WorldWideScience

Sample records for all-pm monolithic fs

  1. Monolithic stabilized Yb-fiber All-PM laser directly delivering nJ-level femtosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We present a monolithic, self-starting, all-PM, stabilized Yb-fiber laser, pulse-compressed in a hollow-core PM photonic crystal fiber, providing the 370 fs pulses of 4 nJ energy with high mode quality.......We present a monolithic, self-starting, all-PM, stabilized Yb-fiber laser, pulse-compressed in a hollow-core PM photonic crystal fiber, providing the 370 fs pulses of 4 nJ energy with high mode quality....

  2. Monolithic all-PM femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser using photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    We present a monolithic Yb fiber laser, dispersion managed by an all-solid photonic bandgap fiber, and pulse compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The laser delivers 9 nJ, 275-fs long pulses at 1035 nm.......We present a monolithic Yb fiber laser, dispersion managed by an all-solid photonic bandgap fiber, and pulse compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The laser delivers 9 nJ, 275-fs long pulses at 1035 nm....

  3. Monolithic all-PM femtosecond Yb-fiber laser stabilized with a narrow-band fiber Bragg grating and pulse-compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We report on an environmentally stable self-starting monolithic (i.e. without any free-space coupling) all-polarization-maintaining (PM) femtosecond Yb-fiber laser, stabilized against Q-switching by a narrow-band fiber Bragg grating and modelocked using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror....... The laser output is compressed in a spliced-on hollow-core PM photonic crystal fiber, thus providing direct end-of-the-fiber delivery of pulses of around 370 fs duration and 4 nJ energy with high mode quality. Tuning the pump power of the end amplifier of the laser allows for the control of output pulse...

  4. All-fiber high-power monolithic femtosecond laser at 1.59 µm with 63-fs pulse width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, M. J.; Omoomi, M.; Gholami, A.; Yazdabadi, A. Bagheri; Abdollahi, M.; Hamidnejad, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Normohamadi, H.

    2018-01-01

    In this research, by adopting an alternative novel approach to ultra-short giant pulse generation which basically originated from difficulties with traditional employed methods, an optimized Er/Yb co-doped double-clad fiber amplifier is applied to boost output average power of single-mode output pulses to a high level of 2-W at 1.59-µm central wavelength. Output pulses of approximately 63-fs pulse width at 52-MHz repetition rate are obtained in an all-fiber monolithic laser configuration. The idea of employing parabolic pulse amplification for stretching output pulses together with high-power pulse amplification using Er/Yb co-doped active fibers for compressing and boosting output average power plays crucial role in obtaining desired results. The proposed configuration enjoys massive advantages over previously reported literature which make it well-suited for high-power precision applications such as medical surgery. Detailed dynamics of pulse stretching and compressing in active fibers with different GVD parameters are numerically and experimentally investigated.

  5. Monolithic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  6. SeaWiFS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — SEAWiFS_US is a high resolution (1km) satellite dataset derived from the eight wavelength SEAWiFS sensor. The dataset also includes the aerosol reflectance over the...

  7. Monolithic ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  8. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  9. A monolithic white laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fan; Turkdogan, Sunay; Liu, Zhicheng; Shelhammer, David; Ning, C Z

    2015-09-01

    Monolithic semiconductor lasers capable of emitting over the full visible-colour spectrum have a wide range of important applications, such as solid-state lighting, full-colour displays, visible colour communications and multi-colour fluorescence sensing. The ultimate form of such a light source would be a monolithic white laser. However, realizing such a device has been challenging because of intrinsic difficulties in achieving epitaxial growth of the mismatched materials required for different colour emission. Here, we demonstrate a monolithic multi-segment semiconductor nanosheet based on a quaternary alloy of ZnCdSSe that simultaneously lases in the red, green and blue. This is made possible by a novel nanomaterial growth strategy that enables separate control of the composition, morphology and therefore bandgaps of the segments. Our nanolaser can be dynamically tuned to emit over the full visible-colour range, covering 70% more perceptible colours than the most commonly used illuminants.

  10. Embedded-monolith armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfresh, Michael W.; Groves, Scott E; Moffet, Mitchell L.; Martin, Louis P.

    2016-07-19

    A lightweight armor system utilizing a face section having a multiplicity of monoliths embedded in a matrix supported on low density foam. The face section is supported with a strong stiff backing plate. The backing plate is mounted on a spall plate.

  11. Monolithic column in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurganov, A

    2013-05-02

    Monolithic columns invented in chromatographic praxis almost 40 years ago gained nowadays a lot of popularity in separations by liquid chromatographic technique. At the same time, application of monolithic columns in gas chromatography is less common and only a single review published by Svec et al. covers this field of research. Since that time a lot of new findings on application and properties of monolithic columns in gas chromatography have been published in the literature deserving consideration and discussion. This review considers preparation of monolithic columns for GC, an impact of preparation conditions on column performance, optimization of separation conditions for GC analysis on monolithic columns and other important aspects of preparation and usage of monolithic capillary columns in GC. A final part of the review discusses the modern trends and possible applications in the future of capillary monolithic columns in GC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Automatic feature selection using FS-NEAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ethembabaoglu, A.; Whiteson, S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a series of experiments used to analyze the FS-NEAT method on a double pole-balancing domain. The FS-NEAT method is compared with regular NEAT to discern its strengths and weaknesses. Both FS-NEAT and regular NEAT find a policy, implemented in a neural network, to solve the

  13. Bioaffinity chromatography on monolithic supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Beek, van T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Affinity chromatography on monolithic supports is a powerful analytical chemical platform because it allows for fast analyses, small sample volumes, strong enrichment of trace biomarkers and applications in microchips. In this review, the recent research using monolithic materials in the field of

  14. Monolithic Ytterbium All-single-mode Fiber Laser with Direct Fiber-end Delivery of nJ-level Femtosecond Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a monolithic, i.e. without any free-space coupling, all-single-mode passively modelocked Yb-fiber laser, with direct fiber-end delivery of 364−405 fs pulses of 4 nJ pulse energy using a low-loss hollow-core photonic crystal fiber compression.......We demonstrate a monolithic, i.e. without any free-space coupling, all-single-mode passively modelocked Yb-fiber laser, with direct fiber-end delivery of 364−405 fs pulses of 4 nJ pulse energy using a low-loss hollow-core photonic crystal fiber compression....

  15. Porous polymer monolithic col

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Terborg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surface coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.46–4.51 molecules/nm2 significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.39–2.45 molecules/nm2. The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water, respectively.

  16. Fs = μs Fn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ministro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2016v12n1p195 Fs = μs Fn é uma releitura a três vozes dos Homeóstatos de José-Alberto Marques. Partindo do desmembramento e recomposição digital do material sonoro, testam-se, com base nas possibilidades oferecidas pelo cruzamento entre a plasticidade vocal e as ferramentas digitais de manipulação, as potencialidades combinatórias que uma obra desta natureza encerra.

  17. Automatic feature selection using FS-NEAT

    OpenAIRE

    Ethembabaoglu, A.; Whiteson, S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a series of experiments used to analyze the FS-NEAT method on a double pole-balancing domain. The FS-NEAT method is compared with regular NEAT to discern its strengths and weaknesses. Both FS-NEAT and regular NEAT find a policy, implemented in a neural network, to solve the pole-balancing task by use of genetic algorithms. FS-NEAT, contrary to regular NEAT, uses a different starting population. Whereas regular NEAT networks start out with links between all the inputs an...

  18. Monolithic metal oxide transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongsuk; Park, Won-Yeong; Kang, Moon Sung; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-28

    We devised a simple transparent metal oxide thin film transistor architecture composed of only two component materials, an amorphous metal oxide and ion gel gate dielectric, which could be entirely assembled using room-temperature processes on a plastic substrate. The geometry cleverly takes advantage of the unique characteristics of the two components. An oxide layer is metallized upon exposure to plasma, leading to the formation of a monolithic source-channel-drain oxide layer, and the ion gel gate dielectric is used to gate the transistor channel effectively at low voltages through a coplanar gate. We confirmed that the method is generally applicable to a variety of sol-gel-processed amorphous metal oxides, including indium oxide, indium zinc oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide. An inverter NOT logic device was assembled using the resulting devices as a proof of concept demonstration of the applicability of the devices to logic circuits. The favorable characteristics of these devices, including (i) the simplicity of the device structure with only two components, (ii) the benign fabrication processes at room temperature, (iii) the low-voltage operation under 2 V, and (iv) the excellent and stable electrical performances, together support the application of these devices to low-cost portable gadgets, i.e., cheap electronics.

  19. Acoustic of monolithic dome structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Refat Ismail

    2018-03-01

    The interior of monolithic domes have perfect, concave shapes to ensure that sound travels through the dome and perfectly collected at different vocal points. These dome structures are utilized for domestic use because the scale allows the focal points to be positioned across daily life activities, thereby affecting the sonic comfort of the internal space. This study examines the various acoustic treatments and parametric configurations of monolithic dome sizes. A geometric relationship of acoustic treatment and dome radius is established to provide architects guidelines on the correct selection of absorption needed to maintain the acoustic comfort of these special spaces.

  20. Controlling S2 terminal using FS software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhuhe

    New S2FS software for controlling S2 terminal of Sheshan station has been developed. It works under Field System software. All S2 operation commands are incorporated in a station program. The interface of SWT computer and S2 terminal is RS232 interface. S2FS software is designed by using Shell and C language. It has been used in VSOP experiments.

  1. USAARL NUH-60FS Acoustic Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Aeromedical Research Laboratory 2Laulima Government Solutions, LLC 3Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education United States Army Aeromedical Research...74.8 98.8 The NUH-60FS has been upgraded since the previous characterization, and these upgrades may have affected the ambient noise levels. The... ambient noise levels of the NUH-60FS while operating can be controlled via either software or hardware adjustments. The new data collected looked at the

  2. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  3. UV-LED photopolymerised monoliths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abele, S.; Nie, F.; Foret, František; Paull, B.; Macka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 7 (2008), s. 864-866 ISSN 0003-2654 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400310651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : photopolymerisation * UV-LED * polymethacrylate monolith Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.761, year: 2008

  4. A monolithic RF transceiver for DC-OFDM UWB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yunfeng; Li Wei; Fu Haipeng; Gao Ting; Chen Danfeng; Zhou Feng; Cai Deyun; Li Dan; Niu Yangyang; Zhou Hanchao; Zhu Ning; Li Ning; Ren Junyan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a first monolithic RF transceiver for DC-OFDM UWB applications. The proposed direct-conversion transceiver integrates all the building blocks including two receiver (Rx) cores, two transmitter (Tx) cores and a dual-carrier frequency synthesizer (DC-FS) as well as a 3-wire serial peripheral interface (SPI) to set the operating status of the transceiver. The ESD-protected chip is fabricated by a TSMC 0.13-μm RF CMOS process with a die size of 4.5 × 3.6 mm 2 . The measurement results show that the wideband Rx achieves an NF of 5–6.2 dB, a max gain of 76–84 dB with 64-dB variable gain, an in-/out-of-band IIP3 of −6/+4 dBm and an input loss S 11 of < −10 in all bands. The Tx achieves an LOLRR/IMGRR of −34/-33 dBc, a typical OIP3 of +6 dBm and a maximum output power of −5 dBm. The DC-FS outputs two separate carriers simultaneously with an inter-band hopping time of < 1.2 ns. The full chip consumes a maximum current of 420 mA under a 1.2-V supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  5. Monolithic bed structure for capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Pankaj; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Milton L

    2012-01-06

    Monolithic stationary phases show promise for LC as a result of their good permeability, ease of preparation and broad selectivity. Inorganic silica monoliths have been extensively studied and applied for separation of small molecules. The presence of a large number of through pores and small skeletal structure allows the chromatographic efficiencies of silica monoliths to be comparable to columns packed with 5 μm silica particles, at much lower back pressure. In comparison, organic polymeric monoliths have been mostly used for separation of bio-molecules; however, recently, applications are expanding to small molecules as well. Organic monoliths with high surface areas and fused morphology rather than conventional globular morphology have shown good performance for small molecule separations. Factors such as domain size, through-pore size and mesopore size of the monolithic structures have been found to govern the efficiency of monolithic columns. The structure and performance of monolithic columns are reviewed in comparison to particle packed columns. Studying and characterizing the bed structures of organic monolithic columns can provide great insights into their performance, and aid in structure-directed synthesis of new and improved monoliths. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 260 fs and 1 nJ pulse generation from a compact, mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2015-11-30

    We report on generation of 260 fs-short pulses with energy of 1.1 nJ from a fully fiberized, monolithic Tm-doped fiber laser system. The design comprises a simple, graphene-based ultrafast oscillator and an integrated all-fiber chirped pulse amplifier (CPA). The system generates 110 mW of average power at 100.25 MHz repetition rate and central wavelength of 1968 nm. This is, to our knowledge, the highest pulse energy generated from a fully fiberized sub-300 fs Tm-doped laser, without the necessity of using grating-based dispersion compensation. Such compact, robust and cost-effective system might serve as a seed source for nonlinear frequency conversion or mid-infrared supercontinuum generation.

  7. Monolithic pattern-sensitive detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2000-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet light (EUV) is detected using a precisely defined reference pattern formed over a shallow junction photodiode. The reference pattern is formed in an EUV absorber preferably comprising nickel or other material having EUV- and other spectral region attenuating characteristics. An EUV-transmissive energy filter is disposed between a passivation oxide layer of the photodiode and the EUV transmissive energy filter. The device is monolithically formed to provide robustness and compactness.

  8. The Three Fs of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a cohesive theory of classroom management, developed by the author. This "three Fs" theory, predicated upon extant empiricism and scholarship vis-a-vis classroom management, was devised and implemented over several semesters within a field-based course at the University of Texas at Austin for preservice mathematics majors…

  9. PCDD/Fs and PCBs in soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pussente, Igor C.; Dam, ten Guillaume; Leeuwen, van Stefan; Augusti, Rodinei

    2017-01-01

    Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)) are substances that represent a global concern due to their ubiquitous presence and toxicity. Industrial processes and other human activities as well as uncontrollable

  10. A monolithic silicon detector telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, G.; Amorini, F.; Cabibbo, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Fallica, G.; Franzo, G.; Figuera, P.; Papa, M.; Pappalardo, G.; Percolla, G.; Priolo, F.; Privitera, V.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrathin silicon detector (1 μm) thick implanted on a standard 400 μm Si-detector has been built to realize a monolithic telescope detector for simultaneous charge and energy determination of charged particles. The performances of the telescope have been tested using standard alpha sources and fragments emitted in nuclear reactions with different projectile-target colliding systems. An excellent charge resolution has been obtained for low energy (less than 5 MeV) light nuclei. A multi-array lay-out of such detectors is under construction to charge identify the particles emitted in reactions induced by low energy radioactive beams. (orig.)

  11. Imaging monolithic silicon detector telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorini, F.; Sipala, V.; Cardella, G.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, B.; Cosentino, L.; Costa, E.; Di Pietro, A.; Emanuele, U.; Fallica, G.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; La Guidara, E.; Marchetta, C.; Pappalardo, A.; Piazza, A.; Randazzo, N.; Rizzo, F.; Russo, G.V.; Russotto, P.

    2008-01-01

    We show the results of some test beams performed on a new monolithic strip silicon detector telescope developed in collaboration with the INFN and ST-microelectronics. Using an appropriate design, the induction on the ΔE stages, generated by the charge released in the E stage, was used to obtain the position of the detected particle. The position measurement, together with the low threshold for particle charge identification, allows the new detector to be used for a large variety of applications due to its sensitivity of only a few microns measured in both directions

  12. Monolithic media for applications in affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproß, Jens; Sinz, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    Affinity chromatography presents a highly versatile analytical tool, which relies on exploiting highly specific interactions between molecules and their ligands. This review covers the most recent literature on the application of monoliths as stationary phases for various affinity-based chromatographic applications. Different affinity approaches as well as separations using molecularly imprinted monoliths are discussed. Hybrid stationary phases created by embedding of particles or nanoparticles into a monolithic stationary phase are also considered in this review article. The ease of preparation of monoliths and the multitude of functionalization techniques, which have matured during the past years, make monoliths interesting for an increasing number of biochemical and medical applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Applications of monolithic materials for sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Tarang; Chan, Eric C Y; Ho, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in monolithic columns have made them an alternative to traditional packed columns used in liquid chromatography as well as capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The monolithic columns have been extensively studied and shown to possess several advantages that make them a promising and potential substitute for the particle packed columns. A large number of papers relating to monolithic columns have been published every year, focusing on different preparation techniques, characteristic evaluations as well as applications. This review highlighted the latest development of monoliths for other modes of analytical chemistry. In particular, this review will highlight the application of monoliths for sample preparation which is an important step of the entire analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Manila on CephFS at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Wiebalck, Arne

    2017-01-01

    In response to the user demand for a light-weight provisioning of distributed file system shares, the OpenStack and Ceph teams at CERN have recently added Manila/CephFS to their service catalogues. While leveraging the operational experience with a 190'000 core OpenStack deployment and a 12 PB Ceph cluster for such a self-service kiosque suggested itself, the service design and setup phases were followed by a number of functionality and stress tests to ensure the individual components are ready for production use. The final service design and the results obtained during the pre-production phase, for instance when scaling to a large number of Manila and CephFS clients or the integration with Magnum/Kubernetes, will be presented alongside the initial use cases and our first experiences running these new services in production.

  15. Preparation and application of hydrophilic monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengjin; Smith, Norman William; Liu, Zhenghua

    2011-04-29

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) has experienced increasing attention in recent years. Much research has been carried out in the area of HILIC separation mechanisms, column techniques and applications. Because of their good permeability, low resistance to mass transfer and easy preparation within capillaries, hydrophilic monolithic columns represent a trend among novel HILIC column techniques. This review attempts to present an overview of the preparation and applications of HILIC monolithic columns carried out in the past decade. The separation mechanism of various hydrophilic monolithic stationary phases is also reviewed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Monolithic cells for solar fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongé, Jan; Bosserez, Tom; Martel, David; Nervi, Carlo; Boarino, Luca; Taulelle, Francis; Decher, Gero; Bordiga, Silvia; Martens, Johan A

    2014-12-07

    Hybrid energy generation models based on a variety of alternative energy supply technologies are considered the best way to cope with the depletion of fossil energy resources and to limit global warming. One of the currently missing technologies is the mimic of natural photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into chemical fuel using sunlight. This idea has been around for decades, but artificial photosynthesis of organic molecules is still far away from providing real-world solutions. The scientific challenge is to perform in an efficient way the multi-electron transfer reactions of water oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction using holes and single electrons generated in an illuminated semiconductor. In this tutorial review the design of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells that combine solar water oxidation and CO2 reduction is discussed. In such PEC cells simultaneous transport and efficient use of light, electrons, protons and molecules has to be managed. It is explained how efficiency can be gained by compartmentalisation of the water oxidation and CO2 reduction processes by proton exchange membranes, and monolithic concepts of artificial leaves and solar membranes are presented. Besides transferring protons from the anode to the cathode compartment the membrane serves as a molecular barrier material to prevent cross-over of oxygen and fuel molecules. Innovative nano-organized multimaterials will be needed to realise practical artificial photosynthesis devices. This review provides an overview of synthesis techniques which could be used to realise monolithic multifunctional membrane-electrode assemblies, such as Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), and porous silicon (porSi) engineering. Advances in modelling approaches, electrochemical techniques and in situ spectroscopies to characterise overall PEC cell performance are discussed.

  17. Preemiad said Rein Raud, fs, Mart Kivastik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Eesti Kultuurkapitali 2004. aasta kirjanduse aastapreemia laureaadid on: Rein Raud ("Hector ja Bernard"), fs (luulekogu "2004"), Mart Kivastik (näidend "Külmetava kunstniku portree"), Jaan Rannap ("Nelja nimega koer"), Toomas Haug ("Troojamäe tõotus"), Harald Rajamets (tõlkeluule kogumik "Pegasos ja peegel"), Antoine Chalvin ("Kalevipoja" tõlge prantsuse keelde"), Ilmar Talve ("Eesti kultuurilugu"), Lauri Sommer (artikkel Uku Masingu käsikirja "Saadik Magellani pilvest" vaimne, ajalis-ruumiline ja elulooline taust), Boris Tuch ("Gorjatshaja desjatka estonskihh pisatelei")

  18. Optimization of monolithic columns for microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagaduan, Jayson V.; Yang, Weichun; Woolley, Adam T.

    2011-06-01

    Monolithic columns offer advantages as solid-phase extractors because they offer high surface area that can be tailored to a specific function, fast mass transport, and ease of fabrication. Porous glycidyl methacrylate-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate monoliths were polymerized in-situ in microfluidic devices, without pre-treatment of the poly(methyl methacrylate) channel surface. Cyclohexanol, 1-dodecanol and Tween 20 were used to control the pore size of the monoliths. The epoxy groups on the monolith surface can be utilized to immobilize target-specific probes such as antibodies, aptamers, or DNA for biomarker detection. Microfluidic devices integrated with solid-phase extractors should be useful for point-of-care diagnostics in detecting specific biomarkers from complex biological fluids.

