been quantified relative to the rims of the glenoid and humeral head (HH). The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to quantify the reliability of a set of protractors that directly fit on to the glenoid and HH rims and (2) to use this to determine direct angular position referencing of landmarks and soft tissue attachment points. Three assessors independently used the protractors to assess nine prescribed landmarks on 30 dry bone specimens (15 glenoids and 15 HHs) recording the angular positions of the structures relative to the glenoid and HH. The collected data showed high levels of validity as indicated by the protractor's intra- and inter-assessor reliabilities: 98.2 and 98.7% for the glenoid component, and 96.2 and 96.5% for the humeral component, respectively. The device could be useful in anatomical studies, description of defects and pathologies on glenohumeral articulation, and planning of scapular reconstructive surgery. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  15. Floating Shoulder: Ipsilateral Clavicle, Scapular Body And Glenoid Fracture. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Elmadag

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of shoulder instability following a traffic accident. Allman Type I midshaft clavicle, Ideberg Type II glenoid and DeCloux Type I scapular body fractures were diagnosed following radiologic examination. There were no signs of ligamentous injury. Mechanical instability was noted at the shoulder due to breakage of the supportive bony skeleton. The patient was treated surgically with plate and screw fixation. Surgical fixation allowed early postoperative physiotherapy and rehabilitation. This rare injury and its treatment options are discussed in the light of current literature.

  16. Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder with large Hillsach's lesion & deficient glenoid: Treated by autogenous bone graft & modified Latarjet procedure☆

    OpenAIRE

    Peshin, Chetan; Jangira, Vivek; Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Jindal, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Neglected anterior dislocation of shoulder is rare in spite of the fact that the anterior dislocation of the shoulder is seen in around 90% of the acute cases. Most of the series of neglected dislocation describe posterior dislocation to be far more common.1,2 We hereby report a case of the neglected anterior shoulder dislocation in a 15 year old boy who had a history of epilepsy. There was a large Hill Sachs lesion in humeral head which was impacted in glenoid inferiorly and glenoid was ebur...

  17. Assessment of condyle and glenoid fossa morphology using CBCT in South-East Asians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Al-koshab

    Full Text Available Proper imaging allows practitioners to evaluate an asymptomatic tempormandibular joint (TMJ for potential degenerative changes prior to surgical and orthodontic treatment. The recently developed cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT allows measurement of TMJ bony structures with high accuracy. A study was undertaken to determine the morphology, and its variations, of the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa among Malay and Chinese Malaysians.CBCT was used to assess 200 joints in 100 subjects (mean age, 30.5 years. i-CAT CBCT software and The Mimics 16.0 software were employed to measure the volume, metrical size, position of each condyle sample and the thickness of the roof of the glenoid fossa (RGF.No significant gender differences were noted in thickness of the RGF and condylar length; however condylar volume, width, height and the joint spaces were significantly greater among males. With regards to comparison of both TMJs, the means of condylar volume, width and length of the right TMJ were significantly higher, while the means of the left condylar height and thickness of RGF were higher. When comparing the condylar measurements and the thickness of RGF between the two ethnic groups, we found no significant difference for all measurements with exception of condylar height, which is higher among Chinese.The similarity in measurements for Malays and Chinese may be due to their common origin. This information can be clinically useful in establishing the diagnostic criteria for condylar volume, metrical size, and position in the Malaysian East Asians population.

  18. Biomechanical analysis of pullout strengths of rotator cuff and glenoid anchors: 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Hapa, Onur; Rapley, Jay H; Barber, Cameron A K; Bynum, James A; Hrnack, Scott A

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical and design characteristics of newer suture anchors. Suture anchors were tested in fresh porcine metaphyseal cortex and cancellous troughs by use of an established protocol. A mechanical testing machine applied tensile loads parallel to the axis of insertion at 12.5 mm/s until failure, and mean anchor failure strengths were calculated. The mode of failure was recorded. Rotator cuff anchors tested included the Doubleplay and Opus SpeedScrew (ArthroCare Sports Medicine, Sunnyvale, CA); PEEK Intraline and PEEK Zip (Stryker, San Jose, CA); Paladin, SuperRevo FT, and CrossFT (ConMed Linvatec, Largo, FL); Piton (Tornier, Warsaw, IN); Ti Screw, ALLthread PEEK, LactoScrew, ALLthread Ti, and ALLthread PEEK knotless (Biomet Sports Medicine, Warsaw, IN). Glenoid anchors included the Gryphon BR P (DePuy-Mitek, Raynham, MA) and JuggerKnot 1.4 (Biomet Sports Medicine). Mean cortical failure loads for cuff anchors were as follows: Doubleplay 5.0, 279 N; Doubleplay 6.5, 338 N; Opus SpeedScrew 5.5, 356 N; Opus SpeedScrew 6.5, 336 N; PEEK Intraline 5.5, 263 N; PEEK Intraline 6.5, 344 N; PEEK Zip 5.5, 435 N; PEEK Zip 6.5, 502 N; Paladin 5.0, 500 N; Paladin 6.5, 521 N; SuperRevo FT, 496 N; CrossFT, 569 N; Piton, 379 N; Ti Screw 5.0, 457 N; Ti Screw 6.5, 443 N; ALLthread PEEK 5.5, 476 N; LactoScrew 5.5, 403 N; ALLthread Ti 5.0, 526 N; ALLthread Ti 6.5, 653 N; and ALLthread PEEK knotless, 441 N). Mean cortical failure loads for glenoid anchors were 161 N for Gryphon BR P and 239 N for JuggerKnot 1.4. Mean cancellous bone failure loads for cuff anchors were Doubleplay 5.0, 263 N; Doubleplay 6.5, 340 N; Opus SpeedScrew 5.5, 356 N; Opus SpeedScrew 6.5, 344 N; PEEK Intraline 5.5, 274 N; PEEK Intraline 6.5, 327 N; PEEK Zip 5.5, 401 N; PEEK Zip 6.5, 396 N; Paladin 5.0, 427 N; Paladin 6.5, 491 N; SuperRevo FT, 483 N; CrossFT, 547 N; Piton, 365 N; Ti Screw 5.0, 420 N; Ti Screw 6.5, 448 N; ALLthread PEEK 5.5, 475 N; LactoScrew 5.5, 435 N; ALLthread Ti 5.0, 512 N

  19. 16-slice MDCT arthrography of the shoulder: accuracy for detection of glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gang Deuk; Kim, Huoung Jun; Kim, Hye Won; Oh, Jung Taek; Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ah [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice MDCT arthrography (CTA) for glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. We enrolled forty-five patients who underwent arthroscopy after CTA for pain or instability of the shoulder joint. The CTA images were analyzed for the existence, sites and types of glenoid labral tears and the presence and severity of rotator cuff tears. We determined the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CTA for detecting glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears on the basis of the arthroscopy findings. At arthroscopy, there were 33 SLAP lesions (9 type I, 23 type II and 1 type III), 6 Bankart lesions and 31 rotator cuff lesions (21 supraspinatus, 9 infraspinatus and 1 subscapularis). On CTA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting 24 SLAP lesions, excluding the type I lesions, were 83%, 100% and 91%, the total rotator cuff tears were 90%, 100% and 98%, the full thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 100%, 94% and 96%, and the partial thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 29%, 100% and 89%, respectively. 16-slice MDCT arthrography has high accuracy for the diagnosis of abnormality of the glenoid labrum or rotator cuff tears and it can be a useful alternative to MRI or US.

  20. Potential axillary nerve stretching during RSA implantation: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Blandine; Leclère, Franck Marie; Casoli, Vincent; Paganini, Federico; Unglaub, Frank; Spies, Christian; Valenti, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical neurological injury after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) may jeopardize functional outcomes due to the risk of irreversible damage to the axillary nerve. We proposed a simple anatomical study in order to assess the macroscopic effects on the axillary nerve when lowering the humerus as performed during RSA implantation. We also measured the effect on the axillary nerve of a lateralization of the humerus. Between 2011 and 2012, cadaveric dissections of 16 shoulder specimens from nine fresh human cadavers were performed in order to assess the effects on the axillary nerve after the lowering and lateralization of the humerus. We assessed the extent of stretching of the axillary nerve in four positions in the sagittal plane [lowering of the humerus: great tuberosity in contact with the acromion (position 1), in contact with the upper (position 2), middle (position 3) and lower rim of the glenoid (position 4)] and three positions in the frontal plane [lateralization of the humerus: humerus in contact with the glenoid (position 1), humerus lateralized 1 cm (position 2) and 2 cm (position 3)]. When the humerus was lowered, clear macroscopical changes appeared below the middle of the glenoid (the highest level of tension). As regards the lateralization of the humerus, macroscopic study and measurements confirm the absence of stretching of the nerve in those positions. Lowering of the humerus below the equator of the glenoid changes the course and tension of the axillary nerve and may lead to stretching and irreversible damage, compromising the function of the deltoid. Improvements in the design of the implants and modification of the positioning of the glenosphere to avoid notching and to increase mobility must take into account the anatomical changes induced by the prosthesis and its impact on the brachial plexus. Level of Evidence and study type Level IV.

  1. Biomechanical Evaluation of Glenoid Version and Dislocation Direction on the Influence of Anterior Shoulder Instability and Development of Hill-Sachs Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Josef K; Massimini, Daniel F; Kim, Jungryul; Higgins, Laurence D

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal glenoid version is a risk factor for shoulder instability. However, the degree to which the variance in version (both anteversion and retroversion) affects one's predisposition for instability is not well understood. To determine the influence of glenoid version on anterior shoulder joint stability and to determine if the direction of the humeral head dislocation is a stimulus for the development of Hill-Sachs lesions. Controlled laboratory study. Ten human cadaveric shoulders (mean age, 59.4 ± 4.3 years) were tested using a custom shoulder dislocation device placed in a position of apprehension (90° of abduction with 90° of external rotation). Glenoid version was adjusted in 5° increments for a total of 6 version angles tested: +10°, +5°, 0°, -5°, -10°, and -15° (anteversion angles are positive, and retroversion angles are negative). Two humeral dislocation directions were tested. The first direction was true anterior through the anterior-posterior glenoid axis. The second dislocation direction was 35° inferior from the anterior-posterior glenoid axis based on the deforming force role of the pectoralis major. The force and energy to dislocate were recorded. Changes in glenoid version manifested a linear effect on the dislocation force. The energy to dislocate increased as a second-order polynomial as a function of increasing glenoid retroversion. Glenoid version of +10° anteversion and -15° retroversion was highly unstable, resulting in spontaneous dislocation in one-quarter (10/40) and one-half (25/40) of the specimens anteriorly and posteriorly, respectively, in the absence of an applied dislocation force. The greater tuberosity was observed to engage with the anterior glenoid rim, consistent with Hill-Sachs lesions, 40% more frequently when the dislocation direction was true anterior compared with 35° inferior from the anterior-posterior glenoid axis. The engagement of the greater tuberosity caused an increase in the energy required to

  2. Reliability and diagnostic accuracy of history and physical examination for diagnosing glenoid labral tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsworth, Matthew K; Doukas, William C; Murphy, Kevin P; Mielcarek, Billie J; Michener, Lori A

    2008-01-01

    Glenoid labral tears provide a diagnostic challenge. Combinations of items in the patient history and physical examination will provide stronger diagnostic accuracy to suggest the presence or absence of glenoid labral tear than will individual items. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 1. History and examination findings in patients with shoulder pain (N = 55) were compared with arthroscopic findings to determine diagnostic accuracy and intertester reliability. The intertester reliability of the crank, anterior slide, and active compression tests was 0.20 to 0.24. A combined history of popping or catching and positive crank or anterior slide results yielded specificities of 0.91 and 1.00 and positive likelihood ratios of 3.0 and infinity, respectively. A positive anterior slide result combined with either a positive active compression or crank result yielded specificities of 0.91 and positive likelihood ratio of 2.75 and 3.75, respectively. Requiring only a single positive finding in the combination of popping or catching and the anterior slide or crank yielded sensitivities of 0.82 and 0.89 and negative likelihood ratios of 0.31 and 0.33, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of individual tests in previous studies is quite variable, which may be explained in part by the modest reliability of these tests. The combination of popping or catching with a positive crank or anterior slide result or a positive anterior slide result with a positive active compression or crank test result suggests the presence of a labral tear. The combined absence of popping or catching and a negative anterior slide or crank result suggests the absence of a labral tear.

  3. The effect of a combined glenoid and Hill-Sachs defect on glenohumeral stability: a biomechanical cadaveric study using 3-dimensional modeling of 142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciero, Robert A; Parrino, Anthony; Bernhardson, Andrew S; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Obopilwe, Elifho; Cote, Mark P; Golijanin, Petr; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Provencher, Matthew T

    2015-06-01

    Bone loss in anterior glenohumeral instability occurs on both the glenoid and the humerus; however, existing biomechanical studies have evaluated glenoid and humeral head defects in isolation. Thus, little is known about the combined effect of these bony lesions in a clinically relevant model on glenohumeral stability. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical efficacy of a Bankart repair in the setting of bipolar (glenoid and humeral head) bone defects determined via computer-generated 3-dimensional (3D) modeling of 142 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The null hypothesis was that adding a bipolar bone defect will have no effect on glenohumeral stability after soft tissue Bankart repair. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 142 consecutive patients with recurrent anterior instability were analyzed with 3D computed tomography scans. Two Hill-Sachs lesions were selected on the basis of volumetric size representing the 25th percentile (0.87 cm(3); small) and 50th percentile (1.47 cm(3); medium) and printed in plastic resin with a 3D printer. A total of 21 cadaveric shoulders were evaluated on a custom shoulder-testing device permitting 6 degrees of freedom, and the force required to translate the humeral head anteriorly 10 mm at a rate of 2.0 mm/s with a compressive load of 50 N was determined at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and 60° of external rotation. All Bankart lesions were made sharply from the 2- to 6-o'clock positions for a right shoulder. Subsequent Bankart repair with transosseous tunnels using high-strength suture was performed. Hill-Sachs lesions were made in the cadaver utilizing a plastic mold from the exact replica off the 3D printer. Testing was conducted in the following sequence for each specimen: (1) intact, (2) posterior capsulotomy, (3) Bankart lesion, (4) Bankart repair, (5) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect, (6) Bankart repair, (7) Bankart lesion with 2-mm glenoid defect and Hill-Sachs lesion

  4. Fate of coracoid grafts after the Latarjet procedure: will be analogous to the original glenoid by remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Young Moon; Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Hwan Jin; Sinha, Skand; Rhee, Yong-Girl

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the location, magnitude, and change over time of osteolysis of coracoid grafts after Latarjet procedure. This is a retrospective study of 54 patients (55 shoulders) who underwent the Latarjet procedure. Three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scans were performed preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at follow-up (mean 7.7 and 31.7 months postoperative). "En face" views of the glenoid, size of glenoid defect and changes in the glenoid surface area postoperatively were measured relative to the area of an assumed outer-fitting circle. On the oblique sagittal planes, location and subsequent severity of osteolysis of the graft at follow-up were documented. The mean glenoid surface area increased significantly from 79.7 ± 4.8% of the original circle preoperatively to 111.3 ± 8.0% immediately postoperatively. At 7.7 and 31.7 months of follow-up, glenoid surface area decreased to 102.2 ± 6.0% and 100.3 ± 5.3%, respectively. Osteolysis occurred on the outer side of the graft in all cases, but did not occur on the inner side. Maximum osteolysis was observed in the superior third of the graft (78.5 ± 17.1%), followed by the middle third (15.8 ± 10.4%), and the inferior third (8.0 ± 5.1%). No significant difference in magnitude of osteolysis was observed between 7.7 and 31.7 months of follow-up. Osteolysis of the grafted coracoid mainly occurred on the outer side of the superior portion, resulting in reshaping of the rectangular shape of graft coracoids after Latarjet procedure. Coracoid graft remodelling was almost completed approximately 8 months postoperatively to reach the original glenoid dish with no further changes thereafter. These results may help surgeons to understand changes of grafts after the surgery. IV.

  5. Glenoid version by CT scan: an analysis of clinical measurement error and introduction of a protocol to reduce variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunt, Fabian van de [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pearl, Michael L.; Lee, Eric K.; Peng, Lauren; Didomenico, Paul [Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Recent studies have challenged the accuracy of conventional measurements of glenoid version. Variability in the orientation of the scapula from individual anatomical differences and patient positioning, combined with differences in observer measurement practices, have been identified as sources of variability. The purpose of this study was to explore the utility and reliability of clinically available software that allows manipulation of three-dimensional images in order to bridge the variance between clinical and anatomic version in a clinical setting. Twenty CT scans of normal glenoids of patients who had proximal humerus fractures were measured for version. Four reviewers first measured version in a conventional manner (clinical version), measurements were made again (anatomic version) after employing a protocol for reformatting the CT data to align the coronal and sagittal planes with the superior-inferior axis of the glenoid, and the scapular body, respectively. The average value of clinical retroversion for all reviewers and all subjects was -1.4 (range, -16 to 21 ), as compared to -3.2 (range, -21 to 6 ) when measured from reformatted images. The mean difference between anatomical and clinical version was 1.9 ± 5.6 but ranged on individual measurements from -13 to 26 . In no instance did all four observers choose the same image slice from the sequence of images. This study confirmed the variation in glenoid version dependent on scapular orientation previously identified in other studies using scapular models, and presents a clinically accessible protocol to correct for scapular orientation from the patient's CT data. (orig.)

  6. Biomechanical Comparison of a First- and a Second-Generation All-Soft Suture Glenoid Anchor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John; Chiarappa, Frank; Haskel, Jonathan; Rice, Justin; Hyatt, Adam; Monica, James; Dhawan, Aman

    2017-01-01

    Background: All–soft tissue suture anchors provide advantages of decreased removal of bone and decreased glenoid volume occupied compared with traditional tap or screw-in suture anchors. Previous published data have led to biomechanical concerns with the use of first-generation all-soft suture anchors. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the load to 2-mm displacement and ultimate load to failure of a second-generation all-soft suture anchor, compared with a first-generation anchor and a traditional PEEK (polyether ether ketone) anchor. The null hypothesis was that the newer second-generation anchor will demonstrate no difference in loads to 2-mm displacement after cycling compared with first-generation all-soft suture anchors. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty human cadaveric glenoids were utilized to create 97 total suture anchor sites, and 1 of 3 anchors were randomized and placed into each site: (1) first-generation all-soft suture anchor (Juggerknot; Biomet), (2) second-generation all-soft suture anchor (Suturefix; Smith & Nephew), and (3) a control PEEK anchor (Bioraptor; Smith & Nephew). After initial cyclic loading, load to 2 mm of displacement and ultimate load to failure were measured for each anchor. Results: After cyclic loading, the load to 2-mm displacement was significantly less in first-generation anchors compared with controls (P .05). Conclusion: The newer generation all-soft suture anchors with a theoretically more rigid construct and deployment configuration demonstrate biomechanical characteristics (specifically, with load to 2-mm displacement after cyclic loading) that are improved over first-generation all-soft suture anchors and similar to a traditional solid tap-in anchor. The configuration of these newer generation all-soft suture anchors appears to mitigate the biomechanical concerns of decreased load to failure with first-generation all–soft tissue suture anchors. Clinical Relevance

  7. Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Breast implants are medical devices that are implanted under the ...

  8. Concurrent Rotator Cuff Tear and Axillary Nerve Palsy Associated with Anterior Dislocation of the Shoulder and Large Glenoid Rim Fracture: A “Terrible Tetrad”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Takase

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of concurrent rotator cuff tear and axillary nerve palsy resulting from anterior dislocation of the shoulder and a large glenoid rim fracture—a “terrible tetrad.” A 61-year-old woman fell on her right shoulder. Radiographs showed anterior dislocation of the shoulder with a glenoid rim fracture, and an MRI two months after injury revealed a rotator cuff tear. Upon referral to our hospital, physical and electrophysiological examinations revealed axillary nerve palsy. The axillary nerve palsy was incomplete and recovering, and displacement of the glenoid rim fracture was minimal and already united; therefore, we surgically repaired only the rotator cuff tear three months after injury. The patient recovered satisfactorily following the operation. In patients whose axillary nerve palsy is recovering, surgeons should consider operating on rotator cuff tears in an attempt to prevent rotator cuff degeneration.

  9. Quantitative three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of glenoid fracture patterns according to the AO/OTA classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Meulen, Dirk P; Janssen, Stein J; Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David C

    2016-02-01

    This study measures the characteristics of glenoid fractures to determine if the AO Foundation and Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) classification captures the most common fracture patterns. The primary null hypothesis was that surface area and degree of fragmentation do not differ among the different fracture types. Secondarily, we tested if there was a relationship between high- vs. low-energy trauma and fracture classification. Three-dimensional models were created for a consecutive series of 53 fractures. The fracture classifications, the number of fragments, and the fragmented articular surface area were related to the type of injury. The difference of articular surface size and number of fragments among classification groups was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test. There is a significant difference in fractured articular surface area among classification groups. Compared with transverse and multifragmented fractures, both anterior and posterior fractures involved significantly less of the articular surface area. High-energy trauma is associated with transverse and multifragmented fractures in 93% of the cases. It is associated with a greater number of fracture fragments and fracture of a larger percentage of the glenoid surface area, with a mean fractured surface of 60% for high-energy fractures and 25% for low-energy injuries. Quantitative 3-dimensional CT analysis confirms that the current AO/OTA classification adequately characterizes and discriminates glenoid fracture patterns. The classification groups are related to the fragmented articular surface area and the number of fragments. Also, the mechanism of injury is related to the classification group, which supports the clinical relevance of the classification. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Penile Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the discussion with your doctor. Types of penile implants There are two main types of penile implants: ... might help reduce the risk of infection. Comparing implant types When choosing which type of penile implant ...

  11. Remplissage versus latarjet for engaging Hill-Sachs defects without substantial glenoid bone loss: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degen, Ryan M; Giles, Joshua W; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent shoulder instability is commonly associated with Hill-Sachs defects. These defects may engage the glenoid rim, contributing to glenohumeral dislocation. Two treatment options to manage engaging Hill-Sachs defects are the remplissage procedure, which fills the defect with soft tissue, and the Latarjet procedure, which increases glenoid arc length. Little evidence exists to support one over the other. We performed a biomechanical comparison of the remplissage procedure to the traditional Latarjet coracoid transfer for management of engaging Hill-Sachs defects in terms of joint stiffness (resistance to anterior translation), ROM, and frequency of dislocation. Eight cadaveric specimens were tested on a shoulder instability simulator. Testing was performed with a 25% Hill-Sachs defect with an intact glenoid and after remplissage and Latarjet procedures. Joint stiffness, internal-external rotation ROM, and frequency of dislocation were assessed. Additionally, horizontal extension ROM was measured in composite glenohumeral abduction. After remplissage, stiffness increased in adduction with neutral rotation (12.7 ± 3.7 N/mm) relative to the Hill-Sachs defect state (8.7 ± 3.3 N/mm; p = 0.016). The Latarjet procedure did not affect joint stiffness (p = 1.0). Internal-external rotation ROM was reduced in abduction after the Latarjet procedure (49° ± 14°) compared with the Hill-Sachs defect state (69° ± 17°) (p = 0.009). Horizontal extension was reduced after remplissage (16° ± 12°) relative to the Hill-Sachs defect state (34° ± 8°) (p = 0.038). With the numbers available, there was no difference between the procedures in terms of the frequency of dislocation after reconstruction: 84% of specimens (27 of 32 testing scenarios) stabilized after remplissage, while 94% of specimens (30 of 32 testing scenarios) stabilized after the Latarjet procedure. Both procedures proved effective in reducing the frequency of dislocation in a 25% Hill-Sachs defect model

  12. Increased signal intensity in the normal glenoid labrum in MR imaging. Diagnostic pitfalls caused by the magic-angle effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Taisuke; Yodono, Hiraku; Prado, G.L.M.; Saito, Yoko; Miura, Hiroyuki; Itabashi, Yoko; Ootsuka, Hironori; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the magic-angle effect on the MR signal in the posterosuperior portion of the glenoid labrum. MR imaging of 15 arthroscopically evaluated shoulders, five with posterosuperior labrum injury and ten intact, was retrospectively reviewed. In the first part of the study, the signal intensity of the posterosuperior labrum on gradient-recalled echo (GRE) T{sub 2}-weighted axial images was correlated with the arthroscopy findings. The second part of the study was designed to illustrate the orientation-dependent signal that occurs in the posterosuperior labrum of three asymptomatic volunteers when imaged in the conventional supine position and in a position similar to Trendelenburg's. Another three volunteers were examined with GRE T{sub 2}-weighted axial images to assess the echo-time (TE)-dependent signal in the labrum. The signal increase in the posterosuperior labrum was identified not only in the injured labra but also in nine of 10 intact labra. In the volunteers' studies, the signal in the posterosuperior labrum changed according to the examinees' positions (conventional supine or similar to Trendelenburg's) and according to TE. Increased signal intensity due to the magic-angle effect may be misdiagnosed as a labrum injury. Awareness of this pitfall is particularly important in MR imaging of throwing athletes whose posterosuperior labra are frequently injured by posterosuperior glenoid impingement. (author)

  13. Clinical and Anatomic Predictors of Outcomes After the Latarjet Procedure for the Treatment of Anterior Glenohumeral Instability With Combined Glenoid and Humeral Bone Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, William R; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Horan, Marilee P; Dornan, Grant J; Millett, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    The Latarjet procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability is highly successful, but reasons for failure are often unclear. Measurements of the "glenoid track" have not previously been evaluated as potential predictors of postoperative stability. There are clinical and anatomic characteristics, including the glenoid track, that are predictive of outcomes after the Latarjet procedure. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Patients who underwent the Latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss before October 2012 were assessed for eligibility. Patient-reported subjective data that were prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed included demographic information, patient satisfaction, pain measured on a visual analog scale (VAS), questions regarding instability, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) scores, and Short Form-12 Physical Component Summary (SF-12 PCS) scores. Anatomic measurements were performed of the coracoid size (surface area and width), width of the conjoined tendon and subscapularis tendon, estimated glenoid defect surface area, Hill-Sachs interval (HSI), and projected postoperative glenoid track engagement. Failure was defined as the necessity for revision stabilization or continued instability (dislocation or subjective subluxation) at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. A total of 38 shoulders in 38 patients (33 men, 5 women) with a mean age of 26 years (range, 16-43 years) were included. The mean follow-up for 35 of 38 patients (92%) was 3.2 years (range, 2.0-7.9 years); 25 of 38 had undergone prior stabilization surgery, and 6 had workers' compensation claims. All mean subjective outcome scores significantly improved (P Latarjet procedure and may be helpful in surgical decision making regarding the treatment of Hill-Sachs lesions at risk for persistent

  14. Modified Latarjet Without Capsulolabral Repair in Rugby Players With Recurrent Anterior Glenohumeral Instability and Significant Glenoid Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Bertona, Agustin; Tanoira, Ignacio; Hidalgo, Ignacio Alonso; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2018-03-01

    The optimal management of recurrent anterior shoulder instability with significant glenoid bone loss in high-demand collision athletes remains a challenge. To analyze the time to return to sport, clinical outcomes, and recurrences following a modified Latarjet procedure without capsulolabral repair in rugby players with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and significant glenoid bone loss. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between June 2008 and June 2015, 50 competitive rugby players (practice >2 times per week and competition during weekends) with recurrent anterior shoulder instability underwent operation with the modified congruent arc Latarjet procedure without capsulolabral repair in our institution. Cases included 18 primary repairs and 32 revisions. Return to sports, range of motion (ROM), the Rowe score, a visual analog scale for pain in sport activity (VAS), and the Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS) were used to assess functional outcomes. Recurrences were also evaluated. The postoperative bone block position and consolidation were assessed with computed tomography. The final analysis included 49 shoulders in 48 patients (31 revision cases). The mean follow-up was 48 months (range, 24-108 months) and the mean age at the time of operation was 22.8 years (range, 17-35 years). Forty-five patients (93.7%) returned to playing rugby, all at their preinjury level of play. No significant difference in shoulder ROM was found between preoperative and postoperative results. The Rowe, VAS, and ASOSS scores showed statistically significant improvement after operation ( P Latarjet procedure without capsulolabral repair produced excellent functional outcomes, with most athletes returning to rugby at their preinjury level of play without recurrences.

  15. A biomechanical assessment of superior shoulder translation after reconstruction of anterior glenoid bone defects: The Latarjet procedure versus allograft reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degen, Ryan M; Giles, Joshua W; Boons, Harm W; Litchfield, Robert B; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S

    2013-01-01

    The coracoacromial ligament (CAL) is an important restraint to superior shoulder translation. The effect of CAL release on superior stability following the Latarjet is unknown; therefore, our purpose was to compare the effect of two Latarjet techniques and allograft reconstruction on superior instability. Eight cadaveric specimens were tested on a simulator. Superior translation was monitored following an axial force in various glenohumeral rotations (neutral, internal, and external) with and without muscle loading. Three intact CAL states were tested (intact specimen, 30% glenoid bone defect, and allograft reconstruction) and two CAL deficient states (classic Latarjet (classicLAT) and congruent-arc Latarjet (congruentLAT)). In neutral without muscle loading, a significant increase in superior translation occurred with the classicLAT as compared to 30% defect (P = 0.046) and allograft conditions (P = 0.041). With muscle loading, the classicLAT (P = 0.005, 0.002) and the congruentLAT (P = 0.018, 0.021) had significantly greater superior translation compared to intact and allograft, respectively. In internal rotation, only loaded tests produced significant results; specifically, classicLAT increased translation compared to all intact CAL states (P 0.05) and no differences (P = 1.0) were found between classicLAT and congruentLAT. In most simulations, CAL release with the Latarjet lead to increased superior humeral translation. The choice of technique for glenoid bone loss reconstruction has implications on the magnitude of superior humeral translation. This previously unknown effect requires further study to determine its clinical and kinematic outcomes.

  16. Cochlear Implants

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    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  17. Goserelin Implant

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    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  18. Traumatic glenohumeral bone defects and their relationship to failure of arthroscopic Bankart repairs: significance of the inverted-pear glenoid and the humeral engaging Hill-Sachs lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, S S; De Beer, J F

    2000-10-01

    Our goal was to analyze the results of 194 consecutive arthroscopic Bankart repairs (performed by 2 surgeons with an identical suture anchor technique) in order to identify specific factors related to recurrence of instability. Case series. We analyzed 194 consecutive arthroscopic Bankart repairs by suture anchor technique performed for traumatic anterior-inferior instability. The average follow-up was 27 months (range, 14 to 79 months). There were 101 contact athletes (96 South African rugby players and 5 American football players). We identified significant bone defects on either the humerus or the glenoid as (1) "inverted-pear" glenoid, in which the normally pear-shaped glenoid had lost enough anterior-inferior bone to assume the shape of an inverted pear; or (2) "engaging" Hill-Sachs lesion of the humerus, in which the orientation of the Hill-Sachs lesion was such that it engaged the anterior glenoid with the shoulder in abduction and external rotation. There were 21 recurrent dislocations and subluxations (14 dislocations, 7 subluxations). Of those 21 shoulders with recurrent instability, 14 had significant bone defects (3 engaging Hill-Sachs and 11 inverted-pear Bankart lesions). For the group of patients without significant bone defects (173 shoulders), there were 7 recurrences (4% recurrence rate). For the group with significant bone defects (21 patients), there were 14 recurrences (67% recurrence rate). For contact athletes without significant bone defects, there was a 6.5% recurrence rate, whereas for contact athletes with significant bone defects, there was an 89% recurrence rate. (1) Arthroscopic Bankart repairs give results equal to open Bankart repairs if there are no significant structural bone deficits (engaging Hill-Sachs or inverted-pear Bankart lesions). (2) Patients with significant bone deficits as defined in this study are not candidates for arthroscopic Bankart repair. (3) Contact athletes without structural bone deficits may be treated by

  19. Arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation (ASA) versus open Latarjet to treat recurrent anterior shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: clinical comparison of two series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, R; Della Rotonda, G; Cautiero, F; Ciccarelli, M; Maiotti, M; Massoni, C; Di Pietto, F; Zappia, M

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss is still debated. The purpose of this study is to compare short-term results of two techniques treating chronic shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: bone block according to open Latarjet-Patte procedure and arthroscopic Bankart repair in association with subscapularis augmentation. Ninety-one patients with moderate anterior glenoid bone loss underwent from 2011 to 2015. From these patients, two groups of 20 individuals each have been selected. The groups were homogeneous in terms of age, gender, dominance and glenoid bone loss. In group A, an open Latarjet procedure has been performed, and in group B, an arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation has been performed. The mean follow-up in group A was 21 months (20-39 months), while in group B was 20 months (15-36 months). QuickDash score, Constant and Rowe shoulder scores, were used for evaluations of results. The mean preoperative rate of QuickDash score was 3.6 for group A and 4.0 for group B; Rowe Score was 50.0 for group A and 50.0 for group B. Preoperative mean Constant score was 56.2 for Latarjet-Patte and 55.2 for Bankart plus ASA. Postoperative mean QuickDash score was in group A 1.8 and 1.7 in group B; Rowe Score was 89.8 and 91.6; Constant Score was 93.3 and 93.8. No complications related to surgery have been observed for both procedures. Not statistically significant difference was reported between the two groups (p > .05). Postoperatively, the mean deficit of external rotation in ER1 was -9° in group A and -8 in group B; In ER2, the mean deficit was -5° in both groups (p = .0942). Arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation of Bankart repair is an effective procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss without any significant difference in comparison with the well-known open Latarjet procedure.

  20. Comparison between conventional MR arthrograhphy and abduction and external rotation MR arthrography in revealing tears of the antero-inferior glenoid labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Ah; Suh, Sang Il; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung Gyu; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Chang Hee

    2001-01-01

    To compare, in terms of their demonstration of tears of the anterior glenoid labrum, oblique axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's shoulder in the abduction and external rotation (ABER) position, with conventional axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's arm in the neutral position. MR arthrography of the shoulder, including additional oblique axial sequences with the patient in the ABER position, was performed in 30 patients with a clinical history of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. The degree of anterior glenoid labral tear or defect was evaluated in both the conventional axial and the ABER position by two radiologists. Decisions were reached by consensus, and a three-point scale was used: grade 1=normal; grade 2=probable tear, diagnosed when subtle increased signal intensity in the labrum was apparent; grade 3=definite tear/defect, when a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim or deficient labrum was present. The scores for each imaging sequence were averaged and to compare conventional axial and ABER position scans, Student's t test was performed. In 21 (70%) of 30 patients, the same degree of anterior instability was revealed by both imaging sequences. Eight (27%) had a lower grade in the axial position than in the ABER position, while one (3%) had a higher grade in the axial position. Three whose axial scan was grade 1 showed only equivocal evidence of tearing, but their ABER-position scan, in which a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim was present, was grade 3. The average grade was 2.5 (SD=0.73) for axial scans and 2.8 (SD=0.46) for the ABER position. The difference between axial and ABER-position scans was statistically significant (p<0.05). MR arthrography with the patient's shoulder in the ABER position is more efficient than conventional axial scanning in revealing the degree of tear or defect of the anterior glenoid labrum. When equivocal features are seen at

  1. Dental Implant Surgery

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    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  2. Eficácia da fixação direta do labrum na glenóide em lesão de Bankart provocada em laboratório e submetida a estresse Eficcacy study of labrum direct fixation on the glenoid in Bankart lesion produced in laboratory and sumitted to osteoarticular shcaring stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Sá Cavalcante Júnior

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A fixação direta do labrum na glenóide para corrigir a lesão de Bankart por via artroscópica na luxação recidivante do ombro, perdeu importância pelo elevado índice de recidiva da afecção e soltura de material. OBJETIVO: Demonstrar a eficácia da fixação direta do labrum na glenóide em lesão de Bankart. MÉTODOS: Foram dissecados 20 ombros de 10 cadáveres, e foram produzidas lesões de Bankart em todas as peças. Foram realizadas fixações diretas com parafusos modificados para tal em 10 ombros, e efetuadas fixações indiretas nos 10 ombros contra laterais com mini-âncoras e suturas dos labruns. As peças foram submetidas à tração até o esgotamento do sistema, em equipamentos de alta precisão. RESULTADOS: Os dois métodos de fixação suportaram em média 234 N de tração, sem apresentar arrancamento ou quebra de material. Provocando antes, lesão capsuloligamentar. CONCLUSÃO: O método de fixação direta apresenta eficácia semelhante ao método de fixação indireta.The arthroscopy direct fixation of the labrum the glenoid in order to correct the Bankart lesion in shoulder recurrent dislocation has lost its importance due to the high level of recurrence of the affection as well as implant loosening. OBJECTIVE: To show the efficacy of the direct fixation of the labrum to the glenoid in Bankart lesion. METHODS: 20 shoulders of 10 cadavers were dissected and Bankart lesions were produced in all specimens. The direct fixation was performed in 10 of the specimens using screws especially designed for this purpose and indirect fixation in the 10 contralateral shoulders by means of mini-anchors and labrum suturing. The specimens were submitted to traction until failure of the system en high-accuracy equipments. RESULTS: Both methods of fixation beared 234N forces of traction on average without loosening or breakage of the implants. Instead, we observed capsuloligamentary lesions. CONCLUSION: The direct fixation and the

  3. Bone fragment union and remodeling after arthroscopic bony bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability with a glenoid defect: influence on postoperative recurrence of instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Mae, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Although good clinical outcomes have been reported after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, the extent of bone union is still unclear. To investigate bone union after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair and its influence on postoperative recurrence of instability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 113 consecutive shoulders that underwent arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, postoperative evaluation of bone union by computed tomography (CT) was performed at various times in 81 shoulders. Bone union was investigated during 3 periods: 3 to 6 months postoperatively (first period), 7 to 12 months postoperatively (second period), and 13 months or more postoperatively (third period). The influence of the size of the preoperative glenoid defect and the size of the bone fragment on bone union was investigated, as well as the influence of bone union on postoperative recurrence of instability. In shoulders with bone union, bone fragment remodeling and changes in the glenoid defect size were also investigated. The bone union rate was 30.5% in the first period, 55.3% in the second period, and 84.6% in the third period. Among 53 shoulders with CT evaluation in the second period or later and follow-up for a minimum of 1 year, there was complete union in 33 shoulders (62.3%), partial union in 3 (5.7%), nonunion in 8 (15.1%), and no fragment on CT in 9 (17.0%). The complete union rate was 50% for 22 shoulders with small bone fragments (10%). The recurrence rate for postoperative instability was only 6.1% for shoulders with complete union, while it was 50% for shoulders with partial union, nonunion, no fragment, and no fragment on CT. The recurrence rate was significantly higher (36.4%) in shoulders with small fragments, but it was significantly lower in shoulders with bone union. In shoulders with bone union, the bone fragment frequently became larger over time, while the size of the glenoid defect decreased significantly from 18.6% preoperatively to 4.7% postoperatively. Bone

  4. Inter-observer agreement of CT measurement of the glenoid bone surface by the CT Pico method: Comparison with laser in a cadaveric model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, Massimo; Saba, Luca; Negrini, Giulio; Silva, Mario [University of Parma, Department of Radiology, Parma (Italy); Pedrazzi, Giuseppe [Universita di Parma, Department of Neuroscience. Unita di Biofisica e Fisica Medica - Plesso Biotecnologico Integrato, Parma (Italy); Pogliacomi, Francesco [University of Parma, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Parma (Italy); Castagna, Alessandro [Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Section of Orthopedic Surgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to test reproducibility of the CT Pico method in a cadaveric model and to compare CT Pico measurements with a high-precision laser probe for optical scanning. The glenoid surface of ten dried cadaveric scapulae (with intact surface) was measured by and high-precision laser probe for optical scanning, the latter being assumed as a reference standard. Measurements were done according to the Pico technique, using a circle-shaped region of interest (ROI) that was placed on the inferior glenoid rim. Measurements obtained using the CT Pico method (three readers) and with laser were compared to assess differences between radiological assessment and the reference standard. Each observer performed two repeated measurements from each scapulae (20 for each observer). Mean differences between laser measurements and each CT reader were 18.4 % (range, -4 to 61 %) for reader 1, 12.4 % (range, -15 to 64 %) for reader 2, and 11 % (range, -14 to 58 %) for reader 3. Considering all the 60 measurements made by the three readers, 39 measurements out of 60 (65 %) were outside the range [-5 %; +5 %] while 26 measurements (43 %) are outside the range [-10 %; +10 %]. The largest differences (positive and negative) were +64 and -14 %, respectively. Intra-operator reproducibility was high in most cases intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) =0.93, ICC = 0.91, ICC = 0.93 and Lin's Concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) = 0.92, CCC = 0.90, CCC = 0.92 for reader 1 to 3, respectively. However, in five cases the CT Pico measurements showed absolute differences between the first and second measurements that exceeded 10 %. The inter-observer variability for CT measurement of the glenoid surface using the CT Pico method was high when compared with laser, in the assessment of glenoid surface in cadaveric specimens, thus the CT Pico method is not reliable and could cause errors in the clinical management of the patient. Level of evidence. Level II, Development of

  5. The use of ultrasound in the assessment of the glenoid labrum of the glenohumeral joint. Part II: Examples of labral pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Krzyżanowski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Labral pathologies of the glenohumeral joint are most commonly caused by trauma. The majority of lesions affect the anterior part of labrum, resulting from much higher frequency of anterior shoulder dislocations over posterior ones. Another subgroup of labral lesions, not directly related to joint instability, are SLAP tears. Other findings include degenerative changes of labrum and paralabral cysts. Diagnostic imaging is crucial for making a decision regarding operative treatment. Apart from a standard X-ray examination, the imaging mainly relies on magnetic resonance or computed tomography arthrography. Based on their own experience, the authors propose the use of ultrasound in the assessment of labral tears of the glenohumeral joint. Different signs indicating labral pathology may be discovered and assessed during ultrasound examination. They include permanent displacement of the labrum onto the glenoid, labral instability during dynamic examination, lack of the labrum in the anatomical position, hypoechoic zone at the base of the labrum >2 mm in width, residual or swollen labrum as well as paralabral cyst(s. The most frequent appearance of labral pathology is displacement of the anteroinferior labrum onto the external aspect of the glenoid typically seen after anterior shoulder dislocation. The another most important US feature is labral instability while dynamically examined. The swelling or reduced size of the labrum usually indicates degeneration. This article presents sonographic images of selected labral pathologies.

