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Sample records for alkyd resins

  1. Epoxidation of linseed oil-Alkyd resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of different linseed oil-alkyd resin ( Alk (I), Alk (II), and Alk (III) ) were prepared with the calculated amounts of mono glycerides and adipic acid (1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 Eq.Wt) respectively via monoglyceride method. The obtained alkyd resins were epoxidized via reaction with the calculated quantities of peracetic acid, which was prepared by the reaction of acetic anhydride with H2O2. Epoxidation occurred with the ratio (1: 1, 1 :3, and 1:6 Eq. Wt) of alkyd to peracetic acid. The effect of reaction time on the epoxy group content was measured during the epoxidation process. The prepared alkyd resins were analyzed by IR and H1NMR. The metal coated film properties of epoxidized alkyd resins were compared with those of unmodified alkyd resins. It was observed that the coating films of epoxidized alkyd resins have better in drying properties, hardness, adhesion, impact and flexibility than those of un epoxidized alkyd resins. The flammability properties of the paper coated films for the prepared brominated epoxidized alkyd resins were found to be fire retardant

  2. Curing kinetics of alkyd/melamine resin mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Jovičić Mirjana C.; Radičević Radmila Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Alkyd resins are the most popular and useful synthetic resins applied as the binder in protective coatings. Frequently they are not used alone but are modified with other synthetic resins in the manufacture of the coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of coating called 'baking enamel' and it is cured through functional groups of resins at high temperatures. In this paper, curing kinetics of alkyd resins based on castor oil and dehydrated castor...

  3. Curing kinetics of alkyd/melamine resin mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana C.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkyd resins are the most popular and useful synthetic resins applied as the binder in protective coatings. Frequently they are not used alone but are modified with other synthetic resins in the manufacture of the coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of coating called 'baking enamel' and it is cured through functional groups of resins at high temperatures. In this paper, curing kinetics of alkyd resins based on castor oil and dehydrated castor oil with melamine resin, has been studied by DSC method with programmed heating and in isothermal mode. The results determined from dynamic DSC curves were mathematically transformed using the Ozawa isoconversional method for obtaining the isothermal data. These results, degree of curing versus time, are in good agreement with those determined by the isothermal DSC experiments. By applying the Ozawa method it is possible to calculate the isothermal kinetic parameters for the alkyd/melamine resin mixtures curing using only calorimetric data obtained by dynamic DSC runs. Depending on the alkyd resin type and ratio in mixtures the values of activation energies of curing process of resin mixtures are from 51.3 to 114 kJ mol-1. The rate constant of curing increases with increasing the content of melamine resin in the mixture and with curing temperature. The reaction order varies from 1.12 to 1.37 for alkyd based on dehydrated castor oil/melamine resin mixtures and from 1.74 to 2.03 for mixtures with alkyd based on castor oil. Based on the results obtained, we propose that dehydrated castor oil alkyd/melamine resin mixtures can be used in practice (curing temperatures from 120 to 160°C.

  4. Fatty Acid Composition of Tobacco Seed Oil and Synthesis of Alkyd Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUKHTAR,Azam; ULLAH,Habib; MUKHTAR,Hamid

    2007-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of tobacco seed oil revealed that the oil is rich in unsaturated fatty acids, having linoleic acid (71.63%), oleic acid (13.46%) and palmitic acid (8.72%) as the most abundant unsaturated and saturated fatty acids respectively. So the tobacco oil was characterized as semi-drying type on the basis of fatty acid composition. The synthesis of alkyd resin was carried out by alcoholysis or monoglyceride process using an alkali refined tobacco seed oil, pentaerythritol, cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride along with lithium hydroxide as catalyst.The alkyd resin so prepared was found to be bright and of low color with high gloss. The drying and hardness properties and adhesion of the tobacco seed oil derived alkyd resin were also found a bit superior to those of other alkyd resins of the same oil length. In addition, the water and acid resistance of the said alkyd was also found comparable to the other alkyds.

  5. Production of alkyd resins starting from the wastes of the polyester process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the results of the bibliographic search of alternatives for the reuse of the waste of the polyester polymerization process and the experimental evaluation at laboratory scale of the process of obtaining alkyd resins. Also a feasibility analysis for applying this resin in the production of enamels was done. A characterization of the material with the purpose of determining the compounds and the present quantities was done. It was carried out a comparison of the raw material costs for the obtained resins using recovered material and without this. It was demonstrated that alkyd resins of commercial quality could be made from the waste of the process of polymerization of the polyester with a sensitive decrease in the raw material costs in comparison to the resins obtained without recovered material

  6. The effects of alkyd/melamine resin ratio and curing temperature on the properties of the coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADMILA Z. RADICEVIC

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic resins are used as binders in protective coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of a coating called “baking enamel” cured through functional groups of resins. The effects of the alkyd/butylated melamine resin ratio (from 85/15 to 70/30 and curing temperature (from 100°C to 160°C on the crosslinking and properties of the coating are presented in this paper. The degree of curing was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. These data were used for the estimation of the degree of crosslinking. The hardness, elasticity, impact resistance, degree of adherence and gloss were also determined. Optimal coating properties could be achieved with an alkyd/melamine resin ratio of 75/25, a curing temperature of 130 °C and a curing time of 30 min.

  7. Surface Coating Studies of Polyurethane Derived from [(Alkyd)-(Epoxy Resin Treated Castor Oil)] Using Isophorene Diisocynate - II

    OpenAIRE

    Dinesh. P. Patel; Kiran Nimavat; Kartik Vyas

    2012-01-01

    Castor oil (C) was reacted with profitable epoxy resin (E) (diglycidylether of bisphenol-A, DGEBF) at a range of mole ratios. The consequential products (Castor oil- Epoxy resin) were nominated as CEs. Isocyanate terminated castor oil Polyurethane (ICOPU) was prepared by reaction of castor oil and various proportion of Isophoren diisocyanate. A commercial alkyd resin was blended with various proportions of CEs and ICOPU. A unique solvent system, which shows a one – phase clear solution and a ...

  8. Alkydic resin wastewaters treatment by fenton and photo-Fenton processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced oxidation processes are an emerging option to treatment of the painting industry effluents. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes in chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and phenolic compounds removal from wastewaters generated during alkydic resins manufacture. The optimized treatment conditions are the following: pH 3.0, 15.15 x 10-3 mol L-1 FeSO4 and 0.30 mol L-1 H2O2 for a reaction time of 6 h. photo-Fenton experiments were carried out in the presence of sunlight or artificial radiation and complementary additions of H2O2 were made for all experiments. The best results were obtained with photo-Fenton process assisted with solar radiation, with reductions of 99.5 and 99.1% of COD and TOC levels, respectively. Fenton and photo-Fenton (with artificial irradiation) processes presented lower but not insignificant removals, within 60-80% reduction for both COD and TOC. In addition, an excellent removal (95%) of total phenols was obtained using photo-Fenton process assisted with artificial irradiation. This study demonstrated that the use of photo-Fenton process on alkydic resins wastewater treatment is very promising especially when solar light is used

  9. Analysis of the Compounds from the BTEX Group, Emitted During Thermal Decomposition of Alkyd Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kubecki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of the given binding agent for the moulding sands preparation depends on the one hand on the estimation of technological properties of the sand and the mould made of it and the obtained casting quality and on the other hand on the assessment of this sand influence on the natural and working environment. Out of moulding sands used in the foundry industry, sands with organic binders deserve a special attention. These binders are based on synthetic resins, which ensure obtaining the proper technological properties and sound castings, however, they negatively influence the environment. If in the initial state these resins are not very dangerous for people and for the environment, thus under an influence of high temperatures they generate very harmful products, being the result of their thermal decomposition. Depending on the kind of the applied resin (phenol-formaldehyde, urea, furfuryl, urea–furfuryl, alkyd under an influence of a temperature such compounds as: furfuryl alcohol, formaldehyde, phenol, BTEX group (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, and also polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH can be formed and released.The aim of the study was the development of the method, selection of analytical methods and the determination of optimal conditionsof formation compounds from the BTEX group. An emission of these components constitutes one of the basic criteria of the harmfulnessassessment of binders applied for moulding and core sands. Investigations were carried out in the specially designed set up for the thermal decomposition of organic substances in a temperature range: 5000C – 13000C at the laboratory scale. The object for testing was alkyd resin applied as a binding material for moulding sands. Within investigations the minimal amount of adsorbent necessary for the adsorption of compounds released during the decomposition of the resin sample of a mass app. 15 mg was selected. Also the minimal amount of solvent needed for

  10. Surface Coating Studies of Polyurethane Derived from [(Alkyd-(Epoxy Resin Treated Castor Oil] Using Isophorene Diisocynate - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh. P. Patel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Castor oil (C was reacted with profitable epoxy resin (E (diglycidylether of bisphenol-A, DGEBF at a range of mole ratios. The consequential products (Castor oil- Epoxy resin were nominated as CEs. Isocyanate terminated castor oil Polyurethane (ICOPU was prepared by reaction of castor oil and various proportion of Isophoren diisocyanate. A commercial alkyd resin was blended with various proportions of CEs and ICOPU. A unique solvent system, which shows a one – phase clear solution and a clear coat of binder system, was used. All the blends were applied on mild steel panels and characterized for drying time, adhesion, flexibility, hardness, impact resistance and chemical resistance properties.

  11. Synthesis and curing of alkyd enamels based on ricinoleic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jovičić Mirjana C.; Radičević Radmila Ž.; Simendić Vesna B.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of an alkyd resin with a melamine-formaldehyde resin gives a cured enamel film with the flexibility of the alkyd constituent and the high chemical resistance and hardness of the melamine resin at the same time. The melamine resin is a minor constituent and plays the role of a crosslinking agent. In this paper, alkyd resins of high hydroxyl numbers based on trimethylolpropane, ricinoleic acid and phthalic anhydride were synthesized. Two alkyds having 30 and 40 wt% of ricino...

  12. The influence of the size and surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles on the rheological properties of alkyd resin

    OpenAIRE

    Radoman Tijana; Džunuzović Jasna V.; Jeremić Katarina; Marinković Aleksandar D.; Spasojević Pavle; Popović Ivanka; Džunuzović Enis S.

    2013-01-01

    Spherical TiO2 particles of different size were dispersed in alkyd resin based on soybean oil. Four samples of TiO2 particles were used, three commercial and one obtained by acid catalyzed hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide. The size of the synthesized nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy. Surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles was performed with propyl gallate and lauryl gallate. The influence of the size of TiO2 nanop...

  13. The influence of the size and surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles on the rheological properties of alkyd resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoman Tijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spherical TiO2 particles of different size were dispersed in alkyd resin based on soybean oil. Four samples of TiO2 particles were used, three commercial and one obtained by acid catalyzed hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide. The size of the synthesized nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy. Surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles was performed with propyl gallate and lauryl gallate. The influence of the size of TiO2 nanoparticles, their concentration and type of the surface modification on the rheological properties of alkyd resin was investigated. The obtained results have shown that the viscosity of the prepared dispersions was higher than viscosity of the pure resin, it increases with decreasing particle diameter and decreases with frequency increase. Surface modified particles showed higher influence on the viscosity of alkyd resin than unmodified, because their hydrodynamic volume is higher due to the presence of the adsorbed gallates, leading to the increase of effective volume fraction of particles in dispersion. For the lowest TiO2 concentration, the viscosity was higher for sample modified with lauryl gallate, due to the higher thickness of the adsorbed layer. The increase of concentration, because of less dispersion stability of the particles modified with propyl gallate, leads to particles agglomeration. The presence of agglomerates, which was confirmed by a change in the slope of the functional dependence of storage modulus on loss modulus, leads to a rapid increase in viscosity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172062 i br. 45020

  14. Analysis of the Compounds from the BTEX Group, Emitted During Thermal Decomposition of Alkyd Resin

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kubecki; Holtzer, M.; A. Bobrowski; R. Dańko; B. Grabowska; S. Żymankowska-Kumon

    2012-01-01

    Suitability of the given binding agent for the moulding sands preparation depends on the one hand on the estimation of technological properties of the sand and the mould made of it and the obtained casting quality and on the other hand on the assessment of this sand influence on the natural and working environment. Out of moulding sands used in the foundry industry, sands with organic binders deserve a special attention. These binders are based on synthetic resins, which ensure obtaining the ...

  15. Synthesis and curing of alkyd enamels based on ricinoleic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of an alkyd resin with a melamine-formaldehyde resin gives a cured enamel film with the flexibility of the alkyd constituent and the high chemical resistance and hardness of the melamine resin at the same time. The melamine resin is a minor constituent and plays the role of a crosslinking agent. In this paper, alkyd resins of high hydroxyl numbers based on trimethylolpropane, ricinoleic acid and phthalic anhydride were synthesized. Two alkyds having 30 and 40 wt% of ricinoleic acid were formulated by calculation on alkyd constant. Alkyds were characterized by FTIR and by the determination of acid and hydroxyl numbers. Then synthesized alkyds were made into baking enamels by mixing with melamine-formaldehyde resins (weight ratio of 70:30 based on dried mass. Two types of commercial melamine resins were used: threeisobutoxymethyl melamine-formaldehyde resin (TIMMF and hexamethoxymethyl melamine resin (HMMMF. Prepared alkyd/melamine resin mixtures were cured in a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC under non-isothermal mode. Apparent degree of curing as a function of temperature was calculated from the curing enthalpies. Kinetic parameters of curing were calculated using Freeman-Carroll method. TIMMF resin is more reactive with synthesized alkyds than HMMMF resin what was expected. Alkyd resin with 30 wt% of ricinoleic acid is slightly more reactive than alkyd with 40 wt% of ricinoleic acid, probably because it has the high contents of free hydroxyl and acid groups. The gel content, Tg, thermal stability, hardness, elasticity and impact resistance of coated films cured at 150°C for 60 min were measured. Cured films show good thermal stability since the onset of films thermal degradation determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA is observed at the temperatures from 281 to 329°C. Films based on alkyd 30 are more thermal stable than those from alkyd 40, with the same melamine resin. The type of alkyd resin has no significant

  16. Convenient routes to synthesize uncommon vaterite nanoparticles and the nanocomposites of alkyd resin/polyaniline/vaterite: The latter possessing superior anticorrosive performance on mild steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaniline (PANI)/Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) composite materials are prepared, for the first time, starting from naturally occurring calcite, and are well characterized. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies provide information for the presence of unstable vaterite form of PCC in the composites, with an average crystallite size of 26 nm, thus demonstrating the ability of PANI to stabilize, otherwise unstable, vaterite phase of CaCO3. Thermal analytical results (TGA and DSC) also provide information for the presence of only PANI and PCC, thus providing information for the purity of the composites. This method, therefore, provides a convenient route to prepare vaterite nanoparticles. Electron Microscopic (FE-SEM) images of the composites confirm that the voids of PANI chains are filled by the spherical nannoparticles of vaterite of diameter ∼ 24 nm, to result in spheres of the composites with an average diameter of 3–4 μm. FTIR spectra show that the PANI exists in its emaraldine form, weakly protonated when prepared at pH 5. Analysis of the FT-IR data for the four composites of PANI/vaterite gives the molar ratios of PANI:vaterite to be 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, respectively. The PANI/PCC composites show electrical conductivity of ∼ 1.00 × 10−5 S cm−1, which is an impressive value to use these materials as anticorrosive coatings. AC impedance studies also give the conductivities of the PANI/PCC composites to be corresponding to a weakly electronically-conductive emeraldine form of PANI, with equal contributions from the ionic and electronic components, irrespective of the different amounts of vaterite or calcite present in the composites. The DC polarization test confirms equal transport numbers for ions and electrons in PANI samples. The above composites of PANI/vaterite, and a composite of 1:1 molar ratio of PANI/calcite, were mixed with alkyd resin and xylene, separately, to prepare anticorrosive coatings on mild steel (Mole percentages: 98.90% Fe, 0

  17. Primary study on synthesis and characterization of the new type EB curable resins. Pt.2: Alkyd resins modified by LFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have synthesized a new type of EB curable resin by using oil fatty acid. The preparation method of coating and the performance of EB curing coating film were described. The synthesis process has been simplified and the price of the raw materials was lower

  18. The Synthesis Method and Development Trend of Acrylic Modified Alkyd Resin%丙烯酸改性醇酸树脂合成方法及发展趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王镇; 黄晓蕾

    2012-01-01

    综述了丙烯酸改性醇酸树脂的合成方法及应用。讨论了该类树脂的生产在新疆地区的可行性及发展趋势。%The synthesis method and application of acrylic modified alkyd resin were reviewed,and the feasibility and development trend of the modified resin in Xinjiang Region were discussed.

  19. Curing reactions of palm oil alkyd enamels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino resins are the most popularly used cross-linking agents for thermosetting coatings. The most common amino resins are those derived from melamine, 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine and formaldehyde. They are attractive for developing high performance and low cost coatings to improve performances of other film-forming resins with reactive functional groups such as hydroxyl, carboxylic, and amide groups. Alkyds modified with melamine are mainly used in industrial baking enamels for metal surfaces. Short-oil alkyds containing 38-45% phthalic anhydride and a high proportion of hydroxyl values in the alkyd resins render good compatibility with melamine-formaldehyde resins. However, the actual mechanisms and pathways of the curing reactions involved are still not fully understood. This paper describes three palm oil alkyds, synthesized with high hydroxyl values. Clear coating enamels were made by mixing 4 parts; of alkyd resin with 1 part of a methylated melamine resin. The complex curing reactions of the clear enamel can be illustrated qualitatively by using DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to set suitable curing temperatures without degradation. The dry hard time with various curing temperatures was examined. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to follow the changes in functional group concentrations as a function of time and temperature. (author)

  20. 双组分聚氨酯涂料用改性醇酸树脂的研究%Research of Modified Alkyd Resin for Two-Component Polyurethane Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘清福; 徐朝华; 夏德慧

    2012-01-01

    The two-component polyurethane coatings were compounded with modified short oil alkyd resin as A component and isocyanate prepolymers as B component. The effect of A component on two-component polyurethane coatings were investigated. The results showed that coconut oil modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as gloss paint, yellowing resistance finish for its pure white color, yellowing resistance properties and good fullness. Castor oil modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as ordinary finish painted resin for its deep color, good fullness, lower drying rate and excellent flexility. Soybean oil modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as primer and matte paint for its fast drying rate. Synthetic fatty acid modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as high-grade finish painted resin for the pure while color, good level ability, slow-speeded drying, nice fullness and high hardness.%采用不同改性的短油度醇酸树脂作甲组分,异氰酸酯预聚物作乙组分,配制双组分聚氨酯涂料,探讨甲组分对双组分聚氨酯涂料性能的影响.结果表明,椰子油改性短油度醇酸树脂,颜色水白、耐黄变性能和丰满度好,可以作为高档的亮光清面漆、耐黄变的面漆用树脂;蓖麻油改性短油度醇酸树脂,颜色较深、丰满度较好、干燥速度慢及柔韧性好,可以作为普通的亮光面漆用树脂;豆油改性短油度醇酸树脂,干燥速度较快,应用于底漆和哑光面漆;合成脂肪酸改性短油度醇酸树脂,颜色水白、流平好、干燥速度慢、丰满度高及硬度高,可以作为高档的亮光面漆用树脂.

  1. Advances in acrylic-alkyd hybrid synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziczkowski, Jamie

    2008-10-01

    In situ graft acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were formed by polymerizing acrylic and acrylic-mixed monomers in the presence of alkyds by introduction of a free radical initiator to promote graft formation. Two-dimensional NMR, specifically gradient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), was used to clarify specific graft sites of the hybrid materials. Both individual and mixed-monomer systems were produced to determine any individual monomer preferences and to model current acrylic-alkyd systems. Different classes of initiators were used to determine any initiator effects on graft location. The 2D-NMR results confirm grafting at doubly allylic hydrogens located on the fatty acid chains and the polyol segment of the alkyd backbone. The gHMQC spectra show no evidence of grafting across double bonds on either pendant fatty acid groups or THPA unsaturation sites for any of the monomer or mixed monomer systems. It was also determined that choice of initiator has no effect on graft location. In addition, a design of experiments using response surface methodology was utilized to obtain a better understanding of this commercially available class of materials and relate both the chemical and physical properties to one another. A Box-Behnkin design was used, varying the oil length of the alkyd phase, the degree of unsaturation in the polyester backbone, and acrylic to alkyd ratio. Acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were reduced with an amine/water mixture. Hydrolytic stability was tested and viscoelastic properties were obtained to determine crosslink density. Cured films were prepared and basic coatings properties were evaluated. It was found that the oil length of the alkyd is the most dominant factor for final coatings properties of the resins. Acrylic to alkyd ratio mainly influences the resin properties such as acid number, average molecular weight, and hydrolytic stability. The degree of unsaturation in the alkyd backbone has minimal effects on resin and film

  2. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  3. Cross-linked network development in compatibilized alkyd/acrylic hybrid latex films for the creation of hard coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; de las Heras Alarcón, Carolina; Goikoetxea, Monika; Beristain, Itxaso; Paulis, Maria; Barandiaran, Maria J; Asua, José M; Keddie, Joseph L

    2010-09-01

    Hybrids made from an alkyd resin and an acrylic copolymer can potentially combine the desired properties of each component. Alkyd/acrylic hybrid latex particles were synthesized via miniemulsion polymerization and used to create films at room temperature. Comparisons of the alkyd auto-oxidative cross-linking rates and the associated network development are made between two alkyd resins (with differing levels of hydrophilicity as measured by their acid numbers). The effects of increasing the compatibilization between the alkyd and the acrylic phase via functionalization with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) are investigated. Magnetic resonance profiling and microindentation measurements reveal that film hardening occurs much faster in a GMA-functionalized alkyd hybrid than in the standard hybrid. The film's hardness increases by a factor of 4 over a 5-day period. The rate of cross-linking is significantly slower in nonfunctionalized alkyd hybrid films and when the more hydrophilic alkyd resin is used. Tensile deformation of the hybrid latex films reveals the effects of GMA functionalization and drier concentration in creating a denser cross-linked network. Modeling of the tensile deformation behavior of the hybrid films used a combination of the upper convected Maxwell model (to describe the viscoelastic component) and the Gent model (to describe the elastic component). The modeling provides a correlation between the cross-linked network formation and the resulting mechanical properties. PMID:20704338

  4. Influence of Nano Silica on Alkyd Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav

    . The present work centers on the reinforcement of alkyd binders emulsified in water and used in exterior wood coatings with nano silica. Raman spectroscopy was used throughout the study to maintain the reproducibility of results as it was found that colloidal nano silica can increase or decrease the speed...... of alkyd curing affecting the tested mechanical properties. Hydrophilic, colloidal nano silica was seen to have limited effect in improving the mechanical properties due to problems in properly dispersing and attaining good surface interactions with the hydrophobic alkyd polymer. Efforts in increasing...... the interactions with the alkyd polymer while keeping the nano filler stable in the water phase did not show further improvements of mechanical properties. The best results in respect to mechanical properties, as measured under static and dynamic loading, were obtained with the use of hexamethyldisilazane treated...

  5. Microcapsules Filled with a Palm Oil-Based Alkyd as Healing Agent for Epoxy Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshafiza Shahabudin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches to prolong the service lifespan of polymeric material is the development of self-healing ability by means of embedded microcapsules containing a healing agent. In this work, poly(melamine-urea-formaldehyde (PMUF microcapsules containing a palm oil-based alkyd were produced by polymerization of melamine resin, urea and formaldehyde that encapsulated droplets of the suspended alkyd particles. A series of spherical and free-flowing microcapsules were obtained. The chemical properties of core and shell materials were characterized by Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis showed a glass transition around −15 °C due to the alkyd, and a melting temperature at around 200 °C due to the shell. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results showed that the core and shell thermally degraded within the temperature range of 200–600 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM examination of the ruptured microcapsule showed smooth inner and rough outer surfaces of the shell. Flexural strength and microhardness (Vickers of the cured epoxy compound were not affected with the incorporation of 1%–3% of the microcapsules. The viability of the healing reactions was demonstrated by blending small amounts of alkyd with epoxy and hardener at different ratios. The blends could readily cure to non-sticky hard solids at room temperature and the reactions could be verified by ATR-FTIR.

  6. Bio-based alkyds by direct enzymatic bulk polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Hiep Dinh

    compared to a corresponding classical reference. In a further development of the system, it has been found possible to use the esters of pentaerythritol and stearic acid in combination with the penta-aze derivative for the preparation of pseudo alkyds containing only pentaerythritol as polyol with high...... traditional method. Bio-based alkyds prepared from a combination of glycerol, and tall oil fatty acids, and azelaic acid by enzymatic polymerization show improved hydrophobicity and lower glass transition temperatures compared to an alkyd prepared from the same raw materials by a classical boiling method. The...... new type of pentaerythritol derivatized with azelaic acid (or penta-aze) was examined and tested for the production of more branched alkyd systems. A photostability test validated the concept, and the method also resulted in alkyds with improved hydrophobicity and lower glass transition temperatures...

  7. Evaluation of Biosourced Alkyd Nanoemulsions as Drug Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Siew Yong Teo; Siang Yin Lee; Huey Lin Ong; Ching Lin Ong; Seng Neon Gan; Michael J Rathbone; Coombes, Allan G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel oil-in-water (O/W) nanoemulsions were formulated using short, medium, and long oil length alkyds synthesized from palm kernel oil by a two-stage alcoholysis-polyesterification reaction. Alkyd/surfactant/water ternary phase diagrams identified a composition of 1% alkyd, 9% Tween 80, and 90% water where spontaneous production of nanoemulsions occurred. The pH, droplet size, and zeta potential of all formulations were in the range of 6.4–6.6, 11–14 nm, and −6 mV to −8 mV, respectively. Rhe...

  8. Evaluation of Biosourced Alkyd Nanoemulsions as Drug Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Yong Teo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel oil-in-water (O/W nanoemulsions were formulated using short, medium, and long oil length alkyds synthesized from palm kernel oil by a two-stage alcoholysis-polyesterification reaction. Alkyd/surfactant/water ternary phase diagrams identified a composition of 1% alkyd, 9% Tween 80, and 90% water where spontaneous production of nanoemulsions occurred. The pH, droplet size, and zeta potential of all formulations were in the range of 6.4–6.6, 11–14 nm, and −6 mV to −8 mV, respectively. Rheological studies showed that the nanoemulsions displayed non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior at low shear rates up to 20 s−1 with conversion to Newtonian behavior above this shear rate. All nanoemulsions were found to be stable against phase separation on storage at 4°C and 25°C for three months. Short oil length alkyd nanoemulsions exhibited significantly higher stability compared with medium and long oil length alkyd nanoemulsions, as demonstrated by an absence of phase separation and only minor changes of droplet size on storage at an elevated temperature of 45°C for 3 months. The drug carrying capacity and storage stability of the nanoemulsions were assessed using phenytoin. The entrapment efficiency of alkyd nanoemulsions was in excess of 90% and loss of phenytoin content was restricted to less than 4% during storage of the nanoemulsions for three months at 4°C, 25°C, and 45°C. Taken together, these findings indicate that nanoemulsions prepared from palm kernel oil-based alkyds offer potential as nanocarriers for drug delivery applications.

  9. Effects of Nano Pigments on the Corrosion Resistance of Alkyd Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alkyd coatings embedded with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO pigments were prepared. The effects of nano pigments on anticorrosion performance of alkyd coatings were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS). For the sake of comparison, the corrosion protection of alkyd coatings with conventional TiO2 and ZnO was also studied. It was found that nano-TiO2 pigment improved the corrosion resistance as well as the hardness of alkyd coatings. The optimal amount of nano-TiO2 in a colored coating for corrosion resistance was 1%. The viscosities of alkyd coatings with nanometer TiO2 and ZnO and conventional TiO2 and ZnO pigments were measured and the relation between viscosity and anticorrosion performance was discussed.

  10. Effect of PVC/CPVC ratio of non-toxic, platy pigments on corrosion protection of acrylic-modified alkyd coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion protection of acrylic-modified alkyd coatings, based on micaceous zinc ferrite (MZF), micaceous iron oxide (MIO) and zinc ferrite (ZF) pigments, at different pigment volume concentrations PVCs to the critical pigment volume concentrations CPVCs ratio was studied and denoted hereafter by A. Scanning electron microscope, weight loss measurements, water vapour transmission and immersion in 3.5% salt solution as well as physicomechanical properties were carried to evaluate the paints anti corrosive performance. It was concluded that, for all systems, water vapour transmission and corrosion protection can be affected by the PVC/CPVC ratio. At certain PVC the barrier property of pigment was the main factor affecting the water vapour transmission and corrosion protection. The optimum percentage of inhibitive pigment in the above systems has also been evaluated. Als, it was found that, micaceous zinc ferrite pigment protect the carbon steel physically through barrier action and chemically by the reaction with the acidic acrylic-modified alkyd resin to produce soaps which passivated the substrate

  11. Influence of surface modified nano silica on alkyd binder before and after accelerated weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Nguyen, Hiep Dinh; Daugaard, Anders Egede;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of nano fillers in exterior wood coatings is not straight forward. Influence on aging of polymer binder needs to be taken into account along with possible benefits that nano fillers can provide immediately after application. This study shows the influence of two differently modified...... hydrophobic nano silica on an alkyd binder for exterior wood coatings. One month after application, the highest strength and energy required to break the films was obtained with addition of 3% disilazane modified silica. Changes in tensile properties were accompanied with a small increase in glass transition...... temperature. However, the highest stability upon accelerated weathering, measured by ATR-IR and DMA, was for nano composites with the highest amount of nano filler. The reasons for the observed changes are discussed together with the appearance of a feature that is possibly a secondary relaxation of alkyd...

  12. Volatile of alkyd varnish inhibits the expression of neuronal growth associated protein-43 in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Huang; Hongxia Wang; Wei Zou

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that coating materials used commonly in the interior decoration contain volatile of alkyd varnish, which has obvious effects on the structure of endothelial cells of respiratory tract.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of volatile of alkyd varnish in the decoration materials on the expression of neuronal growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in mice, and to analyze the influencing mechanism of interior environmental pollutants for brain mechanism.DESIGN: A randomized grouping and controlled experiment.SETTING: College of Life Science, Liaoning Normal University.MATERIALS: This study was carried out in the College of Life Science, Liaoning Normal University between February and December 2006. Twenty one-month-old Kunming mice, weighing (20 + 2) g, male and female in half, were involved in this study. The involved mice were divided into 2 groups by random lot method: chronic poisoning group (n =10) and control group (n =10). Alkyd varnish used commonly for house decoration was purchased from Furnishing World of Liberation Plaza of Dalian City. Alkyd varnish used commonly for house decoration was purchased from Furnishing World of Liberation Plaza of Dalian City. Rabbit GAP-43 polyclonal antibody, rat P -actin monoclonal antibody, goat anti-rat IgG-HRP and goat ant-rabbit IgG-HRP were purchased from Boster Company (Wuhan). ECL was purchased from Amersham Company (Britain), other related reagents were all purchased from Sigma Company and Promega Company(USA). All the other reagents were home-made analytical pure.METHODS:①Poisoning test: The mice were poisoned by static inhalation poisoning method. Mice in the chronic poisoning group were placed in the 0.024 m3 poisoning cabinet. Alkyd varnish (8g,3-time dosage of house decoration) was daily spread once on a 40 cm×21 cm kraft paper evenly. Mice were poisoned for 14 hours within 3 weeks successively. Mice in the control group were placed in the same environment without alkyd

  13. Effect of nano-TiO2 particles size on the corrosion resistance of alkyd coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coating system containing various sizes (∼10, 50, 100, 150 nm) of nano-TiO2 were prepared and investigated for corrosion protection of carbon steel in 1.0 M H2SO4 using polarization, EIS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. It was found that nano-TiO2 particles improved the corrosion resistance of alkyd coatings. The corrosion resistance occurs via physical adhesion on the metal surface. O2 and H2O permeability of coating decreased with decrease in the nano-TiO2 size. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with decreasing the size of nano-TiO2 and with decreasing the temperature. - Highlights: • Nano-TiO2 coating were prepared and used for corrosion protection of C-steel. • Nano-TiO2 particles in coating are effective to improve the corrosion resistance. • Nano-TiO2 coating inhibit both anodic and cathodic reactions. • Corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with decrease in the size of nano-TiO2. • O2 and H2O permeability of coating decreased with decrease in the nano-TiO2 size

  14. Microkinetic modeling of the autoxidative curing of an alkyd and oil-based paint model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Lindsay H.; Casadio, Francesca; Shull, Kenneth R.; Broadbelt, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating the curing and aging mechanisms of alkyd and other oil-based paints is valuable for the fields of conservation and bio-based coatings. Recent research has demonstrated the limitations of artificial aging in predicting the actual properties of paints that are hundreds of years old. Kinetic modeling offers pathways to develop a realistic and dynamic description of the composition of these oil-based paint coatings and facilitates the exploration of the effects of various environmental conditions on their long-term chemical stability. This work presents the construction of a kinetic Monte Carlo framework from elementary steps for the cobalt-catalyzed autoxidative curing of an ethyl linoleate model system up to the formation of single cross-links. Kinetic correlations for reaction families of similar chemistry are employed to reduce the number of parameters required to calculate rate constants in Arrhenius form. The model, developed from mechanisms proposed in the literature, shows good agreement with experiment for the formation of primary products in the early stages of curing. The model has also revealed that the mechanisms proposed in the literature for the formation of secondary products, such as volatile aldehydes, are still not well established, and alternative routes are under evaluation.

  15. Preparation and properties of environmental-friendly coatings based on carboxymethyl cellulose nitrate ester & modified alkyd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongtao; Shao, Ziqiang; Zhao, Ming; Zhou, Zhenwen

    2016-02-10

    Amphipathic coating basic film-forming material carboxymethyl cellulose nitrate ester (CMCN) was synthesized and characterizations of CMCN with different ratio of functional groups were studied. Ratios of functional groups on each repeating units of CMCN have great importance in the decision of CMCN properties using as an amphipathic coating basic film-forming material and ratios of functional groups were the most concerned of the study. Ratios of functional groups on each repeating units of CMCN were measured by elemental analyzer and calculated. Series of experiments were conducted using different ratios of functional groups of CMCN. Thermal properties of CMCN were measured by FT-IR and TG. Densities of CMCN powders were measured. Aqueous coatings based on CMCN/alkyd (after chemical modified by coconut oil) were prepared and morphology & rheology of CMCN hydrophilic dispersions were measured using an Anton-Paar-Strasse 20A-8054 Graz analyzer. Contact angles between films based on CMCN and deionized water were recorded. Other properties of films were measured. CMCN with the etherification of carboxymethyl groups at 0.35-0.40, nitrate ester groups at 1.96-2.19 and hydroxyl groups at 0.46-0.64 per d-glucose was considered as the best film forming material. PMID:26686109

  16. 木器涂料用水性树脂的合成与进展(二)%Synthesis and Progress of Water-borne Resin for Wooden Ware Coatings (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫福安

    2012-01-01

    This paper narrates the synthesis and modification of water-borne resin for wooden ware coatings,including waterborne alkyd resin,water-borne polyurethane resin,water-borne acrylic resin,water-borne polyurethane-acrylate hybrid resin and water-borne UV curable resin.%对水性醇酸树脂、水性聚氨酯树脂、水性丙烯酸树脂、水性聚氨酯-丙烯酸杂化体以及水性UV光固化树脂为成膜物质的木器涂料用水性树脂的合成及改性进行了阐述。

  17. 木器涂料用水性树脂的合成与进展(一)%Synthesis and Progress of Water-borne Resin for Wooden Ware Coatings ( I )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫福安

    2012-01-01

    This paper narrates the synthesis and modification of water-borne resin for wooden ware coatings, including waterborne alkyd resin, water-borne polyurethane resin, water-borne acrylic resin, water-borne polyurethane-acrylate hybrid resin and water-borne UV curable resin.%对水性醇酸树脂、水性聚氨酯树脂、水性丙烯酸树脂、水性聚氨酯-丙烯酸杂化体以及水性UV光固化树脂为成膜物质的木器涂料用水性树脂的合成及改性进行了阐述。

  18. 木器涂料用水性树脂的合成与进展(三)%Synthesis and Progress of Water-borne Resin for Wooden Ware Coatings (III )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫福安

    2012-01-01

    对水性醇酸树脂、水性聚氨酯树脂、水性丙烯酸树脂、水性聚氨酯-丙烯酸杂化体以及水性UV光固化树脂为成膜物质的木器涂料用水性树脂的合成及改性进行了阐述。%This paper narrates the synthesis and modification of water-borne resin for wooden ware coatings, including water-borne alkyd resin, water-borne polyurethane resin, water-borne acrylic resin, water-borne polyurethane - acrylate hybrid resin and water-borne UV curable resin.

  19. Preparation methodology of radiation - curable resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of unsaturated polyester have been prepared according to normal alkyd methods of preparation. In this work the emphasis has been given to the preparation methodology of unsaturated polyesters in styrene. Their molecule weight distributions fall between normal alkyd's i.e. 2500 to 3500. (author)

  20. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity but...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p<0.0001). More paramarginal enamel fractures were observed after loading in teeth restored with Grandio when compared to Charisma (p=0.......008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can be...

  1. Waterborne Alkyd-Amino Insulation Paint Modified by Tung Oil%桐油改性醇酸氨基水性绝缘漆的制备及性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华林; 王啟明; 贺楠男; 王继植

    2011-01-01

    With hexamethoxymethyl melamine(HMMM)as cross-linked agent,the waterborne alkyd-amino insulation paint modified by tung oil was prepared from tung oil, maleic anhydride,phthalic anhydride,lauric acid,trimethylolpropane.The structure and properties of the paint were characterized and tested by FT-IR, DSC and TG.With the increase of oil length,water absorption of the film reduces,electrical strength of the film increases,but water solubility of the resin becomes worse, and the better oil length is 37%.Both glass transition temperature(Tg) and temperature index(T20000)of the film increase with the increase of HMMM content.When HMMM content is 30%,Tg and T20000 of the film is 42.0℃and 151.4℃,respectively.While HMMM content is above 30%,the resin has be nearly cured completely and heat resistance of the film changes unobviously.Hardness,water absorption,adhesion and electrical properties testing results indicate that electric strength of the insulation paint is above 80 kV/mm,and the general properties for the insulation paint are better,which can meet the requirement of actual application.%以桐油、顺丁烯二酸酐、邻苯二甲酸酐、月桂酸、三羟甲基丙烷为原料,六甲氧基甲基三聚氰胺树脂(HMMM)为交联剂,制备出桐油改性醇酸氨基水性绝缘漆,采用FT-IR、DSC和TG对涂料进行结构表征和性能测试.油度增大,漆膜的吸水率降低,电气强度增大,但树脂的水溶性变差,理想的油度为37%;HMMM的加入量增大,漆膜的玻璃化温度(T)和温度指数(T)升高,HMMM为30%时,T和T分别达到42.0℃和151.4℃,当HMMM用量超过30%时,固化越接近完全,对耐热性影响不明显.漆膜硬度、吸水率、附着力和电性能等性能测试结果表明,绝缘漆电气强度大于80 kV/mm.综合性能优异,满足实际应用要求.