  19. MONOLITHIC DISK FOR THE FAST CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hidayat Aprilita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Poly(styrene/divinylbenzene (PS/DVB monolithic disk was prepared by in situ free-radical copolymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the presence of decanol and tetrahydrofuran as porogens. PS/DVB monolithic disks were produced in two different lengths 1.5 mm and 3 mm. The disks were used in reversed phase chromatography of proteins with 0.2 % trifuoroacetic acid (TFA and 0.2 % TFA in acetonitrile as mobile phase A and B, respectively. The effect of gradient rate, flow rate, temperature and disk length on the separation of proteins were also studied. PS/DVB monolithic disks allow the rapid separation of proteins in reversed phase chromatography. Keywords: monolithic disk, poly(styrene/divinylbenzene, proteins

  20. Monolithic Time Delay Integrated APD Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of the proposed program by Epitaxial Technologies is to develop monolithic time delay integrated avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays with sensitivity...

  1. Wideband Monolithic Tile for Reconfigurable Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Wideband Monolithic Tile for Reconfigurable Phased Arrays James J. Komiak1, Ryan S. Westafer2, Nancy V. Saldanha2, Randall Lapierre1, R. Todd...Lee2 BAE Systems Electronic Systems1, Georgia Tech Research Institute2 Abstract: A Wideband Monolithic 6 x 6 Tile of interconnected Quad Switches...circuits. The Tile incorporates 36 such Quad Switches, having 288 PHEMT devices controlled by 144 control lines and 300 bias resistors. To the

  2. Decomposition of monolithic web application to microservices

    OpenAIRE

    Zaymus, Mikulas

    2017-01-01

    Solteq Oyj has an internal Wellbeing project for massage reservations. The task of this thesis was to transform the monolithic architecture of this application to microservices. The thesis starts with a detailed comparison between microservices and monolithic application. It points out the benefits and disadvantages microservice architecture can bring to the project. Next, it describes the theory and possible strategies that can be used in the process of decomposition of an existing monoli...

  3. Monolithic ceramic capacitors for high reliability applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    Monolithic multi-layer ceramic dielectric capacitors are widely used in high reliability applications in spacecraft, launch vehicles, and military equipment. Their relatively low cost, wide range of values, and package styles are attractive features that result in high usage in electronic circuitry in these applications. Design and construction of monolithic ceramic dielectric capacitors, defects that can lead to failure, and methods for defect detection that are being incorporated in military specifications are discussed.

  4. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing [Daly City, CA; Yang, Peidong [Kensington, CA; Kim, Woong [Seoul, KR; Fan, Rong [Pasadena, CA

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  5. A monolithically integrated magneto-optoelectronic circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D.; Basu, D.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2008-11-01

    The monolithic integration of a spin valve, an amplifier, and a light emitting diode to form a magneto-optoelectronic integrated circuit on GaAs is demonstrated. The circuit converts the spin polarization information in the channel of the spin valve to an amplified change in light intensity with a gain of 20. The monolithic circuit therefore operates as a magnetoelectronic switch which modulates the light intensity of the light emitting diode.

  6. Methacrylate Polymer Monoliths for Separation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Groarke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the development of methacrylate-based polymer monoliths for separation science applications. An introduction to monoliths is presented, followed by the preparation methods and characteristics specific to methacrylate monoliths. Both traditional chemical based syntheses and emerging additive manufacturing methods are presented along with an analysis of the different types of functional groups, which have been utilized with methacrylate monoliths. The role of methacrylate based porous materials in separation science in industrially important chemical and biological separations are discussed, with particular attention given to the most recent developments and challenges associated with these materials. While these monoliths have been shown to be useful for a wide variety of applications, there is still scope for exerting better control over the porous architectures and chemistries obtained from the different fabrication routes. Conclusions regarding this previous work are drawn and an outlook towards future challenges and potential developments in this vibrant research area are presented. Discussed in particular are the potential of additive manufacturing for the preparation of monolithic structures with pre-defined multi-scale porous morphologies and for the optimization of surface reactive chemistries.

  7. Methacrylate Polymer Monoliths for Separation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groarke, Robert J.; Brabazon, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the development of methacrylate-based polymer monoliths for separation science applications. An introduction to monoliths is presented, followed by the preparation methods and characteristics specific to methacrylate monoliths. Both traditional chemical based syntheses and emerging additive manufacturing methods are presented along with an analysis of the different types of functional groups, which have been utilized with methacrylate monoliths. The role of methacrylate based porous materials in separation science in industrially important chemical and biological separations are discussed, with particular attention given to the most recent developments and challenges associated with these materials. While these monoliths have been shown to be useful for a wide variety of applications, there is still scope for exerting better control over the porous architectures and chemistries obtained from the different fabrication routes. Conclusions regarding this previous work are drawn and an outlook towards future challenges and potential developments in this vibrant research area are presented. Discussed in particular are the potential of additive manufacturing for the preparation of monolithic structures with pre-defined multi-scale porous morphologies and for the optimization of surface reactive chemistries. PMID:28773570

  8. SeaWiFS Third Anniversary Global Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    September 18,2000 is the third anniversary of the start of regular SeaWiFS operations of this remarkable planet called Earth. This SeaWiFS image is of the Global Biosphere depicting the ocean's long-term average phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration acquired between September 1997 and August 2000 combined with the SeaWiFS-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) over land during July 2000.

  9. Laser impulse coupling at 130 fs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, C.; Luke, J.; Funk, D.; Moore, D.; Glownia, J.; Lippert, T.

    2006-01-01

    We measured the momentum coupling coefficient C m and laser-generated ion drift velocity and temperature in the femtosecond (fs) region, over a laser intensity range from ablation threshold to about one hundred times threshold. Targets were several pure metals and three organic compounds. The organic compounds were exothermic polymers specifically developed for the micro-laser plasma thruster, and two of these used 'tuned absorbers' rather than carbon particles for laser absorption. The metals ranged from Li to W in atomic weight. We measured time of flight (TOF) profiles for ions. Specific impulse reached record values for this type of measurement and ablation efficiency was near 100%. These measurements extend the laser pulsewidth three orders of magnitude downward in pulsewidth relative to previous reports. Over this range, we found C m to be essentially constant. Ion velocity ranged from 60 to 180 km/s

  10. MarFS-Requirements-Design-Configuration-Admin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettering, Brett Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grider, Gary Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-08

    This document will be organized into sections that are defined by the requirements for a file system that presents a near-POSIX (Portable Operating System Interface) interface to the user, but whose data is stored in whatever form is most efficient for the type of data being stored. After defining the requirement the design for meeting the requirement will be explained. Finally there will be sections on configuring and administering this file system. More and more, data dominates the computing world. There is a “sea” of data out there in many different formats that needs to be managed and used. “Mar” means “sea” in Spanish. Thus, this product is dubbed MarFS, a file system for a sea of data.

  11. Surfactant-bound monolithic columns for CEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2009-11-01

    A novel anionic surfactant bound monolithic stationary phase based on 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid is designed for CEC. The monolith possessing bonded undecanoyl groups (hydrophobic sites) and carboxyl groups (weak cationic ion-exchange sites) were evaluated as a mixed-mode stationary phase in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar solutes. Using a multivariate D-optimal design the composition of the polymerization mixture was modeled and optimized with five alkylbenzenes and seven alkyl phenyl ketones as test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of electrochromatographic parameters on the concentration of 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid monomer and porogen (water) in the polymerization mixture. A difference of 6, 8 and 13% RSD between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of efficiency, resolution and retention time, respectively, indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. The physical (i.e. morphology, porosity and permeability) and chromatographic properties of the monolithic columns were thoroughly investigated. With the optimized monolithic column, high efficiency separation of N-methylcarbamates pesticides and positional isomers was successfully achieved. It appears that this type of mixed-mode monolith (containing both chargeable and hydrophobic sites) may have a great potential as a new generation of CEC stationary phase.

  12. EST Table: FS843095 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS843095 E_FL_fner_17B02_F_0 10/09/28 84 %/185 aa ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid...26|ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid facets [Tribolium castaneum] FS840960 fner ...

  13. EST Table: FS906357 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS906357 E_FL_fufe_07P06_F_0 10/09/28 89 %/170 aa gb|EFA11544.1| kurtz [Tribolium c...l|GB13683-PA 10/09/10 89 %/170 aa gi|270015096|gb|EFA11544.1| kurtz [Tribolium castaneum] FS911973 fufe ...

  14. EST Table: FS784619 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS784619 E_FL_fcaL_48C03_R_0 10/09/28 64 %/109 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS874188 fcaL ...

  15. EST Table: FS877412 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS877412 E_FL_ftes_09L06_F_0 10/09/28 63 %/108 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...94187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS756091 ftes ...

  16. EST Table: FS773307 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS773307 E_FL_fcaL_01B18_R_0 10/09/28 51 %/210 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolution...187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS874188 fcaL ...

  17. EST Table: FS905741 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS905741 E_FL_fufe_06A07_F_0 10/09/28 31 %/238 aa ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to williams...189241014|ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to williams-beuren syndrome critical region protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS920403 fufe ...

  18. EST Table: FS882512 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS882512 E_FL_ftes_24I11_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/122 aa ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to williams...189241014|ref|XP_968918.2| PREDICTED: similar to williams-beuren syndrome critical region protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS920403 ftes ...

  19. EST Table: FS897997 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS897997 E_FL_ftes_29D13_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0006457(protein folding)|GO:0051082... 47 %/196 aa gnl|Amel|GB10179-PA 10/09/10 46 %/203 aa gi|91083711|ref|XP_969979.1| PREDICTED: similar to predicted protein [Tribolium castaneum] FS897997 ftes ...

  20. EST Table: FS797976 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS797976 E_FL_ffbm_26A13_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 54 %/234 aa ref|XP_001606773.1| ...enase, peroxisomal precursor (Phytanoyl-CoA alpha-hydroxylase) (PhyH) (Phytanic acid oxidase) [Tribolium castaneum] FS797976 ffbm ...

  1. EST Table: FS797973 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS797973 E_FL_ffbm_26A10_F_0 10/09/28 91 %/280 aa ref|NP_001036850.1| cathepsin B [...P004533 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 49 %/273 aa gi|91078958|ref|XP_974220.1| PREDICTED: similar to cathepsin b [Tribolium castaneum] FS792234 ffbm ...

  2. EST Table: FS797970 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS797970 E_FL_ffbm_26A06_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/248 aa ref|NP_001119730.1| triosephosph...A 10/09/10 78 %/248 aa gi|189236533|ref|XP_975493.2| PREDICTED: similar to triosephosphate isomerase [Tribolium castaneum] FS793264 ffbm ...

  3. EST Table: FS789797 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS789797 E_FL_ffbm_01M07_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/301 aa gb|AAK52495.1|AF361483_1 chymotry...72-PA 10/09/10 30 %/253 aa gi|91088641|ref|XP_974388.1| PREDICTED: similar to serpin 5 [Tribolium castaneum] FS789784 ffbm ...

  4. EST Table: FS930966 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS930966 E_FL_fwgP_29M10_F_0 10/09/28 44 %/215 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteor...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fwgP ...

  5. EST Table: FS767139 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS767139 E_FL_fcaL_45B09_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 43 %/171 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteor...10 43 %/171 aa gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fcaL ...

  6. EST Table: FS849851 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS849851 E_FL_fner_36C21_F_0 10/09/28 44 %/171 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteor...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  7. EST Table: FS850158 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS850158 E_FL_fner_37A23_F_0 10/09/28 43 %/137 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteor...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  8. EST Table: FS855797 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS855797 E_FL_fner_52P17_F_0 10/09/28 43 %/137 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteor...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  9. EST Table: FS845415 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS845415 E_FL_fner_23J15_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/122 aa ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteor...a gi|91078226|ref|XP_969763.1| PREDICTED: similar to meteorin [Tribolium castaneum] FS767139 fner ...

  10. EST Table: FS934675 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS934675 E_FL_fwgP_40L14_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005337(nucleoside transmembrane tr...81805|ref|XP_974174.1| PREDICTED: similar to AGAP009114-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS934675 fwgP ...

  11. EST Table: FS764450 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS764450 E_FL_fcaL_36N15_F_0 10/09/28 42 %/214 aa ref|XP_001945612.1| PREDICTED: similar to glucocerebro...608.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS759318 fcaL ...

  12. Taking a Large Monolith to Use for Teaching Soil Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is a technique for taking a large monolith for the purpose of teaching soil structure. Materials and procedures are detailed. A survey of 93 students indicated that the larger monolith was preferred over the commonly used narrow ones. (CW)

  13. Nielsen: Aladdin-Suite, FS89. Maskarade-Overture / Robert Layton

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Layton, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Nielsen: Aladdin-Suite, FS89. Maskarade-Overture, Prelude, Act 2. The Cockerels' Dance. Rhapsody Overture: An imaginary journey to the Faroe Islands, FS123. Helios Overture, FS32. Saga-Drom, FS46. Pan and Syrinx, FS87. Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi" DG 447 757-2GH (72 minutes: DDD)

  14. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns with reduced thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, A.; Inagaki, R.; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Y.; Milleding, Percy; Ørtengren, Ulf Thore

    2015-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript version. Published version is available at Acta Odontologica Scandinavica Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between fracture load of monolithic zirconia crowns and axial/occlusal thickness, and to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns with reduced thickness in comparison with that of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with regular thickness. Materials and methods. Monolithic zi...

  15. Eigenpolarization theory of monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Alan C.; Gustafson, Eric K.; Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Diode-laser-pumped monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators (NPROs) in an applied magnetic field can operate as unidirectional traveling-wave lasers. The diode laser pumping, monolithic construction, and unidirectional oscillation lead to narrow linewidth radiation. Here, a comprehensive theory of the eigenpolarizations of a monolithic NPRO is presented. It is shown how the properties of the integral optical diode that forces unidirectional operation depend on the choice of the gain medium, the applied magnetic field, the output coupler, and the geometry of the nonplanar ring light path. Using optical equivalence theorems to gain insight into the polarization characteristics of the NPRO, a strategy for designing NPROs with low thresholds and large loss nonreciprocities is given. An analysis of the eigenpolarizations for one such NPRO is presented, alternative optimization approaches are considered, and the prospects for further reducing the linewidths of these lasers are briefly discussed.

  16. High efficiency, monolithic fiber chirped pulse amplification system for high energy femtosecond pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiang; Kim, Kyungbum; Mielke, Michael; Jennings, Stephen; Masor, Gordon; Stohl, Dave; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Nguyen, Dan T; Rhonehouse, Dan; Zong, Jie; Churin, Dmitriy; Peyghambarian, N

    2013-10-21

    A novel monolithic fiber-optic chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system for high energy, femtosecond pulse generation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By employing a high gain amplifier comprising merely 20 cm of high efficiency media (HEM) gain fiber, an optimal balance of output pulse energy, optical efficiency, and B-integral is achieved. The HEM amplifier is fabricated from erbium-doped phosphate glass fiber and yields gain of 1.443 dB/cm with slope efficiency >45%. We experimentally demonstrate near diffraction-limited beam quality and near transform-limited femtosecond pulse quality at 1.55 µm wavelength. With pulse energy >100 µJ and pulse duration of 636 fs (FWHM), the peak power is estimated to be ~160 MW. NAVAIR Public Release Distribution Statement A-"Approved for Public release; distribution is unlimited".

  17. UPDATE ON MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue; G. A. Moore; N. P. Hallinan; B. H. Park; D. E. Burkes

    2006-10-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Progress at INL has led to fabrication of hot isostatic pressed uranium-molybdenum bearing monolithic fuel plates. These miniplates are part of the RERTR-8 miniplate irradiation test. Further progress has also been made on friction stir weld processing which has been used to fabricate full size fuel plates which will be irradiated in the ATR and OSIRIS reactors.

  18. Macroporous Monolithic Polymers: Preparation and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrua, Ruben Dario; Strumia, Miriam Cristina; Alvarez Igarzabal, Cecilia Inés

    2009-01-01

    In the last years, macroporous monolithic materials have been introduced as a new and useful generation of polymers used in different fields. These polymers may be prepared in a simple way from a homogenous mixture into a mold and contain large interconnected pores or channels allowing for high flow rates at moderate pressures. Due to their porous characteristics, they could be used in different processes, such as stationary phases for different types of chromatography, high-throughput bioreactors and in microfluidic chip applications. This review reports the contributions of several groups working in the preparation of different macroporous monoliths and their modification by immobilization of specific ligands on the products for specific purposes.

  19. Technology development for SOI monolithic pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczewski, J.; Domanski, K.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Jaroszewicz, B.; Kociubinski, A.; Kucharski, K.; Tomaszewski, D.; Caccia, M.; Kucewicz, W.; Niemiec, H.

    2006-01-01

    A monolithic detector of ionizing radiation has been manufactured using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers with a high-resistivity substrate. In our paper the integration of a standard 3 μm CMOS technology, originally designed for bulk devices, with fabrication of pixels in the bottom wafer of a SOI substrate is described. Both technological sequences have been merged minimizing thermal budget and providing suitable properties of all the technological layers. The achieved performance proves that fully depleted monolithic active pixel matrix might be a viable option for a wide spectrum of future applications

  20. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  1. Monolithic JFET preamplifier for ionization chamber calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Manfredi, P.F.; Speziali, V.

    1990-10-01

    A monolithic charge sensitive preamplifier using exclusively n-channel diffused JFETs has been designed and is now being fabricated by INTERFET Corp. by means of a dielectrically isolated process which allows preserving as much as possible the technology upon which discrete JFETs are based. A first prototype built by means of junction isolated process has been delivered. The characteristics of monolithically integrated JFETs compare favorably with discrete devices. First results of tests of a preamplifier which uses these devices are reported. 4 refs

  2. [Preparation of monolithic materials and their applications in proteomic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-09-01

    Proteomics is one of the core contents of life science in the post-genomic era, among which it is very important to develop the analytical techniques with high resolution, high sensitivity, high accuracy and high throughput. With the advantages of facile preparation, fast mass transfer, low backpressure and easy modification, monolithic materials have been widely used in proteomic analysis. This review summarizes the preparation methods of different kinds of monolithic materials (including organic polymer monoliths, silica-based monoliths, organic-inorganic hybrid silica monoliths) and their applications in proteomic study such as the digestion of proteins, the separation of proteins or peptides, high throughput analysis integrating online digestion, separation and identification.

  3. Monolithic graphene oxide sheets with controllable composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jae Hwan; Kwak, Jinsung; Kim, Sung-Dae; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Jong Jin; Park, Soon-Dong; Choi, Jae-Kyung; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Park, Kibog; Kim, Sung Youb; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Zonghoon; Kim, Young-Woon; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2014-02-28

    Graphene oxide potentially has multiple applications and is typically prepared by solution-based chemical means. To date, the synthesis of a monolithic form of graphene oxide that is crucial to the precision assembly of graphene-based devices has not been achieved. Here we report the physical approach to produce monolithic graphene oxide sheets on copper foil using solid carbon, with tunable oxygen-to-carbon composition. Experimental and theoretical studies show that the copper foil provides an effective pathway for carbon diffusion, trapping the oxygen species dissolved in copper and enabling the formation of monolithic graphene oxide sheets. Unlike chemically derived graphene oxide, the as-synthesized graphene oxide sheets are electrically active, and the oxygen-to-carbon composition can be tuned during the synthesis process. As a result, the resulting graphene oxide sheets exhibit tunable bandgap energy and electronic properties. Our solution-free, physical approach may provide a path to a new class of monolithic, two-dimensional chemically modified carbon sheets.

  4. Methacrylate monolithic columns functionalized with epinephrine for capillary electrochromatography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Correa, Enrique Javier; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel

    2013-07-12

    Epinephrine-bonded polymeric monoliths for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) were developed by nucleophilic substitution reaction of epoxide groups of poly(glycidyl-methacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate) (poly(GMA-co-EDMA)) monoliths using epinephrine as nucleophilic reagent. The ring opening reaction under dynamic conditions was optimized. Successful chemical modification of the monolith surface was ascertained by in situ Raman spectroscopy characterization. In addition, the amount of epinephrine groups that was bound to the monolith surface was evaluated by oxidation of the catechol groups with Ce(IV), followed by spectrophotometric measurement of unreacted Ce(IV). About 9% of all theoretical epoxide groups of the parent monolith were bonded to epinephrine. The chromatographic behavior of the epinephrine-bonded monolith in CEC conditions was assessed with test mixtures of alkyl benzenes, aniline derivatives and substituted phenols. In comparison to the poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monoliths, the epinephrine-bonded monoliths exhibited a much higher retention and slight differences in selectivity. The epinephrine-bonded monolith was further modified by oxidation with a Ce(IV) solution and compared with the epinephrine-bonded monoliths. The resulting monolithic stationary phases were evaluated in terms of reproducibility, giving RSD values below 9% in the parameters investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCWI_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSP_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. EST Table: FS936166 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) ... similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 fwgP ...

  12. EST Table: FS929848 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DICTED: similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia...1| PREDICTED: similar to Low density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) isoform 1 [Tribolium castaneum] FS929848 fwgP ...

  13. EST Table: FS851943 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to restin (Reed-Steinberg cell-expressed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] ...o restin (Reed-Steinberg cell-expressed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] FS906662 fner ...

  14. EST Table: FS921686 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to restin (Reed-Steinberg cell-expressed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] ...o restin (Reed-Steinberg cell-expressed intermediate filament-associated protein) [Tribolium castaneum] FS906662 fwgP ...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCAU_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCWI_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCWI_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNAU_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3b_DAY_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3b_WC_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3b_WC_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSU_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3b_SCSP_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_CHL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNAU_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSP_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNWI_CDOM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. EST Table: FS748350 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PREDICTED: similar to fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Nasonia vitripennis] 10/09/08 37 %/193 aa FBpp0290563|E...811424.1| PREDICTED: similar to fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Tribolium castaneum] FS748350 caL- ...

