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Sample records for alkyd resins

  1. Fatty Acid Composition of Tobacco Seed Oil and Synthesis of Alkyd Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUKHTAR,Azam; ULLAH,Habib; MUKHTAR,Hamid

    2007-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of tobacco seed oil revealed that the oil is rich in unsaturated fatty acids, having linoleic acid (71.63%), oleic acid (13.46%) and palmitic acid (8.72%) as the most abundant unsaturated and saturated fatty acids respectively. So the tobacco oil was characterized as semi-drying type on the basis of fatty acid composition. The synthesis of alkyd resin was carried out by alcoholysis or monoglyceride process using an alkali refined tobacco seed oil, pentaerythritol, cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride along with lithium hydroxide as catalyst.The alkyd resin so prepared was found to be bright and of low color with high gloss. The drying and hardness properties and adhesion of the tobacco seed oil derived alkyd resin were also found a bit superior to those of other alkyd resins of the same oil length. In addition, the water and acid resistance of the said alkyd was also found comparable to the other alkyds.

  2. Alkyd-amino resins based on waste PET for coating applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakoğlu, A; Güçlü, G

    2009-01-01

    Waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes were depolymerized by using propylene glycol (PG) in the presence of zinc acetate as catalyst. Glycolysis reaction products of waste PET obtained by using PET/glycol molar ratio 1/2. Two short oil alkyd resins of high acid values (30-40mgKOH/g) were prepared from phthalic anhydride (PA), glycerin (G), coconut oil fatty acids (COFA) and glycolyzed products of waste PET (PET-based alkyd resins) or glycols (PG) (reference alkyd resins). These alkyd resins were blended with 30%, 40%, and 50% of a commercial urea-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde/melamine-formaldehyde mixture (1/1 weight ratio) and heated at 140 degrees C. The physical and chemical properties such as drying time, hardness, abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, water resistance, alkaline resistance, acid resistance, gelation time, and thermal oxidative degradation resistance (with thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) of these alkyd-amino resins were investigated. The properties of the waste PET-based resins were found to be compatible with the properties of the reference resins.

  3. Resins and additives for powder coatings and alkyd paints, based on renewable resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Oostveen, E.A.; Micciche, F.; Noordover, B.A.J.; Koning, C.E.; Benthem, van R.A.T.M.; Frissen, A.E.; Weijnen, J.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Due to limited fossil resources and an increased need for environmentally friendly, sustainable technologies, the importance of using renewable feedstocks in the paint and coatings area will increase in the decades to come. This paper highlights some of the perspectives in this area. Alkyd resins fo

  4. The effects of alkyd/melamine resin ratio and curing temperature on the properties of the coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADMILA Z. RADICEVIC

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic resins are used as binders in protective coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of a coating called “baking enamel” cured through functional groups of resins. The effects of the alkyd/butylated melamine resin ratio (from 85/15 to 70/30 and curing temperature (from 100°C to 160°C on the crosslinking and properties of the coating are presented in this paper. The degree of curing was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. These data were used for the estimation of the degree of crosslinking. The hardness, elasticity, impact resistance, degree of adherence and gloss were also determined. Optimal coating properties could be achieved with an alkyd/melamine resin ratio of 75/25, a curing temperature of 130 °C and a curing time of 30 min.

  5. Analysis of the Compounds from the BTEX Group, Emitted During Thermal Decomposition of Alkyd Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kubecki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of the given binding agent for the moulding sands preparation depends on the one hand on the estimation of technological properties of the sand and the mould made of it and the obtained casting quality and on the other hand on the assessment of this sand influence on the natural and working environment. Out of moulding sands used in the foundry industry, sands with organic binders deserve a special attention. These binders are based on synthetic resins, which ensure obtaining the proper technological properties and sound castings, however, they negatively influence the environment. If in the initial state these resins are not very dangerous for people and for the environment, thus under an influence of high temperatures they generate very harmful products, being the result of their thermal decomposition. Depending on the kind of the applied resin (phenol-formaldehyde, urea, furfuryl, urea–furfuryl, alkyd under an influence of a temperature such compounds as: furfuryl alcohol, formaldehyde, phenol, BTEX group (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, and also polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH can be formed and released.The aim of the study was the development of the method, selection of analytical methods and the determination of optimal conditionsof formation compounds from the BTEX group. An emission of these components constitutes one of the basic criteria of the harmfulnessassessment of binders applied for moulding and core sands. Investigations were carried out in the specially designed set up for the thermal decomposition of organic substances in a temperature range: 5000C – 13000C at the laboratory scale. The object for testing was alkyd resin applied as a binding material for moulding sands. Within investigations the minimal amount of adsorbent necessary for the adsorption of compounds released during the decomposition of the resin sample of a mass app. 15 mg was selected. Also the minimal amount of solvent needed for