  2. Effect of nano-TiO{sub 2} particles size on the corrosion resistance of alkyd coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyab, M.A., E-mail: hamadadeiab@yahoo.com; Keera, S.T.

    2014-08-01

    The coating system containing various sizes (∼10, 50, 100, 150 nm) of nano-TiO{sub 2} were prepared and investigated for corrosion protection of carbon steel in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} using polarization, EIS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. It was found that nano-TiO{sub 2} particles improved the corrosion resistance of alkyd coatings. The corrosion resistance occurs via physical adhesion on the metal surface. O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O permeability of coating decreased with decrease in the nano-TiO{sub 2} size. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with decreasing the size of nano-TiO{sub 2} and with decreasing the temperature. - Highlights: • Nano-TiO{sub 2} coating were prepared and used for corrosion protection of C-steel. • Nano-TiO{sub 2} particles in coating are effective to improve the corrosion resistance. • Nano-TiO{sub 2} coating inhibit both anodic and cathodic reactions. • Corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with decrease in the size of nano-TiO{sub 2}. • O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O permeability of coating decreased with decrease in the nano-TiO{sub 2} size.

  3. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  4. Resin Catalyst Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Asaoka

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction: What are resin catalyst hybrids? There are typically two types of resin catalyst. One is acidic resin which representative is polystyrene sulfonic acid. The other is basic resin which is availed as metal complex support. The objective items of this study on resin catalyst are consisting of pellet hybrid, equilibrium hybrid and function hybrid of acid and base,as shown in Fig. 1[1-5].

  5. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  6. Corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel with alkyd paint coatings composited with submicron-structure types polypyrrole-modified nano-size alumina and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Alumina/carbon nanotube (CNT) supported polypyrrole (PPy) particles were prepared. ► Various paint compositions with alkyd binder were immersion tested. ► Alumina-supported PPy based coating provided steel protection in NaCl solution. ► Polyelectrolyte modified CNT embedded coating afforded long-term stable protection. ► sulphonated CNT loaded coating indicated firm corrosion resistance in HCL solution. ► Results are interpreted on the basis of nano and microstructure of the particles. - Abstract: This paper is focused on studying corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel with alkyd paint coatings comprising nano-size alumina and either polystyrene-sulphonate (PSS) modified or sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) supported polypyrrole (PPy). Single layer coatings (in thickness of 40 ± 5 μm) comprising PPy deposited alumina and PSS modified MWCNT supported PPy afforded viable protection during the 1 M sodium chloride test. The coatings containing PSS modified and weakly sulphonated MWCNTs (at volume fractions of 9.9 × 10−4 and 2.5 × 10−4) with PPy volume fractions of 3.5 × 10−3 and 2.5 × 10−3 provided effective corrosion prevention during the 1 M sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid solution tests. While inhibitor particles were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, corrosion products formed at the paint–steel interface were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Apart from the electron microscopy observations, rheology study of three-dimensional structure of the inhibitor particles was performed in dispersions at similar compositions to those used for the paint formulations. Thus, protection mechanism relating to both types of immersion tests is discussed in terms of properties of the inhibitor particles and their microstructure in the coatings.

  7. Resin Longevity Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive resin waste has been generated at the Savannah River Site as a result of water treatment at F- and H-Areas. Key factors in the risk assessment of disposing of these materials in trenches include resin retention of 129I, a long-lived isotope, and the degradation rate of the organic resin itself. In order to estimate the degradation of resin wastes during underground burial, simulated aging studies were carried out with Dowex 21K, CG-8, and GT-73 ion exchange resins. These resins have a polystyrene-base but bear different functional groups. The specific resins considered in this study include anion (Dowex 21K), cation (CG8), and neutral (GT73) resins with, respectively, quaternary ammonium, sulfonate, and thiol functionalities. The objective of this study is to carry out laboratory experiments to simulate aging of organic resin wastes in order to (1) determine the functional life span of CG8, GT73 and Dowex 21K resins under field (trench) conditions, and (2) determine the expected performance of these resins as they degrade

  8. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concern...

  9. Resin performance monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ion exchange resin filled in a water cleaning device disposed in a nuclear power plant for maintaining water quality is transferred to a resin leaching vessel, to measure a TOC amount and molecular weight distribution of effluents from the resin. An amount of the effluents adsorbed to each of a pair ion exchange resins is evaluated based on the result, to forecast the extent of degradation of performance of the ion exchange resins due to the adsorption of the effluents. Then more realistic usage of the ion exchange resin is enabled by considering the effects of the effluents from the resin on the pair ion exchange resins, which has not been considered so far. Namely, since the desalting performance can be forecast at an initial stage of the cycle, requirement for the exchange of the resin and regeneration thereof can be judged appropriately, thereby enabling to maintain performance, for example, of a condensate desalting tower satisfactorily, which is also effective for cleaning water in a reactor primary system to high purity. (T.M.)

  10. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility was investigated of reducing the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin taking place in radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified by introducing unsaturated bonds via acrylamide and N-hydroxymethyloloacrylamide. A composition of 90% unsaturated polyester resin and 10% acrylamide-modified epoxy resin, filled with silica (1:1.5), showed a volume shrinkage below 2%. (author)

  11. Cleanup of demineralizer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium is being removed from demineralizers A and B (DA and DB) by a process that was developed from laboratory tests on small samples of resin from the demineralizers. The process was designed to elute the radiocesium from the demineralizer resins and then to resorb it onto the zeolite ion exchangers contained in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS). It was also required to limit the maximum cesium activities in the resin eluates (SDSD feeds) so that the radiation field surrounding the pipelines would not be excessive. The process consisted of 17 stages of batch elution. In the initial stage, the resin was contacted with 0.18 M boric acid. Subsequent stages subjected the resin to increasing concentrations of sodium in NaH2BO3-H3BO3 solution (total boron= 0.35 M) and then 1 M sodium hydroxide in the final stages. Results on the performance of the process in the cleanup of the demineralizers at TMI-2 are compared with those obtained from laboratory tests with small samples of the DA and DB resins. To date, 15 stages of batch elution have been completed on the demineralizers at TMI-2, which resulted in the removal of about 750 Ci of radiocesium from DA and about 3300 Ci from DB

  12. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  13. Nontoxic Resins Advance Aerospace Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year, PETI-330, is a polyimide matrix resin that performs well at high temperatures and is easily processed into composites in a simple, short curing cycle. Invented by scientists at Langley Research Center, PETI-330 is now licensed to Ube Industries, based in Japan with its American headquarters in New York. In addition to being durable and lightweight, the resin is also nontoxic, which makes it safe for workers to handle. PETI-330 was created specifically for heat-resistant composites formed with resin transfer molding and resin infusion, which formerly could only be used with low temperature resin systems.

  14. High-temperature resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    The basic chemistry, cure processes, properties, and applications of high temperature resins known as polyimides are surveyed. Condensation aromatic polymides are prepared by reacting aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides, aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, or with dialkyl esters of aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, depending on the intended end use. The first is for coatings or films while the latter two are more suitable for polyimide matrix resins. Prepreg solutions are made by dissolving reactants in an aprotic solvent, and advances in the addition of a diamine on the double bond and radical polymerization of the double bond are noted to have yielded a final cure product with void-free characteristics. Attention is given to properties of the Skybond, Pyralin, and NR-150B polyimide prepreg materials and characteristics of aging in the NP-150 polyimides. Finally, features of the NASA-developed PMR polyimides are reviewed.

  15. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  16. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  17. Indirect resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ′indirect resin composites,′ composite inlays,′ and ′fiber-reinforced composites.′

  18. Resin polymerization problems--are they caused by resin curing lights, resin formulations, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, R P; Palmer, T M; Ploeger, B J; Yost, M P

    1999-01-01

    Negative effects of rapid, high-intensity resin curing have been predicted for both argon lasers and plasma-arc curing lights. To address these questions, six different resin restorative materials were cured with 14 different resin curing lights representing differences in intensities ranging from 400 mW/cm2 to 1,900 mW/cm2; delivery modes using constant, ramped, and stepped methods; cure times ranging from 1 second to 40 seconds; and spot sizes of 6.7 mm to 10.9 mm. Two lasers, five plasma-arc lights, and seven halogen lights were used. Shrinkage, modulus, heat generation, strain, and physical changes on the teeth and resins during strain testing were documented. Results showed effects associated with lights were not statistically significant, but resin formulation was highly significant. Microfill resins had the least shrinkage and the lowest modulus. An autocure resin had shrinkage and modulus as high as or higher than the light-cured hybrid resins. Lasers and plasma-arc lights produced the highest heat increases on the surface (up to 21 degrees C) and within the resin restorations (up to 14 degrees C), and the halogen lights produced the most heat within the pulp chamber (up to 2 degrees C). Strain within the tooth was least with Heliomolar and greatest with Z100 Restorative and BISFIL II autocure resin. Clinical effects of strain relief were evident as white lines at the tooth-resin interface and cracks in enamel adjacent to the margins. This work implicates resin formulation, rather than light type or curing mode, as the important factor in polymerization problems. Lower light intensity and use of ramped and stepped curing modes did not provide significant lowering of shrinkage, modulus, or strain, and did not prevent enamel cracking adjacent to margins and formation of "white line" defects at the margins. Until materials with lower shrinkage and modulus are available, use of low-viscosity surface sealants as a final step in resin placement is suggested to

  19. EPOXY RESIN TOUGHENED BY THERMOPLASTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zengli; SUN Yishi

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of tough ductile heatresisting thermoplastic, namely bisphenol A polysulfone (PSF) and polyethersulfone (PES) were used to toughen thermoset epoxy resin. A systematic study on the relationship between the molecular weight and the terminal group of the thermoplastic modifier and the fracture toughness of the modified resin was carried out. The morphology of PSF modified epoxy resin was surveyed. With the same kind of PSF the structure of the epoxy resin and the toughening effect of PSF was also investigated. The fractography of PSF, particle modified epoxy was examined in detail with SEM. The contribution of every possible energy absorption process has been discussed. Crack pinning mechanism seems to be the most important toughening mechanism for tough ductile thermoplastic PSF particle modified epoxy system.

  20. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  1. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and...... three low-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low...

  2. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  3. Synthetic Resin and Plastic Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Banzon, Cesar P.

    1994-01-01

    To stimulate industrial efficiency and achieve competitiveness in domestic and external markets, the government has instituted Tariff Reform Program and the Import Liberalization Program. This study evaluates the performance and competitiveness of the resin and plastic industries in conjunction to the ongoing trade policy reform. It also describes the structure of the resin and plastic industries and identifies the factors affecting inter-firm and inter-industry differences in performance and...

  4. 肥料被覆材の土壌中における分解性

    OpenAIRE

    坪内, 正之; 山本, 一夫; 山田, 憲照; 丸本, 卓哉

    1995-01-01

    Coating resin chemical fertilizer using alkyd resin and polyethylene resin is added into soils, and it is a problem that these resins remain in the soils. Therefore, we investigated the degradation of these resins in the soils. The results obtained were as follows. 1) The dergradation ratio of alkyd resin was higher than polyethylene resin. Three month later, the former was 4.5% and the latter was below 0.5%. The result that the degradation ratio of alkyd resin was higher in soil with a high ...

  5. Brisk Demand of Neopentyl Glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Neopentyl glycol (NPG) is an important chemical raw material. It is mainly used to produce saturated polyester resin for powder coatings,unsaturated polyester resin, polyester polyols, esters for synthetic lubricants, plasticizers and alkyd resins.

  6. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  7. Resin for processing radioactive waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns an anionic exchange resin having a long service life with less radiation degradation. The resin is an anionic exchange resin in which a trimethyl ammonium group is introduced to a copolymer of 4-bromo-butoxymethyl styrene and divinyl benzene. The resin is excellent in economic performance, and can reduce the frequency for the exchange of cross-linked anionic exchangers. (T.M.)

  8. Thermal properties of ablative phenolic resins

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Dimeski, Dimko; BOGOEVA-GACEVA, Gordana

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic resins are known for their excellent thermal properties and chemical stability and are widely used in automotive industry, electrical engineering, military industry and industry of construction materials. Their attractive properties have been especially exploited in high temperature applications. Recently a wide range of phenolic resins for different applications is available on the market. In this paper the properties of two types of ablative phenolic resins are compared: resin B...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polycarbonate resins. 177.1580 Section 177.1580... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1580 Polycarbonate resins. Polycarbonate... with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Polycarbonate resins are polyesters produced by: (1)...

  10. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  11. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane...) For the purpose of this section, polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of...

  13. Features material considerations polyester resins

    OpenAIRE

    Алексеева, Н. Н.; Маслош, О. В.; Островерхова, И. А.; Маслош, В. З.

    2011-01-01

    The features of drafting of financial balance of processes of receipt of polyester resins are considered. It is marked that practical output of polyesters always anymore theoretical. The method of drafting of financial balance of processes of receipt of polyesters is offered.

  14. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil;

    2012-01-01

    . Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to epoxy resin monomer (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; MW 340) among patients with suspected contact dermatitis and relate this to occupation and work-related consequences. Patients/methods. The dataset comprised 20 808 consecutive dermatitis...

  15. Stochastic resin transfer molding process

    CERN Document Server

    Park, M

    2016-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of stochastic resin transfer molding process, which are formulated as random moving boundary problems. We study their properties, analytically in the one-dimensional case and numerically in the two-dimensional case. We show how variability of time to fill depends on correlation lengths and smoothness of a random permeability field.

  16. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... *ABS-SAN Resins *Acrylate-Methacrylate Latexes *Acrylic Latex *Acrylic Resins *Cellulose Acetate Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose...

  17. Spray drying of bead resins: feasibility tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell International has developed a volume reduction system for low-level reactor wastes based on drying the wastes in a heated-air spray dryer. The drying of slurries of sodium sulfate, boric acid, and powdered ion exchange resins was demonstrated in previous tests. The drying of bead ion exchange resins can be especially difficult due to the relatively large size of bead resins (about 500 to 800 microns) and their natural affinity for water. This water becomes part of the pore structure of the resins and normally comprises 50 t 60 wt % of the resin weight. A 76-cm-diameter spray dryer was used for feasibility tests of spray drying of cation and anion bead resins. These resins were fed to the dryer in the as-received form (similar to dewatered resins) and as slurries. A dry, free-flowing product was produced in all the tests. The volume of the spray-dried product was one-half to one-third the volume of the as-received material. An economic analysis was made of the potential cost savings that can be achieved using the Rockwel spray dryer system. In-plant costs, transportation costs, and burial costs of spray-dried resins were compared to similar costs for disposal of dewatered resins. A typical utility producing 170 m3 (6,000 ft3) per year of dewatered resins can save $600,000 to $700,000 per year using this volume reduction system

  18. Formulation of lignin phenol formaldehyde resins as a wood adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the potential of reducing phenol with lignin in phenol formaldehyde resin formulation. The physical and chemical properties between lignin phenol formaldehyde resin (LPF) and commercial phenol formaldehyde resin (CPF) were compared. Phenol had been replaced by lignin [that was extracted from black liquor of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB)] in synthesizing resin with a ratio lignin to phenol 1:1. The IR spectra showed that there were similarities in functional groups between LPF resin and CPF resin. The comparison of physical strength properties via tensile strength test between LPF resin and CPF resin showed that the newly formulated resin has higher bonding strength compared to commercial resin. Kinematics viscosity test showed that LPF resin has lower kinematics viscosity compared to CPF resin in 21 days storage time. SEM images for both resin showed similarities in the effect of resin penetration into woods vessel existed. (author)

  19. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  20. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the...... of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  1. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  2. High-Temperature Polyimide Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanucci, Raymond D.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1990-01-01

    Improved polyimide resin used at continuous temperatures up to 700 degrees F (371 degrees C). PMR-II-50, serves as matrix for fiber-reinforced composites. Material combines thermo-oxidative stability with autoclave processability. Used in such turbine engine components as air-bypass ducts, vanes, bearings, and nozzle flaps. Other potential applications include wing and fuselage skins on high-mach-number aircraft and automotive engine blocks and pistons.

  3. Boron sorption characteristics in resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of boron addition in a nuclear power plant is to control the reactivity. In PHWRs, it is injected into the moderator system in the form of boric anhydride solution, while in PHWRs, it is added to the primary heat transport system in the form of boric acid solution. The required boron levels in PHWRs are controlled by valving in strong base anion exchangers having exchangeable species in OD- form while in PHWRs, the same can be achieved by restoring to the use of Boron Thermal Regeneration System (BTRS). This system operates on the principle of existence of different amounts of various polyborate ions at different temperatures, solution pH's and the boric acid concentrations and on the reversible sorption of these polyions on strong base anion exchange resins. This report describes the salient features of boron sorption characteristics on four types of anion exchange resins, based on experimental data generated in the chemical laboratories of Reactor Engineering Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay. The report further makes an attempt to calculate the pH of the resin and solution phases and the percentages of different polyborates and undissociated boric acid, under the experimental conditions investigated. (author). 30 refs., 4 figs., 20 tables

  4. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  5. Relative Molecular Mass Distribution of BG Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Benzoguanamine-formaldehyde (BG-F) resins are a class of amino resins, which are important cross-linking agents for epoxy, alkyol and acrylic resins, etc. The cross-linking performance is the best one when the polymerization degree is 2-4. This paper discusses the effects of the pH value for polycondensation and the formaldehyde to benzoguanamine mole ratio in a methanol system, and compares the relative molecular mass distribution using the Flory statistics method.

  6. Epoxy Resins Modified with Vegetable Oils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Czub

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The application of modified natural oils, nontoxic, biodegradable and renewable materials, for the modification and the synthesis of epoxy resins were presented. Firstly, the application of epoxidized vegetable oils (soybean, rapeseed, linseed and sunflower):as reactive diluents for epoxy resins was proposed and studied[1-2]. Viscosity reducing ability of epoxidized oils was tested in the compositions with Bisphenol A based low-molecular-weight epoxy resins. The rheological behaviour of the mi...

  7. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4â²... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...) The resins are produced by the condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and...

  8. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  9. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  10. Radiation degradation in organic ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EPICOR-2 Resin/Liner Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, studied the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion exchange resins caused by internal radiation. Results of the third sampling analysis of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and PF-20 are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins and with results from the first and second samplings to determine if degradation has occurred because of the high internal radiation dose. Those results are also compared to findings of other researchers

  11. Curing Mechanism of Condensed Polynuclear Aromatic Resin and Thermal Stability of Cured Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shibin; Sun Qiqian; Wang Yuwei; Wu Mingbo; Zhang Zailong

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the thermal stability of condensed polynuclear aromatic (COPNA) resin synthesized from vacuum residue, 1,4-benzenedimethanol was added to cure COPNA resin. The curing mechanism was investigated by pro-ton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, solid carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry and Fourier trans-form infrared spectroscopy. Microstructures of the uncured and the cured COPNA resins were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The thermal stability of COPNA resins before and after curing was tested by thermo-gravimetric analysis. The element composition of the cured COPNA resin heated at different temperatures was analyzed by an element analyzer. The results showed that the uncured COPNA resin reacted with the cross-linking agent during the cur-ing process, and the curing mechanism was conifrmed to be the electrophilic substitution reaction. Compared with the un-cured COPNA resin, the cured COPNA resin had a smooth surface, well-ordered and streamlined sheet structure with more crystalline solids, better molecular arrangement and orientation. The weight loss process of the uncured and cured COPNA resins was divided into three stages. Carbon residue of the cured COPNA resin was 41.65%at 600℃, which was much higher than 25.02%of the uncured COPNA resin, which indicated that the cured COPNA resin had higher thermal stability.

  12. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  13. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium concentrations of thiosulfate in the NARS system. Keywords: equilibrium, gold loading, resin capacity, thiosulfate, trithionate

  14. Some experiences with epoxy resin grouting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, H R

    1980-07-01

    Epoxy resin systems are used in tiling and grouting in the construction industry. Because of the nature of the application, skin contact is the primary hazard. The most prevalent reaction was reddening of the forearms, followed by whole body reddening and loss of appetite, these latter two being associated with smoking while applying the resin. PMID:7415974

  15. Terpenoid Oligomers of Dammar Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Di Girolamo, Francesca; Corsi, Iacopo; Degano, Ilaria; Tinè, Maria Rosaria; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-04-22

    Dammar is a triterpenoid resin containing a volatile fraction, a monomeric fraction, and a high-molecular weight fraction. Although the low-molecular-weight components comprising sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids have been extensively studied, the nature of the macromolecular components is still not fully understood, and different and sometimes contradictory theories have been proposed. The aim of this paper is to clarify the nature of the macromolecular components of dammar resin. A multianalytical approach was adopted based on thermoanalytical-thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA/FTIR)-and mass spectrometric techniques-direct exposure mass spectrometry (DE/MS), pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py/GC/MS), flow injection analysis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FIA/ESI/MS), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The data indicate that the oligomeric fraction comprises triterpenoids bound through ester bonds, and that these triterpenoids are the same as those found in the free terpenoid fraction. The oligomeric fraction also includes triterpenoids containing carbonyl moieties, such as formyl groups, thus suggesting that these are involved in the esters in their corresponding enolic form. PMID:26981624

  16. Ethylated Urea - Ether - Modified Urea - Formaldehyde Resins,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Obichukwu EDOGA

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available First, phenol - formaldehyde (PF and urea - formaldehyde (UFII resins were separately conventionally prepared in our laboratory. Also, UF resin synthesized from the acid modified synthesis procedure was synthesized in a purely acid medium of pH 1.0, FU molar ratio of 1.0 and at 50oC (one-stage acid modified-synthesis procedure. Subsequently, the UF resin II was modified during synthesis by incorporating ethylated urea-ether (EUER (i.e. UFIII and glycerol (GLYC (i.e. UFV cured with and without acid curing agent. The structural and physicochemical analyses of the various resin samples were carried out.The results showed that the unmodified UF resin (UF II synthesized in acid medium of pH 1.0, F/U molar ratio 1.0, and at 50oC, cured in absence of acid curing catalyst, showed features in their spectra which are consistent with a tri-, and/or tetra-substituted urea in the reaction to give a 3 - dimensional network cured UF resin. Modification of the UF resin(UF II with ethylated urea-ether and glycerol to produce UF resins III and respectively V prominently increased the absorbance of methylene and ether groups in the spectra which are consistent with increased hydrophobicity and improved hydrolytic stability. For the conventional UF resin (UF I, the only clear distinction between spectra for the UF resin II and UF resins (III/V is the presence of diminished peaks for methylene groups at 2.2 ppm. The relationship between the logarithmic viscosity of cured PF resin with time showed continuos dependence of viscosity with time during cure up to 70 minutes. Similar trends were shown by UF resins (III/V, cured in absence of acid catalyst. In contrast, the conventional UF resins I and UF IV (i.e. UF II cured with NH4CL showed abrupt discontinuity in viscosity with time just after about 20 minutes of cure.

  17. Evaluation of resins for provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J O; Haveman, C W; Butzin, C

    1992-06-01

    An in vivo study of two resin materials (Barricaid and Caulk Temporary Crown and Bridge Resin) was done to determine the retention, post-operative sensitivity, and fabrication time of provisional restorations made from these materials. Following the placement of these resins in 67 intracoronal cavity preparations of 19 adult patients, a baseline evaluation was made which included a clinical examination and color slides. Twenty-four hours after the temporary restorations were placed, the patients completed evaluations of the post-operative sensitivity experienced. There was no difference in post-operative sensitivity between the teeth restored with Barricaid or Caulk Temporary Crown and Bridge Resin. At the insertion appointment of the final restoration, the interim restoration's success rate was determined. There was no difference between the retention of the two provisional materials. Fabrication time was significantly different with Barricaid restorations requiring less than one-half the fabrication time of the Caulk Temporary Crown and Bridge Resin material. PMID:1388950

  18. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  19. EPOXY RESINS TOUGHENED WITH CARBOXYL TERMINATED POLYETHERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yunchao; LI Yiming

    1983-01-01

    Carboxyl terminated polyethers, the adducts of hydroxyl terminated polytetrahydrofuran and maleic anhydride, were used as toughener for epoxy resins. The morphology of the toughened resins was investigated by means of turbidity measurement, dynamic mechanical testing and scanning electron microscope observation. It turned out that the molecular weight and the carboxyl content of the polyether and the cure conditions are important factors, which affect the particle size of the polyether-rich domains and, in turn, the mechanical properties of the cured resin. Carboxyl terminated polytetrahydrofurans have a low glass transition temperature, and in appropriate amount they do not affect the thermal resistance of the resin. These advantages make them preferable as toughener for epoxy resins.

  20. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137Cs, 85Sr, and 60Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85Sr or 60Co. Release rates of 137Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137Cs, 85Sr, and 60Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  1. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PE-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with recent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analyses comparing test results of resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 with unirradiated resins obtained from Epicor, Inc. show resin degradation has occurred in some of the EPICOR-II resins examined. The mechanism of degradation is compared with work of other researchers and is consistent with their findings. The strong acid cation resins (divinylbenzene, styrene base structure) are losing effective cross-linking along with scission of functional groups and are experiencing first an increase and eventually a decrease in total exchange capacity as the absorbed radiation dose increases. The phenolic cation resins (phenol-formaldehyde base structure) show a loss of effective cross-linking and oxidation of the polymer chain. Analyses of resins removed from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 over the next several years should show a further increase in degradation

  2. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  3. Decomposing method for ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a method of decomposing ion exchange resins generated in a nuclear power plant to carbon dioxide reliably in a short period of time. (1) The ion exchange resins are mixed with water, and then they are kept for a predetermined period of time in the presence of an inert gas at high temperature and high pressure exceeding the critical point of water to decompose the ion exchange resins. (2) The ion exchange resins is mixed with water, an oxidant is added and they are kept for a predetermined time in the presence of an inert gas at a high temperature and a high pressure exceeding a critical point of water of an inert gas at a high temperature to decompose the ion exchange resins. (3) An alkali or acid is added to ion exchange resins and water to control the hydrogen ion concentration in the solution and the ion exchange resins are decomposed in above-mentioned (1) or (2). Sodium hydroxide is used as the alkali and hydrochloric acid is used as the acid. In addition, oxygen, hydrogen peroxide or ozone is used as an oxidant. (I.S.)

  4. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride... the purpose of this section, poly(vinyl fluoride) resins consist of basic resins produced by...

  5. Studies on cesium uptake by phenolic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selective removal of cesium by phenolic ion-exchange resins from highly salted alkaline radioactive solutions was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and resorcinol-catechol mixture with formaldehyde and characterized for their moisture regain, ion-exchange (H+ → Na+) capacity, and distribution coefficient (KD) for cesium. The effects of open and sealed curing of the polymers on their properties were studied. The effect of Na+, NaOH, and Cs+ concentration on the uptake of cesium by resorcinol-formaldehyde resin was investigated, in particular. The chemical, thermal, and radiation stabilities of the polymers were also studied

  6. Epoxide resins for use at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple screening test is presented which permits the rapid evaluation of many epoxide resin systems, with a subsequent more detailed evaluation of those which performed well in the test. Several hundred resin systems were investigated including such variables as hardened ratios and blends, diluents, flexibilisers and modifiers, but considering only one expoxide resin, namely diglycidyl ether of Bisphenol A. The materials and results are detailed and conclusions formulated. Polymers used in low temperature applications should contain, wherever possible, reinforcement in the form of glass fabrics, rovings or chopped strands. Further work is planned to assess the performance of these materials when used with fillers and in laminates in fatigue situations

  7. Luminous Efficient Compositions Based on Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Palaiah

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium/sodium nitrate illuminating compositions with epoxy resin - E 605 have beenstudied for luminosity and luminous efficiency by varying fuel oxidizer ratio and binder content.The compositions have been evaluated for impact and friction sensitivities, burn rate, thermalcharacteristics, and mechanical properties. Flame temperature and combustion products areevaluated theoretically by using REAL program. Experimental results show that, luminosity,burn rate, and calorimetric value are higher for polyester resin-based compositions. The highluminous efficiency composition is achieved with magnesium/sodium nitrate ratio of 70/30 with4 per cent epoxy resin.

  8. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing

  9. Sorption of dissolved organics from aqueous solution by polystrene resins. I. Resin characterization and sorption equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornel, P.; Sontheimer, H.

    1986-01-01

    The results of sorption equilibrium studies indicate that adsorption is only one of the three mechanisms involved in removing organics from aqueous solution by polystyrene resins. The other two mechanisms are associated with the resin's capability to incorporate organics into their polymer matrix while swelling. To describe the overall sorption behavior, it is not sufficient to characterize the resin structure by estimating pore size distribution and internal surface area of the dry polymers. The amount of swelling in different organic solvents must also be evaluated as an important structural parameter of polystyrene resins. The role of the different mechanisms depends on both the resin structure and the physical and chemical properties of the solute. The solute's affinity for the polystyrene surface can be correlated with the solute's benzene-water partition coefficient. A heuristic model is presented which relates the sorption capacity to both the resin and solute properties.

  10. Method of decomposing radioactive spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve the decomposability of spent ion exchange resins such as anionic resins, anionic - cationic mixed resins or the likes issued from nuclear power plants. Method: Spent ion exchange resins containing radioactive materials are decomposed by hydrogen peroxide. In this case, anionic exchange resins or mixture of anionic exchange resins and cationic exchange resins are decomposed by using bivalent or trivalent iron ions coexistent with sulfate groups in excess of the amount corresponding to the molar amount of bivalent or trivalent iron ions as a catalyst. Since the anionic exchange resins or the mixture of the anionic exchange resins and cationic resins are decomposed substantially completely, the amount of residue after the decomposition is reduced and the volume-reducing property of the radioactive wastes can be improved to facilitate the solidifying treatment. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. The encapsulation of spent ion-exchange resins in an epoxide resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic and organic IX resins have been incorporated into a water-tolerant epoxide resin system. The effect of γ-irradiation to 5 x 109 rads on the mechanical properties of samples containing wet IX resins has been investigated. It was found that although there is a marked embrittlement of the epoxide matrix, useful mechanical properties are retained up to this dose. Gas evolution studies under irradiation and thermogravimetric analyses have also been carried out. (author)

  12. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems

    OpenAIRE

    AlJehani, Yousef A.; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Pekka K. Vallittu

    2015-01-01

    Background With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adh...

  13. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing

  14. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi;

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  15. Advanced cement solidification technique for spent resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 40 years, the nuclear facilities of China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) produced an amount of radioactive organic resins, a kind of problematic stream in nuclear industry. As these facilities were stepping into decommissioning, the treatment of the spent organic resins was put on the agenda. The various routes for spent resin treatment such as incineration, advanced oxidation, cement immobilization, etc, were considered. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages when applied in the treatment of spent resins. Since the quantities of the spent organic resins were relatively small and an experience with variety of cementation processes existed in CIAE, predominately for immobilization of the evaporated concentrates, the option of direct encapsulation of the spent organic resins into cementitious materials was adopted in 2003, as a preferred method from the point of view of saving the on the cost of the disposal. In order to realize the end goal, the main work consisted of: the survey of the source terms; cementitious material formula investigation; and the process development. This work, which was undertaken in the following years, is addressed as follows. Source terms of the spent resins in CIAE were to be made clear firstly. The results showed that a total of 24-29 m3 of spent resins was generated and accumulated in the past 40 years. Spent resin arose from two research reactors (heavy water reactor and light water reactor), and from the waste management plant. The amount of the spent resins from the heavy water reactor was 1m3 or so, but its radioactive concentration was high to ∼108-∼109Bq/m3. Two kinds of cements, ASC and OPC cement were selected next, as the solidifying matrix to be investigated. A mixture surface response approach was employed to design experiment and interpret data. In comparison, ASC was superior to OPC cement and it displayed preferable performances to encapsulate spent resins. The optimum formulation is:1) resin

  16. Phenolic Resin Sector Enters New Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Zeshuang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Rapid output increase With the importation of new production technologies and the boom of large timber processing, insulation refractory material, composite material and foam plastics sectors in recent years, the phenolic resin production in China has developed rapidly.

  17. Epoxide resins for use at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter reports on the development and characterization of a number of unfilled epoxide resin systems offering improved resistance to thermal shock. Points out that the low temperature physical properties of cured resin systems are little changed by formulation variables. Finds that it is during cool down from room temperature that these newly developed resin systems demonstrate their ability to absorb the strains induced by differential thermal contraction. Concludes that the new epoxide resin systems demonstrate excellent resistance to thermal shock and have impregnation characteristics suitable for the preparation of fiber reinforced composites by vacuum impregnation or by wet lay up procedures. Notes that their improved resistance to thermal shock allows them to be used in situations where some inhomogeneity of reinforcement is unavoidable or where large temperature gradients may be present. Recommends that polymers used in low temperature applications should contain, wherever possible, reinforcement in the form of glass fabrics, rovings or chopped strands

  18. Improved high-temperature resistant matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E.; Wright, W. F.; Ueda, K.; Orell, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed with the objective of developing matrix resins that exhibit improved thermo-oxidative stability over state-of-the-art high temperature resins for use at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and air pressures up to 0.7 MPa (100 psia). The work was based upon a TRW discovered family of polyimides currently licensed to and marketed by Ethyl Corporation as EYMYD(R) resins. The approach investigated to provide improved thermo-oxidative properties was to use halogenated derivatives of the diamine, 2, 2-bis (4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF). Polyimide neat resins and Celion(R) 12,000 composites prepared from fluorine substituted 4-BDAF demonstrated unexpectedly lower glass transition temperatures (Tg) and thermo-oxidative stabilities than the baseline 4-BDAF/PMDA polymer.

  19. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  20. Development of Polymer Resins using Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes Fabiano A. N.; Lona Liliane M. F.

    2002-01-01

    The development of polymer resins can benefit from the application of neural networks, using its great ability to correlate inputs and outputs. In this work we have developed a procedure that uses neural networks to correlate the end-user properties of a polymer with the polymerization reactor's operational condition that will produce that desired polymer. This procedure is aimed at speeding up the development of new resins and help finding the appropriate operational conditions to produce a ...

  1. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  2. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  3. Selection of Unsaturated Polyester Resins for Closed Resin Transfer Moulding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Y. Jaramillo-Zapata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper three commercial unsaturated polyester resins of wide use in Colombia are analyzed and it is evaluated the convenience of their use in resin transfer molding processes according to viscosity and reactivity criteria. The resin viscosities are compared between 15 and 50°C, in the same way as the reactivity by mean of the curing curves at room temperature, using catalyst at 1, 1.5 and 2%. In agreement with the results, it was determined that some resins are suitable for RTM process, because of their appropriate viscosity, consistent reactivity and curing velocity. These features are of great importance in the unsaturated polyester resin selection, according to conditions of closed mold processes.

  4. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  5. Resin flow monitoring in vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding using optical fiber distributed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Soohyun; Kageyama, Kazuro; Murayama, Hideaki; Ohsawa, Isamu; Uzawa, Kiyoshi; Kanai, Makoto; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2007-04-01

    In this study, we implemented resin flow monitoring by using an optical fiber sensor during vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VaRTM).We employed optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for distributed sensing. Especially, long gauge FBGs (about 100mm) which are 10 times longer than an ordinary FBG were employed for more effective distributed sensing. A long gauge FBG was embedded in GFRP laminates, and other two ones were located out of laminate for wavelength reference and temperature compensation, respectively. During VaRTM, the embedded FBG could measure how the preform affected the sensor with vacuum pressure and resin was flowed into the preform. In this study, we intended to detect the gradient of compressive strain between impregnated part and umimpregnated one within long gauge FBG. If resin is infused to preform, compressive strain which is generated on FBG is released by volume of resin. We could get the wavelength shift due to the change of compressive strain along gauge length of FBG by using short-time Fourier transformation for signal acquired from FBG. Therefore, we could know the resin flow front with the gradient of compressive strain of FBG. In this study, we used silicon oil which has same viscosity with resin substitute for resin in order to reuse FBG. In order to monitor resin flow, the silicon oil was infused from one edge of preform, the silicon oil was flowed from right to left. Then, we made dry spot within gauge length by infusing silicon oil to both sides of preform to prove the ability of dry spot monitoring with FBG. We could monitor resin flow condition and dry spot formation successfully using by FBG based on OFDR.