  4. EST Table: FS796464 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/09 32 %/334 aa FBpp0237202|DvirGJ227...milar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS796494 ffbm ...

  5. EST Table: FS759318 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 25 aa ref|XP_975608.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidas...%/225 aa gi|91087345|ref|XP_975608.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS759318 fcaL ...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3b_CU_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. EST Table: FS866305 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS866305 E_FL_fner_30L20_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0006904(vesicle docking during exoc...ytosis)|GO:0016192(vesicle-mediated transport) 10/09/28 n.h 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS866305 fner ...

  9. EST Table: FS771867 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS771867 E_FL_fcaL_23K08_F_0 10/09/28 87 %/139 aa ref|XP_001659698.1| liquid facets... [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39088.1| liquid facets [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/08 88 %/136 aa FBpp0227429|DvirGJ13012-P... %/143 aa gi|189240526|ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid facets [Tribolium castaneum] FS840960 fcaL ...

  10. EST Table: FS840960 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS840960 E_FL_fner_11A09_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 87 %/139 aa ref|XP_001659698.1| liquid... facets [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39088.1| liquid facets [Aedes aegypti] 10/09/10 88 %/136 aa FBpp0227429|...A 10/09/10 84 %/143 aa gi|189240526|ref|XP_972038.2| PREDICTED: similar to liquid facets [Tribolium castaneum] FS840960 fner ...

  11. EST Table: FS892940 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 108 aa gi|91094187|ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium castaneum] FS892940 ftes ... ...FS892940 E_FL_ftes_09L06_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 63 %/108 aa ref|XP_970998.1| PREDICTED: similar to Evolut...ionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathway, mitochondrial [Tribolium

  12. EST Table: FS797397 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS797397 E_FL_ffbm_24E08_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003824(catalytic activity)|GO:0004...0/09/10 37 %/268 aa gnl|Amel|GB17533-PA 10/09/10 46 %/232 aa gi|189238804|ref|XP_97...4950.2| PREDICTED: similar to Hibadhb [Tribolium castaneum] FS797397 ffbm ...

  13. EST Table: FS822271 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS822271 E_FL_fmgV_11P16_R_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 75 %/112 aa ref|XP_001656149.1| fetal alzheimer... antigen, falz [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT35210.1| fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Aedes aegypti] 1...8 %/115 aa gi|189240808|ref|XP_001811424.1| PREDICTED: similar to fetal alzheimer antigen, falz [Tribolium castaneum] FS822271 fmgV ...

  14. Test of the TRAPPISTe monolithic detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung Yee, L.; Álvarez, P.; Martin, E.; Cortina, E.; Ferrer, C.

    2013-12-01

    A monolithic pixel detector named TRAPPISTe-2 has been developed in Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. A p-n junction is implanted in the bottom handle wafer and connected to readout electronics integrated in the top active layer. The two parts are insulated from each other by a buried oxide layer resulting in a monolithic detector. Two small pixel matrices have been fabricated: one containing a 3-transistor readout and a second containing a charge sensitive amplifier readout. These two readout structures have been characterized and the pixel matrices were tested with an infrared laser source. The readout circuits are adversely affected by the backgate effect, which limits the voltage that can be applied to the metal back plane to deplete the sensor, thus narrowing the depletion width of the sensor. Despite the low depletion voltages, the integrated pixel matrices were able to respond to and track a laser source.

  15. Monolithic pixel detectors for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic pixel detectors integrating sensor matrix and readout in one piece of silicon have revolutionized imaging for consumer applications, but despite years of research they have not yet been widely adopted for high energy physics. Two major requirements for this application, radiation tolerance and low power consumption, require charge collection by drift for the most extreme radiation levels and an optimization of the collected signal charge over input capacitance ratio ( Q / C ). It is shown that monolithic detectors can achieve Q / C for low analog power consumption and even carryout the promise to practically eliminate analog power consumption, but combining suf fi cient Q / C , collection by drift, and integration of readout circuitry within the pixel remains a challenge. An overview is given of different approaches to address this challenge, with possible advantages and disadvantages.

  16. Update On Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. R Clark; J. M. Wight; G. C. Knighton; G. A. Moore; J. F. Jue

    2005-11-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Advancements have been made in the production of U-Mo foil including full sized foils. Progress has also been made in the friction stir welding and transient liquid phase bonding fabrication processes resulting in better bonding, more stable processes and the ability to fabricate larger fuel plates.

  17. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-12-22

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

  18. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  19. Characterization of SOI monolithic detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Rengifo, P. L.; Soung Yee, L.; Martin, E.; Cortina, E.; Ferrer, C.

    2013-12-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor for charged particle tracking was developed. This research is performed within the framework of an R&D project called TRAPPISTe (Tracking Particles for Physics Instrumentation in SOI Technology) whose aim is to evaluate the feasibility of developing a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) with Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. Two chips were fabricated: TRAPPISTe-1 and TRAPPISTe-2. TRAPPISTe-1 was produced at the WINFAB facility at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Belgium, in a 2 μm fully depleted (FD-SOI) CMOS process. TRAPPISTe-2 was fabricated with the LAPIS 0.2 μm FD-SOI CMOS process. The electrical characterization on single transistor test structures and of the electronic readout for the TRAPPISTe series of monolithic pixel detectors was carried out. The behavior of the prototypes’ electronics as a function of the back voltage was studied. Results showed that both readout circuits exhibited sensitivity to the back voltage. Despite this unwanted secondary effect, the responses of TRAPPISTe-2 amplifiers can be improved by a variation in the circuit parameters.

  20. Fracture-resistant monolithic dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self-consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  1. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  2. Electrically driven monolithic subwavelength plasmonic interconnect circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jiasen; Liu, Huaping; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-10-01

    In the post-Moore era, an electrically driven monolithic optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEIC) fabricated from a single material is pursued globally to enable the construction of wafer-scale compact computing systems with powerful processing capabilities and low-power consumption. We report a monolithic plasmonic interconnect circuit (PIC) consisting of a photovoltaic (PV) cascading detector, Au-strip waveguides, and electrically driven surface plasmon polariton (SPP) sources. These components are fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor)-compatible doping-free technique in the same feature size, which can be reduced to deep-subwavelength scale (~λ/7 to λ/95, λ = 1340 nm) compared with the 14-nm technique node. An OEIC could potentially be configured as a repeater for data transport because of its "photovoltaic" operation mode to transform SPP energy directly into electricity to drive subsequent electronic circuits. Moreover, chip-scale throughput capability has also been demonstrated by fabricating a 20 × 20 PIC array on a 10 mm × 10 mm wafer. Tailoring photonics for monolithic integration with electronics beyond the diffraction limit opens a new era of chip-level nanoscale electronic-photonic systems, introducing a new path to innovate toward much faster, smaller, and cheaper computing frameworks.

  3. An overview of monolithic zirconia in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Malkondu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia restorations have been used successfully for years in dentistry owing to their biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Because of their lack of translucency, zirconia cores are generally veneered with porcelain, which makes restorations weaker due to failure of the adhesion between the two materials. In recent years, all-ceramic zirconia restorations have been introduced in the dental sector with the intent to solve this problem. Besides the elimination of chipping, the reduced occlusal space requirement seems to be a clear advantage of monolithic zirconia restorations. However, scientific evidence is needed to recommend this relatively new application for clinical use. This mini-review discusses the current scientific literature on monolithic zirconia restorations. The results of in vitro studies suggested that monolithic zirconia may be the best choice for posterior fixed partial dentures in the presence of high occlusal loads and minimal occlusal restoration space. The results should be supported with much more in vitro and particularly in vivo studies to obtain a final conclusion.

  4. Immobilized monolithic enzyme reactors for application in proteomics and pharmaceutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spross, Jens; Sinz, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    The use of monolithic supports for a wide variety of applications has rapidly expanded during the past few years. The examples for applications of monoliths presented herein show that the chromatographic performance of bioreactors and affinity media prepared from monolithic media is superior to that of conventional particle-based systems. The ease of fabrication and modification combined with the long lifetime of the monolithic columns and their potential to be used in fully automated analytical systems make them attractive tools for an increasing number of applications.

  5. GlusterFS One Storage Server to Rule Them All

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Eric B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broomfield, Matthew C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perrotti, Terrell A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30

    GlusterFS is a Linux based distributed file system, designed to be highly scalable and serve many clients. Some reasons to use GlusterFS are: No centralized metadata server, Scalability, Open Source, Dynamic and live service modifications, Can be used over Infiniband or Ethernet, Can be tuned for speed and/or resilience and Flexible administration. It's useful for enterprise environments - virtualization; high performance computing (HPC) and it works with Mac, Linux and Windows clients. Conclusions are: (1) GlusterFS proved to have widespread capabilities as a virtual file system; (2) Scalability is very dependent upon the underlying hardware; (3) Lack of built-in encryption and security paradigm; and (4) Best suited in a general purpose computing environment.

  6. Schedule Optimization Study, Hanford RI/FS Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    A Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program was conducted by an independent team of professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration. This team spent two weeks at Hanford in September 1992 examining the reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process at Hanford and developing recommendations to expedite the process. The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. This report documents the study called for in the August 29, 1991, Dispute Resolution Committee Decision Statement. Battelle's Environmental Management Operations (EMO) coordinated the effort for DOE's Richland Field Office (RL).

  7. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  8. EST Table: FS823180 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS823180 E_FL_fmgV_14H20_R_0 10/09/28 33 %/237 aa ref|XP_001868268.1| thymus-specif...ic serine protease [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS26459.1| thymus-specific serine protease [Culex quinquefas...| PREDICTED: similar to thymus-specific serine protease [Tribolium castaneum] FS826745 fmgV ... ... 32 %/237 aa gnl|Amel|GB17481-PA 10/09/10 31 %/248 aa gi|91078858|ref|XP_972061.1

  9. EST Table: FS804780 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS804780 E_FL_fmgV_16C05_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 99 %/218 aa ref|NP_001124364.1| tachykinin... [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAG50368.1| tachykinin [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/...09/10 n.h 10/09/10 30 %/221 aa gi|189240200|ref|XP_975364.2| PREDICTED: similar to preprotachykinin [Tribolium castaneum] FS804780 fmgV ...

  10. EST Table: FS922922 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS922922 E_FL_fwgP_06A21_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 82 %/176 aa ref|NP_001116821.1| 18 wheel...er [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAB85498.1| 18 wheeler [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/...09/10 n.h 10/09/10 36 %/129 aa gi|91076478|ref|XP_972409.1| PREDICTED: similar to 18 wheeler [Tribolium castaneum] FS922922 fwgP ...

  11. EST Table: FS749709 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS749709 E_ET_caL-_19O13_F_0 10/09/28 92 %/228 aa ref|NP_001116821.1| 18 wheeler [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAB85498.1| 18 wheeler [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 47 %/148 aa FBpp0235352|DvirGJ20935-PA 10/08/2...Amel|GB15177-PA 10/09/10 51 %/215 aa gi|91076478|ref|XP_972409.1| PREDICTED: similar to 18 wheeler [Tribolium castaneum] FS922922 caL- ...

  12. EST Table: FS772018 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS772018 E_FL_fcaL_24C05_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 91 %/163 aa ref|NP_001127729.1| ...short neuropeptide F [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAG68397.1| short neuropeptide F [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS772018 fcaL ...

  13. EST Table: FS897697 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS897697 E_FL_ftes_28A03_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003755(peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans i...tatus:Partially_confirmed#UniProt:Q18445#protein_id: AAB00697.1 10/09/10 67 %/167 aa AGAP012376-PA Protein|3...L:41236535:41237137:1|gene:AGAP012376 10/09/10 52 %/146 aa gnl|Amel|GB10843-PA 10/09/10 71 %/169 aa gi|91078828|ref|XP_97...1205.1| PREDICTED: similar to AGAP012376-PA [Tribolium castaneum] FS897697 ftes ...

  14. EST Table: FS923078 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS923078 E_FL_fwgP_06H23_F_0 10/09/28 71 %/265 aa ref|NP_001091801.1| hypothetical protein LOC778506 [Bombyx mori] gb|ABJ97188.1| hypothetical protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS931380 fwgP ...

  15. Development and applications of femtosecond monolithic Yb-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, L.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, compact and environmentally stable high-energy ultrashort pulse laser sources have been broadly utilized in many different applications. Fiber lasers offer big practical advantages over bulk solid-state laser systems in terms of flexibility, compactness, reliability, cost effectiveness and turn-key operability. Moreover, thermal effects are dramatically reduced due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of an optical fiber, and good spatial mode quality can be ensured by its waveguiding property. Therefore, a fiber-based laser system is considered to be the preferred laser architecture. The main theme of this thesis is the development of various femtosecond monolithic Yb-doped fiber chirped-pulse-amplification (FCPA) system and their applications. We demonstrate an ultrafast high-energy monolithic Yb-doped FCPA system in which the pulse fidelity is preserved by weakening the nonlinear effects via a substantial level of temporal stretching of the seed pulses and by using highly doped active fibers as amplifying media. The presented monolithic FCPA delivers up to ∼ 25 μJ diffraction-limited pulses that can be recompressed to sub-200 fs duration, and the pulse quality has been confirmed through the second-harmonic-generation (SHG) conversion efficiency of over 52%. Improved dispersion and nonlinearity management schemes of the FCPA system allowing substantial pulse energy scaling in the monolithic format as well as methods for overcoming a series of technological challenges are reported. Three different types of Yb-doped fiber oscillators have been developed and built in the course of this PhD work. First, we compare two oscillator types that are based on the all-normal-dispersion (ANDi) regime and the dispersion-managed (DM) regime. Both of them have been tested as the seed-pulse source of the monolithic Yb-doped FCPA system. Then we introduce another novel design based on higher-order-mode (HOM) dispersion management that competes with a

  16. Components for monolithic fiber chirped pulse amplification laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Michael Craig

    The first portion of this work develops techniques for generating femtosecond-pulses from conventional fabry-perot laser diodes using nonlinear-spectral-broadening techniques in Yb-doped positive dispersion fiber ampliers. The approach employed an injection-locked fabry-perot laser diode followed by two stages of nonlinear-spectral-broadening to generate sub-200fs pulses. This thesis demonstrated that a 60ps gain-switched fabry-perot laser-diode can be injection-locked to generate a single-longitudinal-mode pulse and compressed by nonlinear spectral broadening to 4ps. Two problems have been identified that must be resolved before moving forward with this approach. First, gain-switched pulses from a standard diode-laser have a number of characteristics not well suited for producing clean self-phase-modulation-broadened pulses, such as an asymmetric temporal shape, which has a long pulse tail. Second, though parabolic pulse formation occurs for any arbitrary temporal input pulse profile, deviation from the optimum parabolic input results in extensively spectrally modulated self-phase-modulation-broadened pulses. In conclusion, the approach of generating self-phase-modulation-broadened pulses from pulsed laser diodes has to be modified from the initial approach explored in this thesis. The first Yb-doped chirally-coupled-core ber based systems are demonstrated and characterized in the second portion of this work. Robust single-mode performance independent of excitation or any other external mode management techniques have been demonstrated in Yb-doped chirally-coupled-core fibers. Gain and power efficiency characteristics are not compromised in any way in this novel fiber structure up to the 87W maximum power achieved. Both the small signal gain at 1064nm of 30.3dB, and the wavelength dependence of the small signal gain were comparable to currently deployed large-mode-area-fiber technology. The efficiencies of the laser and amplifier were measured to be 75% and 54

  17. Fine-grain concrete from mining waste for monolithic construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesovik, R. V.; Ageeva, M. S.; Lesovik, G. A.; Sopin, D. M.; Kazlitina, O. V.; Mitrokhin, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    The technology of a monolithic construction is a well-established practice among most Russian real estate developers. The strong points of the technology are low cost of materials and lower demand for qualified workers. The monolithic construction uses various types of reinforced slabs and foamed concrete, since they are easy to use and highly durable; they also need practically no additional treatment.

  18. Applications of monolithic silica capillary columns in proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barroso, B.; Lubda, D; Bischoff, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    The use and applicability of silica based capillary monolithic reversed-phase columns in proteomic analysis has been evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Chromatographic performance of the monolithic capillaries was evaluated with a tryptic digest of cytochrome C showing

  19. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest

  20. A novel photocatalytic monolith reactor for multiphase heterogeneous photocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, P.; Carneiro, J.T.; Moulijn, J.A.; Mul, Guido

    2008-01-01

    A novel reactor for multi-phase photocatalysis is presented, the so-called internally illuminated monolith reactor (IIMR). In the concept of the IIMR, side light emitting fibers are placed inside the channels of a ceramic monolith, equipped with a TiO2 photocatalyst coated on the wall of each

  1. Hydrogel coated monoliths for enzymatic hydrolysis of penicillin G

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lathouder, K.M.; Smeltink, M.W.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Paasman, M.A.; Van de Sandt, E.J.A.X.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogel-coated monolith for the entrapment of penicillin G acylase (E. coli, PGA). After screening of different hydrogels, chitosan was chosen as the carrier material for the preparation of monolithic biocatalysts. This protocol leads to active

  2. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  3. Monolithic LTCC seal frame and lid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Daniel S.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Stockdale, Dave; Duncan, James Brent; Riggs, Bristen

    2016-06-21

    A method for forming a monolithic seal frame and lid for use with a substrate and electronic circuitry comprises the steps of forming a mandrel from a ceramic and glass based material, forming a seal frame and lid block from a ceramic and glass based material, creating a seal frame and lid by forming a compartment and a plurality of sidewalls in the seal frame and lid block, placing the seal frame and lid on the mandrel such that the mandrel fits within the compartment, and cofiring the seal frame and lid block.

  4. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-01-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also. ((orig.))

  5. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-09-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also.

  6. Applications of silica-based monolithic HPLC columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Karin

    2004-07-01

    The recent invention and successive commercial introduction of monolithic silica columns has motivated many scientists from both academia and industry to study their use in HPLC. The first paper on monolithic silica columns appeared in 1996. Currently about 200 papers have been published relating to applications and characterization of monolithic silica columns, including monolithic capillaries. This review attempts to give an overview covering various aspects of this new column type in the field of high throughput analysis of drugs and metabolites, chiral separations, analysis of pollutants and food-relevant compounds, as well as in bioanalytical separations such as in proteomics. Some of the applications are described in greater detail. The numerous publications dealing with the physicochemical and chromatographic characterization of monolithic silica columns are briefly summarized.

  7. EST Table: FS743379 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se subunit I [Eucereon consorta] 10/09/07 51 %/283 aa FBpp0100176|mt:CoI-PA 10/08/28 51 %/182 aa MTCE.26#CE3...FS743379 E_FL_bmmt_25I11_R_0 10/09/28 64 %/192 aa gb|AAO37307.1| cytochrome c oxida

  8. EST Table: FS938031 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se subunit I [Eucereon consorta] 10/09/13 57 %/265 aa FBpp0100176|mt:CoI-PA 10/08/29 44 %/264 aa MTCE.26#CE3...FS938031 E_FL_fwgP_50M21_F_0 10/09/28 66 %/235 aa gb|AAO37307.1| cytochrome c oxida

  9. EST Table: FS824424 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS824424 E_FL_fmgV_17P08_R_0 10/09/28 31 %/260 aa ref|XP_001868268.1| thymus-specif...ic serine protease [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS26459.1| thymus-specific serine protease [Culex quinquefas

  10. EST Table: FS835826 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS835826 E_FL_fmgV_49K21_R_0 10/09/28 32 %/274 aa ref|XP_001868268.1| thymus-specif...ic serine protease [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS26459.1| thymus-specific serine protease [Culex quinquefas

  11. EST Table: FS824164 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS824164 E_FL_fmgV_17D09_R_0 10/09/28 32 %/284 aa ref|XP_001868268.1| thymus-specif...ic serine protease [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS26459.1| thymus-specific serine protease [Culex quinquefas

  12. EST Table: FS849735 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acetyltransferase [Periplaneta americana] 10/09/11 34 %/218 aa FBpp0169479|DmojGI20262-PA 10/08/29 n.h 10/09...FS849735 E_FL_fner_35N12_F_0 10/09/28 33 %/215 aa dbj|BAC87874.1| arylalkylamine N-

  13. EST Table: FS740405 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS740405 E_FL_bmmt_17C04_R_0 10/09/28 100 %/214 aa ref|NP_001037584.1| ferritin [Bo... gb|ABG76019.1| iron storage protein [Bombyx mandarina] 10/09/07 40 %/216 aa FBpp0225182|DvirGJ10765-PA 10/0

  14. Dispersive waves in fs cascaded second-harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2009-01-01

    Dispersive waves are observed in simulations of cascaded (phase-mismatched) second-harmonic generation. When generating ultra-short fs compressed near-IR solitons the dispersive waves are strongly red-shifted, depending on the soliton wavelength. Semi-analytical calculations predict the wavelengths....

  15. EST Table: FS862268 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS862268 E_FL_fner_18G24_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0000785(chromatin)|GO:0003682(chromatin... binding)|GO:0005634(nucleus)|GO:0006333(chromatin assembly or disassembly) 10/09/28 low homology 10/09/

  16. EST Table: FS756498 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS756498 E_FL_fcaL_02F10_F_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0000785(chromatin)|GO:0003682(chromatin... binding)|GO:0005634(nucleus)|GO:0006333(chromatin assembly or disassembly) 10/09/28 low homology 10/09/

  17. EST Table: FS928371 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS928371 E_FL_fwgP_22B11_F_0 10/09/28 87 %/119 aa ref|XP_975463.1| PREDICTED: similar to rasputin...066-PA 10/09/10 87 %/119 aa gi|91076984|ref|XP_975463.1| PREDICTED: similar to rasputin CG9412-PB [Tribolium castaneum] CK541017 fwgP ...