  6. Effect of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles on thermal, barrier and mechanical properties of long oil alkyd resin-based coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Radoman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Novel soy alkyd-based nanocomposites (NCs were prepared using TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs surface modified with different gallates, and for the first time with imine obtained from 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and oleylamine (DHBAOA. Unmodified and surface modified anatase TiO2 NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, while the amount of adsorbed ligands was calculated from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results. Surface modification of TiO2 NPs was confirmed by FTIR and UV-Vis spectra. The influence of the TiO2 surface modification on the dispersion of TiO2 NPs in alkyd resin, thermal, barrier and mechanical properties and chemical resistance of alkyd resin/TiO2 NC coatings was investigated. The obtained results revealed that glass transition temperature of all investigated NCs is lower than for pure resin, that the presence of TiO2 NPs surface modified with gallates had no significant influence on the thermooxidative stability of alkyd resin, while TiO2-DHBAOA NPs slightly improved alkyd resin thermooxidative stability. Also, the presence of surface modified TiO2 NPs improved barrier properties, increased stress and strain at break and hardness and chemical resistance and decreased modulus of elasticity and abrasion resistance of alkyd resin.

  7. Surface Coating Studies of Polyurethane Derived from [(Alkyd-(Epoxy Resin Treated Castor Oil] Using Isophorene Diisocynate - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh. P. Patel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Castor oil (C was reacted with profitable epoxy resin (E (diglycidylether of bisphenol-A, DGEBF at a range of mole ratios. The consequential products (Castor oil- Epoxy resin were nominated as CEs. Isocyanate terminated castor oil Polyurethane (ICOPU was prepared by reaction of castor oil and various proportion of Isophoren diisocyanate. A commercial alkyd resin was blended with various proportions of CEs and ICOPU. A unique solvent system, which shows a one – phase clear solution and a clear coat of binder system, was used. All the blends were applied on mild steel panels and characterized for drying time, adhesion, flexibility, hardness, impact resistance and chemical resistance properties.

  8. 改性水性醇酸树脂的合成及其应用%Study on synthesis of modified waterborne alkyd resin and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张诚; 吕翠玉; 顾卓伟; 苏畅; 徐立新

    2011-01-01

    以脂肪油、间苯二甲酸、偏苯三酸酐及三羟甲基丙烷为主要原料,采用熔融成盐法合成了水性醇酸树脂,其中苯甲酸为改性剂.研究了改性水性醇酸树脂及其氨基烤漆的配方及其制备工艺,并用红外光谱对树脂的结构进行了分析.通过理论计算结合实验确定改性水性醇酸树脂最终酸值为50~55,油度为35.讨论了油度、最终酸值、苯甲酸和偏苯三酸酐的加入量、脂肪油、多元醇对水性醇酸树脂及漆膜性能的影响,优选了助溶剂和中和剂,其中苯甲酸的质量分数为6%左右,偏苯三酸酐的质量分数为10%左右的树脂综合性能较好,且具有良好的水溶性和稳定性.用HMMM作交联树脂,可制得性能优异的水性醇酸氨基烤漆.性能测试表明:所制烤漆硬度可高达3H,光泽为95,附着力等其他技术指标均达到或超过溶剂型涂料的技术指标,可以直接用于铁制品上.%The waterborne alkyd resin was prepared through melting esterifaction and salified method, based on fatty oil, isophthalic acid ( IPA ), trimellitic anhydride ( TMA ), trimethylolpropane, and modified with benzoic acid(BA). The formulation and production technology of the modified waterborne alkyd resin and its alkyd-amino paint were investigated. The structure of waterborne alkyd resin was characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The final acid value of the modified waterborne alkyd resin was determined by theoretical studies in combination with some experiments. The final acid value of the modified waterborne alkyd resin was 50~55, it's oil degrees was 35. The influences of the oil degree, the final acid value, BA concentration, TMA content, fatty oil and polyol type on the properties of alkyd resin and coating film were discussed. Some experiments for the optimization of cosolvent and neutralizer were performed. The results showed that resin with good performance could be obtained when BA concentration was 6% and TMA