  6. Hot dewatering and resin encapsulation of intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of the processes involved in the hot dewatering and encapsulation of alumino-ferric hydroxide floc in epoxide resin have been studied. Pretreatment of the floc to reduce resin attack and hydrolysis and to increase the dimensional stability of the solidified wasteform has been evaluated. It has been demonstrated that removal of ammonium nitrate from the floc and control of the residual water in the resin are important factors in ensuring dimensional stability of the solidified resin. Resin systems have been identified which, together with the appropriate waste pretreatment have successfully encapsulated a simulated magnox sludge producing a stable wasteform having mechanical and physical properties comparable with the basic resin. (author)

  7. Biocompatibility of polymethylmethacrylate resins used in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rupali; Singh, Raghuwar D; Sharma, Vinod P; Siddhartha, Ramashanker; Chand, Pooran; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    Biocompatibility or tissue compatibility describes the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response when applied as intended. Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) based resins are most widely used resins in dentistry, especially in fabrication of dentures and orthodontic appliances. They are considered cytotoxic on account of leaching of various potential toxic substances, most common being residual monomer. Various in vitro and in vivo experiments and cell based studies conducted on acrylic based resins or their leached components have shown them to have cytotoxic effects. They can cause mucosal irritation and tissue sensitization. These studies are not only important to evaluate the long term clinical effect of these materials, but also help in further development of alternate resins. This article reviews information from scientific full articles, reviews, or abstracts published in dental literature, associated with biocompatibility of PMMA resins and it is leached out components. Published materials were searched in dental literature using general and specialist databases, like the PubMED database. PMID:22454327

  8. Stabilizing parquet blocks with epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Glazkov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available While parquet blocks and panels from stabilized wood show much promise as finishing materials, their widespread use is limited by their low dimensional stability in variable-humidity environments. Existing solutions to stabilize the blocks have several disadvantages, including hard-to-find or toxic stabilizers. This is why this study discusses modifications of epoxy resin which has sufficient functionality for effective structuring. We analyzed the capillary-porous structure of different types of wood, and established the patterns associated with a reduction in the porosity or the specific volume of voids in pine, birch and oak. The basic characteristics of impregnating compositions indicating the high penetrative and structuring capabilities of epoxy resin have been discovered. It is shown that in addition to increasing the strength characteristics, there is a steady decline in water absorption and swelling with an increase in resin content in the wood. It has been found by the method of test fluids that curing the epoxy resin in the presence of hexamethylenediamine is accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of polar components in the total value of the surface tension. Oligomer molecules were shown to penentrate pine wood cells, providing a high moisture protection effect. The results suggest it is possible to use epoxy resin to modify parquet blocks and panels that would be used under variable humidity and high impact loads.

  9. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  10. Immobilization of radioactive ion exchange resins in glass. Part I: Pretreatment of the resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: The ion exchange resins are used to retain the radionuclides that contaminate the water in primary and secondary circuits and storage pools of the Argentine nuclear reactors. Once used, this resins are an intermediate level waste. Due to the generated volume of resins during the reactor life, it is necessary to have a proper method for management and final disposal of these wastes. Up to now in National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the most studied process is cementation. However, this method increases the waste volume and the final product has low compression hardness. The immobilization in glass of these wastes is attractive because of the volume reduction that could be attained and because of the well known durability of glass. In this work we prepared a mixed bed of resins, similar to those used in Argentina nuclear reactors. We use cesium as a simulant for the active elements present in the resins. Absorption of lithium and cesium was controlled by conductivity and/or ph measurements. The so charged resins were thermally decomposed. This process was studied by Dta/T G experiments. Some potentially problematic effects were founded (foam formation, particle explosion), regarding the possibility of immobilisation of the resins in glass by sintering. Finally, the calcination products were analyzed by Sem and X-ray diffraction. This analysis showed that lithium and cesium remain as sulfates. For this reason we decided to use those chemical compounds as simulant s of the calcination products in the following sintering experiments

  11. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last seven years, Low Oxidation State Metal Ion reagents (LOMI) have been used to decontaminate the 100 MW(e) Steam Generating Heavy Water Ractor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. The use of these reagents has resulted in a dilute ionic solution containing activation products which are produced by corrosion of metallic components in the reactor. It has been demonstrated that the amount of activity in the solution can be reduced using organic ion exchanger resins. These resins consist of a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid or quaternary ammonium function groups and can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which has been developed is produced from a 9 to 1 blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing 28% ion exchange resin in the water saturated form. If 6% Microsilica is added to the blended cement the waste loading can be increased to 36 w/o. (author)

  12. Adsorption of plant phenols by polystyrene resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Fukushima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of nine plant phenols by nine polystyrene ion-exchange resins was investigated in an experimental model system. The phenols were adsorbed by Amberlite CG-120 more efficiently than any other acidically charged resins tested in this study. They were also taken up by anion exchangers. Among them Dowex 1-X8 was found to show the strongest effect on the adsorption of the phenolic constituents applied. A comparison of the efficiency of plant phenol adsorption between two different types of the synthetic polymers revealed that the basically charged polystyrenes had more prefarable affinities for phenols than cation exchangers. For example, the ratio of the efficiency between Amberlite CG-120 and Dowex 1-X8 was roughly calculated to be 3:7 under the present experimental conditions. The adsorption rate of the test phenols was raised mostly by increasing the amount of the resins added, if they were mixed with effective polymers in the incubation model system.

  13. Development of Polymer Resins using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Fabiano A. N.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of polymer resins can benefit from the application of neural networks, using its great ability to correlate inputs and outputs. In this work we have developed a procedure that uses neural networks to correlate the end-user properties of a polymer with the polymerization reactor's operational condition that will produce that desired polymer. This procedure is aimed at speeding up the development of new resins and help finding the appropriate operational conditions to produce a given polymer resin; reducing experimentation, pilot plant tests and therefore time and money spent on development. The procedure shown in this paper can predict the reactor's operational condition with an error lower than 5%.

  14. Aging in CTBN modified epoxy resin stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cause of degradation in the glass transition temperature (T/sub G/) of a partially crystallized polymer was investigated. Sample epoxy resin filled capacitors were cured at 900C for 24 hours, then stored at room atmospheric conditions. These showed typical degradation in T/sub G/ after storage for one month. One set of epoxy resin castings was stored at room atmosphere and another set was stored in a dry box at 0% relative humidity and 270C. The samples at room atmospheric conditions showed typical degradation in T/sub G/, while the T/sub G/ for those stored in the dry box increased. Further tests were then made on epoxy resin castings at various curing temperatures and times at both room atmosphere and 0% humidity. Resulting data indicated that absorption of moisture during storage was the predominant cause of T/sub G/ degradation, with stress relaxation another, though smaller, contributing factor

  15. Improved high temperature resistant matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. E.; Powell, S. H.; Jones, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The objective was to develop organic matrix resins suitable for service at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and at air pressures up to 0.4 MPa (60 psia) for time durations of a minimum of 100 hours. Matrix resins capable of withstanding these extreme oxidative environmental conditions would lead to increased use of polymer matrix composites in aircraft engines and provide significant weight and cost savings. Six linear condensation, aromatic/heterocyclic polymers containing fluorinated and/or diphenyl linkages were synthesized. The thermo-oxidative stability of the resins was determined at 644 K and compressed air pressures up to 0.4 MPa. Two formulations, both containing perfluoroisopropylidene linkages in the polymer backbone structure, exhibited potential for 644 K service to meet the program objectives. Two other formulations could not be fabricated into compression molded zero defect specimens.

  16. Vitrification of spent ion exchange resin from Korean NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent resin is the main wet waste generated by nuclear power plants (NPPs). Vitrification is conceptually attractive because of the potential durability of the final product and the large volume reduction. The vitrification of spent resin from NPPs is examined. There is a large amount of sulfate in spent resin ash. However, the limited solubility of sulfate in glass resulted in the low waste loading of spent resin. High sulfate in glass led to the phase separation. Some well-developed glasses frits have been used to vitrify spent resin from Korean NPPs. The waste loading is less than 5 wt percent of resin ash. Spent resin also was added to the borate waste glasses, 20 g of dry resin could be vitrified in 100 g of borate waste glass without phase separation and final waste from has good durability. (author). 12 refs., 6 tabs

  17. Petroleum Resins: Separation, Character, and Role in Petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Ivar; Speight, James

    2001-01-01

    In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes are...... precipitated, adsorbents are added to the n-pentane solutions of the resins and oils, by which process the resins are adsorbed and subsequently recovered by the use of a more polar solvent, and the oils remain in solution. The resin fraction plays an important role in the stability of petroleum and prevents...... of the fact that the resin fraction is extremely important to the stability of petroleum, there is surprisingly little work reported on the characteristics of the resins. This article summarizes the work that has been carried out in determining the character and properties of the resin constituents...

  18. Petroleum Resins: Separation, Character, and Role in Petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Ivar; Speight, James

    In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes are...... precipitated, adsorbents are added to the n-pentane solutions of the resins and oils, by which process the resins are adsorbed and subsequently recovered by the use of a more polar solvent, and the oils remain in solution. The resin fraction plays an important role in the stability of petroleum and prevents...... of the fact that the resin fraction is extremely important to the stability of petroleum, there is surprisingly little work reported on the characteristics of the resins. This article summarizes the work that has been carried out in determining the character and properties of the resin constituents...

  19. Resin additive improves performance of high-temperature hydrocarbon lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. L.; Loomis, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Paraffinic resins, in high temperature applications, improve strength of thin lubricant film in Hertzian contacts even though they do not increase bulk oil viscosity. Use of resin circumvents corrosivity and high volatility problems inherent with many chemical additives.

  20. Simultaneous metal adsorption on tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegetable tannin sorbent is evaluated as ion exchange resin using a multitracer study on the adsorption behavior of various elements. Lisiloma latisiliqua L. tannins, polycondensated into spherical pellets were chosen as sorbent resin material. Sorption evaluation of Ce, Cu(II), U(VI), Eu, Fe(III), Th, Nd as representatives of different classes of metal ions were done at different pH values. The distribution ratio of the studied elements was calculated from laboratory experiments. Tannic ion exchange material shows excellent ability for actinides and rare earth elements adsorption from waters. Using radiotracers, the number of catechins subunits involve in each tannin-metal complex was determined. (author)

  1. Color stability of recent composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Ardu, Stefano; Duc, Olivier; Di Bella, Enrico; Krejci, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the color stability of 8 recently developed resin composites when exposed to various staining agents. Six disc-shaped specimens made out of 8 resin composite materials were immersed in artificial saliva, coffee, coke, tea, orange juice and red wine. The initial color (T0) of the 288 specimens was assessed by a calibrated reflectance spectrophotometer (SpectroShade, MHT) over a black as well as a white background. All specimens were kept in an incubat...

  2. Treatment of liquid wastes using composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite ion exchange resins were prepared by coating copper ferrocyanide and hydrous manganese oxide powders on polyurethane foam. The binder used was polyvinyl acetate in alcohol/acetone medium. Studies were conducted in pilot scale using 50 L ion exchange column and treated category III radioactive liquid wastes. About 2000 to 2400 bed volumes of liquid wastes containing radioactive 137Cs and 90Sr were treated. Digestion of the resins was carried out in a 25 L column using alkaline KMnO4. The digested liquid was fixed in cement matrix and the matrices were characterized with respect to compressive strength, biological and leach resistance. (author)

  3. PMR Resin Compositions For High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to identify polymer matrix resins suitable for making graphite-fiber laminates used at 700 degree F (371 degree C) in such applications as aircraft engines to achieve higher thrust-to-weight ratios. Two particular high-molecular-weight formulations of PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) resins most promising. PMR compositions of higher FMW exhibit enhanced thermo-oxidative stability. Formation of high-quality laminates with these compositions requires use of curing pressures higher than those suitable for compositions of lower FMW.

  4. The influence of resin flexural modulus on the magnitude of ceramic strengthening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to determine the magnitude of ceramic resin-strengthening with resin-based materials with varying flexural moduli using a regression technique to assess the theoretical strengthening at a \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness. The hypothesis tested was that experimentally, increasing resin flexural modulus results in increased resin-strengthening observed at a theoretical \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness.

  5. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Styrene

    OpenAIRE

    Hasmukh S. Patel; Panchal, Kumar K.

    2004-01-01

    Novel unsaturated poly (ester-amide) resins (UPEAs) were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA) and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Styrene (STY.) to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-STY. resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a catalyst and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter ...

  6. Study on the Novel Dicyanate Ester Resin Containing Naphthalene Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Qiang YAN; Hong Yun PENG; Li JI; Guo Rong QI

    2004-01-01

    The novel dicyanate ester resin containing naphthalene unit (DNCY) was synthesized, and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and elemental analysis (EA).The thermal properties of DNCY resin was studied by thermal degradation analysis at a heating rate of 10 (C /min-1 in N2 and air. The DNCY resin exhibited better thermal and thermal-oxidative stability than bisphenol A dicyanate (BACY) resin.

  7. Performances and improvement of copper-hydrazine complexation deoxidising resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper-hydrazine complexation deoxidising resin is tested to examine its performances including effluent water quality and capacity of deoxidisation. By the means of changing the resin type and regeneration, the deoxidising capacity of the resin can be improved to 13 times more than before. At the same time, physical performances of the resin are also greatly improved while maintaining its velocity of deoxidisation and effluent quality. (authors)

  8. Synthesis of highly carboxylate acrylic resins for leather impregnation

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Solé, M.M.; Shendrik, Alexander; Labastida, L.; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the synthesis of new leather finishing acrylic resins. Four resins ware synthesized varying the concentration of ethyl acrylate, and metracrylic acid. Sodium lauryl sulphate was used as emulsifying system. By means of an experimental design, an optimal resin for leather impregnation was defined. The results obtained indicated that the variation of the monomer concentration influences the resin properties, the hardness of the film, and the penetration into the leather. Most...

  9. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    OpenAIRE

    Octarina Octarina; Andi Soufyan; Yosi Kusuma Eriwati

    2013-01-01

    Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV) is obtained using multi-step (MS) resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC) was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS) of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups...

  10. Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kimura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin were investigated. The cure behavior of benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin was monitored by model reaction using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. As a result of the model reaction, the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring and thermal self-cyclotrimerization of cyanate ester group occurred, and then the phenolic hydoroxyl group generated by the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring co-reacted with cyanate ester group. The properties of the cured thermosetting resin were estimated by mechanical properties, electrical resistivity, water resistance and heat resistance. The cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and cyanate ester resin showed good heat resistance, high electrical resistivity and high water resistance, compared with the cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and epoxy resin.

  11. Solid-State Microwave Synthesis of Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash Bajia; Rashmi Sharma; Birbal Bajia

    2009-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of melamine-formaldehyde resin has been achieved using conventional as well as microwave irradiations (without and with solid support) in different molar ratio. Resin samples were tested for their chemical as well as physical properties. The structure of all the resin has been supported by their spectral data

  12. 21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  17. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2 and after (B2. It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  18. Electron sensitive resin and fabrication process of this one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention concerns electron sensitive negative resins, that is to say the resins which, when subjected to the action of an electronic beam of adequate power, undergo a transformation that makes them resistant to certain chemical agents or insoluble in certain solvents. The invention also concerns a process for manufacturing this resin which is a 2.3 epithiopropylmethacrylate copolymer

  19. TRIMETHYLSILYLATED SILICA AS RHEOLOGY MODIFIER FOR SILICONE RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Huang; Ying Huang; Yunzhao Yu

    2000-01-01

    Trimethylsilylated silica was synthesized through hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane followed by trimethylsilylation. Rheological properties of the silicone resin with trimethylsilylated silica as modifier were studied. It turned out that the particle size of silica was important to the rheological behavior of the modified resin. Trimethylsilylated silica of medium particle size shows the strongest tendency of forming physical network in the resin.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  2. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  4. Development of radiation-curable resin based on natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new radiation curable resin based on natural rubber has been developed. The resin was based on the reaction between low molecular weight epoxidised natural rubber and acrylic acid. When formulated with reactive monomers and photoinitiator, it solidified upon irradiation with UV light. The resin may find applications in coating for cellulosic-based substrates and pressure-sensitive adhesive

  5. 21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyester resins, cross-linked. 177.2420 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2420 Polyester resins, cross-linked. Cross-linked polyester resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for...

  6. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  9. Effect of polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan resinate tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Priprem, Aroonsri; Chitropas, Padungkwan; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of different polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on physical properties of multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan (DMP) tablets. DMP resinates were formed by a complexation of DMP and strong cation exchange resins, Dowex 50 W and Amberlite IRP69. The tablets consisted of the DMP resinates and direct compression fillers, such as microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP), and spray-dried...

  10. Effect of epoxy resin properties on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hong-Wei; Gao, Feng [Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering; Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials; Li, Kai-Xi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China). Key Laboratory of Carbon Materials

    2013-09-15

    Three kinds of epoxy resins, i.e. tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (AG80), difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (E51) and novolac type epoxy resin (F46) were selected as matrices for carbon fiber/epoxy composites. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical properties of fiber/epoxy composites by using these three kinds of epoxy resins with different physical and chemical performance. The results show that the composites fabricated with AG80 present the best stiffness and the composites prepared with E5 1have the best toughness. The stiffness and toughness of the composites prepared with F46 are middle values located between those for AG80/epoxy and E51/epoxy composites. Thus, the mixed epoxy resin is a promising approach for industrial production. (orig.)

  11. Low-melt Viscosity Polyimide Resins for Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M.; Mintz, Eric A.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2007-01-01

    A series of polyimide resins with low-melt viscosities in the range of 10-30 poise and high glass transition temperatures (Tg s) of 330-370 C were developed for resin transfer molding (RTM) applications. These polyimide resins were formulated from 2,3,3 ,4 -biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (a-BPDA) with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride endcaps along with either 3,4 - oxyaniline (3,4 -ODA), 3,4 -methylenedianiline, (3,4 -MDA) or 3,3 -methylenedianiline (3,3 -MDA). These polyimides had pot lives of 30-60 minutes at 260-280 C, enabling the successful fabrication of T650-35 carbon fiber reinforced composites via RTM process. The viscosity profiles of the polyimide resins and the mechanical properties of the polyimide carbon fiber composites will be discussed.

  12. 21 CFR 177.2440 - Polyethersulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) resins (CAS Reg. No. 25667-42-9), which have a minimum number average molecular weight of 16,000. (2) 1,1... percent) (CAS Reg. No. 88285-91-0), which have a minimum number average molecular weight of 26,000. (3) In paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section, the minimum number average molecular weight is determined...

  13. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Dept. Biotechnology, Mocow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  14. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  15. [Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A resin-bonded fixed partial denture is a prosthetic construction which can replace I or several teeth in an occlusal system and which comprises a pontic element which is adhesively attached to 1 or more abutment teeth. To compensate for the limited shear strength of the adhesive layer, the Jixed pa

  16. Process for preparing cured polyester resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel process for preparing cured unsaturated polyester resins is provided. The process comprises incorporating an unsaturated polyester resin with a vinyl monomer having an epoxy group, shaping the resulting mixture into a desired form (coatings, molded articles or impregnations), isolating it from the air by covering it with a polyester film (for example, a Mylar film) the surface of which has preliminarily been activated by suitable means such as corona discharge, flame treating plasma jet, gamma rays or chemical grafting agents, and then irradiating the unsaturated polyester with ionizing radiations. The process is advantageous in its simplicity of procedure and high weather and chemical resistance of the cured product. In one example, an unsaturated polyester resin was mixed with 0.1% by wt. of glycidyl methacrylate and coated a decorative laminate. Next, the coated surface was covered with a polyester film the surface of which had preliminarily been activated by means of corona discharge. The resin was irradiated with electron beams (500 keV, 10 Mrad) and then heated to 1000C for 30 min. Thus, a decorative board coated with a cured polyester layer in which the unsaturated polyester and the polyester film were unified was obtained. It was highly resistant to chloroform, acetone and alkali. (Kaichi, S.)

  17. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  18. Bisphenol-A epoxy resin reinforced and toughened by hyperbranched epoxy resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Daohong; JIA Demin; HUANG Xianbo

    2007-01-01

    The study on toughening and reinforcing of bisphenol-A epoxy resin is one of important developmental direction in the field.This paper reports a one-pot synthesis of aromatic polyester hyperbranched epoxy resin HTDE-2,an effect of HTDE-2 content on the mechanical and thermal performance of the bisphenol-A (E51)/HTDE-2 hybrid resin in detail.Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer,scanning electronic microscopy (SEM),differential scanning calorimetry (DSC),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA),dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMA) and molecular simulation technology are used to study the structure of HTDE-2,performance and toughening and reinforcing mechanism of the HTDE-2/E51 hybrid resin.It has been shown that the content of HTDE-2 has an important effect on the performance of the hybrid resin,and the performance of the HTDE-2/E51 blends has maximum with the increase in HTDE-2 content.The impact strength and fracture toughness of the hybrid resin with 9 wt-% HTDE-2 are almost 3.088 and 1.749 times of E51 performance respectively,furthermore,the tensile and flexural strength can also be enhanced about 20.7% and 14.2%,respectively.The glass transition temperature and thermal degradation temperature,however,are found to decrease to some extent.

  19. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development-EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project, founded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. The work is being done by EG and G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins form EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and 20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation had occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with resent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. 16 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Electrochemical regeneration of spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAN-DECON™, CAN-DEREM™ and CAN-DEREM Plus™ processes developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) are dilute regenerative chemical decontamination processes that employ ion exchange resin to remove dissolved metals and radionuclides and to regenerate the reagents. Depending on the system volume and oxide and radionuclide inventories, a large volume of spent ion exchange resin may be generated. Storage and long term disposal of spent resin may be one of the impediments to routine use of chemical decontamination processes. An electrochemical method is being developed by AECL for the regeneration of spent ion exchange resin generated during application of CAN-DECON, CAN-DEREM and CAN-DEREM Plus processes. In addition, some of the work being carried out is directed at methods for liquid waste treatment. This paper will describe the three-compartment electrochemical cell developed for laboratory tests. The cell consists of an anode, cathode and central compartment, the latter containing either solid spent resin or spent solution. The anode and the cathode compartments are separated from the central section by cation exchange membranes which allow cations to transport from anode to cathode compartments through the membranes. The paper will discuss the results of cyclic voltammetry tests performed in CAN-DEREM reagents to determine the iron redox potential in these electrolytes. The results of iron deposition tests performed in simulated spent CAN-DEREM reagents to study the current efficiency of iron deposition as a function of iron concentration, pH, cathode material and temperature will be presented. The results of tests of several commercial cation exchange membranes to study transport efficiency of iron through these membranes will also be discussed. (author)

  1. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper

  2. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  3. Treatment of spent ion-exchange resins for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-exchange resins are used in CANDU-PHW nuclear power stations to purify heavy water in the primary heat transport (PHT) and moderator systems. Two techniques for conditioning spent ion-exchange resins for disposal have been evaluated: direct immobilization, and incineration combined with immobilization of the ash and scrubbed off-gases. When ion-exchange resins were immobilized directly, no volume reductions were obtained at the various resin-to-matrix weight ratios attempted. Volumes of bitumen and glass products were equal to the volumes of untreated resin while the volumes of cement and polyester products were two and three times larger. While incinerating the resin is an extra processing step, high reductions in volume result. Bitumen and glass product volumes were six times smaller than the volumes of untreated resin while cement and polyster product volumes were about half the volume of untreated resin. Since the releases of Cs-137 were about ten times lower for products made by direct immobilization, PHT resins, which have high concentrations of Cs-137, should be immobilized directly. Moderator resins which have high concentrations of C-14 should be incinerated and the ash- and C-14-contaminated scrubbing solutions should be immobilized. By pretreating such resins with calcium chloride, the C-14 present on resin could be released at temperatures below the ignition temperature of the resin. This technique reduces the amount of inactive carbon dioxide that must be scrubbed to trap the C-14. The releases of C-14 from immobilized barium hydroxide scrubbing solution were the same as releases from immobilized resin

  4. Development and application of high performance resins for crud removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of crud removal technology has started with the finding of the resin aging effect that an old ion exchange resin, aged by long year of use in the condensate demineralizer, had an enhanced crud removal capability. It was confirmed that some physical properties such as specific surface area and water retention capacity were increased due to degradation caused by long year of contact with active oxygens in the condensate water. So, it was speculated that those degradation in the resin matrix enhanced the adsorption of crud particulate onto the resin surface, hence the crud removal capability. Based on this, crud removal resin with greater surface area was first developed. This resin has shown an excellent crud removal efficiency in an actual power plant, and the crud iron concentration in the condensate effluent was drastically reduced by this application. However, the cross-linkage of the cation resin had to be lowered in a delicate manner for that specific purpose, and this has caused higher organic leachables from the resin, and the sulfate level in the reactor was raised accordingly. Our major goals, therefore, has been to develop a crud resin of as little organic leachables as possible with keeping the original crud removal efficiency. It was revealed through the evaluation of the first generation crud resin and its improved version installed in the actual condensate demineralizers that there was a good correlation between crud removal efficiency and organic leaching rate. The bast one among a number of developmental resins has shown the organic leaching rate of 1/10 of that of the original crud resin (ETR-C), and the crud removal efficiency of 90%. So far as we understand, the resin was considered to have the best overall balance between crud removal and leaching characteristics. The result of six month evaluation of this developmental resin, ETR-C3, in one vessel of condensate demineralizer of a power plant will be presented. (J.P.N.)

  5. Uranium Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins - Batch Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of five resins (Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 [fresh], Dowex 21K 16-30 [regenerated], Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200) were tested using unspiked, nitrate-spiked, and nitrate-spiked/pH adjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests were conducted in support of a resin selection process in which the best resin to use for uranium treatment in the 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system will be identified. The results from these tests are as follows: • The data from the high-nitrate (1331 mg/L) tests indicated that Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 all adsorbed uranium similarly well with Kd values ranging from ~15,000 to 95,000 ml/g. All four resins would be considered suitable for use in the treatment system based on uranium adsorption characteristics. • Lowering the pH of the high nitrate test conditions from 8.2 to 7.5 did not significantly change the uranium adsorption isotherms for the four tested resins. The Kd values for these four resins under high nitrate (1338 mg/L), lower pH (7.5) ranged from ~15,000 to 80,000 ml/g. • Higher nitrate concentrations greatly reduced the uranium adsorption on all four resins. Tests conducted with unspiked (no amendments; nitrate at 337 mg/L and pH at 8.2) source water yielded Kd values for Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 resins ranging from ~800,000 to >3,000,000 ml/g. These values are about two orders of magnitude higher than the Kd values noted from tests conducted using amended source water. • Compared to the fresh resin, the regenerated Dowex 21K 16-30 resin exhibited significantly lower uranium-adsorption performance under all test conditions. The calculated Kd values for the regenerated resin were typically an order of magnitude lower than the values calculated for the fresh resin. • Additional testing using laboratory columns is recommended to better

  6. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37oC. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  7. Synthesis and Application of a New Acrylic Ester Resin for Recycling SIPA from its Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new acrylic ester polymer YWB-7 resin was prepared and characterized. The properties of YWB-7 resin were compared with those of the commercial Amberlite XAD-7, Diaion HP2MG and hypercrosslinked macroporous polymer NDA-150 resins. Both surface area and micropore area of YWB-7 resin were bigger than those of XAD-7 resin and HP2MG resin. The YWB-7 resin was successfully employed to recycle 5-sodiosulfoisophthalic acids (SIPA) from its solutions with and without methanol.

  8. Effect of Resin Coating and Chlorhexidine on Microleakage of Two Resin Cements after Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating the effect of resin coating and chlorhexidine on microleakage of two resin cements after water storage.Materials and Methods: Standardized class V cavities were prepared on facial and lingual surfaces of one hundred twenty intact human molars with gingival margins placed 1mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Indirect composite inlays were fabricated and thespecimens were randomly assigned into 6 groups. In Groups 1 to 4, inlays were cemented with Panavia F2.0 cement. G1: according to the manufacturer’s instruction. G2: with light cured resin on the ED primer. G3: chlorhexidine application before priming. G4: withchlorhexidine application before priming and light cured resin on primer. G5: inlays were cemented with Nexus 2 resin cement. G6: chlorhexidine application after etching. Each group was divided into two subgroups based on the 24-hour and 6-month water storagetime. After preparation for microleakage test, the teeth were sectioned and evaluated at both margins under a 20×stereomicroscope. Dye penetration was scored using 0-3 criteria.The data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and complementary Dunn tests.Results: There was significantly less leakage in G2 and G4 than the Panavia F2.0 control group at gingival margins after 6 months (P<0.05. There was no significant differences in leakage between G1 and G3 at both margins after 24 hours and 6 months storage. After 6months, G6 revealed significantly less leakage than G5 at gingival margins (P=0.033. In general, gingival margins showed more leakage than occlusal margins.Conclusion: Additionally, resin coating in self-etch (Panavia F2.0 and chlorhexidine application in etch-rinse (Nexus resin cement reduced microleakage at gingival margins after storage.

  9. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  10. Integrating Porous Resins In Enzymatic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Haque, Naweed

    enzymes to be harnessed. Porous resins as opposed to other auxiliary phases, for example organic solvents, are nonbioavailable, biocompatible and offer simpler operational handling (no foaming and emulsification). This strategy has been applied effectively to single substrate – single product systems...... screening procedure. The screening therefore becomes a multi-objective task that has to be solved simultaneously. Such an approach has been applied in the method formulated in this framework. To overcome these challenges, different process strategies are required to obtain high yields. A number of different...... challenges and proposed solutions are discussed in chapter one of this thesis and have also been published as a review. In recent years, integrating porous resins as an auxiliary phase in enzymatic processes, to non-selectively bind the substrate and product as a means to alleviate substrate and product...

  11. Ethynylated aromatics as high temperature matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.

    1987-01-01

    Difunctional and trifunctional arylacetylenes were used as monomers to form thermoset matrix resin composites. Composites can be hot-pressed at 180 C to react 80 percent of the acetylene groups. Crosslinking is completed by postcuring at 350 C. The postcured resins are thermally stable to nominally 460 C in air. As a result of their high crosslink density, the matrix exhibits brittle failure when uniaxial composites are tested in tension. Failure of both uniaixial tensile and flexural specimens occurs in shear at the fiber-matrix interface. Tensile fracture stresses for 0-deg composites fabricated with 60 v/o Celion 6K graphite fiber were 827 MPa. The strain to failure was 0.5 percent. Composites fabricated with 8 harness satin Celion cloth (Fiberite 1133) and tested in tension also failed in shear at tensile stresses of 413 MPa.

  12. Handling sticky resin by stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Gastauer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available For their nest defense, stingless bees (Meliponini collect plant resins which they stick on intruders like ants or cleptobiotic robber bees causing their immobilization. The aim of this article is to identify all parts of stingless bee workers contacting these sticky resins. Of special interest are those body parts with anti-adhesive properties to resin, where it can be removed without residues. For that, extensive behavioral observations during foraging flight, handling and application of the resin have been carried out. When handling the resin, all tarsi touch the resin while walking above it. For transportation from plants to the nest during foraging flight, the resin is packed to the corbicula via tarsi and basitarsi of front and middle legs. Once stuck to the resin or after the corbicula had been unloaded, the bee's legs have to be cleaned thoroughly. Only the tips of the mandibles, that form, cut and apply the sticky resin, seem to have at least temporarily resin-rejecting properties.

  13. Evaluation of the resin oxidation process using Fenton's reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion exchange resin is considered radioactive waste after its final useful life in nuclear reactors. Usually, this type of waste is treated with the immobilization in cement Portland, in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, reducing the possibility of radionuclides release in to environment. Because of the characteristic of expansion and contraction of the resins in presence of water, its incorporation in the common Portland cement is limited in 10% in direct immobilization, causing high costs in the final product. A pre-treatment would be able to reduce the volume, degrading the resins and increasing the load capacity of this material. This paper is about a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Fenton's reagent. The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic and anionic resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25 to 80 mM), with and without external heat. The time of reaction was two hours. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%. The resin degradation was confirmed by the presence of CaCO3 as a white precipitate resulting from the reaction between the Ca(OH)2 and the CO2 from the resin degradation. It was possible to degrade the resins without external heating. The calcium carbonates showed no correlation with the residual resin mass. (author)

  14. Sequestration Resins for Accelerating Removal of Radioactive Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing sequestration resins that can be used in the treatment of nuclear plant water streams for the enhanced removal of ionic cobalt. EPRI is focusing on three key areas of success: 1. Plant safety. The resins that are synthesized must be fully tested to determine that no leachable species or decomposition products (in the event of a resin bed failure) would be introduced to the plant. 2. Acceptable system performance. The resins are currently being synthesized in a powdered form for use in the reactor water clean-up and fuel pool clean-up systems that utilize pre-coatable filter elements. The resins must have effective flocking behavior; uniform application over the underlay resin and efficient removal from the septa elements after use. Bead type resins are also under development. 3. Enhanced cobalt removal. The resins are expected to out-perform the currently used ion exchange resins in the removal of ionic cobalt. During nuclear plant maintenance or refueling outages, current ion exchange resins may require several days to reduce concentrations of cobalt (for example, radio-cobalt 60Co and 58Co) and other activated corrosion products to safe levels in reactor coolant streams. This performance limitation often delays key maintenance activities. EPRI's resins are expected to provide at least a three-fold increase in removal capacity in light water reactor coolants. These resins also offer the potential for higher overall removal efficiencies reducing occupational exposures and waste management costs. This paper addresses issues from the range of novel resin development for radio-cobalt removal from synthesis at the bench-top level through scale-up to demonstration of use in an actual operating nuclear power plant. (authors)

  15. Cellulose whisker/epoxy resin nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Liming; Weder, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    New nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanofibers or “whiskers” and an epoxy resin were prepared. Cellulose whiskers with aspect ratios of ∼10 and ∼84 were isolated from cotton and sea animals called tunicates, respectively. Suspensions of these whiskers in dimethylformamide were combined with an oligomeric difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with an epoxide equivalent weight of 185−192 and a diethyl toluenediamine-based curing agent. Thin films were produced by casting these mixtu...

  16. Fully bio-based epoxy resins

    OpenAIRE

    Ertl, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Epoxy resins are mainly produced by reacting bisphenol A with epichlorohydrin. Growing concerns about the negative health effects of bisphenol A are urging researchers to find alternatives. In this work diphenolic acid is suggested, as it derives from levulinic acid, obtained from renewable resources. Nevertheless, it is also synthesized from phenol, from fossil resources, which, in the current paper has been substituted by plant-based phenols. Two interesting derivatives were identified: dip...

  17. Solidification method for spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrophilic binder having a binder effect increased upon contact with water and a cellulose type fibrous binder for reinforcement are added each in an appropriate amount to spent ion exchange resins in a state moistened with water. After the water content of the mixture is appropriately adjusted, they are pelletized by press molding or extrusion molding. With such procedures, less swelling product are obtained which can be solidified into stable products. (T.M.)

  18. Synteser og studier av propargylterminerte resiner

    OpenAIRE

    Rokvam, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Formålet med dette prosjektet var utvikling av syntesemetoder for propargylterminerte resiner, en gruppe av høytemperaturbestandige herdeplastmaterialer som har interesse innen forsvars- og romfartssektoren. 4,4´-Bifenolmonopropargyleter ble syntetisert og forsøkt brukt som byggekloss i syntesen av silisiumholdige propargylterminerte monomerer. Inkorporering av silisium hadde til formål å redusere sprøheten til disse resintypene, noe som er et utbredt problem. Disse ble forsøkt syntetisert ve...

  19. Synthesis of Resins with Chiral Salen Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ The enormous growth in the use of polymer resin supports in solid phase combinatorial synthesis, and related methodologies, has re-stimulated interest in the area of polymer-supported transition metal complex catalyst .The recently developed chiral salen-based for the enantioselective ring opening of meso epoxides and kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides are appealing candidates for immobilization on solid support. The catalysts are reading prepare from inexpensive components, and are amenable to modification for attachment to a solid support.

  20. Raw materials for paint industry products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brushwell, W.

    1984-01-01

    The current situation as regards raw materials for the United States paint industry is outlined, under the following headings: availability of methanol, chemical products from methanol, alkyd resins, petrochemistry, coal chemistry, and ethanol production by fermentation.

  1. Surface integrity of provisional resin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelatta, O. B.; El-Bediwi, A.; Sakrana, A.; Jiang, X. Q.; Blunt, L.

    2006-03-01

    Provisional resin materials are widely used in prosthetic dentistry and play an important role in the success of restorative treatment. Therefore, these materials must meet the requirements of preserving surface integrity during the treatment process. This study was done to evaluate surface roughness and microhardness of two provisional resin materials after 37 °C water storage. Two rectangular samples 21 mm × 11 mm × 3 mm, one bis-acrylic (bis-acrylic-Protemp II) and one polyethyl methacrylate (Trim®-PEMA) were fabricated as examples of provisional materials (n = 5 per material). The specimens were stored in 37 °C deionized distilled water for 24 h, 1, 2 and 3 weeks. The control specimens were not stored in water. The surface roughness of the tested materials (n = 10) was measured using a profilometer. Microhardness tests were conducted using a Vickers microscope mounted indenter system (n = 10). At 24 h, the surface roughness was recorded with bis-acrylic-Protemp II as higher than methacrylate materials. No significant differences of microhardness between Trim®-PEMA and bis-acrylic-Protemp II were recognized at 1, 2 and 3 weeks. The microhardness values increased with the increase of surface roughness and vice versa in both Trim®-PEMA and bis-acrylic-Protemp II. Both surface roughness and microhardness are affected by water storage. Bis-acrylic-Protemp II revealed better results in hardness than methacrylate resins, whereas Trim®-PEMA has a better surface roughness.

  2. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  3. Thermal stability of ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of heat, radiation and oxidants on carbonchain polymers, such as ion-exchange resins, often cause irreversible chemical changes in macro molecules. These changes can be e g the rupture of the carbon-carbon single or double bond, and/or the degradation of the macro molecule. Ion-exchange materials also contain the far less stable bonds between functional groups and the polymer matrix. For this reason the thermal stability of ion-exchange mat- erials is mainly based on the behaviour of the functional groups, which are responsible for the ion-exchange. The solidification of the ion-exchange resin waste usually involves elevated tempera- tures. Bituminization is carried out at 130-160 degrees C. Cementa- tion is carried out at room temperature. However, cementation can generate temperatures of up to 100-120 degrees C in the solidifica- tion product during the curing period. In this study the swelling/ shrinking properties of different ion-exchange materials have been studied in air and water as a function of the drying time and temp- erature. The air dried resins were used as the reference material. The effect of sodium sulphate as a possible additive to reduce swelling was studied, The experiments which were performed and re- sults observed are discussed in detail in the Appendices. (Authors)

  4. Method of processing spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of radioactive spent ion exchange resins generated from nuclear power plants, etc and process them into stable inorganic compounds through heat decomposition. Method: Spent ion exchange resins are heat-decomposed in an inert atmosphere to selectively decompose only ion exchange groups in the preceeding step while high molecular skeltons are completely heat-decomposed in an oxidizing atmosphere in the succeeding step. In this way, gaseous sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides are generated in the preceeding step, while gaseous carbon dioxide and hydrogen requiring no discharge gas procession are generated in the succeeding step. Accordingly, the amount of discharged gases requiring procession can significantly be reduced, as well as the residues can be converted into stable inorganic compounds. Further, if transition metals are ionically adsorbed as the catalyst to the ion exchange resins, the ion exchange groups are decomposed at 130 - 300 0C, while the high molecular skeltons are thermally decomposed at 240 - 300 0C. Thus, the temperature for the heat decomposition can be lowered to prevent the degradation of the reactor materials. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Adsorption of Iminodiacetic Acid Resin for Lutetium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊春华; 姚彩萍; 王惠君

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of a novel chelate resin,iminodiacetic acid resin(IDAAR) for Lu(Ⅲ) were investigated.The statically saturated adsorption capacity is 210.8 mg·g-1 at 298 K in HAc-NaAc medium.The Lu(Ⅲ) adsorbed on IDAAR can be eluted by 0.5 mol·L-1 HCl and the elution percentage reaches 96.5%.The resin can be regenerated and reused without obvious decrease in adsorption capacity.The apparent adsorption rate constant is k298=2.0×10-5 s-1.The adsorption behavior of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) obeys the Freundlich isotherm.The thermodynamic adsorption parameters,enthalpy change ΔH,free energy change ΔG and entropy change ΔS of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) are 13.1 kJ·mol-1,-1.37 kJ·mol-1 and 48.4 J·mol-1·K-1,respectively.The apparent activation energy is Ea=31.3 kJ·mol-1.The molar coordination ratio of the functional group of IDAAR to Lu(Ⅲ) is about 3∶1.The adsorption mechanism of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) was examined by chemical method and IR spectrometry.