  18. EST Table: FS902665 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS902665 E_FL_ftes_48F15_R_0 10/09/28 49 %/157 aa ref|XP_001651177.1| eukariotic tr...anslation initiation factor 2b, epsilon subunit [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT42872.1| eukariotic translation initia

  19. EST Table: FS910431 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS910431 E_FL_fufe_20D11_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 45 %/288 aa ref|XP_001651177.1| eukariot...ic translation initiation factor 2b, epsilon subunit [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT42872.1| eukariotic trans

  20. EST Table: FS901364 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS901364 E_FL_ftes_42N07_R_0 10/09/28 47 %/163 aa ref|XP_001651177.1| eukariotic tr...anslation initiation factor 2b, epsilon subunit [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT42872.1| eukariotic translation initia

  1. EST Table: FS908760 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS908760 E_FL_fufe_15D04_F_0 10/09/28 46 %/289 aa ref|XP_001651177.1| eukariotic tr...anslation initiation factor 2b, epsilon subunit [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT42872.1| eukariotic translation initia

  2. EST Table: FS756340 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 %/154 aa ref|NP_001116821.1| 18 wheeler [Bombyx mori] dbj|BAB85498.1| 18 wheeler [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 44...gi|91076478|ref|XP_972409.1| PREDICTED: similar to 18 wheeler [Tribolium castaneum] FS756340 fcaL ...

  3. EST Table: FS918333 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS918333 E_FL_fufe_44A23_F_0 10/09/28 60 %/233 aa ref|XP_001843034.1| mystery 45A [...Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS30309.1| mystery 45A [Culex quinquefasciatus] 10/09/12 56 %/209 aa FBpp0155923

  4. EST Table: FS839039 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS839039 E_FL_fner_05J12_F_0 10/09/28 57 %/212 aa gb|ADE18444.1| cytochrome c oxida...se subunit I [Bombyx mori] 10/09/10 50 %/212 aa FBpp0100176|mt:CoI-PA 10/08/29 39 %/207 aa MTCE.26#CE35350#W

  5. EST Table: FS909797 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS909797 E_FL_fufe_18E23_F_0 10/09/28 98 %/207 aa ref|NP_001036906.1| pyruvate kina...58250845:-1|gene:AGAP004596 10/09/10 63 %/193 aa gnl|Amel|GB10695-PA 10/09/10 69 %/197 aa gi|91094451|ref|XP

  6. EST Table: FS870217 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available milar to activating signal cointegrator 1 complex subunit 2 [Nasonia vitripennis] 10/09/11 30 %/300 aa FBpp0...P_966661.1| PREDICTED: similar to activating signal cointegrator 1 complex subunit 2 [Tribolium castaneum] FS782472 fner ...

  7. EST Table: FS781715 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS781715 E_FL_fcaL_38G13_R_0 10/09/28 97 %/209 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 80 %/210 aa FBpp02771

  8. EST Table: FS868421 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS868421 E_FL_fner_36N05_R_0 10/09/28 98 %/197 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 81 %/198 aa FBpp02771

  9. EST Table: FS763745 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS763745 E_FL_fcaL_34J22_F_0 10/09/28 98 %/202 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 83 %/203 aa FBpp02522

  10. EST Table: FS780579 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS780579 E_FL_fcaL_34J22_R_0 10/09/28 98 %/202 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 80 %/203 aa FBpp02771

  11. EST Table: FS770331 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS770331 E_FL_fcaL_18O17_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/155 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 86 %/156 aa FBpp02522

  12. EST Table: FS909348 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS909348 E_FL_fufe_16P20_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 80 %/222 aa FBpp02346

  13. EST Table: FS853020 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS853020 E_FL_fner_45D02_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/180 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 87 %/181 aa FBpp02522

  14. EST Table: FS769451 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS769451 E_FL_fcaL_52D16_F_0 10/09/28 96 %/208 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 78 %/209 aa FBpp02346

  15. EST Table: FS917608 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS917608 E_FL_fufe_41N17_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 80 %/222 aa FBpp02346

  16. EST Table: FS841606 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS841606 E_FL_fner_12N15_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/132 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantat...ion protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/10 87 %/133 aa FBpp0116

  17. EST Table: FS876378 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS876378 E_FL_ftes_06K04_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/154 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantat...ion protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 87 %/155 aa FBpp0252

  18. EST Table: FS871345 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS871345 E_FL_fner_45D02_R_0 10/09/28 99 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 80 %/221 aa FBpp02346

  19. EST Table: FS743516 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS743516 E_FL_bmmt_25O09_R_0 10/09/28 98 %/167 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/07 80 %/167 aa FBpp02771

  20. EST Table: FS785832 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS785832 E_FL_fcaL_52D16_R_0 10/09/28 97 %/118 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 78 %/119 aa FBpp02346

  1. EST Table: FS764958 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS764958 E_FL_fcaL_38G13_F_0 10/09/28 98 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 80 %/222 aa FBpp02346

  2. EST Table: FS917079 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS917079 E_FL_fufe_40D23_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/217 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 81 %/213 aa FBpp02346

  3. EST Table: FS909374 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS909374 E_FL_fufe_17B02_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 80 %/222 aa FBpp02346

  4. EST Table: FS732209 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS732209 E_FL_bmmt_25O09_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/175 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantat...ion protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/03 88 %/176 aa FBpp0252

  5. EST Table: FS931382 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS931382 E_FL_fwgP_31A18_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/158 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantat...ion protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 87 %/159 aa FBpp0252

  6. EST Table: FS912488 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS912488 E_FL_fufe_26G13_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 80 %/222 aa FBpp02346

  7. EST Table: FS910496 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS910496 E_FL_fufe_20G12_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 80 %/222 aa FBpp02346

  8. EST Table: FS786649 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS786649 E_FL_fcaL_18O17_R_0 10/09/28 98 %/167 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 80 %/167 aa FBpp02771

  9. EST Table: FS906090 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS906090 E_FL_fufe_07B18_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/220 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/12 80 %/222 aa FBpp02346

  10. EST Table: FS850077 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS850077 E_FL_fner_36N05_F_0 10/09/28 99 %/204 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 83 %/205 aa FBpp02522

  11. EST Table: FS878889 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS878889 E_FL_ftes_13O22_F_0 10/09/28 96 %/166 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 85 %/167 aa FBpp02522

  12. EST Table: FS860309 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS860309 E_FL_fner_12N15_R_0 10/09/28 98 %/165 aa ref|NP_001040402.1| preimplantati...on protein [Bombyx mori] gb|ABF51322.1| preimplantation protein [Bombyx mori] 10/09/11 80 %/166 aa FBpp02771

  13. EST Table: FS895367 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 004743(pyruvate kinase activity)|GO:0006096(glycolysis)|GO:0030955(potassium ion binding) 10/09/28 n.h 10/09/12 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS895367 ftes ...

  14. EST Table: FS901397 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 004743(pyruvate kinase activity)|GO:0006096(glycolysis)|GO:0030955(potassium ion binding) 10/09/28 n.h 10/09/12 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS901397 ftes ...

  15. EST Table: FS914277 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS914277 E_FL_fufe_31M22_F_0 10/09/28 37 %/274 aa ref|XP_969699.1| PREDICTED: similar to fuzzy.../274 aa gi|91081315|ref|XP_969699.1| PREDICTED: similar to fuzzy CG13396-PA [Tribolium castaneum] CK514734 fufe ...

  16. EST Table: FS871051 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aa ref|NP_001139536.1| mortality factor 4-like [Bombyx mori] gb|ABJ99463.1| mrg15-like protein [Bombyx mori...FS871051 E_FL_fner_44F14_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005634(nucleus) 10/09/28 100 %/257

  17. EST Table: FS847306 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS847306 E_FL_fner_29A01_F_0 10/09/28 81 %/179 aa ref|NP_001119732.1| lebocin-3 pre...cursor [Bombyx mori] sp|P55796.2|LEB3_BOMMO RecName: Full=Lebocin-3; Short=LEB 3; Flags: Precursor dbj|BAA22883.1| leboc

  18. EST Table: FS796494 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 38 aa ref|XP_001945612.1| PREDICTED: similar to glucocerebrosidase, partial [Acyr...9/10 42 %/261 aa gi|91087345|ref|XP_975608.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative lysosomal glucocerebrosidase [Tribolium castaneum] FS796494 ffbm ...

  19. EST Table: FS840242 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l|Amel|GB10584-PA 10/09/10 47 %/128 aa gi|91087383|ref|XP_975651.1| PREDICTED: similar to Glucosylceramidase precursor (Beta-glucocer...ebrosidase) (Acid beta-glucosidase) (D-glucosyl-N-acylsphingosine glucohydrolase) [Tribolium castaneum] FS796494 fner ...

  20. EST Table: FS846041 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS846041 E_FL_fner_25G13_F_0 10/09/28 50 %/132 aa ref|XP_001606590.1| PREDICTED: similar to glucocerebro...el|GB10584-PA 10/09/10 47 %/138 aa gi|91087383|ref|XP_975651.1| PREDICTED: similar to Glucosylceramidase precursor (Beta-glucocerebro

  1. EST Table: FS920740 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS920740 E_FL_fufe_51G05_F_0 10/09/28 40 %/209 aa ref|XP_001867321.1| partner of drosha... [Culex quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS44779.1| partner of drosha [Culex quinquefasciatus] 10/09/13 39 %/204 aa

  2. EST Table: FS891235 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS891235 E_FL_ftes_02B20_R_0 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0003779(actin binding)|GO:0007010(cytoskeleton... organization)|GO:0015629(actin cytoskeleton)|GO:0030036(actin cytoskeleton organization) 10/09/2

  3. Less common applications of monoliths: V. Monolithic scaffolds modified with nanostructures for chromatographic separations and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenkova, Jana; Foret, Frantisek; Svec, Frantisek

    2012-06-01

    Scaffolds modified with nanostructures are recently finding use in a broad range of applications spanning from chromatographic separations to tissue engineering. This continuation of the review series on design and applications of monolithic materials covers some of the less common monoliths including use of nanostructures in preparation, modifications, and applications. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effective management of regulator RI/FS comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolinsky, S.M.; Lojek, D.; George, R.D.; Houser, S.M.; Strimbu, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a successful strategy that facilitates regulatory approval of CERCLA documents required by compliance agreement and CERCLA, based on the experience of Operable Unit 1, Waste Storage Area, of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This strategy, which has become the site standard at the FEMP, was instrumental in obtaining regulator approval of the OU1 RI and FS, and early approval of the Record of Decision during a very tight compliance agreement-driven schedule. This strategy can be applied at any DOE Superfund site, especially where there is need to recover lost schedule, an incentive to meet milestones early, a need to improve the relationship between the DOE and the regulators, or where the regulatory agencies have historically provided a large volume of comments on CERCLA documents. The strategy focuses on early identification and resolution of issues relating to draft RI/FS documents, as raised in regulatory agency review comments. This pro-active strategy has the potential for schedule and cost savings, as well as for improved communication between DOE and the regulators. The strategy includes preparation of a separate comment response document, integration of comment responses with RI/FS documents, development of a database of agency comments and their resolution, and sharing lessons learned with preparers of subsequent RI/FS documents. The paper provides background on the FEMP and describes the FEMP comment response strategy; DOE and regulator interface; the Sitewide Comment Database; networked electronic file management; the process for classifying, analyzing, and responding to comments; integration with base RI/FS documents; and a conclusion

  5. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruggs, S.J.; Putman, P.T.; Fang, H.; Alessandrini, M.; Salama, K.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample

  6. Catastrophic failure of a monolithic zirconia prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae-Seung; Ji, Woon; Choi, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Sunjai

    2015-02-01

    Recently, monolithic zirconia restorations have received attention as an alternative to zirconia veneered with feldspathic porcelain to eliminate chipping failures of veneer ceramics. In this clinical report, a patient with mandibular edentulism received 4 dental implants in the interforaminal area, and a screw-retained monolithic zirconia prosthesis was fabricated. The patient also received a maxillary complete removable dental prosthesis over 4 anterior roots. At the 18-month follow-up, all of the zirconia cylinders were seen to be fractured, and the contacting abutment surfaces had lost structural integrity. The damaged abutments were replaced with new abutments, and a new prosthesis was delivered with a computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing fabricated titanium framework with denture teeth and denture base resins. At the 6-month recall, the patient did not have any problems. Dental zirconia has excellent physical properties; however, care should be taken to prevent excessive stresses on the zirconia cylinders when a screw-retained zirconia restoration is planned as a definitive prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. InterProScan Result: FS785138 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS785138 FS785138_5_ORF1 C35350E971153815 PANTHER PTHR10466 PHOSPHOMANNOMUTASE 1.1e...-107 T IPR005002 Eukaryotic phosphomannomutase Molecular Function: phosphomannomutase activity (GO:0004615)|

  8. Primary Productivity, SeaWiFS and Pathfinder, 0.1 degrees, Global, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary Productivity is calculated from SeaWiFS Chl a, Pathfinder SST, and SeaWiFS PAR data. THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCT: intended strictly for scientific...

  9. Applications of methacrylate-based monolithic supports for speciation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scancar, Janez; Milacic, Radmila

    2009-08-01

    Liquid chromatography combined with element specific detection is commonly applied in speciation analysis. In these analyses, to obtain reliable data chemical species should not be transformed. To preserve chemical species during the separation step, fast chromatographic procedures and mild separation conditions are required. Monolithic supports that enable rapid chromatographic separations have rarely been used in speciation analysis. Methacrylate-based anion- and cation-exchange monolithic supports offer separation of charged chemical species of elements and can be used as a complementary tool to particle-packed liquid chromatographic columns. The present paper presents an overview of successful applications of methacrylate-based monolithic supports in speciation of zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), and aluminium (Al) in environmental, occupational health, and biological samples. Measures of analytical performance of convective interaction media (CIM) monolithic chromatographic supports, namely selectivity, sensitivity, and time of analysis, are compared to those of particle-packed columns. The potential of CIM monolithic chromatography in speciation analysis is critically discussed. Direct comparison of the experimental data in speciation of elements by ion-exchange monolithic and fast protein liquid chromatography is reported for the first time. Finally, some recommendations are given for further investigations of the potential of monolithic chromatography and its implementations in different fields of element speciation analysis.

  10. Influence of different carbon monolith preparation parameters on pesticide adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukčević Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of carbon monolith for pesticide removal from water, and the mechanism of pesticide interaction with carbon surface were examined. Different carbon monolith samples were obtained by varying the carbonization and activation parameters. In order to examine the role of surface oxygen groups in pesticide adsorption, carbon monolith surface was functionalized by chemical treatment in HNO3, H2O2 and KOH. The surface properties of the obtained samples were investigated by BET surface area, pore size distribution and temperature-programmed desorption. Adsorption of pesticides from aqueous solution onto activated carbon monolith samples was studied by using five pesticides belonging to different chemical groups (acetamiprid, dimethoate, nicosulfuron, carbofuran and atrazine. Presented results show that higher temperature of carbonization and the amount of activating agent allow obtaining microporous carbon monolith with higher amount of surface functional groups. Adsorption properties of the activated carbon monolith were more readily affected by the amount of the surface functional groups than by specific surface area. Results obtained by carbon monolith functionalisation showed that π-π interactions were the main force for adsorption of pesticides with aromatic structure, while acidic groups play an important role in adsorption of pesticides with no aromatic ring in the chemical structure.

  11. Biomimetic small peptide functionalized affinity monoliths for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Xia, Donghai; Han, Hai; Peng, Kun; Zhu, Peijie; Crommen, Jacques; Wang, Qiqin; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2018-08-09

    The rapid development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has necessitated the advancement of mAbs purification technologies. In this study, a biomimetic small peptide ligand 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzoic acid-Arg-Arg-Gly (DAAG) functionalized monolith was fabricated through a metal ion chelation-based multi-step approach. The resulting monolith showed good chromatographic performance. Compared with the Ni 2+ based IMAC monolith, the DAAG functionalized monolith exhibited not only excellent specificity but also higher dynamic binding capacity (DBC). The 10% DBC and 50% DBC for hIgG reached as high values as 26.0 and 34.6 mg/mL, respectively, at a ligand density of 8.8 μmol/mL, due to the high porosity and accessibility of the monolithic matrix. Moreover, the stability of the DAAG functionalized monolith in successive breakthrough experiments indicates that it has a promising potential for long-term use in mAbs purification. Finally, the DAAG functionalized monolith was successfully applied to the purification of trastuzumab or human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from biological samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Post-Polymerization Modifications of Polymeric Monolithic Columns: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinéad Currivan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The vast cache of methods used in polymeric monolithic column modification is presented herein, with specific attention to post-polymerization modification reactions. The modification of polymeric monolithic columns is defined and can include the modification of pre-existing surface groups, the addition of polymeric chains or indeed the addition of structures such as nano-particles and nano-structures. The use of these modifications can result in the specific patterning of monoliths, useful in microfluidic device design or in the investigation of modification optimization.

  13. Status and future perspectives of CernVM-FS

    CERN Document Server

    Blomer, J; Charalampidis, I; Harutyunyan, A; Larsen, D; Meusel, R

    2012-01-01

    The CernVM File System (CernVM-FS) provides a scalable, reliable and close to zero-maintenance software distribution service. It was developed to assist HEP collaborations to deploy their software on the worldwide-distributed computing infrastructure used to run their data processing applications. CernVM-FS is deployed on a wide range of computing resources, ranging from powerful worker nodes at Tier 1 grid sites to simple virtual appliances running on volunteer computers. We present a new approach to stage updates and changes into the file system, which aims to reduce the delay in distributing a software release to less than an hour. In addition, it significantly reduces the complexity with respect to both required capabilities of the master storage as well as installation and maintenance. Furthermore, we will discuss new requirements for additional features on the client side that have arisen from HEP community feedback.

  14. Monolithic fuel injector and related manufacturing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve [Greenville, SC; Johnson, Thomas Edward [Greenville, SC; Lacy, Benjamin [Greenville, SC; York, William David [Greenville, SC; Stevenson, Christian Xavier [Greenville, SC

    2012-05-22

    A monolithic fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle includes a substantially hollow vesicle body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween, an internal baffle plate extending radially outwardly from a downstream end of the bore, terminating short of the peripheral wall, thereby defining upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body, in fluid communication by way of a radial gap between the baffle plate and the peripheral wall. A plurality of integral pre-mix tubes extend axially through the upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body and through the baffle plate, with at least one fuel injection hole extending between each of the pre-mix tubes and the upstream fuel plenum, thereby enabling fuel in the upstream plenum to be injected into the plurality of pre-mix tubes. The fuel injection head is formed by direct metal laser sintering.

  15. Determining leach rates of monolithic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Dole, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provides a conservative means of predicting long-term release from monolithic waste forms, offering a simple and relatively quick means of determining effective solid diffusion coefficients. As presented here, these coefficients can be used in a simple model to predict maximum release rates or be used in more complex site-specific models to predict actual site performance. For waste forms that pass the structural integrity test, this model also allows the prediction of EP-Tox leachate concentrations from these coefficients. Thus, the results of the ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provide a powerful tool that can be used to predict the waste concentration limits in order to comply with the EP-Toxicity criteria for characteristically nonhazardous waste. 12 refs., 3 figs

  16. Present status of the MONOLITH project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    MONOLITH is a proposed massive (34 kt) magnetized tracking calorimeter at the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, optimized for the detection of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The main goal is to establish (or reject) the neutrino oscillation hypothesis through an explicit observation of the full first oscillation swing. The Δm 2 sensitivity range for this measurement comfortably covers the complete Super-Kamiokande allowed region. Other measurements include studies of matter effects, the NC up/down ratio, ν bar / ν ratio, the study of cosmic ray muons in the multi-TeV range, and auxiliary measurements from the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam. Depending on approval, data taking with the part of the detector could start towards the end of 2004

  17. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  18. EST Table: FS826745 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine-type peptidase activity) 10/09/28 32 %/283 aa ref|XP_001868268.1| thymus-specific serine protease [Culex... quinquefasciatus] gb|EDS26459.1| thymus-specific serine protease [Culex quinquefasciatus] 10/09/10 30 %/282...91 aa gi|91078858|ref|XP_972061.1| PREDICTED: similar to thymus-specific serine protease [Tribolium castaneum] FS826745 fmgV ...

  19. EST Table: FS840403 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS840403 E_FL_fner_09H04_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/173 aa gb|ABF51445.1| tropomyosin isofo...rm 5 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/10 84 %/173 aa FBpp0242940|DwilGK13797-PA 10/08/29 54 %/173 aa Y105E8B.1d#CE29060#W

  20. EST Table: FS908806 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS908806 E_FL_fufe_15F06_F_0 10/09/28 64 %/229 aa ref|XP_974421.1| PREDICTED: similar to synoviolin.../09/10 58 %/222 aa gnl|Amel|GB14313-PA 10/09/10 64 %/229 aa gi|91087035|ref|XP_974421.1| PREDICTED: similar to synoviolin [Tribolium castaneum] DC547331 fufe ...

  1. EST Table: FS733278 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS733278 E_FL_bmmt_20O16_F_0 10/09/28 77 %/113 aa ref|XP_974421.1| PREDICTED: similar to synoviolin.../09/10 70 %/106 aa gnl|Amel|GB14313-PA 10/09/10 77 %/113 aa gi|91087035|ref|XP_974421.1| PREDICTED: similar to synoviolin [Tribolium castaneum] DC547331 bmmt ...