  6. Implantation metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picraux, S.T.

    1975-01-01

    Important changes in the near-surface physical properties of metals were obtained by high-fluence ion implantation. Recently there have been an increasing number of studies of the behavior of implanted species with the aim of understanding the detailed physical processes that occur in an implanted metal layer. A key aspect of these implantation metallurgy studies has been the ability to form uniquely controlled systems in the near-surface regions of metals that can be studied with accurate depth resolution. Metallurgical parameters that may be difficult or impossible to obtain by other means can be measured. Also, parameters that depend on the implantation process, due to the athermal introduction of atoms and defects can be determined. Thus the dual objective of implantation metallurgy is to obtain information to improve understanding of the microscopic aspects of metallurgy and to understand how to form controlled new metallurgical systems. Examples of parameters studied include implanted impurity location, diffusion, enhanced diffusion, solubility, precipitation, and dissolution. (auth)

  7. Cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made up of a microphone/receiver, a speech processor, and an antenna. This part of the implant ... ear. This sound is sent to a speech processor, which is most often connected to the microphone ...

  8. Delaying Shoulder Motion and Strengthening and Increasing Achilles Allograft Thickness for Glenoid Resurfacing Did Not Improve the Outcome for a 30-Year-Old Patient with Postarthroscopic Glenohumeral Chondrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although interposition soft-tissue (biologic resurfacing of the glenoid with humeral hemiarthroplasty has been considered an option for end-stage glenohumeral arthritis, the results of this procedure are highly unsatisfactory in patients less than 40 years old. Achilles tendon allograft is popular for glenoid resurfacing because it can be made robust by folding it. But one reason that the procedure might fail in younger patients is that the graft is not initially thick enough for the young active patient. Most authors report folding the graft only once to achieve two-layer thickness. We report the case of a 30-year-old male who had postarthroscopic glenohumeral chondrolysis that was treated with Achilles tendon allograft resurfacing of the glenoid and humeral hemiarthroplasty. An important aspect of our case is that the tendon was folded so that it was 50–100% thicker than most allograft constructs reported previously. We also used additional measures to enhance allograft resiliency and bone incorporation: (1 multiple nonresorbable sutures to attach the adjacent graft layers, (2 additional resorbable suture anchors and nonresorbable sutures in order to more robustly secure the graft to the glenoid, and (3 delaying postoperative motion and strengthening. However, despite these additional measures, our patient did not have an improved outcome.

  9. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

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    ... To Health Topics / Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Also known as What Is an Implantable Cardioverter ... pacemakers and defibrillators. Comparison of an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator and a Pacemaker The image compares an ICD ...

  10. Breast reconstruction - implants

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    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to close the skin flaps. Breast reconstruction with implants is usually done in two stages, or surgeries. ...

  11. Cochlear Implants

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    ... For young children who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing, using a cochlear implant while they are young exposes them to sounds during an optimal period to develop speech and language skills. Research has shown that when these children receive ...

  12. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  13. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  14. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    Underlying ion-beam modification of surfaces is the more basic subject of particle-surface interaction. The ideas can be grouped into forward and backward features, i.e. those affecting the interior of the target and those leading to particle expulsion. Forward effects include the stopping of the incident particles and the deposition of energy, both governed by integral equations which are easily set up but difficult to solve. Closely related is recoil implantation where emphasis is placed not on the stopping of the incident particles but on their interaction with target atoms with resulting implantation of these atoms. Backward effects, all of which are denoted as sputtering, are in general either of collisional, thermal, electronic, or exfoliational origin. (Auth.)

  15. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss. In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  16. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  17. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  18. Arthroscopic Versus Open Latarjet in the Treatment of Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Dislocation With Marked Glenoid Bone Loss: A Prospective Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiming; Jiang, Chunyan; Song, Guanyang

    2017-06-01

    Very few studies have compared open Latarjet versus arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. To compare the clinical and computed tomographic outcomes between open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A prospective, comparative study was performed. The open Latarjet group included 44 patients, and the arthroscopic Latarjet group included 46 patients. All patients had more than 2 years of clinical follow-up (range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] score, Constant-Murley score, and Rowe score). The position of the transferred coracoid, the screw orientation, and graft resorption were evaluated on computed tomography (CT) scan. The surgery time for the open group was significantly shorter than that for the arthroscopic group ( P = .003). No recurrent dislocation occurred in either group. The apprehension test was negative in all patients in both groups. At the final follow-up, no significant difference was detected between the open group and the arthroscopic group regarding any of the clinical outcome measurements. The transferred coracoid graft was level with the glenoid in all patients in both groups. The open group had better position in the superior-inferior direction compared with the arthroscopic group ( P Latarjet group showed notably less graft resorption compared with patients in the open Latarjet group.

  19. Individual titanium zygomatic implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Ryabov, K. N.; Avdeev, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    Custom individual implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to better qualitative characteristics over their generic counterparts – plates, which should be bent according to patient needs. The Additive Manufacturing of individual implants allows reducing cost and improving quality of implants. In this paper, the authors describe design of zygomatic implant models based on computed tomography (CT) data. The fabrication of the implants will be carried out with 3D printing by selective laser melting machine SLM 280HL.

  20. Resultados da cirurgia de latarjet no tratamento da instabilidade anterior traumática do ombro associada à erosão óssea da cavidade glenoidal - seguimento mínimo de um ano Results from latarjet surgery for treating traumatic anterior shoulder instability associated with bone erosion in the glenoid cavity, after minimum follow-up of one year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yukio Ikemoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o resultado da cirurgia de Latarjet para pacientes com luxação recidivante anterior do ombro com perda óssea maior que 25% da cavidade glenoidal. MÉTODO: Avaliamos 26 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia de Latarjet. O tempo médio de seguimento foi de 38 meses e a média etária, de 28 anos. Os pacientes foram avaliados quanto à amplitude de movimento e pelas escalas de Rowe e UCLA, no período pré-operatório como no período pós-operatório, radiografias do ombro para avaliar a presença de artrose, posição e consolidação do enxerto e posicionamento dos parafusos. A análise estatística foi utilizada para avaliar se haveria relação entre o número de episódios de luxação, presença de artrose, correlação entre artrose e limitação da rotação lateral. Comparar a diferença entre o arco de movimento do lado operado com o não acometido e avaliação funcional pré e pós-operatória das escalas de UCLA e Rowe. RESULTADOS: A elevação e rotação lateral foram estatisticamente inferiores do lado operado. A escala de UCLA e a de Rowe mostrou uma melhora estatisticamente significante dos resultados clínico-funcionais (P OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the results from the Latarjet procedure in patients with anterior recurrent dislocation of the shoulder who present bone loss of the glenoid cavity greater than 25%. METHODS: Twenty six male patients underwent the Latarjet procedure, The bone loss was evaluated by means of radiography using the Bernageau view and by means of CAT scan. The patients were evaluated with regard to range of motion, using the Rowe and UCLA scales, before and after the operation, and by radiographs to assess the presence of arthrosis, position and consolidation of the graft and positioning of the screws. Statistical analysis was used to assess whether there was any relationship between the number of episodes of dislocation and the presence of arthrosis, , and any relationship between arthrosis and

  1. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... differ in material and consistency, however. Saline breast implants Saline implants are filled with sterile salt water. ... of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with silicone gel — ...

  2. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  3. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007370.htm Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is a device that detects any life- ...

  4. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000108.htm Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is a device that detects a life- ...

  5. About Implantable Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a tube was inserted, and get a new contraceptive implant on schedule or switch to another method ... STDs. Possible Side Effects Young women who get contraceptive implants might notice such side effects as: irregular ...

  6. Urinary incontinence - collagen implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007373.htm Urinary incontinence - injectable implant To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to ...

  7. Moessbauer spectroscopy of implanted sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niesen, L.

    1983-01-01

    A review is given of the field of Moessbauer spectroscopy of ion-implanted sources. After an introduction to the various aspects of the ion-implantation method, the following topics are treated: final site selection of implanted impurities; trapping of defects at implanted ions; on-line implantation; implantation in metals, semiconductors and insulators. (Auth.)

  8. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  9. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION: MY EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implant is a small, surgically implanted complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss, typically involves damage to hair cells in the cochlea, as a result sound cannot reach the auditory nerve which usually receives information from hair cells. A cochlear implant skips the damaged hair cells and to stimulate the auditory nerve directly. An implant does not rest...

  10. Diagnostic Imaging for Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M Mallya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants are a popular modality for permanent tooth replacement. The key to successful implant placement, its subsequent osseointegration and the final prosthetic rehabilitation is proper preoperative assessment. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the pre- and post-surgical evaluation process. Imaging is used to evaluate suitability of implant sites, aid in selection of appropriate implants, and finally evaluate implant placement and osseointegration. This article reviews the role of diagnostic imaging in the various phases and the advantages and limitations of the numerous imaging modalities.

  11. Is reverse total shoulder arthroplasty a feasible treatment option for failed shoulder arthroplasty? A retrospective study of 44 cases with special regards to stemless and stemmed primary implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschen, M; Franetzki, B; Witt, K-A; Liem, D; Steinbeck, J

    2017-08-01

    Is reverse total shoulder arthroplasty a feasible treatment option for failed shoulder arthroplasty? A retrospective study of 44 cases with special regards to stemless and stemmed primary implants. Due to humeral or glenoid bone-loss and rotator cuff insufficiency reverse total shoulder arthroplasty often means the only remaining treatment option in revision shoulder arthroplasty. This study investigates the clinical outcome of patients treated with a reverse total shoulder in revision cases with special regard to stemless and stemmed primary implants. From 2010 to 2012 60 failed shoulder arthroplasties were converted to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Forty-four patients were available for follow-up after a mean of 24 months. Patients were assessed with X-rays, Constant- and ASES Score and a questionnaire about their subjective satisfaction. The total number of observed complications was seven (16%). Ninety-eight percent of the patients were satisfied with their clinical result. Patients achieved a mean normalized constant score of 70.2% and a mean ASES Score of 65.3. Patients with stemless primary implants achieved a higher normalized constant score than patients with stemmed primary implants (82 vs. 61.8%; p = 0009). Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty provides satisfactory clinical results and a high patient satisfaction in revision shoulder arthroplasty. The complication rate needs to be considered and discussed with the patient prior to surgery. Presence or absence of a stem of revised shoulder arthroplasties interferes with the outcome. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE IV: (Retrospective study).

  12. HA-Coated Implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Bechtold, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    The goal of osseointegration of orthopedic and dental implants is the rapid achievement of a mechanically stable and long lasting fixation between living bone and the implant surface. In total joint replacements of cementless designs, coatings of calcium phosphates were introduced as a means...... of improving the fixation of implants. Of these, hydroxyapatite (HA) is the most widely used and most extensively investigated. HA is highly osseoconductive, and the positive effect is well documented in both basic and long-term clinical research [1–6]. This chapter describes experimental and clinical studies...... evaluating bone-implant fixation with HA coatings....

  13. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  14. Antimicrobial coatings for implant surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brunetto, Priscilla S.; Fromm, Katharina M.

    2008-01-01

    Body-foreign materials are used more and more frequently in our lives: joint implants (hips, knees, fingers, etc.), catheters, pacemakers, dental and aesthetic implants, etc. The increasing numbers of patients requiring such implants also raises the absolute numbers of implant-related infections. Thus, it is known that body-foreign materials are prone to bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, either via bacterial debris on implant materials, infections during implantation or, la...

  15. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  16. Peri-Implant Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dentists about How Often They Floss Their Teeth Oral Hygiene Habits and Hypertension Risk Alcohol Consumption and Gum ... peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor ... tooth. With a proper oral health routine, your dental implant can last a ...

  17. Biocompatible implant surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash Pattanaik

    2012-01-01

    Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  18. Ion implantation into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    The graphitization and the change to amorphous state of diamond surface layer by ion implantation and its characteristics are reported. In the diamond surface, into which more than 10 16 ions/cm 2 was implanted, the diamond crystals are broken, and the structure changes to other carbon structure such as amorphous state or graphite. Accompanying this change of structure, the electric conductivity of the implanted layer shows two discontinuous values due to high resistance and low resistance. This control of structure can be done by the temperature of the base during the ion implantation into diamond. Also it is referred to that by the base temperature during implantation, the mutual change of the structure between amorphous state and graphite can be controlled. The change of the electric resistance and the optical characteristics by the ion implantation into diamond surface, the structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy, and the control of the structure of the implanted layer by the base temperature during implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  19. HA-Coated Implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Bechtold, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    The goal of osseointegration of orthopedic and dental implants is the rapid achievement of a mechanically stable and long lasting fixation between living bone and the implant surface. In total joint replacements of cementless designs, coatings of calcium phosphates were introduced as a means...

  20. Dynamic ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, I.F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Dynamic Ion Implantation Technique consists of ion implantation of a film during the film-deposition process. This technique was investigated theoretically and experimentally with ions whose incident energy is of the order of a few times 100 keV. It was found to be a viable alternative low-temperature method for the preparation of thick zirconium nitride films (∼1 μm) with good mechanical properties. Theoretical modeling of the processes involved during dynamic ion implantation lead to analytical expressions for the ions' depth-profile distributions. Numerical evaluations of these equations indicated that the depth distributions of dynamically implanted ions are in general more uniform than those predicted by the model for ions implanted by more conventional techniques. Mechanical properties of stoichiometric RF sputter-deposited zirconium nitride films post implanted with krypton and rubidium ions were investigated. Scratch-adhesion critical load and Vickers microhardness of samples implanted with doses varying from 1 x 10 15 to 5 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 and energies ranging from 300 to 500 keV were studied. In general, best mechanical properties were observed for 300- keV krypton implantations

  1. Maintenance in dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Póvoa Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In implants, maintenance is a decisive factor for obtaining success when implant supported overdentures and dentures are used. The present stud presents, a clinical case of a patient, a 70 year-old white man, with a completely edentulous mandibular alveolar ridge, severe bone resorption with presence of basal bone only, and absence of vestibule. Initially, treatment consisted of the placement of a mandibular overdenture, supported on three implants in the anterior inter-foramen region, as the left implant was transfixed in the basal bone of 2 to 3 millimeters. Eleven years later, another two implants were placed in the anterior area and an immediate load was performed up to the first molars, for the placement of an implant supported fixed. Throughout the entire treatment, meticulous maintenance was carried out, with follow-up for fourteen years, interrupted by the patient’s death. From the third month after the opening the three implants initially placed, the presence of keratinized mucosa, definition of the vestibule, maturation of the alveolar ridge and bone formation in the mento region were observed. It was concluded that good planning, allied to mastery of the technique and adequate maintenance were the prerequisites necessary for obtaining favorable results, success of the present case, and for the patient to have a better quality of life.

  2. Implants in the hand; Implantate der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanivenhaus, A. [Medizinische Universitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Increasingly, implants in the region of hand joints and the wrist represent an alternative for the treatment of post-traumatic, inflamed, or degenerative joint damage. The diversity of hand functions also results in varied solutions, which are effective in their stability, mobility, and distraction. Different materials are necessary for this, and they require subtile radiological control. The native X-ray represents the substantial method to observe migration of the implants. Each interface between titanium, ceramic, zirconium, pyrocarbon, and silicon to the bone has to be assessed differently in order to obtain a relevant statement. The finger joints and to a limited extent the wrist represent the artificial joints with limited alternative therapy. Other implants in the hand should only be applied after strict indication and patient compliance, as arthrodesis and resection arthroplasty have shown very good long-term results. (orig.) [German] Implantate im Bereich der Gelenke der Hand und des Handgelenks stellen zunehmend Alternativen bei der Versorgung posttraumatischer, entzuendlicher oder degenerativer Gelenkschaeden dar. Die Vielfalt der Handfunktionen fuehrt auch zu unterschiedlichen Loesungen, die durch Stabilitaet, Mobilitaet und Distraktion wirksam werden. Dafuer sind unterschiedliche Materialien erforderlich, die eine subtile radiologische Kontrolle erfordern. Das Nativroentgen stellt das wesentlichste Verfahren zur Verlaufsbeobachtung von Implantaten dar. Das Interface zwischen Titan, Keramik, Zirkonium, Pyrokarbon und Silikon zum Knochen muss unterschiedlich bewertet werden, um relevante Aussagen treffen zu koennen. Die Fingergelenke und in begrenztem Ausmass auch das Handgelenk stellen Kunstgelenke mit geringen Alternativtherapiemoeglichkeiten dar. Die uebrigen Implantate der Hand sollten nur bei strenger Indikationsstellung und hoher Patientencompliance Anwendung finden, da Arthrodese oder Resektionsarthroplastik gute Langzeitresultate aufweisen. (orig.)

  3. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  4. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  5. Radiology of Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ekrish, Asma'a Abdurrahman

    2018-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the goal of imaging at each stage of implant therapy and the usefulness and limitations of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in achieving those goals. Various MDCT protocols of use in implant imaging also are presented, with an emphasis on dose reduction and the use of iterative reconstruction techniques. Also discussed are options for viewing and analysis of CT images, issues related to appropriate image reformatting and interpretation, interactive treatment planning, and transfer of information from the images to the surgical field during implant surgery using surgical guides and CT-guided navigation systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dealing with dental implant failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options.When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  7. Precipitation processes in implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is a nonequilibrium process. It is possible to implant materials with impurities to concentration levels which exceed the solid solubilities. The return of the system to thermodynamic equilibrium is often accomplished by precipitation of the implanted species or a compound involving atoms of both the host and the implanted species. This may involve long time scales when taking place at room temperature or it may take place during the implantation

  8. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible.

  9. Recent advances in dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Do Gia Khang; Oh, Ji-hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Dental implants are a common treatment for the loss of teeth. This paper summarizes current knowledge on implant surfaces, immediate loading versus conventional loading, short implants, sinus lifting, and custom implants using three-dimensional printing. Most of the implant surface modifications showed good osseointegration results. Regarding biomolecular coatings, which have been recently developed and studied, good results were observed in animal experiments. Immediate loading had similar c...

  10. The implantable artificial kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissell, William H; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    The confluence of an increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), clinical trial data suggestive of benefit from quotidian dialysis, and ongoing cost/benefit reanalysis of healthcare spending have stimulated interest in technological improvements in provision of ESRD care. For the last decade, our group has focused on enabling technologies that would permit a paradigm shift in dialysis care similar to that brought by implantable defibrillators to arrhythmia management. Two significant barriers to wearable or implantable dialysis persist: package size of the dialyzer and water requirements for preparation of dialysate. Decades of independent research into highly efficient membranes and cell-based bioreactors culminated in a team effort to develop an implantable version of the University of Michigan Renal Assist Device. In this review, the rationale for the design of the implantable artificial kidney is described.

  11. Wireless cortical implantable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Majidzadeh Bafar, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Cortical Implantable Systems examines the design for data acquisition and transmission in cortical implants. The first part of the book covers existing system-level cortical implants, as well as future devices. The authors discuss the major constraints in terms of microelectronic integration. The second part of the book focuses on system-level as well as circuit and system level solutions to the development of ultra low-power and low-noise microelectronics for cortical implants. Existing solutions are presented and novel methods and solutions proposed. The third part of the book focuses on the usage of digital impulse radio ultra wide-band transmission as an efficient method to transmit cortically neural recorded data at high data-rate to the outside world. Original architectural and circuit and system solutions are discussed.

  12. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Orthopaedic Surgeons Information about Soft Tissue Imaging and Metal Ion Testing Information for All Health Care Professionals who Provide Treatment to Patients with a Metal-on-Metal Hip Implant Metal-on-Metal Hip ...

  13. [Implant supported prostheses (1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río Highsmith, J; López Lozano, J F

    1988-11-01

    In the present article deals with a number of general considerations in the realization of prostheses over endosseous implants. The different principles to study in the construction of a fixed protesic rehabilitation implanto-supported are analyzed.

  14. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What you can expect Breast reconstruction begins with placement of a breast implant or tissue expander, either at the time of your mastectomy surgery (immediate reconstruction) or during a later procedure (delayed reconstruction). ...

  15. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  16. Risks of Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them or to undergo additional reconstructive surgery. Photo courtesy of Walter Peters, Ph.D., M.D., F. ... placement of silicone gel-filled breast implants. Photo courtesy of Walter Peters, Ph.D., M.D., F. ...

  17. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Studies of complications following reconstructive surgery with implants among women with breast cancer are needed. As the, to our knowledge, first prospective long-term study we evaluated the occurrence of complications following delayed breast reconstruction separately for one- and two......-stage procedures. From the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast, which has prospectively registered data for women undergoing breast implantations since 1999, we identified 559 women without a history of radiation therapy undergoing 592 delayed breast reconstructions following breast cancer during...... of reoperation was significantly higher following the one-stage procedure. For both procedures, the majority of reoperations were due to asymmetry or displacement of the implant. In conclusion, non-radiated one- and two-stage delayed breast implant reconstructions are associated with substantial risks...

  18. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  19. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placeme...

  20. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  1. Ion implantation - an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Ion implantation is a widely used technique with a literature that covers semiconductor production, surface treatments of steels, corrosion resistance, catalysis and integrated optics. This brief introduction outlines advantages of the technique, some aspects of the underlying physics and examples of current applications. Ion implantation is already an essential part of semiconductor technology while in many other areas it is still in an early stage of development. The future scope of the subject is discussed. (author)

  2. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome.

  3. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  4. Plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.R.; Forest, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors' technique allows the ion implantation to be performed directly within the ion source at higher currents without ion beam extraction and transport. The potential benefits include greatly increased production rates (factors of 10-1000) and the ability to implant non-planar targets without rastering or shadowing. The technique eliminates the ion extractor grid set, beam raster equipment, drift space and target manipulator equipment. The target to be implanted is placed directly within the plasma source and is biased to a large negative potential so that plasma ions gain energy as they accelerate through the potential drop across the sheath that forms at the plasma boundary. Because the sheath surrounds the target on all sides, all surfaces of the target are implanted without the necessity to raster the beam or to rotate the target. The authors have succeeded in implanting nitrogen ions in a silicon target to the depths and concentrations required for surface treatment of materials like stainless steel and titanium alloys. They have performed ESCA measurements of the penetration depth profile of a silicon target that was biased to 30 kV in a nitrogen discharge plasma. Nitrogen ions were implanted to a depth of 700A at a peak concentration of 30% atomic. The measured profile is quite similar to a previously obtained profile in titanium targets with conventional techniques

  5. Contraceptive implants: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowlands S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sam Rowlands,1,2 Stephen Searle3 1Centre of Postgraduate Medical Research and Education, School of Health and Social Care, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 2Dorset HealthCare, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 3Sexual Health Services, Chesterfield, United KingdomAbstract: Progestin-only contraceptive implants are a highly cost-effective form of long-acting reversible contraception. They are the most effective reversible contraceptives and are of a similar effectiveness to sterilization. Pregnancies are rare in women using this method of contraception, and those that do occur must be fully investigated, with an ultrasound scan of the arm and serum etonogestrel level if the implant cannot be located. There are very few contraindications to use of implants, and they have an excellent safety profile. Both acceptability and continuation with the method are high. Noncontraceptive benefits include improvements in dysmenorrhea, ovulatory pain, and endometriosis. Problematic bleeding is a relatively common adverse effect that must be covered in preinsertion information-giving and supported adequately if it occurs. Recognized training for both insertion and removal should be undertaken. Care needs to be taken at both insertion and removal to avoid neurovascular injury. Implants should always be palpable; if they are not, noninsertion should be assumed until disproven. Etonogestrel implants are now radiopaque, which aids localization. Anticipated difficult removals should be performed by specially trained experts. Keywords: contraceptive, subdermal implant, etonogestrel, levonorgestrel, progestin-only, long-acting reversible contraception

  6. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  7. Short dental implants: an emerging concept in implant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashedi, Ashwaq Ali; Taiyeb Ali, Tara Bai; Yunus, Norsiah

    2014-06-01

    Short implants have been advocated as a treatment option in many clinical situations where the use of conventional implants is limited. This review outlines the effectiveness and clinical outcomes of using short implants as a valid treatment option in the rehabilitation of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges. Initially, an electronic search was performed on the following databases: Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and DARE using key words from January 1990 until May 2012. An additional hand search was included for the relevant articles in the following journals: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, International Journal of Periodontics, Journal of Periodontology, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Any relevant papers from the journals' references were hand searched. Articles were included if they provided detailed data on implant length, reported survival rates, mentioned measures for implant failure, were in the English language, involved human subjects, and researched implants inserted in healed atrophic ridges with a follow-up period of at least 1 year after implant-prosthesis loading. Short implants demonstrated a high rate of success in the replacement of missing teeth in especially atrophic alveolar ridges. The advanced technology and improvement of the implant surfaces have encouraged the success of short implants to a comparable level to that of standard implants. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials and prospective studies with longer follow-up periods are needed.

  8. BAHA implant: implantation technique and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, N; Hemar, P; Schultz, P; Charpiot, A; Debry, C

    2014-02-01

    BAHA implants have been shown to be effective in certain forms of conductive hearing loss, but the presence of the titanium abutment is responsible for sometimes severe skin reactions. The objective of this study was to compare two operative techniques: skin flap, and full-thickness skin graft. Between January 2004 and January 2011, 72 patients were treated by BAHA implant and 32 of these patients (total of 41 implants) were included in the study. Two surgical techniques were used: full-thickness skin graft (n=21) and skin flap (n=20). Four types of skin complications were observed: necrosis, inflammation/infection, hypertrophic scar, and fixture loss due to inadequate osseointegration. Complications requiring surgical revision were observed in 20% of cases with the skin flap method and 38% of cases with the skin graft technique, with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.31). The skin graft technique appears to be associated with a higher rate of major complications. The most common complication is hypertrophic scar. The apparently high complication rate in this series can be explained by a selection bias (exclusion of a large number of complication-free patients). Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. New dental implant selection criterion based on implant design

    OpenAIRE

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; El-Zawahry, Mohamed M.; Ibraheem, Eman M.; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; ElGabry, Hisham

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A comparative study between threaded and plain dental implant designs was performed to find out a new criterion for dental implant selection. Materials and Methods: Several dental implant designs with a systematic increase in diameter and length were positioned in a cylindrical-shaped bone section and analyzed using finite element method. Four loading types were tested on different dental implant designs; tension of 50 N, compression of 100 N, bending of 20 N, and torque of 2 Nm, t...

  10. Implant isotopy (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, G

    1995-01-01

    Because nature has given humans from 14 to 16 teeth per arch, the author maintains that an implantologist ought to replace each missing tooth with an implant and calls this philosophical creed "implant isotopy". Three different prosthetic solutions are suggested for the cases of either complete or partially edentulous arches, where from 12 to 14 abutments are emerging from the gingiva. The first type consists of parallel protruding posts. The second type is a modification of the first method through the connection of all the posts (although they are not perfectly parallel) via a titanium wire-drawn bar to be welded via endoral welding. Finally, the third type consists of a laboratory cast titanium denture composed of different sections that can be connected to one another and to the implant abutments via endoral welding.

  11. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Complications in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Ayesha; Qureshi, Saima; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Rashid, Haroon

    2017-01-01

    After tooth loss, an individual may seek tooth replacement so that his/her function and esthetics could be restored. Clinical prosthodontics, during the past decade, has significantly improved and developed according to the advancements in the science and patient's demands and needs. Conventional options in prosthodontics for substituting a missing single tooth include the removable partial denture, partial and full coverage bridgework, and resin-bonded bridgework. Dental implants have gained increasing popularity over the years as they are capable of restoring the function to near normal in both partial and completely edentulous arches. With substantial evidence available, fixed implant-supported prosthesis are fully acknowledged as a reliable treatment option for the replacement of single or multiple missing teeth nowadays. While dental implants are increasingly becoming the choice of replacement for missing teeth, the impediments associated with them are progressively emerging too.

  13. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  14. [Tinnitus and implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despreaux, G; Tison, P; Van Den Abbeele, T; Moine, A; Frachet, B

    1990-01-01

    The experience with cochlear implantation at Avicenne hospital prompted us to carry out a retrospective study on tinnitus in a population of operated patients. Improvement or disappearance of the symptoms was noted in all cases. These results, which partly match those found in the literature, are probably produced by rehabilitation inhibiting the "deafferentation" mechanisms in analogy with pain phenomena. In some precise cases, which are described, they led us to proposing implantation even though the main, if not sole, complaint of the patient was tinnitus.

  15. Osseointegration of Immediate Transalveolar Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Yoel González Beriau; Eduardo Enrique Castillo Betancourt; Bienvenido Mesa Reinaldo

    2016-01-01

    Background: osseointegration is critical to start prosthetic rehabilitation. Objective: to describe osseointegration of immediate transalveolar implants. Methods: a prospective case series study was conducted from January 2012 to December 2013. It included all patients (75 patients with 79 implants) who attended the Prosthodontics service. Age, sex, osseointegration, cause of tooth loss, region of the implant, specific tooth, bone level and keratinized gingiva around the implant, were the var...

  16. Recent advances in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Do Gia Khang; Oh, Ji-Hyeon

    2017-12-01

    Dental implants are a common treatment for the loss of teeth. This paper summarizes current knowledge on implant surfaces, immediate loading versus conventional loading, short implants, sinus lifting, and custom implants using three-dimensional printing. Most of the implant surface modifications showed good osseointegration results. Regarding biomolecular coatings, which have been recently developed and studied, good results were observed in animal experiments. Immediate loading had similar clinical outcomes compared to conventional loading and can be used as a successful treatment because it has the advantage of reducing treatment times and providing early function and aesthetics. Short implants showed similar clinical outcomes compared to standard implants. A variety of sinus augmentation techniques, grafting materials, and alternative techniques, such as tilted implants, zygomatic implants, and short implants, can be used. With the development of new technologies in three-dimension and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) customized implants can be used as an alternative to conventional implant designs. However, there are limitations due to the lack of long-term studies or clinical studies. A long-term clinical trial and a more predictive study are needed.

  17. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Theodor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term.

  18. Implant-abutment interface

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healing collars, abutments, transfer copings and analogs, which increases inventory costs and complexity. Limitations of external hex became more evident ..... 0.75mm or bone platform switching which involves an inward bone ring in the coronal part of the implant. 34 that is in continuity with the alveolar bone crest .

  19. Corrosion of bio implants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical stability, mechanical behaviour and biocompatibility in body fluids and tissues are the basic requirements for successful application of implant materials in bone fractures and replacements. Corrosion is one of the major processes affecting the life and service of orthopaedic devices made of metals and alloys used ...

  20. Remote actuated valve implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  1. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    is put on the low-energy implantation of metal ions causing the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in the shallow polymer layers. Electrical, optical and magnetic properties of metal/polymer composites are under the discussion and the approaches towards practical applications are overviewed....

  2. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  3. Allergy to Surgical Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Karin A

    2015-01-01

    Surgical implants have a wide array of therapeutic uses, most commonly in joint replacements, but also in repair of pes excavatum and spinal disorders, in cardiac devices (stents, patches, pacers, valves), in gynecological implants, and in dentistry. Many of the metals used are immunologically active, as are the methacrylates and epoxies used in conjunction with several of these devices. Allergic responses to surgical components can present atypically as failure of the device, with nonspecific symptoms of localized pain, swelling, warmth, loosening, instability, itching, or burning; localized rash is infrequent. Identification of the specific metal and cement components used in a particular implant can be difficult, but is crucial to guide testing and interpretation of results. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium remain the most common metals implicated in implant failure due to metal sensitization; methacrylate-based cements are also important contributors. This review will provide a guide on how to assess and interpret the clinical history, identify the components used in surgery, test for sensitization, and provide advice on possible solutions. Data on the pathways of metal-induced immune stimulation are included. In this setting, the allergist, the dermatologist, or both have the potential to significantly improve surgical outcomes and patient care. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Corrosion of bio implants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical stability, mechanical behaviour and biocompatibility in body fluids and tissues are the basic requirements for successful application of implant materials in ... and surface modification of stainless steel with bioceramic coatings are considered potential methods for improving the performance of orthopaedic devices.

  6. Remote actuated valve implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  7. Middle ear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Gangadhara Somayaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is becoming more common in the society living in cities with lot of background noise around, and frequent use of gadgets like mobile phones, MP3s, and IPods are adding to the problem. The loss may involve the conductive or perceptive pathway. Majority of the patients with conductive hearing loss will revert back to normal hearing levels with medical and/or surgical treatment. However, in sensorineural hearing loss, many factors are involved in the management. Though traditionally hearing aids in various forms are the most commonly used modality in managing these patients, there are some drawbacks associated with them. Implantable middle ear amplifiers represent the most recent breakthrough in the management of hearing loss. Middle ear implants are surgically implanted electronic devices that aim to correct hearing loss by stimulating the ossicular chain or middle ear. Of late, they are also being used in the management of congenital conductive hearing loss and certain cases of chronic otitis media with residual hearing loss. The article aims to provide general information about the technology, indications and contraindications, selection of candidates, available systems, and advantages of middle ear implants. (MEI

  8. Effect of cochlear implant technology in sequentially bilaterally implanted adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budenz, Cameron L; Roland, J Thomas; Babb, James; Baxter, Peter; Waltzman, Susan B

    2009-09-01

    Bilateral sequential cochlear implantation outcomes are dependent on many different factors. Newer technology in the second implanted ear may also contribute to outcome. This study examines the effect of cochlear implant technology on speech recognition outcomes in a population of adult patients who have undergone bilateral sequential implantation using different technologies in each ear. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary referral center. Twenty adults who underwent bilateral sequential cochlear implantation with different technologies and processing strategies in each ear were patients for this study. Control Group A included patients (n = 8) who were simultaneously implanted, and Control Group B (n = 3) were patients who were sequentially implanted with the same technology. Bilateral sequential cochlear implantation. The outcome measure was the Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant monosyllabic word test administered in each implanted ear and in the binaural condition before and 1 year after operation. A multivariate analysis was performed to account for factors including duration of deafness, length of device usage, and severity of deafness. There was significant improvement from before to 1 year after the operation in word scores for the individual ears and in the binaural condition for all groups. All patients were consistent users of both devices, and the use of different technology in the second implanted ear did not affect the patients' ability to benefit from bilateral implantation despite the use of different devices and processing strategies. Bilateral sequential implantation with newer and/or differing technology in the second implanted ear did not reduce the benefits of bilateral stimulation and should not be considered a deterrent to second-sided implantation.

  9. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analyses of fractured implant fixture after prolonged implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Han-Cheol; Lee, June-Kyu; Chung, Chae-Heon

    2004-07-01

    Although fortunately rare, fracture of implants causes significant problems for both clinicians and patients. The major cause of a fractured implant may be corrosion fatigue fracture. To investigate how to increase the fatigue life and corrosion resistance of dental implants, the surface morphology of six Steri-Oss fractured implants was analyzed. The period of implantation after loading in patient jaws varied between 23 months and 37 months. The topography and surface chemical composition were studied with electron probe micro-analysis (point mapping, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy) and field emission scanning electron microscopy. All samples were fractured at the screw root and the crest formed a keen-edged shape. The five samples were fractured at the first thread of the fixture and one sample at the third thread of fixture. The fatigue cracks were mainly nucleated and grown at scratches occurring for the screw root and crest formation and the cervix portion of the implant having a small curvature. The pits were nucleated in the vicinity of inclusions such as SiO2 and corrosion fatigue cracking was predominantly propagated. Corrosion products were found on the opposite side of the starting point of corrosion fatigue crack. From observations of fatigue striations, it is possible to predict the life time of fractured implants and estimate the cleavage fracture and dimple fracture of implants. In this study, analysis of fractured surfaces revealed the characteristics of the implant materials, problems of design, fatigue life, and manufacturing process. In order to protect against corrosion fatigue fractures and prolong the fatigue life of dental implants, we must consider the implant design, implant manufacturing, and surface treatment of the implant materials.