  6. Characterization Of Cycled Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Ion Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two ∼11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work

  7. Effects of layering technique on the shade of resin overlays and the microhardness of dual cure resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the color of layered resin overlays and to test the early microhardness of dual cure resin cement (DCRC light cured through the layered resin overlays. Resin overlays of 1.5 mm thickness were fabricated with the A3 shade of Z350 (Group 1L, the A3B and A3E shades of Supreme XT (Group 2L, and the A3, E3, and T1 shades of Sinfony (Group 3L using one, two, and three layers, respectively (n = 7. Each layer of the resin overlays was set in equal thickness. The color of the resin overlays was measured with a colorimeter and compared with an A3 shade resin denture tooth. DCRC was light cured through the resin overlays, and the early microhardness of the DCRC was measured. The ΔE value between the denture tooth and the resin overlays and the Vickers hardness number (VHN of the DCRC were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test. The color differences were 8.9 ± 0.5, 5.3 ± 1.0, and 7.3 ± 0.5 and the VHNs were 19.4 ± 1.1, 21.1 ± 0.9, and 29.3 ± 0.6 for Groups 1L, 2L, and 3L, respectively. Therefore, to match the designated tooth color of resin inlays and to increase the early microhardness of DCRC, layered resin inlays are more appropriate than single-dentin-layer resin inlays. However, the translucent layer should be used cautiously because the color difference of resin inlays with a translucent layer was affected more than those without a translucent layer.

  8. Modification of unsaturated polyester resins (UP) and reinforced UP resins via plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guanglu; Wei Xing [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 21009 (China); Wang Wanjun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 21009 (China); Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203 (China); He Tao, E-mail: taohe@njut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 21009 (China); Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203 (China); Li Xuemei, E-mail: xueemei.li@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 21009 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Unsaturated polyester resins (UP) and reinforced composite unsaturated polyester resins (RCP) were made superhydrophobic by plasma assisted methods. Both CF{sub 4}-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CF{sub 4}-PECVD) and alternative method were tested. The surfaces were characterized by water contact angle (CA) measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Water contact angle results indicated that CF{sub 4}-PECVD can significantly improve the wettability of UP surfaces, but suffer from difficulties for RCP surfaces. Alternatively, O{sub 2} plasma followed by self-assembly of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was tested. It was shown that regardless of the filler percentage, O{sub 2} plasma followed by self-assembly of OTS monolayer formation all led to superhydrophobic surfaces. The results provided a means to improve the wettability of reinforced UP resins (RCP).

  9. Modification of unsaturated polyester resins (UP) and reinforced UP resins via plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglu; Wei, Xing; Wang, Wanjun; He, Tao; Li, Xuemei

    2010-10-01

    Unsaturated polyester resins (UP) and reinforced composite unsaturated polyester resins (RCP) were made superhydrophobic by plasma assisted methods. Both CF 4-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CF 4-PECVD) and alternative method were tested. The surfaces were characterized by water contact angle (CA) measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Water contact angle results indicated that CF 4-PECVD can significantly improve the wettability of UP surfaces, but suffer from difficulties for RCP surfaces. Alternatively, O 2 plasma followed by self-assembly of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was tested. It was shown that regardless of the filler percentage, O 2 plasma followed by self-assembly of OTS monolayer formation all led to superhydrophobic surfaces. The results provided a means to improve the wettability of reinforced UP resins (RCP).

  10. Modification of unsaturated polyester resins (UP) and reinforced UP resins via plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsaturated polyester resins (UP) and reinforced composite unsaturated polyester resins (RCP) were made superhydrophobic by plasma assisted methods. Both CF4-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CF4-PECVD) and alternative method were tested. The surfaces were characterized by water contact angle (CA) measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Water contact angle results indicated that CF4-PECVD can significantly improve the wettability of UP surfaces, but suffer from difficulties for RCP surfaces. Alternatively, O2 plasma followed by self-assembly of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was tested. It was shown that regardless of the filler percentage, O2 plasma followed by self-assembly of OTS monolayer formation all led to superhydrophobic surfaces. The results provided a means to improve the wettability of reinforced UP resins (RCP).

  11. Uptake of actinides by sulphonated phosphinic acid resin from acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of uranium and americium from nitric acid solutions by sulphonated phosphinic acid resin has been investigated. The capacity of the sulphonated resin exceeds the capacities of phosphinic acid resin and commercial cation exchange resin. Other advantages of the sulphonated resin for uranium and americium removal include reduced sensitivity to acidity and inert salt concentration. (author)

  12. Rapid dewatering of Powdex resins at a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For most BWR's a large portion of their radioactive waste produced is water demineralization resins, both powdered and bead. In order to minimize the quantities of resins produced, proper demineralizer operation, volume reduction and minimization techniques are relevant to spent resin dewatering and packaging. To meet burial requirements spent resin needs to be dewatered and packaged properly. Methods of dewatering spent resins have included centrifuge separation and pulling water out of the resin with a diaphragm pump. Various vendors are offering systems that provide rapid dewatering and volume reduction using filter/liners in combination with vacuum pumps and air blowers. The various systems required a standardized test program for proper comparison and evaluation. The program is described in this paper

  13. Epoxy resin developments for large superconducting magnets impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J. M.; Gallet, B.; Kircher, F.; Lottin, J. C.

    The future detectors ATLAS and CMS of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will use two huge superconducting magnets. Both are now under design, and their electrical insulation could be realized using epoxy resin and a wet impregnation technique. Because of their large dimensions, and the indirect cooling of the superconductor, the strengths of the resin and of the resin/conductor interface are of major importance. A new generation of epoxy resins for vacuum/pressure impregnation methods has been tested, and compared with some classical and well-known epoxy resins used in impregnation techniques. In order to understand the mechanical behaviour at 4 K, the complete evolution from liquid state to low temperature service condition is considered. The paper will present some results on the mechanical properties, the density and the chemical shrinkage occurring during the polymerization and the thermal contraction between room temperature and 4 K for these different types of epoxy resins.

  14. Design of systems for handling radioactive ion exchange resin beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow of slurries in pipes is a complex phenomenon. There are little slurry data available on which to base the design of systems for radioactive ion exchange resin beads and, as a result, the designs vary markedly in operating plants. With several plants on-line, the opportunity now exists to evaluate the designs of systems handling high activity spent resin beads. Results of testing at Robbins and Meyers Pump Division to quantify the behavior of resin bead slurries are presented. These tests evaluated the following slurry parameters; resin slurry velocity, pressure drop, bead degradation, and slurry concentration effects. A discussion of the general characteristics of resin bead slurries is presented along with a correlation to enable the designer to establish the proper flowrate for a given slurry composition and flow regime as a function of line size. Guidelines to follow in designing a resin handling system are presented

  15. Use of dried ion exchange resin for heavy water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prevent degradation of D2O in HANARO reflector system due to the moisture in the ion exchange resin, a method using the dried resin is developed. The physical change of dried resin was observed and measured. The performance was tested, and verified. The moisture content in the resin could be reduced to below 1% from its original content of about 55%. The integrated degradation of D2O for 20 years is estimated as 0.23% if the dried resin is used whenever it is replaced. This is much simpler process than the deuteration method which has been used in the other facilities such as heavy water reactors, and the cost of which is almost negligible. Should the dried resin be used for an existing deuteration facility, the generation of degraded D2O will be significantly reduced

  16. Do resin cements influence the cuspal deflection of teeth restored with composite resin inlays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Helen C V; Marcondes, Maurem L; de Souza, Niélli C; Weber, João B B; Spohr, Ana M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different resin cements on the cuspal deflection of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Sixty upper premolars were randomly divided into five groups (n=12): 1 - sound teeth; 2 - cavity; 3 - Rely X ARC; 4 - RelyX Unicem; 5 - SeT. The teeth from groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a MOD preparation and endodontic treatment. Impressions were made with vinyl polysiloxane and poured using type IV die stone in groups 3, 4 and 5. Inlays with composite resin were built over each cast and luted with the resin cements. A 200 N load was applied on the occlusal surface, and cuspal deflection was measured using a micrometer. After 24 h, cuspal deflection was measured again using a 300 N load. The Student t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 200 N and 300 N occlusal loads only for the sound teeth group (p = 0.389) and the RelyX ARC group (p = 0.188). ANOVA and Tukey'test showed that the sound teeth had the lowest mean cuspal deflection, differing statistically from the other groups (p<0.05). The highest cuspal deflections were obtained in the SeT group and the cavity group, with no statistical difference between them. Intermediate values were obtained in RelyX ARC group and RelyX Unicem group, which differed statistically. The self-adhesive resin cements RelyX Unicem and SeT showed less capacity to maintain the stiffness of the tooth/restoration complex than the conventional resin cement RelyX ARC. PMID:25950160

  17. Multi‐component Epoxy Resin Formulation for High Temperature Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Poynton, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The high functionality epoxy resins tetraglycidyl-4,4’-diaminodiphenyl-methane(TGDDM) and triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP) are the main components in mostaerospace grade epoxy resin formulations. Owing to their high reactivity and highviscosity, TGDDM and TGPAP pose difficulties when used in wet layup compositemanufacturing. As such, these resins are often modified to achieve the desiredperformance both in the liquid and cured states.The main objective of this thesis is to optimise a low vis...

  18. SYNTHESIS OF A NEW SILICONE-CONTAINING BISMALEIMIDE COPOLYMER RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Wenfeng; CAI Xingxian; JIANG Luxia

    1997-01-01

    A copolymer of bismaleimide-diallylbisphenol A-diphenylsilandiol was synthesized and the copolymerization was studied by using N-phenylmaleimide, bisphenol A and diphenylsilandiol as model compounds. The copolymer could be well cured around 200 ℃, and the cured resins had good thermal stability. In the range of 170-210 ℃, a higher curing temperature was favorable to obtain more thermal stable resin by reducing the content of diphenylsilandiol cyclo-homopolymer in resin which would spoil its thermal stability.

  19. Internal stabilization of polycarbonate resins by two stage radiation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Liang, Ranty H. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A new polycarbonate copolymer resin is formed by internal generation of stabilizers bound to the polymer chain. Irradiation of a solid piece or a deoxygenated solution of the resin at a first frequency below 300 nm generates 2 to 8 mol percent of phenyl salicylate groups which are rearranged to dihydroxybenzophenone groups by irradiating the resin under oxygen excluding conditions at a second frequency from 300 to 320 nm.

  20. Mini fiberglass post for composite resin restorations: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Luís Fernando Dos Santos Alves; Martins, Adriana Vieira; Albuquerque, Rodrigo de Castro; Silveira, Rodrigo Richard; Silva, Nelson Renato França Alves; Moreira, Allysson Nogueira

    2016-06-01

    Threaded metal pins have been used to create additional retention for large composite resin restorations. However, their dark appearance may compromise esthetic outcome. The use of small fiberglass posts has been advocated as an alternative. This clinical report describes a mini fiberglass post (MFP) used to provide additional retention in a fractured anterior tooth that received a composite resin restoration. The MFP represents a promising option for creating additional retention for large composite resin restorations. PMID:26724848

  1. Analytical applications of resins containing amide and polyamine functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orf, G. M.

    1977-12-01

    A dibutyl amide resin is used for the separation of uranium(VI), thorium(IV), and zirconium(IV) from each other and several other metal ions. Uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) are determined in the presence of large excesses of foreign metal ions and anions. A practical application of the amide resin is studied by determining uranium in low grade uranium ores. The amide resin is also used for the selective concentration of gold(III) from sea water.

  2. Oxidation of Petroleum Resin Based on Dicyclopentadiene Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Bondaletov, Vladimir Grigoryevich; Bondaletova, Lyudmila Ivanovna; Nguen Van Thanh; Baikova, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    This work represents the results of obtaining modified petroleum resin based on dicyclopentadiene fraction. The modification is carried out by means of resin oxidation by the Prilezhaev's method. The possibility of epoxidation of dicyclopentadiene double bonds during the process in the residual hydrocarbons is experimentally established. Dependences of acid, bromine and epoxy numbers on oxidation process duration at various "oxidative system: resin PR[DF]" component ratio is found. The modifi...

  3. Monitoring the Cure State of Thermosetting Resins by Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso Maffezzoli; Francesca Lionetto

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of low intensity ultrasound in a curing resin, acting as a high frequency oscillatory excitation, has been recently proposed as an ultrasonic dynamic mechanical analysis (UDMA) for cure monitoring. The technique measures sound velocity and attenuation, which are very sensitive to changes in the viscoelastic characteristics of the curing resin, since the velocity is related to the resin storage modulus and density, while the attenuation is related to the energy dissipation and ...

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Vinyl Ester Matrix Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hui III

    1998-01-01

    Vinyl ester oligomers diluted with styrene are important matrix resins for thermosetting polymer composites. A major objective of this work has been to study the chemistry and kinetics of the cure reactions of vinyl ester resins at elevated curing temperatures, which are consistent with typical composite processing conditions. The crosslinking reaction of vinyl ester resins was studied by FTIR and the loss of the carbon-carbon double bonds of the methacrylate (943 cm-1) and styrene (910 cm-1...

  5. Properties of modified anhydride hardener and its cured resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Chen; Bingjun, Gao; Jinglin, Chen; Tongzhao, Xu

    2000-01-01

    Methyl-nadic-tetrahydric-methylanhydride (MNA), nadic-tetrahydric-methylanhydride (NA), anhydride hardener was modified by solid diol molecule to improve the impregnation resin fracture toughness in cryogenic temperature. The lap-shear strength, transverse tension as well as the thermal shock test showed that the resin cured by the modified anhydride hardener had higher bond strength and more toughness at 77 K. After the experiment of vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) processing, it was found that this resin had a longer usable life, better impregnating properties, but higher initial viscosity than the resin hybrid HY925 as hardener.

  6. Resins characterization strategy at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium ENSA- Gas Natural Fenosa Engineering has a contract with Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) for the retrieval and conditioning of the resins. Before that, the project deals with resins characterization to verify the fulfillment the Bulgarian authorities’ requirements. The project includes all the resins generated during the operation of the BACKGROUND Resins characterization strategy at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant units 1, 2, 3 and 4, which were stored into six big dimensions tanks: four low tanks and two intermediate tanks. They only have a manhole above for tanks access. The methodology and the progress of the work are presented

  7. Modified ion exchange resins - synthesis and properties. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doescher, F.; Klein, J.; Pohl, F.; Widdecke, H.

    1982-01-22

    Sulfomethylated resins are prepared by polymer analogous reactions, starting from macroporous poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) matrices. Different reaction paths are discussed and used in the synthesis. Sulfomethylation can be achieved by reaction of a chloromethylated resin with dimethyl sulfide and sodium sulfonate or alternatively by oxidation of polymer-bound thiol groups. Both methods give high conversions as shown by IR spectra and titration of the sulfonic acid groups. Poly(1-(4-hydroxysulfomethylphenyl)ethylene) (3) is obtained by reaction of poly(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylene) (2) resin with formaldehyde/sodium sulfonate. The thermal stability, catalytic activity, and ion exchange equilibria of the sulfomethylated resin are investigated.

  8. Electro regeneration of iodide loaded resin. Contributed Paper RD-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent resins generated in the nuclear reactor contain essentially cationic activities due to Cesium, Strontium, Cobalt, and anionic activities due to Iodide, Iodate etc with activity loading to the extent of 0.1 Cim-3 and a surface dose of the order of 5 R. It is necessary to convert the spent resin into innocuous, reusable forms. An attempt has been made to regenerate Iodide containing spent resin into OH- electrolytically by using the OH- produced at the cathode compartment of an electrolytic cell. Results show that the regeneration of the spent resin containing Iodide could be completely accomplished electrolytically more efficiently than by addition of alkali. (author)

  9. Low temperature plasma incineration of radioactive ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the incineration studies of radioactive ion-exchange resin in an oxygen plasma atmosphere at pressures 20...50 mbar are presented. The plasma is generated using a 27.12 MHz radio frequency (RF) generator. The chamber temperature during the incineration varies between 100...140 deg C depending on the oxygen pressure in the chamber. The virtue of the low-temperature incineration is that the radioactive substances remain in the solid ash. The average retention of 60Co and 137Cs in the incineration chamber was about 94 %. The retention of 99mTc was in the average 77 % and of 131I about 70 %. The results indicate that, within the limit of the measurement accuracy, practically all Co and Cs remains in the chamber and can be recovered and further conditioned with the ash. The rest of technetium and iodine can be easily recovered on any cooled surface right after the incineration chamber. The mass reduction achievable with this method is 95 %. The ion-exchange resins in use at the Loviisa NPP were used as test samples. The activity retention and ashing experiments were made with a 1:1 mixture of granular anion and cation resin. The same kind of mixture is used for the primary water purification at the Loviisa NPP. The test resin was labelled with 60Co, 137Cs, 99mTc and 131I. Also spent Loviisa NPP resin was incinerated. The VVER-440 reactors of the Loviisa NPP use boric acid to control the reactivity of the core. The boric acid in the resin presents an extra cumber in the incineration process tending to prevent the oxygen plasma from getting into contact with the resin. The results with the granulated spent Loviisa NPP resin were drastically inferior to the results with the labelled test resin. The average unburnt residual mass was about 20 %. By prior crushing of the resin equal incineration results could be achieved with the test resin and with the spent Loviisa NPP resin. The low-temperature plasma incineration of radioactive ion-exchange resins presents

  10. Report on use of XAD resins in racing chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G H

    1976-10-01

    This report comprises a summary of the work done with XAD resin extraction by racing chemists and reported in the Association of Official Racing Chemists publications. It is apparent that the use of XAD resins is becoming more popular in racing laboratories as a technique for routine screening and also for the extraction of certain conjugated drugs. Most laboratories employ variations on the original Brinkmann Drug-Skreen Technique. Comparisons of the efficiency of extraction of drugs from horse urine by XAD-2 resin and by chloroform column extraction indicate that some drugs can be extracted with equal or greater efficiency by the resin technique. PMID:1000159

  11. Acetylene-chromene terminated resins as high temperature thermosets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godschalx, J. P.; Inbasekaran, M. N.; Bartos, B. R.; Scheck, D. M.; Laman, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    A novel phase transfer catalyzed process for the preparation of propargyl ethers has been developed. The propargyl ethers serve as precursors to a new class of thermosetting resins called acetylene-chromene terminated (ACT) resins. Heat treatment of a solution of propargyl ethers with various catalysts, followed by removal of solvent leads to the ACT resins via partial conversion of the propargyl ether groups to chromenes. This process reduces the energy content of the resin systems and reduces the amount of shrinkage found during cure. Due to the presence of the solvent the process is safe and gives rise to low viscosity products suitable for resin transfer molding and filament winding type applications. Due to the high glass transition temperature, high modulus, and low moisture uptake the cured resins display better than 232 C/wet performance. The thermal stability of the ACT resins in air at 204 C is superior to that of conventional bismaleimide resins. The resins also display excellent electrical properties.

  12. Development of heat resistant ion exchange resin. First Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear power stations, as a means of maintaining the soundness of nuclear reactors, the cleaning of reactor cooling water has been carried out. But as for the ion exchange resin which is used as the cleaning agent in the filtrating and desalting facility in reactor water cleaning system, since the heat resistance is low, high temperature reactor water is cooled once and cleaned, therefore large heat loss occurs. If the cleaning can be done at higher temperature, the reduction of heat loss and compact cleaning facilities become possible. In this study, a new ion exchange resin having superior heat resistance has been developed, and the results of the test of evaluating the performance of the developed ion exchange resin are reported. The heat loss in reactor water cleaning system, the heat deterioration of conventional ion exchange resin, and the development of the anion exchange resin of alkyl spacer type are described. The outline of the performance evaluation test, the experimental method, and the results of the heat resistance, ion exchange characteristics and so on of C4 resin are reported. The with standable temperature of the developed anion exchange resin was estimated as 80 - 90degC. The ion exchange performance at 95degC of this resin did not change from that at low temperature in chloride ions and silica, and was equivalent to that of existing anion exchange resin. (K.I.)

  13. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment. PMID:24240901

  14. Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, H.; Ohtsuka, K.; Matsumoto, A

    2011-01-01

    Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin were investigated. The cure behavior of benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin was monitored by model reaction using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). As a result of the model reaction, the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring and thermal self-cyclotrimerization of cyanate ester group occurred, and then the phenolic hydoroxyl group generated by the ring opening reac...

  15. A comparison of shear bond strength of ceramic and resin denture teeth on different acrylic resin bases

    OpenAIRE

    Corsalini, Massimo; Venere, Daniela Di; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial pl...

  16. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K.; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-01-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth i...

  17. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  18. Solidification of radioactive wastes using thermoplastic resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method has been developed by Niigata Engineering Company, Japan, of solidifying BWR wastes, i.e. evaporator concentrates, spent ion-exchange resins (granular and powder), and filtration sludges (cellulosic materials and diatomaceous earth), using thermoplastic resin as the fixing agent. Due to the fact that in Japan a suitable method for the final disposal of nuclear wastes has not yet been decided upon, at NEC we proposed and developed our own process. The method was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) reduction of waste volume; and (2) effective immobilization of radionuclides. After close examination of the existing methods of waste treatment, i.e. solidification of wastes into monolithic block form with sea dumping as the means of the final disposal, and solidification of wastes into pellet form for interim storage until disposed of, after experiments a new method of binding wastes with thermoplastic resin was developed. Using this process only one system component is needed to produce both of the above-mentioned forms of solid waste. The process was tested by solidifying some wastes containing 60Co and 137Cs adsorbed by adding 60CoCl2 and 137CsCl solutions to waste slurries. The safety of the process and the behaviour of the radionuclides at each step of the process were closely checked. Subsequently the solidified products were tested and evaluated. Monolithic products were tested to determine such factors as density, uniformity, mechanical strength and leachability. Pellet form products were evaluated mainly with regard to maximization of volume reduction and mechanical strength; more than acceptable results were achieved in all cases. It is therefore concluded that this process can be used for the solidification of various wastes, and that it reduces waste volume. Also, this process is a safer and more efficient means of solidifying nuclear wastes than others offered by current technology. (author)

  19. Hydrophilic Silicone Resins Obtained by Radiation Grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-vinylpyrrolidone was grafted radiochemically on a silicone resin by pre-irradiation in the presence of oxygen. Under these conditions, peroxide groups capable of initiating radical copolymerization are formed. The trapped radicals do not seem to make any contribution. An RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanization) type silicone resin was used, i. e. a poly(dimethylsiloxane) crosslinked by vinyl-silane bonds. The unsaturated product was transparent. The silicones containing phenyl groups as well as saturated resins were also studied. Irradiation with 60Co gamma rays was performed in the 10-kCi irradiator of the Radiation Applications Group (GAR) at Saclay. Brief pre-irradiation tests with an electron accelerator were also performed. The amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone(PVP) grafted depends on the pre-irradiation dose and dose-rate as well as on the temperature and duration of the grafting proper. These different parameters were analysed. The grafting efficiency of PVP can be as much as 60%. The grafted copolymers are more or less opaque and coloured sections show that grafting remains peripheral. The transparency can be restored by immersion in water. The swelling in water is such that the ratio of absorbed water to grafted PVP varies between 0.8 and 1.5. When the grafting efficiency is higher than 50%, it is observed that the grafted PVP redissolves after swelling. The redissolving is due to the breaking of the grafted chains. For grafting rates below 30%, the grafted PVP silicones have notably high thermal stability. Examination of some properties of the grafted PVP silicones shows the additive nature of the properties of the grafted copolymers. Reference is made to the possible applications of these products, especially in biology and medicine. (author)

  20. The Durability of Epoxy Resin Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Fujun; BA Hengjing; GAO Xiaojian

    2008-01-01

    The durability of epoxy resin coating was studied under environments with relative humidity(RH) of 98%-100%, at 55 ℃ for 900 h, at 65℃ for 700 h and at 75 ℃ for 400 h, respectively. Peel strength test, dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were employed for measurements. Peel strength indicated the development of adhesive property of the coating, DMTA indicated the development of physical property, IR revealed the development of chemical structure, and EDX showed surface element change of the coating. All these results show a good time-temperature equivalence characteristic between humidity aging time and temperature.

  1. Examination of styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchange resins, used in contact with food, for potential migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Sidwell, John Andrew; Willoughby, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This study has investigated the nature of extractable substances from five types of styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchange resins used in the preparation of foodstuffs. Resins examined included strong acid cation resins, strong and weak base anion resins and an active carbon replacement resin. These resins are used for a variety of purposes including water softening, decalcification of sugar syrups, demineralisation, removal of nitrate ions from water and decolourisation. The...

  2. Comparison of anion exchange resins for recovering plutonium from nitric acid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microreticular and macroreticular anion exchange resins were compared for their capability of recovering plutonium from nitric acid waste streams. Plutonium breakthrough capacity and elution behavior of the resins were determined as a function of resin properties. Small-bead microreticular resins with a polystyrene matrix containing 4% divinylbenzene cross-linkage showed the best performance. Of the 20- to 50-mesh resins, the macroreticular resin, Amberlite IRA-938, gave the highest plutonium breakthrough capacity and eluted plutonium the fastest

  3. Metabolomics Reveals the Origins of Antimicrobial Plant Resins Collected by Honey Bees

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Michael B.; Spivak, Marla; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Rendahl, Aaron; Cohen, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of antimicrobial plant resins in honey bee, Apis mellifera, nests has important physiological benefits. Resin foraging is difficult to approach experimentally because resin composition is highly variable among and between plant families, the environmental and plant-genotypic effects on resins are unknown, and resin foragers are relatively rare and often forage in unobservable tree canopies. Subsequently, little is known about the botanical origins of resins in many regions or t...

  4. Degradation and bacterial survival on nuclear-grade ion exchange resins and implications for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-exchange resins are used, among others, for the purification of the moderator of CANDU reactors. The resins are potentially degraded during service due to peroxide and temperature. The resins containing radioactive impurities collected during service are eventually discarded in non-sterile holding tanks or shipping liners, awaiting permanent disposal. In this study, we have investigated the impacts of bacterial survival on resins. We developed protocols to gently degrade resins, simulating damage during service. Resins were then contacted with bacteria. We found that, even though the resins were previously damaged, the impact of bacterial growth on resins (damaged or undamaged) was minimal. (author)

  5. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles... articles intended for repeated use in contact with nonacid food (pH above 5.0), in accordance with...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and gums is made. The resin impression tray material is applied to this preliminary study model...

  7. 76 FR 8774 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... December 22, 2010, because ``the domestic parties did not participate in this review.'' (76 FR 3614... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury....

  8. 75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan (53 FR 32267). On August 30, 1988, Commerce issued an... from Italy and Japan (65 FR 6147, February 8, 2000). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce and... orders on imports of granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan (70 FR 76026)....

  9. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Natural fossil resins, as the basic resin: Copal. Damar. Elemi. Gilsonite. Glycerol ester of damar, copal...-Chloro-1,3-butadiene (neoprene). Natural rubber (natural latex or natural latex solids, smoked or... catalyst used shall be that required to effect optimum cure but shall not exceed 1 part of tin per...

  10. Mercuric iodide semiconductor detectors encapsulated in polymeric resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Joao F. Trencher; Santos, Robinson A. dos; Ferraz, Caue de M.; Oliveira, Adriano S.; Velo, Alexandre F.; Mesquita, Carlos H. de; Hamada, Margarida M., E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disch, Christian; Fiederle, Michael [Albert-Ludwigs Universität Freiburg - UniFreibrug, Freiburg Materials Research Center - FMF, Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The development of new semiconductor radiation detectors always finds many setback factors, such as: high concentration of impurities in the start materials, poor long term stability, the surface oxidation and other difficulties discussed extensively in the literature, that limit their use. In this work was studied, the application of a coating resin on HgI2 detectors, in order to protect the semiconductor crystal reactions from atmospheric gases and to isolate electrically the surface of the crystals. Four polymeric resins were analyzed: Resin 1: 50% - 100%Heptane, 10% - 25% methylcyclohexane, <1% cyclohexane; Resin 2: 25% - 50% ethanol, 25% - 50% acetone, <2,5% ethylacetate; Resin 3: 50% - 100% methylacetate, 5% - 10% n-butylacetate; Resin 4: 50% - 100% ethyl-2-cyanacrylat. The influence of the polymeric resin type used on the spectroscopic performance of the HgI{sub 2} semiconductor detector is, clearly, demonstrated. The better result was found for the detector encapsulated with Resin 3. An increase of up to 26 times at the stability time was observed for the detectors encapsulated compared to that non-encapsulated detector. (author)

  11. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The 99mTc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the 99mTc and 99Tc are presented. (Author)

  12. Mercuric iodide semiconductor detectors encapsulated in polymeric resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new semiconductor radiation detectors always finds many setback factors, such as: high concentration of impurities in the start materials, poor long term stability, the surface oxidation and other difficulties discussed extensively in the literature, that limit their use. In this work was studied, the application of a coating resin on HgI2 detectors, in order to protect the semiconductor crystal reactions from atmospheric gases and to isolate electrically the surface of the crystals. Four polymeric resins were analyzed: Resin 1: 50% - 100%Heptane, 10% - 25% methylcyclohexane, <1% cyclohexane; Resin 2: 25% - 50% ethanol, 25% - 50% acetone, <2,5% ethylacetate; Resin 3: 50% - 100% methylacetate, 5% - 10% n-butylacetate; Resin 4: 50% - 100% ethyl-2-cyanacrylat. The influence of the polymeric resin type used on the spectroscopic performance of the HgI2 semiconductor detector is, clearly, demonstrated. The better result was found for the detector encapsulated with Resin 3. An increase of up to 26 times at the stability time was observed for the detectors encapsulated compared to that non-encapsulated detector. (author)

  13. Radiation induced structural changes in an epoxide resin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural changes which occur on irradiation of an aromatic amine cured epoxide resin have been examined using UV and IR spectroscopy. The production of stable diphenyl ethylene and carbonyl groups, diphenyl cations and phenyl, phenoxyl and diphenyl radicals have been identified. Modifications to the resin system by the use of additives produces changes in the relative proportions of the species produced. (author)

  14. Stochastic Flow Modeling for Resin Transfer Moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Verpoest, Ignaas; Lomov, Stepan

    2009-07-01

    Liquid moulding processes suffer from inherently present scatter in the textile reinforcement properties. This variability can lead to unwanted filling patterns within the mould resulting in bad parts. If thermoplastic resins are used with the in-situ polymerisation technique, an additional difficulty appears. The time window to inject the material is small if industrial processing parameters are used (mould filling process has been used with the permeability distribution of the preform given as a random field. The random field of the permeability is constructed as a correlated field with an exponential correlation function. Optical microscopy and X-ray micro-CT have been used to study the stochastic parameters of the geometry for 2D and 3D woven textile preforms. The parameters describing the random permeability field (average, standard deviation and correlation length) are identified based on the stochastic parameters of the geometry for the preforms, analytical estimations and CFD modelling of the permeability. In order to implement the random field for the permeability and the variability for the resin viscosity, an add-on to the mould filling simulation software PAM-RTM™ has been developed. This analysis has been validated on case studies.

  15. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolitetrademark NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900trademark, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material

  16. The sorption capacity of boron on anionic-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron sorption capacities on anionic-exchange resins vary with temperature, concentration, and resin cross-linkage. A semiempirical correlation, developed from boron solution chemistry, is presented to account for these variations. The relationship, based on boron chemistry and changes in Gibb's energy, can be stated approximately as Q = a1CBa2Za3 exp[-(a4T + a5T2 + a6Z0.5)]. Correlation parameters, which vary with resin type, are evaluated experimentally. Parameter values for macroporous resin Diaion PA 300 and for gel-type resins Diaion SA10 and Amberlite IRN 78LC are presented. The resulting expression is used to determine boron sorption and desorption limitations on ion exchangers at various temperatures and concentrations, and to determine the interfacial boron concentration in equilibrium and rate models

  17. Resins for selective sorption of technetium from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new class of anion exchange resins with improved selectivity and sorptive capacity for the pertechnetate anion (TcO4-) as compared to commercially available resins has been prepared and evaluated, both in batch-equilibrium and flow-through column testing conditions using a groundwater test solution. The resins have been designed and optimized for removal of pertechnetate from contaminated groundwater containing nanomolar concentrations of pertechnetate and sub-millimolar quantities of inorganic anions like nitrate, sulfate, and chloride. Equilibrium distributions coefficients for the sorption of pertechnetate to several classes of resin as a function of both time and electrolyte concentration will be discussed. The selectivity and exchange kinetics as a function of the chemical and physical structure of the resins will be addressed

  18. Radiation degradation in EPICOR-2 ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Johnson, D.A.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1990-09-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data base Development -- EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating chemical and physical conditions for organic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. The work was performed by EG G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. This is the final report of this task and summarizes results and analyses of three samplings of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine the extent of degradation due to the high internal radiation dose received by the organic resins. Results also are compared with those of other researchers. 18 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Radiation degradation in EPICOR-2 ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low-Level Waste Data base Development -- EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating chemical and physical conditions for organic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. The work was performed by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. This is the final report of this task and summarizes results and analyses of three samplings of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine the extent of degradation due to the high internal radiation dose received by the organic resins. Results also are compared with those of other researchers. 18 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs

  20. A Quantum Chemistry Study on Structural Properties of Petroleum Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Daxi; Pan Yueqiu; Zhang Hongye

    2007-01-01

    The geometries of resins with single-layer (SG), double-layer (DG) and triple-layer (TG) were calculated with the quantum chemistry method. The geometries and net charges of atoms were obtained. The calculated average distances between layers were 0.5348 nm and 0.5051 nm and the action energies were -9.6355 kJ/mol and -32.2803 kJ/mol for resins DG and TG, respectively. Higher electronegative polar atoms can easily form hydrogen bonds with hydrogen atoms of other resin molecules, resulting in resin aggregates. The minimum cross-sectional diameters of resin molecules are too large to enter the pores of zeolite, so they are likely to crack on the surface of zeolite.

  1. Effect of Resin on the Strength Characteristics of Thonnakkal Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SmithaAlex

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving the properties of soil by stabilization is considered as a means of fulfilling design criteria. Stabilization is usually performed to improve material properties of soil such as strength, stiffness, and permeability. The use of new materials for soil strengthening is crucial for geotechnical engineering, especially in foundation construction. Experiments were conducted using resins with different epoxy resin-to-water (ER/W ratios. . The results show that by increasing the resin in the soil, the maximum dry density increases, and the optimum water content decreases in the compaction tests.The results indicate that the epoxy resins improve the physical and mechanical properties of soil significantly, and if successfully grouted into a formation, the resins could provide a suitable solution for the stabilization of foundation material.

  2. Chemical signatures of fossilized resins and recent plant exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph B; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A; Anderson, Ken B

    2008-01-01

    Amber is one of the few gemstones based on an organic structure. Found over most of the world, it is the fossil form of sticky plant exudates called resins. Investigation of amber by modern analytical techniques provides structural information and insight into the identity of the ancient plants that produced the source resin. Mass spectrometric analysis of materials separated by gas chromatography has identified specific compounds that are the basis of a reliable classification of the different types of amber. NMR spectroscopy of bulk, solid amber provides a complementary classification. NMR spectroscopy also can be used to characterize modern resins as well as other types of plant exudates such as gums, gum resins, and kinos, which strongly resemble resins in appearance but have very different molecular constitutions. PMID:18925589

  3. Attribute based selection of thermoplastic resin for vacuum infusion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhakaran, R.T. Durai; Lystrup, Aage; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The composite industry looks toward a new material system (resins) based on thermoplastic polymers for the vacuum infusion process, similar to the infusion process using thermosetting polymers. A large number of thermoplastics are available in the market with a variety of properties suitable...... for different engineering applications, and few of those are available in a not yet polymerised form suitable for resin infusion. The proper selection of a new resin system among these thermoplastic polymers is a concern for manufactures in the current scenario and a special mathematical tool would...... be beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a new decision making tool for resin selection based on significant attributes. This article provides a broad overview of suitable thermoplastic material systems for vacuum infusion process available in today’s market. An illustrative example—resin selection...