  2. EST Table: FS911973 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7600(sensory perception) 10/09/28 87 %/168 aa gb|EFA11544.1| kurtz [Tribolium castaneum] 10/09/12 78 %/173 a...11360-PA Protein|3L:21912318:21931730:-1|gene:ARRK 10/09/10 81 %/169 aa gnl|Amel|GB13683-PA 10/09/10 87 %/168 aa gi|270015096|gb|EFA11544.1| kurtz [Tribolium castaneum] FS911973 fufe ...

  3. EST Table: FS865567 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10/09/28 45 %/163 aa ref|ZP_03318013.1| hypothetical protein PROVALCAL_00934 [Providencia alcalifaciens DSM ...30120] gb|EEB47224.1| hypothetical protein PROVALCAL_00934 [Providencia alcalifaciens DSM 30120] 10/09/11 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h FS865567 fner ...

  4. F.S. Northedge and English School of International Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor V. Mironov

    2017-01-01

    This article is devoted to English historian F.S. Northedge (1918-1985) and his role in the development conception of international society and English School of International relations in 1960-1980. This school consists of small group of scientists and diplomats, who were well educated in elite British universities like Cambridge and Oxford. They were acquainted with each other personally. British Committee for the Theory of International Politics in 1960-1970 was the center for the stud...

  5. Monolithic Rare Earth Doped PTR Glass Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a monolithic solid state laser on the basis of PTR glass co-doped with luminescent rare earth ions....

  6. Packaged, cascadable wideband monolithic feedback amplifiers for radar systems applications

    OpenAIRE

    Alleva, V.; Calori, M.; Cetronio, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Proietti, C.; Rapisarda, S.

    1990-01-01

    Design criteria and fabrication of a packaged, monolithic, cascadable, feedback amplifier are presented. The good performances in term of bandwidth, gain, flatness, reproducibility and reliability makes this component highly suitable for many radar applications.

  7. Reliability Analysis and Optimal Design of Monolithic Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Burcharth, Hans F.; Christiani, E.

    1994-01-01

    Reliability analysis and reliability-based design of monolithic vertical wall breakwaters are considered. Probabilistic models of the most important failure modes, sliding failure, failure of the foundation and overturning failure are described . Relevant design variables are identified and relia...

  8. Plant oil-based shape memory polymer using acrylic monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsujimoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the synthesis of a plant oil-based material using acrylic monolith. An acrylic monolith bearing oxirane groups was prepared via simple technique that involved the dissolution of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-comethyl methacrylate (PGMA in ethanolic – aqueous solution by heating and subsequent cooling. The PGMA monolith had topologically porous structure, which was attributed to the phase separation of the polymer solution. The PGMA monolith was impregnated by epoxidized soybean oil (ESO containing thermally-latent catalyst, and the subsequent curing produced a crosslinked material with relatively good transparency. The Young’s modulus and the tensile strength of polyESO/PGMA increased compared with the ESO homopolymer. The strain at break of polyESO/PGMA was larger than that of the ESO homopolymer and crosslinked PGMA. Furthermore, polyESO/PGMA exhibited good shape memory-recovery behavior.

  9. Application of monolithic chromatographic supports in virus research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajacic, Mladen; Ravnikar, Maja; Štrancar, Aleš; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion

    2017-11-01

    Key properties of monolithic chromatographic supports, make them suitable for separation and/or concentration of large biomolecules, especially virus particles and viral genomes. One by one, the studies that have been completed so far, contributed to the knowledge that monolith chromatography has hardly any limitation to be applied in virus research. Viruses of different sizes, possessing icosahedral structure and symmetrical morphology, as well as rod-shaped or filamentous viruses with helical structure, even enveloped ones, all of them could be successfully managed by means of monolith chromatography. Same is true for viral genomes, primarily when being distinct from other nucleic acid forms present in a host cell. This review is exclusively focused on viruses. It describes the application of monolith chromatography to different problematics within the virus research field. The reviewed achievements offer new possibilities and trigger new aspects in virology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of accelerated aging on translucency of monolithic zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Abdelbary

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Thickness of zirconia has significant effect on translucency. Aging has significant effect on thinner sections of zirconia. More research is required on zirconia towards making the material more translucent for its potential use as esthetic monolithic restoration.

  11. Microchip-based monolithic column for high performance liquid chromatography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed microchip based monolithic columns that can be used for liquid chromatography of small organic molecules, as well as, macromolecules such as...

  12. Monolithic Perovskite Silicon Tandem Solar Cells with Advanced Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Jan C.; Bett, Alexander J.; Bivour, Martin; Blasi, Benedikt; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Kohlstadt, Markus; Lee, Seunghun; Mastroianni, Simone; Mundt, Laura; Mundus, Markus; Ndione, Paul; Reichel, Christian; Schubert, Martin; Schulze, Patricia S.; Tucher, Nico; Veit, Clemens; Veurman, Welmoed; Wienands, Karl; Winkler, Kristina; Wurfel, Uli; Glunz, Stefan W.; Hermle, Martin

    2016-11-14

    For high efficiency monolithic perovskite silicon tandem solar cells, we develop low-temperature processes for the perovskite top cell, rear-side light trapping, optimized perovskite growth, transparent contacts and adapted characterization methods.

  13. Sol-Gel Synthesis of Non-Silica Monolithic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaweł, Bartłomiej; Gaweł, Kamila; Øye, Gisle

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic materials have become very popular because of various applications, especially within chromatography and catalysis. Large surface areas and multimodal porosities are great advantages for these applications. New sol-gel preparation methods utilizing phase separation or nanocasting have opened the possibility for preparing materials of other oxides than silica. In this review, we present different synthesis methods for inorganic, non-silica monolithic materials. Some examples of application of the materials are also included.

  14. Evaluation of translucency of monolithic zirconia and framework zirconia materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tuncel, ?lkin; Turp, I??l; ???mez, Asl?han

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The opacity of zirconia is an esthetic disadvantage that hinders achieving natural and shade-matched restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the translucency of non-colored and colored framework zirconia and monolithic zirconia. MATERIALS AND METHODS The three groups tested were: non-colored framework zirconia, colored framework zirconia with the A3 shade according to Vita Classic Scale, and monolithic zirconia (n=5). The specimens were fabricated in the dimensions of 15?1...

  15. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  16. Performance characteristics between monolithic and microservice-based systems

    OpenAIRE

    Flygare, Robin; Holmqvist, Anthon

    2017-01-01

    A new promising technology to face the problem of scalability and availability is the microservice architecture. The problem with this architecture is that there is no significant study that clearly proves the performance differences compared to the monolithic architecture. Our thesis aims to provide a more conclusive answer of how the microservice architecture differs performance wise compared to the monolithic architecture. In this study, we conducted several experiments on a self-developed...

  17. Towards a Technique for Extracting Microservices from Monolithic Enterprise Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Levcovitz, Alessandra; Terra, Ricardo; Valente, Marco Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The idea behind microservices architecture is to develop a single large, complex application as a suite of small, cohesive, independent services. On the other way, monolithic systems get larger over the time, deviating from the intended architecture, and becoming risky and expensive to evolve. This paper describes a technique to identify and define microservices on monolithic enterprise systems. As the major contribution, our evaluation shows that our approach was able to identify relevant ca...

  18. 100% reflectivity from a monolithic dielectric microstructured surface

    OpenAIRE

    Brückner, F.; Clausnitzer, T.; Burmeister, O.; Friedrich, D.; Kley, E.; Danzmann, K.; Tünnermann, A.; Schnabel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we propose a new mirror architecture which is solely based upon a monolithic dielectric micro-structured surface. Hence, the mirror device, which consists of a possibly mono-crystalline bulk material, can in principle simultaneously provide perfect reflectivity and lowest mechanical loss. By specifically structuring the monolithic surface, resulting in T-shaped ridges of a subwavelength grating, a resonant behavior of light coupling can be realized, leading to theoretically 100% reflect...

  19. Sol-Gel Synthesis of Non-Silica Monolithic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Gaweł

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic materials have become very popular because of various applications, especially within chromatography and catalysis. Large surface areas and multimodal porosities are great advantages for these applications. New sol-gel preparation methods utilizing phase separation or nanocasting have opened the possibility for preparing materials of other oxides than silica. In this review, we present different synthesis methods for inorganic, non-silica monolithic materials. Some examples of application of the materials are also included.

  20. Sol-Gel Synthesis of Non-Silica Monolithic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gawe?, Bart?omiej; Gawe?, Kamila; ?ye, Gisle

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic materials have become very popular because of various applications, especially within chromatography and catalysis. Large surface areas and multimodal porosities are great advantages for these applications. New sol-gel preparation methods utilizing phase separation or nanocasting have opened the possibility for preparing materials of other oxides than silica. In this review, we present different synthesis methods for inorganic, non-silica monolithic materials. Some examples of appl...

  1. Nano-Doped Monolithic Materials for Molecular Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Acquah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoliths are continuous adsorbents that can easily be synthesised to possess tuneable meso-/macropores, convective fluid transport, and a plethora of chemistries for ligand immobilisation. They are grouped into three main classes: organic, inorganic, and hybrid, based on their chemical composition. These classes may also be differentiated by their unique morphological and physicochemical properties which are significantly relevant to their specific separation applications. The potential applications of monoliths for molecular separation have created the need to enhance their characteristic properties including mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and chemical and thermal stability. An effective approach towards monolith enhancement has been the doping and/or hybridization with miniaturized molecular species of desirable functionalities and characteristics. Nanoparticles are usually preferred as dopants due to their high solid phase dispersion features which are associated with improved intermolecular adsorptive interactions. Examples of such nanomaterials include, but are not limited to, carbon-based, silica-based, gold-based, and alumina nanoparticles. The incorporation of these nanoparticles into monoliths via in situ polymerisation and/or post-modification enhances surface adsorption for activation and ligand immobilisation. Herein, insights into the performance enhancement of monoliths as chromatographic supports by nanoparticles doping are presented. In addition, the potential and characteristics of less common nanoparticle materials such as hydroxyapatite, ceria, hafnia, and germania are discussed. The advantages and challenges of nanoparticle doping of monoliths are also discussed.

  2. Monoliths: A Review of the Basics, Preparation Methods and Their Relevance to Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeeran Govender

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Considerable research has been conducted on monolithic catalysts for various applications. Strategies toward coating monoliths are of equal interest and importance. In this paper, the preparation of monoliths and monolithic catalysts have been summarized. More specifically, a brief explanation for the manufacturing of ceramic and metallic monoliths has been provided. Also, different methods for coating γ-alumina, as a secondary support, are included. Techniques used to deposit metal-based species, zeolites and carbon onto monoliths are discussed. Furthermore, monoliths extruded with metal oxides, zeolites and carbon are described. The main foci are on the reasoning and understanding behind the preparation of monolithic catalysts. Ideas and concerns are also contributed to encourage better approaches when designing these catalysts. More importantly, the relevance of monolithic structures to reactions, such as the selective oxidation of alkanes, catalytic combustion for power generation and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide, has been described.

  3. Polymethacrylate Monolithic and Hybrid Particle-Monolithic Columns for Reversed-Phase and Hydrophilic Interaction Capillary Liquid Chromatography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandera, P.; Urban, J.; Škeříková, V.; Langmeier, P.; Kubíčková, R.; Planeta, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1217, č. 1 (2010), s. 22-33 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : particle-monolithic columns * hybrid columns * polymethacrylate monoliths * capillary HPLC * HILIC * proteins * phenolic acids Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2010

  4. Biasable, Balanced, Fundamental Submillimeter Monolithic Membrane Mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Tsang, Raymond; Dengler, Robert; Lin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This device is a biasable, submillimeter-wave, balanced mixer fabricated using JPL s monolithic membrane process a simplified version of planar membrane technology. The primary target application is instrumentation used for analysis of atmospheric constituents, pressure, temperature, winds, and other physical and chemical properties of the atmospheres of planets and comets. Other applications include high-sensitivity gas detection and analysis. This innovation uses a balanced configuration of two diodes allowing the radio frequency (RF) signal and local oscillator (LO) inputs to be separated. This removes the need for external diplexers that are inherently narrowband, bulky, and require mechanical tuning to change frequency. Additionally, this mixer uses DC bias-ability to improve its performance and versatility. In order to solve problems relating to circuit size, the GaAs membrane process was created. As much of the circuitry as possible is fabricated on-chip, making the circuit monolithic. The remainder of the circuitry is precision-machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs circuit. The most critical alignments are performed using micron-scale semiconductor technology, enabling wide bandwidth and high operating frequencies. The balanced mixer gets superior performance with less than 2 mW of LO power. This can be provided by a simple two-stage multiplier chain following an amplifier at around 90 GHz. Further, the diodes are arranged so that they can be biased. Biasing pushes the diodes closer to their switching voltage, so that less LO power is required to switch the diodes on and off. In the photo, the diodes are at the right end of the circuit. The LO comes from the waveguide at the right into a reduced-height section containing the diodes. Because the diodes are in series to the LO signal, they are both turned on and off simultaneously once per LO cycle. Conversely, the RF signal is picked up from the RF waveguide by the probe at the left, and flows

  5. EST Table: FS755467 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS755467 E_ET_caL-_19O13_R_0 10/09/28 87 %/114 aa ref|NP_001116821.1| 18 wheeler [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAB85498.1| 18 wheeler [Bombyx mori] 10/09/08 n.h 10/08/28 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h BY944435 caL- ...

  6. EST Table: FS929627 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS929627 E_FL_fwgP_25L02_F_0 10/09/28 62 %/258 aa ref|NP_001116821.1| 18 wheeler [B...ombyx mori] dbj|BAB85498.1| 18 wheeler [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 38 %/278 aa FBpp0245036|DwilGK15893-PA 10/08/2...Amel|GB15177-PA 10/09/10 51 %/263 aa gi|91076478|ref|XP_972409.1| PREDICTED: similar to 18 wheeler [Tribolium castaneum] CK516272 fwgP ...

  7. EST Table: FS813939 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS813939 E_FL_fmgV_41L05_F_0 10/09/28 65 %/121 aa ref|NP_001136225.1| hypothetical ...protein LOC100216500 [Bombyx mori] gb|ACJ66918.1| hypothetical protein 39 [Bombyx mori] 10/09/09 n.h 10/08/29 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h 10/09/10 n.h AU001277 fmgV ...

  8. Single-shot 35 fs temporal resolution electron shadowgraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoby, C. M.; Li, R. K.; Threlkeld, E.; To, H.; Musumeci, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-01-14

    We obtain single-shot time-resolved shadowgraph images of the electromagnetic fields resulting from the interaction of a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse with a metal surface. Using a high brightness relativistic electron beam and a high streaking speed radiofrequency deflector, we report <35 fs temporal resolution enabling a direct visualization of the retarded-time dominated field evolution which follows the laser-induced charge emission. A model including the finite signal propagation speed well reproduces the data and yields measurements of fundamental parameters in short pulse laser-matter interaction such as the amount of emitted charge and the emission time scale.

  9. EST Table: FS839797 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS839797 E_FL_fner_07L06_F_0 10/09/28 100 %/142 aa ref|NP_001037402.1| arginine kin...ase [Bombyx mori] gb|ABB88514.1| arginine kinase [Bombyx mori] gb|ABD36282.1| arginine kinase [Bombyx mori] gb|ABY597...rotein|UNKN:39405743:39406543:-1|gene:AGAP012924 10/09/10 83 %/142 aa gnl|Amel|GB10973-PA 10/09/10 84 %/146 aa gi|27001497

  10. EST Table: FS904516 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1461 10/09/10 48 %/243 aa gnl|Amel|GB18846-PA 10/09/10 46 %/242 aa gi|91086187|ref|XP_971225.1| PREDICTED: similar to medulloblastoma...oblastoma antigen MU-MB-50.4 [Tribolium castaneum] gb|EFA06682.1| hypothetical prot...FS904516 E_FL_fufe_02D20_F_0 11/12/09 n.h 10/09/28 46 %/242 aa ref|XP_971225.1| PREDICTED: similar to medull

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

    1988-08-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

  12. Properties of glass-bonded zeolite monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F.; Murphy, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that mineral waste forms can be used to immobilize waste salt generated during the pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Solid, leach resistant monoliths were formed by hot-pressing mixtures of salt-occluded zeolite A powders and glass frit at 990 K and 28 MPa. Additional samples have now been fabricated and tested. Normalized release rates for all elements, including iodide and chloride, were less than 1 g/m 2 d in 28-day tests in deionized water and in brine at 363 K (90 degrees C). Preliminary results indicate that these rates fall with time with both leachants and that the zeolite phase in the glass-bonded zeolite does not function as an ion exchanger. Some material properties were measured. The Poisson ratio and Young's modulus were slightly smaller in glass-bonded zeolite than in borosilicate glass. Density depended on zeolite fraction. The glass-bonded zeolite represents a promising mineral waste form for IFR salt

  13. Characterisation of methacrylate monoliths for bacteriophage purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Franc; Ciringer, Mateja; Strancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2011-04-29

    Binding of three different bacteriophages (phages), namely T7, lambda and M13 on methacrylate monoliths was investigated. Phage M13 exhibited the highest dynamic binding capacity of 4.5×10(13) pfu/mL while T7 and lambda showed capacity of 1×10(13) pfu/mL, all corresponding to values of around 1mg/mL. Interestingly, capacity for lambda phage was increased 5-fold by increasing NaCl concentration in a loaded sample from 0 to 0.2M while there was a constant capacity decrease for T7 and M13 phages. Under optimal conditions, recovery for all three phages approached 100%. Measurement of a pressure drop increase during loading enabled estimation of adsorbed phage layer thickness. At a maximal capacity it was calculated to be around 50 nm for T7 phage and 60 nm for lambda phage matching closely capside size thus indicating monolayer adsorption while 80 nm layer thickness was estimated for M13 phage showing its orientation along the pore. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns with reduced thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, Akio; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between fracture load of monolithic zirconia crowns and axial/occlusal thickness and to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns with reduced thickness in comparison with that of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with regular thickness. Monolithic zirconia crowns (Lava Plus Zirconia, 3M/ESPE) with specified axial/occlusal thicknesses and lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max press, Ivoclar/Vivadent) with regular thickness were fabricated using a dental CAD/CAM system and a press technique, respectively. The crowns cemented onto dies were loaded until fracture. Based on measurements of the crown thickness made by micro-CT and the fracture load, multiple regression analysis was performed. It was revealed that the occlusal thickness significantly affected the fracture load (p zirconia crowns, the fracture load of the zirconia crowns with the occlusal thickness of 0.5 mm (5558 ± 522 N) was significantly higher than that of lithium disilicate crowns with an occlusal thickness of 1.5 mm (3147 ± 409 N). Within the limitations of the present study, it is suggested that monolithic zirconia crown with chamfer width of 0.5 mm and occlusal thickness of 0.5 mm can be used in the molar region in terms of fracture resistance.

  15. Surfactant-Bound Monolithic Columns for Capillary Electrochromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel anionic surfactant bound monolithic stationary phase based on 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid (AAUA) is designed for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The monolith possessing bonded undecanoyl groups (hydrophobic sites) and carboxyl groups (weak cationic ion-exchange sites) was evaluated as a mixed-mode stationary phase in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar solutes. Using a multivariate D-optimal design the composition of the polymerization mixture was modeled and optimized with five alkylbenzenes (ABs) and seven alkyl phenyl ketones (APKs) as test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of electrochromatographic parameters on the concentration of AAUA monomer and porogen (water) in the polymerization mixture. A difference of 6%, 8% and 13% RSD between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of efficiency, resolution, and retention time, respectively, indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. The physical (i.e., morphology, porosity and permeability) and chromatographic properties of the monolithic columns were thoroughly investigated. With the optimized monolithic column, high efficiency separation of N-methylcarbamates (NMCs) pesticides and positional isomers was successfully achieved. It appears that this type of mixed-mode monolith (containing both chargeable and hydrophobic sites) may have a great potential as a new generation of CEC stationary phase. PMID:19885887

  16. Estimation of methacrylate monolith binding capacity from pressure drop data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornik, Aleš; Smrekar, Vida; Krajnc, Peter; Strancar, Aleš

    2013-01-11

    Convective chromatographic media comprising of membranes and monoliths represent an important group of chromatographic supports due to their flow-unaffected chromatographic properties and consequently fast separation and purification even of large biological macromolecules. Consisting of a single piece of material, common characterization procedures based on analysis of a small sample assuming to be representative for the entire batch, cannot be applied. Because of that, non-invasive characterization methods are preferred. In this work pressure drop was investigated for an estimation of dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of proteins and plasmid DNA for monoliths with different pore sizes. It was demonstrated that methacrylate monolith surface area is reciprocally proportional to pore diameter and that pressure drop on monolith is reciprocally proportional to square pore size demonstrating that methacrylate monolith microstructure is preserved by changing pore size. Based on these facts mathematical formalism has been derived predicting that DBC is in linear correlation with the square root of pressure drop. This was experimentally confirmed for ion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions for proteins and plasmid DNA. Furthermore, pressure drop was also applied for an estimation of DBC in grafted layers of different thicknesses as estimated from the pressure drop data. It was demonstrated that the capacity is proportional to the estimated grafted layer thickness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Lee, James J.-W.; Srikanth, Ramanathan; Lawn, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass–ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass–ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics. PMID:24139756

  18. Monolithic Chip-Integrated Absorption Spectrometer from 3-5 microns, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A monolithically integrated indium phosphide (InP) to silicon-on-sapphire (SoS) platform is being proposed for a monolithic portable or handheld spectrometer between...