  11. [Implantable middle ear hearing aids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    à Wengen, D F

    2004-01-01

    Conventional acoustic hearing aids are limited in their performance. Due to physical laws their amplification of sound is limited to within 5 kHz. However, the frequencies between 5 and 10 kHz are essential for understanding consonants. Words can only be understood correctly if their consonants can be understood. Furthermore noise amplification remains a problem with hearing aids. Other problems consist of recurrent infections of the external auditory canal, intolerance for occlusion of the ear canal, feedback noise, and resonances in speech or singing. Implantable middle ear hearing aids like the Soundbridge of Symphonix-Siemens and the MET of Otologics offer improved amplification and a more natural sound. Since the first implantation of a Soundbridge in Switzerland in 1996 almost one thousand patients have been implanted worldwide. The currents systems are semi-implantable. The external audio processor containing the microphone, computer chip, battery and radio system is worn in the hair bearing area behind the ear. Implantation is only considered after unsuccessful fitting of conventional hearing aids. In Switzerland the cost for these implantable hearing aids is covered by social insurances. Initially the cost for an implant is higher than for hearing aids. However, hearing aids need replacement every 5 or 6 years whereas implants will last 20 to 30 years. Due to the superior sound quality and the improved understanding of speech in noise, the number of patients with implantable hearing aids will certainly increase in the next years. Other middle ear implants are in clinical testing.

  12. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    2007-01-01

      Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  13. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  14. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies.

  15. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Letícia Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration.

  16. Ion implantation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vook, F.L.

    1977-02-01

    The application of ion beams to metals is rapidly emerging as a promising area of research and technology. This report briefly describes some of the recent advances in the modification and study of the basic properties of metals by ion implantation techniques. Most of the research discussed illustrates some of the new and exciting applications of ion beams to metals which are under active investigation at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque

  17. Modelling of Hand Implants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jírová, Jitka

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (1999), s. 67-78 ISSN 1509-409X. [Polish Scientific Conference Biomechanics 99 /4./. Polanica Zdrój, 08.09.1999-11.09.1999] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/96/0268; GA ČR GA103/97/0729 Keywords : wrist and finger joints implants biomechanics * numerical modelling * experimental research Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics

  18. Pleural implants of thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patan, D.; Danza, F.M.; Di Gregorio, F.

    1986-01-01

    Six observations of peculiar pleural implants completely separated from invasive thymomas (examined by conventional chest-x-ray and CT) were revoewed. CT was more effective than chest-x-ray; number, size and extent of plain film studies. Moreover CT provides a densitometric evaluation of the pleural pathology being useful in differential diagnosis. CT can also be helpful as a guide to needle biopsy

  19. Ion implantation in ices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G.A.; Palumbo, M.E.; Satorre, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied, by in situ infrared spectroscopy, some effects due to ion implantation in frozen ices. In particular mixtures containing C, N and O atoms (e.g., N 2 :H 2 O:CH 4 ) have been irradiated with unreactive (noble gases) ions: the resulting alteration of the frozen sample induces the formation of other molecules (e.g., CO 2 , R- - -OCN, CO and HCN) and of a refractory organic residue. Similar products are formed when mixtures containing only C and O atoms (e.g., H 2 O:CH 4 ) are irradiated with N ions, i.e. molecular species that include the projectile are formed. These results are important, in particular for their applications to planetary physics. In planetary environments ice thickness is usually much larger than the penetration depth of the relevant ion populations (solar wind ions, magnetospheric particles, etc.) and ion implantation phenomena are expected. Our results indicate that some molecular species observed on icy planetary surfaces could not be native of that object but formed by ion irradiation and/or by implantation of reactive ions

  20. [Osseointegration and dental implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya

    2014-02-01

    The concept of osseointegration was developed and the term was coined Dr. Brånemark. Osseointegration is initially defined as the direct structural and functional connection between living bone and surface living bone and the surface of a loadbearing artificial implant, typically made of titanium. Osseointegration required new bone formation around fixture, the healing of implant system is similar to primary bone healing. Bone formation on the titanium surface needs the formation of oxide film, deposition of calcium phosphate, and deposition of the protein. However, osseointegration is not the direct bonding between bone and the titanium surface, there exists an amorphous layer including osteopontin or osteocalcin that osteoblasts use them as a scaffold. In clinical the ratio of bone and implant contacts is called as BIC, and BIC was from 40% to 60% if the osseointegration was obtained. Numerous studies were performed for the surface modification to increase the score of BIC. Recently, surface treatments such as glow discharge, acid-etch, or UV irradiation have been found to be effective for osseointegration. Further modification would be needed to maintain the osseointegration as well as to obtain the osseointegration.

  1. Primary partial humeral head resurfacing: outcomes with the HemiCAP implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Stephan J; Takara, Tad; Ho, Lance; Tibone, James E

    2015-03-01

    choice of the procedure. Three patients had postoperative complications unrelated to the implants, including a partial rotator cuff tear treated with physical therapy, preexisting glenoid wear treated with arthroscopic debridement and microfracture, and infection complicated by subscapularis rupture requiring several subsequent surgical procedures but with retention of the implant. Humeral head inlay arthroplasty is effective in providing pain relief, functional improvement, and patient satisfaction. Rather than delaying shoulder arthroplasty to end-stage osteoarthritis, humeral head inlay arthroplasty is a promising new direction in primary shoulder arthroplasty for younger and active patients with earlier stage disease. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. New dental implant selection criterion based on implant design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I; El-Zawahry, Mohamed M; Ibraheem, Eman M; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; ElGabry, Hisham

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study between threaded and plain dental implant designs was performed to find out a new criterion for dental implant selection. Several dental implant designs with a systematic increase in diameter and length were positioned in a cylindrical-shaped bone section and analyzed using finite element method. Four loading types were tested on different dental implant designs; tension of 50 N, compression of 100 N, bending of 20 N, and torque of 2 Nm, to derive design curves. Better stress distribution on both spongy and cortical bone was noted with an increase in dental implant diameter and length. With the increase in dental implant side area, a stress reduction in the surrounding bones was observed, where threaded dental implants showed better behavior over the plain ones. Increasing value of ratio between dental implant side area and its cross-sectional area reduces stresses transferred to cortical and spongy bones. The use of implants with higher ratio of side area to cross-section area, especially with weak jaw bone, is recommended.

  3. Production of high thickness implanted layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdrashitov, V.G.; Ryzhov, V.V.; Turchanovskij, I.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities of consecutive implantation and spray-coating method (CISC) for obtaining materials with implanted addition given profile were investigated. Taking nitrogen ions implantation as example, it is shown, that it is possible to control nitrogen distribution profile configuration by spray-coating of titanium layers with different thickness and by implantation dose change. Implanted layer thickness is determined by CISC cycle number

  4. Improving osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Meirelles, Luiz

    2010-03-01

    In the beginning of implantology, the procedures adopted for treating patients were performed in two surgical phases with an interval of 3-6 months. Nowadays, it is possible to insert and load a dental implant in the same surgical procedure. This change is due to several factors, such as improvement of surgical technique, modifications of the implant design, increased quality of implant manufacturing, development of the surgical instruments' quality, careful patient screening and adequate treatment of the implant surface. The clinical results show that adequate treatment of surfaces is crucial for reducing healing time and treating at-risk patients. The surface properties of dental implants can be significantly improved at the manufacturing stage, affecting cells' activity during the healing phase that will ultimately determine the host tissue response, a fundamental requirement for clinical success. This review focuses on different types of dental implant surfaces and the influence of surface characteristics on osseointegration.

  5. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Implant rupture is a well-known complication of breast implant surgery that can pass unnoticed by both patient and physician. To date, no prospective study has addressed the possible health implications of silicone breast implant rupture. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether...... breast implants for a median period of 12 years (range, 3 to 25 years). A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging examination was carried out in 2001, excluding women who underwent explantation in the period between the two magnetic resonance imaging examinations (n = 44). On the basis of these examinations......, the authors identified 64 women who had at least one ruptured implant at the first magnetic resonance imaging examination and, for comparison, all women who had intact implants at both examinations (n = 98). Magnetic resonance images from the two examinations were compared and changes in rupture configuration...

  6. Air Abrasive Disinfection of Implant Surfaces in a Simulated Model of Peri-Implantitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Introduction: Dental implant technology has evolved into a predictable treatment option for the restoration of edentulous sites. However, peri... implantitis is an emerging complication leading to increased morbidity or mortality of osseointegrated implants . The prevalence of peri- implant ... implant surface. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ability of air-powder abrasion to mechanically decontaminate dental implants in a

  7. Immediate Direct-To-Implant Breast Reconstruction Using Anatomical Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Eun Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn 2012, a new anatomic breast implant of form-stable silicone gel was introduced onto the Korean market. The intended use of this implant is in the area of aesthetic breast surgery, and many reports are promising. Thus far, however, there have been no reports on the use of this implant for breast reconstruction in Korea. We used this breast implant in breast reconstruction surgery and report our early experience.MethodsFrom November 2012 to April 2013, the Natrelle Style 410 form-stable anatomically shaped cohesive silicone gel-filled breast implant was used in 31 breasts of 30 patients for implant breast reconstruction with an acellular dermal matrix. Patients were treated with skin-sparing mastectomies followed by immediate breast reconstruction.ResultsThe mean breast resection volume was 240 mL (range, 83-540 mL. The mean size of the breast implants was 217 mL (range, 125-395 mL. Breast shape outcomes were considered acceptable. Infection and skin thinning occurred in one patient each, and hematoma and seroma did not occur. Three cases of wound dehiscence occurred, one requiring surgical intervention, while the others healed with conservative treatment in one month. Rippling did not occur. So far, complications such as capsular contracture and malrotation of breast implant have not yet arisen.ConclusionsBy using anatomic breast implants in breast reconstruction, we achieved satisfactory results with aesthetics better than those obtained with round breast implants. Therefore, we concluded that the anatomical implant is suitable for breast reconstruction.

  8. Cochlear implant assessment: imaging issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot-Dupuch, K. E-mail: kathlyn.marsot-dupuch@bct.ap-hop-paris.fr; Meyer, B

    2001-11-01

    Cochlear implants are electronic auditory prostheses used to rehabilitate deafened persons who have lost their hair cells. They are partly worn externally and partly implanted in the ear. They provide a direct stimulation of the spiral ganglion cells of the cochlear nerve by bypassing the destroyed hair cells. The objectives of this article are to summarise what head and neck surgeons need to know before cochlear implantation and to describe the imaging study protocol used and anomalies to look for. A few explanations are resumed about placement of a brainstem implant.

  9. Short implants: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, I.; Desai, Shrikar R.; Singh, Rika

    2012-01-01

    Background: Short implants are manufactured for use in atrophic regions of the jaws. Although many studies report on short implants as ≤10 mm length with considerable success, the literature regarding survival rate of ≤7 mm is sparse. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the publications concerning short dental implants defined as an implant with a length of ≤7 mm placed in the maxilla or in the mandible. Materials and Methods: A Medline and manual search was conducted to identify studies concerning short dental implants of length ≤7 mm published between 1991 and 2011. The articles included in this study report data on implant length ≤7 mm, such as demographic variables, implant type, location in jaws, observation time, prostheses and complications. Results: The 28 included studies represent one randomized controlled trial, 12 prospective studies and 10 retrospective studies. The survival rate of short implant was found to be increased from 80% to 90% gradually, with recent articles showing 100%. Conclusion: When severe atrophy of jaws was encountered, short and wide implants can be placed successfully. PMID:23162320

  10. Esthetic failure in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Rodrigo; Jofré, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The definition of failure for dental implants has evolved from lack of osseointegration to increased concern for other aspects, such as esthetics. However, esthetic failure in implant dentistry has not been well defined. Although multiple esthetic indices have been validated for objectively evaluating clinical outcomes, including failure of an implant-supported crown, only one author has determined a failure threshold. On the basis of objective indices, esthetic failures in implant dentistry can be categorized as pink-tissue failures and white-tissue failures. This article discusses esthetic failures, the factors involved in these failures, and their prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic periodontitis and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael M; Knight, Ellie T; Al-Harthi, Latfiya; Leichter, Jonathan W

    2017-06-01

    Dental implants are regularly placed in patients with a history of periodontitis, even though peri-implant tissues are susceptible to the same host-modulated plaque-induced factors that initiate and sustain periodontitis. This article endeavors to clarify the evidence regarding the history of periodontitis as a risk factor for implant success and survival, and the role of supportive periodontal therapy in maintaining implants for individuals with a history of periodontitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Printing of Titanium implant prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiria, Florencia Edith; Shyan, John Yong Ming; Lim, Poon Nian; Wen, Francis Goh Chung; Yeo, Jin Fei; Cao, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Dental implant plays an important role as a conduit of force and stress to flow from the tooth to the related bone. In the load sharing between an implant and its related bone, the amount of stress carried by each of them directly related to their stiffness or modulus. Hence, it is a crucial issue for the implant to have matching mechanical properties, in particular modulus, between the implant and its related bone. Titanium is a metallic material that has good biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Whilst the modulus of the bulk material is still higher than that of bone, it is the lowest among all other commonly used metallic implant materials, such as stainless steel or cobalt alloy. Hence it is potential to further reduce the modulus of pure Titanium by engineering its processing method to obtain porous structure. In this project, porous Titanium implant prototype is fabricated using 3-dimensional printing. This technique allows the flexibility of design customization, which is beneficial for implant fabrication as tailoring of implant size and shape helps to ensure the implant would fit nicely to the patient. The fabricated Titanium prototype had a modulus of 4.8-13.2 GPa, which is in the range of natural bone modulus. The compressive strength achieved was between 167 to 455 MPa. Subsequent cell culture study indicated that the porous Titanium prototype had good biocompatibility and is suitable for bone cell attachment and proliferation.

  13. Cochlear implantation in Mondini dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshi, Ahmad; Hassanzadeh, Saeid; Abasalipour, Parvaneh; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaddin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    The use of cochlear implantation to treat patients with inner ear malformations such as Mondini dysplasia has been increasingly successful. Until now, conventional hearing aids in these patients have not performed well. Consequently, the hearing problem for patients with this condition has been somewhat improved with the use of cochlear implants. Various results of cochlear implantation have been reported in these patients so far. This is a report of 5 patients with Mondini malformation who have undergone cochlear implant surgery. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... music. Some enjoy the sound of certain instruments (piano or guitar, for example) and certain voices. Others ... in Cochlear Implants What is a Cochlear Implant? Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Frequently Asked Questions ...

  15. Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prosthetics Breast Implants Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... it Email Print Description: Silicone gel-filled breast implants have a silicone outer shell that is filled ...

  16. Psychological intervention following implantation of an implantable defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; van den Broek, Krista C; Sears, Samuel F

    2007-01-01

    The medical benefits of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are unequivocal, but a subgroup of patients experiences emotional difficulties following implantation. For this subgroup, some form of psychological intervention may be warranted. This review provides an overview of current...... evidence on the efficacy of psychological intervention in ICD patients and recommendations for future research....

  17. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  18. Immediate implant placement and provisionalization of maxillary anterior single implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Joseph Yun Kwong; Rungcharassaeng, Kitchai; Deflorian, Matteo; Weinstein, Tommaso; Wang, Hom-Lay; Testori, Tiziano

    2018-02-25

    An inevitable loss of soft and hard tissue after tooth extraction often results in a compromised site for anterior implant esthetics in both vertical and horizontal dimensions. Immediate implant placement and provisionalization has been a viable option for replacing failing maxillary anterior teeth as it preserves the vertical existing osseous and gingival architecture. With the simultaneous addition of soft- and hard-tissue grafts, the peri-implant horizontal tissue topography can also be maintained. The esthetic success of immediate implant placement and provisionalization procedures is influenced by a number of factors that can be identified as patient-dependent or clinician-dependent. This article describes in detail the process of patient selection, indications, contraindications, diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment execution required to achieve functional and esthetic success with immediate implant placement and provisionalization. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast...

  20. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  1. Ion implantation for materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, F.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book reviews current research on ion implantation for materials processing as a viable technique for improving surface properties of metals and alloys-wear, fatigue, and corrosion. An introductory section on new potential applications of ion beam technology is provided. Contents: New potential applications of ion beam technology; ion implantation science and technology; wear and fatigue; corrosion; other research areas

  2. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Gjedde, Albert; Wallentin, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners...

  3. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  4. Subcutaneous implants of polypropylene filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, T C; Chartoff, R P; Cosgrove, S L; McCuskey, R S

    1976-11-01

    Extruded filaments of unmodified polypropylene (PP) with and without antioxidant were implanted subcutaneously in hamsters in order to determine their rate of degradation. Specimens were removed periodically during a 5 month test period and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical testing. The analyses show that degradation beigns to occur after only a few days. Although the reaction sequence is not known, several factors suggest that the in vivo degradation process is similar to autoxidation which occurs in air or oxygen. The infrared data indicate that the hydroxyl content of the implants increases at a rate of 0.061 mg/g polypropylene per day during the initiation phase of the reaction. An induction time of 108 days was extablished. Carbonyl bonds appear after an implantation time of 50--90 days and increase therafter. Mechanical tests indicate a decrease in the dynamic loss tangent, tan delta, during the first month of implantation for unmodified polypropylene. No change in the infrared spectra or tan delta was observed, however, for implants containing an antioxidant. Thus, it is apparent that polypropylene filaments implanted subcutaneously in hamsters degrade by an oxidation process which is retarded effectively by using an antioxidant. While the findings reported are specific to subcutaneous polypropylene implants, they suggest that degradation of other systems may involve similar processes. This notion suggests directions for further research on increasing the in vivo stability of synthetic polymers. Long-term effects of polymer implantation upon tissue were not studied in this work.

  5. Sequential provisional implant prosthodontics therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Reid, Patrick E; Schnader, Yale E; Shapiro, Herbert J

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and long-term use of first- and second-stage provisional implant prostheses is critical to create a favorable prognosis for function and esthetics of a fixed-implant supported prosthesis. The fixed metal and acrylic resin cemented first-stage prosthesis, as reviewed in Part I, is needed for prevention of adjacent and opposing tooth movement, pressure on the implant site as well as protection to avoid micromovement of the freshly placed implant body. The second-stage prosthesis, reviewed in Part II, should be used following implant uncovering and abutment installation. The patient wears this provisional prosthesis until maturation of the bone and healing of soft tissues. The second-stage provisional prosthesis is also a fail-safe mechanism for possible early implant failures and also can be used with late failures and/or for the necessity to repair the definitive prosthesis. In addition, the screw-retained provisional prosthesis is used if and when an implant requires removal or other implants are to be placed as in a sequential approach. The creation and use of both first- and second-stage provisional prostheses involve a restorative dentist, dental technician, surgeon, and patient to work as a team. If the dentist alone cannot do diagnosis and treatment planning, surgery, and laboratory techniques, he or she needs help by employing the expertise of a surgeon and a laboratory technician. This team approach is essential for optimum results.

  6. Implanted electroenzymatic glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, L C; Duggan, C A

    1982-01-01

    The advent of electrochemical sensors for intermittent sampling of blood gases and hydrogen ions in the clinic, intensive care, and surgical units has revolutionized diagnostic and critical care medical technics. The use of electrochemical sensors for continuous transcutaneous monitoring of blood gases is further enhancing the medical surveillance of patients. The more recent introduction of glucose and other electroenzymatic sensors has stimulated broad research in the development of metabolic monitoring. For the present research, the glucose sensor widely used for the rapid specific micro-analysis of whole blood and plasma is explored for possible use as an in vivo intravascular or tissue-implanted sensor. This sensor is based on the polarographic measurement of hydrogen peroxide generated by glucose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.4) held between two membranes. The first membrane allows the diffusion of glucose, ions, and many other small molecules, while the second membrane allows the diffusion of the glucose-generated hydrogen peroxide to the platinum surface, but excludes ascorbic acid, bilirubin, and uric acid. Such sensors respond rapidly and specifically when acutely implanted subcutaneously in cats and dogs. They function well as glucose-sensor-tipped venous catheters. One sensor was repeatedly used for in vitro polarograms, subcutaneous and blood glucose monitoring, over a period of ten months, with storage in the cold between uses, with the complete retention of its response characteristics.

  7. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stübinger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Stübinger,1 Andres Stricker,2 Britt-Isabelle Berg3,4 1Hightech Research Center of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel, Allschwil, Switzerland; 2Private Practice, Konstanz, Germany; 3Department of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. Keywords: implantology, piezoelectric device, piezosurgery, maxillary sinus elevation, bone grafting, osteotomy, edentulous ridge splitting

  8. Ion implantation: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, R.N.; Subramanyam, K.

    1975-10-01

    Ion implantation is a technique for introducing controlled amounts of dopants into target substrates, and has been successfully used for the manufacture of silicon semiconductor devices. Ion implantation is superior to other methods of doping such as thermal diffusion and epitaxy, in view of its advantages such as high degree of control, flexibility, and amenability to automation. This annotated bibliography of 416 references consists of journal articles, books, and conference papers in English and foreign languages published during 1973-74, on all aspects of ion implantation including range distribution and concentration profile, channeling, radiation damage and annealing, compound semiconductors, structural and electrical characterization, applications, equipment and ion sources. Earlier bibliographies on ion implantation, and national and international conferences in which papers on ion implantation were presented have also been listed separately

  9. Tribological properties of nitrogen implanted and boron implanted steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of a steel with high chrome content was implanted separately with 75 keV nitrogen ions and with 75 keV boron ions. Implanted doses of each ion species were 2-, 4-, and 8 x 10 17 /cm 2 . Retained doses were measured using resonant non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Tribological properties were determined using a pin-on-disk test with a 6-mm diameter ruby pin with a velocity of 0.94 m/min. Testing was done at 10% humidity with a load of 377 g. Wear rate and coefficient of friction were determined from these tests. While reduction in the wear rate for nitrogen implanted materials was observed, greater reduction (more than an order of magnitude) was observed for boron implanted materials. In addition, reduction in the coefficient of friction for high-dose boron implanted materials was observed. Nano-indentation revealed a hardened layer near the surface of the material. Results from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction suggest the formation of Fe 2 N and Fe 3 N in the nitrogen implanted materials and Fe 3 B in the boron implanted materials. Results from transmission electron microscopy will be presented

  10. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Yeol Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone, duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management.ResultsForty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case, microfat graft (2 case, removal only (14 case, and follow-up loss (17 case.ConclusionsSaline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs.

  11. Pre implantation psychological functioning preserved in majority of implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients 12 months post implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Hoogwegt, Madelein T; Jordaens, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The impact of ICD therapy on patient well being has typically focused on mean differences between groups, thereby neglecting changes within individuals. Using an intra-individual approach, we examined (i) the prevalence of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients maintaining their pre...... implantation level of psychological functioning at 12 months, and (ii) factors associated with deterioration in functioning....

  12. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  13. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  14. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION PREVALENCE IN ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Starokha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper describes an experience of cochlear implantation in elderly. Cochlear implantation has become a widely accepted intervention in the treatment of individuals with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implants are now accepted as a standard of care to optimize hearing and subsequent speech development in children and adults with deafness. But cochlear implantation affects not only hearing abilities, speech perception and speech production; it also has an outstanding impact on the social life, activities and self-esteem of each patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cochlear implantation efficacy in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. There were 5 patients under our observation. Surgery was performed according to traditional posterior tympanotomy and cochleostomy for cochlear implant electrode insertion for all observed patients. The study was conducted in two stages: before speech processor’s activation and 3 months later. Pure tone free field audiometry was performed to each patient to assess the efficiency of cochlear implantation in dynamics. The aim of the study was also to evaluate quality of life in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss after unilateral cochlear implantation. Each patient underwent questioning with 36 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. SF-36 is a set of generic, coherent, and easily administered quality-of-life measures. The SF-36 consists of eight scaled scores, which are the weighted sums of the questions in their section. Each scale is directly transformed into a 0-100 scale on the assumption that each question carries equal weight. The eight sections are: physical functioning; physical role functioning; emotional role functioning; vitality; emotional well-being; social role functioning; bodily pain; general health perceptions. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in elderly consistently improved quality of life

  15. Basic research on maxillofacial implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yoshiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2001-11-01

    Osseointegrated implants have begun to be used not only in general practice in dentistry but also in various clinical situations in the maxillofacial region. The process has yielded three problems: the spread of application, new materials and diagnostic methods, and management for difficult situations. This paper presents basic data and clinical guidelines for new applications, it investigates the characteristics of the materials and the usefulness of a new diagnostic method, and it studies effective techniques for difficult cases. The results obtained are as follows: Investigations into the spreading application. The lateral and superior orbital rim have sufficient bone thickness and width for the implant body to be placed. Osseointegrated implants, especially by the fixed bridge technique, are not recommended in the craniofacial bone and jaws of young children. Implant placement into bone after/before irradiation must be performed in consideration of impaired osteogenesis, the decrease of trabecular bone, and the time interval between implantation and irradiation. Investigations into materials and diagnostic methods. Hydroxyapatite-coated and titanium implants should be selected according to the characteristics of the materials. A dental simulating soft may also be applicable in the craniofacial region. Investigations into the management of difficult cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and tissue engineering should be useful for improving the quality and increasing the quantity of bone where implants are placed. Soft tissue around implants placed in the reconstructed area should be replaced with mucosal tissue. The data obtained here should be useful for increasing the efficiency of osseointegrated implants, but further basic research is required in the future. (author)

  16. Basic research on maxillofacial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yoshiro

    2001-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants have begun to be used not only in general practice in dentistry but also in various clinical situations in the maxillofacial region. The process has yielded three problems: the spread of application, new materials and diagnostic methods, and management for difficult situations. This paper presents basic data and clinical guidelines for new applications, it investigates the characteristics of the materials and the usefulness of a new diagnostic method, and it studies effective techniques for difficult cases. The results obtained are as follows: Investigations into the spreading application. The lateral and superior orbital rim have sufficient bone thickness and width for the implant body to be placed. Osseointegrated implants, especially by the fixed bridge technique, are not recommended in the craniofacial bone and jaws of young children. Implant placement into bone after/before irradiation must be performed in consideration of impaired osteogenesis, the decrease of trabecular bone, and the time interval between implantation and irradiation. Investigations into materials and diagnostic methods. Hydroxyapatite-coated and titanium implants should be selected according to the characteristics of the materials. A dental simulating soft may also be applicable in the craniofacial region. Investigations into the management of difficult cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and tissue engineering should be useful for improving the quality and increasing the quantity of bone where implants are placed. Soft tissue around implants placed in the reconstructed area should be replaced with mucosal tissue. The data obtained here should be useful for increasing the efficiency of osseointegrated implants, but further basic research is required in the future. (author)

  17. An introduction to single implant abutments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Warreth, Abdulhadi

    2013-01-01

    This article is an introduction to single implant abutments and aims to provide basic information about abutments which are essential for all dental personnel who are involved in dental implantology. Clinical Relevance: This article provides a basic knowledge of implants and implant abutments which are of paramount importance, as replacement of missing teeth with oral implants has become a well-established clinical procedure.

  18. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit and...

  19. Cochlear implantation in a bilateral Mondini dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, M; Orzan, E; Gabana, M; Genovese, E; Arslan, E; Fisch, U

    1997-01-01

    We report the speech perception progress and programming procedures of a case of congenital profound deafness and bilateral Mondini dysplasia implanted with a Nucleus 20 + 2 cochlear implant at the age of six. Unclear relations between electrodes array and cochlear partition made implant programming difficult and non-standard procedures were set. Cochlear implantation may give excellent rehabilitative results also in cochleae with malformation.

  20. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation in children in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Harkel, ADJ; Blom, NA; Reimer, AG; Tukkie, R; Sreeram, N; Bink-Boelkens, MTE

    To evaluate the indications, underlying cardiac disorders, efficacy and complications involved with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in paediatric patients in The Netherlands, the records of all patients aged 18 years or younger who underwent ICD placement were reviewed

  1. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation in children in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Harkel, A. Derk Jan; Blom, Nico A.; Reimer, Annette G.; Tukkie, Raymond; Sreeram, Narayanswami; Bink-Boelkens, Margreet T. E.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the indications, underlying cardiac disorders, efficacy and complications involved with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in paediatric patients in The Netherlands, the records of all patients aged 18 years or younger who underwent ICD placement were reviewed

  2. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation in children in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkel, A.D. Ten; Blom, N.A.; Reimer, A.G.; Tukkie, R.; Sreeram, N.; Bink-Boelkens, M.T.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the indications, underlying cardiac disorders, efficacy and complications involved with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in paediatric patients in The Netherlands, the records of all patients aged 18 years or younger who underwent ICD placement were reviewed

  3. Ion implantation in semiconductor bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ions are selectively implanted into layers of a semiconductor substrate of, for example, semi-insulating gallium arsenide via a photoresist implantation mask and a metallic layer of, for example, titanium disposed between the substrate surface and the photoresist mask. After implantation the mask and metallic layer are removed and the substrate heat treated for annealing purposes. The metallic layer acts as a buffer layer and prevents possible contamination of the substrate surface, by photoresist residues, at the annealing stage. Such contamination would adversely affect the electrical properties of the substrate surface, particularly gallium arsenide substrates. (author)

  4. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  5. Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In the current report, a design and capabilities of a cluster implantation and deposition apparatus (CIDA) involving two different cluster sources are described. The clusters produced from gas precursors (Ar, N etc.) by PuCluS-2 can be used to study cluster ion implantation in order to develop...... contributions to the theory of cluster stopping in matter as well as for practical applications requiring ultra-shallow implantation and modification of surfaces on the nanoscale. Metal clusters from the magnetron cluster source are of interest for the production of optical sensors to detect specific biological...

  6. Implant surface material, design, and osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E

    2015-04-01

    The structural and functional union of the implant with living bone is greatly influenced by the surface properties of the implant. The success of a dental implant depends on the chemical, physical, mechanical, and topographic characteristics of its surface. The influence of surface topography on osseointegration has translated to shorter healing times from implant placement to restoration. This article presents a discussion of surface characteristics and design of implants, which should allow the clinician to better understand osseointegration and information coming from implant manufacturers, allowing for better implant selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ion implantation in Thailand (I) - development of ion implantation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yotsombat, B.; Boonyawan, D.; Charoennugul, R.; Vichaisirimongkol, P.; Aumkaew, S.; A-No, V.

    1997-01-01

    Ion implantation with its many advantages has been widely and rapidly developed in the world to be a novel material treatment technique, which holds significance in both academic research and technical application. In order to develop and apply the ion implantation technique in the country, Thailand has launched a program to establish an ion beam center at Chiang Mai University. By efforts made during the past six years, the University has completed construction and installation of a 150-kV, research-purpose ion implantation facility, which consists of two beam lines - a 00 non-analyzed line and a 450 analyzed line, and which is being put into regular operation, and a 20-kV, high-current ion implanter based on a duoplasmatron ion source for non-analyzed N-ion beam implantation, and a high-intensity, multi cusp ion source for special implantation purposes. The facilities have formed powerful tools for research, teaching and engineering application, and have played an indispensable role in promoting development of novel techniques in the country

  8. Rapid implant therapies: immediate implant placement and immediate restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lin Lai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the effectiveness of implant therapy has greatly improved, and the demands of dental esthetics in implant dentistry have become an important issue. The traditional two-stage implant protocol with delayed restoration has a treatment duration of 1–2 years, in which patients had to wear a removable appliance and experienced significant discomfort during the recovery period. Nowadays, immediate implant placement into an extraction site followed by immediate restoration of a dental implant can shorten the dental rehabilitation time and preserve patients' esthetic appearance at all stages of treatment. However, these treatment protocols always pose a great challenge to clinicians, especially when treating patients with preexisting soft and hard tissue deficiencies. The aim of this report is to present various treatment modalities to provide immediate tissue reconstruction and implant restoration following tooth extraction. With appropriate patient selection and careful clinical planning, these treatment strategies can lessen the number of surgeries required, condense treatment times, reduce discomfort to the patient, and accelerate the restoration process.

  9. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-15

    isolated from occlusal loads by orthodontic stay wires attached to adjacent dentition and a methacrylare resin cap over the top of the implant. A third...were performed using orthodontic devices to stabilize the implant to adjacent teeth. Orthodontic bands were * fitted to adjacent teeth and connected by... wires . An acrylic cap was fitted * over the top of the implant to support and protect the implant. The patients were implanted in the posterior

  10. Basics of clinical diagnosis in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-based prosthetic rehabilitation requires an understanding of associated anatomical structures. The ultimate predictability of an implant site is determined by the existing anatomy as related to dentition and the associated hard and soft tissues. Meticulous clinical assessment helps in determining the suitability of the potential site for implant placement. The purpose of this article is to present the clinical assessment for dental implants' placement to modulate peri-implant tissue characteristics in individual clinical need.

  11. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  12. Soft tissue and esthetic considerations around implants

    OpenAIRE

    Joann Pauline George; Sangeeta Dhir

    2015-01-01

    The health of the peri – implant tissues play an important in the long term outcome of dental implants. The absence of keratinized gingiva (KG) may be a risk factor for developing recession or peri –implantitis. However there is still ambiguity in the need for keratinized gingiva around dental implants. The preservation and reconstruction of soft tissue around dental implants is an integral component of dental Implantology. There is no long-term evidence whether augmented soft tissues can be ...

  13. Surface microhardening by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amarjit

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the process and the underlying mechanism of surface microhardening by implanting suitable energetic ions in materials like 4145 steel, 304 stainless steel, aluminium and its 2024-T351 alloy. It has been observed that boron and nitrogen implantation in materials like 4145 steel and 304 stainless steel can produce a significant increase in surface hardness. Moreover the increase can be further enhanced with suitable overlay coatings such as aluminium (Al), Titanium (Ti) and carbon (C). The surface hardening due to implantation is attributed to precipitation hardening or the formation of stable/metastable phase or both. The effect of lithium implantation in aluminium and its alloy on microhardness with increasing ion dose and ion beam energy is also discussed. (author)

  14. Implanted-tritium permeation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Watts, K.D.; Kershner, C.J.; Rogers, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent theoretical investigations have pointed to considerable uncertainty in estimating the amount of tritium which will permeate the first wall of a fusion reactor and enter the primary coolant system due in part to the implantation of energetic ions. An experiment is being planned to study this problem in a small test reactor where the 3 He(n,p) 3 T reaction is used to generate protons and tritons for implantation in and permeation of a simulated first wall. By comparing the amount of tritium moving through the wall in the presence of implantation with that in its absence while maintaining the time background partial pressure and temperature, the efflct of implantation on tritium permeation will be determined. The experiment offers an interesting and important complement to similar experiments based on plasmas or ion beams

  15. ADVANCED DENTAL IMPLANT PLACEMENT TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M. GREENBERG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The availability of in office Cone Beam CT (CBCT scanners, dental implant planning software, CAD CAM milling, and rapid printing technologies allow for the precise placement of dental implants and immediate prosthetic temporization. These technologies allow for flapless implant placement, or open flap bone reduction for “All on 4” techniques with improved preoperative planning and intraoperative performance. CBCT permits practitioners in an office setting with powerful diagnostic capabilities for the evaluation of bone quality and quantity, as well as dental and osseous pathology essential for better informed dental implant treatment. CBCT provides the convenience of in office imaging and decreased radiation exposure. Rapid printing technologies provide decreased time and high accuracy for bone model and surgical guide fabrication.

  16. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Implant rupture is a well-known complication of breast implant surgery that can pass unnoticed by both patient and physician. To date, no prospective study has addressed the possible health implications of silicone breast implant rupture. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether...... untreated ruptures are associated with changes over time in magnetic resonance imaging findings, serologic markers, or self-reported breast symptoms. A baseline magnetic resonance imaging examination was performed in 1999 on 271 women who were randomly chosen from a larger cohort of women having cosmetic...... breast implants for a median period of 12 years (range, 3 to 25 years). A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging examination was carried out in 2001, excluding women who underwent explantation in the period between the two magnetic resonance imaging examinations (n = 44). On the basis of these examinations...

  17. Cochlear implanted children: Linguistic outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lynce, Sofia; Marques, Sofia; Paço, João; Mineiro, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The present exploratory study aims at exploring expressive linguistics abilities of cochlear-implanted children by testing spontaneous speech samples. For this purpose, Mean Length of Utterance in words will be measured and the productive use of single grammatical morphemes will be analysed. We analysed the spontaneous speech of three deaf Portuguese children with cochlear implants and three normal-hearing children paired case by case, taking into account the chronological age, gender and par...

  18. Fingerprinting diamonds using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, R.C.; Reihl, R.F.; Tuft, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    It is possible to ion implant patterns in diamond crystals at fluences below that which would impart visible damage and then to reveal those patterns by electrostatic charging and dusting. The charge distribution - and therefore the dust attachment - is related to the difference in electrical conductivity between the implanted region and the rest of the crystal. The technique may have applicability for ''fingerprinting'' or personalizing diamond gemstones. (author)

  19. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amisha T Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer.

  20. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer

  1. Why are mini-implants lost: the value of the implantation technique!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  2. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  3. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lourenço Romano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1 Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2 Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3 Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4 The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5 Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6 Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  4. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  5. Meningitis as cochlear implant complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosanović Rade

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, cochlear implantation has been fully proven as the treatment for profound hearing losses. The direct electrical stimulation of the spiral ganglion hair cells through the electrode inserted in the cochlear scala tympani is the essence of the cochlear implant (CI functioning. Modern technological development has introduced unexpected technical quality possibilities of the device itself, as well as coding strategies, which further enable improved patients' rehabilitation results. Nevertheless, in spite of cochlear implantation becoming a routine surgical procedure, which has been changing lives of thousands of profoundly deaf adults and children, it has possible complications. Though rare, these complications could lead to severe, even fatal consequences. Bacterial meningitis represents one of the most severe postoperative complications. In this article, our five-year experience with cochlear implantation is shown, compared to other, much bigger, experiences. Despite severity and a potentially fatal outcome of meningitis, it has rarely been seen, and the precise connection between surgical procedure and this complication is not yet clear. Do cochlear implants increase the risk of bacterial meningitis? Are deafness-associated factors predisposing the bacterial meningitis occurrence, independently from the implant? These are the questions that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and the CI surgeons have been facing, as well as manufacturers and patients with their families.