  4. EPICOR-II resin/linear research plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resin/liner research project being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on EPICOR-II prefilters from Three Mile Island (TMI) is discussed. The duration of that DOE funded effort as planned is three years. Technical justification is presentd to extend the plan in several areas. The contents of several of the highest loaded prefilters are used in this to investigate degradation in resin and zeolite. Solidification of resin and zeolite with Portland cement and Dow polymer and prefilter liner integrity. The degradation studies describe use of resin and zeolite samples analyzed chemically and physically for degradation. During the extended studies, the radiation dose is expected to increase from 3 x 108 to 109 rads which should result in pronounced degradation of the resin. Solidification studies are described

  5. Assessment of Forest Road Network Alternatives for Pine Resin Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Budiaman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pine resin, one type of non-timber forest products (NTFPs, is important for Indonesia.   In addition to its high economic value, pine resin also has bright domestic and international market prospects.  Utilization of commercial pine resin has been carried out in Indonesia, but the forest road network required for extracting pine resin has not been specifically planned. To date, the planning and selection of forest road network  in  forest management in Indonesia are intended only for the extraction of  timber products and have not been integrated with the use of NTFPs; also,  they have not considered the economic, ecological, and social aspects a whole. Planning and selection of forest road network have focused more on economic aspects only. This study aimed at planning and assessing the forest road network for extracting pine resin by considering the economic, ecological, and social criteria.  Decision-making method used  to select the best  forest road network was utility analysis.  Indicator used  included road length, road density, a correction factor for manual carrying of pine resin, pine resin carrying distance, road construction cost, and productivity of carrying and extracting pine resin. The result of  the utility analysis indicates that an alternative of forest road network for extracting pine resin has no the whole best indicators, but it has the highest utility value.  This study suggested that the use of the utility analysis help the decision makers to selects process for forest  road network alternative easily and rapidly.Keywords: pine  resin,  forest  road network, utility analysis, non-timber  forest products  (NTFPs

  6. A randomized controlled three year evaluation of "bulk-filled" posterior resin restorations based on stress decreasing resin technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    -hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono) layer. In the second cavity, the hybrid resin composite was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 3 years. Caries risk and parafunctional habits of the participants were estimated...

  7. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM , size R4, embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37°C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN. Independent sample ′t′ test revealed a nonsignificant ( P < 0.385 difference between mean shear bond strength values of conventional and nanocomposite group. The bond strength values revealed that nanocomposite had slightly higher mean shear bond strength (21.04 ± 0.56 compared to conventional composite (20.78 ± 0.60. It was found that conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  8. Bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using the resin coating technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Batitucci dos Santos-Daroz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using different adhesive systems (AS in the presence or absence of a low-viscosity composite liner (Protect Liner F - PLF applied over the bonded dentin. The adhesive systems selected were: AdheSE/Vivadent (AD; Clearfil Protect Bond/Kuraray (CP; One-Up Bond F/Tokuyama (OU; Single Bond/3M ESPE (SB; Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus/Bisco (TY; Xeno III/Dentsply (XE and Unifil Bond/GC (UN. After removing the labial and lingual enamel surfaces of bovine incisors, dentin fragments were prepared and randomly divided into 15 groups (n = 8. The dentin substrates were bonded with the AS and the PLF was applied or not before application of the resin cement (Panavia F, Kuraray. In the control group, the ED Primer (ED and the resin cement without PLF were used. The AS, PLF and resin cement tested were used according to the manufacturers' instructions, and all treated dentin surfaces were temporized. After water storage for one week, three cylinders of resin cement were applied to each bonded dentin surface, using tygon tubing molds. The specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing and the data were statistically analyzed (two-way ANOVA, Tukey and Dunnett tests, p < 0.05. The observed mean shear bond strengths in MPa were: ED: 20.2 ± 2.3; AD: 30.3 ± 6.5; CP: 25.3 ± 4.4; OU: 28.3 ± 6.6; SB: 25.6 ± 6.9; TY: 24.5 ± 2.5; XE: 17.3 ± 3.4; UN: 28.4 ± 6.2; AD+PLF: 32.8 ± 4.1; CP+PLF: 29.9 ± 3.9; OU+PLF: 34.1 ± 4.1; SB+PLF: 29.5 ± 8.2; TY+PLF: 29.2 ± 3.9; XE+PLF: 32.8 ± 6.7; UN+PLF: 32.2 ± 4.5. The bond strength of the resin cement to dentin using the tested AS was increased when the low-viscosity composite liner was applied.

  9. Study for highly functional resin (macroporous resin) superior in removing micro particles in PWR primary circuit: on-site test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japanese PWR plants, efforts to remove particulate constituents containing radioactive cobalt which provides a source of radiation exposure, are needed. Performance evaluation study was conducted for macroporous resin which was said to possess excellent performance in removing particulate constituents and whose practical accomplishment at plants in USA was reported to be good. As one of the means for radiation exposure reduction in PWR, a study for application of crud removing resin to actual plant was executed by laboratory experiments using simulated crud (Fe3O4 particle). In this study, following two mechanisms were demonstrated as the particle capturing mechanism of macroporous resin; physical trapping by fine pores on resin surface; electrical adsorption onto resin surface. In addition, in parallel to the study for application of macroporous resin to actual PWR plant, on-site study was planned to investigate the primary system water chemistry during various stages of actual plant operation and to research performance of particle capturing in detail. As the on-site study, column experiments, there water was let pass through the column, were planned for various operation stage (startup period, power operation period and shutdown period). A kind of conventional gel-type resin and three kinds of macroporous resin were examined for onsite tests. As to particulate capturing, basic knowledge regarding capturing efficiency and influence of water chemistry on capturing performance were ordered. Capturing performance of each resin tested became clear and was ordered by comparison. Effectiveness of macroporous resin with regard to crud removal in primary coolant was confirmed. (author)

  10. Bond Strength of Repaired Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Máximo de ARAÚJO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the bond strength of direct composite resins and composite repairs, using 3 different commercial brands - GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (Tokuyama, GII: Filtek Z350 (3M/ESPE and GIII: Te Econon (Ivoclar/Vivadent - and the use of AdperTM Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE adhesive system at the base/repair interface. Method: Thirty conic bases (5 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm of each commercial brand of composite resin were fabricated. All bases of each group were submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 20,000 cycles (5ºC to 55ºC ± 2ºC, for 30 s. The bases of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub-groups, in which a combination of the commercial brands was performed for the repairs. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C during 7 days and were thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC - MEM 2000 with 500 kgf load cell running at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data in MPa were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (5%.Results: The following results were found: GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (11.22±4.00 MPa, Te Econom (12.03±3.47 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.66±2.89 MPa; GII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.88±2.04 MPa, Te Econom (7.77±1.64 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.50±6.14 MPa; and GIII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.41±2.50 MPa, Te Econom (12.33±3.18 MPa and Z350 (11.73±3.54 MPa.Conclusion: The bond strengths at the interface of the different composite resins submitted to repair were statistically similar regardless of the commercial brand.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of the Compressive Strength of a Direct Composite Resin and Two Laboratorial Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Costa Reis BRITO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the compressive strength of two commercially available laboratorial resins - Solidex® (Shofu and Cristobal® (Dentsply - to that of a direct composite resin (Concept®; Vigodent, as a control group.Method: Five specimens of each tested material were fabricated using stainless steel matrices with the following dimensions: 8 mm of internal diameter on the base, 9 mm of internal diameter on the top and 4 mm of height. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 72 hours and submitted to an axial load by the action of a 2-mm-diameter round-end tip adapted to a universal testing machine (EMIC 500. A 200 kgf load cell was used running at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load and the point of failure were recorded. Results: Means, in kgf, were: Concept® (Ct = 124.26; Cristobal® (C =184.63; Solidex® (S =173.58. Data (means and standard deviations were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s for comparisons among the groups using the SPSS software (version 10.0. Significance level was set at á=0.05 (95%. Concept® presented significantly lower (p<0.05 compressive strength than the other two materials, Cristobal® and Solidex®, which, in turn, did not differ significantly to each other.Conclusion: Cristobal® and Solidex® laboratorial resins did not show significant difference to each other and both presented compressive strength significantly higher than that of Concept® direct resin.

  12. Positive masking resin with improved sensibility to electronic irradiation, and process of fabrication of this resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a positive masking resin with improved sensitivity to electronic irradiation, characterized in that prior to electronic irradiation it has a mean molecular mass by weight between 1x106 and 5x106 g. It is composed of polymethyl methacrylate. The method of fabrication consists in polymerizing a monomer proceeding by radical reactions at slow polymerization rate, with a low degree of conversion of the monomer into a polymer

  13. Recyclability of PET from virgin resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancini Sandro Donnini

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Bottle grade virgin PET (polyethylene terephthalate resin was investigated through five consecutive injection molding steps to simulate recycling cycles. Tests were carried out after each recycling to evaluate degradation, crystallinity (by density and Differential Scanning Calorimetry-DSC measurements, hardness, and tensile and flexural properties. Consecutive recycling resulted in cumulative chain breaks caused by the material's contact with degrading agents such as temperature, oxygen, mechanical stresses, light, and water. In the fifth recycling step, for example, the number of carboxylic end groups, an indicator of the extent of chain-break, tripled in comparison to the initial molecule. The smaller chains that were formed fit more easily among the larger ones, thus increasing the percentage of crystalline phase in the structure. These two changes in the polymer's structure explained the recycled products' final properties, i.e., the injected samples became progressively harder and more fragile in each recycling step.

  14. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  15. Purification of degraded TBP solvent using macroreticular anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with a suitable diluent is commonly used for solvent extraction in Purex process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuels. This solvent gets degraded due to various factors, the main degradation product being dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). A solvent cleanup step is generally incorporated in the process for removing the degradation products from the used solvent. A liquid-liquid cleanup system using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution is routinely used. Considering certain advantages, like the possibility of loading the resin almost to saturation capacity and the subsequent disposal of the spent resin by incineration and the feasibility of adopting it to the process, a liquid-solid system has been tried as an alternate method, employing various available macroreticular anion exchange resins in OH- form for the sorption of HDBP from TBP. After standardizing the various conditions for the satisfactory removal of HDBP from TBP using synthetic mixtures, resins were tested with process solvent in batch contacts. The parameters studied were (1) capacity of different resins for HDBP sorption (2) influence of acidity, uranium and HDBP on the sorption behaviour of the latter (3) removal of fission products from the solvent by the resin and (4) regeneration and recycling of the resin. (author). 2 figs., 13 tabs., 17 refs

  16. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  17. Resin infusion of large composite structures modeling and manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, A.C. [Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The resin infusion processes resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are cost effective techniques for the fabrication of complex shaped composite structures. The dry fibrous preform is placed in the mold, consolidated, resin impregnated and cured in a single step process. The fibrous performs are often constructed near net shape using highly automated textile processes such as knitting, weaving and braiding. In this paper, the infusion processes RTM, RFI and VARTM are discussed along with the advantages of each technique compared with traditional composite fabrication methods such as prepreg tape lay up and autoclave cure. The large number of processing variables and the complex material behavior during infiltration and cure make experimental optimization of the infusion processes costly and inefficient. Numerical models have been developed which can be used to simulate the resin infusion processes. The model formulation and solution procedures for the VARTM process are presented. A VARTM process simulation of a carbon fiber preform was presented to demonstrate the type of information that can be generated by the model and to compare the model predictions with experimental measurements. Overall, the predicted flow front positions, resin pressures and preform thicknesses agree well with the measured values. The results of the simulation show the potential cost and performance benefits that can be realized by using a simulation model as part of the development process. (au)

  18. Incorporation of radioactive spent ion exchange resins in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were undertaken on the incorporation in plastics - polyethylene in particular - of radioactive spent ion exchange resins produced in nuclear power plants. The resulting polyethylene products burdened with radioactive resin were tested to ascertain the properties considered important for radioactive waste management. The items chosen for testing were mechanical strength, leachability of radionuclide and radiation resistance. Polyethylene products burdened with 50 wt % of resin were found to possess an impact strength of 10 kg.cm/cm and a compressive strength of 300 kg/cm2, which values do not indicate any appreciable decrease in mechanical strength compared with polyethylene unburdened with resin. The leaching rate of 137Cs from the resin-burdened polyethylene product was very small - only 0.1% leached out in one year. In respect of decomposition by radiation, the amount of gases evolving upon absorbing a dose of 109 rad was 10 ml/g. The effect of radiation on the mechanical strength was also studied. It is concluded from above results that solidification of radioactive spent ion exchange resin by incorporation in plastics is one of the best methods devised so far for treating spent resins. (auth.)

  19. Elution behavior of uranium from a TRU resin cartridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to separate and concentrate uranium from environmental samples for determination of 235U/238U isotopic ratio by quadrupole ICP-MS, a TRU resin procedure was studied. A water sample (100-200 mL), acidified to 1M HNO3, was passed through the resin cartridge at 4-5 mL/min flow rate to extract U in the solution onto the resin, then, the cartridge was washed with 0.5M HCl. Most of the matrix elements in the sample solution were not retained on the resin when the sample solution was passed through, and all Th and some portions of the rare earth elements were eluted from the resin with the wash solution. For removal of U from the resin cartridge, 0-0.07M tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was used. No elution of U with deionized water was observed, however, 10 mL of 0.07M TMAH could extract almost all the U from the resin cartridge. (author)

  20. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C–O–C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P–O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  1. Ten-years degradation of resin-dentin bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Fujita, Shinichi; Nagano, Futami; Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durability of resin-dentin bonds in 10-yr water-storage testing. Resin-dentin bonded bulk specimens were prepared using six commercially available resin adhesives. The resin-dentin bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 h (control group) or for 10 yr (experimental groups). After each storage period, the specimens were sectioned to make specimen beams and then subjected to a microtensile bond test. After the bond test, fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, interfacial observation of silver nanoleakage was performed using the backscatter electron mode of SEM. The bond strengths of four of the six adhesive systems tested decreased significantly after 10 yr. However, no significant bond-strength reduction was recorded for the other two systems. The interfacial observations showed water tree propagation in the bonding resin layer as a typical morphological change after aging for five of the six adhesives tested. Water tree propagation may be a symptom of degradation in the resin bonding layer of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:20662915

  2. Method of processing spent ion exchange resins by steam decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To lower the decomposing temperature and reduce the decomposing pressure to the atmospheric pressure upon decomposing resin wastes by steam decomposition. Method: Prior to the steam decomposition of resin wastes, alkali metal ions or alkaline earth metal ions are ionically adsorbed as catalysts. When Na+ ions, for example, are absorbed ionically to the resin wastes, Na+ ions are uniformly dispersed within the resin waste particles and Na+ ions are converted into Na2CO3 with a high catalytic activity at a decomposing temperature higher than 600 deg C. As a result, the decomposing temperature for the resin under the steam atmosphere and atmospheric pressure can be reduced from 1000 deg C to 700 deg C due to Na2CO3 uniformly dispersed within the resin wastes, and the required amount of the catalyst can only be from 0.5 to 1.0 meq/g of the resins. This enables to prevent the degradation of the reactor materials and can save the amount of the catalyst as compared with the conventional case of adding powdery catalysts. (Takahashi, M.)

  3. Application of THOR-Technology on resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The THermal Organic Reduction (THOR) process, developed and patented by studsvik utilises pyrolysis / steam reforming technology. The THOR-process provides a reliable and safe method for treating a wide variety of LLW in a unique, fluidised bed treatment system at moderate temperature. This technology is suitable for processing hazardous, mixed and dry active LLW with appropriate waste feed modifications. Both solid and liquid LLRW and ILRW streams including ion exchange resins, activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 4 Sv/hr can be processed. Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its facility at Erwin, Tennessee, USA. During this period studsvik has processed more than 1,5 thousand tons of radioactive ion exchange bead resins. powdered filter media and active carbon, with a cumulative total radioactivity of about 7 (E+8) MBq. Operations have demonstrated consistent, reliable, robust operating characteristics. Due to the widely varying characteristics of the incoming waste streams various efficiencies and volume reductions have been experienced. Input waste has varied in total inorganic content from 90%. A substantial element of this variability has been the ''soluble salt'' content of the input waste streams. Final reformed residue comprises a non-dispersible, granular solid which is suitable for long-term storage or direct burial in a qualified container. Special containers, THOR-liners, are available from studsvik for the transport of waste from the customer to the Erwin facility and HICs (high integrity containers) for transport of the residues to Barnwell. The paper will give an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing LLRW from commercial nuclear power plans. (orig.)

  4. Preparation of extractive resins for producing terbium-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the development of a methodology for extractive resins preparation to base of HDEHP, which allows to separation of Tb from Gd generating an own technology of preparation of these resins. The study included the extractive resins preparation from 6 different supports: kieselguhr Dg, alumina, red volcanic rock, chiluca, quarry and fluorite; two treatment types of of supports and varied concentrations of HDEHP extractant (di(2-etil hexyl) orthophosphoric acid), in order to determine which resin has improved efficiency of Gd and Tb separation, and radionuclide purity of 161Tb. Resins were prepared to base of kieselguhr to determine the most appropriate silicon deposition process. Two silicon deposition treatments were realized: treatment I , by contact with silicon deposition solution (dimethyldichlorosilane / heptane 1:30) and treatment II by contact with vapors of dimethyldichlorosilane in vacuum. The extractant retention was carried out to different concentrations of HDEHP / acetone: 1:4, 1:8, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30 and 1:40. According to the results, there is not direct relation of HDEHP concentration used in extractive resins preparation to base of kieselguhr over the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation and of radionuclide purity of 161Tb. The effect of support in the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation was studied to prepare resins with the supports kieselguhr, alumina, quarry, chiluca, volcanic rock and fluorite, using the silicon deposition treatment II for the supports and a concentration of HDEHP / acetone 1:20, for extractant retention. Only resins based on kieselguhr could separate to Gd from Tb quantitatively, the resin at a concentration of HDEHP / Acetone 1:20 was the best results obtained in Gd and Tb separation, achieving a separation efficiency greater than 90% and a radionuclide purity higher than 99%. (Author)

  5. Radiation chemical production of resin-bonded paper laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After referring to the economic importance of resin-bonded paper laminates and to the environmental and energy-related aspects of radiation chemical processes, the radiation polymerization of resins and monomers is discussed. Furthermore, a survey is given of the application of melamine resins to the production of laminates and of the modification of these melamines to obtain radiation polymerizable resins. According to the dose distribution within the laminate samples a detailed investigation has been made with regard to the radiation conditions at the electron processing unit used. Some relevant methods of preparing modified melamine resins were examined by analytical tests and efforts have been made in optimizing the resins obtained. To investigate the radiation curability of these resins, an analytical procedure has been developed based upon the precipitation of manganese dioxide from potassium permanganate, which enables to establish a quantitative relation between the decrease of the double bond content and the absorbed dose as well as to compare the reactivity of radiation curable systems. A description of common production processes of laminates is followed by some data concerning the radiation damage of cellulose, the basis of both conventionally and radiation chemically produced laminates. By thorough investigations a correlation could be found between the composition of the resin-monomer-systems and the properties of the corresponding laminates making the latter predictable. These investigations did not only lead to a preference of acrylic-modified melamine resins but also to a reduction among the available reactive diluents to non-volatile mono- and diacrylates. Finally, a description of a production line on a large scale is followed by a calculation of cost of the radiation chemical part of the process. (author)

  6. 21 CFR 177.1460 - Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles...-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. Melamine-formaldehyde resins may be safely used as the food-contact...: (a) For the purpose of this section, melamine-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. 177...-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. Urea-formaldehyde resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface... conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole...

  8. Investigation of chloride-release of nuclear grade resin in PWR primary system coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new preparation technique is developed for making the low-chloride nuclear-grade resin by commercial resin. The chloride remained in nuclear grade resin may release to PWR primary coolant. The amount of released chloride is depended on the concentration of boron, lithium, other anion impurities, and remained chloride concentration in resin

  9. 76 FR 3614 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... resin (``PTFE resin'') from Japan. See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 67082... Antidumping Duty Order; Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan, 53 FR 32267 (August 24, 1988). On... of Antidumping Duty Orders on Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin from Italy and Japan, 70...

  10. Radioactive ion exchange resin pretreatment and treatment system and corresponding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent organic ion exchange resins contain Li (cationic resins) and B (amionic resins) which interfere with cement after encapsulation. Radioactive anionic and cationic resins or their mixture are treated by a soluble aluminum salt for precipitation of insoluble lithium aluminate, then neutralized and mixed with the cement containing calcium oxide for precipitation of boron

  11. Adsorption behaviour of uranium on immobilized tannin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of uranium by Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. tannin resin was investigated. This resin resulted a suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. The presence of appreciable quantities of sodium chloride does not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these found in seawater and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. TANNsorb resin can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Cryogenic compressive properties of basic epoxy resin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markley, F.W.; Hoffman, J.A.; Muniz, D.P.

    1985-09-01

    The compressive properties of short cylindrical samples of many different epoxy resin systems have been measured at ambient temperature and at 77/sup 0/K. These are pure resin systems of known chemistry, without the inorganic fillers or fibrous reinforcements needed in final cryogenic systems. Of course, chemically incorporated modifiers such as flexibilizing resins have been included. This data should make possible inferences about cryogenic properties from molecular structures and provide specific data useful to formulators and end users. Measurements on some other plastics such as PTFE, Polyimides, and UHMWPE have been made for comparison purposes.

  13. KEMAMPUAN LEKAT RESIN KOMPOSIT PADA REPARASI RESTORASI PORSELEN YANG FRAKTUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Noerdin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since ceramic and metal ceramic restorations in crown and bridge have the potential to fracture, repairing porcelain restorations has become a serious cosmetic and clinical problem. Composite resins have been the material of choice for porcelain repair intraorally because of the esthetic appearance and easy manipulation. However for the repair to withstand functional load, the bond between the repair material and remaining restoration must be strong and durable. Bond strength between composite resins and dental porcelain have been reported by several authors. Several studies reported that silane solution can significantly improve the bond strength of composite resin to dental porcelain.

  14. Separation of boron isotopes using NMG type anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange separation of boron isotopes (B-10 and B-11) has been studied by using a special boron selective ion exchange resin; NMG (n-methyl glucamine)-type anion exchange resin. The resin has shown a large isotope separation coefficient of 1.02 at the experimental conditions of temperature, 80degC, and boric acid concentration, 0.2 M (mole/dm3). Enriched B-10 (92%) was obtained after the migration of 1149 m by a recyclic operation of ion exchange columns in a merry-go-round method. (author)

  15. Low-level radioactive wastes bituminization - ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the research and development of low level radioactive waste treatment by bituminization process in Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN). Low level radioactive solid waste was simulated by mixed ion exchange resin. Cation exchange and anion resin were loaded with lithium and boric acid respectively and were incorporated in bitumen of suitable rheological properties. The simulated solid wastes incorporated in bitumen were 30 to 46 weight %. The rheological properties of waste product bitumen-mixed resin have been reported. The waste product with bitumen V-65 showed best physical and rheological properties and grave lowest leaching rates of boron and lithium. (author)

  16. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% Ordinary Portland Cement 84% gg Blast Furnace Slag, 6% Microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This information was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  17. Optimizing the management of spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety treatment,conditioning and disposal of spent ion exchange resin (SR) from nuclear facilities is a hot topic. The SR features, various treatment and conditioning methods, such as filling into the high integrity container after drying and dewatering, elution, hot compaction, biodegradation, incineration, wet oxidation, bituminization and vitrification are described in this paper. Especially, the cementation is expounded in detail. The swelling mechanism of cementlined spent resins and preventative measures are discussed. It is pointed out that the cementation formulation has to be given more attention and the key point is to comply with disposal requirements. Finally, comments and suggestions for optimizing the management of spent resins are addressed

  18. The kinetics of fossil resin extraction from a flotation concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Yu, Q.; Miller, J.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The kinetics of fossil resin extraction from a flotation concentrate by heptane were investigated as a function of process variables using monosize particles. Experimental results provide for a better understanding of the refining process and the basis for subsequent design and construction of a continuous resin refining circuit. Based on the effect of process variables (particle size, stirring speed, and temperature) the resin extraction rate appears to be controlled by surface solvation phenomena. The initial extraction rate was found to be inversely proportional to the initial particle size and a kinetic model is being developed to describe the experimental results.

  19. Preparation and properties of lignin-epoxy resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Quanfu Yin; Weijun Yang; Chengjun Sun; Mingwei Di

    2012-01-01

    A cross-linked biomass-polymer composite with a lignin content of up to 60% was prepared by blending lignin with an epoxy resin and polyamine using a hot press molding process. The characteristics of the curing reaction of lignin with epoxy resin were studied using DSC and FTIR analysis. The effect of molding temperature and molding pressure on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the lignin/epoxy resin composite was also studied by SEM, DMA, and TG analyses. The results showed tha...

  20. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  1. Recovery of tetrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    OpenAIRE

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    The recovery of the tetrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q = kCn. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20°C. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of th...

  2. Change of color in resins by adding layers of color 'enamel'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantification of the color change is proposed at the time of employing enamel resin over dentine resin. Six resins color dentin and two color enamel were used. Five discs of resin were built of each resin, with a deameter of 10 mm and a thicjness of 2 mm. The reflectance spectrophotometer Color-Eye ® 7000-A were used, to obtain the values L*, a*, b* of the dentin resin disks and transposition of these with enamel. The conclusion has been that in the color have produced changes clinically detectable when put layers of enamel. The Resin Helio Fill Transparent has been which has produced major changes. Given the two enamel resins, dentin resin Helio Molar 310/B3 has been which has suffered major changes and Helio Fill A2 which has introduced fewer changes. Most resins have decreased the chroma, less the value. (author)

  3. Extraction chromatography of neodymium by an organophosphorous extractant supported on various polymeric resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1993-04-01

    Fifteen resins coated with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethyl phosphonate (CMP) were studied for their extraction of neodymium (Nd) in 4.0 and 7.0 M nitric acid. Resin properties, such as chemical composition and physical morphology, which can influence Nd extraction as well as subsequent resin regeneration (Nd stripping), were identified. Hydrophilic or polar resins coated with CMP efficiently extracted the Nd. Resins initially washed free of residual monomer and solvent before CMP coating outperformed their untreated counterparts. The macroporous styrene-divinylbenzene hydrophobic resins that were high in surface area were less effective supports compared with hydrophilic microporous Aurorez, polybenzimidazole (PBI) and macroporous Amberlite polyacrylic resins. Only one resin, Duolite C-467, showed no measurable improvement in Nd extraction with CMP coating. CMP-coated Aurorez PBI, a microporous and hydrophilic polymeric resin with an average surface area, showed the best overall efficiency for Nd removal and resin regeneration.

  4. Metabolomics reveals the origins of antimicrobial plant resins collected by honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael B; Spivak, Marla; Hegeman, Adrian D; Rendahl, Aaron; Cohen, Jerry D

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of antimicrobial plant resins in honey bee, Apis mellifera, nests has important physiological benefits. Resin foraging is difficult to approach experimentally because resin composition is highly variable among and between plant families, the environmental and plant-genotypic effects on resins are unknown, and resin foragers are relatively rare and often forage in unobservable tree canopies. Subsequently, little is known about the botanical origins of resins in many regions or the benefits of specific resins to bees. We used metabolomic methods as a type of environmental forensics to track individual resin forager behavior through comparisons of global resin metabolite patterns. The resin from the corbiculae of a single bee was sufficient to identify that resin's botanical source without prior knowledge of resin composition. Bees from our apiary discriminately foraged for resin from eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), and balsam poplar (P. balsamifera) among many available, even closely related, resinous plants. Cottonwood and balsam poplar resin composition did not show significant seasonal or regional changes in composition. Metabolomic analysis of resin from 6 North American Populus spp. and 5 hybrids revealed peaks characteristic to taxonomic nodes within Populus, while antimicrobial analysis revealed that resin from different species varied in inhibition of the bee bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae. We conclude that honey bees make discrete choices among many resinous plant species, even among closely related species. Bees also maintained fidelity to a single source during a foraging trip. Furthermore, the differential inhibition of P. larvae by Populus spp., thought to be preferential for resin collection in temperate regions, suggests that resins from closely related plant species many have different benefits to bees. PMID:24204850

  5. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a... polymethylmethacrylate, intended to make a temporary prosthesis, such as a crown or bridge, for use until a...

  6. Spatial distribution of volatile compounds in epoxy resins for composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precision abrasion mass spectrometry (PAMS) was used to determine the quantitative distribution profile of water in three epoxy resin systems: tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with dicyandiamide (DICY), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) cured with DICY, and TGDDM cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The first two resin systems also contain an epoxy cresol novolac. Specimens of the three resins were exposed to a humid environment for 4 to 2000 hours. The water distribution was determined immediately following environmental exposure. Distribution profiles of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and dichloromethane were also measured in the specimens. A brief description of the PAMS apparatus and a discussion of the distribution profiles of the sorbed gases in the three epoxy resin systems as a function of exposure time are given

  7. Influence of the molecular structure on hydrolyzability of epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDF has decided to use glass reinforced composites for certain pipework in Pressurized Water Reactors (service water, emergency-supplied service water, fine pipe works, etc...) as a replacement for traditional materials. In practice, steel is prone to rapid corrosion in these circuits; introducing composites could prove economically viable if their long term behaviour can be demonstrated. However, composite materials can undergo deterioration in service through hydrolysis of the resin or the fibre-matrix interface. Different resins can be chosen depending on the programmed use. A first study has covered the hydrolyzability of polyester and vinyl ester resins. The present document undertakes the resistance to hydrolysis of epoxy resins, concentrating on those reputed to withstand high temperatures. This research uses model monomer, linking the molecular structure of the materials to their resistance to hydrolysis. (author)

  8. 21 CFR 177.2415 - Poly(aryletherketone) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of hydroquinone and 4,4′-difluorobenzophenone, and have a minimum weight-average molecular weight of... percent by weight as a residual solvent in the finished basic resin. (c) Extractive limitations....

  9. Curing of Epoxy Resin Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yubin; ZHANG Zuoguang

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of curing of epoxy resin induced by femtosecond laser beam was explored through choosing different initiators . Absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to analyze the structure of epoxy resin systems after irradiation with a femtosecond laser beam. The experimental results show that the epoxy resin systems containing diaryliodonium salts can be cured by irradiation of Jemtosecond laser pulse, while the systems containing benzoin can not be cured. It is found that diaryliodonium salts decompose under the irradiation of femtosecond laser pulse through multi ( two ) -photon absorption, initiating the ring-opening polymerization of epoxy resin. And the appearance of cured area has a sheet structure consisting of many tiny lamellar structures.

  10. Resin Permeation Through Compressed Glass Insulation for Iter Central Solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R.; Roundy, F.; Martovetsky, N.; Miller, J.; Mann, T.

    2010-04-01

    Concern has been expressed about the ability of the resin system to penetrate the compressed dry glass of the turn and layer insulation during vacuum-pressure impregnation of ITER Central Solenoid (CS) modules. The stacked pancake layers of each module result in compression loads up to 9×104 kg (100 tons) on the lowest layers of each segment. The objective of this program was to assess the effects of this compressive load on resin permeation under resin-transfer conditions and with materials identical to that expected to be used in actual coil fabrication [45-50 °C, vacuum of 133 Pa (1 torr), DGEBF/anhydride epoxy resin system, E-glass satin weave, applied pressure of 125 kPa]. The experimental conditions and materials are detailed and the permeation results presented in this paper.

  11. A genetic-neural artificial intelligence approach to resins optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a preliminary study about the viability and adequacy of a new methodology for the definition of one of the main properties of ion exchange resins used for isotopic separation. Basically, the main problem is the definition of pelicule diameter in case of pelicular ion exchange resins, in order to achieve the best performance in the shortest time. In order to achieve this, a methodology was developed, based in two classic techniques of Artificial Intelligence (AI). At first, an artificial neural network (NN) was trained to map the existing relations between the nucleus radius and the resin's efficiency associated with the exchange time. Later on, a genetic algorithm (GA) was developed in order to find the best pelicule dimension. Preliminary results seem to confirm the potential of the method, and this can be used in any chemical process employing ion exchange resins. (author)

  12. Macroporus resins in actinide separations (Preprint No. IT-4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper attempts to review the studies reported on the use of macroporous resins for separation of actinides. The literature data reveal that the macroporous resins are superior in many ways, to gel type resins. This is primarily due to the improvement in the rate of absorption and desorption as the result of the availability of a large surface area as a consequence of macroporous structure. By and large, the investigations have been limited only to laboratory studies. Uranium leach liquor processing and the isolated example of neptunium recovery, are the only plant scale applications of macroporous resins, besides their routine use in water treatment in the commercial water reactors. (author). 65 refs., 11 tables

  13. Radiation processed composite materials of wood and elastic polyester resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation polymerization of multifunctional unsaturated polyester-monomer mixtures in wood forms interpenetrating network system. The mechanical resistance (compression, abrasion, hardness, etc.) of these composite materials are generally well over the original wood, however the impact strength is almost the same or even reduced, in comparison to the wood itself. An attempt is made using elastic polyester resins to produced wood-polyester composite materials with improved modulus of elasticity and impact properties. For the impregnation of European beech wood two types of elastic unsaturated polyester resins were used. The exothermic effect of radiation copolymerization of these resins in wood has been measured and the dose rate effects as well as hardening dose was determined. Felxural strength and impact properties were examined. Elastic unsaturated polyester resins improved the impact strength of wood composite materials. (author)

  14. Effect of organoclay incorporation on dental resin morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present work was to incorporate nanosilicates in commercial dental resins in order to prepare dental nanocomposites competitive as commercial nanoparticulates dental resins. Thus, a silicate, Cloisite 20A (C20A), was incorporated in a microhybrid dental resin (Z100) and morphological properties of the nanocomposites evaluated as a function of the incorporation method and the amount of filler employed. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results evidence that nanocomposites have been obtained and according to SEM results, the morphology of microhybrid resin was modified when C20A nanoparticulate was incorporated improve the size distribution and reduce the agglomeration of the particles. (author)

  15. Analysis of polymerization time on abrasive wear of dental resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Carlos Bianchi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation was made of the abrasive wear of six composite thermofixed dental resins subjected to different polymerization times. The method of evaluation was based on sharpness measurements to quantify the abrasive wear resistance of the resins. To this end, a test bench was built, consisting of a rotating porcelain cylinder that wears out a resin-coated cylinder placed above it, thus causing vertical displacement of the contact as the wear progresses. The values of vertical displacement, i.e., the input variables, were read and recorded by means of a computer program to obtain the sharpness values. These data indicated that the resins displayed different behaviors as a function of the polymerization times applied, reinforcing the importance of using a practical and rapid method of analysis in order to ensure that the behavior of new materials is fully understood before they are launched on the market.

  16. KARAKTERISASI PELIKEL YANG TERADSORPSI PADA PERMUKAAN RESIN AKRILIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sunarintyas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to determine the composiiton of adsorbed pellicle on acrylic resin surface. Fifteen plates of 10x10x2 mm were made from chemical, heat, and microwave activated acrylic resin. The plates were incubated in saliva for 1,2,3,4, and 5 hours. Pellicle characterization was done every hour by SDS PAGE electrophoresis. The result showed that: 1. chemical, heat, and microwave activated acrylic resin adsorbed salivary pellicle by molecular weight of 50-61 kDa (amylase band; 2. incubation of 1,2,3,4, and 5 hours in saliva resulted in similar pellicle composition. In conclusion, adsorbed salivary pellicle on acrylic resin surface during 5 hours showed similar characteristic in every hour, with the major protein adsorbed: amylase.

  17. Adsorption behavior of proteins on temperature-responsive resins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poplewska, I.; Muca, R.; Strachota, Adam; Piatkowski, W.; Antos, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1324, 10 January (2014), s. 181-189. ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : bioseparations * N-isopropylacrylamide * thermo-responsible resins Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.169, year: 2014

  18. Stabilization and volume reduction of radioactive spent ionexchange resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Stabilization and volume reduction of spent radioactive ion-exchange resins (IERs)were studied. Stabilization technology includes volume reduction with wet chemicaloxidation process and immobilization of the residue into cement. Undersuitable conditions, the exhaustedradioactive ion-exchange resins were dissolved successfully in aH2O2-Fe2+/Cu2+ catalytic oxidationsystem (Fenton reagent). The analytical results indicated that the radioactive nuclides loaded in the resins were concentrated in decomposed solution and solid residues. The process parameters ofwet chemical oxidation and solidification were also obtained. Thedecomposition ratios were 100%and more than 90% for cation and anion IERs respectively. The waste volume was decreased by40% compared with that of original spent resins.

  19. Quantification and Purification of Mulberry Anthocyanins with Macroporous Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueming Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Total anthocyanins in different cultivars of mulberry were measured and a process for the industrial preparation of mulberry anthocyanins as a natural food colorant was studied. In 31 cultivars of mulberry, the total anthocyanins, calculated as cyanidin 3-glucoside, ranged from 147.68 to 2725.46 mg/L juice. Extracting and purifying with macroporous resins was found to be an efficient potential method for the industrial production of mulberry anthocyanins as a food colorant. Of six resins tested, X-5 demonstrated the best adsorbent capability for mulberry anthocyanins (91 mg/mL resin. The adsorption capacity of resins increased with the surface area and the pore radius. Residual mulberry fruit juice after extraction of pigment retained most of its nutrients, except for anthocyanins, and may provide a substrate for further processing.

  20. Effect of surface pretreatments on resin composite bonding to PEEK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silthampitag, Patcharawan; Chaijareenont, Pisaisit; Tattakorn, Kittipong; Banjongprasert, Chaiyasit; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of surface pretreatments on resin composite bonding to polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Four groups of surface pretreatment (no pretreatment, etched with 98% sulfuric acid, etched with piranha solution and sandblasting with 50 µm alumina) were performed on PEEK. Surface roughness, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were examined. Shear bond strength (SBS) and interface characteristics were also evaluated after the specimens were bonded with resin materials. Two-way ANOVA analysis revealed significance on two main effects and interactions. Tukey's multiple comparisons test showed that the SBS of resin composite on PEEK were the highest in the group etched with 98% sulfuric acid and bonded with Heliobond(®) (p<0.05). All pretreatments produced similar spectra of FTIR patterns. SEM demonstrated porosities and pitting from chemical etching, which suggested a significant influence on the adhesion between PEEK and resin materials. PMID:27477234

  1. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular... purification of partially delactosed whey. The gel bed shall be maintained in a sanitary manner in...

  2. Selection of anion exchange resins for boron thermal regeneration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron concentration changes in the reactor coolant are effected using a new development called the boron thermal regeneration system (BTRS). Thermal regeneration refers to the use of ion-exchange resins in either retaining or releasing borate ions as a function of temperature. For the BTRS the equilibrium capacity of commercial and special anion exchange resins was investigated for the degree of cross-linking of anion resins. The equilibrium capacity increases with decreased temperature and depends strongly on the degree of cross-linking having the maximum point at about 7% of DVB. The temperature coefficient of equilibrium capacity of boric acid is also a function of the concentration of external solution and of the cross-linking having a maximum point of around 7% of DVB. Other basic characteristics of anion exchange resin were also investigated. (author)

  3. Resin Infusion Rigidized Inflatable Concept Development and Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing resin infusion to rigidize an inflatable structure and form fiber-reinforced composites on-orbit is a novel concept that builds on current NASA technology...