  19. Monolithic View of Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Chiosi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We review and critically discuss the current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution limited to Early Type Galaxies (ETGs as inferred from the observational data and briefly contrast the hierarchical and quasi-monolithic paradigms of formation and evolution. Since in Cold Dark Matter (CDM cosmogony small scale structures typically collapse early and form low-mass haloes that subsequently can merge to assembly larger haloes, galaxies formed in the gravitational potential well of a halo are also expected to merge thus assembling their mass hierarchically. Mergers should occur all over the Hubble time and large mass galaxies should be in place only recently. However, recent observations of high redshift galaxies tell a different story: massive ETGs are already in place at high redshift. To this aim, we propose here a revision of the quasi-monolithic scenario as an alternative to the hierarchical one, in which mass assembling should occur in early stages of a galaxy lifetime and present recent models of ETGs made of Dark and Baryonic Matter in a Λ-CDM Universe that obey the latter scheme. The galaxies are followed from the detachment from the linear regime and Hubble flow at z ≥ 20 down to the stage of nearly complete assembly of the stellar content (z ∼ 2 − 1 and beyond.  It is found that the total mass (Mh = MDM + MBM and/or initial over-density of the proto-galaxy drive the subsequent star formation histories (SFH. Massive galaxies (Mh ~ _1012M⊙ experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates ≥ 103M⊙/yr at early epochs, consistently with observations, with a weak dependence on the initial over-density; intermediate mass haloes (Mh~_ 1010 − 1011M⊙ have star formation histories that strongly depend on their initial over-density; finally, low mass haloes (Mh ~_ 109M⊙ always have erratic, burst-like star forming histories. The present-day properties (morphology, structure, chemistry and photometry of the

  20. Monolithic PDMS passband filters for fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobera, Andreu; Demming, Stefanie; Joensson, Haakan N; Vila-Planas, J; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Büttgenbach, Stephanus

    2010-08-07

    We present the fabrication and characteristics of monolithically integrated ink dyed poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) filters for optical sensing in disposable lab-on-a-chip. This represents a migration of auxillary functions onto the disposable chip with the goal of producing truly portable systems. Filters made from commercially available ink (Pelikan) directly mixed into PDMS oligomer without the use of any additional solvents were patterned with standard soft lithography technologies. Furthermore, a fabrication process based on capillary forces is presented allowing PDMS coloration of arbitrary shapes. Different filters of varying thickness fabricated using red, green and blue ink in four different concentrations were characterized. The optimal performance was found with filter thicknesses of 250 microm and ink to PDMS ratios of 0.1 (mL ink : mL PDMS oligomer) resulting in a transmittance ranging from -15.1 dB to -12.3 dB in the stopband and from -4.0 dB to -2.5 dB in the passband. Additionally, we demonstrate the robustness of this approach as the ink dyed PDMS filters do not exhibit temporal ageing due to diffusion or autofluorescence. We also show that such filters can easily be integrated in fluorescence systems, with stopbands efficient enough to allow fluorescence measurements under non-optimal conditions (broadband excitation, 180 degrees configuration). Integrated ink dyed PDMS filters add robust optical functionalities to disposable microdevices at a low cost and will enable the use of these devices for a wide range of fluorescence and absorbance based biological and chemical analysis.

  1. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant.

  2. Monolithic optoelectronic integrated broadband optical receiver with graphene photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chuantong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical receivers with potentially high operation bandwidth and low cost have received considerable interest due to rapidly growing data traffic and potential Tb/s optical interconnect requirements. Experimental realization of 65 GHz optical signal detection and 262 GHz intrinsic operation speed reveals the significance role of graphene photodetectors (PDs in optical interconnect domains. In this work, a novel complementary metal oxide semiconductor post-backend process has been developed for integrating graphene PDs onto silicon integrated circuit chips. A prototype monolithic optoelectronic integrated optical receiver has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Moreover, this is a firstly reported broadband optical receiver benefiting from natural broadband light absorption features of graphene material. This work is a perfect exhibition of the concept of monolithic optoelectronic integration and will pave way to monolithically integrated graphene optoelectronic devices with silicon ICs for three-dimensional optoelectronic integrated circuit chips.

  3. Monolithic optoelectronic integrated broadband optical receiver with graphene photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuantong; Huang, Beiju; Mao, Xurui; Zhang, Zanyun; Zhang, Zan; Geng, Zhaoxin; Xue, Ping; Chen, Hongda

    2017-07-01

    Optical receivers with potentially high operation bandwidth and low cost have received considerable interest due to rapidly growing data traffic and potential Tb/s optical interconnect requirements. Experimental realization of 65 GHz optical signal detection and 262 GHz intrinsic operation speed reveals the significance role of graphene photodetectors (PDs) in optical interconnect domains. In this work, a novel complementary metal oxide semiconductor post-backend process has been developed for integrating graphene PDs onto silicon integrated circuit chips. A prototype monolithic optoelectronic integrated optical receiver has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Moreover, this is a firstly reported broadband optical receiver benefiting from natural broadband light absorption features of graphene material. This work is a perfect exhibition of the concept of monolithic optoelectronic integration and will pave way to monolithically integrated graphene optoelectronic devices with silicon ICs for three-dimensional optoelectronic integrated circuit chips.

  4. Preparation of poly(γ-glutamic acid)/hydroxyapatite monolith via biomineralization for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Bin; Hasegawa, Urara; van der Vlies, André J; Sung, Moon-Hee; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid monolith of poly(γ-glutamic acid) and hydroxyapatite (PGA/HAp monolith) was prepared via biomineralization and used as a macroporous cell scaffold in bone tissue engineering. The PGA monolith having a bimodal pore size distribution was used as a substrate to induce biomineralization. The PGA/HAp monolith was obtained by immersing the PGA monolith in simulated body fluid. Pretreatment with CaCl2 enhanced the apatite-forming ability of the PGA monolith. Murine osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells efficiently attached and proliferated on the PGA/HAp monolith. MTT assay showed that both the PGA and PGA/HAp monolith did not have apparent cytotoxicity. Moreover, the PGA and PGA/HAp monoliths adsorbed bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) by electrostatic interaction which was slowly released in the medium during cell culture. The PGA/HAp monolith enhanced BMP-2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity compared to the PGA monolith and a polystyrene culture plate. Thus, these PGA/HAp monoliths may have potential in bone tissue engineering.

  5. Large volume monolithic stationary phases: preparation, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornik, Aleš; Jančar, Janez; Mihelič, Igor; Barut, Miloš; Strancar, Aleš

    2010-03-01

    Monoliths represents the 4th generation of chromatographic supports. They consist of a single piece of highly porous material with interconnected flow through pores. Because of that transport is based on convection what results in a flow unaffected separation and dynamic binding capacity. This is especially important when large molecular weight molecules such as proteins, DNA or viruses have to be purified. For this purpose large volume monolithic columns are needed. In this article preparation of such columns is described together with their main applications. The article is dedicated to Prof. Tine Koloini who substantially contributed to this topic.

  6. Silver-coated monolithic columns for separation in radiopharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, Ondrej; Kucka, Jan; Svec, Frantisek; Hruby, Martin

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the preparation of a macroporous monolithic column containing anchored silver nanoparticles and its use for the elimination of excess radioiodine from the radiolabeled pharmaceutical. The poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was first functionalized with cystamine and the free thiol groups liberated by reaction with borohydride. In-house-prepared silver nanoparticles were then attached by interaction with the surface thiols. The deiodization process was demonstrated with the commonly used radiopharmaceutical m-iodobenzylguanidine labeled with radionuclide iodine-125. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Dynamics in a Monolithic Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As for the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC is used for PAH identification and densitometry. However, when a solvent containing a substance to be identified passes through a column of UPLC, a dedicated high-pressure-proof device is required. Recently, a liquid chromatography instrument using a monolithic column technology has been proposed to reduce the pressure of UPLC. The present study tested five types of monolithic columns produced in experiments. To simulate the flow field, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM was used. The velocity profile was discussed to decrease the pressure drop in the ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC system.

  8. Paladin Enterprises: Monolithic particle physics models global climate.

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Paladin Enterprises presents a monolithic particle model of the universe which will be used by them to build an economical fusion energy system. The model is an extension of the work done by James Clerk Maxwell. Essentially, gravity is unified with electro-magnetic forces and shown to be a product of a closed loop current system, i.e. a particle - monolithic or sub atomic. This discovery explains rapid global climate changes which are evident in the geological record and also provides an explanation for recent changes in the global climate.

  9. F.S. Northedge and English School of International Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor V. Mironov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to English historian F.S. Northedge (1918-1985 and his role in the development conception of international society and English School of International relations in 1960-1980. This school consists of small group of scientists and diplomats, who were well educated in elite British universities like Cambridge and Oxford. They were acquainted with each other personally. British Committee for the Theory of International Politics in 1960-1970 was the center for the study of International Society. Such composition of the school demonstrated aristocratic character of the International relations study as intellectual pursuit in United Kingdom. Meanwhile, such people like Charles Manning, Fred Northedge, Edward Carr and some other famous people, who usually were English School members, did not taken part in the British Committee due to different reasons. Thus, F.S. Northedge was untypical participant of English school and his scientific heritage need to be studied. Key factors of his biography and his views on International Policy are studies in the article. “Diplomatic style”, “System of the state” and “International society” were the central concepts in his works. He met with these ideas in the London School of economy, where Charles Manning, Martin Wight and Headley Bull – founders of English School - had worked at International relations chair in different time. The analysis of these categories let make conclusion that F. Northedge agreed with main ideas of English School of International relations. But at the same time he understood them very originally. His system of the views demonstrated that British Committee for the Theory of International Politics, but not London School of economy, was the main center for the development conception of International Society in 1960-1980.

  10. Constitutive Theory Developed for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1998-01-01

    with these service conditions by developing a multiaxial viscoplastic constitutive model that accounts for time-dependent hereditary material deformation (such as creep and stress relaxation) in monolithic structural ceramics. Using continuum principles of engineering mechanics, we derived the complete viscoplastic theory from a scalar dissipative potential function.

  11. InterProScan Result: FS919451 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919451 FS919451_2_ORF2 2BE5B01B58D78D81 PANTHER PTHR10466 PHOSPHOMANNOMUTASE 8.6e...-20 T IPR005002 Eukaryotic phosphomannomutase Molecular Function: phosphomannomutase activity (GO:0004615)|C

  12. InterProScan Result: FS869839 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS869839 FS869839_6_ORF1 95DADAF199A6108D SUPERFAMILY SSF81382 Skp1 dimerisation do...main-like 8.8e-32 T IPR016072 SKP1 component, dimerisation Biological Process: ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process (GO:0006511) ...

  13. InterProScan Result: FS779843 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS779843 FS779843_4_ORF1 437F417A972B5635 PFAM PF04615 Utp14 6.5e-33 T IPR006709 Small-subunit process...ome, Utp14 Biological Process: rRNA processing (GO:0006364)|Cellular Component: small-subunit processome (GO:0032040) ...

  14. InterProScan Result: FS783191 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS783191 FS783191_5_ORF1 072DBEF328F41109 PFAM PF04192 Utp21 5e-59 T IPR007319 Small-subunit process...ome, Utp21 Biological Process: rRNA processing (GO:0006364)|Cellular Component: small-subunit processome (GO:0032040) ...

  15. InterProScan Result: FS916423 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS916423 FS916423_2_ORF2 B2940816BE6DE7BE PFAM PF04615 Utp14 2.7e-61 T IPR006709 Small-subunit process...ome, Utp14 Biological Process: rRNA processing (GO:0006364)|Cellular Component: small-subunit processome (GO:0032040) ...

  16. InterProScan Result: FS873128 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS873128 FS873128_4_ORF1 97398CBF49C72044 PFAM PF08625 Utp13 2.9e-34 T IPR013934 Small-subunit process...ome, Utp13 Biological Process: rRNA processing (GO:0006364)|Cellular Component: small-subunit processome (GO:0032040) ...

  17. InterProScan Result: FS898954 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS898954 FS898954_4_ORF2 AA99CAAFD037F5BB PFAM PF04615 Utp14 1.4e-56 T IPR006709 Small-subunit process...ome, Utp14 Biological Process: rRNA processing (GO:0006364)|Cellular Component: small-subunit processome (GO:0032040) ...

  18. InterProScan Result: FS769068 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS769068 FS769068_2_ORF2 CC628FD86337D2E6 PFAM PF03998 Utp11 5.3e-70 T IPR007144 Small-subunit process...ome, Utp11 Biological Process: rRNA processing (GO:0006364)|Cellular Component: small-subunit processome (GO:0032040) ...

  19. InterProScan Result: FS898120 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS898120 FS898120_5_ORF2 88A0F99A1A469778 PFAM PF03998 Utp11 6.1e-69 T IPR007144 Small-subunit process...ome, Utp11 Biological Process: rRNA processing (GO:0006364)|Cellular Component: small-subunit processome (GO:0032040) ...

  20. InterProScan Result: FS736344 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS736344 FS736344_5_ORF2 9CF1871EA8CE2B95 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 2.4e-65 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  1. InterProScan Result: FS796478 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS796478 FS796478_3_ORF1 D1FBDF902D2C91C4 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 2.1e-35 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  2. InterProScan Result: FS777160 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS777160 FS777160_5_ORF1 07476288E0DCCAFC PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 6.8e-67 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  3. InterProScan Result: FS866521 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS866521 FS866521_5_ORF1 F7964C6D0CA7810C PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 6.9e-67 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  4. InterProScan Result: FS869388 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS869388 FS869388_6_ORF1 421E151867B64228 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 3.6e-72 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  5. InterProScan Result: FS779838 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS779838 FS779838_6_ORF2 AF3D373C0FC34A31 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 2.8e-49 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: FS746079 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS746079 FS746079_1_ORF1 C1895D30C94EB9A0 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 3.6e-28 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  7. InterProScan Result: FS880240 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS880240 FS880240_2_ORF2 FB8F7E1571A34356 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 1.6e-08 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  8. InterProScan Result: FS789884 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS789884 FS789884_1_ORF2 59FE94464D244E28 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 9.9e-66 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  9. InterProScan Result: FS791387 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS791387 FS791387_1_ORF1 6485601A6C4D4FCC PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 1e-41 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  10. InterProScan Result: FS783140 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS783140 FS783140_4_ORF1 EBF8C4CDC42F9BC4 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 3.7e-101 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  11. InterProScan Result: FS919521 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919521 FS919521_3_ORF2 46059DF0EFFFC154 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 9.5e-23 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  12. InterProScan Result: FS901105 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS901105 FS901105_4_ORF2 B4020BBF781D8F6D PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 1.1e-42 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  13. InterProScan Result: FS871101 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS871101 FS871101_5_ORF1 779E234793E79118 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 1.3e-78 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  14. InterProScan Result: FS930057 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS930057 FS930057_2_ORF2 6BA15F624864DB39 PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 1.1e-36 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  15. InterProScan Result: FS911889 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS911889 FS911889_3_ORF2 BD79BC7DBE2199EA PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 1.2e-34 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  16. InterProScan Result: FS860577 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS860577 FS860577_5_ORF1 EF0A059C3EDA403F PANTHER PTHR11461 SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR, SERP...IN 1.8e-16 T IPR000215 Protease inhibitor I4, serpin Molecular Function: serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity (GO:0004867) ...

  17. InterProScan Result: FS927613 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS927613 FS927613_1_ORF2 69335069D1E4A38A PANTHER PTHR10642 RIBONUCLEASE H1 NA ? IP...R002156 unintegrated Molecular Function: nucleic acid binding (GO:0003676)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease H activity (GO:0004523) ...

  18. InterProScan Result: FS894971 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS894971 FS894971_5_ORF1 9F63219843AE6637 PANTHER PTHR10954 RIBONUCLEASE HII 1.9e-57 T IPR001352 Ribonu...clease HII/HIII Molecular Function: RNA binding (GO:0003723)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease H activity (GO:0004523) ...

  19. InterProScan Result: FS796095 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS796095 FS796095_2_ORF2 BB3A4A8DC2701001 PANTHER PTHR11240:SF1 RIBONUCLEASE T2 4.7...e-61 T IPR018188 unintegrated Molecular Function: RNA binding (GO:0003723)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease T2 activity (GO:0033897) ...

  20. InterProScan Result: FS932411 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932411 FS932411_1_ORF1 F2A896624834EC72 PANTHER PTHR23355:SF10 RIBONUCLEASE II-RE...LATED NA ? IPR001900 unintegrated Molecular Function: RNA binding (GO:0003723)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease activity (GO:0004540) ...

  1. InterProScan Result: FS788260 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS788260 FS788260_4_ORF1 17B5B46B731265F8 PANTHER PTHR22748 AP ENDONUCLEASE 4.9e-30... T IPR004808 Exodeoxyribonuclease III xth Molecular Function: nuclease activity (GO:0004518)|Biological Process: DNA repair (GO:0006281) ...

  2. InterProScan Result: FS747483 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS747483 FS747483_1_ORF1 52A09FA8B62B2000 PANTHER PTHR22748 AP ENDONUCLEASE 2.8e-50... T IPR004808 Exodeoxyribonuclease III xth Molecular Function: nuclease activity (GO:0004518)|Biological Process: DNA repair (GO:0006281) ...

  3. InterProScan Result: FS918167 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS918167 FS918167_2_ORF1 D5AE1121C885716E PANTHER PTHR15314 RIBONUCLEASE P PROTEIN ...SUBUNIT P20 2.5e-30 T IPR014612 unintegrated Molecular Function: ribonuclease P activity (GO:0004526)|Cellul

  4. InterProScan Result: FS927613 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS927613 FS927613_1_ORF2 69335069D1E4A38A PANTHER PTHR10642 RIBONUCLEASE H1 8.9e-10... T IPR002156 unintegrated Molecular Function: nucleic acid binding (GO:0003676)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease H activity (GO:0004523) ...

  5. InterProScan Result: FS932411 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932411 FS932411_1_ORF1 F2A896624834EC72 PANTHER PTHR23355 RIBONUCLEASE 1.1e-101 T... IPR001900 unintegrated Molecular Function: RNA binding (GO:0003723)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease activity (GO:0004540) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: FS904734 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS904734 FS904734_3_ORF2 9DE48FC7A90DF3FE PANTHER PTHR12341 5'->3' EXORIBONUCLEASE ...NA ? IPR004859 unintegrated Molecular Function: nucleic acid binding (GO:0003676)|Molecular Function: exonuclease activity (GO:0004527)|Cellular Component: intracellular (GO:0005622) ...

  7. InterProScan Result: FS793463 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS793463 FS793463_1_ORF2 63CEDD18ECDFEF1E PANTHER PTHR10954 RIBONUCLEASE HII 1.4e-57 T IPR001352 Ribonu...clease HII/HIII Molecular Function: RNA binding (GO:0003723)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease H activity (GO:0004523) ...

  8. InterProScan Result: FS796095 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS796095 FS796095_2_ORF2 BB3A4A8DC2701001 PANTHER PTHR11240 RIBONUCLEASE T2 4.7e-61 T IPR001568 Ribonu...clease T2 Molecular Function: RNA binding (GO:0003723)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease T2 activity (GO:0033897) ...

  9. InterProScan Result: FS932411 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932411 FS932411_1_ORF1 F2A896624834EC72 PANTHER PTHR23355:SF10 RIBONUCLEASE II-RE...LATED 1.1e-101 T IPR001900 unintegrated Molecular Function: RNA binding (GO:0003723)|Molecular Function: ribonuclease activity (GO:0004540) ...

  10. InterProScan Result: FS819204 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS819204 FS819204_6_ORF1 C3A80394C031959B PANTHER PTHR11097 EXOSOME COMPLEX EXONUCL...EASE (RIBOSOMAL RNA PROCESSING PROTEIN) 3.3e-67 T IPR001247 unintegrated Molecular Function: 3'-5'-exoribonu

  11. InterProScan Result: FS835578 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS835578 FS835578_4_ORF2 83C6F013F2E30C10 PANTHER PTHR13031 RIBONUCLEASE P-RELATED ...1.2e-61 T IPR002738 RNase P subunit p30 Molecular Function: ribonuclease activity (GO:0004540)|Biological Process: tRNA processing (GO:0008033) ...

  12. InterProScan Result: FS920569 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS920569 FS920569_3_ORF2 C22EDBD62AA2996F PANTHER PTHR13031 RIBONUCLEASE P-RELATED ...9.8e-59 T IPR002738 RNase P subunit p30 Molecular Function: ribonuclease activity (GO:0004540)|Biological Process: tRNA processing (GO:0008033) ...

  13. InterProScan Result: FS919289 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919289 FS919289_1_ORF2 36E962522134F4A1 PANTHER PTHR10858 DEOXYRIBONUCLEASE II 3....2e-31 T IPR004947 Deoxyribonuclease II Molecular Function: deoxyribonuclease II activity (GO:0004531)|Biological Process: DNA metabolic process (GO:0006259) ...

  14. InterProScan Result: FS900033 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS900033 FS900033_6_ORF2 EF77440746FF9E55 PROFILE PS50175 ASP_PROT_RETROV 8.635 T I...PR001995 Peptidase A2A, retrovirus, catalytic Molecular Function: aspartic-type endopeptidase activity (GO:0004190)|Biological Process: proteolysis (GO:0006508) ...