  6. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  7. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  8. Influence of immediate/delayed implant placement and implant platform on the peri-implant bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, Bernardo B; Marques de Castro, Daniel S; de Araújo, Maria Angelica R; de Araújo, Carlos D R P; Piatelli, Adriano; Benfatti, César A M

    2016-11-01

    To determinate the influence of the timing and position of the implant placement, as well as the presence and absence of a buccal gap, associated with different implant platforms on bone formation around implants. In a first surgical stage, two premolars in one side of the mandibular arch of 07 mongrel dogs were extracted. After a 120-day healing period, a second-stage surgery was performed, in which a full flap was raised and two implants were installed. At this same stage, two contralateral premolars were extracted and two immediate implants were placed into the fresh sockets, through the "palatal approach technique" without flap elevation, totaling four implants per animal. The 28 installed implants constituted groups according to the timing (Immediate or delayed) of placement and the type of surface treatment. After 4 months, samples were collected and histomorphometric analysis was performed to determinate buccal surface BIC, lingual surface BIC, total BIC, buccal area, and lingual area of all implants. Kruskal-Wallis and pared Wilcoxon (P immediate implants presented better BIC scores, mainly on the buccal surface. Data also suggest better bone area formation around the implants of these same groups. Concerning the type of implant platform, better results were found using Morse taper. The flapless technique with "palatal approach," Morse taper implants, and immediate implant placement all have favorable influence on the bone formation around the implants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF IMPLANT GEOMETRY TO STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS OF DENTAL IMPLANT SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    topkaya, tolga; solmaz, murat yavuz; dündar, serkan; Eltas, Abubekir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The success of dental implants is related to the quality, quantity of local bones, implant design and surgical technique. Implant diameter and length are accepted as key factors. Present work focuses to investigate the effect of titanium implant geometry to stress distributions in implant system.Materials and Methods: For this purpose three different implant models which are currently being used in clinical cases constructed by using ANSYS Workbench 12.1. The stress distribu...

  10. Argon implantation gettering for a ''through-oxide'' arsenic-implanted layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, K.; Harada, H.

    1977-01-01

    Argon implantation gettering was investigated to improve p-n junctions made by high-dose arsenic implantation through oxide film. Arsenic was implanted into p-type silicon through 520 A oxide at 2 x 10 15 to 1 x 10 16 cm -2 , 100--110 keV. When argon was implanted on the wafer back side at 1 x 10 16 cm -2 , 200 keV following arsenic implantation, all junctions showed hard breakdown. However, many junctions without argon implantation showed soft breakdown with large leakage current. Argon implantation reduced etch pits appearing in the arsenic-implanted region

  11. Comparison of Implant Stability Before Prosthetic Loading of Two Dental Implant Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lagdive, Sanjay Balaji; Lagdive, Sushma Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Dental implantology is the state of the art technique to replace missing teeth. Implant stability of implant jeopardizes its longevity and success of treatment. This study evaluates the implant stability of implant before and after 4 months of the implant placement, but before prosthetically loading it. Ten two-stage implants of Life care and Nobel Biocare dental implants were placed in 20 patients. Digital OPG was taken on the day of implant placement. After 4 months, at the time of second s...

  12. Additional palatal implants for refractory snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Peter; Goh, Yao Hong; Romanow, John

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate safety and efficacy of additional palatal implants for snoring treatment. A prospective case series at two clinical sites in an office setting. Patients who did not have an acceptable reduction in snoring intensity after an initial 3 implant procedure received additional implants. Bed partners rated snoring intensity on a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) at baseline and 90 days postprocedure. Snoring intensity VAS decreased significantly from 6.4 +/- 2.3 to 4.6 +/- 2.9 (P < 0.01) for patients who received an additional fourth implant, and to 4.1 +/- 2.8 after the 5th implant (P<0.01). Epworth sleepiness scale scores also decreased significantly for patients who received additional fourth or fifth implants. There were no adverse events. Additional palatal implants for snoring treatment were safe and effective in this case series. Additional implants may offer relief for snorers not responding to the initial 3 implant procedure.

  13. Resultado funcional do tratamento artroscópico da instabilidade do ombro sem a lesão do lábio da glenóide Functional results of arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability without glenoid labral lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo Lino Júnior

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Tratar a instabilidade anterior e ântero-inferior do ombro sem lesão do lábio da glenóide por via artroscópica por meio de capsulorrafia térmica e fechamento do espaço rotador e avaliar os resultados quanto à estabilidade e à melhora funcional. MÉTODOS: Entre janeiro de 1998 e junho de 2002, 11 pacientes foram submetidos a esse procedimento, imobilizados por cinco semanas e após tratados por fisioterapia. Todos os pacientes foram avaliados no pré e pós-operatório pelas escalas de Neer, Rower e UCLA e, no pós-operatório, pela escala de ASES. RESULTADOS: Durante o período de seguimento entre 46 e 97 meses média de 75,54 meses todos os ombros permaneceram estáveis. Comparando-se a evolução do pré ao pós-operatório, houve melhora de acordo com a escala de Neer, na qual nenhum paciente apresentou resultado satisfatório no pré-operatório e oito tiveram resultado satisfatório no pós-operatório. Segundo a escala de Rowe, a média pré-operatória foi de 36,8 e, no pós-operatório, de 81,6 pontos. Conforme a escala da UCLA, a média no pré-operatório foi de 23,45 e, no pós-operatório, de 31,18 pontos. De acordo com todas essas escalas houve melhora estatisticamente significativa (p = 0,05. A escala da ASES mostrou média pós-operatória de 77,2 pontos. CONCLUSÃO: O procedimento artroscópico analisado confere estabilidade e melhora funcional.OBJECTIVE: Anterior and anterior-lower instability of the shoulder without a glenoid labral lesion was arthroscopically treated by thermal capsulorrhaphy and closing of the rotator space, and results were evaluated for stability and functional improvement. METHODS: From January 1998 to June 2002, 11 patients were submitted to this procedure, immobilized for five weeks, and then treated by physiotherapy. All patients were evaluated pre- and post-operatively by the Neer, Rower, and UCLA scale, and in the post-operative period, by the ASES scale. RESULTS: During the follow

  14. Multiple immediate implants placement with immediate loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Sumit; Narang, Anu; Jain, Kapil; Bhatia, Vineet

    2014-09-01

    The replacement of missing teeth with implant-borne restorations has become a treatment modality accepted by the scientific community for fully and partially edentulous patients. Recent reports have demonstrated the successful placement of dental implants into the fresh extraction socket in the anterior as well as in molar regions, which is made possible due to modification in implant surface. The present case report highlights the placement of three bicortical screw (BCS) implants into the fresh extraction sockets and one KOS implant in edentulous area with flapless technique. All the implants were immediately loaded and followed up for a period of 6 months.

  15. Occlusal considerations for dental implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Ranier H

    2014-01-01

    When placed, dental implants are put into an ever-changing oral environment in which teeth can continue to migrate. Yet, the implants themselves are ankylosed. This can lead to occlusal instability. Teeth may continue to erupt, leaving the implants in infraocclusion. Teeth may move mesially away from an implant, requiring modification to close an open contact point. Friction in the connection between teeth and implants can lead to intrusion of teeth and damage to the periodontal attachment apparatus. Implant occlusion with shallow incisal guidance minimizes lateral and tipping forces. Cross-arch stabilization allows the best distribution of occlusal forces. The choice of restorative materials influences long-term occlusal stability.

  16. Multiple immediate implants placement with immediate loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Narang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of missing teeth with implant-borne restorations has become a treatment modality accepted by the scientific community for fully and partially edentulous patients. Recent reports have demonstrated the successful placement of dental implants into the fresh extraction socket in the anterior as well as in molar regions, which is made possible due to modification in implant surface. The present case report highlights the placement of three bicortical screw (BCS implants into the fresh extraction sockets and one  KOS implant in edentulous area with flapless technique. All the implants were immediately loaded and followed up for a period of 6 months.

  17. The mandibular two-implant overdenture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Hussein Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment with the two-implant overdenture has been documented with multiple implant designs (e.g., hexagonal, Morse taper, internal connection and many implant systems. Clinicians may select implants for retention of the two-implant overdenture according to personal experience and preference with confidence that treatment success will not be determined by the selection made. This is due primarily to the anatomy and density of the bone in the anterior mandible. The aim of this case report is to demonstrate the concept of immediate functional loading in the mandible using unsplinted implants to support a locator attachment supported overdenture.

  18. Pterygoid implant for atrophic posterior maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of missing teeth in the posterior maxilla is always a challenge for the treating implant surgeon as the posterior maxilla has several obstacles in the form of quality, quantity, the anatomy of the maxillary sinus, and inaccessibility. To overcome these deficiencies, several surgical procedures such as sinus lift, bone augmentation, tilted implants, short implants, and zygomatic implants were tried. Since these procedures have their own limitations, pterygomaxillary region provides us an excellent place for placement of implant and rehabilitation of posterior maxilla. This case report describes the usage of the pterygomaxillary region for placement of the implant to restore atrophic posterior maxilla, without any additional surgical procedures.

  19. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  20. Falha prematura em implantes orais = Early oral implant failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadanelli, Alexandro Bianchi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente, ainda há uma percentagem significativa de fracassos de implantes na prática clínica, causando transtorno para o profissional e para o paciente. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a bibliografia disponível sobre o assunto, apresentar um caso clínico e discutir os aspectos relacionados aos insucessos na terapia com implantes ocorridos durante o período de osteointegração. A avaliação da literatura mostrou haverem múltiplos fatores possivelmente envolvidos nas falhas de implantes, sendo que através do estudo das falhas pode-se minimizar sua ocorrência

  1. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  2. Composite fibrous glaucoma drainage implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapstova, A.; Horakova, J.; Shynkarenko, A.; Lukas, D.

    2017-10-01

    Glaucoma is a frequent reason of loss vision. It is usually caused by increased intraocular pressure leading to damage of optic nerve head. This work deals with the development of fibrous structure suitable for glaucoma drainage implants (GDI). Commercially produced metallic glaucoma implants are very effective in lowering intraocular pressure. However, these implants may cause adverse events such as damage to adjacent tissue, fibrosis, hypotony or many others [1]. The aim of this study is to reduce undesirable properties of currently produced drains and improve their properties by creating of the composite fibrous drain for achieve a normal intraocular pressure. Two types of electrospinning technologies were used for the production of very small tubular implants. First type was focused for production of outer part of tubular drain and the second type of electrospinning method made the inner part of shape follows the connections of both parts. Complete implant had a special properties suitable for drainage of fluid. Morphological parameters, liquid transport tests and in-vitro cell adhesion tests were detected.

  3. Capacitive feedthroughs for medical implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Grob

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Important technological advances in the last decades paved the way for a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs include the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced test structures. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied for all kinds of electrical medical implants.

  4. Cranioplasty with individual titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishinov, S.; Stupak, V.; Sadovoy, M.; Mamonova, E.; Koporushko, N.; Larkin, V.; Novokshonov, A.; Dolzhenko, D.; Panchenko, A.; Desyatykh, I.; Krasovsky, I.

    2017-09-01

    Cranioplasty is the second procedure in the history of neurosurgery after trepanation, and it is still relevant despite the development of civilization and progress in medicine. Each cranioplasty operation is unique because there are no two patients with identical defects of the skull bones. The development of Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique opened up the possibility of direct implant printing of titanium, a biocompatible metal used in medicine. This eliminates the need for producing any intermediate products to create the desired implant. We have produced 8 patient-specific titanium implants using this technique for patients who underwent different decompressive cranioectomies associated with bone tumors. Follow-up duration ranged from 6 to 12 months. We observed no implant-related reactions or complications. In all cases of reconstructive neurosurgery we achieved good clinical and aesthetic results. The analysis of the literature and our own experience in three-dimensional modeling, prototyping, and printing suggests that direct laser sintering of titanium is the optimal method to produce biocompatible surgical implants.

  5. ICD implantation via thoracoscopy, "mailslot" thoracotomy, and subxiphoid incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodman, R F; Furman, S; Fell, S C; Foxx, M J; Frame, R A; Fisher, J D; Kim, S G; Roth, J A; Ferrick, K J

    1994-02-01

    An improved method of thoracoscopic implantable cardioverter defibrillators implantation is described. "Mailslot" thoracotomy is more expeditious than thoracoscopic implantation via multiple ports. If required for adequate defibrillation thresholds, subxiphoid, subdiaphragmatic implantation of a defibrillator patch may be performed.

  6. Flapless single-tooth immediate implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Breno Carnevalli Franco; de Carvalho, Elaine Manso Oliveira Franco; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2013-01-01

    This 15-year prospective study evaluated the success rate and preservation of the gingival margin of single implants placed in a flapless procedure loaded immediately after extraction or after a healing period. Immediate flapless implant placement was performed in patients who fulfilled specified inclusion criteria. Implants were either immediately restored with a provisional crown or left unloaded (received healing abutment only). Implant success and gingival margin levels were evaluated after implant placement and after 1 to 15 years. A total of 305 healthy nonsmoking subjects (90 men, 215 women) were treated with 430 immediate implants during a 15-year period (December 1994 to December 2009) and monitored for 1 to 15 years. Two hundred seventy-five implants received an immediate provisional crown, and 155 received a healing abutment. The implant survival rate was 93.03% (± 3.74%). The immediate provisional helped to maintain the original gingival margin, although the implant survival rate was higher for implants that were not immediately restored (96.78%) than for the implants that were immediately restored with a provisional (90.9%). This 15-year prospective study showed a favorable implant success rate related to the flapless immediate implant placement protocol with healing abutment placement or an immediate provisional crown to replace a single missing tooth.

  7. The future of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B S

    1997-08-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in recent years in the design and application of processing strategies for cochlear implants. Most notably, use of the new spectral peak (SPEAK) and continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) strategies have provided large improvements in speech reception performance compared with prior strategies (NIH Consensus Statement, 1995; Skinner et al., 1994a; Wilson et al., 1991). All major manufacturers of multichannel implant systems, including Advanced Bionics Corp., Bionic Systems, Cochlear Pty. Ltd., and Med El, now offer CIS or CIS-like strategies in their speech processors. The SPEAK strategy was developed by Cochlear Pty. Ltd and continues to be one of the options available in that company's devices. The principal purpose of this editorial is to present some of the many possibilities for further improvements in performance. To the extent that such possibilities are realized, implant systems of the future may be quite different from present systems, with different processing strategies, electrode designs, telemetry features, and fitting procedures.

  8. Radioactive implants for medical applications; Radioaktive Implantate fuer medizinische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, M.

    2008-07-01

    The long-term success of surgery is often diminished by excessive wound healing, which makes another intervention necessary. Locally applied radionuclides with short range radiation can prevent such benign hyperproliferation. As pure electron emitter with a half-life of 14.3 days and a mean energy of 694.9 keV (E{sub max}=1710.48 keV) {sup 32}P is a suitable radionuclide which can be produced from the stable {sup 31}P by the capture of thermal neutrons (1 x 10{sup 14} /s/cm{sup 2}) in a nuclear reactor. After a typical irradiation time (14 days) the ratio of {sup 32}P to {sup 31}P is 1.4 x 10{sup -5} to 1. Implants made of polymer and/or bioabsorbable material functioning as a carrier of the radioactive emitter allow - as opposed to metallic implants - for new applications for this type of radiotherapy. In this thesis a manufacturing method for previously not available organic, radioactive implants has been developed and a corresponding dosimetry system has been established. By means of ion implantation, {sup 32}P ions with up to 180 keV can be shot some 100 nm deep into organic implant materials. For a typical dose (15 Gy over 7 days, 1 mm distance from the implant) an activity of 75 kBq is needed corresponding to 1.3 x 10{sup 11} {sup 32}P ions. The sputter ion gun, which has been optimized for this application, creates an ion beam with high beam current (> 14 {mu}A P{sup -}) and low emittance (< 4 {pi} mm mrad {radical}(MeV)). Because of the good beam quality also small implants (<1 mm{sup 2}) can be manufactured with high efficiency. The unintentionally co-implanted portion of molecules and nuclides of the same mass (e.g. {sup 31}PH, {sup 16}O{sub 2} and {sup 32}S) could be reduced from approximately 500 to 50 by an improvement of the isotope selection at {sup 32}P beam creation. Hence, in comparison with the best hitherto existing implantation methods, the radiation dose of the implant could be reduced by an order of magnitude. With regard to the beta

  9. Surface engineering by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Bjarne Roger

    1995-01-01

    Awidespread commercial applica tion iof particle accelerators is for ion implantation. Accelerator beams are used for ion implantation into metals, alloying a thin surface layer with foreign atoms to concentrations impossible to achieve by thermal processes, making for dramatic improvements in hardness and in resistance to wear and corrosion. Traditional hardening processes require high temperatures causing deformation; ion implantation on the other hand is a ''cold process'', treating the finished product. The ionimplanted layer is integrated in the substrate, avoiding the risk of cracking and delamination from normal coating processes. Surface properties may be ''engineered'' independently of those of the bulk material; the process does not use environmentally hazardous materials such as chromium in the surface coating. The typical implantation dose required for the optimum surface properties of metals is around 2 x 10 17 ion/cm 2 , a hundred times the typical doses for semiconductor processing. When surface areas of more than a few square centimetres have to be treated, the implanter must therefore be able to produce high beam currents (5 to 10 mA) to obtain an acceptable treatment time. Ion species used include nitrogen, boron, carbon, titanium, chromium and tantalum, and beam energies range from 50 to 200 keV. Since most components are three dimensional, it must be possible to rotate and tilt them in the beam, and control beam position over a large area. Examples of industrial applications are: - surface treatment of prostheses (hip and knee joints) to reduce wear of the moving parts, using biocompatible materials; - ion implantation into high speed ball bearings to protect against the aqueous corrosion in jet engines (important for service helicopters on oil rigs); - hardening of metal forming and cutting tools; - reduction of corrosive wear of plastic moulding tools, which are expensive to produce

  10. Living with Your Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Living With Your Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) Updated:Dec 21,2016 The American Heart ... home without it. Download a printable Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) Wallet ID card . Always keep it with ...

  11. Dental implant surgery: planning and guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobregt, S.; Schillings, J.J.; Vuurberg, E.

    2001-01-01

    A prototype application has been developed for interactive planning of dental implants on the EasyVision workstation. The user is led step by step via virtual positioning of the implant to the design of a customized drill guide. (orig.)

  12. Neutrophil Responses to Sterile Implant Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Jhunjhunwala

    Full Text Available In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.

  13. Defect characteristics by boron cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuo, Jiro; Takaoka, Gikan; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2003-01-01

    Cluster ion implantation using decaborane (B 10 H 14 ) has been proposed as a shallow implantation technique for LSI devices with gate lengths of several-tens nanometers. Experiments and computer simulations of low-energy boron monomers and decaborane clusters implantation were performed. Molecular dynamics simulations of B 10 cluster implantation have shown similar implant depth but different damage density and damage structure compared to monomer (B 1 ) ion implantation with the same energy-per-atom. For monomer implantation, point-defects such as vacancy-interstitial pairs are mainly formed. On the other hand, B 10 generates large numbers of defects within a highly-amorphised region at the impact location. This difference in damage structure produced during implantation is expected to cause different annihilation processes

  14. Fractographic analysis of fractured dental implant components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ling Chang

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: To avoid implant fracture, certain underlying mechanical risk factors should be noted such as patients with a habit of bruxism, bridgework with a cantilever design, or two implants installed in a line in the posterior mandible.

  15. Dental implant surgery: planning and guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobregt, S.; Schillings, J.J.; Vuurberg, E. [MIMIT Easy Vision Advanced Development, Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands)

    2001-11-01

    A prototype application has been developed for interactive planning of dental implants on the EasyVision workstation. The user is led step by step via virtual positioning of the implant to the design of a customized drill guide. (orig.)

  16. Implants in free fibula flap supporting dental rehabilitation - Implant and peri-implant related outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay V; Ebenezer, Supriya; Kämmerer, Peer W; Jacob, P C; Kuriakose, Moni A; Hedne, Naveen; Wagner, Wilfried; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the difference in success rates of implants when using two or four implant-supported-overdentures following segmental mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flap. This prospective, parallel designed, randomized clinical study was conducted with 1:1 ratio. At baseline, all participants already had segmental reconstruction of mandible with free fibula flap. The participants were randomized into two groups: Group-I received implant-supported-overdentures on two tissue-level implants and Group-II received implant-supported-overdentures on four tissue-level implants. Success rates of the implants were evaluated at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months following implant loading using marginal bone level changes as well as peri-implant indices (Buser et al., 1990). 52 patients were randomized into two treatment groups (26 each), out of which 18 patients (36 implants) of Group-I and 17 patients (68 implants) of Group-II were evaluated. One implant in Group-I was lost due to infective complications and one patient in the same group had superior barrel necrosis. There was a statistically significant increase at both time points (p = 0.03, p = 0.04 at 6 months, 12 months) in the amount of marginal bone loss in Group-I (0.4 mm, 0.5 mm at 6 months, 12 months) as compared to Group-II (0.1 mm, 0.2 mm at 6 months, 12 months). There were no clinically significant changes peri-implant parameters between both groups. Peri-implant soft tissue hyperplasia was seen in both groups, 32% of implants at 3-months, 26% at 6-months and 3% at 12-months follow-up. The results of this study show that patients with 2-implant-supported-overdentures had higher marginal bone loss as compared to patients with 4-implant-supported-overdentures. There were no clinically significant differences in peri-implant soft tissue factors in patients with 2- or 4-implant-supported-overdentures. Hyperplastic peri-implant tissues are common in the early implant

  17. Implant angulation : A measurement technique, implant overdenture maintenance, and the influence of surgical experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walton, JN; Huizinga, SC; Peck, CC

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to develop a technique to measure the angulation between two implants and between each implant and reference planes, to analyze the relationship between the maintenance (adjustments and repairs) of ball-attachment mandibular implant overdentures and implant

  18. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search...

  19. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Ludmila Assuncao de Mello; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia Santos, E-mail: ludmilapedroso@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Garcia, Robson Rodrigues [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Medicina Oral; Leles, Jose Luiz Rodrigues [Universidade Paulista (UNIP), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Cirurgia; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Prevencao e Reabilitacao Oral

    2013-11-15

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p < 0.05). The final sample comprised 95 implants in 27 patients, distributed over the maxilla and mandible. Agreement in implant length was 50.5% between initial and final planning, and correct prediction of the actual implant length was 40.0% and 69.5%, using PAN and CBCT exams, respectively. Agreement in implant width assessment ranged from 69.5% to 73.7%. A paired comparison of the frequency of changes between initial or final planning and implant placement (McNemmar test) showed greater frequency of changes in initial planning for implant length (p < 0.001), but not for implant width (p = 0.850). The frequency of changes was not influenced by implant location at any stage of implant planning (chi-square test, p > 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  20. Short Implants Versus Standard Implants: Midterm Outcomes of a Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlidayi, M Emre; Ucar, Yurdanur; Tatli, Ufuk; Ekren, Orhun; Evlice, Burcu; Kisa, Halil Ibrahim; Baksi, Uygar

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the midterm survival rate, marginal bone resorption (MBR), and stability of short implants and to compare the results with standard length implants. A total of 38 patients were included. In total, 147 implants (Nucleoss Implants, Izmir, Turkey) were placed (86 short implants and 61 standard implants). Cement-retained metal-ceramic prostheses were fabricated. MBR was evaluated on periapical radiographs taken at implant placement, at the time of crown insertion and annually thereafter. The stability of the implants was evaluated by resonance frequency analysis. The 3- and 5-year cumulative survival rates for standard implants was 98.4% and for short implants was 96.5% (P = 0.644). The MBR of the short implants was significantly lower than that of the standard implants after 1, 2, and 3 years of loading (P implant stability (implant stability quotient values) (P > 0.05). Within the limits of this study, it is concluded that short implants achieved similar results as standard implants after 3 to 5 years of loading.

  1. A rapid micrograft implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, E L

    1995-11-01

    A rapid and simple method for the implantation of micrografts is presented. A 14-gauge needle is used to deliver the micrograft to the recipient hole created by the needle. Jeweler's forceps are used to seat the graft once it is in place. The needle-guided implantation technique described here is a fast and effective method for insertion of one- or two-hair grafts at the frontal hairline or over extensive areas of hair loss. The technique described can be readily learned and produces excellent cosmetic results.

  2. Implantable Devices: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan V. Jacob

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ageing population and a multitude of neurological and cardiovascular illnesses that cannot be mitigated by medication alone have resulted in a significant growth in the number of patients that require implantable electronic devices. These range from sensors, gastric and cardiac pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, to deep brain, nerve, and bone stimulators. Long-term implants present specific engineering challenges, including low energy consumption and stable performance. Resorbable electronics may offer excellent short-term performance without the need for surgical removal. However, most electronic materials have poor bio- and cytocompatibility, resulting in immune reactions and infections. This paper reviews the current situation and highlights challenges for future advancements.

  3. Multiple immediate implants placement with immediate loading

    OpenAIRE

    Narang, Sumit; Narang, Anu; Jain, Kapil; Bhatia, Vineet

    2014-01-01

    The replacement of missing teeth with implant-borne restorations has become a treatment modality accepted by the scientific community for fully and partially edentulous patients. Recent reports have demonstrated the successful placement of dental implants into the fresh extraction socket in the anterior as well as in molar regions, which is made possible due to modification in implant surface. The present case report highlights the placement of three bicortical screw (BCS) implants into the f...

  4. Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers – 50 Years from the First Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratko Magjarević

    2010-01-01

    Overview: Development of implantable cardiac pacemaker was enabled by another important invention, the silicon transistor. h ough the invention of suitable lithium cells as appropriate power supply was essential for prolongation of battery life cycle and for increased reliability of pacemakers, main milestones in the development were associated with technological breakthroughs in electronics: from transistors, which introduced such features as small size and low power consumption, to hybrid and integrated circuits, which enabled programmability, microprocessors, which added more options in programming (multiprogrammability, diagnostics and telemetry, and the ICT (information communication technology that enabled physicians remote access to patients and interrogation of their implantable devices. Conclusions: Implantable pacemakers are reliable devices indicated for a wide range of dif erent therapies of cardiac rhythm disorders and heart failure. h ere is still a lot to learn about the physiology of a normal heart and even more about the failing heart. Modern pacemakers provide physicians valuable information from pacemakers’ memory via the built-in telemetry system. h ese information help physicians to better understand pathologic processes within the heart, thus contributing to the development of new ideas for treatment of diseases and for precise tailoring of the therapy to the patient’s needs. Although implantable pacemakers have reached the level of mature technology, they will continue to develop with therapies and diagnostics to facilitate a higher quality of life.

  5. Hydroxyapatite-coated uncemented implants and peri-implant infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbos, Cornelis Johannes Maria

    2004-01-01

    One of the major complications of joint replacement surgery is a peri-implant infection. A hip prosthesis coated with hydroxyapatite, a calcium phosphate (found in human bone), may offer protection in this respect. In a series of patients who were treated with a hydroxyapatite-coated hip prosthesis

  6. Influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Yun Pan; Szu-Ting Chou; Yu-Chuan Tseng; Yi-Hsin Yang; Chao-Yi Wu; Ting-Hsun Lan; Pao-Hsin Liu; Hong-Po Chang

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants by measuring the resonance frequency. Twenty-five orthodontic mini-implants with a diameter of 2 mm were used. The first group contained stainless steel mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm). The second group included titanium alloy mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm) and stainless steel mini-implants 10 mm in length. The mini-implants w...

  7. Peri-implant plastic surgery techniques to hard and soft tissue augmentation in implant rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltacioğlu, Esra; Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Aydin, Güven; Sukuroglu, Erkan

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the clinical results of peri-implant plastic surgical approaches for hard and soft tissues before and during the implant placement in a patient with vertical ridge deformation and a shallow vestibule sulcus, and the subsequently performed prosthetic rehabilitation. The surgical approaches used in this case reduced the crown-height space and crown-to-implant ratio and ensured that the implants were placed in their ideal positions, and peri-implant tissue health was maintained. In conclusion, developments in the peri-implant plastic surgery enable the successful augmentation of hard and soft tissue defects and provide the implant-supported fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:29386805

  8. Simple, quick, and efficient implant placement jig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Narayan Pai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implants have become an inherent part of everyday orthodontic practice, but unlike prosthodontic implants, their placement and insertion into narrow interradicular spaces for orthodontic purposes remain a tricky and challenging part to most clinicians. An innovative and clinically useful method has been described here for safe and easy insertion of mini-implants.

  9. Active implants and scaffolds for tissue regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Zilberman, Meital

    2011-01-01

    Active implants are actually drug or protein-eluting implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task, such as support. This book gives a broad overview of biomaterial platforms used as basic elements of drug-eluting implants.

  10. Investigations to problems of the implantation metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.

    1987-01-01

    Basing on processes and effects caused ion implantation of metals a review is given about the problems of the implantation metallurgy. Techniques of high-fluence ion implantation and ion beam mixing are generally confined. These techniques change the structure and the chemical composition in the near of the surface of metals. The application of these methods is demonstrated on series of examples. (author)

  11. [The elementary discussion on digital implant dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y C

    2016-04-09

    It is a digital age today. Exposed to all kinds of digital products in many fields. Certainly, implant dentistry is not exception. Digitalization could improve the outcomes and could decrease the complications of implant dentistry. This paper introduces the concepts, definitions, advantages, disadvantages, limitations and errors of digital implant dentistry.

  12. Etonogestrel contraceptive implant: ulnar nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    (1) Subcutaneous etonogestrel implants are intended to provide female contraception for three years. The implants can be difficult to locate before removal, and general anaesthesia is necessary in some cases. (2) Cases of ulnar (cubital) nerve damage have occurred during manipulation of the implant, especially during removal. Neurological recovery is sometimes slow and uncertain.

  13. Primary prevention of peri-implantitis: Managing peri-implant mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Søren; Berglundh, Tord; Genco, Robert; Aass, Anne Merete; Demirel, Korkud; Derks, Jan; Figuero, Elena; Giovannoli, Jean Louis; Goldstein, Moshe; LAMBERT, France; Ortiz-Vigon, Alberto; Polyzois, Ioannis; Salvi, Giovanni; Schwarz, Frank; Serino, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Abstract AIMS: Over the past decades, the placement of dental implants has become a routine procedure in the oral rehabilitation of fully and partially edentulous patients. However, the number of patients/implants affected by peri-implant diseases is increasing. As there are--in contrast to periodontitis--at present no established and predictable concepts for the treatment of peri-implantitis, primary prevention is of key importance. The management of peri-implant mucositis is considere...

  14. Effectiveness of Implant Therapy Analyzed in a Swedish Population: Prevalence of Peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, J; Schaller, D; Håkansson, J; Wennström, J L; Tomasi, C; Berglundh, T

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease affecting soft and hard tissues surrounding dental implants. As the global number of individuals that undergo restorative therapy through dental implants increases, peri-implantitis is considered as a major and growing problem in dentistry. A randomly selected sample of 588 patients who all had received implant-supported therapy 9 y earlier was clinically and radiographically examined. Prevalence of peri-implantitis was assessed and risk indicators were identified by multilevel regression analysis. Forty-five percent of all patients presented with peri-implantitis (bleeding on probing/suppuration and bone loss >0.5 mm). Moderate/severe peri-implantitis (bleeding on probing/suppuration and bone loss >2 mm) was diagnosed in 14.5%. Patients with periodontitis and with ≥4 implants, as well as implants of certain brands and prosthetic therapy delivered by general practitioners, exhibited higher odds ratios for moderate/severe peri-implantitis. Similarly, higher odds ratios were identified for implants installed in the mandible and with crown restoration margins positioned ≤1.5 mm from the crestal bone at baseline. It is suggested that peri-implantitis is a common condition and that several patient- and implant-related factors influence the risk for moderate/severe peri-implantitis (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01825772). © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  15. Implantable Sensors for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterhoff, Brett S; Tsang, Melissa; She, Didi; Ong, Keat Ghee; Allen, Mark G; Willett, Nick J; Guldberg, Robert E

    2017-02-01

    The translation of many tissue engineering/regenerative medicine (TE/RM) therapies that demonstrate promise in vitro are delayed or abandoned due to reduced and inconsistent efficacy when implemented in more complex and clinically relevant preclinical in vivo models. Determining mechanistic reasons for impaired treatment efficacy is challenging after a regenerative therapy is implanted due to technical limitations in longitudinally measuring the progression of key environmental cues in vivo. The ability to acquire real-time measurements of environmental parameters of interest including strain, pressure, pH, temperature, oxygen tension, and specific biomarkers within the regenerative niche in situ would significantly enhance the information available to tissue engineers to monitor and evaluate mechanisms of functional healing or lack thereof. Continued advancements in material and fabrication technologies utilized by microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs) and the unique physical characteristics of passive magnetoelastic sensor platforms have created an opportunity to implant small, flexible, low-power sensors into preclinical in vivo models, and quantitatively measure environmental cues throughout healing. In this perspective article, we discuss the need for longitudinal measurements in TE/RM research, technical progress in MEMS and magnetoelastic approaches to implantable sensors, the potential application of implantable sensors to benefit preclinical TE/RM research, and the future directions of collaborative efforts at the intersection of these two important fields.

  16. Ovarian stimulation, endometrium and implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mandana Beigi Boroujeni

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Paper article, the collection of the studies related to the effect of ovarian stimulation on endometrium of uterus and implantation have been investigated. History: Monash group used ovarian stimulation method for the first time in infertility treatment and also, they could increase the pregnancy rate using this method. However, the percentage of successful embryonic implantation has been decreased by this method due to imbalance of hormones and the effect of these hormonal changes on endometrium. Materials and Methods: Studies done by researchers have shown that ovarian stimulation causes undesirable changes in endometrium which in turn such alterations lead to inadequate attachment of embryo to endometrium and finally decrease the percentage of embryonic implantation. Conclusion: Based on several researches and the importance of using the ovarian stimulation method in treatment of infertility, also due to undesirable effects that ovarian stimulation has on endometrium during embryonic implantation it is inevitable that more investigations should be done for improvement of treatment methods in infertility clinics.

  17. Cochlear implant after bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, Jesper; Ovesen, Therese

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective case study at a tertiary referral center was to investigate the outcome of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss due to meningitis compared to CI in children with deafness due to other reasons. This post-meningial group (PMG) consisted of 22 children undergoing CI due to deafness induced by meningitis, between December 1996 and January 2012. Five children had bilateral simultaneous implantation. None was excluded and the children were followed for at least 3 years. Operations were carried out by one of two surgeons using similar techniques in all cases. Each patient from the PMG was matched 2:1 with children having implantation for other reasons according to age and follow up (control group). Overall, the median category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) score were not statistically significantly different between the two groups. The presence of additional central nervous system (CNS) disorders (post-meningeal sequelae), however, correlated significantly with poorer outcome CI was a safe procedure without surgical complications in the present study. It is possible to restore auditory capacity and speech performance to a degree comparable to children undergoing implantation for other reasons. A statistically important variable is secondary CNS involvement. The rehabilitation program after CI should be adjusted according to these additional handicaps. It is recommended to screen meningitis patients as fast as possible to identify those with hearing loss and initiate treatment with hearing aids or CI. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. [Dental implant restoration abutment selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Shi; Hao, Zeng

    2017-04-01

    An increasing number of implant restoration abutment types are produced with the rapid development of dental implantology. Although various abutments can meet different clinical demands, the selection of the appropriate abutment is both difficult and confusing. This article aims to help clinicians select the appropriate abutment by describing abutment design, types, and selection criteria.

  19. Reading skills after cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    It has frequently been found that profoundly deaf children with conventional hearing aids have difficulties with the comprehension of written text. Cochlear Implants (CIs) were expected to enhance the reading comprehension of these profoundly deaf children because they provide auditory access to

  20. Hydroxyapatite-coated tooth implants by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Miroslav; Dostalova, Tatjana; Himmlova, Lucia; Grivas, Christos

    1996-09-01

    Thin films of biocompatible ceramic were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on cylindrical implants. Diamond- like carbon films were deposited in vacuum on titanium alloy prostheses, heated to 90 degrees C. Coated prostheses were implanted into legs of rats and osseointegration higher than 60 percent was determined. Thin films of hydroxyapatite were created on real dental implants at 500 degrees C in Ar-water vapor atmosphere. Coated implants were implanted into mandibula of minipigs to study load free osseointegration. Results and experiences are presented and discussed.

  1. [Cochlear implant treatment in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, R; Stelzig, Y

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of impaired auditory function through cochlear implant is possible, with high reliably and great success. Nevertheless, there are regular disputes between patients and insurance companies due to high costs. In Germany, approx. 1.9 Mio. people are severely hearing impaired. It can be estimated that for adequate hearing rehabilitation about 30,000 cochlear implants/year are necessary. Currently, less than 10% of those affected are offered cochlear implant. A handicap is defined if there is deviation from normal hearing for more than 6 months. This sets a time frame for the supply with cochlear implant after sudden deafness. The professional code requires to advice all medical options to a person seeking help for hearing loss. This includes benefit-risk consideration. At this point, the economic aspect plays no role. The indication for medical treatment is only subject to the treating physician and should not be modified by non-physicians or organizations. It should be noted that a supply of hearing aids is qualitatively different to the help from a cochlear implant, which provides a restoration of lost function. In social law (SGB V and IX) doctors are requested to advise and recommend all measures which contribute to normal hearing (both sides). This indicates that doctors may be prosecuted for not offering help when medically possible, just because health insurance employees did not approve the cost balance. The current situation, with insufficient medical care for the hearing impaired, needs clarifying. To do this, patients, health insurance companies, the political institutions, legislation and professional societies need to accept their responsibilities.

  2. He reemission implanted in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Observation of He reemission of various metals under He + implantation at wide temperature range. • Materials examined are aluminum (Al), Nickel (Ni) and molybdenum (Mo). • He reemission is quite temperature dependent and different with materials. • Three metals show similar dependence on temperature normalized with respective melting point. • He reemission is successfully correlated with He behavior in metals. - Abstract: Helium (He) reemission of Al, Ni and Mo under energetic He implantation (10–30 keV) in wide temperature range is studied to understand behavior of implanted He in correlation with structure changes. The reemission behavior is categorized into 4 different temperature ranges with the normalized temperature (T m ) to the melting point of each metal. At elevated temperatures (well above ∼0.6 T m ), interstitial He atoms and/or He-vacancy (ies) clusters can migrate remaining no structure change and showing smooth reemission without any burst. Between ∼0.25 and 0.6 T m , He reemission always accompanies significant structure modification. For ∼04–0.6 T m , implanted He coalesce to make bubbles and the bubbles can move to the surface. Bubble migration accompanies materials flow to the surface resulting in fuzz surface or columnar structure, depending on implantation flux. Slower bubble motion at ∼0.25–0.4 prohibits the material migration. Instead the bubbles coalesce to grow large and multi-layered blistering appears as periodic reemission behavior. Below ∼0.25 T m , He migration is too slow for bubbles to grow large, but bubble density increases up to a certain fluence, where neighboring bubbles start to coalesce. Accordingly, He release is mostly caused by mechanical failure or blister rapture. With increasing fluence, all defects (bubbles and dislocation loops) tangle or inter connected with neighboring defects and accordingly He migration to the surface along the tangled or connected defects is enhanced

  3. [Clinical application of individualized three-dimensional printing implant template in multi-tooth dental implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lie; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Rong; Zeng, Hao

    2017-08-01

    To study the value and satisfaction of three-dimensional printing implant template and conventional implant template in multi-tooth dental implantation. Thirty cases (83 teeth) with missing teeth needing to be implanted were randomly divided into conventional implant template group (CIT group, 15 cases, 42 teeth) and 3D printing implant template group (TDPIT group, 15 cases, 41 teeth). Patients in CIT group were operated by using conventional implant template, while patients in TDPIT group were operated by using three-dimensional printing implant template. The differences of implant neck and tip deviation, implant angle deviation and angle satisfaction between the two groups were compared. The difference of probing depth and bone resorption of implant were compared 1 year after operation between the two groups. The difference of success rate and satisfaction of dental implantation were compared 1 year after operation between the two groups. SPSS19.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The deviation direction of the neck and the tip in disto-mesial, bucco-palatal, vertical direction and angle of implants in disto-mesial and bucco-palatal direction in TDPIT group were significantly lower than in CIT group (P0.05). The difference of the cumulative success rate in dental implantation at 3 months and 6 months between the two groups were not significant (P>0.05), but the cumulative success rate of TDPIT group was significantly higher than CIT group at 9 months and 1 year (90.48% vs 100%,P=0.043). The patients' satisfaction rate of dental implantation in TDPIT group was significantly higher than in CIT group (86.67% vs 53.33%, P=0.046). Using three-dimensional printing implant template can obtain better accuracy of implant, higher implant success rate and better patients' satisfaction than using conventional implant template. It is suitable for clinical application.