  4. Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil); Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the

  5. Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation

  6. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance

  7. Adhesion between high-strength concrete, epoxy resin and CFRP

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de; Krzywon, Rafal; Camões, Aires; Gorski, M.; Dawczynski, Szymon

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the adhesion between high-strength concrete, epoxy resin and CFRP. The adhesion of the high-strength concrete was compared with the same property measured in conventional concrete. Shear tests were made to test adhesion from concretes to epoxy resin. Flexural tests were used to evaluate the adhesion between concretes, epoxy and CFRP. The effect of temperature was also evaluated. For ordinary temperatures (20 ºC) the results showed a better flexural performance o...

  8. Polymerization of epoxy resins studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polymerization process of epoxy resins (bisphenol-A dicyanate) was studied using positron-annihilation spectroscopy. The polymerization from monomer to polymer through a polymerization reaction was followed by positron-annihilation lifetime spectroscopy measurements. Resins kept at curing temperatures (120, 150 and 200 oC) changed form from of powder to a solid through a liquid. The size of the intermolecular spaces of the solid samples increased along with the progress of polymerization. (author)

  9. The dynamic behaviour of a modified polyurethane resin

    OpenAIRE

    Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Hazell, P.J.; Stennett, C; Cooper, G; Cleave, R.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic response of both a pure and nano-reinforced polyurethane replacement resin (PRR) have been investigated using plate impact techniques. Similar U-P-U- S Hugoniot equations of state have been established for both materials, despite the altered cross-linking associated with the addition of inorganic polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) blocks of c. 1.5 nm size to the resin matrix. At higher particle velocities a similar U-P-U-S response to that of polyurethane ...

  10. Effects of Resin Hydrophilicity on Dentin Bond Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Nishitani, Y.; Yoshiyama, M; Donnelly, A.M.; Agee, K.A.; Sword, J.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if hydrophobic resins can be coaxed into dentin wet with ethanol instead of water. The test hypothesis was that dentin wet with ethanol would produce higher bond strengths for hydrophobic resins than would dentin wet with water. This study examined the microtensile bond strength of 5 experimental adhesives (50 wt% ethanol/50% comonomers) of various degrees of hydrophilicity to acid-etched dentin that was left moist with water, moist with ethanol, or ...

  11. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is disclosed of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with A2O3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art

  12. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes. PMID:26624231

  13. Branched polymeric media: Perchlorate-selective resins from hyperbranched polyethyleneimine

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Dennis P.

    2012-10-02

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a persistent contaminant found in drinking groundwater sources in the United States. Ion exchange (IX) with selective and disposable resins based on cross-linked styrene divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads is currently the most commonly utilized process for removing low concentrations of ClO4 - (10-100 ppb) from contaminated drinking water sources. However, due to the low exchange capacity of perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins (∼0.5-0.8 eq/L), the overall cost becomes prohibitive when treating groundwater with higher concentration of ClO4 - (e.g., 100-1000 ppb). In this article, we describe a new perchlorate-selective resin with high exchange capacity. This new resin was prepared by alkylation of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension polymerization process. Batch and column studies show that our new PEI resin with mixed hexyl/ethyl quaternary ammonium chloride exchange sites can selectively extract trace amounts of ClO4 - from a makeup groundwater (to below detection limit) in the presence of competing ions. In addition, this resin has a strong-base exchange capacity of 1.4 eq/L, which is 1.75-2.33 times larger than those of commercial perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins. The overall results of our studies suggest that branched PEI beads provide versatile and promising building blocks for the preparation of perchlorate-selective resins with high exchange capacity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R.; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theor...

  15. Temperature Rise during Resin Composite Polymerization under Different Ceramic Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Yondem, Isa; Altintas, Subutay Han; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure temperature increase induced by various light polymerizing units during resin composite polymerization beneath one of three types of ceramic restorations. Methods: The resin composite (Variolink II) was polymerized between one of three different ceramic specimens (zirconium oxide, lithium disilicate, feldspathic) (diameter 5 mm, height 2 mm) and a dentin disc (diameter 5 mm, height 1 mm) with a conventional halogen light, a high intensity h...

  16. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge - engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation

  17. SuperLig Ion Exchange Resin Swelling and Buoyancy Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to achieve a fundamental understanding of SuperLig resin swelling and shrinking characteristics, which lead to channeling and early breakthrough during loading cycles. The density of salt solution that causes resin floating was also determined to establish a limit for operation. Specific tests performed include (a) pH dependence, (b) ionic strength dependence and (c) buoyancy effect vs. simulant composition

  18. Synthesis of cardanol based phenolic resin with aid of microwaves.

    OpenAIRE

    Dileep Tiwari; Archana Devi; Ramesh Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Cardanol based novolac resin was prepared. Cardanol based novolac-type phenolic resin was prepared under microwave irradiation by the reaction of cardanol ( C ) and formaldehyde ( F ) with mole ratio 1:0.8 of C/F using tricarboxylic acid as catalyst. Analogical synthesize have been done using conventional heating for the comparison of the methods. The methylolation of cardanol was confirmed by Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis and a reaction mechanism was proposed. The...

  19. Organic resin anion exchangers for the treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic anion exchange resins are evaluated for 99-TcO4- (pertechnate) removed from aqueous nuclear waste streams. Chemical, thermal and radiation stabilities were studied. Selected resins were examined in detail for their selectivities in the presence of I-, NO3-, SO4=, CO3=, Cl- and OH-. Ion exchange equilibria and kinetic mechanisms were determined. Preliminary investigations of cement encapsulation in polymer modified form were made and some leach studies carried out. (author)

  20. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet·X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram·X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO, after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h, for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco. The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DE abFNx01 between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  1. Application of Ketone-Based Resins as Anticorrosive Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Esma Sezer; Nilgün Kızılcan; Kerim Çoban

    2011-01-01

    Effect of some newly synthesized modified ketonic resins on corrosion inhibition of stainless steel (SS) and copper (Cu) was investigated in acidic medium. Carboxyl, hydroxyl, and carbonyl functionalized resins have been coated on metal electrode as a thin film by dipping method. Corrosion characteristics of coating on SS (304 L) and Cu were investigated by polarization, open-circuit, and impedance measurement. These measurements performed at different time and the stability of polymeric coat...

  2. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  3. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin and Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Cyanate ester (or polycyanate) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14A polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. Process trials, tests and analyses were conducted in order to gain insight into factors that can affect final properties of the cured cyanate ester resin and its composites. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to cure is also crucial as it affects the T{sub g} of the resin and composite. Recommendations for reducing moisture contact with the resin during wet-winding are presented. High fiber volume fraction ({approximately}80%) composites wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent hoop tensile strengths (660 to 670 ksi average with individual rings failing above 700 ksi), which are believed to be the highest recorded strengths for this class of materials. The measured transverse properties were also exceptional for these high fiber fraction composites. Based on the available data, this cyanate ester resin system and its composites are recommended for space and vacuum applications only. Further testing is required before these materials can be recommended for long term use at elevated temperatures in an ambient air environment. The results of all analyses and tests performed as part of this study are presented as well as baseline process for fabricating thick, stage-cured composites. The manufacture of a 1 in. thick composite cylinder made with this process is also described.

  4. Study and application on lean resin converting in uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field test about sulphuric acid used to convert lean resin was finished. The results indicated sulphuric acid could replace chlorin in lean resin and could be reclaimed to desorption procedure. The consumption of NaCl decreased, the chlorin concentration of tailing decreased too. Both of uranium loss and waste water volume were reduced. The uranium concentration of tailing decreased and energy saving and emission reduction can be achieved. (authors)

  5. Moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant: A boon

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanna Kumar Bhat; Sapna Konde; Sunil N Raj; Narayan Chandra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pit and fissure sealants are highly effective in preventing occlusal caries. The present study clinically evaluated and compared the retention and development of caries when sealed with moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant, conventional resin-based sealant with and without a bonding agent, and Glass Ionomer Cement Sealant in young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 healthy cooperative children aged 6-9 years who were at high caries risk with all ...

  6. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cement...

  7. Characterisation of a phenolic resin and sugar cane pulp composite

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, J.L.; A. T. N. Pires; S. M. A. G. Ulson de Souza; A.A.Ulson de Souza

    2004-01-01

    Polymeric materials are increasingly replacing metallic materials as a result of their properties. In this work a composite of phenolic resin and sugar cane pulp was developed. The sugar cane pulp has been previously alkalinised, dried, and milled and the particles had been classified in a range of grain sizes. Experimental assays were performed, varying the proportion of the resin and the reinforcement and the size of the cane pulp fibre, keeping the pressure and moulding temperature constan...

  8. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    OpenAIRE

    Feilzer, A.J.; Özcan, M.; Kleverlaan, C. J.; Scholtanus, J.D. (Hans)

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attributed to penetration of corrosion products, is an adequate substrate for bonding resin composite restorations. Previous studies revealed tin and zinc as main metals from amalgam in stained dentin and...

  9. Chemical resistance of optical plastics and resin for level detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omegna, Cicero L.; Fontes Garcia, Jonas; Ramos-Gonzáles, Roddy E.; Barbosa, Luiz C.

    2015-09-01

    A test method was developed to find the ideal optical material that supports the chemical reaction of some fuels. Optical plastics and resin were submerged for long periods of time in reservoirs of ethanol, gasoline, Diesel and biodiesel. The dimensional change and weight change of the submerged samples was measured. A special resin successfully supported the chemical attack of fuels. Samples of acrylic polymer and polycarbonate were used as type of optical plastic.

  10. Resin and organic transport in PWR secondary cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical techniques for quantifying low concentrations of cation and anion resins and low-molecular-weight organic acids in power station process streams are described. Average resin concentrations at the outlet of condensate polisher systems and individual vessels at three pressurized water reactors generally were much less than 1 ppB. Organic acid concentrations throughout the cycle at the three study plants also were very low

  11. Artificial saliva effect on toxic substances release from acrylic resins

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić Milena; Krunić Nebojša; Najman Stevo; Nikolić Ljubiša; Nikolić Vesna; Rajković Jelena; Petrović Milica; Igić Marko; Ignjatović Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim. Acrylic-based resins are intensively used in dentistry practice as restorative or denture-base materials. The purpose of this study was to analyze the surface structure of denture base resins and the amount of released potentially toxic substances (PTS) immediately upon polymerization and incubation in different types of artificial saliva. Methods. Storage of acrylic samples in two models of artificial saliva were performed in a water bath a...

  12. Long-term deterioration of composite resin and amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smales, R J

    1991-01-01

    Previous long-term longitudinal studies of two different methods of placing an auto-cured conventional anterior composite resin, and of a low- and a high-copper amalgam alloy, had shown similar restoration survivals despite the different resin treatment methods used or the types of amalgam alloy placed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess several clinical factors or characteristics of these restorations that were believed to affect the survival of the restorative materials. The 950 composite resin and the 1042 amalgam restorations examined were placed by many operators in numerous patients attending a dental hospital. The composite resin restorations were placed using unetched- and etched-enamel-bonding treatment methods, and the amalgam restorations were polished after insertion. Clinical ratings supplemented by color transparencies were used for the assessment of four factors for the resin, and four factors for the amalgam restoration. Significant deterioration differences were found for several of the clinical factors assessed for both the two different composite resin treatment methods, and for the two different amalgam alloys, which were not directly related to the restoration survivals. PMID:1840079

  13. Gamma radiation effect on gas production in anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced decomposition of Amberlite IRA400 anion exchange resin in hydroxide form by gamma radiolysis has been studied at various doses in different atmospheres (anaerobic, anaerobic with liquid water, and aerobic). The effect of these parameters on the degradation of ion exchange resins is rarely investigated in the literature. We focused on the radiolysis gases produced by resin degradation. When the resin was irradiated under anaerobic conditions with liquid water, the liquid phase over the resin was also analyzed to identify any possible water-soluble products released by degradation of the resin. The main products released are trimethylamine (TMA), molecular hydrogen (H2g) and carbon dioxide (CO2g). TMA and H2g are produced in all the irradiation atmospheres. However, TMA was in gaseous form under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and in aqueous form in presence of liquid water. In the latter conditions, TMAaq was associated with aqueous dimethylamine (DMAaq), monomethylamine (MMAaq) and ammonia (NH4+aq). CO2g is formed in the presence of oxygen due to oxidation of organic compounds present in the system, in particular the degradation products such as TMAg

  14. Electro-assisted regeneration of ion exchange resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang LIU; Ying WANG; Yansheng LI; Hui CHANG

    2008-01-01

    Electro-assisted regeneration (EAR) for the mixed bed of strongly acidic cation and weakly basic anion exchange resins with the Al(OH)3 suspension in a three-compartment cell was investigated. The desalina-tion experiments were carried out to evaluate the char-acteristic of the regenerated mixed resins. Experimental results showed that the efficiency of resin regeneration was strictly dependent on the voltage, regeneration time, and feed regenerant flow rate. The amount of the effluent reached 50 times the volume of the resins bed, and the conductivity was less than 1.0 μs/cm. Compared to the conventional ER, the total effluent volume of EAR was about 1000 mL more than that of ER under the same conditions, and the outlet conductivity was significantly lower. The desalination and regeneration reaction mechanisms of the mixed resins indicated the regeneration efficiency of resin with Al(OH)3 as the regenerant was much higher than that with H2O.

  15. Pengaruh Minuman Kopi terhadap Perubahan Warna pada Resin Komposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilia Aprilia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of coffee beverage on hybrid composite resin discoloration. Material and method: This study used hybrid composite resin with A3 color, and was done by soaking composite resin plates in coffee solution for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days, corresponding to equivalent coffee usage for 6 months, 1, 1.5, and 2 years. The same measurements of reflectance were done before and after soaking into coffee solution. In the measurement, a beam from He-Ne laser is reflected by the sample to a photovoltaic cell type BOY-47, which provides a voltage signal accordig to the intensity of reflected light. Results: There was a significant difference between composite resin plates before and after soaking into coffee dilution for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. Conclusion: Composite resin is discolored after soaking into a coffee solution, suggesting that coffee usage will have a discoloring effect on dental composite resin.

  16. Carbonization-cementation process for treatment of spent IX resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent IX resins containing radioactive fission and activation products of reactor structural materials are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of nuclear reactors. Feasibility tests were conducted for carbonization of IX resins to achieve weight and volume reduction and destruction of functional groups so as to make them compatible for immobilization in cement matrix. Carbonization of non-radioactive resins was studied at 250 to 350 degC. Carbonization residues were 20 to 32 wt% depending upon the type of resin and temperature of carbonization. The release of 137Cs activity to off-gases was 0.004% at 300 degC and 0.05 % at 350 degC. Based on these tests, a 50 liter/batch capacity inactive resin carbonization pilot plant was set up. Carbonization residues could be immobilized into cement matrix with 60 wt % loading using vermiculite and precipitated silica as admixtures. The cumulative fraction of 137Cs leached from the selected cement matrix was 0.0066 in 200 days. Based on pilot plant studies and cementation tests, the swollen spent resins waste volume could be minimized by 2.7 times. (author)

  17. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  18. Thermal Study of Anhydrides Cured Tetrafunctional Cardo Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh P. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrafunctional cardo epoxy resin (EBCF was cured by using 10 wt% maleic anhydride (MA, pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA, phthalic anhydride (PA, tetrahydrophthalic anhydride (THPA, tetrabromophthalic anhydride (TBPA, and tetrachlorophthalic anhydride (TCPA as hardeners at 120°C for 40–105 min (gel time and then postcured 1 h at 130°C. Gel time is found to depend on the structure of the anhydrides used. Cured samples were found insoluble in common solvents. Cured and uncured EBCF were characterized by FTIR, DSC, and TGA techniques. Cured and uncured resins followed multistep degradation reactions. Kinetic parameters, namely, order of degradation, energy of activation, frequency factor, and entropy change, were determined according to the Anderson-Freeman method and interpreted in light of the nature of hardeners used for curing purpose. The resins followed integral or fractional order degradation kinetics. Complex degradation reactions are due to different types of linkages in cured resins. Both nature and structure of resin and hardeners affected the curing behavior and the resultant thermal properties of the cured resins.

  19. Study of LPOP residue on resin mineralization and solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji Electric had developed the low pressure oxygen plasma technology for mild decomposition and mineralization of an organic material such as ion exchange resin. This method is suitable for radioactive spent resin volume/weight reduction and stabilization for final disposal. On this process, the ion-exchange resins are vaporized and decomposed into gas-phase with pyrolysis, and then, they are decomposed and oxidized with low-pressure plasma activity based on oxygen. And this process is achieved under moderate condition for radio active waste. Incinerate temperature: 400-700degC. Low-pressure (low-temperature) plasma condition: 10-50 Pa. From the result of this process, named of LPOP(low pressure oxidation process) by the inductively coupled plasma, we have confirmed that the process is applicable for organic fireproof waste including ion-exchange resin, and found that the used resin treatment performance is the same as cold test (using imitate spent resin). In this paper, the outline of the LPOP technology, and two research results on the possibility of solidification with cement of LPOP residue for geological disposes are reported. (1) Study of the residue chemical form after LPOP process. (2) Study of the solidification character with cement. (author)

  20. Ballistic properties of bidirectional fiber/resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research was to make evaluation of the ballistic strength of four different fiber/resin composites intended to be used in manufacturing of ballistic items for personal protection. Research has been performed on glass, ballistic nylon, aramid and HPPE (High Performance Polyethylene) plainly woven fabric based composites. As a matrix system, in all cases, polyvinylbutyral modified phenolic resin was used. For the investigation, areal weight range 2 - 9 kg/m2 chosen was, which is applicable for personal ballistic protection and the ultimate resin content range 20 - 50 vol.%. Ballistic test of the composites has shown that the best results exhibit HPPE based composites; aramid based composites have been the second best followed by the polyamide based composites. The worst results have been shown by the glass based composites. All composites with lower resin content (20%) have performed much better than their counterparts with higher resin content (50 %).The plot of the ballistic strength (V50) versus areal weight has shown a linear increase of V50 with the increase of areal weight. The ballistic strength of the composites is highly dependant on the fiber/resin ratio and increases with the increase of the fiber content. (Author)

  1. Ion exchange resin fouling of molybdenum in recovery uranium processess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between anion exchange resin fouling and molybdic acid polymerization was studied. By using potentiometer titration and laser-Raman spectroscopy the relationship of molybdic acid polymerization and the pH value of solution or the molybdenum concentration was determined. It was shown that as the concentration of initial molybdenum in solution decreases from 0.2 mol/L to 0.5 mmol/L, the pH value of starting polymerization decreased from 6.5 to 4.5. The experimental results show that the fouling of 201 x 7 resin in the acidic solution is mainly caused by the adsorbing of Mo3O264- ion and occupying the exchange radical site of the resin. Under the leaching conditions the molybdenum and phosphate existing in the leaching liquor can form 12-molybdo-phosphate ion. It also leads to resin fouling. The molybdenum on the fouled resin can synergically be desorbed by mixed desorbents containing ammonium hydroxide and ammonium sulfate. The desorbed resin can be used for uranium adsorption and the desorbed molybdenum can be recovered by ion exchange method

  2. Analysis of surface hardness of artificially aged resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of artificially accelerated aging (AAA on the surface hardness of eight composite resins: Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, 4 Seasons, Herculite, P60, Tetric Ceram, Charisma, and Filtek Z100. Sixteen specimens were made from the test piece of each material, using an 8.0 × 2.0 mm teflon matrix. After 24 hours, eight specimens from each material were submitted to three surface hardness readings using a Shimadzu Microhardness Tester for 5 seconds at a load of 50 gf. The other eight specimens remained in the artificially accelerated aging machine for 382 hours and were submitted to the same surface hardness analysis. The means of each test specimen were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (p > 0.05, ANOVA and Tukey test (p < 0.05. With regard to hardness (F = 86.74, p < 0.0001 the analysis showed significant differences among the resin composite brands. But aging did not influence the hardness of any of the resin composites (F = 0.39, p = 0.53. In this study, there was interaction between the resin composite brand and the aging factors (F = 4.51, p < 0.0002. It was concluded that notwithstanding the type of resin, AAA did not influence surface hardness. However, with regard to hardness there was a significant difference among the resin brands.

  3. Evaluation of commercial resins for fructo-oligosaccharide separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, C; Suvarov, P; De Weireld, G

    2014-01-25

    Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) produced by fermentative processes are obtained in mixtures containing significant amounts of salts and other non-prebiotic sugars. A demineralisation process using a mixture of a cationic and an anionic resin was proposed. The separation of FOS from a mixture of fructose, glucose and sucrose was evaluated. Experiments were conducted with several commercial cationic exchange resins in calcium, sodium and potassium forms packed in preparative columns (7cm×2.2cm length×diameter). Resins in potassium form obtained the higher retention factor values for sugars when compared to the other ionic forms. However, when compared to calcium and sodium ones, resins in potassium cationic forms were shown to be the less efficient separating sugar mixtures. The resin with best separation performance was the Diaion UBK535Ca. A recovery yield of 92% (w/w) of FOS with 90% (w/w) of purity was obtained from batch experiments conducted in a single column loaded with the Diaion UBK535Ca resin at 25°C. The temperature shown did not influence the separation performance significantly. By increasing the column length, the purity of FOS increased to 92% (w/w), however the recovery yield decreased to 88% (w/w). PMID:23806732

  4. Determination of shielding parameters for different types of resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The gamma and neutron shielding properties of four types of resin have been investigated. • The total mass attenuation coefficients have been calculated using WinXCom computer programs. • The macroscopic fast neutron removal cross-sections have been calculated theoretically. • The total mass attenuation coefficient and the macroscopic fast neutron removal cross-section depend on chemical content. • The resin 250 WD is effective for shielding fast neutrons, and heavy resins are effective for shielding gamma rays. - Abstract: In this paper, the neutron and gamma shielding properties of four types of resin have been studied. The mass attenuation coefficients (μt) have been calculated at the photon energy range of 1 keV–1 GeV by using WinXCom program. The macroscopic fast neutron removal cross-sections (ΣR) have also been calculated. The dependence of mass attenuation coefficients and the macroscopic fast neutron removal cross-sections on chemical composition of the selected polymers has been discussed. Also, the dependence of mass attenuation coefficients on incident photon energy has been studied. The results show that resins with high density is an effective for shielding gamma rays and resin 250WD is effective for shielding fast neutrons

  5. Clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite with and without an intermediate layer of flowable resin composite: a 7-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite.......The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite....

  6. Bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using the resin coating technique

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Batitucci dos Santos-Daroz; Marcelo Tavares de Oliveira; Mário Fernando de Góes; Toru Nikaido; Junji Tagami; Marcelo Giannini

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using different adhesive systems (AS) in the presence or absence of a low-viscosity composite liner (Protect Liner F - PLF) applied over the bonded dentin. The adhesive systems selected were: AdheSE/Vivadent (AD); Clearfil Protect Bond/Kuraray (CP); One-Up Bond F/Tokuyama (OU); Single Bond/3M ESPE (SB); Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus/Bisco (TY); Xeno III/Dentsply (XE) and Unifil Bond/GC (UN). After removing the labi...

  7. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  8. Thermal and photochemical curing of filled resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.UV-radiation curing has experienced a steady growth for the past 20 years because of its distinct advantages, namely, solvent-free formulations cured within a fraction of a second upon illumination at ambient temperature. But as the UV light hardly penetrates into pigmented resins and does not reach shadow areas of items presenting a complex shape, conventional UV-curable colored coatings cannot be used as protective varnishes for 3D items. Dual-cure systems have therefore been developed: the light induced polymerization of acrylic double bonds is combined with a thermally induced poly addition reaction between isocyanates and hydroxyl groups. the resulting polyurethane network was shown to exhibit satisfactory mechanical properties for a few millimeter thick pigmented samples. The influence of the hydrogen donor, the reaction temperature, the ambient humidity, as well as the importance of the UV step on the poly addition kinetics has been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. the efficiency of this dual-cure processing has been demonstrated by ATR infrared spectroscopy investigations for composite materials containing carbon black. The mechanical properties of the resulting material have been evaluated by hardness and dynamic mechanical analysis measurements

  9. Thermal and photochemical curing of filled resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.UV-radiation curing has experienced a steady growth for the past 20 years because of its distinct advantages, namely, solvent-free formulations cured within a fraction of a second upon illumination at ambient temperature. But as the UV light hardly penetrates into pigmented resins and does not reach shadow areas of items presenting a complex shape, conventional UV-curable colored coatings cannot be used as protective varnishes for 3D items. Dual-cure systems have therefore been developed: the light induced polymerization of acrylic double bonds is combined with a thermally induced poly addition reaction between isocyanates and hydroxyl groups. The resulting polyurethane network was shown to exhibit satisfactory mechanical properties for a few millimeter thick pigmented samples. The influence of the hydrogen donor, the reaction temperature, the ambient humidity, as well as the importance of the UV step on the poly addition kinetics has been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The efficiency of this dual-core processing has been demonstrated by ATR infrared spectroscopy investigations for composite materials containing carbon black. The mechanical properties of the resulting material have been evaluated by hardness and dynamic mechanical analysis measurements

  10. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  11. Tribological performance of resin impregnated gunny (RIG) and resin reinforced honeycomb (RRH) material composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Gunny and honeycomb composites were fabricated using hand-lay-up and cold-press techniques. ► Wear rate and frictional response was studied using pin-on-disk machine. ► Wear endurance (around 0.35 mg/N) is better performed in RRH. ► Minimum friction was 0.01 for both RIG and RRH. ► RRH deformation is due to cracking and fatigue failure. - Abstract: Temptation to recycle gunny fiber and honeycomb chassis as part of tribo-composite has been realized for body shell application. In this exploration, tribological performance of resin impregnated gunny (RIG) and resin reinforced honeycomb (RRH) material composites have been studied in response to wear and frictional coefficient on dry sliding against steel counter-face using pin-on-disk (POD) influenced by applied loads (5–25 N) and sliding velocities (1.12–22.56 m/s). The specific wear rate (from weight loss) for RIG is lower approximately around 0.35 mg/N and comparable at increasing velocity at approximately 0.16 mg/N. Friction was minimized at 0.01. Compression result shows RIG has more than 8 N. The average maximum displacement is highest for RRH at 1.8 cm. Finally, the worn surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) for its wear mechanisms

  12. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis experiments with organization exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrolysis may be an important pretreatment step before vitrification in a cold crucible melter (CCM). During vitrification of organic resin the carbon or other remaining residues may harm the performance of the cold crucible melter of the eventual stability of the final glass product. Hence, it is important to reduce or prevent such harmful waste from entry into the cold crucible melter. Pretreatment with pyrolysis will generally provide volume reduction resulting in less amount of solid waste that needs to be handled by the CCM; in addition, the pyrolytic processes may breakdown much of the complex organics causing release through volatilization resulting in less carbon and other harmful substances. Hence, KEPRI has undertaken studies on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resin. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis were examined with TGA and a tube furnace. TGA results for pyrolysis with the flow of nitrogen indicate that even after pyrolyzing from room temperature to about 900 deg C, a significant mass fraction of the original cationic resin remains, approximately 46 %. The anionic resin when pyrolytically heated in a flow of nitrogen only, from room temperature to about 900 deg C, produced a final residue mass fraction of about 8 percent. Oxidation at a ratio of air to nitrogen, 1:2, reduced the cationic resin to 5.3% when heated at 5 C/min. Oxidation of anionic resin at the same ratio and same heating rate left almost no solid residue. Pyrolysis (e.g. nitrogen-only environment) in the tube furnace of larger samples relative to the TGA produced very similar results to the TGA. The differences may be attributed to the scale effects such as surface area exposure to the gas stream, temperature distributions throughout the resin, etc. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs

  13. Ultrafiltration Membrane Fouling and the Effect of Ion Exchange Resins

    KAUST Repository

    Jamaly, Sanaa

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is a challenging process for the ultrafiltration membrane during wastewater treatment. This research paper determines the organic character of foulants of different kinds of wastewater before and after adding some ion exchange resins. Two advanced organic characterization methods are compared in terms of concentration of dissolved organic carbons: The liquid chromatography with organic carbon (LC-OCD) and Shimadzu total organic carbon (TOC). In this study, two secondary wastewater effluents were treated using ultrafiltration membrane. To reduce fouling, pretreatment using some adsorbents were used in the study. Six ion exchange resins out of twenty were chosen to compare the effect of adsorbents on fouling membrane. Based on the percent of dissolved organic carbon’s removal, three adsorbents were determined to be the most efficient (DOWEX Marathon 11 anion exchange resin, DOWEX Optipore SD2 polymeric adsorbent, and DOWEX PSR2 anion exchange), and three other ones were determined to the least efficient (DOWEX Marathon A2 anion exchange resin, DOWEX SAR anion exchange resin, and DOWEX Optipore L493 polymeric adsorbent). Organic characterization for feed, permeate, and backwash samples were tested using LC-OCD and TOC to better understand the characteristics of foulants to prevent ultrafiltration membrane fouling. The results suggested that the polymeric ion exchange resin, DOWEX SD2, reduced fouling potential for both treated wastewaters. All the six ion exchange resins removed more humic fraction than other organic fractions in different percent, so this fraction is not the main for cause for UF membrane fouling. The fouling of colloids was tested before and after adding calcium. There is a severe fouling after adding Ca2+ to effluent colloids.

  14. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchangers (IEX in international language) are used to remove radionuclides from the primary coolant in all nuclear power stations with a water cooling circuit. This is done by continuously removing a volume of coolant from the primary circuit and passing it through coolers, filters and the ion exchange beds. Cation and anion exchangers, in the form of coarse-grained resin beads in pressurized-water reactors and as finely ground powdered resins in boiling water reactors, are used. The trend for new power stations is to exploit all the possibilities for avoiding the generation of contaminated liquids and then to clean, as far as possible, the solutions that are nevertheless generated using ion exchange for it to be possible to dispose of them as non-radioactive waste. This relieves the burden on evaporator facilities, or means that these can even be dispensed with entirely. Regeneration is possible in principle, but little use is made of it. As the regeneration usual in conventional technologies is not employed in nuclear power stations, it is necessary to dispose of this material as radioactive waste. On the international level, a great number of processes are offered that are intended to meet the relevant national regulations, and these will be discussed in brief with their advantages and disadvantages. The aim is then to find a process which reduces the volume, yields an inert or mineralized product, works at temperatures of no more than approximately 600 deg. C and can be run in a simple facility. Originally, the pyrolysis process was developed to treat liquid organic waste from reprocessing. A typical application is the decomposition of spent solvent (TBP, tributyl phosphate, mixed with kerosene). In this process TBP is pyrolyzed together with calcium hydroxide in a fluidized bed facility at temperatures of around 500 deg. C, the calcium hydroxide reacts with the phosphate groups directly to form calcium pyrophosphate which contains all the radioactivity

  15. A new resin system for the impregnation and bonding of large magnet coils

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, D

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS is an instrument which forms part of the Large Hadron Collider, a high energy physics experiment which is under construction at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. The properties of the candidate resin systems developed for the impregnation of the Atlas End Cap Toroid magnets are presented. The resin systems contain a blend of two resins; a low viscosity Bisphenol F resin, with a long chain aliphatic epoxide resin. An aromatic amine curing agent was used. It was found that increased additions of the long chain aliphatic epoxide resin resulted in longer useable life, lower glass transition temperature, lower modulus, higher toughness and higher bond strength at 4 K. (4 refs).

  16. Reducing the shrinkage and setting dose in polyester resins by addition of metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To an unsaturated polyester resin, metal oxides (MgO, CaO, BaO) were introduced which reacted with it for 200 h. In this modified resin cured by radiation, considerable reduction of setting dose as well as of the shrinkage of resin were observed in comparison with the unmodified resin. It has been also found that there is an addition of this effect with the previously observed antishrinking action of epoxy resin containing unsaturated bonds. The service properties of the resin modified with metal oxides have not changed, while its thermal stability has increased. (author)

  17. Bituminous solidification, disposal, transport and burial of spent ion-exchange resins. Part of a coordinated programme on treatment of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project dealing with the incorporation of spent ion-exchange resins into bitumen was performed within the Agency coordinated research programme on treatment of spent ion-exchange resins. Physical and chemical properties of commercial ion-exchange resins, bitumens and bituminized resins were studied. It was shown that bitumen with low oil content and with a softening point of 60-70 deg. C are applicable for the incorporation of resins. The final waste form is allowed to contain maximum 50% resin. The comprehensive study of the biological resistance of B-30 bitumen was performed. That showed that any bacteriological attack can be regarded as generally insignificant. A continuously operating technology was realized on a semi-plant scale. The best operating conditions of this technology were determined. On the basis of the experience gained from the experiments a design of the bituminization plant of 50m3 dry resin/year treatment capacity was proposed

  18. Fixation of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on an anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since sulfosalicylate ions have acid-base properties, sulfosalicylate complexes have an apparent stability which varies with the ph. As a result, the fixation of sulfo-salicylates on an anionic exchange resin depends on the ph of the solution in equilibrium with the resin. This research has been aimed at studying the influence of the ph on the fixation on an anionic exchange resin (Dowex 1 x 4) of sulfosalicylate anions on the one hand, and of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on the other hand. In the first part of this work, a determination has been made, by frontal analysis of the distribution of sulfosalicylate ions in the resin according to the total sulfosalicylate I concentration in the aqueous solution in equilibrium with the resin. The exchange constants of these ions between the resin and the solution have been calculated. In the second part, a study has been made of the fixation of anionic sulfosalicylate complexes of Fe(III), Al(III), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Fe(II) and UO22+. By measuring the partition coefficients of these different elements between the resin and the solution it has been possible to give interpretation for the modes of fixation of the metallic ions, and to calculate their exchange constant between the resin and the solution. The relationship has been established for each metallic element studied, between its partition coefficient, the ph and the total concentration of the complexing agent in solution. Such a relationship makes it possible to predict, for given conditions, the nature of the species in solution and in the resin, as well as the partition coefficient of a metallic, element. Finally, in the third part of the work, use has been made of results obtained previously, to carry out some separations (Ni2+ - Co2+; Ni2+ - Co2+ - Cu2+; UO22+ - Fe3+; UO22+ - Cr3+; UO22+ - Cu2+; UO22+ - Ni2+; UO22+ - Co2+; UO22+ - Mn2+ and UO22+ - Cd2+), as well as the purification of a uranyl sulfosalicylate solution

  19. Thermal analysis of cast-resin dry-type transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers is modeled by two approaches. → A FEM-based model with empirical-analytical formula and a 3D CFD model are developed. → The simulation results are compared and verified with the experimental data. → The influences of different parameters on temperature distribution are investigated. -- Abstract: Non-flammable characteristic of dry-type cast-resin transformers make them suitable for residential and hospital usages. However, because of resin's property, thermal behavior of these transformers is undesirable, so it is important to analyze their thermal behavior. In this paper temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers is modeled by two different approaches. A FEM-based model which uses experimental-analytical formula for air-cooling vertical ducts and a 3D finite volume based CFD model which is established in the ANSYS CFX software. In order to evaluate and compare the models, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from an 800 kVA transformer. Finally, the influences of some construction parameters and environmental conditions on temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers were discussed.

  20. Effect of radiation exerted to creep rate of resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the high performance composite materials which became to be manufactured by the progress of working techniques and the improvement of material performance is fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP). Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are used as space and aircraft material, and glass fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRP) are expected as the structural material for superconducting magnets in nuclear fusion. In these materials, the use for long term must be considered, and the creep characteristics, of resin should be taken as one of the design factors. Therefore, the effect that radiation exerted to the stress relaxation of epoxy resin was measured, and its mechanism was investigated. The sample was bisphenol F system epoxy. The measurements of DSC, dynamic viscoelasticity and stress relaxation were carried out. The stress relaxation in bisphenol F system epoxy resin occurred down to 10 % of the initial stress only at 3 MGy. This is the dose far lower than the life in the radiation resistance of this resin. It is considered that the stress relaxation of the resin was caused by the change in molecular structure instead of the cut of molecular chain, as energy was given to the microscopic region by the interaction with radiation. (K.I.)

  1. Modification of (DGEBA epoxy resin with maleated depolymerised natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DEGBA type epoxy resin has been modified with maleated depolymerised natural rubber (MDPR. MDPR was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride onto depolymerised natural rubber. MDPR has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MDPR was blended with epoxy resin at three different ratios (97/3, 98/2 and 99/1, by keeping the epoxy resin component as the major phase and maleated depolymerised natural rubber component as the minor phase. The reaction between the two blend components took place between the acid/anhydride group in the MDPR and the epoxide group of the epoxy resin. The proposed reaction schemes were supported by the FT-IR spectrum of the uncured Epoxy/MDPR blends. The neat epoxy resin and Epoxy/MDPR blends were cured by methylene dianiline (DDM at 100°C for three hours. Thermal, morphological and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy and the blends were investigated. Free volume studies of the cured, neat epoxy and Epoxy/MDPR blends were correlated with the morphological and mechanical properties of the same systems using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Studies.

  2. Cost effectiveness of detritiating water with resin columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    There are technologies in use for cleaning up concentrated tritiated process water. These are not cost effective for tritiated water with low concentrations of tritium. There are currently no cost-effective technologies for cleaning up low-tritium-concentration tritiated water, such as most tritiated groundwater, spent fuel storage basin water, or underground storage tank water. Resin removal of tritium from tritiated water at low concentrations (near the order of magnitude of drinking water standard maximums) is being tested on TA-SO (Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) waste streams. There are good theoretical and test indications that this may be a technologically effective means of removing tritium from tritiated water. Because of likely engineering design similarity, it is reasonable to anticipate that a resin column system`s costs will be similar to some common commercial water treatment systems. Thus, the potential cost effectiveness of a resin treatment system offers hope for treating tritiated water at affordable costs. The TA-50 resin treatment cost projection of $18 per 1,000 gallons is within the same order of magnitude as cost data for typical commercial groundwater cleanup projects. The prospective Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resin treatment system at $18 per 1,000 gallons appears to have a likely cost advantage of at least an order of magnitude over the competing, developmental, water detritiation technologies.