  15. InterProScan Result: FS783872 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS783872 FS783872_6_ORF1 BA5FE6126355555E PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 3.4e-91 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  16. InterProScan Result: FS869064 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS869064 FS869064_4_ORF1 695CB31F11566E0F PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 7.2e-59 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  17. InterProScan Result: FS789644 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS789644 FS789644_3_ORF1 3FD8C3F3DE2784DF PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 1.9e-36 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  18. InterProScan Result: FS870207 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS870207 FS870207_4_ORF2 FFFFA32CCEEE9C22 PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 2.3e-58 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  19. InterProScan Result: FS846233 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS846233 FS846233_3_ORF1 CA79F4973BC95B3B PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 2.3e-55 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  20. InterProScan Result: FS737409 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS737409 FS737409_6_ORF2 88A57179AEB2D8F4 PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 1.3e-55 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  1. InterProScan Result: FS840651 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS840651 FS840651_1_ORF1 94EF63EA745CA8C6 PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 1.5e-13 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  2. InterProScan Result: FS729413 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS729413 FS729413_1_ORF1 F5F1B912996F097F PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 0.00027 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  3. InterProScan Result: FS858176 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS858176 FS858176_5_ORF1 254F313A614617BC PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 6.7e-33 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  4. InterProScan Result: FS866454 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS866454 FS866454_6_ORF2 DDC025B36B2DDB01 PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 1.4e-54 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  5. InterProScan Result: FS859370 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS859370 FS859370_4_ORF1 7AE8D53E269C5CCA PANTHER PTHR11511 INSECT HEMOCYANIN-RELAT...ED 5.6e-12 T IPR013788 Arthropod hemocyanin/insect LSP Molecular Function: oxygen transporter activity (GO:0005344)|Biological Process: transport (GO:0006810) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: FS740743 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS740743 FS740743_5_ORF1 BD8F541075214777 PROFILE PS51340 MOSC 35.110 T IPR005302 Mol...ybdenum cofactor sulfurase, C-terminal Molecular Function: catalytic activity (GO:0003824)|Molecular Funct...ion: molybdenum ion binding (GO:0030151)|Molecular Function: pyridoxal phosphate binding (GO:0030170) ...

  7. InterProScan Result: FS817458 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS817458 FS817458_1_ORF1 B27ECCF086D27F4E PFAM PF00067 p450 3.1e-28 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  8. InterProScan Result: FS865512 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS865512 FS865512_4_ORF2 5E2A7F9124D73F34 PRINTS PR00385 P450 1.7e-09 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  9. InterProScan Result: FS836461 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS836461 FS836461_6_ORF1 4B253188815CBC36 PRINTS PR00385 P450 2.2e-08 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  10. InterProScan Result: FS858611 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS858611 FS858611_5_ORF1 E15CFA5CC72259B8 PRINTS PR00385 P450 7.7e-06 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  11. InterProScan Result: FS829494 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS829494 FS829494_5_ORF1 A59F385AE3D6656D PRINTS PR00385 P450 3.5e-13 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  12. InterProScan Result: FS828147 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS828147 FS828147_5_ORF1 7B963168B4634A1D PRINTS PR00385 P450 2.3e-13 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  13. InterProScan Result: FS804057 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS804057 FS804057_2_ORF1 F65DFC6DB9EB6E59 PFAM PF00067 p450 1.6e-13 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  14. InterProScan Result: FS828147 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS828147 FS828147_5_ORF1 7B963168B4634A1D PFAM PF00067 p450 1.3e-61 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  15. InterProScan Result: FS793798 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS793798 FS793798_2_ORF2 AF822AAC581E0462 PFAM PF00067 p450 1.8e-29 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  16. InterProScan Result: FS739298 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS739298 FS739298_4_ORF2 E65DEA0712139D30 PFAM PF00067 p450 3.3e-19 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  17. InterProScan Result: FS777434 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS777434 FS777434_4_ORF1 546CBAAA77BF4D8A PRINTS PR00385 P450 3.7e-11 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  18. InterProScan Result: FS760705 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS760705 FS760705_3_ORF2 BCE542E7B7154334 PFAM PF00067 p450 6.5e-36 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  19. InterProScan Result: FS733119 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS733119 FS733119_3_ORF1 FBEF91F3CDA644D7 PRINTS PR00385 P450 1.7e-13 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  20. InterProScan Result: FS783911 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS783911 FS783911_6_ORF1 F4FB77A4630C2DCB PRINTS PR00385 P450 8.8e-13 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  1. InterProScan Result: FS807624 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS807624 FS807624_3_ORF2 727CB335F709D390 PFAM PF00067 p450 3.4e-19 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  2. InterProScan Result: FS895048 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS895048 FS895048_5_ORF1 A78EA11E5E964520 PRINTS PR00385 P450 4.5e-10 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  3. InterProScan Result: FS932674 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS932674 FS932674_3_ORF2 C43825172FE72B67 PFAM PF00067 p450 0.00014 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  4. InterProScan Result: FS874329 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS874329 FS874329_4_ORF1 93DDB3924654C140 PFAM PF00067 p450 3.6e-36 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  5. InterProScan Result: FS764425 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS764425 FS764425_1_ORF2 38B2ED93758BCB7B PFAM PF00067 p450 4.2e-24 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: FS784665 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS784665 FS784665_4_ORF1 7E959D55ADFEC376 PRINTS PR00385 P450 5.5e-11 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular... Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular... Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  7. InterProScan Result: FS791471 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS791471 FS791471_2_ORF2 574DC839FAAC7A65 SUPERFAMILY SSF82282 Homocysteine S-methy...ltransferase 1.7e-67 T IPR003726 Homocysteine S-methyltransferase Molecular Function: homocysteine S-methyltransferase activity (GO:0008898) ...

  8. InterProScan Result: FS742354 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS742354 FS742354_4_ORF1 F2DA74A8CC5DF5A1 SUPERFAMILY SSF82282 Homocysteine S-methy...ltransferase 1.3e-44 T IPR003726 Homocysteine S-methyltransferase Molecular Function: homocysteine S-methyltransferase activity (GO:0008898) ...

  9. InterProScan Result: FS919781 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919781 FS919781_2_ORF2 11D6928E8BA64F8F SUPERFAMILY SSF55194 Ribosome recycling f...actor, RRF 5.5e-35 T IPR002661 Ribosome recycling factor Biological Process: translation (GO:0006412) ...

  10. InterProScan Result: FS787904 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS787904 FS787904_5_ORF1 F46B8A7F4DCFA20B SUPERFAMILY SSF55194 Ribosome recycling f...actor, RRF 4.1e-24 T IPR002661 Ribosome recycling factor Biological Process: translation (GO:0006412) ...

  11. InterProScan Result: FS874648 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS874648 FS874648_2_ORF1 2CED241FB157BFCC PRINTS PR00309 ARRESTIN 7.8e-13 T IPR000698 Arrestin Biolog...ical Process: signal transduction (GO:0007165)|Biological Process: sensory perception (GO:0007600) ...

  12. InterProScan Result: FS911973 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS911973 FS911973_2_ORF3 FBDFC7C1F8C27366 PANTHER PTHR11792 ARRESTIN 6.3e-12 T IPR000698 Arrestin Biolog...ical Process: signal transduction (GO:0007165)|Biological Process: sensory perception (GO:0007600) ...

  13. InterProScan Result: FS911973 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS911973 FS911973_1_ORF2 2E2F43F4558B5288 PANTHER PTHR11792 ARRESTIN 2.6e-53 T IPR000698 Arrestin Biolog...ical Process: signal transduction (GO:0007165)|Biological Process: sensory perception (GO:0007600) ...

  14. InterProScan Result: FS874648 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS874648 FS874648_2_ORF1 2CED241FB157BFCC PANTHER PTHR11792 ARRESTIN 1.9e-55 T IPR000698 Arrestin Biolog...ical Process: signal transduction (GO:0007165)|Biological Process: sensory perception (GO:0007600) ...

  15. InterProScan Result: FS911973 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS911973 FS911973_1_ORF2 2E2F43F4558B5288 PRINTS PR00309 ARRESTIN 4.7e-22 T IPR000698 Arrestin Biolog...ical Process: signal transduction (GO:0007165)|Biological Process: sensory perception (GO:0007600) ...

  16. The Core Flight System (cFS) Community: Providing Low Cost Solutions for Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David; Wilmot, Jonathan; Cudmore, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In February 2015 the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) completed the open source release of the entire Core Flight Software (cFS) suite. After the open source release a multi-NASA center Configuration Control Board (CCB) was established that has managed multiple cFS product releases. The cFS was developed and is being maintained in compliance with the NASA Class B software development process requirements and the open source release includes all Class B artifacts. The cFS is currently running on three operational science spacecraft and is being used on multiple spacecraft and instrument development efforts. While the cFS itself is a viable flight software (FSW) solution, we have discovered that the cFS community is a continuous source of innovation and growth that provides products and tools that serve the entire FSW lifecycle and future mission needs. This paper summarizes the current state of the cFS community, the key FSW technologies being pursued, the development/verification tools and opportunities for the small satellite community to become engaged. The cFS is a proven high quality and cost-effective solution for small satellites with constrained budgets.

  17. InterProScan Result: FS919034 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS919034 FS919034_1_ORF2 B43350CE3EBAB928 SUPERFAMILY SSF48019 DNA polymerase III clamp... loader subunits, C-terminal domain 1.8e-11 T IPR008921 DNA polymerase III, clamp loader complex, gamma/

  18. InterProScan Result: FS774901 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS774901 FS774901_4_ORF1 CD4791BEB6887DF0 SUPERFAMILY SSF48019 DNA polymerase III clamp... loader subunits, C-terminal domain 8.2e-22 T IPR008921 DNA polymerase III, clamp loader complex, gamma/

  19. InterProScan Result: FS783624 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS783624 FS783624_4_ORF1 488137DC17526E45 SUPERFAMILY SSF48019 DNA polymerase III clamp... loader subunits, C-terminal domain 6.4e-13 T IPR008921 DNA polymerase III, clamp loader complex, gamma/

  20. InterProScan Result: FS907382 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS907382 FS907382_1_ORF2 1C0441A9D0DDEE80 SUPERFAMILY SSF47798 Barrier-to-autointegration... factor, BAF 1.3e-44 T IPR004122 Barrier- to-autointegration factor, BAF Molecular Function: DNA binding (GO:0003677) ...

  1. InterProScan Result: FS735919 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS735919 FS735919_4_ORF2 1C0441A9D0DDEE80 SUPERFAMILY SSF47798 Barrier-to-autointegration... factor, BAF 1.3e-44 T IPR004122 Barrier- to-autointegration factor, BAF Molecular Function: DNA binding (GO:0003677) ...

  2. Comparison of monolithic silica and polymethacrylate capillary columns for LC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, D.; Jandera, P.; Urban, J.; Planeta, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 27, 10-11 (2004), s. 789-800 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0023 Keywords : monolithic column s * capillary HPLC * column testing Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.927, year: 2004

  3. Characterization of polymer monolithic stationary phases for capillary HPLC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, D.; Jandera, P.; Urban, J.; Planeta, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 11 (2003), s. 1005-1016 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919; CEZ:MSM 253100002 Keywords : monolithic column s * capillary HPLC * column testing Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.108, year: 2003

  4. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the vertex detector elements and thus existing CCDs are not adequate. New CCD architectures are ... sizes of the 292 detector elements (chips) are summarized in tables 1 and 2. The baseline time structure of ... an R&D contract, we developed a conceptual design for a monolithic CMOS device. (chip) that achieves the ILC ...

  5. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of Sciences. Home · About ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 69; Issue 6. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear ... Keywords. Vertex detector; international linear collider; linear collider; high energy physics.

  6. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J.A.; Metaxas, M.G.; Royle, G.J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J.M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end

  7. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Monolithically-Integrated μGC Chemical Sensor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Copic

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography (GC is used for organic and inorganic gas detection with a range of applications including screening for chemical warfare agents (CWA, breath analysis for diagnostics or law enforcement purposes, and air pollutants/indoor air quality monitoring of homes and commercial buildings. A field-portable, light weight, low power, rapid response, micro-gas chromatography (μGC system is essential for such applications. We describe the design, fabrication and packaging of mGC on monolithically-integrated Si dies, comprised of a preconcentrator (PC, μGC column, detector and coatings for each of these components. An important feature of our system is that the same mechanical micro resonator design is used for the PC and detector. We demonstrate system performance by detecting four different CWA simulants within 2 min. We present theoretical analyses for cost/power comparisons of monolithic versus hybrid μGC systems. We discuss thermal isolation in monolithic systems to improve overall performance. Our monolithically-integrated μGC, relative to its hybrid cousin, will afford equal or slightly lower cost, a footprint that is 1/2 to 1/3 the size and an improved resolution of 4 to 25%.

  9. A monolithically-integrated μGC chemical sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P; Bauer, Joseph M; Moorman, Matthew W; Sanchez, Lawrence J; Anderson, John M; Whiting, Joshua J; Porter, Daniel A; Copic, Davor; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2011-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is used for organic and inorganic gas detection with a range of applications including screening for chemical warfare agents (CWA), breath analysis for diagnostics or law enforcement purposes, and air pollutants/indoor air quality monitoring of homes and commercial buildings. A field-portable, light weight, low power, rapid response, micro-gas chromatography (μGC) system is essential for such applications. We describe the design, fabrication and packaging of μGC on monolithically-integrated Si dies, comprised of a preconcentrator (PC), μGC column, detector and coatings for each of these components. An important feature of our system is that the same mechanical micro resonator design is used for the PC and detector. We demonstrate system performance by detecting four different CWA simulants within 2 min. We present theoretical analyses for cost/power comparisons of monolithic versus hybrid μGC systems. We discuss thermal isolation in monolithic systems to improve overall performance. Our monolithically-integrated μGC, relative to its hybrid cousin, will afford equal or slightly lower cost, a footprint that is 1/2 to 1/3 the size and an improved resolution of 4 to 25%.

  10. Status of the Monolithic Suspensions for Advanced Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travasso, F.; Virgo Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    Successfully implemented in GEO and Virgo+, the monolithic suspensions are one of the most important upgrades in the second generation of gravitational wave interferometric detectors, including Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Advanced Virgo (AdV). Characterized by a very low thermal noise, monolithic suspensions are essential for improving the interferometers sensitivity at low frequencies (10-100Hz). In Advanced Virgo their installation was delayed because of a contamination problem in the vacuum system: dust produced by scroll pumps was injected in the main vacuum chambers during the venting processes, damaging the fibers and ultimately causing their repeated failure. The effort to explain and resolve this issue was useful to further confirm the suspensions’ reliability and our control on the production process. Moreover, we developed and implemented new tools and procedures to certify each part of the monolithic suspensions. In the meanwhile, in order to join aLIGO during its second Observation Run (O2), a temporary steel suspension was implemented, based on the initial Virgo design. That solution allowed us to contribute to the first three-detector observation of a gravitational wave (GW) ([1]), and to the first observation of a coalescing neutron star binary ([2]) In the near future the monolithic suspensions will be reinstalled along with additional upgrades of Virgo.

  11. Methacrylate monolithic capillary columns for gradient peptide separations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruim, P.; Öhman, M.; Huo, Y.; Schoenmakers, P.J.; Kok, W.Th.

    2008-01-01

    For the separation of peptides with gradient-elution liquid chromatography a poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (BMA) monolithic capillary column was prepared and tested. The conditional peak capacity was used as a metric for the performance of this column, which was compared with a

  12. High density fuels using dispersion and monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br, E-mail: alfredo@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: rafael.orm@gmail.com, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Naval e Oceânica

    2017-07-01

    Fuel plates used in high-performance research reactors need to be converted to low-enrichment uranium fuel; the fuel option based on a monolithic formulation requires alloys to contain 6 - 10 wt% Mo. In this case, the fuel plates are composed of the metallic alloy U-10Mo surrounded by a thin zirconium layer encapsulated in aluminum cladding. This study reviewed the physical properties of monolithic forms. The constraints produced during the manufacturing process were analyzed and compared to those of dispersed fuel. The bonding process used for dispersion fuels differs from the techniques applied to foil bonding used for pure alloys. The quality of monolithic plates depends on the fabrication method, which usually involves hot isostatic pressing and the thermal annealing effect of residual stress, which degrades the uranium cubic phase. The preservation of the metastable phase has considerable influence on fuel performance. The physical properties of the foil fuel under irradiation are superior to those of aluminum-dispersed fuels. The fuel meat, using zirconium as the diffusion barrier, prevents the interaction layer from becoming excessively thick. The problem with dispersed fuel is breakaway swelling with a medium fission rate. It has been observed that the fuel dispersed in aluminum was minimized in monolithic forms. The pure alloys exhibited a suitable response from a rate at least twice as much as the fission rate of dispersions. The foils can support fissile material concentration combined with a reduced swelling rate. (author)

  13. A Monolithic Perovskite Structure for Use as a Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Clemens, Frank; Menon, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    and the influence of the sintering on the adiabatic temperature change, were investigated. Comparisons between the extruded monolithic structure before and after the sintering showed that an increase of the adiabatic temperature change was seen after the sintering. Furthermore, calculations show...

  14. A radiation hard bipolar monolithic front-end readout

    CERN Document Server

    Baschirotto, A; Cappelluti, I; Castello, R; Cermesoni, M; Gola, A; Pessina, G; Pistolesi, E; Rancoita, P G; Seidman, A

    1999-01-01

    A fast bipolar monolithic charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP), implemented in the monolithic 2 mu m BiCMOS technology (called HF2CMOS) was designed and built in a quad monolithic chip. Studies of radiation effects in the CSP $9 performance, from non-irradiated and up to neutron irradiation of 5.3*10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2/, have confirmed that the use of bipolar npn transistors is suitable for the radiation level of the future LHC collider environment. The CSP $9 presents a new circuit solution for obtaining adequate slew rate performances which results in an integral linearity better than 0.8554330n 5 V at 20 ns of shaping time, regardless of the bias current selected for the CSP. This way $9 the bias current of the CSP can be set for optimizing the power dissipation with respect to series and parallel noise, especially useful when the CSP is put in a radiation environment. A prototype test with a novel monolithic 20 ns $9 time constant RC-CR shaper, capable to sum up four inputs has been also realized, featurin...

  15. Monolithic natural gas storage delivery system based on sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2016-09-27

    The invention provides methods for producing a strong, light, sorbent-based storage/dispenser system for gases and fuels. The system comprises a porous monolithic material with an adherent strong impervious skin that is capable of storing a gas under pressure in a safe and usable manner.

  16. Study of monolithic prestressed reinforced concrete overhead road.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.I. Kovalchyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of inspection and testing of monolithic prestressed reinforced concrete road trestle built in Kyiv are considered. The analysis of the gained results has shown that parametres correspond to the requirements of current standards on design of bridges.

  17. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the vertex detector elements and thus existing CCDs are not adequate. New CCD architectures are under development [2] but have yet to achieve the required perfor- mance. For these reasons there is an increased importance on the development of monolithic CMOS pixel detectors that allow extremely fast non-sequential ...

  18. Dopamine-imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşır, Süleyman; Sarı, Duygu; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yılmaz, Fatma; Şarkaya, Koray; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    A dopamine-imprinted monolithic column was prepared and used in capillary electrochromatography as stationary phase for the first time. Dopamine was selectively separated from aqueous solution containing the competitor molecule norepinephrine, which is similar in size and shape to the template molecule. Morphology of the dopamine-imprinted column was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the organic solvent content of mobile phase, applied pressure and pH of the mobile phase on the recognition of dopamine by the imprinted monolithic column has been evaluated, and the imprinting effect in the dopamine-imprinted monolithic polymer was verified. Developed dopamine-imprinted monolithic column resulted in excellent separation of dopamine from structurally related competitor molecule, norepinephrine. Separation was achieved in a short period of 10 min, with the electrophoretic mobility of 5.81 × 10 -5  m 2 V -1 s -1 at pH 5.0 and 500 mbar pressure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Monolithic and Small Particle Column Materials for Application in Proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbrand, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the influence of the capillary liquid chromatography separation on the identification of protein digests is studied. In the first part the chromatographic parameters for silica monolithic columns are optimized to obtain a high throughput or a high separation performance. in the second

  20. Environmentally Benign Production of Stretchable and Robust Superhydrophobic Silicone Monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexander; Surdo, Salvatore; Caputo, Gianvito; Bayer, Ilker S; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2018-01-24

    Superhydrophobic materials hold an enormous potential in sectors as important as aerospace, food industries, or biomedicine. Despite this great promise, the lack of environmentally friendly production methods and limited robustness remain the two most pertinent barriers to the scalability, large-area production, and widespread use of superhydrophobic materials. In this work, highly robust superhydrophobic silicone monoliths are produced through a scalable and environmentally friendly emulsion technique. It is first found that stable and surfactantless water-in-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) emulsions can be formed through mechanical mixing. Increasing the internal phase fraction of the precursor emulsion is found to increase porosity and microtexture of the final monoliths, rendering them superhydrophobic. Silica nanoparticles can also be dispersed in the aqueous internal phase to create micro/nanotextured monoliths, giving further improvements in superhydrophobicity. Due to the elastomeric nature of PDMS, superhydrophobicity can be maintained even while the material is mechanically strained or compressed. In addition, because of their self-similarity, the monoliths show outstanding robustness to knife-scratch, tape-peel, and finger-wipe tests, as well as rigorous sandpaper abrasion. Superhydrophobicity was also unchanged when exposed to adverse environmental conditions including corrosive solutions, UV light, extreme temperatures, and high-energy droplet impact. Finally, important properties for eventual adoption in real-world applications including self-cleaning, stain-repellence, and blood-repellence are demonstrated.