  4. Properties of nitrogen-implanted polycrystalline nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehni, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of nitrogen-implanted polycrystalline nickel foils were investigated. An ultrahigh vacuum chamber, equipped with a cylindrical mirror analyzer for Auger electron spectroscopy and a quadrapole mass spectrometer, was attached to an ion implanter via a beam line. Pressure in the UHV chamber during implantation was 2 x 10 -10 Torr, which allowed control over sample cleanliness and composition of background gases. Polycrystalline Ni foils were implanted with N 2 + ions. Auger electron spectroscopy sputter depth profiles of the N-implanted Ni samples reveal a two-peaked N distribution. Besides the normal implant distribution peak, there is a buildup of N on the surface due to radiation-induced segregation of the implanted N. The implanted distribution has an unusually long tail that extends deep into the Ni sample. A submonolayer of C on the Ni surface prior to implantation has a marked effect on the N distribution. The implant distribution peak is deeper for samples with carbon initially on the surface. Annealing the Ni samples causes the implant distribution peak to migrate deeper into the sample and spread out. The surface N concentration increases with annealing eventually reaching a saturation coverage

  5. Conduction in ion implanted single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, J.D.; Parikh, N.R.; Swanson, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have implanted sodium, phosphorus and arsenic into single crystal type IIa diamond as possible n-type dopants. Particular emphasis was applied to the implantation of sodium at different temperatures and doses; combined implantation energies of 55,80 and 120 keV were used to provide a uniformly doped layer over approximately 100 nm depth. The implanted layers exhibited semiconducting behavior with a single exponential activation energy between 0.40 and 0.48 eV, as determined by temperature dependent resistance measurements. A sample implanted to a concentration of 5.10 19 Na + /cm 3 at 550 degrees C exhibited a single activation energy of 0.415 eV over a temperature range from 25 to 500 degrees C. Thermal annealing above 900 degrees C was found to remove implantation damage as measured by optical absorption and RBS/channeling. However, concomitant increases in the resistance and the activation energy were observed. Implantation of 22 Ne was used to introduce a damage density equivalent to the 23 Na implant, while not introducing an electrically active species. The activation energy and electrical resistance were similar but higher than those produced by implantation with sodium. We conclude that the electrical properties of the Na-implanted samples were at least partly due to electrically active Na, but that residual implantation damage was still important

  6. Effect of anomalous drift during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, P.A.; Baranova, E.K.; Beloshitskii, V.V.; Demakov, K.D.; Starostin, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented on Tl-ion implantation into hot silicon substrates (approx. 1200 0 C). a An anomalously large (by more than an order of magnitude) displacement of the peak position of the implanted impurity distribution into the bulk of the substrate is found. b) The conclusion is drawn that the basic process responsible for this displacement of the peak is radiation-enhanced diffusion (RED) due to nonequilibrium concentration of point defects produced in the heated target directly under implantation. c) The crystalline structure of the resulting ion-implanted layer indicates that in-situ annealing of the exposed layer occurs during high-temperature implantation. d) Experimental impurity distributions confirm the possibility of producing an implanted-impurity 'buried layer' below the layer of a single crystal silicon, the 'buried layer' depth depending on the implantation regime. (author)

  7. Immediate implants for aesthetic success: New guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish Bhola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immediate implant placement in extraction sockets is well-documented. There is adequate long-term evidence that immediate implants have survival rates similar to delayed placement. Additionally, immediate implants also help preserve the crestal bone and minimize soft tissue changes in the aesthetic zone. The decision to extract teeth and replace them with implants is determined by many factors. While implant insertion at the time of tooth extraction is desirable for a number of reasons, extraction socket morphology, soft tissue biotype, presence of infection, health of the bone and soft tissue, and other factors help determine if the site is ideal for immediate implant placement or not. This article will review some key and new guidelines for immediate implant placement in the aesthetic zone for long-term success and stability.

  8. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on cochlear implantation in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of 5 congenitally...... deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2 years of age.  Ratings of video observations were used to measure the children's early communication development with and without the use of their cochlear implants. In addition, parental interviews were used to assess the benefits...... parents perceived regarding their children's cochlear implants. Two examples are included in this article to illustrate the parents' perspectives about cochlear implantation in their deafblind children. Benefits of cochlear implantation in this cohort of children included improved attention and emotional...

  9. Dynamics of bone graft healing around implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    A few questions arise pertaining to the use of bone grafts along with implants are whether these are successful in approximation with implant. Do they accelerate bone regeneration? Are all defects ultimately regenerated with new viable bone? Is the bone graft completely resorbed or integrated in new bone? Does the implant surface characteristic positively affect osseointegration when used with a bone graft? What type of graft and implant surface can be used that will have a positive effect on the healing type and time? Finally, what are the dynamics of bone graft healing around an implant? This review discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone graft healing in general and in vicinity of another foreign, avascular body, namely the implant surface, and further, the role of bone grafts in osseointegration and/or clinical success of the implants.

  10. Prevalence of peri-implant disease on platform switching implants: a cross-sectional pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Duque DUQUE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of mucositis and peri-implantitis associated with the use of two types of implants—conventional versus platform switching after one year of loading. A longitudinal study of 64 implants in 25 patients was performed. Clinical variables, such as clinical pocket depth and bleeding upon probing, plaque, mobility, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss, and radiographic bone loss, were analyzed. The case definition for peri-implantitis was established as pockets of ≥ 5 mm with bleeding and bone loss ≥ 2 mm. One year after implant loading, the prevalence of mucositis and peri-implantitis with conventional implants (CIs was 81.2% and 15.6%, respectively. For platform switching implants (PSIs the prevalence was 90% and 6.6%, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.5375. However, there was a trend towards a lower prevalence of peri-implantitis with platform switching Implants.

  11. Successful Rehabilitation of Partial Edentulous Maxilla and Mandible with New Type of Implants: Molecular Precision Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Danza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of teeth results in rapid bone resorption both vertically and horizontally in the first month. The loss of alveolar ridge reduces the chance of implant rehabilitation. Atraumatic extraction, implant placement in extraction socket, and an immediate prosthesis have been proposed as alternative therapies to maintain the volume and contours tissue and reduce time and cost of treatment. The immediate load of implants is a universally practiced procedure; nevertheless a successful procedure requires expertise in both the clinical and the reconstructive stages using a solid implant system. Excellent primary stability and high bone-implant contact are only minimal requirements for any type of implant procedure. In this paper we present a case report using a new type of implants. The new type of implants, due to its sophisticated control system of production, provides to the implantologist a safe and reliable implant, with a macromorphology designed to ensure a close contact with the surrounding bone.

  12. Hydroxyapatite ocular implant and non-integrated implants in eviscerated patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinaru, S; Popescu, V; Leasu, C; Pricopie, S; Yasin, S; Ciuluvica, R; Ungureanu, E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study compares the outcomes and complications of hydroxyapatite ocular implant and non-integrated ocular implants following evisceration. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 90 patients who underwent evisceration for different ocular affections, in the Ophthalmology Department of the University Emergency Hospital Bucharest, between January 2009 and December 2013. The outcomes measured were conjunctival dehiscence, socket infection, implant exposure and extrusion rate. Results: Forty-three patients had the hydroxyapatite implant (coralline–Integrated Ocular Implants, USA or synthetic–FCI, France) and forty-seven received non-integrated ocular implants (24 acrylic and 23 silicone). Five cases of socket infection, thirteen cases of extrusion and two cases of conjunctival dehiscence were encountered. Conclusions: There was a higher rate of conjunctival dehiscence with hydroxyapatite ocular implant, but implant extrusion and socket infection were found in non-integrated ocular implants. PMID:25914747

  13. Custom Cast Ball Attachments Used on Outdated Implants to Restore a Maxillary Implant-Supported Overdenture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; Marin, Danny Omar Mendoza; Giro, Gabriela; Pero, Ana Carolina; Pinelli, Ligia Antunes Pereira; Reis, José Maurício Dos Santos Nunes

    2017-08-01

    The lack of compatible prosthetic components can be a complication during oral rehabilitation using outdated implants. The aim of the present clinical report was to describe an alternative technique for the fabrication of a maxillary implant-supported overdenture in a patient with 20-year-old dental implants using castable spherical patterns and ball attachments. The patient had been wearing a relined bar/clip overdenture in the mandible on 4 external-hexagon dental implants and a relined complete denture in the maxilla on 4 internal-hexagon implants due to abutment screw fracture inside of the implants, losing the attachment system. The remaining maxillary dental implants did not possess attachments compatible with current systems due to configuration changes by the manufacturer in the dental implant's platform and the components over time. Therefore, castable spherical patterns and cast ball attachments were used to fabricate a maxillary implant-supported overdenture. The mandible rehabilitation was performed using 4 osseointegrated dental implants with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis. The use of cast ball attachments on the maxillary dental implants avoided invasive procedures on the remaining implants. Considering the lack of available compatible prosthetic components for the osseointegrated implants, this technique was considered a viable and satisfactory treatment option.

  14. Immediate loading of two implants with a mandibular implant-retained overdenture: a new treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Geert T; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to present the clinical outcomes of the immediate loading of two bar-splinted implants retaining a mandibular overdenture. In a clinical trial, 124 edentulous patients were treated according to a new treatment concept, which involves the immediate loading of two bar-splinted SLActive implants with an implant-retained mandibular overdenture. The new conventional mandibular denture is used as a template for implant positioning and as an impression tray, and for mounting the retention clip by the dental laboratory. At the same day the implants are placed, the conventional denture is converted into an implant-retained overdenture. During the healing and evaluation period, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) was undertaken to assess the effect of loading on implant stability and survival. The survival rate of the implants was 98.8% during the evaluation period (12-40 months). Only 3 of the 248 implants were lost. During the healing (osseointegration) phase, the implant-stability quotient increased significantly (p = .0001). During the evaluation period, four patients (3%) needed a relining of their mandibular overdenture, whereas 13 patients (11%) needed relining of the maxillary denture. Two interconnected implants can be successfully loaded by a mandibular overdenture at the same day of implant placement with a high survival rate of the implants. Only a few patients needed additional relining of the overdenture. Repeated RFA measurements can be useful in gauging implant stability and survival. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Subgingival microbiome in patients with healthy and ailing dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Zicheng; Li, Lianshuo; Zhang, Jieni; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Ting; Lin, Jiuxiang; Chen, Feng

    2015-06-16

    Dental implants are commonly used to replace missing teeth. However, the dysbiotic polymicrobial communities of peri-implant sites are responsible for peri-implant diseases, such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. In this study, we analyzed the microbial characteristics of oral plaque from peri-implant pockets or sulci of healthy implants (n = 10), peri-implant mucositis (n = 8) and peri-implantitis (n = 6) sites using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. An increase in microbial diversity was observed in subgingival sites of ailing implants, compared with healthy implants. Microbial co-occurrence analysis revealed that periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, were clustered into modules in the peri-implant mucositis network. Putative pathogens associated with peri-implantitis were present at a moderate relative abundance in peri-implant mucositis, suggesting that peri-implant mucositis an important early transitional phase during the development of peri-implantitis. Furthermore, the relative abundance of Eubacterium was increased at peri-implantitis locations, and co-occurrence analysis revealed that Eubacterium minutum was correlated with Prevotella intermedia in peri-implantitis sites, which suggests the association of Eubacterium with peri-implantitis. This study indicates that periodontal pathogens may play important roles in the shifting of healthy implant status to peri-implant disease.

  16. Basic surgical principles with ITI implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buser, D; von Arx, T; ten Bruggenkate, C; Weingart, D

    2000-01-01

    The basic surgical principles governing the placement of ITI implants are based on research-oriented developments in harmony with evidence-based and outcome-oriented clinical procedures. In the past 15 years, the range of implant indications has been significantly widened, and partially edentulous patients clearly represent the majority of patients seeking treatment with dental implants today. An important aspect of the successful rehabilitation of patients with ITI implants is the careful selection of implant candidates with respect to systemic and local risk factors. These factors are presented based on current knowledge. Today, solid-screw implants in various screw dimensions and neck configurations comprise the ITI Dental Implant System. These different implant types are necessary to handle the full range of implant indications, in particular in partially edentulous patients. The main clinical factors are presented for the selection of the appropriate implant type, length and diameter. These implants are utilized both in a non-submerged and in a submerged approach. The main goal of surgical therapy is low trauma and the least demanding surgical procedure for patient and clinician to optimize the cost-effectiveness of implant therapy. Hence, a non-submerged approach is preferred in all sites without esthetic priority, such as in fully edentulous patients or in posterior sites of partially edentulous patients. These indications clearly represent the majority of implant patients. In esthetic sites, a submerged approach is utilized to satisfy the specific esthetic demands. The possibility to successfully utilize short implants (6 and 8 mm) and a reduced healing period of 3 months are further advantages of ITI implants due to favorable properties of the rough TPS surface. With the introduction of the microrough SLA surface, a reduction of the healing period to 6 weeks facilitates further progress towards simplification of implant therapy. In summary, the ITI Dental

  17. A simple method of making an implant-level impression when presented with limited space, unfavorable implant positions, or problematic implant angulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimattayompol, Nopsaran; Arbree, Nancy S; Wong, Stefanie X

    2002-06-01

    Making an implant-level impression for the purpose of abutment selection when implants are placed in limited space, unfavorable positions, or compromising angulations can be a time-consuming procedure. An impression procedure is presented that makes use of either prefabricated screw-retained titanium implant index copings or plastic snap-on implant index copings to help resolve problematic implant placement. Both the titanium and plastic implant index copings are easy to modify and therefore make impression procedures more predictable.

  18. Management of peri-implant infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing popularity of dental implants in recent years has been associated with the reported incidence of short-term and long-term complications such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Therapies proposed for treating peri-implantitis are based on the evidence available for the treatment of periodontitis, and are aimed at reducing the bacterial load within peri-implant pockets and decontaminating implant surfaces, and, in some cases, attempting afterward to bring about bone regeneration. The treatment of peri-implant infections comprises conservative (nonsurgical and surgical approaches. This paper reviews various treatment strategies used for the treatment of peri-implant diseases. There are many approaches suggested by various authors for the treatment of peri-implant diseases, but there is no “ideal peri-implant therapy” that has been described in the literature. There is no consensus regarding the treatment protocol as the studies conducted so far have had varying study designs, small sample sizes, and short follow-up periods.

  19. R&D on dental implants breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Sorin Mihai; Popovici, Ion Alexandru

    2017-09-01

    Most used dental implants for human dental prostheses are of two steps type: first step means implantation and, after several months healing and osseointegration, second step is prosthesis fixture. For sure, dental implants and prostheses are meant to last for a lifetime. Still, there are unfortunate cases when dental implants break. This paper studies two steps dental implants breakage and proposes a set of instruments for replacement and restoration of the broken implant. First part of the paper sets the input data of the study: structure of the studied two steps dental implants based on two Romanian patents and values of the loading forces found in practice and specialty papers. In the second part of the paper, using DEFORM 2D™ FEM simulation software, worst case scenarios of loading dental implants are studied in order to determine which zones and components of the dental implant set are affected (broken). Last part of the paper is dedicated to design and presentation of a set for extracting and cutting tools used to restore the broken implant set.

  20. Treatment of protruding osseo integrated dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddula Aravind

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dental implants have been used in the treatment of partial or complete edentulism. The height and width of the residual alveolus and surrounding anatomical structures can determine the proper position and path of insertion of dental implants. The following case report describes the treatment of a malpositioned osseo integrated dental implant with an apex perforating the buccal cortex of alveolar bone. A 61-year-old male was referred by his local dentist for the chief complaint of a swelling at site of tooth 14 where an implant was present. Intraoral clinical examination revealed an implant supported porcelain fused to metal crown replacing the maxillary right first premolar. A peri-apical radiograph of the implant revealed no signs of peri-implant bone loss or radiolucency. Surgical exploration and modification of the protruding implant. The area healed uneventfully without the need of explantation of the implant in site of tooth 14. We felt that the conservative treatment provided was prudent and treatment of choice and anticipate that the implant will most likely continue to function for a lifetime.

  1. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided or dynamic (navigated systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias, in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry.

  2. Miniscrew implant applications in contemporary orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Po Chang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for orthodontic treatment modalities that provide maximal anchorage control but with minimal patient compliance requirements has led to the development of implant-assisted orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Skeletal anchorage with miniscrew implants has no patient compliance requirements and has been widely incorporated in orthodontic practice. Miniscrew implants are now routinely used as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatment. This review summarizes recent data regarding the interpretation of bone data (i.e., bone quantity and quality obtained by preoperative diagnostic computed tomography (CT or by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT prior to miniscrew implant placement. Such data are essential when selecting appropriate sites for miniscrew implant placement. Bone characteristics that are indications and contraindications for treatment with miniscrew implants are discussed. Additionally, bicortical orthodontic skeletal anchorage, risks associated with miniscrew implant failure, and miniscrew implants for nonsurgical correction of occlusal cant or vertical excess are reviewed. Finally, implant stability is compared between titanium alloy and stainless steel miniscrew implants.

  3. Cochlear implants: system design, integration, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Rebscher, Stephen; Harrison, William; Sun, Xiaoan; Feng, Haihong

    2008-01-01

    As the most successful neural prosthesis, cochlear implants have provided partial hearing to more than 120000 persons worldwide; half of which being pediatric users who are able to develop nearly normal language. Biomedical engineers have played a central role in the design, integration and evaluation of the cochlear implant system, but the overall success is a result of collaborative work with physiologists, psychologists, physicians, educators, and entrepreneurs. This review presents broad yet in-depth academic and industrial perspectives on the underlying research and ongoing development of cochlear implants. The introduction accounts for major events and advances in cochlear implants, including dynamic interplays among engineers, scientists, physicians, and policy makers. The review takes a system approach to address critical issues in cochlear implant research and development. First, the cochlear implant system design and specifications are laid out. Second, the design goals, principles, and methods of the subsystem components are identified from the external speech processor and radio frequency transmission link to the internal receiver, stimulator and electrode arrays. Third, system integration and functional evaluation are presented with respect to safety, reliability, and challenges facing the present and future cochlear implant designers and users. Finally, issues beyond cochlear implants are discussed to address treatment options for the entire spectrum of hearing impairment as well as to use the cochlear implant as a model to design and evaluate other similar neural prostheses such as vestibular and retinal implants.

  4. Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1 Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2 Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth becomes difficult to restore. Placing an implant within the root can make the retained root restorable. At the same time, as the implant is placed within the root surface it achieves a periodontal integration which dampens occlusal forces better than osseointegration. Therefore, such a “tooth retained implant” may serve as an additional treatment option with significant benefits over tooth retention and implant placement alone. The hypothesis: Implants placed within retained roots have shown cementum deposition and attachment of periodontal ligament fibers over their surface. This periodontal attachment may be able to dam-pen forces better than in an osseointegrated implant. Moreover, since an implant is being placed, the crown of the tooth can be resected and submerged. This prevents epithelial migration, allows for the periodontal ligament cells to populate the wound and favors regeneration.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The technique of placing implants within cavities prepared in the root and then submerging them are simple for any practitioner placing implants routinely.

  5. Erbium implantation in Strontium Titanate

    CERN Document Server

    Araújo, J P; Alves, E; Correia, J G; Monteiro, T; Soares, J; Santos, L

    2002-01-01

    We report on the lattice location of Er in SrTiO$_{3}$ single crystals using the emission channeling technique. The angular distribution of conversion electrons emitted from $^{167m}$Er(T$_{1/2}$=2.27 s) was monitored with a position-sensitive detector following the room-temperature 60 keV implantation of the precursor isotope $^{167}$Tm(T$_{1/2}$=9.25 d) to a dose of 2$\\times$ 10$^{12}$ at./cm$^{2}$. The results for the sample annealed in vacuum at 610°C for 15 min provide direct evidence that Er occupies both Sr and Ti substitutional lattice sites. In addition, thermal recovery of lattice damage was also studied with RBS/C for SrTiO$_{3}$ implanted to doses of 5$\\times$ 10$^{14}$ and 5 $\\times$ 10$^{15}$ Er/cm$^{2}$. We further comment on preliminary photoluminescence results from these samples.

  6. Implante imediato com carga imediata

    OpenAIRE

    Fontoura, Ricardo Cauterucci

    2016-01-01

    Dois estágios cirúrgicos, somados a um período de cicatrização de três a seis meses, com a ausência de cargas funcionais foram estabelecidos por Bränemark, em 1977, como protocolo cirúrgico da terapia com implantes osteointegrados. Somente após esse tempo de cicatrização, poderia ocorrer a activação dos implantes e confecção das próteses. O desenvolvimento de vários estudos, com a finalidade de abreviar esse período de cicatrização, a simplificação da terapia restauradora, somados aos avan...

  7. Ankylos implant system: concept and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwig, Georg H

    2004-01-01

    The Ankylos system was developed in 1985 and has been in clinical use since 1987. Some of its significant design features include (1) a progressive thread structure of the endosseous implant body for targeted load distribution to the apically positioned spongy bone; and (2) the gap-free subgingival tapered connection to the abutments. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the Ankylos Implant System meets both the patients' and the dentists' standards of success and is suitable for use as single tooth replacements, bridge abutments, and retention elements for all regions and prosthetic indications. The data from 5439 implants were evaluated between October 1991 and October 2002. The implants were considered successful if the following criteria were met: (1) clinical stability and function; (2) no inflammation of the peri-implant hard and soft tissue; (3) no progressive loss of the peri-implant bone; (4) no progressive loss of the peri-implant mucosa; and (5) satisfaction of the patient. All implants placed during this period were included in the evaluation as a prospective study. The average loading period was 56.8 months. Postoperative follow-ups were made once a year by a standardized protocol. The results were classified by prosthetic application in Table 1. A total of 943 implants were placed as single tooth restoration and were followed for the duration of the study. The success rate for this type of restoration was 98.7%. For free-end implant restorations, there were 1679 implants placed with a 97.9% success rate. When the edentulous area involved a large gap, a total of 805 implants were placed with a 97.3% success rate. For cases involving reduced dentition, 606 implants were used with a 95.8% success rate. Another significant finding was that the success rates classified by maxilla and mandible showed no differences.

  8. Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Priapism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Ömer Barış; Pazır, Yaşar; Kadıoğlu, Ateş

    2018-04-01

    Priapism is defined as a full or partial erection lasting longer than 4 hours after sexual stimulation and orgasm or unrelated to sexual stimulation. The main goal of priapism management is to resolve the episode immediately to preserve erectile function and penile length. Corporal smooth muscle necrosis is likely to have already occurred, and medically refractory erectile dysfunction is expected in patients with a protracted episode. Penile prosthesis implantation (PPI) in the early or late phase of priapism can restore erectile function. To review the literature on PPI in priapism. A PubMed search of all English-language articles published before 2017 was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement using the following search terms: penile prosthesis implantation, priapism, and corporal fibrosis. All publications reporting on PPI during or after priapism episodes were included for review. Three types of priapism were reviewed for management using PPI. Surgical techniques, outcomes, and patient satisfaction were reported. Early implantation (during the episode) is technically easier and has lower complication rates compared with delayed (electively, after the erectile dysfunction is observed) surgery. Immediate PPI also allows preservation of penile length, which is related to higher satisfaction rates. The paradigm is shifting toward immediate PPI in the management of ischemic priapism. Patients with non-ischemic priapism or recurrent priapism, even without a major ischemic episode, are at high risk for erectile dysfunction and are candidates for PPI. Yücel ÖB, Pazır Y, Kadıoğlu A. Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Priapism. Sex Med Rev 2018;6:310-318. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno R; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2017-11-01

    To assess the survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants and to explore the possible factors that might affect the outcome of this reimplantation procedure. Patients that had failed dental implants, which were replaced with the same implant type at the same site, were included. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants; survival analysis was also performed. The effect of systemic, environmental, and local factors on the survival of the reoperated implants was evaluated. 175 of 10,096 implants in 98 patients were replaced by another implant at the same location (159, 14, and 2 implants at second, third, and fourth surgeries, respectively). Newly replaced implants were generally of similar diameter but of shorter length compared to the previously placed fixtures. A statistically significant greater percentage of lost implants were placed in sites with low bone quantity. There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.032) in the survival rates between implants that were inserted for the first time (94%) and implants that replaced the ones lost (73%). There was a statistically higher failure rate of the reoperated implants for patients taking antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. Dental implants replacing failed implants had lower survival rates than the rates reported for the previous attempts of implant placement. It is suggested that a site-specific negative effect may possibly be associated with this phenomenon, as well as the intake of antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chin-Yun; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Chao-Yi; Lan, Ting-Hsun; Liu, Pao-Hsin; Chang, Hong-Po

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates the influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants by measuring the resonance frequency. Twenty-five orthodontic mini-implants with a diameter of 2 mm were used. The first group contained stainless steel mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm). The second group included titanium alloy mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm) and stainless steel mini-implants 10 mm in length. The mini-implants were inserted into artificial bones with a 2-mm-thick cortical layer and 40 or 20 lb/ft(3) trabecular bone density at insertion depths of 2, 4, and 6 mm. The resonance frequency of the mini-implants in the artificial bone was detected with the Implomates(®) device. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α = 0.05). Greater insertion depth resulted in higher resonance frequency, whereas longer mini-implants showed lower resonance frequency values. However, resonance frequency was not influenced by the implant materials titanium alloy or stainless steel. Therefore, the primary stability of a mini-implant is influenced by insertion depth and not by implant material. Insertion depth is extremely important for primary implant stability and is critical for treatment success. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yun Pan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the influence of different implant materials on the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants by measuring the resonance frequency. Twenty-five orthodontic mini-implants with a diameter of 2 mm were used. The first group contained stainless steel mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm. The second group included titanium alloy mini-implants with two different lengths (10 and 12 mm and stainless steel mini-implants 10 mm in length. The mini-implants were inserted into artificial bones with a 2-mm-thick cortical layer and 40 or 20 lb/ft3 trabecular bone density at insertion depths of 2, 4, and 6 mm. The resonance frequency of the mini-implants in the artificial bone was detected with the Implomates® device. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α = 0.05. Greater insertion depth resulted in higher resonance frequency, whereas longer mini-implants showed lower resonance frequency values. However, resonance frequency was not influenced by the implant materials titanium alloy or stainless steel. Therefore, the primary stability of a mini-implant is influenced by insertion depth and not by implant material. Insertion depth is extremely important for primary implant stability and is critical for treatment success.

  12. Treatment concepts for the posterior maxilla and mandible: short implants versus long implants in augmented bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Cha, Jae-Kook; Jung, Ui-Won

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to describe treatment options for the posterior regions of the mandible and the maxilla, comparing short implants vs. longer implants in an augmented bone. The dental literature was screened for treatment options enabling the placement of dental implants in posterior sites with a reduced vertical bone height in the maxilla and the mandible. Short dental implants have been increasingly used recently, providing a number of advantages including reduced patient morbidity, shorter treatment time, and lower costs. In the posterior maxilla, sinus elevation procedures were for long considered to be the gold standard using various bone substitute materials and rendering high implant survival rates. More recently, implants were even placed without any further use of bone substitute materials, but the long-term outcomes have yet to be documented. Vertical bone augmentation procedures in the mandible require a relatively high level of surgical skill and allow the placement of standard-length dental implants by the use of autogenous bone blocks. Both treatment options, short dental implants, and standard-length implants in combination with vertical bone augmentation procedures, appear to result in predictable outcomes in terms of implant survival rates. According to recent clinical studies comparing the therapeutic options of short implants vs. long implants in augmented bone, the use of short dental implants leads to a number of advantages for the patients and the clinician.

  13. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw Around Dental Implants: Implant Surgery-Triggered or Implant Presence-Triggered Osteonecrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannacci, Ilaria; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Mortellaro, Carmen; Greco Lucchina, Alberta; Bonanini, Mauro; Vescovi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Dentoalveolar surgery including tooth extractions and dental implants placement is considered the major risk factor for developing medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ).In this study, a patient series of MRONJ around dental implants were carefully analyzed to describe the findings and to assess the possible risk factors. Fifteen patients with peri-implant bone osteonecrosis were selected out of a group of 250 patients (6%). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the temporal relationship. Group 1 (G1)-necrosis immediately after implant placement (from 2 to 10 months) and defined as "implant surgery-triggered" MRONJ. Group 2-necrosis distant (from 1 to 15 years) from implant placement and defined as "implant presence-triggered" MRONJ. Epidemiological and pharmacological variables were recorded as well as specific data about osteonecrosis and dental implants. G1 included 6 patients: 5 (83.4%) treated with oral bisphosphonates (BPs) for osteoporosis and 1 (16.6%) with intravenous BPs for breast cancer. Mean duration of BP therapy (BPT) was 83.7 months. G2 included 9 patients: 8 patients (88.89%) treated with intravenous BPs for malignant disease and 1 (11.11%) with oral BPs for osteoporosis. Data confirms that not only surgical insertion of dental implants is a potential risk factor for the development of osteonecrosis but also the presence itself of the implant into the bone can be associated with this disease. Therefore, it is necessary to inform of the increased risk for MRONJ also the patients who have already osteointegrated implants and are going to start the BPT.The risk is lower for patients receiving oral BPs but it exists and seems to be higher if the implant is located in the posterior areas, if the duration of BPT is more than 3 years and if the patient is under corticosteroid therapy.

  14. Clinical management of implant prostheses in patients with bruxism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komiyama, O.; Lobbezoo, F.; de Laat, A.; Iida, T.; Kitagawa, T.; Murakami, H.; Kato, T.; Kawara, M.

    2012-01-01

    There is general agreement that excessive stress to the bone-implant interface may result in implant overload and failure. Early failure of the implant due to excessive loading occurs shortly after uncovering the implant. Excess load on a final restoration after successful implant integration can

  15. Provisional restoration options in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, R E

    2007-09-01

    Unlike their use in conventional crown and bridge, provisional restorations during implant therapy have been underutilized. Provisional restorations should be used to evaluate aesthetic, phonetic and occlusal function prior to delivery of the final implant restorations, while preserving and/or enhancing the condition of the peri-implant and gingival tissues. Provisional restorations are useful as a communication tool between members of the treatment team which, in most cases, consists of the restorative clinician, implant surgeons, laboratory technicians, and the patient. This article describes and discusses the various options for provisionalization in implant dentistry. Clinicians should be aware of the different types of provisional restorations and the indications for their use when planning implant retained restorations.

  16. Methods to measure stability of dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Digholkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant treatment is an excellent option for prosthetic restoration that is associated with high success rates. Implant stability is essential for a good outcome. The clinical assessment of osseointegration is based on mechanical stability rather than histological criteria, considering primary stability (absence of mobility in bone bed after implant insertion and secondary stability (bone formation and remodeling at implant-bone interface. However, due to the invasive nature of the histological methods various other methods have been proposed: Radiographs, the surgeon′s perception, Insertion torque (cutting torque analysis, seating torque, reverse torque testing, percussion testing, impact hammer method, pulsed oscillation waveform, implant mobility checker, Periotest, resonance frequency analysis. This review focuses on the methods currently available for the evaluation of implant stability.

  17. Immediate Implants: Clinical Guidelines for Esthetic Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Javaid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that tooth loss results in morphological changes in alveolar ridge that may influence the subsequent implant placement. Immediate implant placement was introduced as a possible means to limit bone resorption and reduce the number of surgical procedures following tooth extraction. Histological and clinical evidence from human clinical studies showing efficacy of immediate implants has come to light over the last decade or so. However, immediate implant placement is a challenging surgical procedure and requires proper case selection and surgical technique. Furthermore, there appears to be a lack of clinical guidelines for immediate implant placement case selection. Therefore, the aim of this mini-review is to analyze critical evidence from human studies in order to establish clinical guidelines which may help clinicians in case selection when considering immediate implant placement protocol.

  18. The diagnosis of breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse; Conrad, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as performed according to a strict study protocol in diagnosing rupture of silicone breast implants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 64 women with 118 implants, who had...... participated in either one or two study MRI examinations, aiming at determining the prevalence and incidence of silent implant rupture, respectively, and who subsequently underwent explantation. Implant rupture status was determined by four independent readers and a consensus diagnosis of either rupture...... (intracapsular or extracapsular), possible rupture or intact implant was then obtained. Strict predetermined rupture criteria were applied as described in this report and findings at surgery were abstracted in a standardised manner and results compared. RESULTS: At MRI, 66 implants were diagnosed as ruptured...

  19. RFID technology for human implant devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Hervé

    2011-09-01

    This article presents an overview on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology for human implants and investigates the technological feasibility of such implants for locating and tracking persons or for remotely controlling human biological functions. Published results on the miniaturization of implantable passive RFID devices are reported as well as a discussion on the choice of the transmission frequency in wireless communication between a passive RFID device implanted inside human body and an off-body interrogator. The two techniques (i.e., inductive coupling and electromagnetic coupling) currently used for wirelessly supplying power to and read data from a passive implantable RFID device are described and some documented biomedical and therapeutic applications of human RFID-implant devices are finally reported.

  20. Long time follow up of implant therapy and treatment of peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos-Jansåker, Ann-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Dental implants have become an often used alternative to replace missing teeth, resulting in an increasing percentage of the adult population with implant supported prosthesis. Although favourable long-term results of implant therapy have been reported, infections occur. Until recently few reports included data on peri-implant infections, possibly underestimating this complication of implant treatment. It is possible that some infections around implants develop slowly and that with time peri-implantitis will be a common complication to implant therapy as an increasing number of patients have had their implants for a long time (>10 years). Data on treatment of peri-implant lesions are scarce leaving the clinician with limited guidance regarding choice of treatment. The aim of this thesis was to study the frequency of implant loss and presence of peri-implant lesions in a group of patients supplied with Brånemark implants 9-14 years ago, and to relate these events to patient and site specific characteristics. Moreover three surgical treatment modalities for peri-implantitis were evaluated. The thesis is based on six studies; Studies I-III included 218 patients and 1057 implants followed for 9-14 years evaluating prevalence of, and factors related to implant loss (Paper I) and prevalence of peri-implant infections and related factors (Paper I-III). Study IV is a review describing different treatment modalities of peri-implant infections. Study V is a prospective cohort study involving 36 patients and 65 implants, evaluating the use of a bone substitute with or without the use of a resorbable membrane. Study VI is a case series with 12 patients and 16 implants, evaluating a bone substitute in combination with a resorbable membrane and submerged healing. This thesis demonstrated that: After 9-14 years the survival rates of dental implants are high (95.7%). Implant loss seems to cluster within patients and are related to periodontitis evidenced as bone loss on

  1. One-stage explant-implant procedure of exposed porous orbital implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Peter B; Rasmussen, Marie L Roed; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Purpose:  To investigate the risks of implant exposure after a combined explant-implant procedure in patients with an exposed porous orbital implant. Methods:  Twenty-four consecutive patients who had a combined explant-implant procedure of an exposed hydroxyapatite (21) or porous polyethylene (3......) orbital implant from January 2000 to February 2009 were included. The patient records were reviewed; patients were interviewed by telephone and invited for a clinical examination. Histopathological examination was carried out on the removed implants. Main outcome measures were: presence of exposure...... of the new implant or not, patient graded satisfaction with the cosmetic result, and presence of poor motility. Results:  None of the new implants became exposed or infected in the follow-up period of 25 [3-94] months (median [range]). The patients scored their satisfaction with the cosmetic result...

  2. Immediatevsnon-immediate loading post-extractive implants: a comparative study of implant stability quotient (ISQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, L; Fiandaca, C; Giannoulis, F; Ottria, L; Lucchese, A; Silvestre, F; Petruzzi, M

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate differences in implant stability between post-extractive implants vs immediately placed post-extractive implants by resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Patients were grouped into two different categories. In Group A 10 patients had an immediate post-extractive implant, then a provisional, acrylic resin crown was placed (immediate loading). In Group B (control group) 10 patients only had an immediate post-extractive implant. Both upper and lower premolars were chosen as post-extractive sites. Implant Stability Quotient (ISQ) was measured thanks to RFA measurements (Osstell®). Five intervals were considered: immediately after surgery (T0) and every four weeks, until five months after implant placement (T1, T2, T3, T4,T5). A statistical analysis by means of Student's T-test (significance set at pimmediate prosthetic surgery in post-extraction sites with cone-shaped implants, platform-switching abutment and bioactive surface can facilitate osseointegration, reducing healing time.

  3. Cochlear implantation in late-implanted prelingually deafened adults: changes in quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straatman, L.V.; Huinck, W.J.; Langereis, M.C.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mulder, J.J.S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With expanding inclusion criteria for cochlear implantation, the number of prelingually deafened persons who are implanted as adults increases. Compared with postlingually deafened adults, this group shows limited improvement in speech recognition. In this study, the changes in

  4. VENTRAL SPONDYLODESIS BYTITAN IMPLANTS AT SPINE TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Babkin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At RSPC of traumatology and orthopaedic surgery and Institute of powders metallurgic porous implants are working out which allow complitely replace alio- and autotranplants and improve the surgical technology of interbody spondylodesis. Porous implants, made from mechanic durabilities, are bioinert or biocompatible materials, provide durabilities prime spondylodesis. It doesn't need an additional fixation, realize a possibility to grow a bone matter in powder structure of implants.

  5. Relation between bruxism and dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    TORCATO,Leonardo Bueno; ZUIM,Paulo Renato Junqueira; BRANDINI,Daniela Atili; FALCÓN-ANTENUCCI,Rosse Mary

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to gather information and discuss the predictability of implant-supported prostheses in patients with bruxism by performing a literature review.METHODS: In order to select the studies included in this review, a detailed search was performed in PubMed and Medlinedatabases, using the following key words: bruxism, dental implants, implant supported prosthesis, and dental restoration failure. Items that were included are: case reports, randomized controlled tr...