  3. Property of nano-SiO2/urea formaldehyde resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Qiaojia; Yang Guidi; Liu Jinghong; Rao Jiuping

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,we discuss the effects of a nanometer silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2) coupling agent,dispersal methods and the amount of nano-SiO2/urea formaldehyde resin.The results of our study indicate that when nano-SiO2,using KH-550 silane as a coupling agent,was added to UF resin by discontinuous ultrasonic vibration its properties improved effectively.When the content of nano-SiO2 was below 1.5%, the amount of free formaldehyde decreased,and the viscosity and bonding strength of resin increased with an increase in the added nano-SiO2,which did not prolong the curing time.The performance indices of plywood,particleboard and medium density fiberboard (MDF),hot-pressed by nano-SiO2 (I%)/UF resin (F/U molar ratio=l.2), exceeded the requirements of the National Standard. Their free formaldehyde emission reached E1 grade.Finally,we analyzed the mechanism of the strengthening effects of nano-SiO2 on UF resin by means of infrared spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectronic spectrum (XPS).

  4. Diphonix trademark Resin: A review of its properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently developed Diphonix trademark resin is a new multifunctional chelating ion exchange resin containing seminally substituted diphosphonic acid ligands chemically bonded to a styrene-based polymeric matrix. Diphonix can be regarded as a dual mechanism polymer, with a sulfonic acid cation exchange group allowing for rapid access, mostly non-specific, of ions into the polymeric network, and the diphosphonic acid group responsible for specificity (recognition) for a number of metal cations. The Diphonix resin exhibits an extraordinarily strong affinity for actinides, especially in the tetra- and hexavalent oxidation states. It has potential applications in TRU and mixed waste treatment and characterization, and in the development of new procedures for rapid actinide preconcentration and separation from environmental samples. Metal uptake studies have been extended to alkaline earth cations, to transition and post transition metal species, and to metal sorption from neutral or near neutral solutions. Also the kinetic behavior of the resin has been investigated in detail. Influence of the most commonly occurring matrix constituents (Na, Ca, Al, Fe, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, oxalic and phosphoric acids) on the uptake of actinide ions has been measured. This review paper summarizes the most important results studies on the Diphonix resin and gives an overview of the applications already in existence or under development in the fields of mixed waste treatment, actinide separation procedures, treatment of radwaste from nuclear power plants, and removal of iron from copper electrowinning solutions

  5. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-05-23

    Cyanate ester resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption, and radiation resistance. This paper describes the results of a processing study to develop a high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray TI 000G carbon fiber and YLA RS- 14A cyanate ester resin as the constituent materials. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to and during cure is also crucial as it affects the glass transition temperature of the resin and composite. Composite cylinders wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent ring tensile strengths both at room and elevated temperature. A summary of the measured mechanical and thermal property data for these composites is presented. Potential applications for these materials include flywheeI energy storage systems for space and satellite structures.

  6. Preparation and properties of lignin-epoxy resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanfu Yin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A cross-linked biomass-polymer composite with a lignin content of up to 60% was prepared by blending lignin with an epoxy resin and polyamine using a hot press molding process. The characteristics of the curing reaction of lignin with epoxy resin were studied using DSC and FTIR analysis. The effect of molding temperature and molding pressure on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the lignin/epoxy resin composite was also studied by SEM, DMA, and TG analyses. The results showed that the epoxy resin can be cured by lignin, and the curing temperature for the blends can be reduced by the introduction of a polyamine cure agent. The properties of the composite, such as bending strength, impact strength, glass-transition temperature, and thermal stability, were evidently influenced by the molding process. A good interfacial combination was formed between lignin and epoxy resin. Increasing the molding temperature and pressure proved beneficial to achieve a better interfacial combination for the composite, and the degree of ductile fracture was increased in the fracture surface of the composite.

  7. Pyrolysis of ion exchange resins for volume reduction and inertisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive ion exchange resins are produced in water cleaning systems in nuclear power plants. Studsvik RadWaste AB and GNS have developed a pyrolysis process for the treatment of resins with the goal of an optimal volume reduction and a transformation of the ion exchange resins into a biological and chemical inert state. The degradation products arising from the pyrolysis are char, tar and gas. In the pyrolysis process used by Studsvik RadWaste and GNS about 1/3 char, 1/3 water and tar and 1/3 gas are produced. The char is supercompacted in order to receive a volume reduction of about 10:1 and a better product for final storage. Ion exchange resins with a specific β/γ activity of 1E12 Bq/m3 with 50% of Co-60 can be handled. The retention of the activity has been 0.5E6:1. By processing a total of 100 kg ion exchange resins with a total activity of IE9 Bq only some hundred becquerel have been monitored outside the pyrolyzing unit. This means that the products leaving the pyrolyzing unit, in this case tar, water and gas could be handled as non radioactive material in a conventional waste treatment facility

  8. Acute toxicity and laxative activity of Aloe ferox resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa R. L. Celestino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aloe ferox Mill., Xanthorrhoeaceae, resin is the solid residue obtained by evaporating the latex that drains from the leaves transversally cut. Aloe ferox has been used in folk medicine as anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, antitumor, laxative and to heal wounds and burns. The effects of the oral administration of A. ferox resin (10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg were evaluated on intestinal transit in mice and its acute toxicity (5.0 g/kg in Wistar rats. The hydroxyanthracene derivatives present in the resin were expressed as aloin, identified by thin layer chromatography and quantified by spectrophotometry. The aloin (Rf 0.35 was identified and the percentage of hydroxyanthracene derivates expressed as aloin was 33.5%. A. ferox resin extract (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg increased the gastrointestinal motility at a 30 min interval at 93.5, 91.8 and 93.8%, respectively, when compared to control group (46.5%. A single oral dose of the A. ferox resin extract did not induce signs of toxicity or death. Thus, the results demonstrate that A. ferox has laxative activity and that it is nontoxic, since LD50 could not be estimated and it is possibly higher than 5.0 g/kg.

  9. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  10. Monitoring the Cure State of Thermosetting Resins by Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Maffezzoli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of low intensity ultrasound in a curing resin, acting as a high frequency oscillatory excitation, has been recently proposed as an ultrasonic dynamic mechanical analysis (UDMA for cure monitoring. The technique measures sound velocity and attenuation, which are very sensitive to changes in the viscoelastic characteristics of the curing resin, since the velocity is related to the resin storage modulus and density, while the attenuation is related to the energy dissipation and scattering in the curing resin. The paper reviews the results obtained by the authors’ research group in the last decade by means of in-house made ultrasonic set-ups for both contact and air-coupled ultrasonic experiments. The basics of the ultrasonic wave propagation in polymers and examples of measurements of the time-evolution of ultrasonic longitudinal modulus and chemical conversion of different thermosetting resins are presented. The effect of temperature on the cure kinetics, the comparison with rheological, low frequency dynamic mechanical and calorimetric results, and the correlation between ultrasonic modulus and crosslinking density will be also discussed. The paper highlights the reliability of ultrasonic wave propagation for monitoring the physical changes taking place during curing and the potential for online monitoring during polymer and polymer matrix composite processing.

  11. Adhesives Based on Furan Resin for Structural Laminated Timber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavia ZELENIUC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In wood laminated products manufacturing thephenol-based adhesives are especially used. Recentlyother adhesives such as polyurethanes were promotedon the market for structural applications withremarkable properties. Structural adhesives have tofulfil the requirements according to their uses, underwet or dry conditions as adhesive type I and type IIrespectively. Criteria for evaluating structuraladhesives, includes delamination resistance, shearstrength of bond and percent of wood failure. Thisstudy has the objective to evaluate the bondingperformance of furan based resin and its suitability forstructural purposes. There are some investigationsabout the possibility of incorporating the furan resin intowood adhesive formulations but their industrialexploitation is still modest. Three experimentaladhesive compositions based on furan and ureaformaldehyderesins, were used to cold-glue beechand spruce lamellas to form a structural timber likeglued laminated timber. Adhesive formulations includedmixed furan resin with furfuryl alcohol (FC2 and twomodified furan resins with urea-formaldehyde resin(UR/FC2 and UR/FC3 at 50% UR. Bond shearstrength by longitudinal tensile and resistance todelamination were performed according to SR EN302:2004. The best performance was obtained withadhesive FC2 which showed shear strength above thevalues indicated for structural adhesives in EN301:2004. FC2 adhesive performed significantly betterin delamination tests too, both in dry and wetconditions, compared to the other two adhesives,showing promise for its use in load-bearing timberstructures.

  12. Innovative Resin Transfer and Disposition at Indian Point Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of sites have both operating and shuttered nuclear facilities. Reducing dose to the caretakers can have beneficial effects for other site personnel who may work or pass near the shuttered facility. Furthermore, disposition of waste can have a positive effect on NRC required regular reporting of, and plans for the disposition of on-site wastes. Entergy's Indian Point Energy Center recently reduced the on-site curie load by working with RWE NUKEM and WMG, Inc. to innovatively free and ship nearly 1,000 cubic feet and nearly 600 curies of 30 year old resin and sludge from Unit 1. Old drawings, operations logs, were consulted and transfer lines were remotely checked. The tank selection sequence was primarily based on dose rates. System modifications to facilitate resin transfer were made on the lowest dose tanks first to gain current operating experience. Resin transfers were performed in accordance with the procedures developed, into waiting cask with appropriate waste containers. Decomposed resin of varying consistency could clog discharge lines and operational changes were made to mitigate against flow interruptions. Hydrogen buildup in the tanks was carefully addressed while solidified resin remains a challenge to be overcome. (authors)

  13. Phase separation during radiation crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. During crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin phase separation may occur, as the crosslinked part becomes insoluble in unreacted resin. Radiation initiated reaction can be interrupted and the system be analysed at different reaction stages. Resin samples were irradiated to selected doses in cells of different width. Phase separation occurred at total dose above 4 kGy, liquid part was removed and analysed separately of gel part. DSC traces of residual reaction were recorded showing difference in shape. Gels had one distinct reaction peak, while unreacted resin and liquid parts had double partially overlapped peaks. Such behavior has been noted previously in the literature but it was attributed to effects of initiator. Radiation crosslinking enabled us to show that double reaction peaks are property of resin system itself. In most cases the high temperature peak of liquid phase corresponded to that of related gel. Low temperature process is assumed to be styrene-polyester reaction. At higher temperatures steric hindrances can be overcome to enable homopolymerization of polyester double bonds. As the radiation dose was increased, the onset temperature of the residual reaction in the liquid phase was approximately constant but it decreased at the doses where liquid phase became scarce before it disappeared. On the other hand onset temperatures of corresponding gels were almost constant. Reaction heats of the liquid phase were almost constant, the influence of sample width was insignificant. Gels of wider sample showed higher dependence of residual reaction heat on radiation dose

  14. Effects of the crisis in the resin sector on the demography of rural municipalities in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno Perez, S.; Garcia Robredo, F.; Ayuga Tellez, E.; Fullana Belda, C.

    2013-05-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this work is to test the positive effect of a substantially developed resin sector on rural demographic evolution. This work shows how in the period between 1970 and 2010 the demographic decline in the interior regions of Spain was more pronounced in areas characterized by the importance of resin-producing forest stands compared to other nearby rural municipalities where this natural resource is not present. Area of study: The study area consists of a set of rural municipalities in Central Spain, both resin and non-resin producing, in the provinces of Segovia, Avila, Valladolid, Burgos, Soria, Cuenca and Guadalajara. Material and methods: The relationship between resin production and population in resin and non-resin producing municipalities was modeled by means of linear regression analysis. Main results: Generally speaking, between 1950 and 1970 the production of resin halted demographic decline in the regions where this activity was substantially developed. However, when the resin sector entered into crisis in the 1970s, and the economic repercussions of this activity gradually ceased to be felt, the demographic decline in the regions which had been involved in resin production was much more acute than in other non-resin-producing rural areas. Research highlights: This work shows the relationship between resin extraction activity and population evolution in rural municipalities. Sustainable resin exploitation can contribute to the maintenance and development of rural communities, and should be used as a tool for generating employment in rural areas. (Author) 37 refs.

  15. Resin pumps and check valves. Resin pumps with resistance to seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seawater is utilized at thermal/nuclear power plants, chemical plants, and various other fields. In most of all the pumps used there, corrosion protection against seawater and maintenance management have become important issues. Seawater pumps are typically made of stainless steel-based materials, while plastic pumps having excellent corrosion resistance are used in a very limited range competing with many problems. This paper takes up PENTAM, a plastic made by the molding method called ZEON-RIM system developed by ZEON Corp., and introduces its characteristics. As the pump products made of PENTAM resin, it introduces the pumps and unit products, such as centrifugal pump FRS type, self-priming pump FPSQ type, mixed-flow pump FPSZ type, and hammer soft check valve CVRSP type. (A.O.)

  16. Separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides by using R-BTP resins and stability of R-BTP resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the development of advanced aqueous reprocessing system, it is one of the most important subjects to separate minor trivalent actinides (MA = Am and Cm). MA are α-emitters with long half-life, therefore it is desired to separate MA from fission products. However, it is very difficult to separate MA from lanthanides (Ln) owing to their chemical similarity. For the separation of these two groups of elements, solvent extraction process has been widely studied based on the difference in complex formation with extractants. Extraction chromatography is one of the most promising separation techniques for recovering small amounts of target components from solution. For this purpose, we prepared novel silica-based extraction resins by impregnating some R-BTP molecules into a macroreticular styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer which is immobilized in porous silica particles with a mean diameter of 50 μm. The impregnated resin has high affinity for Am against Ln(III) not only in sodium nitrate solution but also in nitric acid solution. Stability of the extraction resin was also examined. The silica-based support was significantly stable against γ-irradiation and nitric acid. A part of R-BTP was dissolved into nitric acid solution from the extraction resin due to protonation. However, the branched R-BTP (iso-Bu-BTP) resin was much more stable than a normal R-BTP in nitric acid solution (≤3 M)

  17. Physical and chemical durability of cement impregnated epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of simulation radioactive waste contains Cs and Sr with cement impregnated epoxy resin has been done. Low level liquid waste in 30% weight mixed cement homogeneously and then set in its curing time about 28 days. Waste from was impregnated with epoxy resin (Bisphenol-A-diglycidylether) and use Triethylenteramin as catalyst. the sample of cement impregnated epoxy resin 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm in diameter and length was tested by Paul Weber. The compressive strength was obtained of 4.08 kN.cm-2. The sochxlet apparatus was run on flow rate of 300 ml/hour at 100oC and during 24 hours. The leaching rate of Cs was round on 5.5 x 10-4 g.cm-2.d-1 and Sr was 6.1 x 10-4 g.cm-2.d-1 (author)

  18. Viscoelastic behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes into phenolic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Edson Cocchieri; Costa, Michelle Leali; Braga, Carlos Isidoro, E-mail: ebotelho@feg.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia; Burkhart, Thomas [Institut fuer Verbundwerkstoffe GmbH, Kaiserslautern, (Germany); Lauke, Bernd [Leibniz-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multi-functional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. This study focuses on the viscoelastic evaluation of phenolic resin reinforced carbon nanotubes, processed by using two techniques: aqueous-surfactant solution and three roll calender (TRC) process. According to our results a relative small amount of CNTs in a phenolic resin matrix is capable of enhancing the viscoelastic properties significantly and to modify the thermal stability. Also has been observed that when is used TRC process, the incorporation and distribution of CNT into phenolic resin is more effective when compared with aqueous solution dispersion process. (author)

  19. Preparation and Property of the Water Absorbent Hybrid Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; YunPu

    2001-01-01

    Water absorption material has been attracted much more attention for its wide use in soil and water conservation, agriculture, etc. But this material will actually apply in agriculture, soil and water conservation only when it is cheap enough. Pulp fiber and starch to prepare high absorbing-water resin is a good method for decreasing the cost [1,2]. However, it still has a long way to turn it into reality.  Now the montmorillonite is widely used in preparing nanocomposites [3]. But used it in preparing absorbing-water resin has little report. In this article the water absorption hybrid resin has been prepared by one step intercalation polymerization method. In the process of intercalation the partly neutralization acrylic acid and urea have been used as intercalating reagent. Beside that, the urea also has been used as cross-linking agent.   ……

  20. Preparation and Property of the Water Absorbent Hybrid Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Water absorption material has been attracted much more attention for its wide use in soil and water conservation, agriculture, etc. But this material will actually apply in agriculture, soil and water conservation only when it is cheap enough. Pulp fiber and starch to prepare high absorbing-water resin is a good method for decreasing the cost [1,2]. However, it still has a long way to turn it into reality. Now the montmorillonite is widely used in preparing nanocomposites [3]. But used it in preparing absorbing-water resin has little report. In this article the water absorption hybrid resin has been prepared by one step intercalation polymerization method. In the process of intercalation the partly neutralization acrylic acid and urea have been used as intercalating reagent. Beside that, the urea also has been used as cross-linking agent.

  1. Resin-composite Blocks for Dental CAD/CAM Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N.D.; Sadoun, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. PMID:25344335

  2. A study on immobilization of spent resins with polyester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process for immobilization of spent resins generated from NPPs with polyester is described. The results obtained show that the polyester system process is feasible to solidify spent resins by means of dewatering or drying if necessary. The performance, such as waterproof property, compressive strength, leaching rates, thermal stability and radiation resistance of solidified forms can meet the requirements of storage, transportation and final disposal. As compared with the styrene system, the polyester system possesses its own advantages, such as no special requirement of solidification temperature, relative short period of solidification needed and lower leaching rates and cumulative fractions, though the styrene system process may have a maximum loading capacity as high as ω(resin) = 65%, which is more than that of the polyester system, and a little cheaper cost

  3. Deuterisation of mixed bed ion exchange resin: kinetics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of deuterisation of a mixture of strongly acidic cationic and strongly basic anionic resins in a mixed bed system has been investigated for kinetics measurement through laboratory scale experiment. The up-flow fluidization method employing a heavy water flow from the bottom end of the mixed bed column at a reasonably low flow rate has been amply exploited for displacement of light water molecules inside the resin pores and adhering to resin surface as well. The course of deuterisation has been tracked down by determination of D2O content as a function of time and the process is found to exhibit a breakthrough type sigmoidal kinetics. An empirical relation, involving half-life of deuterisation and some process parameters such as flow rate, volume of light water to be replaced, could be achieved for plant scale deuterisation of a mixed bed ion exchanger prior to use in purification unit of heavy water process system of a nuclear reactor. (author)

  4. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  5. Viscoelastic behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes into phenolic resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multi-functional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. This study focuses on the viscoelastic evaluation of phenolic resin reinforced carbon nanotubes, processed by using two techniques: aqueous-surfactant solution and three roll calender (TRC) process. According to our results a relative small amount of CNTs in a phenolic resin matrix is capable of enhancing the viscoelastic properties significantly and to modify the thermal stability. Also has been observed that when is used TRC process, the incorporation and distribution of CNT into phenolic resin is more effective when compared with aqueous solution dispersion process. (author)

  6. Synthesis of cardanol based phenolic resin with aid of microwaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Tiwari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardanol based novolac resin was prepared. Cardanol based novolac-type phenolic resin was prepared under microwave irradiation by the reaction of cardanol ( C and formaldehyde ( F with mole ratio 1:0.8 of C/F using tricarboxylic acid as catalyst. Analogical synthesize have been done using conventional heating for the comparison of the methods. The methylolation of cardanol was confirmed by Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR spectroscopic analysis and a reaction mechanism was proposed. The numberaverage molecular weight was found by gel permeation chromatographic (GPC technique. On the basis of the calculated value of kinetic chain length, the structure of the novolac-type phenolic resin was proposed. The main advantage of the process is twofold reduction of reaction time of the process carried at microwave reactors in comparison to the conventional heating.

  7. Glass Reinforcement of Various Epoxy Resins-Polyurea Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Medha; Jauhari, Smita

    2012-07-01

    Polyureas (PUs) were prepared by the polycondensation reaction of disperse dyes containing -NH2 group and toluene 2, 4-diisocyanate. The disperse dyes have been prepared by coupling of various 2-diazobenzothiazoles with 1,3-benzenediamine. All the PUs were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral studies, number average molecular weight ( {overline{{Mn}} } ), and thermogravimetry. Further reaction of PUs was carried out with an epoxy resin (i.e., DGEBA). The curing study of prepared resins was monitored by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Based on DSC, thermograms glass fiber-reinforced composites have been laminated and characterized by chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties. The unreinforced cured resins were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The laminated composites showed excellent resistance properties against chemicals and good mechanical and electrical properties.

  8. Quantitative analysis of PMR-15 polyimide resin by HPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Lauver, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of individual components and of total solids of 50 wt pct PMR-15 resin solutions was determined using reverse-phase HPLC to within + or - 8 percent accuracy. Acid impurities, the major source of impurities in 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), were eliminated by recrystallizing the BTDE prior to esterification. Triester formation was not a problem because of the high rate of esterification of the anhydride relative to that of the carboxylic acid. Aging of PMR-15 resin solutions resulted in gradual formation of the mononadimide and bisnadimide of 4,4'-methylenedianiline, with the BTDE concentration remaining constant. Similar chemical reactions occurred at a reduced rate in dried films of PMR-15 resin.

  9. Preparation and Properties of Phenolic Resin/Montmorillonite Intercalation Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jian-ying; WEI Lian-qi; CAO Xian-kun

    2003-01-01

    Phenolic resin/ montmorillonite intercalation composites were prepared by using the methods of pressing intercalation and melt intercalation. Properties and structure of the composites were investigated by using XRD , TG and test of softening point. It is indicated that both the pressing intercalation and melt intercalation can be used to prepare the phenolic resin/organo-montmorillonite intercalation nanocomposites. Compared with phenolic resin, the intercalation nanocomposites have better heat-resistance, higher decomposition temperatures and less thermal weight-loss. However , these two intercalation methods have different effects on the softening point of the intercalation nanocomposites . Pressing intercalation almost does not affect the softening point of the intercalation nanocomposites, while melt intercalation signifwantly increases the softening point of the intercalation nanocomposites ,probably due to the chemical actions happening in the process of melt intercalation.

  10. Formulation of eb-curable epoxy resin : some important parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The works on the electron-beam curing of surface coatings using epoxy acrylic-based resins were discussed. The works covered among other things the effect of molecular weights of the resins on the physical properties of coatings and their physical and chemical characterizations. The emphasis was given to formulating the resins applicable to surface coatings. Curings were done on a low-energy electron beam accelerator operating at 250 kV. A number of parameters deemed important to formulations, such as the molecular weights of the oligomers and monomers, monomer ratios, and HEA additions were explored. It was found that one could modify the physical properties of the coatings by changing or adjusting those parameters. (author)

  11. Method of eluting radioactive nuclide from spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly radioactive spent ion exchange resins containing a great amount of cesium or strontium as radioactive nuclides are immersed in an eluting solution and, by stirring solution, cesium or strontium adsorbed to the spent ion exchange resins are eluted. The eluting solution is passed through a zeolite bed to selectively remove cesium and/or strontium. As an eluent for the eluting solution to be used, sodium salts such as sodium hydroxide or sodium sulfate is preferred. Zeolite having radiation resistance and not suffering from reduction in the absorbent performance by the presence of boric acid or sodium are used. Since the zeolite is highly stabilized with inorganic material by cement or glass solidification, the amount is remarkably reduced as compared with that of the spent resins and the administration is facilitated. (K.M.)

  12. Stability and demulsification of emulsions stabilized by asphaltenes or resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lixin; Lu, Shiwei; Cao, Guoying

    2004-03-15

    Experimental data are presented to show the influence of asphaltenes and resins on the stability and demulsification of emulsions. It was found that emulsion stability was related to the concentrations of the asphaltene and resin in the crude oil, and the state of dispersion of the asphaltenes and resins (molecular vs colloidal) was critical to the strength or rigidity of interfacial films and hence to the stability of the emulsions. Based on this research, a possible emulsion minimization approach in refineries, which can be implemented utilizing microwave radiation, is also suggested. Comparing with conventional heating, microwave radiation can enhance the demulsification rate by an order of magnitude. The demulsification efficiency reaches 100% in a very short time under microwave radiation. PMID:14972628

  13. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel); Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry (Israel); Domb, Abraham J., E-mail: avid@ekmd.huji.ac.i [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  14. Rear Bumper Laminated In Jute Fiber With Polyester Resin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga, R. A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, a growing interest exists in the use of natural of fibers (sisal, coconut, banana, and jute, as reinforcement in composites. The aim of the present study is shows the use of jute fiber agglutinated with polyester resin in the automobile industry in the production of a rear bumper of hatch vehicle. A simplified mathematical model was used for evaluation of the flaw on trunk center cover submitted to dynamic loads. The traverse section of the referred bumper is simplified by a channel formation. This study shows that a rear bumper made using jute fiber agglutinated with polyester resin will be possible. The molded part obtained good visual characteristics, good geometric construction and surface without bubbles and imperfections in the fiber and resin composite. The mathematical model to failure criterion showed that the rear bumper in jute fiber will not resist to an impact equivalent at 4.0 km/h.

  15. Processing ix spent resin waste for C-14 isotope recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process developed at Ontario Hydro for recovering carbon-14 (C-14) from spent ion exchange resin wastes is described. Carbon-14 is an undesirable by-product of CANDU1 nuclear reactor operation. It has an extremely long (5730 years) half-life and can cause dosage to inhabitants by contact, inhalation, or through the food cycle via photosynthesis. Release of carbon-14 to the environment must be minimized. Presently, all the C-14 produced in the Moderator and Primary Heat Transport (PHT) systems of the reactor is effectively removed by the respective ion exchange columns, and the spent ion exchange resins are stored in suitably engineered concrete structures. Because of the large volumes of spent resin waste generated each year this method of disposal by long term storage tends to be uneconomical; and may also be unsatisfactory considering the long half-life of the C-14. However, purified C-14 is a valuable commercial product for medical, pharmaceutical, agricultural, and organic chemistry research. Currently, commercial C-14 is made artificially in research reactors by irradiating aluminum nitride targets for 4.5 years. If the C-14 containing resin waste can be used to reduce this unnecessary production of C-14, the total global build-up of this radioactive chemical can be reduced. There is much incentive in removing the C-14 from the resin waste to reduce the volume of C-14 waste, and also in purifying the recovered C-14 to supply the commercial market. The process developed by Ontario Hydro consists of three main steps: C-14 removal from spent resins, enrichment of recovered C-14, and preparation of final product. Components of the process have been successfully tested at Ontario Hydro's Research Division, but the integration of the process is yet to be demonstrated. A pilot scale plant capable of processing 4 m3 of spent resins annually is being planned for demonstrating the technology. The measured C-14 activity levels on the spent resins ranged from 47-213 Ci

  16. Method and device of processing spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To formulate the residues of thermally decomposed spent ion exchange resins into firm pellets of excellent durability neither with particular high temperature heat treatment nor by the addition of binders. Method: Spent ion exchange resins are thermally or oxidatively decomposed in an inert atmosphere or oxygen-containing atmosphere at a temperature from 300 to 600 deg C and the decomposition residues obtained thereby are hot pressed at a predetermined temperature into pellets, since firm pellets excellent in durability can be prepared from thermally decomposed or oxidatively decomposed residues of spent ion exchange resins neither with particular high temperature heat treatment nor with addition of binders, it is possible to reduce the cost and simplify the system. (Yoshihara, H.)

  17. Method and apparatus for processing radioactive resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To process spent radioactive resin wastes by heat decomposition, to thereby decrease the amount thereof and convert them into stable inorganic compounds. Method: Upon processing spent radioactive ion exchange resins through heat decomposition, decomposition gases formed at lower temperature are at first separated, and are followed by the separation of decomposed gases formed at higher temperature. Since nitrogen oxides and gaseous sulfur oxides are formed at lower temperature, while hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are generated at higher temperature selectively, amount of injurious gases can be reduced significantly. Then, the remaining ion exchange resins are subjected to hot press into molding products. The heat decomposing apparatus comprises a reaction vessel, a heater, a slurry transport pipe, a decomposing filter, a pressing device or the like. As the result, the volume can be decreased to about 1/30 of the initial volume. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Thermochemical treatment of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion exchange resins (IER) is a principal type of radioactive waste constantly generated by nuclear plants of various functions. The reduction of volume of this waste and its treatment to the forms suitable for long-term disposal is an urgent problem facing the present-day atomic energetics. Nowadays the technological process THOR (Studsvik, Sweden) based on the thermodestruction of IER is the best developed and realized on the industrial scale. Unfortunately, this process requires expensive equipment and great energy consumption for the moisture to be evaporated and thereafter IER to be destroyed by heat. Meanwhile the capability of some elements (Mg, Al, Si, Ti etc.) has long been known and practical use found for active interaction with water in combustion regime. This property of the metals has been used in the development of new technology of treatment of IERs in SIA ''Radon''. Wet IER is mixed with powder metal fuel (PMF) which represents a mixture of metal powder, a quantity of burning activator and some technological additives. On initiation, the mixture of IER with PMF burns without extra energy supply to generate enough heat for the moisture to be evaporated and products of IER decomposition to be destroyed and evaporated. To burn out the products of IER evaporation the air is used. The thermodynamic simulation data and the results of experiments using a pilot plant show that radionuclides contained in IER are chemically bound in ash residue consisting of metal oxides, spinel, silicates, etc. According to the experimental data, radionuclides in amounts of 90% or more of Cs-137 and up to 95% of Sr-90 and Co-60 are fixed in the ash residue. The residue volume is several times less than the initial volume of IER. Concentrations of hazard gases in off-gases do not exceed maximum permissible ones accepted in different countries. The technological process is easy to perform, it does not require sophisticated equipment and great energy consumption which

  19. Radiation resistance of epoxy resins and their composistes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the electric equipment installed inside containment vessels in nuclear power plants, many epoxy resins have been employed as insulating materials. However, there are very few reports on the investigation of their properties in such environment, specifically under LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) conditions. This paper investigates on the electrical and mechanical properties of the epoxy resins supposed to be applicable to the actual equipment, by LOCA simulation. The epoxy resins used for the experiment were the following three types: (1) typical epoxy resin, bisphenol A group; (2) novolak group epoxy resins in consideration of improving humidity resistance; and (3) triazine group epoxy resins for the purpose of giving radiation, humidity and heat resistances. The last one includes the composites with Nomex and with laminated mica. After LOCA simulation which is composed of up to 2 MGy irradiation of 60Co γ-ray at the dose rate of 104 Gy/h and the exposure to high temperature saturated steam, the electrical properties of dielectric tangent, insulation breakdown voltage (BDV) and conductivity and the mechanical properties of bending strength and viscoelasticity were measured. In the paper, the experimental results are described in detail. Of these, the triazine group epoxy/Nomex composite did not show swelling, but demonstrated stable radiation resistance. It is excellent in the electrical and mechanical properties, and also shows good dimension-stability. In LOCA simulation, its bending strength was reduced than that for only γ-irradiation of 2 MGy, but still had the residual strength of about 80 %. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, T.N. Jr. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  1. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass

  2. Process for producing a radiation curable resin composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation curable resin composition can be cured with a very low radiation dose by adding a fluorescent material and/or a photoconductive material to the resin. The process comprises the steps of adding a fluorescent material, a photoconductive material or both of them at the same time to a resin composition having polymerizable unsaturated radicals in the molecules of the resin. The process is advantageous in that it can be completely cured with a low dose in a short period of time. The process can increase the productivity of the continuous coating process applied to plywood, particle boards and aluminum and steel coil coating. In one embodiment, a first coating composition consists of 47% of an unsaturated polyester resin, 19.5% of styrene, 3% of carbon black, 15% of barium sulfate, 15% of a fluorescent material of the sulfide series (zinc oxide/zinc) and 0.5% of an additive. In another embodiment, a second coating composition consists of 45% of an unsaturated polyester resin, 19.5% styrene, 20% of titanium oxide, 15% of a fluorescent material of the sulfide series (zinc oxide/zinc) and 0.5% of an additive. The first and second coating compositions are mixed, dispersed with a pebble mill and applied to a plywood with an applicator. The coating is irradiated under the following conditions: voltage 300 kV, current 25 mA, linear velocity 15 m/minute and dose 1.5 Mrad/frequency. The product has a thickness of 76 microns with a superior appearance, adhesiveness and chemical corrosion resistance. (Iwakiri, K.)

  3. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  4. Correlation between the cytotoxicity of self-etching resin cements and the degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís FSA Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that photopolymerization of dual cure self-etching resin cements decrease toxic effects on cell culture. Adequate photopolymerization should be considered during cementation when using dual polymerization self-etching resin cements.

  5. STUDIES ON THE BLEND OF POLYACRYLATE EMULSIONS AND TACKIFIER RESIN EMULSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shuwen; YANG Yukun

    1996-01-01

    A series of polyacrylate emulsions were blended with tackifier resin emulsions such as modified rosin emulsion, C5 resin and C9 resin emulsion. The miscibility of the polyacrylates and tackifier resins was investigated by means of SEM and visual observation. The phase diagrams of the miscibility change systematically with the polarity of polyacrylates and tackifier resins. The influence of the content of the tackifier resins on the adhesion properties of the polyacrylate emulsions were also studied. The results show that the 180℃ peel strength is improved as the amount of the tackifier resin increases and comes to a maximum at a specific content. The ball tack property decreases slightly and the hold strength changes complicatedly as the tackifier resin increases.

  6. Thermal evaluation of resorcinol formaldehyde resin used for treatment of intermediate level liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) resin is used for treatment of intermediate level liquid radioactive waste. The resin is having high specificity for Cs ion. This resin is under use in level treatment cell of Waste Immobilisation Plant at Tarapur. After the saturation of resin column with Cs, it needs regeneration. Regeneration with nitric acid gives the waste which is compatible with the vitrification process. However, there is probability of degradation and nitration of RF resin and the same may have explosive nature. To find out the parameters for safe regeneration, resin samples treated with different molarity of nitric acid were evaluated with differential thermal analyser (DTA) in air as well as in argon atmosphere. The study indicated that the nitration of resin does not start up to 1.17M nitric acid concentration and therefore is safe for elution of Cs from the resin. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE. CHAPTER 10A. THE PLASTICS AND RESINS PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report contains a detailed analysis of the plastics and resins processing industry, which includes operations that convert polymers and resins into consumer products. Analytical elements include industry definition, raw materials, products, manufacturers, environmental impact...

  8. Mechanism and Effectiveness of Reduction Action of Unsaturated Polyester Resin Reducer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reduction action mechanism of unsaturated polyester resin reducer is analysed.The experimental results show that the active reducer bearing reactive functional group on the ends of molecules effectively lowers the curing shrinkage of unvaturated polyester resin.

  9. Structural investigation of resin glycosides from Ipomoea lonchophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, J K; Ward, A; Oelrichs, P B

    1997-05-01

    A fraction from Ipomoea lonchophylla, which was toxic to mice, contained an inseparable mixture of resin glycosides with differing numbers of C5 ester groups on the hexasaccharide chain. After alkaline hydrolysis of the esters, the structure of the major component (1) was elucidated using high-field NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chemical studies, and comparison with known resin glycosides. Compound 1 was identified as 3,11-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid 11-O-beta-quinovopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)- [alpha-rhamnopyranosyl- (1-->4)]-quinovopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta -fucopyranoside. PMID:9170289

  10. Extractive-scintillating resin produced by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterization of a resin material is presented, which contains selective complexing and scintillating molecules in chemically bound form. The resin material is produced via radiation polymerization of the solution of 2-(4-allyloxy-phenyl)-5-phenyl oxazole, 5-(allyloxy-phenyl)-2-[4-(5-phenyl-oxazole-2-il)-phenyl] oxazole, diethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DEGMA), styrene and the allyl derivative of a 18C6 crown ether-dicarbolic acid complexing agent. The product is a macroporous polymer matrix, which shows both excellent scintillation properties and ion binding capacity for radioanalytical purposes

  11. Diffusion in composite materials made of thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The embedding process of low and medium level radioactive wastes in thermosetting resins allows their containment in a solid matrix. During storage the risk of circulation of water is possible. The aim of this containment process is to prevent radionuclide migration in environment. Ion migration through membranes of thermosetting resins alone or filler added were measured to evaluate released radioactivity by embedded blocks with time and to compare the different embedding formulas. Water influence on diffusion was taken into account considering that radioactive wastes dispersion is faster in a wet medium than in a dry one

  12. Electrodeposition of Asphaltenes. 2. Effect of Resins and Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khvostichenko, Daria S; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Electrodeposition of asphaltenes from oil/heptane, asphaltene/heptane, and asphaltene/heptane/additive mixtures has been investigated. Toluene, native petroleum resins, and a synthetic asphaltene dispersant, p-nonylphenol, were used as additives. The addition of these components led to partial...... preparation of the mixture and the toluene content. Introduction of petroleum resins into asphaltene/heptane mixtures resulted in neutralization of the asphaltene particle charge. The addition of p-nonylphenol to asphaltene suspensions in heptane did not alter the charge of asphaltene particles. Current...

  13. Strengthening of Porcelain Provided by Resin Cements and Flowable Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, A O; Guarda, G B; Oliveira-Ogliari, A; Leal, F B; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Moraes, R R

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of mechanical properties of resin-based luting agents on the strength of resin-coated porcelain. The luting agents tested were two flowable resin composites (Filtek Z350 Flow and Tetric-N Flow), a light-cured resin cement (Variolink Veneer [VV]), and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) in either light-cured (base paste) or dual-cured (base + catalyst pastes [VD]) mode. Flexural strength (σf) and modulus of elasticity (Ef) of the luting agents were measured in three-point bending mode (n=5). Porcelain discs (Vita VM7) were tested either untreated (control) or acid etched, silanized, and coated with the luting agents. Biaxial flexural strength (σbf) of the porcelain discs was tested using a ball-on-ring setup (n=30). The σbf of the resin-coated specimens was calculated at z-axial positions for multilayer specimens in the ball-on-ring test: position z = 0 (ceramic surface at the bonded interface) and position z = -t2 (luting agent surface above ring). The σf and Ef data were subjected to analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=0.05). A Weibull analysis was performed for σbf data. Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (σ0) were calculated. Linear regression analyses investigated the relationship between mechanical properties of the luting agents and the strengthening of porcelain. VD had higher and VV had lower mechanical strength than the other materials. At z = 0, all resin-coated groups had higher σbf than the control group. No significant differences between the luting agents were observed for σbf and σ0. At z = -t2, VD had the highest σbf and σ0, whereas VV had the poorest results. No significant differences in m were observed across groups. A linear increase in flexural strength of the porcelain was associated with increased σf and Ef of the luting agents at position z = -t2. In conclusion, resin coating and use of luting agents with better physical properties generally improved the

  14. Study on full-length recoverable resin-metal bolts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玉宁; 康全玉

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces a kind of full-length recoverable resin-metal bolts, expounds its structural principle and stress features, and gives some instances in laboratory tests and underground tests. The results show that full-length recoverable resin-metal bolts can be used for supporting the walls of class Ⅰ~Ⅲ mining gateways, that the anchoring force is 50 kN or so, and that the recoverability rate is more than 80%, thus the supporting effect is better than that of split-set bolts.