  1. Mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for low frequency seismic noise measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, Fausto; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; De Rosa, Rosario; Barone, Fabrizio

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric discharge machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation makes it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result is the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument of 70 mHz with a Q=140 in air without thermal stabilization. This result demonstrates the feasibility of a monolithic folded pendulum sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of millihertz with a more refined mechanical tuning.

  2. Single d-metal atoms on F(s) and F(s+) defects of MgO(001): a theoretical study across the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyman, Konstantin M; Inntam, Chan; Matveev, Alexei V; Nasluzov, Vladimir A; Rösch, Notker

    2005-08-24

    Single d-metal atoms on oxygen defects F(s) and F(s+) of the MgO(001) surface were studied theoretically. We employed an accurate density functional method combined with cluster models, embedded in an elastic polarizable environment, and we applied two gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals. In this way, we quantified how 17 metal atoms from groups 6-11 of the periodic table (Cu, Ag, Au; Ni, Pd, Pt; Co, Rh, Ir; Fe, Ru, Os; Mn, Re; and Cr, Mo, W) interact with terrace sites of MgO. We found bonding with F(s) and F(s+) defects to be in general stronger than that with O2- sites, except for Mn-, Re-, and Fe/F(s) complexes. In M/F(s) systems, electron density is accumulated on the metal center in a notable fashion. The binding energy on both kinds of O defects increases from 3d- to 4d- to 5d-atoms of a given group, at variance with the binding energy trend established earlier for the M/O2- complexes, 4d period, group 7 atoms are slightly destabilized compared to their group 6 congeners in both the F(s) and F(s+) complexes; for later transition elements, the binding energy increases gradually up to group 10 and finally decreases again in group 11, most strongly on the F(s) site. This trend is governed by the negative charge on the adsorbed atoms. We discuss implications for an experimental detection of metal atoms on oxide supports based on computed core-level energies.

  3. Fs-laser processing of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, P.A., E-mail: paatanas@ie.bas.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsaridradsko shose Blvd., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Stankova, N.E.; Nedyalkov, N.N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsaridradsko shose Blvd., Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Fukata, N. [International Centre for Materials for NanoArchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification (IOM), Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Amoruso, S.; Wang, X. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II and CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S.Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Kolev, K.N.; Valova, E.I.; Georgieva, J.S.; Armyanov, St.A. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Fs-laser (263, 527 and 1055 nm) processing of PDMS-elastomer is studied. • High quality trenches are produced on the PDMS surface. • The trenches are analyzed by Laser Microscope and by μ-Raman spectrometry. • Selective Ni metallization of the trenches is accomplished via electro-less plating. • The metalized trenches are studied by SEM. - Abstract: Medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer is a biomaterial widely used in medicine and high-tech devices, e.g. MEMS and NEMS. In this work, we report an experimental investigation on femtosecond laser processing of PDMS-elastomer with near infrared (NIR), visible (VIS) and ultraviolet (UV) pulses. High definition trenches are produced by varying processing parameters as laser wavelength, pulse duration, fluence, scanning speed and overlap of the subsequent pulses. The sample surface morphology and chemical composition are investigated by Laser Microscopy, SEM and Raman spectroscopy, addressing the effects of the various processing parameters through comparison with the native materials characteristics. For all the laser pulse wavelengths used, the produced tracks are successfully metalized with Ni via electro-less plating method. We observe a negligible influence of the time interval elapsed between laser treatment and metallization process. Our experimental findings suggest promising perspectives of femtosecond laser pulses in micro- and nano-fabrication of hi-tech PDMS devices.

  4. Pressure Monitoring Using Hybrid fs/ps Rotational CARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Sean P.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of gas-phase pressure measurements at kHz-rates using fs/ps rotational CARS. Femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses impulsively prepare a rotational Raman coherence, which is then probed by a high-energy 6-ps pulse introduced at a time delay from the Raman preparation. Rotational CARS spectra were recorded in N2 contained in a room-temperature gas cell for pressures from 0.1 to 3 atm and probe delays ranging from 10-330 ps. Using published self-broadened collisional linewidth data for N2, both the spectrally integrated coherence decay rate and the spectrally resolved decay were investigated as means for detecting pressure. Shot-averaged and single-laser-shot spectra were interrogated for pressure and the accuracy and precision as a function of probe delay and cell pressure are discussed. Single-shot measurement accuracies were within 0.1 to 6.5% when compared to a transducer values, while the precision was generally between 1% and 6% of measured pressure for probe delays of 200 ps or more, and better than 2% as the delay approached 300 ps. A byproduct of the pressure measurement is an independent but simultaneous measurement of the gas temperature.

  5. Comparative Genome Analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 Reveals Its High Antagonistic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengpeng; Kwok, Amy H. Y.; Jiang, Jingwei; Ran, Tingting; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu; Leung, Frederick C.

    2015-01-01

    S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens. PMID:25856195

  6. Comparative genome analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 reveals its high antagonistic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengpeng; Kwok, Amy H Y; Jiang, Jingwei; Ran, Tingting; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu; Leung, Frederick C

    2015-01-01

    S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens.

  7. Comparative genome analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 reveals its high antagonistic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Li

    Full Text Available S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens.

  8. Monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talley, W.K.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies into monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies have been undertaken as a collaborative project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. The work involves the design and fabrication of monolithic frequency multiplier, beam control, and imaging arrays for millimeter-wave imaging and radar, as well as the development of high speed nonlinear transmission lines for ultra-wideband radar imaging, time domain materials characterization and magnetic fusion plasma applications. In addition, the Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group is involved in the fabrication of a state-of-the-art X-band (∼8-11 GHz) RF photoinjector source aimed at producing psec high brightness electron bunches for advanced accelerator and coherent radiation generation studies

  9. Hydrogenation with monolith reactor under conditions of immiscible liquid phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved for the hydrogenation of an immiscible mixture of an organic reactant in water. The immiscible mixture can result from the generation of water by the hydrogenation reaction itself or, by the addition of, water to the reactant prior to contact with the catalyst. The improvement resides in effecting the hydrogenation reaction in a monolith catalytic reactor from 100 to 800 cpi, at a superficial velocity of from 0.1 to 2 m/second in the absence of a cosolvent for the immiscible mixture. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrogenation is carried out using a monolith support which has a polymer network/carbon coating onto which a transition metal is deposited.

  10. Monolithic integration of a plasmonic sensor with CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Abdul; Cheah, Boon C.; Hao, Danni; Al-Rawhani, Mohammed; Nagy, Bence; Grant, James; Dale, Carl; Keegan, Neil; McNeil, Calum; Cumming, David R. S.

    2017-02-01

    Monolithic integration of nanophotonic sensors with CMOS detectors can transform the laboratory based nanophotonic sensors into practical devices with a range of applications in everyday life. In this work, by monolithically integrating an array of gold nanodiscs with the CMOS photodiode we have developed a compact and miniaturized nanophotonic sensor system having direct electrical read out. Doing so eliminates the need of expensive and bulky laboratory based optical spectrum analyzers used currently for measurements of nanophotonic sensor chips. The experimental optical sensitivity of the gold nanodiscs is measured to be 275 nm/RIU which translates to an electrical sensitivity of 5.4 V/RIU. This integration of nanophotonic sensors with the CMOS electronics has the potential to revolutionize personalized medical diagnostics similar to the way in which the CMOS technology has revolutionized the electronics industry.

  11. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  12. Coherent optical monolithic phased-array antenna steering system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    An optical-based RF beam steering system for phased-array antennas comprising a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The system is based on optical heterodyning employed to produce microwave phase shifting by a monolithic PIC constructed entirely of passive components. Microwave power and control signal distribution to the antenna is accomplished by optical fiber, permitting physical separation of the PIC and its control functions from the antenna. The system reduces size, weight, complexity, and cost of phased-array antenna systems.

  13. Monolithic AlGaAs second-harmonic nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gili, V F; Carletti, L; Locatelli, A; Rocco, D; Finazzi, M; Ghirardini, L; Favero, I; Gomez, C; Lemaître, A; Celebrano, M; De Angelis, C; Leo, G

    2016-07-11

    We demonstrate monolithic aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) optical nanoantennas. Using a selective oxidation technique, we fabricated epitaxial semiconductor nanocylinders on an aluminum oxide substrate. Second harmonic generation from AlGaAs nanocylinders of 400 nm height and varying radius pumped with femtosecond pulses delivered at 1554-nm wavelength has been measured, revealing a peak conversion efficiency exceeding 10-5 for nanocylinders with an optimized geometry.

  14. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An Energy Preserving Monolithic Eulerian Fluid-Structure Numerical Scheme *

    OpenAIRE

    Pironneau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The conservation laws of continuum mechanic written in an Eulerian frame make no difference between fluids and solids except in the expression of the stress tensors, usually with Newton's hypothesis for the fluids and Helmholtz potentials of energy for hyperelastic solids. By taking the velocities as unknown , monolithic methods for fluid structure interactions (FSI) are built. In this article such a formulation is analyzed when the fluid is compressible and the fluid is incompressible. The i...

  16. An Energy stable Monolithic Eulerian Fluid-Structure Numerical Scheme *

    OpenAIRE

    Pironneau , Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The conservation laws of continuum mechanic written in an Eulerian frame make no difference between fluids and solids except in the expression of the stress tensors, usually with Newton's hypothesis for the fluids and Helmholtz potentials of energy for hyperelastic solids. By taking the velocities as unknown , monolithic methods for fluid structure interactions (FSI) are built. In this article such a formulation is analyzed when the fluid is compressible and the fluid is incompressible. The i...

  17. Fabrication and characterization of nanotemplated carbon monolithic material

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xiaoyun; Nesterenko, Ekaterina; Nesterenko, Pavel; Brabazon, Dermot; Zhou, Lin; Glennon, Jeremy D.; Luong, John H.T.; Paull, Brett

    2013-01-01

    A novel hierarchical nanotemplated carbon monolithic rod (NTCM) was prepared using a novel facile nanotemplating approach. The NTCM was obtained using C60-fullerene modified silica gels as hard templates, which were embedded in a phenolic resin containing a metal catalyst for localized graphitization, followed by bulk carbonization, and template and catalyst removal. TEM, SEM, and BET measurements revealed that NTCM possessed an integrated open hierarchical porous structure, with a trimodal p...

  18. Porous polyacrylamide monoliths in hydrophilic interaction capillary electrochromatography of oligosaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guryča, Vilém; Mechref, Y.; Palm, A. K.; Michálek, Jiří; Pacáková, V.; Novotny, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2007), s. 3-13 ISSN 0165-022X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Grant - others:U.S. Department of Health and Human Services(US) GM24349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyacrylamide monoliths * analytical glycobiology * capillary electrochromatography Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.338, year: 2007

  19. Nanoparticle-modified monolithic pipette tips for phosphopeptide enrichment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenková, Jana; Foret, František

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 405, č. 7 (2013), s. 2175-2183 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055 Grant - others:Jihomoravský kraj(CZ) 2SGA2721 Program:2SGA Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : nanoparticles * monolith * phosphopeptide Enrichment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.578, year: 2013

  20. Distributed or Monolithic? A Computational Architecture Decision Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Mosleh, Mohsen; Dalili, Kia; Heydari, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Distributed architectures have become ubiquitous in many complex technical and socio-technical systems because of their role in improving uncertainty management, accommodating multiple stakeholders, and increasing scalability and evolvability. This departure from monolithic architectures provides a system with more flexibility and robustness in response to uncertainties that it may confront during its lifetime. Distributed architecture does not provide benefits only, as it can increase cost a...

  1. Short monolithic columns for purification and fractionation of peptide samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, Dana; Kahle, Vladislav; Řehulková, Helena; Chmelík, Jan; Řehulka, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1216, č. 17 (2009), s. 3629-3636 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06023; GA MŠk 1M06030; GA ČR GA203/06/1179; GA AV ČR IAAX00310701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : proteomics * monolithic capillary columns * sample pre-treatment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.101, year: 2009

  2. Monolithic GaAs surface acoustic wave chemical microsensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HIETALA,VINCENT M.; CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; HELLER,EDWIN J.; WENDT,JOEL R.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-03-09

    A four-channel surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensor array with associated RF electronics is monolithically integrated onto one GaAs IC. The sensor operates at 690 MHz from an on-chip SAW based oscillator and provides simple DC voltage outputs by using integrated phase detectors. This sensor array represents a significant advance in microsensor technology offering miniaturization, increased chemical selectivity, simplified system assembly, improved sensitivity, and inherent temperature compensation.

  3. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lanigan, David C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    This revision to the original report adds two longer term leach sets of data to the report and provides more discussion and graphics on how to interpret the results from long-term laboratory leach tests. The leach tests were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of zirconia-coated silica monolith for capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z-G; Feng, Y-Q; Xu, L; Zhang, M; Da, S-L

    2004-06-17

    Silica monoliths were fabricated inside fused-silica capillaries. Then the monolithic columns were coated with membrane-like zirconia. The zirconia-coated silica monoliths exhibited different EOF behavior comparing with that of bare silica monoliths. The magnitude and direction could be manipulated by changing the running buffers. Due to the amphoteric characteristic of zirconia, the silica monoliths with zirconia surface facilitate the separation of basic compounds. Aromatic amines and alkaloids were separated without obvious peak tailing. The zirconia surface was easily modified with octadecylphosphonic acid for the separation of neutral compounds. Column efficiency as high as 90,000 and 80,000m(-1) was obtained for beberine and naphthalene, respectively. Furthermore, the zirconia coating increased the stability of the monolithic columns. Even after being exposed to severe condition, there was no apparently efficiency decrease for the test samples.

  5. Cholesterol-imprinted macroporous monoliths: Preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Mariia А; Kinziabulatova, Lilia R; Nikitina, Anna A; Korzhikova-Vlakh, Evgenia G; Tennikova, Tatiana B

    2017-11-01

    The development of sorbents for selective binding of cholesterol, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has a great importance for analytical science and medicine. In this work, two series of macroporous cholesterol-imprinted monolithic sorbents differing in the composition of functional monomers (methacrylic acid, butyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate), amount of a template (4, 6 and 8 mol%) used for molecular imprinting, as well as mean pore size were synthesized by in situ free-radical process in stainless steel housing of 50 mm × 4.6 mm i.d. All prepared materials were characterized regarding to their hydrodynamic permeability and porous properties, as well as examined by BET and SEM methods. Imprinting factors, apparent dynamic dissociation constants, the maximum binding capacity, the number of theoretical plates and the height equivalent to a theoretical palate of MIP monoliths at different mobile phase flow rates were determined. The separation of a mixture of structural analogues, namely, cholesterol and prednisolone, was demonstrated. Additionally, the possibility of using the developed monoliths for cholesterol solid-phase extraction from simulated biological solution was shown. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Monolithic pixels on moderate resistivity substrate and sparsifying readout architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubilato, P.; Battaglia, M.; Bisello, D.; Caselle, M.; Chalmet, P.; Demaria, L.; Ikemoto, Y.; Kloukinas, K.; Mansuy, S.C.; Mattiazzo, S.; Marchioro, A.; Mugnier, H.; Pantano, D.; Potenza, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rousset, J.; Silvestrin, L.; Snoeys, W.

    2013-01-01

    The LePix projects aim realizing a new generation monolithic pixel detectors with improved performances at lesser cost with respect to both current state of the art monolithic and hybrid pixel sensors. The detector is built in a 90 nm CMOS process on a substrate of moderate resistivity. This allows charge collection by drift while maintaining the other advantages usually offered by MAPS, like having a single piece detector and using a standard CMOS production line. The collection by drift mechanism, coupled to the low capacitance design of the collecting node made possible by the monolithic approach, provides an excellent signal to noise ratio straight at the pixel cell together with a radiation tolerance far superior to conventional un-depleted MAPS. The excellent signal-to-noise performance is demonstrated by the device ability to separate the 6 keV 55 Fe double peak at room temperature. To achieve high granularity (10–20 µm pitch pixels) over large detector areas maintaining high readout speed, a completely new compressing architecture has been devised. This architecture departs from the mainstream hybrid pixel sparsification approach, which uses in-pixel logic to reduce data, by using topological compression to minimize pixel area and power consumption

  7. Monolithic pixels on moderate resistivity substrate and sparsifying readout architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Giubilato, P; Snoeys, W; Bisello, D; Marchioro, A; Battaglia, M; Demaria, L; Mansuy, S C; Pantano, D; Rousset, J; Mattiazzo, S; Kloukinas, K; Potenza, A; Ikemoto, Y; Rivetti, A; Chalmet, P; Mugnier, H; Silvestrin, L

    2013-01-01

    The LePix projects aim realizing a new generation monolithic pixel detectors with improved performances at lesser cost with respect to both current state of the art monolithic and hybrid pixel sensors. The detector is built in a 90 nm CMOS process on a substrate of moderate resistivity. This allows charge collection by drift while maintaining the other advantages usually offered by MAPS, like having a single piece detector and using a standard CMOS production line. The collection by drift mechanism, coupled to the low capacitance design of the collecting node made possible by the monolithic approach, provides an excellent signal to noise ratio straight at the pixel cell together with a radiation tolerance far superior to conventional un-depleted MAPS. The excellent signal-to-noise performance is demonstrated by the device ability to separate the 6 keV Fe-55 double peak at room temperature. To achieve high granularity (10-20 mu m pitch pixels) over large detector areas maintaining high readout speed, a complet...

  8. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  9. A Ferrite LTCC-Based Monolithic SIW Phased Antenna Array

    KAUST Repository

    Nafe, Ahmed

    2016-11-17

    In this work, we present a novel configuration for realizing monolithic SIW-based phased antenna arrays using Ferrite LTCC technology. Unlike the current common schemes for realizing SIW phased arrays that rely on surface-mount component (p-i-n diodes, etc) for controlling the phase of the individual antenna elements, here the phase is tuned by biasing of the ferrite filling of the SIW. This approach eliminates the need for mounting of any additional RF components and enables seamless monolithic integration of phase shifters and antennas in SIW technology. As a proof of concept, a two-element slotted SIW-based phased array is designed, fabricated and measured. The prototype exhibits a gain of 4.9 dBi at 13.2 GHz and a maximum E-plane beam-scanning of 28 degrees using external windings for biasing the phase shifters. Moreover, the array can achieve a maximum beam-scanning of 19 degrees when biased with small windings that are embedded in the package. This demonstration marks the first time a fully monolithic SIW-based phased array is realized in Ferrite LTCC technology and paves the way for future larger-size implementations.

  10. SeaWiFS_L3m_CU_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSP_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. Field Support System (FS-AID) and Working Capital Fund Tracking System (WCF-TS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Field Support System (FS-AID) and Working Capital Fund Tracking System (WCF-TS) are two modules of a single data management system that share common tables and...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSU_RRS_angstrom_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSU_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_LAND_NDVI_4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. Towards the validation of SeaWiFS in Southern African Waters: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emission matrices, performed on filtered seawater samples. Modelled bio-optical data, using conditions typical of high biomass marine environments, are then used to assess the performance of a proposed SeaWiFS combined algorithm with ...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3m_YR_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCAU_LAND_NDVI_4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_LAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3m_DAY_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNWI_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_RRS_angstrom_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3m_8D_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_PAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3m_8D_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_PIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3m_CU_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCWI_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSU_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_R32_RRS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. System design specification Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System (FS), and Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The system design specification for ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) is presented. The requirements for both a BIPS conceptual Flight System (FS) and a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) are defined

  7. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  8. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  10. SeaWiFS_L3m_CU_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSU_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSU_CHL_chlor_a_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_KD490_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3m_8D_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3m_MO_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3m_WC_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3m_DAY_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  1. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCAU_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  2. SeaWiFS_L3b_SNSU_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  3. SeaWiFS_L3b_MO_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  4. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  5. SeaWiFS_L3b_MC_KD490

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  6. SeaWiFS_L3b_8D_POC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  7. Time-resolved ARPES with sub-15 fs temporal and near Fourier-limited spectral resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, G; Hendel, A; Stange, A; Hanff, K; Oloff, L-P; Yang, L X; Rossnagel, K; Bauer, M

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with sub-15 fs temporal resolution is presented. A hollow-fiber compressor is used for the generation of 6.5 fs white light pump pulses, and a high-harmonic-generation source delivers 11 fs probe pulses at a photon energy of 22.1 eV. A value of 13 fs full width at half-maximum of the pump-probe cross correlation signal is determined by analyzing a photoemission intensity transient probing a near-infrared interband transition in 1T-TiSe 2 . Notably, the energy resolution of the setup conforms to typical values reported in conventional time-resolved photoemission studies using high harmonics, and an ultimate resolution of 170 meV is feasible.

  8. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSU_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  9. SAFARI 2000 SeaWiFS Images for Core Study Sites, 2000-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) imagery for the eight core study sites of Mongu, Etosha, Kasangu, Skukuza, Mutoko, Mzola,...

  10. SAFARI 2000 SeaWiFS Images for Core Study Sites, 2000-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) imagery for the eight core study sites of Mongu, Etosha, Kasangu, Skukuza, Mutoko,...

  11. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNAU_RRS_aot_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  12. SeaWiFS_L3m_MC_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  13. SeaWiFS_L3m_SNSP_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  14. SeaWiFS_L3m_YR_RRS_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  15. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSP_POC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  16. SeaWiFS_L3m_DAY_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  17. SeaWiFS_L3m_YR_CDOM_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  18. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_LAND_NDVI_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  19. SeaWiFS_L3m_SCSP_PAR_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...

  20. SeaWiFS_L3m_R32_PIC_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SeaWiFS instrument was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the OrbView-2 (a.k.a. SeaStar) satellite in August 1997, and collected data from September...