  6. Periapical implant lesion: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya-Tárraga, J-A; Cervera-Ballester, J; Peñarrocha-Oltra, D; Peñarrocha-Diago, M

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence for periapical implant lesion, which makes a patient more susceptible to the periapical lesion, frequency, symptoms, signs (including radiological findings) and possible treatment options. A systematic literature review and analysis of publications included in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane; articles published until March 2016; with a populations, exposures and outcomes (PEO) search strategy was performed, focused on the issue: "In patients with periapical lesion to the implant during the osseointegration, what symptoms, signs, and changes in complementary examination manifested, for according to that stage, be intervened with the appropriate approach?". The set criteria for inclusion were peer-reviewed articles. From a total of 212 papers identified, 36 studies were included in this systematic review, with 15461 implants evaluated and 183 periapical implant lesions. Which 8 papers included more than 5 cases and 28 included equal or less than 5 cases. Analysis of the papers revealed that periapical implant lesion is classified according to evolution stages into acute (non-suppurated and suppurated) and subacute (or suppurated-fistulized). In the acute stage and in the subacute if there is no loss of implant stability, the correct treatment approach is implant periapical surgery. In the subacute stage associated with implant mobility the implant must be removed. Evidence on the subject is very limited, there are few studies with small sample, without homogeneity of criteria for diagnosing the disease and without design of scientific evidence. Currently etiology lacks consensus. The early diagnosis of periapical implant periapical lesions during the osseointegration phase and early treatment, will lead to a higher survival rate of implants treated, hence preventing the need for implant extraction.

  7. Characterization of diamond amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    Single crystal diamond has been implanted at 1 MeV with 2 x 10 20 Ar/m 2 . Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeled geometry revealed a broad amorphized region underlying a thin, partially crystalline layer. Raman spectroscopy disclosed modifications in the bonding characteristic of the appearance of non-diamond carbon. The complementary nature of the two analysis techniques is demonstrated. The Knoop hardness of the implanted diamond was reduced by implantation

  8. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    irritation is seen in baboons. This drawback has not led to the loss of any implant to date. The poor gingival health and/or the approximation of gold...tively poor oral hygiene of the baboon. Infection has never been a causa- tive factor in the loss of an implant. Apparently, the environment in 9 the... oral cavity allows the implant to survive even though there is no attachment of gingiva to the ceramic root. Fortunately, the mild gingival irritation

  9. Immediate Implant Placement: Report of Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of immediate postextraction implant placement. Immediate placement of dental implants have been claimed of the potential advantages such as reductions in the number of surgical interventions, a shorter treatment time, an ideal 3-dimensional implant positioning, the presumptive preservation of alveolar bone at the site of the tooth extraction and soft tissue aesthetics.

  10. Cochlear implant revision surgeries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Stella Arantes do; Reis, Ana Cláudia Mirândola B; Massuda, Eduardo T; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2018-02-16

    The surgery during which the cochlear implant internal device is implanted is not entirely free of risks and may produce problems that will require revision surgeries. To verify the indications for cochlear implantation revision surgery for the cochlear implant internal device, its effectiveness and its correlation with certain variables related to language and hearing. A retrospective study of patients under 18 years submitted to cochlear implant Surgery from 2004 to 2015 in a public hospital in Brazil. Data collected were: age at the time of implantation, gender, etiology of the hearing loss, audiological and oral language characteristics of each patient before and after Cochlear Implant surgery and any need for surgical revision and the reason for it. Two hundred and sixty-five surgeries were performed in 236 patients. Eight patients received a bilateral cochlear implant and 10 patients required revision surgery. Thirty-two surgeries were necessary for these 10 children (1 bilateral cochlear implant), of which 21 were revision surgeries. In 2 children, cochlear implant removal was necessary, without reimplantation, one with cochlear malformation due to incomplete partition type I and another due to trauma. With respect to the cause for revision surgery, of the 8 children who were successfully reimplanted, four had cochlear calcification following meningitis, one followed trauma, one exhibited a facial nerve malformation, one experienced a failure of the cochlear implant internal device and one revision surgery was necessary because the electrode was twisted. The incidence of the cochlear implant revision surgery was 4.23%. The period following the revision surgeries revealed an improvement in the subject's hearing and language performance, indicating that these surgeries are valid in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Strain driven fast osseointegration of implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesmann Hans-Peter

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the bone's capability of dental implant osseointegration has clinically been utilised as early as in the Gallo-Roman population, the specific mechanisms for the emergence and maintenance of peri-implant bone under functional load have not been identified. Here we show that under immediate loading of specially designed dental implants with masticatory loads, osseointegration is rapidly achieved. Methods We examined the bone reaction around non- and immediately loaded dental implants inserted in the mandible of mature minipigs during the presently assumed time for osseointegration. We used threaded conical titanium implants containing a titanium2+ oxide surface, allowing direct bone contact after insertion. The external geometry was designed according to finite element analysis: the calculation showed that physiological amplitudes of strain (500–3,000 ustrain generated through mastication were homogenously distributed in peri-implant bone. The strain-energy density (SED rate under assessment of a 1 Hz loading cycle was 150 Jm-3 s-1, peak dislocations were lower then nm. Results Bone was in direct contact to the implant surface (bone/implant contact rate 90% from day one of implant insertion, as quantified by undecalcified histological sections. This effect was substantiated by ultrastructural analysis of intimate osteoblast attachment and mature collagen mineralisation at the titanium surface. We detected no loss in the intimate bone/implant bond during the experimental period of either control or experimental animals, indicating that immediate load had no adverse effect on bone structure in peri-implant bone. Conclusion In terms of clinical relevance, the load related bone reaction at the implant interface may in combination with substrate effects be responsible for an immediate osseointegration state.

  12. Clinical evaluation of mandibular implant overdentures via Locator implant attachment and Locator bar attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Yong-Ho; Bae, Eun-Bin; Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, So-Hyoun; Yun, Mi-Jung; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical findings and patient satisfaction on implant overdenture designed with Locator implant attachment or Locator bar attachment in mandibular edentulous patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Implant survival rate, marginal bone loss, probing depth, peri-implant inflammation, bleeding, plaque, calculus, complications, and satisfaction were evaluated on sixteen patients who were treated with mandibular overdenture and have used it for at least 1 ...

  13. Anterior surface breakdown and implant extrusion following secondary alloplastic orbital implantation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmann, Shadi; Paridaens, Dion

    2017-12-08

    Secondary orbital implantation surgery can be complex due to scarring of the orbital tissues and can be complicated by implant exposure and extrusion. To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of implant exposure and extrusion following secondary alloplastic orbital implantation surgery in anophthalmic patients. Retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients who underwent secondary placement of an alloplastic orbital implant by one surgeon between 2001 and 2016 in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital. implant exposure or extrusion. Other complications. Sixty-three patients underwent secondary orbital placement of scleral-wrapped acrylic (60) or silicone (three) spherical implants. A subset of 25 patients had undergone earlier secondary orbital implant placement (by other surgeons) with exposure/extrusion necessitating additional implant surgery. Two patients were excluded due to lack of follow-up (Implant exposure or extrusion occurred in six of 18 (33%) patients in whom no muscle had been reattached during secondary orbital implantation and in five of 43 (12%) patients in whom the extraocular recti muscles had been attached, but the follow-up time was shorter for the latter group. Surgical treatment for implant exposure/extrusion was required in eleven of 61 patients (18%). Other complications included postoperative volume deficiency despite optimal prosthesis (five of 61, 8%), inclusion cysts (four of 61, 7%) and conjunctivitis sicca (two of 61, 3%). Seven of 61 (11%) patients required fornix deepening and seven (11%) blepharoptosis correction. Secondary orbital implantation of sclera-wrapped alloplastic implants was complicated by implant extrusion or exposure in 12% of cases in which the extraocular muscles were attached to the implant. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Immediate loading of single SLA implants: drilling vs. osteotomes for the preparation of the implant site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Andreas; Nyengaard, Jens R; Lang, Niklaus P; Karring, Thorkild

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate whether or not preparation of the implant site with osteotomes instead of drilling may improve peri-implant bone density and/or osseointegration, and whether or not this further improves the predictability of immediate loading of SLA implants. The second, third, and fourth premolars were extracted in both sides of the mandible in six dogs, and after at least 3 months four SLA implants were inserted into each side of the jaw. In three animals, the implant sites were prepared by means of osteotomes, while standard stepwise drilling was used in the remaining animals. In each side of the jaw, two non-adjacent implants were restored with single crowns 4 days after installation, while the remaining two implants were left without crowns to serve as non-loaded controls. After 2, 4, or 12 weeks of loading, specimens including the implants and surrounding tissues were obtained and processed for histologic analysis of undecalcified sections. All implants placed with osteotomes were lost (five before delivery of the crowns and the rest during the first week after loading). None of the conventionally inserted implants, however, was lost, and histomorphometrical analysis revealed similar soft- and hard peri-implant tissue characteristics at immediately loaded and non-loaded implants at all observation times. Average bone-to-implant contact was 59-72% at immediately loaded implants vs. 60-63% at non-loaded ones. Preparation of the implant site by means of osteotomes had a deleterious effect on osseointegration, while immediate loading of single, free-standing, SLA implants following a conventional surgical protocol did not jeopardize their osseointegration.

  15. Treatment concepts for the posterior maxilla and mandible: short implants versus long implants in augmented bone

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Cha, Jae-Kook; Jung, Ui-Won

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to describe treatment options for the posterior regions of the mandible and the maxilla, comparing short implants vs. longer implants in an augmented bone. The dental literature was screened for treatment options enabling the placement of dental implants in posterior sites with a reduced vertical bone height in the maxilla and the mandible. Short dental implants have been increasingly used recently, providing a number of advantages including reduced patient...

  16. [Comperative study of implant surface characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Bernadett; Daróczi, Lajos; Jenei, Attila; Bakó, József; Hegedus, Csaba

    2013-12-01

    The osseointegration between the implant and its' bone environment is very important. The implants shall meet the following requirements: biocompatibility, rigidity, resistance against corrosion and technical producibility. In our present study surface morphology and material characteristics of different implants (Denti Bone Level, Denti Zirconium C, Bionika CorticaL, Straumann SLA, Straumann SLA Active, Dentsply Ankylos and Biotech Kontact implant) were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The possible surface alterations caused by the manufacturing technology were also investigated. During grit-blasting the implants' surface is blasted with hard ceramic particles (titanium oxide, alumina, calcium phosphate). Properties of blasting material are critical because the osseointegration of dental implants should not be hampered. The physical and chemical features of blasting particles could importantly affect the produced surfaces of implants. Titanium surfaces with micro pits are created after immersion in mixtures of strong acids. On surfaces after dual acid-etching procedures the crosslinking between fibrin and osteogenetic cells could be enhanced therefore bone formation could be directly facilitated on the surface of the implant. Nowadays there are a number of surface modification techniques available. These can be used as a single method or in combination with each other. The effect of the two most commonly used surface modifications (acid-etching and grit-blasting) on different implants are demonstrated in our investigation.

  17. Periodontio-integrated implants: A revolutionary concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Govila, Vivek; Jain, Nikil; Rastogi, Pavitra; Bahuguna, Rohit; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Though the fields of regenerative dentistry and tissue engineering have undergone significant advancements, yet its application to the field of implant-dentistry is lacking; in the sense that presently the implants are being placed with the aim of attaining osseointegration without giving consideration to the regeneration of periodontium around the implant. The following article reveals the clinical benefits of such periodontio-integrated implants and reviews the relevant scientific proofs. A comprehensive research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of periodontio-integrated implants was carried out using various online resources such as PubMed, Wiley-Blackwell, Elsevier etc., to retrieve studies published between 1980 and 2012 using the following key words: “implant,” “tissue engineering,” “periodontium,” “osseo-integration,” “osseoperception,” “regeneration” (and their synonyms) and it was found that in the past three decades, several successful experiments have been conducted to devise “implant supported by the periodontium”that can maintain form, function and potential proprioceptive responses similar to a natural tooth. Based on these staunch evidences, the possibility of the future clinical use of such implant can be strongly stated which would revolutionize the implant dentistry and will be favored by the patients as well. However, further studies are required to validate the same. PMID:24932184

  18. Osseointegration of cobalt-chrome alloy implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Babis, George C

    2011-01-01

    Osseointegration or osteointegration refers to a direct bone-to-metal interface without interposition of non-bone tissue. The long-term clinical success of bone implants is critically related to wide bone-to-implant direct contact. However, only poor bone formation or even host bone resorption have been shown where bone is in tight contact with the implant surface. It has been suggested that an appropriate space between implant and host bone may be useful for early peri-implant bone formation. Additionally, osseointegration depends on the topographical and chemical characteristics of the implant surface. Cobalt-chrome (Co-Cr) is a metal alloy of cobalt and chromium. Because of its high strength, temperature endurance and wear resistance, it is commonly used in dental and orthopedic implants. In orthopedic implants it is usually composed of cobalt with chromium, molybdenum, and traces of other elements. Co-Cr alloys are especially useful where high stiffness or a highly polished and extremely wear-resistant material is required. This article reviews the Co-Cr alloy orthopedic implants in terms of their properties, porous coating, osseointegration, outcome, and failure.

  19. Digital photoelastic analysis applied to implant dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K.; Hariprasad, M. P.; Bhuvanewari, S.

    2016-12-01

    Development of improved designs of implant systems in dentistry have necessitated the study of stress fields in the implant regions of the mandible/maxilla for better understanding of the biomechanics involved. Photoelasticity has been used for various studies related to dental implants in view of whole field visualization of maximum shear stress in the form of isochromatic contours. The potential of digital photoelasticity has not been fully exploited in the field of implant dentistry. In this paper, the fringe field in the vicinity of the connected implants (All-On-Four® concept) is analyzed using recent advances in digital photoelasticity. Initially, a novel 3-D photoelastic model making procedure, to closely mimic all the anatomical features of the human mandible is proposed. By choosing appropriate orientation of the model with respect to the light path, the essential region of interest were sought to be analysed while keeping the model under live loading conditions. Need for a sophisticated software module to carefully identify the model domain has been brought out. For data extraction, five-step method is used and isochromatics are evaluated by twelve fringe photoelasticity. In addition to the isochromatic fringe field, whole field isoclinic data is also obtained for the first time in implant dentistry, which could throw important information in improving the structural stability of the implant systems. Analysis is carried out for the implant in the molar as well as the incisor region. In addition, the interaction effects of loaded molar implant on the incisor area are also studied.

  20. Trends in prosthetic biomaterials in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranjit Singh Bhasin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important criterion for the success of dental implants is the selection of a suitable implant biomaterial. To improve the biologic performance of an implant, it is necessary to select a material that does not elicit any negative biological response and at the same time maintains adequate function. It is mandatory for a dentist to have a comprehensive knowledge of various biomaterials used for dental implants. The material of choice for fabrication of the dental implant till date is titanium. With the advancements in the field of implants, zirconia seems to be propitious in the future. However, more advanced in vitro and in vivo studies are required before reaching any such conclusion. To increase the success of zirconia implants, care should be taken to reduce the incidence of mechanical failures. Such failures can be taken care of by having a thorough technical knowledge of implant designing and manufacturing defects. This article attempts to compare the advantages and disadvantages of various dental implant biomaterials. Focus is placed on the recent advances in this field with the recently introduced zirconia and its comparison to conventional titanium.

  1. Physical modification of polyetheretherketone for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Gu, Hong-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates for replacing current implant applications. To obtain good bone-implant interfaces, many modification methods have been developed to enable PEEK and PEEK-based composites from bio-inert to bioactive. Among them, physical methods have aroused significant attention and been widely used to modify PEEK for orthopedic implants. This review summarizes current physical modification techniques of PEEK for orthopedic applications, which include composite strategies, surface coating methods and irradiation treatments. The positive consequences of those modification methods will encourage continuing investigations and stimulate the wide range of applications of PEEK-based implants in orthopedics.

  2. Periodontio-integrated implants: A revolutionary concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though the fields of regenerative dentistry and tissue engineering have undergone significant advancements, yet its application to the field of implant-dentistry is lacking; in the sense that presently the implants are being placed with the aim of attaining osseointegration without giving consideration to the regeneration of periodontium around the implant. The following article reveals the clinical benefits of such periodontio-integrated implants and reviews the relevant scientific proofs. A comprehensive research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of periodontio-integrated implants was carried out using various online resources such as PubMed, Wiley-Blackwell, Elsevier etc., to retrieve studies published between 1980 and 2012 using the following key words: "implant," "tissue engineering," "periodontium," "osseo-integration," "osseoperception," "regeneration" (and their synonyms and it was found that in the past three decades, several successful experiments have been conducted to devise "implant supported by the periodontium"that can maintain form, function and potential proprioceptive responses similar to a natural tooth. Based on these staunch evidences, the possibility of the future clinical use of such implant can be strongly stated which would revolutionize the implant dentistry and will be favored by the patients as well. However, further studies are required to validate the same.

  3. Augmentation of keratinized gingiva around dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissa, J; El Kholti, W; Laalou, Y; El Farouki, M

    2017-06-01

    To date, there is no general consensus with respect to the amount of soft-tissue volume needed for esthetic and functional purposes on the buccal aspect of dental implants. Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between the width of keratinized mucosa and the health of peri-implant tissues. Our purpose was to discuss about the necessity of keratinized tissue to maintain the peri-implant health and to report clinical efficacy of different techniques used to increase the keratinized tissue around dental implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojak, S., E-mail: stanislav.sojak@stuba.sk; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • ODS steel MA 956 was studied after thermal treatment and ion implantations. • Increase of the defects size was observed after hydrogen ions implantation. • Intensity/amount of the defects did not increase after ion implantations. • Due to defects aggregation defects concentration decreased. - Abstract: This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors – Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  5. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Bozena; Przybylski, Andrzej; Kucińska, Beata; Lewandowski, Michał; Szwed, Hanna; Wróblewska-Kałuzewska, Maria

    2004-03-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) have been increasingly used in adult patients for the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). The usefulness and feasibility of ICD implantation in children have been less well established. To analyse indications, results and safety of ICD therapy in children. ICDs were implanted in seven children, aged from 6 to 17 years. All patients underwent cardiological evaluation which included analysis of medical history, physical examination, chest X-ray, standard ECG, 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring and echocardiography. In five children devices were implanted due to aborted sudden death (ventricular fibrillation) whereas in the remaining two - as a primary prevention of SCD. Three children had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, one - dilated cardiomyopathy, one - mitral valve prolapse and QT prolongation, one - congenital long QT syndrome and the remaining patient - idiopathic ventricular tachycardia. Single-chamber devices were implanted in six children, and dual-chamber system - in one patient. In all patients endocardial leads were implanted and ICD pocket was formed under the greater pectoral muscle. During follow-up ranging between four months to 5.4 years, four children developed ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia which were terminated by appropriate ICD discharges. 1. ICD implantation in children is effective in the prevention of SCD. 2. In our population, the most frequent indications for device implantation were life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias occurring in patients with cardiomyopathy. 3. Cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation may occur in children without a history of aborted SCD. 4. ICD implantation in children is feasible and safe.

  6. Early implant-associated osteomyelitis results in a peri-implanted bacterial reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Kruse; Koch, Janne; Aalbæk, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Implant-associated osteomyelitis (IAO) is a common complication in orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to elucidate how deep IAO can go into the peri-implanted bone tissue within a week. The study was performed in a porcine model of IAO. A small steel implant and either 104 CFU/kg body...

  7. Azygos Vein Lead Implantation For High Defibrillation Thresholds In Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naga VA Kommuri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of defibrillation threshold is a standard of care during implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator. High defibrillation thresholds are often encountered and pose a challenge to electrophysiologists to improve the defibrillation threshold. We describe a case series where defibrillation thresholds were improved after implanting a defibrillation lead in the azygos vein.

  8. Implant Insertion Torque: Its Role in Achieving Primary Stability of Restorable Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Gary; Cavallaro, John

    2017-02-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the role of insertion torque in attaining primary stability of dental implants. The review is comprised of articles that discussed the amount of torque needed to achieve primary implant stability in healed ridges and fresh extraction sockets prior to immediate implant loading. Studies were appraised that addressed the effects of minimum and maximum forces that can be used to successfully place implants. The minimum torque that can be employed to attain primary stability is undefined. Forces ≥30 Ncm are routinely used to place implants into healed ridges and fresh extraction sockets prior to immediate loading of implants. Increased insertion torque (≥50 Ncm) reduces micromotion and does not appear to damage bone. In general, the healing process after implant insertion provides a degree of biologic stability that is similar whether implants are placed with high or low initial insertion torque. Primary stability is desirable when placing implants, but the absence of micromotion is what facilitates predictable implant osseointegration. Increased insertion torque helps achieve primary stability by reducing implant micromotion. Furthermore, tactile information provided by the first surgical twist drill can aid in selecting the initial insertion torque to achieve predictable stability of inserted dental implants.

  9. Investigation of the Effects of Abutment and Implant Length on Stability of Short Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda OZYILMAZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of dental implants to solve different problems in dentistry has been growing rapidly. The success rates of dental implants are also very important for patients. Depending on the bone level of patients, short dental implants are very popular and widely used by many dentists. Although many dentists are using short dental implants frequently, It can be guessed that there can be stability problems because of crown to implant ratios. In this study, it is aimed to find out the effects of dental implant and abutment lengths on stability of short dental implants. 3 different short dental implant design made with the use of Solidworks 2013. Abutment lengths were 3,5 mm, 4 mm, 4,5 mm, 5 mm and implant lengths were 5 mm, 6 mm, 7 mm for each model. Human mandible model is transferred from Computed Tomography. Then, each implant model is mounted to modeled mandible and Finite Element Analysis is performed for each model. In order to see the effects of implant number on stability, we performed same analysis by placing 4 implants to the mandible

  10. A systematic review on marginal bone loss around short dental implants (implant-supported fixed prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Alberto; Suarez, Fernando; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; García-Nogales, Agustín; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2014-10-01

    This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effect of implant length on peri-implant marginal bone loss (MBL) and its associated influencing factors. An electronic search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for relevant studies published in English from November 2006 to July 2012 was performed by one examiner (AM). Selected studies were randomized clinical trials, human experimental clinical trials or prospective studies (e.g., cohort as well as case series) with a clear aim of investigating marginal bone loss of short dental implants (implant length." Additionally, a subgroup analysis, by means of a random-effect one-way ANOVA model, comparing mean MBL values at different levels of each factor ("type of connection" and "type of prostheses") was also performed. The meta-regression of mean MBL on the moderator "implant length" was found to be insignificant (P = 0.633). Therefore, it could not be concluded that implant length had an effect on peri-implant MBL. In addition, standardized differences in mean MBL on the subgroups short (implants, as determined by the meta-analysis (random-effect model), were found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.222). Within limitations of the present systematic review, it could be concluded that short dental implants (implant MBL as standard implants (≥ 10 mm) for implant-supported fixed prostheses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Primary prevention of peri-implantitis: managing peri-implant mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Søren; Berglundh, Tord; Genco, Robert; Aass, Anne Merete; Demirel, Korkud; Derks, Jan; Figuero, Elena; Giovannoli, Jean Louis; Goldstein, Moshe; Lambert, France; Ortiz-Vigon, Alberto; Polyzois, Ioannis; Salvi, Giovanni E; Schwarz, Frank; Serino, Giovanni; Tomasi, Cristiano; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades, the placement of dental implants has become a routine procedure in the oral rehabilitation of fully and partially edentulous patients. However, the number of patients/implants affected by peri-implant diseases is increasing. As there are--in contrast to periodontitis--at present no established and predictable concepts for the treatment of peri-implantitis, primary prevention is of key importance. The management of peri-implant mucositis is considered as a preventive measure for the onset of peri-implantitis. Therefore, the remit of this working group was to assess the prevalence of peri-implant diseases, as well as risks for peri-implant mucositis and to evaluate measures for the management of peri-implant mucositis. Discussions were informed by four systematic reviews on the current epidemiology of peri-implant diseases, on potential risks contributing to the development of peri-implant mucositis, and on the effect of patient and of professionally administered measures to manage peri-implant mucositis. This consensus report is based on the outcomes of these systematic reviews and on the expert opinion of the participants. Key findings included: (i) meta-analysis estimated a weighted mean prevalence for peri-implant mucositis of 43% (CI: 32-54%) and for peri-implantitis of 22% (CI: 14-30%); (ii) bleeding on probing is considered as key clinical measure to distinguish between peri-implant health and disease; (iii) lack of regular supportive therapy in patients with peri-implant mucositis was associated with increased risk for onset of peri-implantitis; (iv) whereas plaque accumulation has been established as aetiological factor, smoking was identified as modifiable patient-related and excess cement as local risk indicator for the development of peri-implant mucositis; (v) patient-administered mechanical plaque control (with manual or powered toothbrushes) has been shown to be an effective preventive measure; (vi) professional intervention

  12. Osteogenesis and Morphology of the Peri-Implant Bone Facing Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of different implant surfaces on peri-implant osteogenesis and implant face morphology of peri-implant tissues during the early (2 weeks and complete healing period (3 months. Thirty endosseous titanium implants (conic screws with differently treated surfaces (smooth titanium = SS, titanium plasma sprayed = TPS, sand-blasted zirconium oxide = Zr-SLA were implanted in femur and tibiae diaphyses of two mongrel sheep. Histological sections of the implants and surrounding tissues obtained by sawing and grinding techniques were observed under light microscopy (LM. The peri-implant tissues of other samples were mechanically detached from the corresponding implants to be processed for SEM observation. Two weeks after implantation, we observed osteogenesis (new bone trabeculae around all implant surfaces only where a gap was present at the host bone-metal interface. No evident bone deposition was detectable where threads of the screws were in direct contact with the compact host bone. Distance osteogenesis predominated in SS implants, while around rough surfaces (TPS and Zr-SLA, both distance and contact osteogenesis were present. At SEM analysis 2 weeks after implantation, the implant face of SS peri-implant tissue showed few, thin, newly formed, bone trabeculae immersed in large, loose, marrow tissue with blood vessels. Around the TPS screws, the implant face of the peri-implant tissue was rather irregular because of the rougher metal surface. Zr-SLA screws showed more numerous, newly formed bone trabeculae crossing marrow spaces and also needle-like crystals in bone nodules indicating an active mineralising process. After 3 months, all the screws appeared osseointegrated, being almost completely covered by a compact, mature, newly formed bone. However, some marrow spaces rich in blood vessels and undifferentiated cells were in contact with the metal surface. By SEM analysis, the implant face of the peri-implant

  13. Ion beam studies of hydrogen implanted Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurmela, A.; Henttinen, K.; Suni, T.; Tolkki, A.; Suni, I.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied silicon-on-insulator (SOI) materials with two different ion beam analysis methods. The SOI samples were implanted with boron and hydrogen ions. After implantation the wafers were annealed, and some of them were bonded to thermally oxidized silicon wafers. The damage in silicon single crystal due to ion implantations has been studied by Rutherford Backscattering in the channeling mode (RBS/C). The content of the ion-implanted hydrogen has been studied by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) method. The strength of the implanted region after thermal annealings were measured with the crack opening method. The boron implantation before hydrogen implantation resulted to shallower implantation depth and lower splitting temperature than in samples implanted with hydrogen only. The boron implantation after hydrogen implantation did not influence the splitting temperature and RBS spectra showed that B implantation drove the H deeper to the sample

  14. The Biolink Implantable Telemetry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Zamora, Rafael J.

    1999-01-01

    Most biotelemetry applications deal with the moderated data rates of biological signals. Few people have studied the problem of transcutaneous data transmission at the rates required by NASA's Life Sciences-Advanced BioTelemetry System (LS-ABTS). Implanted telemetry eliminate the problems associated with wire breaking the skin, and permits experiments with awake and unrestrained subjects. Our goal is to build a low-power 174-216MHz Radio Frequency (RF) transmitter suitable for short range biosensor and implantable use. The BioLink Implantable Telemetry System (BITS) is composed of three major units: an Analog Data Module (ADM), a Telemetry Transmitter Module (TTM), and a Command Receiver Module (CRM). BioLink incorporates novel low-power techniques to implement a monolithic digital RF transmitter operating at 100kbps, using quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation in the 174-216MHz ISM band. As the ADM will be specific for each application, we focused on solving the problems associated with a monolithic implementation of the TTM and CRM, and this is the emphasis of this report. A system architecture based on a Frequency-Locked Loop (FLL) Frequency Synthesizer is presented, and a novel differential frequency that eliminates the need for a frequency divider is also shown. A self sizing phase modulation scheme suitable for low power implementation was also developed. A full system-level simulation of the FLL was performed and loop filter parameters were determined. The implantable antenna has been designed, simulated and constructed. An implant package compatible with the ABTS requirements is also being proposed. Extensive work performed at 200MHz in 0.5um complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) showed the feasibility of integrating the RF transmitter circuits in a single chip. The Hajimiri phase noise model was used to optimize the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) for minimum power consumption. Two test chips were fabricated in a 0.5pm, 3V CMOS

  15. CT evaluation of preoperative cochlear implantation cochlear implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Xiuzhong; Zhong Lansheng; Lan Bowen; Huang Yaosheng; Du Baowen; Zhu Jian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT scan as a preoperative evaluation for cochlear implantation candidates. Methods: Axial high-resolution temporal bone CT and three-dimensional reconstruction of inner ear were performed in 93 patients with sensorineural hearing loss. results: Among 81 patients with congenital sensorineural deafness, Mondini malformation was seen in 7 case (13 ears); large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) was revealed in 5 cases (8 ears); and inner ear ossification was found in 1 case (2 ears). In 1 case (2 ears) of inner ear fibrosis, reduced cochlear signal was noted on MRI but no unremarkable findings was shown on CT scan, however, in the operation, the device could not inserted into the basal circle of the cochlea, due to fibrous obliteration. In 12 patients with post-speech deafness, chronic suppurative tympanitis was seen in 2 cases (4 ears), and inner ear ossification was revealed in 1 case (2 ears). Conclusion: CT plays an indispensable role in the pre-operative evaluation of cochlear implantation. T 2 -weighted FSE-MRI of the inner ear is a useful complementary to CT scan. (authors)

  16. Fracture dynamics in implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massy, D.; Tardif, S.; Penot, J. D.; Ragani, J.; Rieutord, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Mazen, F.; Madeira, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Landru, D.; Kononchuk, O. [SOITEC, Parc Technologique des Fontaines, 38190 Bernin (France)

    2015-08-31

    Crack propagation in implanted silicon for thin layer transfer is experimentally studied. The crack propagation velocity as a function of split temperature is measured using a designed optical setup. Interferometric measurement of the gap opening is performed dynamically and shows an oscillatory crack “wake” with a typical wavelength in the centimetre range. The dynamics of this motion is modelled using beam elasticity and thermodynamics. The modelling demonstrates the key role of external atmospheric pressure during crack propagation. A quantification of the amount of gas trapped inside pre-existing microcracks and released during the fracture is made possible, with results consistent with previous studies.

  17. Optimal Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bindi K

    Optimal programming of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is essential to appropriately treat ventricular tachyarrhythmias and to avoid unnecessary and inappropriate shocks. There have been a series of large clinical trials evaluating tailored programming of ICDs. We reviewed the clinical trials evaluating ICD therapies and detection, and the consensus statement on ICD programming. In doing so, we found that prolonged ICD detection times, higher rate cutoffs, and antitachycardia pacing (ATP) programming decreases inappropriate and painful therapies in a primary prevention population. The use of supraventricular tachyarrhythmia discriminators can also decrease inappropriate shocks. Tailored ICD programming using the knowledge gained from recent ICD trials can decrease inappropriate and unnecessary ICD therapies and decrease mortality.

  18. [Spinal column: implants and revisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, S M; Meyer, H S; Meyer, B

    2016-03-01

    Non-fusion spinal implants are designed to reduce the commonly occurring risks and complications of spinal fusion surgery, e.g. long duration of surgery, high blood loss, screw loosening and adjacent segment disease, by dynamic or movement preserving approaches. This principle could be shown for interspinous spacers, cervical and lumbar total disc replacement and dynamic stabilization; however, due to the continuing high rate of revision surgery, the indications for surgery require as much attention and evidence as comparative data on the surgical technique itself.

  19. Burnishing Techniques Strengthen Hip Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Lambda Research Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn Research Center to demonstrate low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on metal engine components. By producing a thermally stable deep layer of compressive residual stress, LPB significantly strengthened turbine alloys. After Lambda patented the process, the Federal Aviation Administration accepted LPB for repair and alteration of commercial aircraft components, the U.S. Department of Energy found LPB suitable for treating nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain. Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed LPB to completely eliminate the occurrence of fretting fatigue failures in modular hip implants.

  20. Implantation techniques of antitachycardia devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, S; Brodman, R; Pannizzo, F; Fisher, J D

    1984-05-01

    Implantation of a defibrillator may be by a mixed technique of transvenous leads and subcostal thoracotomy. An alternative approach is placement of all defibrillator leads and possible pacemaker leads via median sternotomy. All sensing leads, either for a defibrillator or a pacemaker, should be bipolar to provide maximal rejection of interference signals. Interpretation of the electrogram requires analysis of the pathologic electrogram to distinguish it from the "normal" electrogram for that patient and may require several leads to determine the activation sequence which will allow diagnosis of a tachycardia in a fashion similar to that performed by a human observer.

  1. THE EARLY INTERVENTION TENDENCY OF CHINESE CHILDREN WITH COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jiaojiao; Xie, Yuhan

    2016-01-01

    From the change of adult unilateral cochlear implantation into young children even under the age of six implant cochlear, sequential bilateral cochlear implantation, which benefit by early hearing screening and technological development of cochlear implants. It is a worldwide trend that simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation for hearing impaired children under the age of three. Cochlear implants bring changes of education opportunities and choices for children with hearing impairment. F...

  2. Predicting Clustered Dental Implant Survival Using Frailty Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, S.-K.; Cai, T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict future implant survival using information on risk factors and on the survival status of an individual’s existing implant(s). We considered a retrospective cohort study with 677 individuals having 2349 implants placed. We proposed to predict the survival probabilities using the Cox proportional hazards frailty model, with three important risk factors: smoking status, timing of placement, and implant staging. For a non-smoking individual with 2 implants ...

  3. Implantation of a Resynchronization Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator in a Patient with Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante Antonelli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of resynchronization implantable cardioverter defibrillator was performed in a patient with persistent left superior vena cava. A dual coil defibrillation lead was inserted in the right ventricle apex via a small innominate vein. Left ventricular and atrial leads were implanted through persistent left superior vena cava. Left ventricular lead was easily implanted into the postero lateral vein. Pacing thresholds and sensing values were excellent and remained stable at 18 months follow-up. Presence of persistent left superior vena cava generally makes transvenous lead implantation difficult. However when a favorable coronary sinus anatomy is also present, it may facilitate left ventricular lead positioning in the coronary sinus branches.

  4. CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DENTAL IMPLANT SYSTEM IN IMMEDIATE LOADING IMPLANT CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Damayanti Marpaung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Immediate loading of dental implant has been researched intensively in the development of Branemark’s early concept of 2 stages implant placement. This was embarked from both patients and practiitioner’s convenience towards a simpler protocol and shorter time frame. Many recent researchers later found that micromotions derived from occlusal loading for a certain degree, instead of resulting a fibrous tissue encapsulation, can enhance the osseointegration process. Dental Implant system enhancement towards maximizing the primary stability held a key factor in Branemark’s concept development. Surgical protocol and implant design was found to give a significant contribution to the prognosis of immediate-loading implants.

  5. Crestal bone loss of standard implant versus platform switch implant design using minimal invasive technique

    OpenAIRE

    Karim M. Ahmed; Salah Abd Elfatah; Mohamed Abd El-Mageed Katamish

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the type of abutment/implant connection on the marginal bone loss around dental implant. The present study was conducted on eleven patients, six males and five females with age range from 26 to 45 years. Twenty consecutive dental implants were inserted for implant – supported restoration in the maxillary premolar area. The diameter and length of dental implants of all subjects were the same in groups, 3.7 mm diameter and 11.5 mm leng...

  6. Comparison of peri-implant bone formation around injection-molded and machined surface zirconia implants in rabbit tibiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Kyun; Woo, Kyung mi; Shon, Won-Jun; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare osseointegration and surface characteristics of zirconia implants made by the powder injection molding (PIM) technique and made by the conventional milling procedure in rabbit tibiae. Surface characteristics of 2 types of implant were evaluated. Sixteeen rabbits received 2 types of external hex implants with similar geometry, machined zirconia implants and PIM zirconia implants, in the tibiae. Removal torque tests and histomorphometric analyses were performed. The roughness of PIM zirconia implants was higher than that of machined zirconia implants. The PIM zirconia implants exhibited significantly higher bone-implant contact and removal torque values than the machined zirconia implants (P zirconia implant is promising, and PIM, using the roughened mold etching technique, can produce substantially rough surfaces on zirconia implants. PMID:26235717

  7. [A clinical retrospective study of 10 years implant results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Li, Jian-hui; Qiu, Li-xin; Di, Ping; Hu, Xiu-lian; Wang, Xing

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate ten years clinical results of dental implant treatment. A total of 5,590 endosseous implants were consecutively placed from Aug. 1994 to Aug 2004 in Center of Implantation, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. Among them, 161 were Brånemark implants, 1,436 were Frialit-2 implants, 1,012 were IMZ implants, 767 were Ankylos implants, 2,189 were Camlog implants, and 25 were Komet implants. A total of 2,629 prostheses were delivered, including 2,314 fixed prostheses and 315 implant-supported removable dentures. The patient age range was between 17 and 82. The mean follow-up time was 77.2 months (7 to 121 months). Clinical examination and X-ray films were conducted. The results were evaluated with Wheeler's survival criteria. With the final prostheses, 2,624 patients were satisfied. Five patients were unsatisfied with the prostheses. With refabricating the prostheses, 4 patients were satisfied and one expressed as acceptable. Peri-implantitis was observed in 178 implants of 105 cases. Prostheses loose was observed in 21 cases and fracture in 4 cases. Ceramic crack was observed in 51 cases. The documented implants lost were 68. The implant survival rate was 96.7% according to Wheeler's survival criteria. Implant prostheses were with high satisfaction. The implant survival rate was as highly as 96.7%. Implant prostheses were indicated for almost all the partial and complete edentulous cases due to modern implant surgical technique.