  15. New Regeneration process of heavy metals loaded chelating resin

    OpenAIRE

    Menoud, P.; Cavin, L.; Renken, A.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative to the classical acid-base regeneration of chelating resins loaded with heavy metals is investigated. The new process consists in recovering the heavy metals with recyclable soluble complexing agents. The semiclosed reactor includes a fixed bed and a stirred tank. A three-parameter model, which implies a double equilibrium in series, is introduced. When less than 10 % of the metal is still fixed on the resin at the end of the desorption, a simplified form of the model with two ...

  16. Phase separation during radiation crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase separation during radiation-initiated crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin was studied. Residual reactivity of liquid phases and gels of partially cured samples was determined by DSC. Uncured resin and liquid phases showed double reaction exotherm, gels had a single maximum that corresponded to higher-temperature maximum of liquid parts. The lower-temperature process was attributed to styrene-polyester copolymerization. At higher temperatures, polyester unsaturations that remained unreacted due to microgel formation homopolymerized. FTIR revealed different composition of phases. In thicker samples, reaction heat influenced microgel formation causing delayed appearance of gel and faster increase in conversion

  17. Controlled Release of Chlorhexidine from UDMA-TEGDMA Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Anusavice, K.J.; Zhang, N.-Z.; Shen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Chlorhexidine salts are available in various formulations for dental applications. This study tested the hypothesis that the release of chlorhexidine from a urethane dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate resin system can be effectively controlled by the chlorhexidine diacetate content and pH. The filler concentrations were 9.1, 23.1, or 33.3 wt%, and the filled resins were exposed to pH 4 and pH 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that Fickian diffusion was the dominant relea...

  18. Cost benefit of patch testing with textile finish resins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1982-01-01

    Eleven years experience of textile finish resin patch testing of suspected textile dermatitis patients revealed 15 cases of allergic textile dermatitis among 428 patients tested. Ten of the 15 patients had a relevant positive patch test to one or more of a limited series of textile finishes; 1 was...... negative and 4 were not tested with textile finishes. All 15 patients were formaldehyde sensitive. No unexpected, relevant, positive textile finish resin patch test was found. In this study a negative patch test to formaldehyde virtually excluded allergic contact dermatitis from textile finishes....

  19. Post-irradiation vickers microhardness development of novel resin composites

    OpenAIRE

    Hanadi Yousif Marghalani

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of post-irradiation dry aging at different periods of time on Vickers microhardness of some dental composites based on various resin matrices. Sixty four disc-shaped specimens of the resin composites were prepared in a split Teflon mold (8 × 2 mm) and irradiated by Optilux 501 light cure (500 mW.cm-2 for 40 seconds) on their top side. The specimens were aged-dry in dark at 23 and 37 °C for the following storage periods; immediate, 1/2 an hour, ...

  20. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  1. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Vinyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, H. S.; Panchal, K. K.; Patel, S. R.; Desai, S N

    2004-01-01

    Novel unsaturated poly (ester- amide) resins (UPEAs) were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA) and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Vinyl acetate (VA) to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-VA resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as an initiator for the radical polymerization and was monitored by using ...

  2. Fossil resin flotation from coal by selective coagulation and depression of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a method for separating minute resin particles from a slurry mixture of minute resin particles and minute coal particles. It comprises: adjusting the pH of the slurry mixture of minute resin particles and minute coal particles to above about 12 and subjecting the pH adjusted slurry mixture of particles to froth flotation in the presence of a frothing agent, to produce a froth fraction enriched with respect to the minute resin particles.

  3. Effect of photocuring lamp type in the polymerization of various resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four different curing lamps were evaluated, a halogen and three LED technology with that are photocured five different resins. These four lamps have evaluated the surface hardness of the resin samples as a way of measuring the degree of polymerization. Comparing the Knoop surface hardness of the resin samples was found that the halogen light produced a greater surface hardness in all evaluated resins. (author)

  4. Microporous phenol–formaldehyde resin-based adsorbents for pre-combustion CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Martín, Claudia; González Plaza, Marta; García López, Susana; Pis Martínez, José Juan; Rubiera González, Fernando; Pevida García, Covadonga

    2011-01-01

    Different types of phenolic resins were used as precursor materials to prepare adsorbents for the separation of CO2 in pre-combustion processes. In order to obtain highly microporous carbons with suitable characteristics for the separation of CO2 and H2 under high pressure conditions, phenol–formaldehyde resins were synthesised under different conditions. Resol resins were obtained by using an alkaline environment while Novolac resins were synthesised in the presence of acid catalysts. In add...

  5. SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF HIGHLY OIL-ABSORPTIVE RESIN WITH HYDROXY ETHYLACRYLATE AS POTENTIAL CROSSLINKING AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yan; XIAO Changfa

    2006-01-01

    A concept of potential crosslinking agent was introduced into the synthesizing process of highly oil-absorptive resin that is traditionally prepared by single chemical crosslinking. The resin was heated after manufactured to obtain three-dimension network structure. The effects of potential crosslinking agent and the crosslinking conditions on the absorptive properties of resin were studied.The results showed that hydroxyl ethylacrylate got satisfied results, and the resin with it had good oil absorbency and oil retention.

  6. Molecular Properties and Evaluation of Indion 234–Ondansetron Resinates

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, S; Pandya, S.; Bhalekar, MR

    2010-01-01

    Ondansetron is a serotonin 5HT3 antagonist; anti-emetic drug. Bitter taste of the ondansetron is a major problem in ensuring patient compliance. The study was designed to formulate tasteless complexes of ondansetron with ion exchange resin and evaluate molecular properties of drug complex. The drug-loading process was carried out using various resins and was optimized using different drug:resin ratio and pH. Resinates were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and X-ray po...

  7. STUDY ON COPOLYMER EPOXY RESIN MATRIX WITHOUT SHRINKAGE PART I VOLUME CHANGE DURING CURE PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pingsheng; ZHOU Zhiqiang; WANG Gengchao; PAN Caiyuan; WU Renjie

    1988-01-01

    The volume change of the copolymer epoxy resins can be controlled by copolymerizing epoxy resin E51 with 3,9-di (5-norbornene-2, 2)-1, 5, 7, 11-tetraoxaspiro [5, 5] undecane (NSOC). During curing,the volume changes of copolymer epoxy resins with various amounts of NSOC were measured with a dilatometer. Cure process does not produce volume change when epoxy resin E51: NSOC is 5.88: 1 in equivalent.

  8. The application of nanotechnology in the improvement of dental composite resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yang; Xie Haifeng; Zhang Feimin; Gu Ning

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, nanotechnology for the improvement of dental composite resins has been reviewed in the back- ground of the existing shortcomings, focusing on the improvement for polymerization shrinkage, anti-bacterial properties and mechanical properties of composite resins. The results show that the use of nanotechnology and nano materials can be an effective method to improve the performance of dental composite resins in a various ways. At last, the paper also discusses the perspective about the dental composite resins.

  9. The Evaluation of Water Sorption/Solubility on Various Acrylic Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Keyf, Filiz; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Uzun, Cengiz

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The absorption of water by acrylic resins is a phenomenon of considerable importance since it is accompanied by dimensional changes, a further undesirable effect of absorbed water in acrylic resins to reduce the tensile strength of the material. Solubility is also an important property because it represents the mass of soluble materials from the polymers. Methods Ten acrylic resin-based materials were evaluated: two heat cure acrylic resins (De Trey QC-20, Meliodent Heat Cure) and ...

  10. Evaluation of bond strength between glass fiber and resin composite using different protocols for dental splinting

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral R Fabrício; Queiroz C José Renato; Leite P. P. Fabíola; Reskalla N. J. F. Helcio; Rodrigo Furtado de Carvalho; Özcan Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Context: Many different polymeric materials to chair-side application on pre-impregnated glass fibers (PGF) are available and different protocols are used in clinical procedure. Aims: This study evaluated protocols used for dental splinting on adhesion between PGF and resin. Settings and Design: 42 pair of nano composite resin blocks with (6 × 6 × 8) mm 3 were assigned into seven groups (n=6) and bonded according to the protocol: Gar) adhesive, resin; Ggr) glass fiber, resin; Ggar) glass fibe...

  11. Study on degradation of cation exchange resin for condensate polishing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of condensate polisher resin might cause the deterioration of water chemistry in power plants. The cause of cation resin degradation was studied in laboratory tests which simulated actual operating condition in a condensate polishing plant. It was found that air-scrubbing and unregenerated storage accelerate the decomposition of the cation exchange resin. Decrease of air-scrubbing times and regenerated storage are suggested as countermeasures against cation exchange resin degradation. (author)

  12. New technology for separating resin powder and fiberglass powder from fiberglass-resin powder of waste printed circuit boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Gao, Bei; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-05-01

    New recycling technologies have been developed lately to enhance the value of the fiberglass powder-resin powder fraction (FRP) from waste printed circuit boards. The definite aim of the present paper is to present some novel methods that use the image forces for the separation of the resin powder and fiberglass powder generated from FRP during the corona electrostatic separating process. The particle shape charactization and particle trajectory simulation were performed on samples of mixed non-metallic particles. The simulation results pointed out that particles of resin powder and particles of fiberglass powder had different detach trajectories at the conditions of the same size and certain device parameters. An experiment carried out using a corona electrostatic separator validated the possibility of sorting these particles based on the differences in their shape characteristics. The differences in the physical properties of the different types of particles provided the technical basis for the development of electrostatic separation technologies for the recycling industry. PMID:24678800

  13. Effect of accelerated aging on the microhardness and color stability of flexible resins for dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resins have been widely used due to their acceptable esthetics and desirable characteristics such as easy handling, good thermal conductivity, low permeability to oral fluids and color stability. Flexible resins were introduced on the market as an alternative to the use of conventional acrylic resins in the construction of complete and partial removable dentures. Although these resins present advantages in terms of esthetics and comfort, studies assessing chromatic and microhardness alterations of these materials are still scarce in the related literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chromatic and microhardness alterations of two commercial brands of flexible resins in comparison to the conventional resin Triplex when submitted to accelerated aging. The resins were manipulated according to manufacturers' instructions and inserted into a silicone matrix to obtain 21 specimens divided into 3 groups: Triplex, Ppflex and Valplast. Triplex presented the highest microhardness value (p < 0.05 for all the aging periods, which was significantly different from that of the other resins, followed by the values of Valplast and Ppflex. Comparison between the flexible resins (Ppflex and Valplast revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 as regards color. The flexible resin Ppflex and the conventional resin Triplex presented no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 as regards aging. The accelerated aging significantly increased the microhardness values of the resins, with the highest values being observed for Triplex. Valplast presented the greatest chromatic alteration after accelerated aging.

  14. IONIC DOPING OF LOW-CONDUCTIVITY STRUCTURAL RESINS FOR IMPROVED DIRECT-CURRENT SENSING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This investigation developed a methodology for doping high-resistivity vinyl-ester (VE) resins with an organic dopant. The polymeric resin system investigated was a Dow Derakane 411-C50 VE resin. A number of potential dopants were studied, and two in particular, tetrabutylammoniu...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5380 - Mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5380 Mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin (generic). (a) Chemical... as mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin (PMN P-98-718) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. Permanganate Degradation of Reillex HPQ Ion Exchange Resin for Use in HB-Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the use of Reillex TM HPQ resin as a replacement for the Ionac A-641 resin currently authorized for use in H B-Line. The study concentrated on the ability of the existing alkaline permanganate digestion process to convert spent resin for disposal

  17. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  18. Preparation of Phenolic Resin/Silver Nanocomposites via in-situ Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Resol type phenolic resin/silver nanocomposite was prepared by in-situ reduction method, in which the curing of phenolic resin and the formation of silver nano-particles took place simultaneously. The silver ions were reduced completely to silver nanoparticles, which were dispersed homogeneously in the resin matrix with narrow size distribution.

  19. Permanganate Degradation of Reillex HPQ Ion Exchange Resin for Use in HB-Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B.W.

    1999-06-02

    This study evaluated the use of Reillex TM HPQ resin as a replacement for the Ionac A-641 resin currently authorized for use in H B-Line. The study concentrated on the ability of the existing alkaline permanganate digestion process to convert spent resin for disposal.

  20. RHEOLOGICAL MODIFICATION OF EPOXY RESINS WITH NANO SILICA PREPARED BY THE SOL-GEL PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Wang; Jiang Li; Cheng-fen Long; Yun-zhao Yu

    1999-01-01

    Nano silica-modified epoxy resins were synthesized by the sol-gel process. The materials have the morphological structure of nano particales dispersed in the epoxy matrix. The dispersed phase formed a physical network in the resin and thus influenced the rheological behavior greatly. However, the nano silica did not show a significant influence on the mechanical properties of the cured resins.

  1. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section... prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, partial phosphoric acid esters of...

  2. Strong cation exchange resin for improving physicochemical properties and sustaining release of ranitidine hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study strong cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRP69 was used to improve the physicochemical properties of ranitidine hydrochloride such as taste and bulk properties and to sustain dissolution rate. Drug-resin complexes were prepared using batch method. Drug loading was done under different processing conditions such as temperature, pH, drug-resin ratio, and drug concentration to get the optimum condition for resinate preparation. Resinate prepared under optimized condition was tested for taste, bulk properties and release rate. Degree of bitterness of ranitidine was found to reduce to zero after complexation with resin. Improvement in flow properties was also observed. Angle of repose for resinate was found to be 33.21 o as compared to 42.27 o for ranitidine HCl. Effect of dissolution medium and particle size on in vitro release of drug from resinate was also investigated. Resinate with drug to resin ratio of 2:3 and particle size> 90 µm showed about 90% of drug release within 12 h. The orodispersible tablet formulated from the resinate containing 10% croscarmellose sodium disintegrated within 35 sec in oral cavity and showed similar dissolution profile as the resinate. Tablets were found stable after stability studies with no change in dissolution profile.

  3. The microdistribution of urea formaldehyde resin in particleboard, and its significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique has been developed to enable urea formaldehyde resins to be located in particle boards using Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDAX). This method of detection requires the resin to be chemically labelled, and several possible chemicals are proposed. The merits of each of these chemicals are discussed and thiourea and chloral are selected as the best potential labels. It is necessary to ensure that adding these chemicals to a resin will not alter the resin's properties. For this reason the thiourea and chloral labelled resins' physical properties are compared with those of an unlabelled resin. The effect of cyclic soaking (in water) and drying on the physical behaviour and tensile strengths of labelled and unlabelled resin films is also assessed. As a result of these, and later experiments, chloral is rejected as a suitable label. All subsequent investigations of resin microdistribution are carried out using a thiourea/urea formaldehyde resin. These studies reveal several important characteristics of particleboard ''glue lines''. The majority of resin is concentrated close to the ''glue line'' and is rarely found more than two cells away from the chip junction. Little or no resin is observed in the cell lumen, but there is evidence of cell wall penetration and possible within cell wall distributions are identified. Finally the implications of the cycling, tensile strength and resin distribution data are discussed with reference to the problems of particleboard failure in moist environments. (author)

  4. Rheological behavior of a bismaleimide resin system for RTM process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yuexin; SHI Feng; LIANG Zhiyong; ZHANG Zuoguang

    2007-01-01

    The curing properties and rheological behavior of a bismaleimide resin system were studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis and viscometer mea-surements,respectively.A dual-Arrhenius viscosity model and an engineering viscosity model were established to pre-dict the resin rheological behavior of this resin system.The two viscosity models were compared.The results show that the two models are both suitable for predicting the viscosity in the mold filling stage of resin transfer molding (RTM). However,the engineering model provides a more accurate prediction of the viscosity near the gel point.The effective-ness of the engineering viscosity model is verified both in isothermal and nonisothermal conditions.The limitation of the engineering model is that it cannot be used to predict the viscosity after cross-linking of the curing system.The engineering viscosity models can be used to predict the pro-cessing windows of different processing parameters of the RTM process,which is critical for the simulation and the optimization of composite manufacturing processes.

  5. Resin adhesif Sebagai Bahan Kaping Pulpa Secara Langsung

    OpenAIRE

    Julitha Dewi

    2008-01-01

    Penggunaan Kalsium Hidroksida sebagai bahan kaping pulpa secara langsung telah terbukti dapat menyebabkan timbulnya celah mikro sehingga mengakibatkan kegagalan perawalan. Berdasarkan beberapa penelitian, bahan resin adhesi yang dapat digunakan sebagai bahan kaping pulpa secara langsung adalah yang terdiri dari kombinasi Polyethylene Glycidyl Methacrylate (PEGDMA), Glutaraldehid 5% dan Bisphenol-Glycidyl Methacrylate (13is-GMA), kombinasi 4-Methacryloxyethyl Trimelliatate Anhydride (4-META),...

  6. Caged polyprenylated xanthones from the resin of Garcinia hanburyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; He, Shiwen; Tang, Chu; Li, Jun; Yang, Guangzhong

    2016-03-01

    Five new caged polyprenylated xanthones (1a, 2a, 3, 10a and 10b), and 12 known related compounds were isolated from the resin of Garcinia hanburyi. Their structures were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analyses and their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were investigated in vitro. Most of xanthones showed modest inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase. PMID:26688377

  7. Recovery of tetrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of the tetrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q = kCn. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20°C. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of the resin.

    Se estudia la recuperación del ion tetracloroaurato mediante la resina aniónica Dowex 11. La extracción de oro depende tanto de las concentraciones del metal y la resina como de la temperatura. La isoterma de adsorción responde a la ecuación Q = kCn. La resina cargada con oro puede ser eluida con una disolución acida de tiourea a 20°C. Después de varios ciclos de adsorción-desorción no hay pérdida de carga por parte de la resina.

  8. Bond strength between acrylic resin and maxillofacial silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Filié Haddad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of implant dentistry improved the possibilities of rehabilitation with maxillofacial prosthesis. However, clinically it is difficult to bond the silicone to the attachment system. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an adhesive system on the bond strength between acrylic resin and facial silicone. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 120 samples were fabricated with auto-polymerized acrylic resin and MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. Both materials were bonded through mechanical retentions and/or application of primers (DC 1205 primer and Sofreliner primer S and adhesive (Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A or not (control group. Samples were divided into 12 groups according to the method used to attach the silicone to the acrylic resin. All samples were subjected to a T-peel test in a universal testing machine. Failures were classified as adhesive, cohesive or mixed. The data were evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey's HSD test (α=.05. RESULTS: The highest bond strength values (5.95 N/mm; 3.07 N/mm; 4.75 N/mm were recorded for the samples that received a Sofreliner primer application. These values were significantly higher when the samples had no scratches and did not receive the application of Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A. CONCLUSIONS: The most common type of failure was adhesive. The use of Sofreliner primer increased the bond strength between the auto-polymerized acrylic resin and the Silastic MDX 4-4210 facial silicone.

  9. Geochemistry of anomalous uranium enrichment in fossil resin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelcová, Martina; Machovič, Vladimír; Mizera, Jiří; Sýkorová, Ivana; Dvořák, Z.

    Leoben : Montanauniversität Leoben, 2015. s. 49. [Geoanalysis 2015. 09.08.2015-14.08.2015, Leoben] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : fossil resin * amber * uranium Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry http://2015.geoanalysis.info/documents/abstract_volume_geoanalysis2015.pdf

  10. Properties of epoxy resins filled with modified carbon nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špitalský, Z.; Matějka, Libor; Šlouf, Miroslav; Konyushenko, E. N.; Kovářová, Jana

    Prague : Consortium for Research of Nanostructured and Crosslinked Polymeric Materials, 2005. s. 61. [Workshop Nanofun-Poly on Chemistry, Processing Structure, Properties and Applications of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites, Life- Cycle Engineering, Gender Issues /3./. 11.11.2005-12.11.2005, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : epoxy resins * nanotubes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. Textile impregnation with thermoplastic resin - models and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, R.; Grouve, W.J.B.; Lamers, E.A.D.; Wijskamp, S.; Kelly, P.A.; Bickerton, S.; Lescher, P.; Govignon, Q.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues of the development of cost-effective thermoplastic composites for the aerospace industry is the process quality control. A complete, void free impregnation of the textile reinforcement by the thermoplastic resin is an important measure of the quality of composites. The introduc

  12. 76 FR 4936 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... on granular PTFE resin from Italy and Japan (75 FR 67082-67083 and 67105-67108, November 1, 2010... correction of the initiation notice on January 12, 2011 (76 FR 2083). On January 13, 2011, Commerce notified... 17, 2011; Responses to the 13 items requested in the Commission's notice of institution (75 FR...

  13. Effects of Guayule Resin on Termite Feeding Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guayule, a desert adapted plant, yields hypoallergenic rubber that is used primarily by the medical profession for rubber gloves, catheters, etc. Terpene resin, a co-product from guayule that can be extracted prior to rubber extraction, has been found to have termiticidal properties. As such, this r...

  14. SYNTHESIS OF MBS RESIN BASED ON MOLECULE DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jianqing; YUAN Huigen; PAN Zuren

    1992-01-01

    The relationships between the properties of PVC-MBS polyblend and of the MBS multiphase structure and between the MBS structure and polymerization parameters are studied theoretically and experimentally. MBS resin synthesized from the molecule design principle is suitable to prepare PVC-MBS polyblend with good transparency and high impact strength.

  15. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °C in an inert atmosphere and formation of a protective silica layer on material surfaces beyond 1,200 °C in an oxidative atmosphere are discussed from the viewpoints of the wide chemical composition of the Si-O-C materials. Applications of the resins for binding agents, as starting materials for porous ceramics, matrix sources with impregnation, fiber spinning and ceramic adhesions are introduced. The recent development of the process of filler or cross-linking agent additions to resin compounds is also introduced. Such resin compounds are useful for obtaining thick coatings, MEMS parts and bulk ceramics, which are difficult to obtain by pyrolysis of simple organometallic precursors without additives.

  16. Design of integrated emergency receiver equipment for radioactive scrap resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the source item features and considering the requirement of safety, light-weight and interface support in radioactive scrap resin emergency receiver for PWR coolant circuit, the receiving process flow is proposed. The integrated receiving equipment is designed, and its corresponding experiment method and requirement is brought forward. (authors)

  17. Positron Annihilation in a Rubber Modified Epoxy Resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Pethrick, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Positron annihilation data is reported on a rubber-modified epoxy resin. Studies of the temperature dependence of the o-positronium lifetime indicated the existence of three distinct regions; the associated transition temperatures by comparison with dilatometric data can be ascribed respectively ...... be glass transition of the epoxy phase and to that of a mixed acrylonitrile—epoxy—butadiene interfacial region....

  18. Photothermal radiometry monitoring of light curing in resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real time measurement of thermal diffusivity during the evolution of the light curing process in dental resins is reported using photothermal radiometry. The curing is induced by a non-modulated blue light beam, and at the same time, a modulated red laser beam is sent onto the sample, generating a train of thermal waves that produce modulated infrared radiation. The monitoring of this radiation permits to follow the time evolution of the process. The methodology is applied to two different commercially available light curing resin-based composites. In all cases thermal diffusivity follows a first order kinetics with similar stabilization characteristic times. Analysis of this kinetics permits to exhibit the close relationship of increase in thermal diffusivity with the decrease in monomer concentration and extension of the polymerization in the resin, induced by the curing light. It is also shown that the configuration in which the resin is illuminated by the modulated laser can be the basis for the development of an in situ technique for the determination of the degree of curing

  19. Photothermal radiometry monitoring of light curing in resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano-Arjona, M A [Applied Physics Department, Cinvestav-Unidad Merida, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Merida, 97310 (Mexico); Medina-Esquivel, R [Cinvestav-Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente 2000 Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro (Mexico); Alvarado-Gil, J J [Applied Physics Department, Cinvestav-Unidad Merida, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Merida, 97310 (Mexico)

    2007-10-07

    Real time measurement of thermal diffusivity during the evolution of the light curing process in dental resins is reported using photothermal radiometry. The curing is induced by a non-modulated blue light beam, and at the same time, a modulated red laser beam is sent onto the sample, generating a train of thermal waves that produce modulated infrared radiation. The monitoring of this radiation permits to follow the time evolution of the process. The methodology is applied to two different commercially available light curing resin-based composites. In all cases thermal diffusivity follows a first order kinetics with similar stabilization characteristic times. Analysis of this kinetics permits to exhibit the close relationship of increase in thermal diffusivity with the decrease in monomer concentration and extension of the polymerization in the resin, induced by the curing light. It is also shown that the configuration in which the resin is illuminated by the modulated laser can be the basis for the development of an in situ technique for the determination of the degree of curing.

  20. Creep of experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Kaleem, Muhammad; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Satterthwaite, Julian D; Watts, David C; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of short E-glass fiber fillers oriented in different directions on composite resin under static and dynamic loading. Experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of resin, and 55 wt% of silane-treated silica fillers. Three groups of specimens (n=5) were tested: FC with isotropic fiber orientation, FC with anisotropic fiber orientation, and particulate-filled composite resin (PFC) as a control. Time-dependent creep and recovery were recorded. ANOVA revealed that after secondary curing in a vacuum oven and after storage in dry condition for 30 days, FC with isotropic fiber orientation (1.73%) exhibited significantly lower static creep value (p<0.05) than PFC (2.54%). For the different curing methods and storage conditions evaluated in this study, FC achieved acceptable static and dynamic creep values when compared to PFC. PMID:23037835

  1. Advanced ultrastructural detection of antigens on resin sections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hozák, Pavel; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Philimonenko, Vlada; Sobol, Margaryta; Janáček, Jiří; Vyhnal, Aleš; Kubínová, Lucie; Janda, P.

    Innsbruck: Society for Histochemistry, 2009. ---. [Symposium of the Society for Histochemistry /51./. 07.10.2009-10.10.2009, Mieders] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cell ultrastructure * high-pressure freezing * freeze substitution * resins * immunocytochemistry Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Organic geochemistry of fossil resins from the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelcová, Martina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Mach, K.; Dvořák, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, August (2014), s. 303-312. ISSN 1878-5220. [Geochemistry of the Earth's Surface (GES) Meeting /10./. Paris, 18.08.2014-23.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : fossil resin * amber * resinite * TMAH-Py-GC/MS Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  3. Degradation of ion spent resin using the Fenton's reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common method for spent radioactive ion exchange resin treatment is its immobilization in cement, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. Although this method is efficient, it increases considerably the final volume of the waste due to the low incorporation capacity. The objective of this work was to develop a degradation method of spent resins arising from the nuclear research reactor located at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP), using an Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagents. This method would allow a higher incorporation in cement. Three different resins were evaluated: cationic, anionic and a mixture of both resins. The reactions were conducted varying the catalyst concentration (25, 50, 100 and 150 mM), the volume of hydrogen peroxide (320 to 460 mL), and three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg C. Degradation of about 98% was achieved using a 50 mM catalyst solution and 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide solution. The most efficient temperature was 60 deg C. (author)

  4. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Scholtanus

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attribu

  5. Plastination of decalcified bone by a new resin technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Rabiei

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our synthesized resin found to be much more economical than conventional plastination method. In more details, properties of these new products were the same as, S 10 method, from points of strength, flexibility and weight, but, since the money cost for producing them was about one fifth that of S 10 method.

  6. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  7. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants...

  8. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper...

  9. Supercritical water oxidation of ion exchange resins: Degradation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion exchange resins are radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment. Supercritical water oxidation could offer a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of resins and contain radioactivity. IER degradation experiments were carried out in a continuous supercritical water reactor. Total organic carbon degradation rates in the range of 95-98% were obtained depending on operating conditions. GC-MS chromatography analyses were carried out to determine intermediate products formed during the reaction. Around 50 species were identified for cationic and anionic resins. Degradation of poly-styrenic structure leads to the formation of low molecular weight compounds. Benzoic acid, phenol and acetic acid are the main compounds. However, other products are detected in appreciable yields such as phenolic species or heterocycles, for anionic IERs degradation. Intermediates produced by intramolecular rearrangements are also obtained. A radical degradation mechanism is proposed for each resin. In this overall mechanism, several hypotheses are foreseen, according to HOO center dot radical attack sites. (authors)

  10. Microbial degradation of resins fractionated from Arabian light crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment samples from the Japanese coasts were screened for microorganisms able to degrade resin components of crude oil. A mixed population that could degrade 35% of 5000 ppm resin in 15 days was obtained. This population also metabolized 50% of saturates and aromatics present in crude oil (5000 ppm) in 7 days. A Pseudomonas sp., isolated from the mixed population, emulsified and degraded 30% of resins. It also degraded saturates and aromatics (30%) present in crude oil (5000 ppm). These results were obtained from Iatroscan analysis. Degradation of crude oil was also analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The peaks corresponding to known aliphatic hydrocarbons in crude oil greatly decreased within the first two days of incubation in the cultures of the RY-mixed population and of Pseudomonas strain UN3. Aromatic compounds detected as a broad peak by GC were significantly degraded at day 7 by Pseudomonas strain UN3, and at day 15 by the RY-mixed population. Investigations are ongoing to determine the genetic basis for the ability of these organisms to grow on the resin fractions of crude oil as a sole source of carbon and energy. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Ion Exchange Resin and Clay Vitrification by Plasma Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of treatment of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) lead us to propose a vitrification process based on a plasma discharge; this technique incorporates LILRW into a matrix glass composed of ceramic clays material. The Mexican Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), uses an ion exchange resin IRN 150 (styrene-divinilbence copolymer) in the TRIGA MARK III nuclear reactor. The principal objective of this resin is to absorb particles containing heavy metals and low-level radioactive particles. Once the IRN 150 resin filter capacity has been exceeded, it should be replaced and treated as LILRW. In this work, a transferred plasma system was realized to vitrify this resin taking advantage of its high power density, enthalpy and chemical reactivity as well as its rapid quenching and high operation temperatures. In order to characterize the morphological structure of these clay samples, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques were applied before and after the plasma treatment

  12. High Temperature VARTM of Phenylethynyl Terminated Imides (PETI) Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sayata; Cano, Roberto J.; Britton, Sean M.; Watson, Kent A.; Jensen, Brian J.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Fabrication of composite structures using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) is generally more affordable than conventional autoclave techniques. Recent efforts have focused on adapting VARTM for the fabrication of high temperature composites. Due to their low melt viscosity and long melt stability, certain phenylethynyl terminated imides (PETI) can be processed into composites using high temperature VARTM (HT-VARTM). However, one of the disadvantages of the current HT-VARTM resin systems has been the high porosity of the resultant composites. For aerospace applications a void fraction of less than 2% is desired. In the current study, two PETI resins, LARCTM PETI-330 and LARCTM PETI-8 have been used to fabricate test specimens using HT-VARTM. The resins were infused into carbon fiber preforms at 260 C and cured between 316 C and 371 C. Modifications to the thermal cycle used in the laminate fabrication have reduced the void content significantly (typically temperatures. These include short beam shear and flexure tests. The results of this work are presented herein.

  13. Management of Spent Organic Ion-Exchange Resins by Photochemical Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivas, C.; Sugilal, S.; Wattal, P. K.

    2003-02-26

    Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional groups. It is a two-step process consisting of dissolution (conversion of solid resin into water-soluble reaction products) and photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin. Cation and anion resin dissolution was effected by reaction of the resin with H2O2 at 50-60 C in the presence of ferrous/copper sulphate catalyst. Direct dissolution of mixed resin was not efficient. However, the cation resin portion in the mixed resin could be selectively dissolved without affecting the anion portion. The solid anion resin after separation from the cation resin solution could be dissolved. About 0.5 liters of 50% H2O2 was required for dissolution of one kg of wet resin. The reaction time was 4-5 hours. Dissolution experiments were conducted on up to 8 liters of wet resin. The second step, viz., photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin was effected at ambient temperature(25-35 C). Kinetic results of laboratory scale experiments in immersion type photo-reactor and pilot scale experiments in tubular flow photo-reactor were presented. These results clearly demonstrated the photo-Fenton mineralization of dissolved resin at ambient temperature with stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 as against 70-200% excess H2O2 requirement in chemical mineralization experiments under Fenton oxidation conditions at 90-95 C. Based on these studies, a treatment scheme was developed and presented in this paper.

  14. Nonlinear Inelastic Mechanical Behavior Of Epoxy Resin Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekani Fard, Masoud

    Polymer and polymer matrix composites (PMCs) materials are being used extensively in different civil and mechanical engineering applications. The behavior of the epoxy resin polymers under different types of loading conditions has to be understood before the mechanical behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) can be accurately predicted. In many structural applications, PMC structures are subjected to large flexural loadings, examples include repair of structures against earthquake and engine fan cases. Therefore it is important to characterize and model the flexural mechanical behavior of epoxy resin materials. In this thesis, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken combining experiments and theoretical modeling to investigate the mechanical behavior of epoxy resins subject to different loading conditions. Epoxy resin E 863 was tested at different strain rates. Samples with dog-bone geometry were used in the tension tests. Small sized cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical samples were used in compression tests. Flexural tests were conducted on samples with different sizes and loading conditions. Strains were measured using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique, extensometers, strain gauges, and actuators. Effects of triaxiality state of stress were studied. Cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical compression samples undergo stress drop at yield, but it was found that only cubic samples experience strain hardening before failure. Characteristic points of tensile and compressive stress strain relation and load deflection curve in flexure were measured and their variations with strain rate studied. Two different stress strain models were used to investigate the effect of out-of-plane loading on the uniaxial stress strain response of the epoxy resin material. The first model is a strain softening with plastic flow for tension and compression. The influence of softening localization on material behavior was investigated using the DIC system. It was found that

  15. Effects of modeling liquid/resin and polishing on the color change of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Brondani, Lucas Pradebon; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Modeling liquids/resins have been used to build up resin composite (RC) restorations, although there is a lack of information regarding their effects on the color stability of the latter. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the presence of modeling liquid between layers of RC and the finishing/polishing state of the material on color change in specimens exposed to red wine staining over time. Specimens were prepared by placing four increments (±0.5 mm thick) of RC (Filtek™ Z350 XT, 3M ESPE) into molds; half of which were prepared by applying modeling liquid (Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose™ Adhesive, SBMP, 3M ESPE) between the layers of RC, whereas the other half were prepared without SBMP (control). Light-activation was performed after application of the final RC layer using a light-emitting diode (Radii, SDI) curing unit with an irradiance of 900 mW/cm2 for 20 s. Each group was divided according to the surface finishing protocol (n = 7): nothing (non-polished) or polishing with Sof-Lex™/diamond paste (polished). Initial colors of the specimens were evaluated with a digital spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* color system. The specimens were stored in wine (37°C) for 12 months, and the color measurements were reassessed after 4, 6, and 12 months of storage. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed at the end. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The presence of SBMP resulted in lower overall color change of the RC as compared with the control. The non-polished specimens exhibited a significantly higher color change than the polished specimens. SEM images corroborated the previous findings. In summary, the use of modeling liquid between layers of RC shows potential for application to reduce or delay the staining process of RC over time. Moreover, polishing is essential to provide increased color stability of the RC restoration. PMID:27556554

  16. Use of eco-friendly epoxy resins from renewable resources as potential substitutes of petrochemical epoxy resins for ambient cured composites with flax reinforcements

    OpenAIRE

    Bertomeu Perelló, David; García Sanoguera, David; Fenollar Gimeno, Octavio Ángel; Boronat Vitoria, Teodomiro; Balart Gimeno, Rafael Antonio

    2012-01-01

    [EN] In the last years, some high renewable content epoxy resins, derived from vegetable oils, have been developed at industrial level and are now commercially available; these can compete with petroleum-based resins as thermoset matrices for composite materials. Nevertheless, due to the relatively high cost in comparison to petroleum-based resins, their use is still restricted to applications with relatively low volume consumption such as model making, tuning components, nautical parts, spec...

  17. Reillex/trademark/ HPQ: A new, macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin for separating plutonium using nitrate anion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion exchange in nitric acid is the major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure scrap materials. Most strong-base anion exchange resins incorporate a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. A newly available, macroporous anion exchange resin based on a copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine and divinylbenzene has been evaluated. Comparative data for Pu(IV) sorption kinetics and capacity are presented for this new resin and two other commonly used anion exchange resins. The new resin offers high capacity and rapid sorption kinetics for Pu(IV) from nitric acid, as well as greater stability to chemical and radiolytic degradation. 8 refs., 12 figs

  18. Nitrate Conversion Of HB-LINE REILLEX(trademark) HPQ RESIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reillex(trademark) HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex(trademark) HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same

  19. Study on dehydrochlorination of waste poly (vinyl chloride) resins by microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Saburo; Qian, Qingrong; Sunohara, Satoshi; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    Waste poly (vinyl chloride: PVC) resins are experimentally dehydrochlorinated by microwave irradiation. The following unique results are obtained: (1) plasticizer in PVC resin absorbs microwave power more effectively than PVC polymer. The higher the plasticizer content in PVC resin, the higher is the dehydrochlorination reaction (2) low PVC polymer content materials such as cushion floor require high microwave irradiation power to secure a high dehydrochlorination yield, (3) calcium carbonate in PVC resin reacts with released hydrochloric acid gas and results calcium chloride during microwave irradiation, (4) additives in PVC resin strongly influence dehydrochlorination yield, (5) it is evidenced that the PVC copolymer is also dehydrochlorinated by microwave irradiation.

  20. Immobilisation Of Spent Ion Exchange Resins Using Portland Cement Blending With Organic Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins (spent resins) using Portland cement blending with organic material for example bio char was investigated. The performance of cement-bio char matrix for immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins was evaluated based on their compression strength and leachability under different experimental conditions. The results showed that the amount of bio char and spent resins loading effect the compressive strength of the waste form. Several factors affecting the leaching behaviour of immobilised spent resins in cement-bio char matrix. (author)