  8. PHOSPHATED, ACID-ETCHED IMPLANTS DECREASE MINERAL APPOSITION RATES NEAR IMPLANTS IN CANINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Christine Hyon; Kerns, David G.; Hallmon, William W.; Rivera-Hidalgo, Francisco; Nelson, Carl J.; Spears, Robert; Dechow, Paul C.; Opperman, Lynne A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of phosphate-coated titanium on mineral apposition rate (MAR) and new bone-to-implant contact (BIC) in canines. Materials and Methods: 2.2 mm × 4 mm electrolytically phosphated or non-phosphated titanium implants with acid-etched surfaces were placed in 48 mandibular sites in 6 foxhounds. Tetracycline and calcein dyes were administered 1 week after implant placement and 1 week before sacrifice. At twelve weeks following implant healing, animals were sacrificed. MAR and BIC were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Light microscopic and histological evaluation was performed on undecalcified sections. Results: Microscopic evaluation showed the presence of healthy osteoblasts lining bone surfaces near implants. Similar bone-to-implant contact was observed in phosphated and non-phosphated titanium implant sites. MAR was significantly higher near non-phosphated titanium implant surfaces than the phosphated titanium samples. No significant differences were found between dogs or implant sites. Discussion and Conclusion: Acid-etched only implants showed significantly higher mineral apposition rates compared to acid-etched, phosphate-coated implants. PMID:20369085

  9. Influence of prosthesis design and implantation technique on implant stresses after cementless revision THR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duda Georg N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral offset influences the forces at the hip and the implant stresses after revision THR. For extended bone defects, these forces may cause considerable bending moments within the implant, possibly leading to implant failure. This study investigates the influences of femoral anteversion and offset on stresses in the Wagner SL revision stem implant under varying extents of bone defect conditions. Methods Wagner SL revision stems with standard (34 mm and increased offset (44 mm were virtually implanted in a model femur with bone defects of variable extent (Paprosky I to IIIb. Variations in surgical technique were simulated by implanting the stems each at 4° or 14° of anteversion. Muscle and joint contact forces were applied to the reconstruction and implant stresses were determined using finite element analyses. Results Whilst increasing the implant's offset by 10 mm led to increased implant stresses (16.7% in peak tensile stresses, altering anteversion played a lesser role (5%. Generally, larger stresses were observed with reduced bone support: implant stresses increased by as much as 59% for a type IIIb defect. With increased offset, the maximum tensile stress was 225 MPa. Conclusion Although increased stresses were observed within the stem with larger offset and increased anteversion, these findings indicate that restoration of offset, key to restoring joint function, is unlikely to result in excessive implant stresses under routine activities if appropriate fixation can be achieved.

  10. Novel implant design improves implant survival in multirooted extraction sites: a preclinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan-Gildor, Adi; Machtei, Eli E; Gabay, Eran; Frankenthal, Shai; Levin, Liran; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G; Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim is to evaluate clinical, radiographic, and histologic parameters of novel implants with "three roots" design that were inserted into fresh multirooted extraction sockets. A secondary aim is to compare this new implant to standard root-form dental implants. Immediate implantation of novel or standard design 6 × 6-mm implants was performed bilaterally into multirooted sockets in mandibles of mini-pigs. Twelve weeks later, clinical, radiographic, stability, histomorphometric, and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analyses were performed. Survival rates were significantly higher in the test implants compared with control (92.8% versus 33.3%, respectively; P implants. Moreover, bone-to-implant contact was higher in the test implants (55.50% ± 3.68% versus 42.47% ± 9.89%). Contrary to the clinical, radiographic, and histomorphometric results, resonance frequency analysis measurements were greater in the control group (77.74 ± 3.21 implant stability quotient [ISQ]) compared with the test group (31.09 ± 0.28 ISQ), P = 0.008. The novel design implants resulted in significantly greater survival rate in multirooted extraction sites. Further studies will be required to validate these findings.

  11. [Clinical research of immediate restoration implant with mini-implants in edentulous space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-sheng; Zhao, Jian-jiang; Liu, Qiong; Liu, Tian-tao

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effective of immediate restoration with Osstem MS mini-implant in the edentulous space of 5-6 mm. The sample consisted of 36 consecutively treated partially edentulous patients who had a total of 36 Osstem MS mini-implants, which were 2.5 mm or 3.0 mm in diameter and placed in 5-6 mm gap. The chair-side-made or laboratory-made provisional crowns for implants were fabricated at the time of fixtures placed. The final restorations were fabricated with gold alloy-fused-porcelain crown 3 to 5 months later. During the mean 21.3 months (12-37 months) follow-up time since fixtures placement, all implants were examined clinically and radiologically. No implant failed before restoration. One implant led an adjacent tooth pulp necrosis after the implantation, but the natural tooth and implant were successfully retained by root canal therapy. 36 implants in 36 patients who were followed-up were successful and their aesthetic results were satisfactory. Immediate loaded implant with Osstem MS mini-implant has good clinical prosthetic effects in the edentulous space of 5-6 mm.

  12. CO2 laser surface treatment of failed dental implants for re-implantation: an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Torkzaban, Parviz; Shams, Bahar; Hosseinipanah, Seyed Mohammad; Farhadian, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the success rate of failed implants re-implanted after surface treatment with CO2 laser. Despite the widespread use of dental implants, there are many incidents of failures. It is believed that lasers can be applied to decontaminate the implant surface without damaging the implant. Ten dental implants that had failed for various reasons other than fracture or surface abrasion were subjected to CO2 laser surface treatment and randomly placed in the maxillae of dogs. Three failed implants were also placed as the negative controls after irrigation with saline solution without laser surface treatment. The stability of the implants was evaluated by the use of the Periotest values (PTVs) on the first day after surgery and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-operatively. The mean PTVs of treated implants increased at the first month interval, indicating a decrease in implant stability due to inflammation followed by healing of the tissue. At 3 and 6 months, the mean PTVs decreased compared to the 1-month interval (P laser surface debridement is associated with a high success rate in terms of implant stability.

  13. Systemic alendronate treatment improves fixation of press-fit implants: a canine study using nonloaded implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas B; Bechtold, Joan E; Chen, Xinqian

    2007-01-01

    investigated the influence of oral alendronate treatment on early implant fixation in two implant interface settings representing sites of an implant that are in contact with surrounding bone, and other sites without intimate bone contact. One plasma-sprayed cylindrical titanium implant (6 mm diameter...... of alendronate treatment. Bone ongrowth (bone in contact with implant surface) was estimated using the linear intercept technique and shear strength was calculated as the slope on a load-displacement curve. For the press fit implants, alendronate treatment significantly increased bone ongrowth from 24% to 29......Bone resorption associated with local trauma occurring during insertion of joint prostheses is recognized as an early event. Being an osteoclastic inhibitor, alendronate is a potential candidate means to decrease early periprosthetic bone resorption and thereby improve implant fixation. We...

  14. Histological evaluation of the peri-implant tissues of three human-retrieved Straumann implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellavia, Claudia; Carmagnola, Daniela; Storelli, Stefano; Rossi, Alessandro; Canciani, Elena; Romeo, Eugenio

    2011-08-01

    The most frequently-used histological parameters to define dental implant osseointegration include bone-to-implant contact and quantitative and qualitative assessments of the surrounding tissue (rate of mineralized/non-mineralized tissue and proportion of lamellar and woven bone compared to soft tissue or bone marrow). The aim of this paper was to present the histological features of the bone tissue surrounding three well-functioning Straumann SLA and SLActive implants placed in two patients after 12 and 60 months of loading. The percentage of osseointegration ranged from 66.4% and 71.9% for SLA surfaces, to 88.3% for the SLActive implant. Such results confirm that osseointegration occurs with high rates of bone-to-implant contact in humans, and that implants can be similarly clinically successful, although they show different bone-to-implant contact values. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, Ludmila Assuncao de Mello; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia Santos; Garcia, Robson Rodrigues; Leles, Jose Luiz Rodrigues; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  16. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Littmark, U.; Johansen, A.; Christodoulides, C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 , thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  17. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infection caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Like any other foreign bodies, implanted cardiac devices can become infected. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphilococci are the most common causes of infections of pacemaker and defibrillator systems. In this case an implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infection caused by an extremely rare ...

  18. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    also dictates to the surgeon about the implant body placement that offers the best ... surgical template. The requirements are more relevant than the. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning;. Current Knowledge and Clinical Perspectives. Mohammed Zaheer Kola ..... A risk of damage to vital anatomical structures.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction at implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lien M; Coward, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon the implantation of a competent embryo into a receptive endometrium. Despite major advancement in our understanding of reproductive medicine over the last few decades, implantation failure still occurs in both normal pregnancies and those created artificially by assisted reproductive technology (ART). Consequently, there is significant interest in elucidating the etiology of implantation failure. The complex multistep process of implantation begins when the developing embryo first makes contact with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells within the uterine environment. However, although this biological interaction marks the beginning of a fundamental developmental process, our knowledge of the intricate physiological and molecular processes involved remains sparse. In this synopsis, we aim to provide an overview of our current understanding of the morphological changes which occur to the plasma membrane of the uterine endothelium, and the molecular mechanisms that control communication between the early embryo and the endometrium during implantation. A multitude of molecular factors have been implicated in this complex process, including endometrial integrins, extracellular matrix molecules, adhesion molecules, growth factors, and ion channels. We also explore the development of in vitro models for embryo implantation to help researchers investigate mechanisms which may underlie implantation failure. Understanding the precise molecular pathways associated with implantation failure could help us to generate new prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers, and may identify novel therapeutic targets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Role of Imaging in Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Kalra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants have become an accepted form of permanent tooth replacement. Nearly all implants currently being placed are of the osseointegrated type. These typically consist of three parts: a fixture, an abutment and a screw or threaded rod. The fixture, usually composed of titanium, can be placed in either a surgically created site in the alveolar ridge or a fresh extraction socket. Diagnostic imaging can play an important role in evaluating patients with such implants. Useful imaging studies include plain panoramic radiography, computed tomography, and computer-reformatted cross-sectional, panoramic, and three-dimensional imaging. Advanced imaging studies can be used to determine the suitability of implant placement, appropriate sites for implant placement, the size of the implant that can be placed, and the need for preimplantation ridge surgery. Postoperatively, advanced imaging studies can show failure of an endosseous implant to osseointegrate, improper placement of an implant, and violation of important structures. This paper gives a brief insight into the various imaging modalities, which have been applied in implantology.

  1. Fundamentals and history of implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamal Kanti Pal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of implant dentistry was not there a few decades ago It has its long historical retrospectives. The quest for rehabilitation of edentulous ridge has intrigued mankind since ancient times. The period from the time of Egyptian and Mayan civilizations to 1930s was unique when clinicians attempted to replace a missing tooth utilizing various materials. The spark of inquiry began from mid-1930s with the advent of an alloy named “vitallium;” attempts have been made to utilize this new material as an implant. Thereafter, in early 1950s, a good deal of fundamental and clinical research started taking place. These research data had given a boost to the tremendous growth of the practice of using dental implants made of vitallium that practically exploded to reach every general practitioner's clinic across the globe. Critical understanding of bone physiology, drilling protocol, implant design and surface texture, initial implant stability, single-stage implant surgery, and immediate loading of implants are the few factors based on which modern implant practice has become a predictable treatment modality for the replacement of missing teeth.

  2. Dental implants: A boon to dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B H Sripathi Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and use of implants is one of the biggest advances in dentistry in the last few decades. It has helped to give many solutions to tooth loss as well as maxillo facial prosthetics. This article traces the history and evolution of dental implants.

  3. Surgical factors influencing mesiodistal implant angulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Michael; Kirmeier, Robert; Jakse, Norbert; Pertl, Christof; Wegscheider, Walther; Lorenzoni, Martin

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to identify relevant surgical parameters influencing the mesiodistal angular deviation of dental implants. Pilot drillings of 2 mm diameter were performed in bovine ribs with a parallelometer. The subsequent preparation of the implant socket was performed freehand. Utilizing six different implant systems, at least 80 drillings per system of different diameters were performed. The pilot drillings were marked with 2 mm steel pins and cephalometric radiographs were taken. The mesiodistal angle between the longitudinal implant axis and the marked pilot drillings was measured and evaluated by a blinded investigator. To evaluate the influence of the surgeons' experience, their drillings were compared with those of a group of unexperienced surgeons. Additionally, the influence of drilling speed and size of bur steps on drilling accuracy were evaluated. The difference between the lowest value of 0.91 degrees of mesiodistal angular deviation found for 3i implants and the highest of 1.36 degrees for Ankylos implants was of low statistical significance (P=0.065). Drillings of experienced surgeons showed less deviation compared with those of a beginners group (P<0.0001). Higher deviations were measured when a bur size was skipped. Drillings performed at high speed showed significantly higher deviations than those with fewer rewinds per minute. In order to achieve precise implant angulation, all bur diameters available should be used. Utilizing low drilling speeds results in less mesiodistal deviation. The surgeon's experience seems to be the most relevant factor in precise implant placement.

  4. Magnetoreflection studies of ion implanted bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, C.; Chieu, T.C.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Dresselhaus, G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the implantation of Sb ions on the electronic structure of the semimetal bismuth is studied by the magnetoreflection technique. The results show long electronic mean free paths and large implantation-induced increases in the band overlap and L-point band gap. These effects are opposite to those observed for Bi chemically doped with Sb. (author)

  5. Quality assessment of pacemaker implantations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Arnsbo, P; Asklund, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: Quality assessment of therapeutic procedures is essential to insure a cost-effective health care system. Pacemaker implantation is a common procedure with more than 500,000 implantations world-wide per year, but the general complication rate is not well described. We studied procedure relat...

  6. Polymeric implant of methylprednisolone for spinal injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymeric implant of methylprednisolone for spinal injury: preparation and characterization. Bo Yin, Jian-Jun Ji, Ming Yang. Abstract. Purpose: To improve the effectiveness and reduce the systemic side effects of methylprednisolone in traumatic spinal injuries, its polymeric implants were prepared using chitosan and sodium ...

  7. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals - clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human studies, abstracts, review articles.

  8. Osseoperception in Dental Implants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Brånemark, Per-Ingvar

    2016-04-01

    Replacement of lost teeth has significant functional and psychosocial effects. The capability of osseointegrated dental implants to transmit a certain amount of sensibility is still unclear. The phenomenon of developing a certain amount of tactile sensibility through osseointegrated dental implants is called osseoperception. The aim of this article is to evaluate the available literature to find osseoperception associated with dental implants. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and PubMed database. Articles published in English and articles whose abstract is available in English were included. The articles included in the review were based on osseoperception, tactile sensation, and neurophysiological mechanoreceptors in relation to dental implants. Articles on peri-implantitis and infection-related sensitivity were not included. Review articles without the original data were excluded, although references to potentially pertinent articles were noted for further follow-up. The phenomenon of osseoperception remains a matter of debate, so the search strategy mainly focused on articles on osseoperception and tactile sensibility of dental implants. This review presents the histological, neurophysiological, and psychophysical evidence of osseoperception and also the role of mechanoreceptors in osseoperception. The literature on osseoperception in dental implants is very scarce. The initial literature search resulted in 90 articles, of which 81 articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this systematic review. Patients restored with implant-supported prostheses reported improved tactile and motor function when compared with patients wearing complete dentures. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Procedure‑related and patient‑related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fifty‑one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental ...

  10. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These days, dental implants are becoming routinely used as a treatment option for rehabilitation of lost teeth. Conventionally, it is only after the completion of bone healing that the dental implants are loaded into the bone. Bone healing time is approximately 3 months and. 6 months for the mandible and maxilla, respectively.

  11. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Branemark was one of the initial pioneers who applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms an immobile connection with bone. The need for a dental implant to completely address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the surgical and ...

  12. Risk factors of peri-implant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Mano Azul, António; Rocha, Evangelista; Maló, Paulo

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to identify risk factors for the incidence of peri-implant pathology. One-thousand, two-hundred and seventy-fifty patients (255 cases and 1020 controls), rehabilitated with dental implants, were included. Peri-implant pathology was defined as the presence of peri-implant pockets ≥ 5 mm, bleeding on probing, vertical bone loss, and loss of attachment ≥ 2 mm. Cases and controls were matched for age, gender, and duration of follow-up. A logistic regression model was used, with estimation of the OR for each variable and interaction, with a level of significance of 5%. The risk factors for peri-implant pathology were: history of periodontitis (OR = 19), bacterial plaque (OR = 3.6), bleeding (OR = 2.9), bone level on the medium third of the implant (OR = 13.9), lack of prosthetic fit or non-optimal screw joint (OR = 5.9), metal-ceramic restorations (OR = 3.9), and the interaction between bacterial plaque and the proximity of other teeth or implants (PROXI) (OR = 4.3). PROXI (OR = 0.44) exerted a protective effect when independent. Based on the results, peri-implant pathology represents a group of multifactorial situations with interaction of biological and biomechanical components in its pathogenesis. It was possible to model the condition and to assess, with high precision, the risk profile of each patient. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  13. Simplifying cochlear implant speech processor fitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willeboer, C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional fittings of the speech processor of a cochlear implant (CI) rely to a large extent on the implant recipient's subjective responses. For each of the 22 intracochlear electrodes the recipient has to indicate the threshold level (T-level) and comfortable loudness level (C-level) while

  14. Titania nanotube arrays: Interfaces for implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara Symie

    For the 8--10% of Americans (20--25 million people) that have implanted biomedical devices, biomaterial failure and the need for revision surgery are critical concerns. The major causes for failure in implantable biomedical devices promoting a need for re-implantation and revision surgery include thrombosis, post-operative infection, immune driven fibrosis and biomechanical failure. The successful integration of long-term implantable devices is highly dependent on the early events of tissue/biomaterial interaction, promoting either implant rejection or a wound healing response (extracellular matrix production and vasculature). Favorable interactions between the implant surface and the respective tissue are critical for the long-term success of any implantable device. Recent studies have shown that material surfaces which mimic the natural physiological hierarchy of in vivo tissue may provide a possible solution for enhancing biomaterial integration, thus preventing infection and biomaterial rejection. Titania nanotube arrays, fabricated using a simple anodization technique, provide a template capable of promoting altered cellular functionality at a hierarchy similar to that of natural tissue. This work focuses on the fabrication of immobilized, vertically oriented and highly uniform titania nanotube arrays to determine how this specific nano-architecture affects skin cell functionality, hemocompatibility, thrombogenicity and the immune response. The results in this work identify enhanced dermal matrix production, altered hemocompatibility, reduced thrombogenicity and a deterred immune response on titania nanotube arrays. This evidences promising implications with respect to the use of titania nanotube arrays as beneficial interfaces for the successful implantation of biomedical devices.

  15. Libyan cochlear implant programme: achievements, difficulties, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cochlear implantation has become established worldwide as a safe and effective method of auditory rehabilitation of selected severely and profound deaf children and adults. Over 100,000 patients have received cochlear implants worldwide with the paediatric population proving to be the main beneficiaries. The Libyan ...

  16. Dental Implants in Patients with Sjogren's Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, Anke; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Arends, Suzanne; Meiners, Petra M; Visser, Anita; Kroese, Frans Gm; Bootsma, Hendrika; Vissink, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Limited evidence is available for applying dental implants in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) patients. Purpose: This study aims to retrospectively assess clinical outcome of implant therapy in a cohort of well-classified patients with SS. Materials and Methods: All SS patients attending the

  17. Physical Properties of Silicone Gel Breast Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Mark L; Bengtson, Bradley P; Smither, Kate; Nuti, Gina; Perry, TracyAnn

    2018-04-28

    Surgical applications using breast implants are individualized operations to fill and shape the breast. Physical properties beyond shape, size, and surface texture are important considerations during implant selection. Compare form stability, gel material properties, and shell thickness of textured shaped, textured round, and smooth round breast implants from 4 manufacturers: Allergan, Mentor, Sientra, and Establishment Labs through bench testing. Using a mandrel height gauge, form stability was measured by retention of dimensions on device movement from a horizontal to vertical supported orientation. Dynamic response of gel material (gel cohesivity, resistance to gel deformation, energy absorption) was measured using a synchronized target laser following application of graded negative pressure. Shell thickness was measured using digital thickness gauge calipers. Form stability, gel material properties, and shell thickness differed across breast implants. Of textured shaped devices, Allergan Natrelle 410 exhibited greater form stability than Mentor MemoryShape and Sientra Shaped implants. Allergan Inspira round implants containing TruForm 3 gel had greater form stability, higher gel cohesivity, greater resistance to gel deformation, and lower energy absorption than those containing TruForm 2 gel and in turn, implants containing TruForm 1 gel. Shell thickness was greater for textured versus smooth devices, and differed across styles. Gel cohesivity, resistance to gel deformation, and energy absorption are directly related to form stability, which in turn determines shape retention. These characteristics provide information to aid surgeons choosing an implant based on surgical application, patient tissue characteristics, and desired outcome.

  18. Impurity gettering by implanted carbon in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.; Cheung, N.W.; Yu, K.M.; Chu, P.K.; Liu, J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have observed strong gold gettering by implanted carbon in silicon. It was found that the gettering agents in carbon implanted layers are point defects associated with singular carbon atoms. The positions of the gettered Au atoms were found to be distorted substitutional sites. A point-defect gettering model is proposed to explain the findings. 27 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  19. Oral Abstract Session 3: Orthognathic/Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlev, Jens

    Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study......Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study...

  20. An unusual case of implant failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, J. Willem; Cune, Marco S.; van Es, Robert J. J.

    2007-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman was referred with a rapidly progressing swelling in the left canine region of the edentulous mandible. Nine months earlier, 2 permucosal implants had been placed in her atrophic anterior mandible. A few weeks after implant placement, an inoperable carcinoma of the lung had been

  1. Effect of Healing Time on Bone-Implant Contact of Orthodontic Micro-Implants: A Histologic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Fatemi, Kazem; Dehghani, Mahboobe; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed loading of orthodontic micro-implants on bone-implant contact. Materials and Methods. Sixty four micro-implants were implanted in dog's jaw bone. The micro-implants were divided into loaded and unloaded (control) groups. The control group had two subgroups: four and eight weeks being implanted. The loaded group had two subgroups of immediate loading and delayed (after four weeks healing) loading. Loaded samples were ...

  2. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  3. Bioactivity of plasma implanted biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D) is an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification of biomedical materials is described. NiTi alloys have unique super-elastic and shape memory properties and are suitable for orthopedic implants but the leaching of toxic Ni may pose health hazards in humans. We have recently investigated the use of acetylene, oxygen and nitrogen PIII and D to prevent out-diffusion of nickel and good results have been obtained. Silicon is the most important material in the microelectronics industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PIII into silicon to improve the surface bioactivity and observed biomimetic growth of apatite on the surface in simulated body fluids. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness and by incorporation of elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the surface blood compatibility can be improved. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results are discussed in this article

  4. Diclofenac Sodium Loaded Multicomponent Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, Lila; Viitanen, Petrus; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2008-02-01

    Earlier we have reported on developing DS releasing bioabsorbable rods for inhibition of osteolysis [l]. Due to their unsatisfactory drug release profiles we assessed the use of sintering technique of enhancement of drug release in the current study. Melt extruded PLGA 80/20 rods were compounded 8 wt-% DS. Some rods were self reinforced (SR) and some of them were sterilized to get three different components with different drug release profiles. Different rods were sintered together with heat and pressure. Three different specimen groups with different construction were studied. Thermal properties were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Changes of IV were performed with capillary analysis and drug release measurements with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Mechanical strength were measured two weeks, when disintegration occurred. Release rate consisted of 1) sharp jump start peak, 2) second smoother peak, and 3) third smooth peak. Released DS concentrations reached local therapeutic levels and maintained at that stage for 24-36 days. All DS was released during 50-70 days. The drug release from multicomponent implant was more stable and commenced earlier than from initial rods. Such properties were favored ones. Initial shear strength was 82 MPa and it decreased to 15 MPa. The mechanical bonding was sufficient although the components disintegrated relatively fast. By sintering different PLGA/DS components with different release rates it is possible to construct a truly controlled release implant for bone fixation with anti-inflammatory properties.

  5. Automated design of customized implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Chulvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo muestra un modelo que se postula como capaz para el diseño de un implante craneal personalizado directamente desde el proceso de toma de imágenes médica. La salida de este proceso de diseño se conseguirá en un formato capaz de ser reconocido por el sistema de manufactura. El sistema propuesto se ha creado a partir de la unión de dos prototipos informáticos desarrollados durante la presente investigación, y a través del estudio de las tecnologías relacionadas o circundantes. El núcleo del modelo en la tecnología basada en el conocimiento (KBS, que debe permitir de almacenar y gestionar datos médicos y de diseño para poder aplicar dichos conocimientos durante el proceso de diseño del implante. El objeto de este proyecto es el de obtener una herramienta para mejorar el proceso de diseño, la biocompatibilidad con el paciente y reducir los costes finales, y que pueda ser operado sin necesidad del conocimiento completo de todas sus fases por el usuario.

  6. Experimental study on bone tissue reaction around HA implants radiated after implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Masato; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tamura, Sayaka; Chen, Xuan; Uchida, Haruo; Mori, Kimie; Ohno, Kohsuke; Michi, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate histologically and histomorphometrically the tissue reaction around hydroxylapatite (HA) implants that underwent irradiation in 3 different periods in the course of bone healing after implantation. The cylindrical high-density HA implants were implanted in 48 Japanese white rabbit mandibles. A single 15 Gy dose was applied to the mandible 5, 14, or 28 days after implantation. The rabbits were sacrificed 7, 14, 28, and 90 days after irradiation. Nonirradiated rabbits were used as controls. CMR, labeling with tetracycline and calcein, and non-decalcified specimens stained with toluidine blue were used for histological analyses and histomorphometric measurements. The results were as follows: In the rabbits irradiated 5 days after implantation, the HA-bone contact was observed later than that in the controls and the bone-implant contact surface ratio was lower than that in the controls at examination because necrosis of the newly-formed bone occurred just after irradiation. HA-bone contact of the rabbits irradiated 14 and 28 days after implantation was similar to that of the controls. And, bone remodeling was suppressed in rabbits of each group sacrificed at 90 days after irradiation. The results suggested that a short interval between implantation and irradiation causes direct contact between HA implant and bone and a long lapse of time before irradiation hardly affects the bone-implant contact, but delays bone remodeling. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent overloading the HA implants irradiated after implantation and pay utmost attention to conditions around the bone-implant contact. (author)

  7. Surface characterization of titanium based dental implants; Caracterizacao de implantes odontologicos a base de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilho, Guilherme Augusto Alcaraz

    2006-07-01

    Dental implantology uses metallic devices made of commercially pure titanium in order to replace lost teeth. Titanium presents favorable characteristics as bio material and modern implants are capable of integrate, witch is the union between bone and implant without fibrous tissue development. Three of the major Brazilian implant manufacturers were chosen to join the study. A foreign manufacturer participated as standard. The manufacturers had three specimens of each implant with two different surface finishing, as machined and porous, submitted to analysis. Surface chemical composition and implant morphology were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microprobe. Implant surface is mainly composed of titanium, oxygen and carbon. Few contaminants commonly present on implant surface were found on samples. Superficial oxide layer is basically composed of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), another oxides as Ti O and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} were also found in small amount. Carbon on implant surface was attributed to manufacturing process. Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Silicon appeared in smaller concentration on surface. There was no surface discrepancy among foreign and Brazilian made implants. SEM images were made on different magnification, 35 X to 3500 X, and showed similarity among as machined implants. Porous surface finishing implants presented distinct morphology. This result was attributed to differences on manufacturing process. Implant bioactivity was accessed through immersion on simulated body solution (SBF) in order to verify formation of an hydroxyapatite (HA) layer on surface. Samples were divided on three groups according to immersion time: G1 (7 days), G2 (14 days), G3 (21 days), and deep in SBF solution at 37 deg C. After being removed from solution, XPS analyses were made and then implants have been submitted to microprobe analysis. XPS showed some components of SBF solution on sample surface but microprobe

  8. Experimental study on bone tissue reaction around HA implants radiated after implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Masato; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tamura, Sayaka; Chen, Xuan; Uchida, Haruo; Mori, Kimie; Ohno, Kohsuke; Michi, Ken-ichi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1998-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate histologically and histomorphometrically the tissue reaction around hydroxylapatite (HA) implants that underwent irradiation in 3 different periods in the course of bone healing after implantation. The cylindrical high-density HA implants were implanted in 48 Japanese white rabbit mandibles. A single 15 Gy dose was applied to the mandible 5, 14, or 28 days after implantation. The rabbits were sacrificed 7, 14, 28, and 90 days after irradiation. Nonirradiated rabbits were used as controls. CMR, labeling with tetracycline and calcein, and non-decalcified specimens stained with toluidine blue were used for histological analyses and histomorphometric measurements. The results were as follows: In the rabbits irradiated 5 days after implantation, the HA-bone contact was observed later than that in the controls and the bone-implant contact surface ratio was lower than that in the controls at examination because necrosis of the newly-formed bone occurred just after irradiation. HA-bone contact of the rabbits irradiated 14 and 28 days after implantation was similar to that of the controls. And, bone remodeling was suppressed in rabbits of each group sacrificed at 90 days after irradiation. The results suggested that a short interval between implantation and irradiation causes direct contact between HA implant and bone and a long lapse of time before irradiation hardly affects the bone-implant contact, but delays bone remodeling. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent overloading the HA implants irradiated after implantation and pay utmost attention to conditions around the bone-implant contact. (author)

  9. Living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S; Knudsen, Charlotte; Dilling, Karen

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The clinical management and care of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has shifted from face-to-face in-clinic visits to remote monitoring. Reduced interactions between patients and healthcare professionals may impede patients' transition to adapting post-implant.......AIMS: The clinical management and care of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has shifted from face-to-face in-clinic visits to remote monitoring. Reduced interactions between patients and healthcare professionals may impede patients' transition to adapting post......-implant. We examined patients' needs and preferences for information provision and care options and overall satisfaction with treatment. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients implanted with a first-time ICD or defibrillator with cardiac resynchronization therapy (n = 389) within the last 2 years at Odense University...

  10. Implant supported overdentures--the Copenhagen experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K

    1997-01-01

    and all but two of the implants were longer than 10 mm. For the implant supported overdentures two methods of attachment were used, a bar or a ball. RESULTS: One of 69 fixtures was lost during the 4-5 year observation period. The mean bone loss for all fixtures was less than 0.2 mm per year. Complications......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and biological effect of implant-supported overdenture treatment in the lower jaw. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Thirty-two patients were consecutively treated with Astra Tech implants in the lower jaw for retaining overdentures. All implants had a diameter of 3.5 mm...... included 15 fractures of the ball attachment and 26 episodes of looseness of the matrices holding the screw in place. Patient satisfaction with the treatment of the lower jaw was high although 7 patients found that control of the upper denture was poor following treatment. CONCLUSIONS: When the bone...

  11. Mutagenic effects of ion implanted rice seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang

    1996-04-01

    Dry seeds of rice were implanted with 15∼30 keV N + , H + , Ar + ion beam of various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam could induce the variation on the chromosome structure and inhibit mitosis in root tip cell. The chromosomal aberration rate of cells tended to be increased with increase of implanted ion dose. Compared with 60 Co γ-rays, ion implantation induced lower rate of cells with chromosome aberration. However, there was a similar inhibitory effect on mitosis between ion beam and γ-rays. The electrophoretic banding patterns of peroxidase enzymes were altered by both mutagens and varied. Frequency of the chlorophyll mutation implanted by ion beam was higher than that induced by γ-rays. Mutation frequencies of heading date and plant height were similar between ion beam implanting and γ-rays irradiation. (11 tabs., 2 figs.)

  12. Study of hydrogen implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugeat, J.P.; Chami, A.C.; Danielou, R.; Ligeon, E.

    1976-01-01

    An aluminium sample was implanted with deuterium and hydrogen at 5keV and 10keV respectively. The 1 H( 11 B,α) 8 Be* and D( 3 He,p) 4 He reactions were used for the analysis of H and D respectively. The implanted deuterium was shown to be as a whole in a tetrahedral site as far as the implantation temperature is lower than 175K, beyond that temperature the deuterium is randomly located. When the implantation temperature increases from 33K up to 275K the tetrahedral siting remains during annealing. The migration temperatures of hydrogen (or temperature of transition from the tetrahedral siting to a random distribution) experimentally observed during annealing (300K) and for increased implantation temperatures, show that the tetrahedral site is associated with a monovacancy migrating at 300K, the diffusion temperature of hydrogen being lower than 180K [fr

  13. Boron precipitates in ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.K.; Washburn, J.

    1975-03-01

    Long rod-like defects are observed in ion implanted silicon when boron is present either as a prior dopant addition or as the implanted species. Results of recent work indicates that these defects have the characteristics of narrow extrinsic dipoles or elongated dislocation loops and that there are two different types along each of the six (110) directions. An annealing kinetics method has been used to identify the nature of these defects formed during post-implantation annealing in boron ion (100 keV) implanted silicon irradiated at room temperature to a dose of 2 x 10 14 /cm 2 . It is concluded that at least two different kinds of rod-like defects exist in boron ion implanted silicon. From the activation energy for shrinkage, it is also concluded that one type (anti A) is composed largely of boron atoms. (U.S.)

  14. Taking stock of training in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrak, F

    2016-08-26

    Despite the ever-growing demand for implant treatments by patients, there is confusion about what the appropriate training pathway in implant dentistry should be. This is accompanied by a worrying lack of training at undergraduate level for correct patient selection and monitoring of implant cases. An unclear training pathway, inappropriate referrals and a 'hands-off' approach to patients with implants may be putting patients at risk. This article highlights these issues with a suggestion that the training should of course follow the current GDC guidelines, but goes further to suggest that the end point of training should be at diploma level as a minimum, either via a university route, or via the RCS Edinburgh Diploma in Implant Dentistry Examination.

  15. Submandibular fossa augmentation in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2017-01-01

    There are two limiting factors for determining the dental implant fixture length in mandibular posterior edentulous region: Inferior dental canal and submandibular fossa. Submandibular fossa augmentation is a suggested way to overcome the problem of lingual undercut beneath the mylohyoid ridge in implant dentistry. Patients with lingual posterior bony undercut that interferes with the placement of a standard implant with a length of 10 mm were enrolled in this study. This method was used for eight patients in 10 sites. Increased implant length and decreasing the chance of sublingual hematoma due to lingual cortical plate perforation are the results of this study. Submandibular fossa augmentation is a new technique to improve the maneuver of oral surgeons to increase dental implant length in the presence of deep lingual bony undercut.

  16. Etonogestrel contraceptive implant-associated secondary anorgasmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Hector O; Ramirez, Alexiya; Dawson, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    The etonogestrel contraceptive implant is a 4-cm radio-opaque subdermal rod, inserted in the nondominant arm, providing up to 3 years of continuous contraception. We describe a 21-year-old nulligravid, nondepressed female who experienced new-onset secondary anorgasmia 1 month after etonogestrel insertion. Off-label, oral use of bupropion and sildenafil did not restore orgasmic ability. Finally, 1 week after implant removal (4½ months after insertion), spontaneous return of orgasmic ability occurred. Anorgasmia after etonogestrel implant use is a rare adverse event; nonetheless, clinicians should be alert to its possibility. This report documents secondary anorgasmia in a nondepressed female temporally associated with etonogestrel implant insertion. Clinicians should be aware that this rare event can occur but is quickly reversible with implant removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-energy ion implantation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    High-energy ion implantation is an extremely flexible type of surface treatment technique, in that it offers the possibility of treating almost any type of target material or product with ions of almost any chemical species, or combinations of chemical species. In addition, ion implantations can be combined with variations in temperature during or after ion implantation. As a result, the possibility of approaching a wide variety of surface-related materials science problems exists with ion implantation. This paper will outline factors pertinent to application of high-energy ion implantation to surface engineering problems. This factors include fundamental advantages and limitations, economic considerations, present and future equipment, and aspects of materials science

  18. Mutagenic effects of ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1998-01-01

    Dry seeds of Stevia were implanted by 75 keV nitrogen and carbon ions with various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam dose. The rate of cells with chromosomal aberration was lower than that induced with γ-rays. Frequency of the mutation induced by implantation of N + and C + ions were higher than those induced by γ-rays. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and in M 2 useful mutation induced by implantation of C + ion was higher than those induced by implantation of N + ion. Mutagenic effects Feng 1 x Riyuan and Riyuan x Feng 2 by implantation of N + and C + were higher than that of Jining and Feng 2

  19. Development of industrial ion implantation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ho; Hwang, Churl Kew; Kim, Wan; Jin, Jung Tai; Jung, Ki Sok; Yoon, Su Ho; Shin, Won Churl; Kim, Jong Gook; Han, Jeon Geon; Chung, Ki Hyung

    1994-01-01

    On a cooperation between KAERI, Kurchatov Institute (Russia), and Mirae Co., development of a metal ion implanter and ion implantation technology is performed on a basic idea of popularization and refinement of ion implantation technology applied to the industrial components. The developed implanter is a two beam type: the mass separation line produces several mA of metal ion beams and the non-separation line produces several tens of mA gas ion beams, thus making the synergistic effect possible by the irradiation of beams from both lines. The target is made of a rotating plate of 60cm in radius and can treat various types of industrial components or parts. About 60 kinds of specimens were treated for the development of implantation technology. Two or five times lengthening of longevities were achieved on the PCB drills, razor blades, cutters, and precision dies. (Author)

  20. Hydrogenation of stainless steels implanted with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Ramos, L.E. da.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work the effects of both ion implantation and hydrogenation on the fatigue behaviour of an AISI-304 type unstable stainless steel was studied. The material was tested under the following microstructural conditions: annealed; annealed plus hydrogenated; annealed plus ion-implanted; annealed, ion-implanted and hydrogeneted. The hydrogen induced phase transformations were also studied during the outgassing of the samples. The ion implanted was observed to retard the kinetics of the hydrogen induced phase transformations. It was also observed that the nitrogen ion implantation followed by both natural (for about 4 months) and artificial (100 0 C for 6 hours) aging treatments was beneficial to the fatigue life of both non hydrogenated and severely hydrogenated samples. (author) [pt

  1. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Nagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy.

  2. Silicone breast implants and connective tissue disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipworth, Loren; Holmich, Lisbet R; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2011-01-01

    CTD, has been extensively studied. We have reviewed the epidemiologic literature regarding an association between cosmetic breast implants and CTDs, with particular emphasis on results drawn from the most recent investigations, many of which are large cohort studies with long-term follow-up, as well......-analyses and critical reviews, which have demonstrated that cosmetic breast implants are not associated with a subsequent increased occurrence of individual CTDs or all CTDs combined, including fibromyalgia. Moreover, there is no credible evidence for the conjectured excess of "atypical" CTD among women with cosmetic...... breast implants, or of a rheumatic symptom profile unique to these women. No increased risk of CTDs is evident in women with extracapsular ruptures in two studies, which evaluated risk by implant rupture status, and no consistent association has been observed between silicone breast implants...

  3. Effect of implant position, angulation, and attachment height on peri-implant bone stress associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hae Ryong; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Yooseok; Paek, Janghyun; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the level and distribution of peri-implant bone stresses associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with different implant positions. Mathematical models of mandibles and overdentures were designed using finite element analysis software. Two intraosseous implants and ball attachment systems were placed in the interforaminal region. The overdenture, which was supported by the two implants, was designed to withstand bilateral and unilateral vertical masticatory loads (total 100 N). In all, eight types of models, which differed according to assigned implant positions, height of attachments, and angulation, were tested: MI (model with implants positioned in the lateral incisor sites), MC (implants in canine sites), MP (implants in premolar sites), MI-Hi (greater height of attachments), MC-M (canine implants placed with mesial inclination), MC-D (canine implants placed with distal inclination), MC-B (canine implants placed with buccal inclination), and MC-L (canine implants placed with lingual inclination). Peri-implant bone stress levels associated with overdentures retained by lateral incisor implants resulted in the lowest stress levels and the highest efficiency in distributing peri-implant stress. MI-Hi showed increased stress levels and decreased efficiency in stress distribution. As the implants were inclined, stress levels increased and the efficiency of stress distribution decreased. Among the inclined models, MC-B showed the lowest stress level and best efficiency in stress distribution. The lowest stress and the best stability of implants in mandibular two-implant overdentures were obtained when implants were inserted in lateral incisor areas with shorter attachments and were placed parallel to the long axes of the teeth.

  4. Are short implants in the mandible safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Henrique Gonçalves Motta

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the importance of bioengineering and the improvement in surgical techniques demonstrated by the rates attained of the prevalence of successful placement of dental implants in the posterior region of the mandible, in D3 bone quality in patients between the ages of 52 and 60 years, with dentures fixed on 8.5 mm implants. Methods: The statistical data for this retrospective study were collected at the Post-Graduation Center of the Integrated Dentistry Center, Faculty of Sarandi / Academy of Dentistry - Rio de Janeiro, at the CLIVO clinic, from among a total of 2.294 implants placed in the mandible, in the period from 1999 to 2007. There was a total of 1.056 short implants, of a length shorter than or equal to 10 mm, among which 20 implants were randomly chosen and analyzed. Results: The data were treated statistically and comparison of these data was consubstantiated in constructive data analysis by means of Statistical Pattern Recognition Methods for each variable under study. A success rate of 85% was obtained, and the need to take certain care when indicating the use of short implants was verified. Conclusion: Bioengineering and the development of present day surgical techniques have optimized the use of short implants, with the aim of avoiding advanced surgeries. To compensate the smaller size, there are some factors that must be observed, such as: Bone quality, crown/implant ratio, number and diameter of implants, macroscopic and microscopic geometry of the implants, magnitude of mesial occlusal forces.

  5. Periodontal parameters around implants and natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Goel, Kopal; Shakya, Vijay; Tiwari, Arunesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, dental implants permit consideration of as one of the most reliable therapeutic modalities during the establishment of any prosthetic treatment plan. In numerous clinical situations, implants can clearly contribute to a notable simplification of therapy, frequently enabling removable prostheses to be avoided, keeping it less invasive with respect to remaining tooth structure. The aim of the present study was to clinically assess the peri-implant and periodontal conditions after the placement of crowns in partially edentulous patients. Twenty-five participants with 28 implant supported crowns were recruited in the study. After the insertion of suprastructure, meticulous scaling and root planing were performed on adjacent teeth which served as control. The clinical examination was carried out by a single examiner after placement of crowns at an interval of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months and included the assessment of modified plaque index (mPlI), bleeding score, calculus score, probing pocket depth (PPD), and recession on the four aspects of each implant and adjacent teeth. The mPlI, modified bleeding index (mBlI), calculus score, PPD, and recession decreased from 1 month to 12 months in both implants and in control teeth. The mean mPlI, mBlI, and calculus score were comparatively high in control teeth than implants. PPD was found to be more on implants than in control teeth. Recession was slightly higher in control teeth than implants throughout the study period, but it was not statistically significant. An implant patient must always be enrolled in a supportive therapy program that involves recall visits at regular intervals.

  6. Soft tissue grafting to improve implant esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moawia M Kassab

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Moawia M KassabDivision of Periodontics, Marquette University, School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Dental implants are becoming the treatment of choice to replace missing teeth, especially if the adjacent teeth are free of restorations. When minimal bone width is present, implant placement becomes a challenge and often resulting in recession and dehiscence around the implant that leads to subsequent gingival recession. To correct such defect, the author turned to soft tissue autografting and allografting to correct a buccal dehiscence around tooth #24 after a malpositioned implant placed by a different surgeon. A 25-year-old woman presented with the chief complaint of gingival recession and exposure of implant threads around tooth #24. The patient received three soft tissue grafting procedures to augment the gingival tissue. The first surgery included a connective tissue graft to increase the width of the keratinized gingival tissue. The second surgery included the use of autografting (connective tissue graft to coronally position the soft tissue and achieve implant coverage. The third and final surgery included the use of allografting material Alloderm to increase and mask the implant from showing through the gingiva. Healing period was uneventful for the patient. After three surgical procedures, it appears that soft tissue grafting has increased the width and height of the gingiva surrounding the implant. The accomplished thickness of gingival tissue appeared to mask the showing of implant threads through the gingival tissue and allowed for achieving the desired esthetic that the patient desired. The aim of the study is to present a clinical case with soft tissue grafting procedures.Keywords: case report, connective tissue, dental implants, allograft, coronally positioned flap

  7. Probing around implants and teeth with healthy or inflamed peri-implant mucosa/gingival. A histologic comparison in cynomolgus monkeys. (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Søren; Holmstrup, Palle; Stoltze, K.

    2002-01-01

    Osseointegrated oral implants; teeth; phathology; peri-implant mucositis; gingivitis; peri-implantitis; periodontitis; diagnosis; probing depth; non-human primates; cynomolgus monkeys: Macaca fascicularis...

  8. Short implants had lower survival rates in posterior jaws compared to standard implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Gary L

    2016-12-01

    Data sourcesPubMed/Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases supplemented by searches of the journals; Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, Clinical Oral Implants Research, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Dentistry, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Oral Implantology, Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Journal of Periodontology, Periodontology 2000.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective studies with at least ten patients, published in the last ten years that compared short and standard implants and published in English were considered.Data extraction and synthesisA single author abstracted data with checking by a second reviewer. Methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad Scale and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Risk ratios (RR) were calculated for implant survival rates, complications and prostheses failures and marginal bone loss was evaluated using mean difference (MD).ResultsThirteen studies consisting of ten RCTs and three prospective studies were included. The ten RCTs were considered to be of high quality. Two thousand six hundred and thirty-one implants were placed in 1269 patients (981 short and 1650 standard implants). Thirty-eight short implants failed (3.87%) and 45 standard implants (2.72%). Random effects meta-analysis found no statistically significant difference between standard implants and short implants placed in the posterior regions; RR =1.35 (95% CI; 0.82-2.22: P=0.24). Marginal bone loss was evaluated in nine studies and no differences in marginal bone loss were observed. Complications were reported by seven studies and no significant difference was seen between standard and short implants; RR= 0.54 (95% CI; 0.27-1.09: P = 0.08). There was also no significant difference in prosthesis failures between standard and short implants; RR= 0.96 (95

  9. Influence Of Implantation Age On School-Age Language Performance In Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobey, Emily A.; Thal, Donna; Niparko, John K.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Wang, Nae-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined specific spoken language abilities of 160 children with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss followed prospectively 4, 5, or 6 years after cochlear implantation. Study sample Ninety-eight children received implants before 2.5 years, and 62 children received implants between 2.5 and 5 years of age. Design Language was assessed using four subtests of the Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language (CASL). Standard scores were evaluated by contrasting age of implantation and follow-up test time. Results Children implanted under 2.5 years of age achieved higher standard scores than children with older ages of implantation for expressive vocabulary, expressive syntax, and pragmatic judgments. However, in both groups, some children performed more than two standard deviations below the standardization group mean, while some scored at or well above the mean. Conclusions Younger ages of implantation are associated with higher levels of performance, while later ages of implantation are associated with higher probabilities of continued language delays, particularly within subdomains of grammar and pragmatics. Longitudinal data from this cohort study demonstrate that after 6 years of implant experience, there is large variability in language outcomes associated with modifiers of rates of language learning that differ as children with implants age. PMID:23448124

  10. Osseointegration of zirconia implants: an SEM observation of the bone-implant interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naujoks Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The successful use of zirconia ceramics in orthopedic surgery led to a demand for dental zirconium-based implant systems. Because of its excellent biomechanical characteristics, biocompatibility, and bright tooth-like color, zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO2 has the potential to become a substitute for titanium as dental implant material. The present study aimed at investigating the osseointegration of zirconia implants with modified ablative surface at an ultrastructural level. Methods A total of 24 zirconia implants with modified ablative surfaces and 24 titanium implants all of similar shape and surface structure were inserted into the tibia of 12 Göttinger minipigs. Block biopsies were harvested 1 week, 4 weeks or 12 weeks (four animals each after surgery. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis was performed at the bone implant interface. Results Remarkable bone attachment was already seen after 1 week which increased further to intimate bone contact after 4 weeks, observed on both zirconia and titanium implant surfaces. After 12 weeks, osseointegration without interposition of an interfacial layer was detected. At the ultrastructural level, there was no obvious difference between the osseointegration of zirconia implants with modified ablative surfaces and titanium implants with a similar surface topography. Conclusion The results of this study indicate similar osseointegration of zirconia and titanium implants at the ultrastructural level.

  11. The Clinical Implications of Poly Implant Prothèse Breast Implants: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Wazir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammary implants marketed by Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP were found to contain industrial grade silicone and this caused heightened anxiety and extensive publicity regarding their safety in humans. These implants were used in a large number of patients worldwide for augmentation or breast reconstruction. We reviewed articles identified by searches of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases up to May 2014 using the terms: "PIP", "Poly Implant Prothèse", "breast implants" and "augmentation mammoplasty" "siloxanes" or "silicone". In addition the websites of regulating bodies in Europe, USA, and Australia were searched for reports related to PIP mammary implants. PIP mammary implants are more likely to rupture than other implants and can cause adverse effects in the short to the medium term related to the symptoms of rupture such as pain, lumps in the breast and axilla and anxiety. Based on peer-reviewed published studies we have calculated an overall rupture rate of 14.5% (383/2,635 for PIP implants. However, there is no evidence that PIP implant rupture causes long-term adverse health effects in humans so far. Silicone lymphadenopathy represents a foreign body reaction and should be treated conservatively. The long-term adverse effects usually arise from inappropriate extensive surgery, such as axillary lymph node dissection or extensive resection of breast tissue due to silicone leakage.

  12. Saving an Integrating Implant Involved with Endodontic Implant Pathology Using Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shin Hye; Park, Young-Seok; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woocheol; Shon, Won-Jun

    Endodontic implant pathology (EIP) refers to cases in which endodontic infections cause infections in adjacent implants, and vice versa. This case report demonstrates the successful resolution of two types of EIPs, implant endodontitis and endodontic implantitis, by endodontic intervention with surgical treatment. In case 1, the patient complained of tooth discomfort after implant placement in the adjacent tooth. The tooth was sensitive to percussion and showed slight mobility with a negative reaction to an electric pulp test. The symptoms persisted despite conventional root canal treatment, and surgical treatment of the symptomatic tooth and implant lesion was performed. In case 2, the patient suffered from repeated infection around a newly installed implant. The adjacent devitalized tooth exhibited a periapical lesion that was contiguous with the implant. Conventional root canal treatment and retreatment did not successfully resolve the symptoms. Surgical root canal therapy was then performed with regenerative biomaterials as needed. Neither case showed radiographic or clinical evidence of failure after 4 and 5 years of follow-up, respectively, after the surgery and the adjacent implants were successfully osseointegrated. Endodontic intervention combined with surgical treatment resolved both types of EIPs and led to tooth preservation and successful osseointegration of adjacent implants.

  13. The clinical implications of poly implant prothèse breast implants: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Umar; Kasem, Abdul; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-01-01

    Mammary implants marketed by Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) were found to contain industrial grade silicone and this caused heightened anxiety and extensive publicity regarding their safety in humans. These implants were used in a large number of patients worldwide for augmentation or breast reconstruction. We reviewed articles identified by searches of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases up to May 2014 using the terms: "PIP", "Poly Implant Prothèse", "breast implants" and "augmentation mammoplasty" "siloxanes" or "silicone". In addition the websites of regulating bodies in Europe, USA, and Australia were searched for reports related to PIP mammary implants. PIP mammary implants are more likely to rupture than other implants and can cause adverse effects in the short to the medium term related to the symptoms of rupture such as pain, lumps in the breast and axilla and anxiety. Based on peer-reviewed published studies we have calculated an overall rupture rate of 14.5% (383/2,635) for PIP implants. However, there is no evidence that PIP implant rupture causes long-term adverse health effects in humans so far. Silicone lymphadenopathy represents a foreign body reaction and should be treated conservatively. The long-term adverse effects usually arise from inappropriate extensive surgery, such as axillary lymph node dissection or extensive resection of breast tissue due to silicone leakage.

  14. Histology of a dental implant with a platform switched implant-abutment connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Perrotti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peri-implant crestal bone must be stable for aesthetic reasons. Aim of this study was a histologic analysis of an implant with a platform switched implant-abutment connection. Materials and methods: A 32-year-old male patient participated in this study. The patient needed a bilateral mandibular restoration. Four implants were used, and were immediately restored and loaded the same day of insertion. After a 6 weeks healing period, one implant with platform-switched abutment was retrieved with trephine. Before retrieval the implant was osseointegrated and not mobile. On one side of the implant, a 1 mm resorption of the crestal bone was present. On the contrary, on the other side no bone resorption had occurred and about 1 mm of bone was present over the implant shoulder. Results: The bone-implant contact percentage was 65.1 ± 6.3 %. Platform- switching could help in maintaining the height of the peri-implant crestal bone.

  15. Can degradation products released from dental implants affect peri-implant tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha Oliveira, M; Schunemann, W V H; Mathew, M T; Henriques, B; Magini, R S; Teughels, W; Souza, J C M

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the literature available on the effects, on peri-implant tissues, of degradation products released from dental implants as a consequence of therapeutic treatment for peri-implantitis and/or of wear-corrosion of titanium. A literature review of the PubMed medline database was performed up to December 31, 2016. The following search terms were used: "titanium wear and dental implant"; "titanium corrosion and dental implant"; "bio-tribocorrosion"; "peri-implantitis"; "treatment of peri-implantitis"; "titanium particles release and dental implant"; and "titanium ion release and dental implant". The keywords were applied to the database in different combinations without limits of time period or type of work. In addition, the reference lists of relevant articles were searched for further studies. Seventy-nine relevant scientific articles on the topic were retrieved. The results showed that pro-inflammatory cytokines, infiltration of inflammatory response cells and activation of the osteoclasts activity are stimulated in peri-implant tissues in the presence of metal particles and ions. Moreover, degenerative changes were reported in macrophages and neutrophils that phagocytosed titanium microparticles, and mutations occurred in human cells cultured in medium containing titanium-based nanoparticles. Debris released from the degradation of dental implants has cytotoxic and genotoxic potential for peri-implant tissues. Thus, the amount and physicochemical properties of the degradation products determine the magnitude of the detrimental effect on peri-implant tissues. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Dental implant surfaces after insertion in bone: an in vitro study in four commercial implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Herbert; Wolff, Carolina; Bauer, Florian; Ruthenberg, Ricarda; Sculean, Anton; Mücke, Thomas

    2017-10-24

    Primary healing of dental implants is influenced by their surface morphology. However, little is known about any alterations in morphology during their insertion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the surface morphology of four different implant systems, following their insertion in porcine jaw bones. Four fresh porcine mandible specimens were used. Six new implants of four systems (Ankylos® 4.5 × 14 mm, Frialit Synchro® 4.5 × 15 mm, NobelReplace ® Tapered Groovy RP 4.3 × 13 mm, Straumann SLA® Bone Level 3.3 × 14 mm) were inserted, whereas one implant of each system served as a control. After their removal, implants were cleaned in an ultrasonic bath. All 28 implants were examined quantitatively by 3D confocal microscopy for surface characteristics. In the evaluated zones, implants of the Ankylos, Frialit, and Straumann systems showed mostly a reduction of the mean surface roughness Sa, the maximal surface roughness Sz, and the developed surface area ratio Sdr; Nobel implants showed an increase in these parameters. With respect to all three parameters Sa, Sz, and Sdr, statistical analysis revealed that differences between the four systems were highly significant in the apical region of implants. Controls showed no morphologic alterations. The insertion process had an impact on the surface of all four implant systems. Anodized implant surface modification seems to result in more alterations compared with subtractive surface modifications. Therefore, surgical planning should take into consideration the choice of surface treatment because the characteristics of the implants may be modified during the installation process. The given information is of value for daily implantation practice and the course of osseointegration.

  17. Updated secondary implant stability data of two dental implant systems. A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grognard, Nicolas; Verleye, Gino; Mavreas, Dimitrios; Vande-Vannet, Bart

    2017-09-01

    At present, updated secondary implant stability data generated by actual versions of resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and mobility measurement (MM) electronic devices of 2 different implant systems with actual manufactured surfaces seem to lack and/or are incomplete. Secondary implant stability data based on both RFA and MM measurements were collected and analyzed from 44 formerly treated patients (24 f, 20 m) that received either Ankylos Cellplus (Ø3.5mm) (A) (n=36) or Straumann regular neck SLA tissue level (Ø4.1mm) (S) (n=37) implants in posterior positions of both jawbones (total number= 72). These results were interpretated in view of formerly published data. Estimated RFA outcomes (mean±SD) for A implants were of 81.23 (±0.65) (LP) - 76.15 (±1.57) (UP) isq; for S implants 76.15 (±1.48) (LP) - 73.88 (±2.34) (UP) isq. Estimated MM outcomes for A implants were (-4.0) (±0.23) (LP) - (-3.2) (±0.33) (UP) ptv; for S implants (-5.15) (±0.39) (LP) - (-4.4) (±0.84) (UP) ptv. According to GEE statistical modelling, implant type and - position seems to influence the outcome variables ( p 0.05). Secondary implant stability values, recorded with current RFA and MM devices, of A Cellplus implants are provided for the first time. A difference of 14.7-9.7 isq values was noted for CellPlus versus TPS S implants recorded with a cabled RFA device. This study supports the assumption that RFA outcomes generated with first generation RFA devices are different from those obtained with current RFA devices, meaning that its use in reviews need caution and correction. Key words: Secondary implant stability, resonance frequency analysis, Periotest, Osstell Mentor, Straumann, Ankylos, CellPlus, SLA.

  18. Six-implant-supported immediate fixed rehabilitation of atrophic edentulous maxillae with tilted distal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentaschek, S; Hartmann, S; Walter, C; Wagner, W

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the treatment outcome of six Bredent blueSky™ implants (Bredent GmbH, Senden, Germany) immediately loaded with a fixed full-arch prosthesis (two tilted posterior and four axial frontal and premolar implants). All 10 patients with atrophic edentulous maxillae being treated with a standardized procedure from 09/2009 to 01/2013, who had a follow-up of at least 3 years, were included. Sixty implants were placed to support 10 screwed prostheses. Twenty-one of them were inserted in fresh extraction sockets. Lab-side-prepared provisional fixed prostheses were placed at the day of implantation. Periotest (PT) values and implant stability quotient (ISQ) were measured after implant surgery and after 3 months of healing in all patients. The analyzed implants were in function in mean 64 ± 13 months (range 42 to 84 months). One axial and two tilted implants failed in three patients. The mean PT values decreased, and ISQ increased significantly after the first 3 months at the osseointegrated tilted and axial implants. With an area under the curve of 0.503 and 0.506 in the receiver operating characteristic, the PT values and the ISQ were unspecific parameters and unsuitable as a predictor for the risk of non-osseointegration. Within the limits of this small group (n = 10 patients/60 implants), the failure rate of the analyzed implant system (n = 3 respective 5% implant loss) seems to be comparable with other immediate-loading protocols. The failure rate of tilted implants in the atrophic upper jaw was quite high, but the aimed treatment concept could be achieved in every patient. The rehabilitation of the posterior region in edentulous maxilla remains a challenge.

  19. Application of Plasma Sprayed Zirconia Coating in Dental Implant: Study in Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengfei; Wang, Zhifeng; Li, Chuanhua; Yin, Kaifeng; Hao, Dan; Lan, Jing

    2018-01-05

    The aim was to investigate the osseointegration of a novel coating-plasma-sprayed nanostructured zirconia (NSZ) in dental implant. Nanostructured zirconia coating on non-thread titanium implant was prepared by plasma spraying, the implant surface morphology, surface roughness and wettability were measured. In vivo, nanostructured zirconia-coated implants were inserted in rabbit tibia and animals were respectively sacrificed at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after implantation. The bond strength between implant and bone was measured by removal torque (RTQ) test. The osseointegration was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro computed tomography (Micro CT) and histological analyses. Quantified parameters were calculated, including removal torque, Bone Volume to Tissue Volume (BV/TV), Trabecular Thickness (Tb. Th), Trabecular Number (Tb. N), Trabecular Separation/Spacing (Tb. Sp), and Bone-Implant contact (BIC) percentage. The statistical differences were detected by two-tail Mann-Whitney U test (SPSS 20.0). The surface roughness (1.58µm) and wettability (54.61°) of nanostructured zirconia coated implant was more suitable than those of titanium implant (0.598µm and 74.38°) for osseointegration and hierarchical surface morphology could be seen on zirconia coating. The histological analyses showed that zirconia coated implant induced earlier and more condensed bone formation than titanium implant at 2 and 4 weeks. Quantified parameters showed the significant differences between these two groups at early healing period, but the differences between these two groups decreased with the increase of healing period. All these results demonstrated that plasma sprayed zirconia coated implant induced better bone formation than titanium implant at early stage.

  20. Brainjacking: Implant Security Issues in Invasive Neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pycroft, Laurie; Boccard, Sandra G; Owen, Sarah L F; Stein, John F; Fitzgerald, James J; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2016-08-01

    The security of medical devices is critical to good patient care, especially when the devices are implanted. In light of recent developments in information security, there is reason to be concerned that medical implants are vulnerable to attack. The ability of attackers to exert malicious control over brain implants ("brainjacking") has unique challenges that we address in this review, with particular focus on deep brain stimulation implants. To illustrate the potential severity of this risk, we identify several mechanisms through which attackers could manipulate patients if unauthorized access to an implant can be achieved. These include blind attacks in which the attacker requires no patient-specific knowledge and targeted attacks that require patient-specific information. Blind attacks include cessation of stimulation, draining implant batteries, inducing tissue damage, and information theft. Targeted attacks include impairment of motor function, alteration of impulse control, modification of emotions or affect, induction of pain, and modulation of the reward system. We also discuss the limitations inherent in designing implants and the trade-offs that must be made to balance device security with battery life and practicality. We conclude that researchers, clinicians, manufacturers, and regulatory bodies should cooperate to minimize the risk posed by brainjacking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlating implant stability to bone structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozé, Julie; Babu, Stéphanie; Saffarzadeh, Afchine; Gayet-Delacroix, Marie; Hoornaert, Alain; Layrolle, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate a possible correlation between bone microarchitecture and primary implant stability. Twenty-two implants (Ankylos((R)) and Straumann((R))) were inserted into the maxillae and mandibles of human cadavers. Bone structure was determined by computed tomography in three specimens (male, age 53; female, 67; female, 80). A strict clinical protocol was used for implantation. Primary implant stability was measured by resonance frequency analysis (Osstell Mentor). The bone structure was analyzed by micro-computed tomography (CT). Bone histomorphometrical parameters were calculated and correlated to primary implant stability. Implant stability quotients (ISQ) ranged from 50 to 70% depending on the specimens and sites. Histomorphometry indicated differences in the bone microstructures of the specimens. However, ISQ values were not related to trabecular bone histomorphometrical parameters. The sole correlation was found between ISQ values and cortical bone thickness. This study confirms the relevance for primary stability of cortical thickness around implants. The thickness of cortical bone can be assessed using a standard clinical CT.

  2. Balance in children following cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Andrew; Liu, Zhaobo; Leonard, Shanna; Toner, Fearghal; Adams, Mark; Toner, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    To assess the vestibular function of children who had unilateral and bilateral cochlear implants compared with a control group of otherwise healthy children who had not been implanted. Observational case-control study. Posturography was carried out in the form of a Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance using a Wii Balance Board and the Vestio App on an iPod Touch. Thirty children in total were tested, 10 children in each cohort. Results in the form of root mean square calculations were available for each child. Results showed a significant difference in the vestibular function of implanted children and the non-implanted control group (P < 0.05). As expected, children in all groups had more difficulty maintaining posture with their eyes closed on a compliant surface (P < 0.05). Thirty per cent of children with bilateral and 10% with unilateral cochlear implants were unable to complete testing. Our study demonstrates posturography as an inexpensive, easily operated tool that can be used to assess paediatric vestibular function. It showed a significant difference between the control group and the implanted groups. Further work prompted by this study will include interval post-operative testing to more accurately assess the effect that implantation has on vestibular function.

  3. Mechanical behavior of provisional implant prosthetic abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Roig-Vanaclocha, Ana; Román-Rodriguez, Juan-Luis; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implant-supported prostheses have to overcome a major difficulty presented by the morphology and esthetics of peri-implant tissues in the anterior sector. Diverse therapeutic techniques are used for managing the mucosa adjacent to the implant and the most noteworthy is immediate/deferred fixed provisionalization. Objectives: In vitro testing of strength and deformation of implant prosthetic abutments made from different materials (Titanium/PEEK/methacrylate). Material and Methods: Forty Sweden&Martina® implant prosthetic abutments (n=40) were divided into five groups: Group MP: methacrylate provisional abutments with machined titanium base; Group PP: Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) provisional abutments; Group TP: titanium provisional abutments; Group TAD: titanium anti-rotational definitive abutments; Group TRD: titanium rotational definitive abutments. Their mechanical behavior under static loading was analyzed. Samples were examined under a microscope to determine the type of fracture produced. Results and Conclusions: Definitive anti-rotational titanium abutments and definitive rotational titanium abutments achieved the best mean compression strength, while PEEK resin provisional abutments obtained the lowest. The group that showed the greatest elastic deformation was the group of titanium provisional abutments. Key words:Immediate loading, immediate provisionalization, implant prosthetic abutment, definitive implant prosthetic abutment. PMID:25129253

  4. Audiovisual segregation in cochlear implant users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Landry

    Full Text Available It has traditionally been assumed that cochlear implant users de facto perform atypically in audiovisual tasks. However, a recent study that combined an auditory task with visual distractors suggests that only those cochlear implant users that are not proficient at recognizing speech sounds might show abnormal audiovisual interactions. The present study aims at reinforcing this notion by investigating the audiovisual segregation abilities of cochlear implant users in a visual task with auditory distractors. Speechreading was assessed in two groups of cochlear implant users (proficient and non-proficient at sound recognition, as well as in normal controls. A visual speech recognition task (i.e. speechreading was administered either in silence or in combination with three types of auditory distractors: i noise ii reverse speech sound and iii non-altered speech sound. Cochlear implant users proficient at speech recognition performed like normal controls in all conditions, whereas non-proficient users showed significantly different audiovisual segregation patterns in both speech conditions. These results confirm that normal-like audiovisual segregation is possible in highly skilled cochlear implant users and, consequently, that proficient and non-proficient CI users cannot be lumped into a single group. This important feature must be taken into account in further studies of audiovisual interactions in cochlear implant users.

  5. Worldwide Predoctoral Dental Implant Curriculum Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashrazm, P.; Vallaie, N.; Rahnema, R.; Ansari, H.; Shahab, M. Pour

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Predoctoral dental implant education is included in dental school teaching curricula in most of the developed and some developing countries; however, it was not introduced into undergraduate curriculum of some countries and Iranian dental schools. Our purpose was to investigate the status of the predoctoral dental implant education of dental schools in the world. Materials and Methods: One hundred-thirty five dental schools were randomly selected representing 62 countries divided into two regions. The first region included North America and Europe, and the second region comprised of Asia, South America and Africa. A questionnaire including onset year, lecture hours, lectures available on the internet, required textbooks, department jurisdictions, the year of dental school the course was offered, clinical and laboratory courses, implant systems used surgically and in restorative phase, and type of restorations treated by predoctoral students was mailed electronically to the predoctoral implant dentistry directors. Results: Ninety-two (68%) schools responded; of which 79 (86%) incorporated implant dentistry in their predoctoral teaching curricula, 39 (49%) offered surgical and prosthodontics courses in which students mainly observe. Of these 39 dental schools, 28 (71%) and 11 (29%) dental schools are from the first and second region, respectively. Conclusion: A large percentage of responding schools included implant education in the predoctoral dental curriculum. Onset year of course, topics included in lecture series, lecture hours, faculty to student ratio and practical course vary among schools. Fifty percent of responding dental schools including Iranian dental schools do not have curriculum guidelines for predoctoral implant dentistry. PMID:21998802

  6. [7-year clinical application of Straumann implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Wei; Lai, Hong-Chang; Wu, Yi-Qun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Shen

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate 7-year clinical application of Straumann implant treatment. 5532 non-submerged Straumann implants were placed from july 2000 to december 2006 at the department of implantology, Ninth People's Hospital, College of Stomatology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The average age of 2449 patients was 40.2 years(16 to 87 years) and healing period was 5.39 months(1.75 to 23.75 months). A total of 2710 prostheses were accomplished, including 2640 fixed partial prostheses, 52 implant supported overdentures and 18 implant supported full arch fixed protheses. Patients were recalled 6 months after restoration and later annual follow-up. Clinical and X-ray examinations were performed during the follow-up period. Among the 91 failed implants, 59 implants were failed in healing period and considered early failures. The survival rate was 98.36%. Prosthetic restoration of partially edentulous and edentulous patients with the Straumann implant system can be described as a reliable and efficient therapy in the long term.

  7. Transverse microanalysis of high energy Ion implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, S.P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    High energy ion implants in semiconductor materials have been analyzed by Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) perpendicular to the implant direction, allowing imaging of the entire ion track. The damage produced by Channeled and Random 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants into the edge of a <100> type IIa diamond wafer were analyzed by channeling into the face of the crystal. The results showed negligible damage in the surface region of the implants, and swelling induced misalignment at the end of range of the implants. Channeled 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants in diamond had a range only 9% deeper than Random implants, which could be accounted for by dechanneling of the beam. The channeling of H{sup +}{sub 2} ions has been previously found to be identical to that of protons of half energy, however the current experiment has shown a 1% increase in {chi}{sub min} for H{sup +}{sub 2} in diamond compared to H{sup +} at 1,2 MeV per proton. This is due to repulsion between protons within the same channel. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Soft tissue and esthetic considerations around implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joann Pauline George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The health of the peri – implant tissues play an important in the long term outcome of dental implants. The absence of keratinized gingiva (KG may be a risk factor for developing recession or peri –implantitis. However there is still ambiguity in the need for keratinized gingiva around dental implants. The preservation and reconstruction of soft tissue around dental implants is an integral component of dental Implantology. There is no long-term evidence whether augmented soft tissues can be maintained over time and are able to influence the peri-implant bone levels. Among the various soft tissue augmentation techniques Apically positioned flap with vestibuloplasty , Free gingival grafts and Connective tissue grafts are documented as the most predictable methods to increase the width of KG. Autogenous grafts increase the soft tissue thickness and improve aesthetics compared to non-grafted sites. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the need for KG around implants and the techniques to preserve and augment KG. It is difficult to arrive at a definitive conclusion due to scarcity of well designed studies in literature. Reliable evidence is lacking to suggest the ideal soft tissue augmentation/preservation techniques. Long term randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to provide a clearer image.

  9. Music enjoyment with cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevoteau, Charlotte; Chen, Stephanie Y; Lalwani, Anil K

    2018-03-05

    Since the advent of cochlear implant (CI) surgery in the 1960s, there have been remarkable technological and surgical advances enabling excellent speech perception in quiet with many CI users able to use the telephone. However, many CI users struggle with music perception, particularly with the pitch-based and melodic elements of music. Yet remarkably, despite poor music perception, many CI users enjoy listening to music based on self-report questionnaires, and prospective studies have suggested a disassociation between music perception and enjoyment. Music enjoyment is arguably a more functional measure of one's listening experience, and thus enhancing one's listening experience is a worthy goal. Recent studies have shown that re-engineering music to reduce its complexity may enhance enjoyment in CI users and also delineate differences in musical preferences from normal hearing listeners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Implant surfaces and interface processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemo, B; Gold, J

    1999-06-01

    The past decades and current R&D of biomaterials and medical implants show some general trends. One major trend is an increased degree of functionalization of the material surface, better to meet the demands of the biological host system. While the biomaterials of the past and those in current use are essentially bulk materials (metals, ceramics, polymers) or special compounds (bioglasses), possibly with some additional coating (e.g., hydroxyapatite), the current R&D on surface modifications points toward much more complex and multifunctional surfaces for the future. Such surface modifications can be divided into three classes, one aiming toward an optimized three-dimensional physical microarchitecture of the surface (pore size distributions, "roughness", etc.), the second one focusing on the (bio) chemical properties of surface coatings and impregnations (ion release, multi-layer coatings, coatings with biomolecules, controlled drug release, etc.), and the third one dealing with the viscoelastic properties (or more generally the micromechanical properties) of material surfaces. These properties are expected to affect the interfacial processes cooperatively, i.e., there are likely synergistic effects between and among them: The surface is "recognized" by the biological system through the combined chemical and topographic pattern of the surface, and the viscoelastic properties. In this presentation, the development indicated above is discussed briefly, and current R&D in this area is illustrated with a number of examples from our own research. The latter include micro- and nanofabrication of surface patterns and topographies by the use of laser machining, photolithographic techniques, and electron beam and colloidal lithographies to produce controlled structures on implant surfaces in the size range 10 nm to 100 microns. Examples of biochemical modifications include mono- or lipid membranes and protein coatings on different surfaces. A new method to evaluate, e

  11. Immediate CAD/ CAM Custom Fabricated Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Kolahi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There will almost always be gaps between cylin-drical or screw shaped prefabricated implant surface and funnel-shaped tooth socket when an implant is placed immediately after tooth extraction. Hence expensive and difficult bone grafting is re-quired. A custom fabricated implant will be a pragmatic solution for this limitation.The hypothesis: First step following extraction of a tooth is data capture or scanning via a 3D scan method e.g. coordinate measuring machine or non-contact laser scanners such as triangulation range finder. Second step is reconstruction or modeling via editable CAD (computer-aided design model, allowing us to add retentive holes and correction of implant angle. Third step is fabrication via CAM (computer aided manufacturing followed by plasma cleaning process. Fourth step is insertion of the CAD/CAM custom fabricated one-stage implant in the fresh tooth socket. Optimal time for this step is 24-48 hours after extraction. The custom fabricated implant should not load 3-4 months. Usage of chlorhexidine mouth-rinse or chewing gum twice daily for 2 weeks and, in some cases oral antibiotic is recommended. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Contemporary dental implant system faced with several clinical and anatomical limitations such is low sinuses or nerve bundles. Complex and expensive surgical procedures such as nerve repositioning and sinus lift are frequently required. With custom fabricated implant we can overcome several of these limitations because insertion of custom fabricated implant will perform before alveolar bone recession.

  12. Implant Mandibular Overdentures Retained by Immediately Loaded Implants: A 1-Year Randomized Trial Comparing the Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes Between Mini Dental Implants and Standard-Sized Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygogiannis, Kostas; Aartman, Irene Ha; Parsa, Azin; Tahmaseb, Ali; Wismeijer, Daniel

    The aim of this 1-year randomized trial was to evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic performance of four immediately loaded mini dental implants (MDIs) and two immediately loaded standard-sized tissue-level (STL) implants, placed in the interforaminal region of the mandible and used to retain mandibular overdentures (IODs) in completely edentulous patients. A total of 50 completely edentulous patients wearing conventional maxillary dentures and complaining about insufficient retention of their mandibular dentures were divided into two groups; 25 patients received four MDIs and 25 patients received two STL implants. The marginal bone loss (MBL) at the mesial and distal sides of each implant was assessed by means of standardized intraoral radiographs after a period of 1 year. Implant success and survival rates were also calculated. Immediate loading was possible for all patients in the first group. In the second group, an immediate loading protocol could not be applied for 10 patients. These patients were treated with a delayed loading protocol. A mean MBL of 0.42 ± 0.56 mm for the MDIs and 0.54 ± 0.49 mm for the immediately loaded STL implants was recorded at the end of the evaluation period. There was no statistically significant difference between the MDIs and the immediately loaded STL implants. Two MDIs failed, resulting in a survival rate of 98%. The success rate was 91%. For the immediately loaded conventional implants, the survival rate was 100% and the success rate 96.7% after 1 year of function. However, in 10 patients, the immediate loading protocol could not be followed. Considering the limitations of this short-term clinical study, immediate loading of four unsplinted MDIs or two splinted STL implants to retain mandibular overdentures seems to be a feasible treatment option. The marginal bone level changes around the MDIs were well within the clinically acceptable range.

  13. Non-palpable and difficult contraceptive implant removals: The New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-03

    Dec 3, 2017 ... Once the muscle fascia is exposed, the forceps is used to feel for the implant in the muscle. Two small right- angled retractors are inserted on either side of the implant. The fascia is opened longitudinally and the implant is grasped with the modified vasectomy forceps or another forceps. If the implant is ...

  14. Early Vocabulary Development in Children with Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimaa, Taina; Kunnari, Sari; Laukkanen-Nevala, Päivi; Lonka, Eila

    2018-01-01

    Background: Children with unilateral cochlear implants (CIs) may have delayed vocabulary development for an extended period after implantation. Bilateral cochlear implantation is reported to be associated with improved sound localization and enhanced speech perception in noise. This study proposed that bilateral implantation might also promote…

  15. 21 CFR 876.5270 - Implanted electrical urinary continence device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Implanted electrical urinary continence device. (a) Identification. An implanted electrical urinary device is a device intended for treatment of urinary incontinence that consists of a receiver implanted in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted electrical urinary continence device...

  16. Particle migration and gap healing around trabecular metal implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, O; Kold, S; Zippor, Berit

    2005-01-01

    Bone on-growth and peri-implant migration of polyethylene particles were studied in an experimental setting using trabecular metal and solid metal implants. Cylindrical implants of trabecular tantalum metal and solid titanium alloy implants with a glass bead blasted surface were inserted either i...

  17. Dental extraction, immediate placement of dental implants, and immediate function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ole T

    2015-05-01

    Immediate function requires adequate implant stability. Immediate function requires prosthetic stability, particularly when multiple implants are loaded. Factors to consider for immediate implants into extraction sites are thickness of socket walls, thickness of gingival drape, optimal position of the implant, and patient factors such as hygiene and smoking cessation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An eye sphere implant is a device intended to be implanted in the eyeball to occupy space following the removal...

  19. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in the...

  20. 21 CFR 886.3340 - Extraocular orbital implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraocular orbital implant. 886.3340 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3340 Extraocular orbital implant. (a) Identification. An extraocular orbital implant is a nonabsorbable device intended to be implanted during scleral...