  9. The influence of the size and surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles on the rheological properties of alkyd resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoman Tijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spherical TiO2 particles of different size were dispersed in alkyd resin based on soybean oil. Four samples of TiO2 particles were used, three commercial and one obtained by acid catalyzed hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide. The size of the synthesized nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy. Surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles was performed with propyl gallate and lauryl gallate. The influence of the size of TiO2 nanoparticles, their concentration and type of the surface modification on the rheological properties of alkyd resin was investigated. The obtained results have shown that the viscosity of the prepared dispersions was higher than viscosity of the pure resin, it increases with decreasing particle diameter and decreases with frequency increase. Surface modified particles showed higher influence on the viscosity of alkyd resin than unmodified, because their hydrodynamic volume is higher due to the presence of the adsorbed gallates, leading to the increase of effective volume fraction of particles in dispersion. For the lowest TiO2 concentration, the viscosity was higher for sample modified with lauryl gallate, due to the higher thickness of the adsorbed layer. The increase of concentration, because of less dispersion stability of the particles modified with propyl gallate, leads to particles agglomeration. The presence of agglomerates, which was confirmed by a change in the slope of the functional dependence of storage modulus on loss modulus, leads to a rapid increase in viscosity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172062 i br. 45020

  10. Synthesis and curing of alkyd enamels based on ricinoleic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of an alkyd resin with a melamine-formaldehyde resin gives a cured enamel film with the flexibility of the alkyd constituent and the high chemical resistance and hardness of the melamine resin at the same time. The melamine resin is a minor constituent and plays the role of a crosslinking agent. In this paper, alkyd resins of high hydroxyl numbers based on trimethylolpropane, ricinoleic acid and phthalic anhydride were synthesized. Two alkyds having 30 and 40 wt% of ricinoleic acid were formulated by calculation on alkyd constant. Alkyds were characterized by FTIR and by the determination of acid and hydroxyl numbers. Then synthesized alkyds were made into baking enamels by mixing with melamine-formaldehyde resins (weight ratio of 70:30 based on dried mass. Two types of commercial melamine resins were used: threeisobutoxymethyl melamine-formaldehyde resin (TIMMF and hexamethoxymethyl melamine resin (HMMMF. Prepared alkyd/melamine resin mixtures were cured in a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC under non-isothermal mode. Apparent degree of curing as a function of temperature was calculated from the curing enthalpies. Kinetic parameters of curing were calculated using Freeman-Carroll method. TIMMF resin is more reactive with synthesized alkyds than HMMMF resin what was expected. Alkyd resin with 30 wt% of ricinoleic acid is slightly more reactive than alkyd with 40 wt% of ricinoleic acid, probably because it has the high contents of free hydroxyl and acid groups. The gel content, Tg, thermal stability, hardness, elasticity and impact resistance of coated films cured at 150°C for 60 min were measured. Cured films show good thermal stability since the onset of films thermal degradation determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA is observed at the temperatures from 281 to 329°C. Films based on alkyd 30 are more thermal stable than those from alkyd 40, with the same melamine resin. The type of alkyd resin has no significant

  11. The impact of epoxy acrylate-modified on the properties waterborne alkyd resin%环氧丙烯酸酯改性对水性醇酸树脂性能的影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁腾; 刘文济; 赵韬; 周显宏; 王锋; 涂伟萍

    2015-01-01

    以亚麻油、甘油、苯酐、顺酐为原料合成醇酸树脂,并利用环氧树脂、苯乙烯以及丙烯酸单体对所合成的醇酸树脂进行改性,得到一种环氧丙烯酸改性水性醇酸树脂。采用红外光谱表征了合成过程中每一步骤所得到的产物的结构,证明了成功在醇酸树脂链段上引入了改性链段;以热重分析和凝胶色谱考察了改性前后的醇酸树脂的性能,结果表明,偏酐与环氧丙烯酸改性后的醇酸树脂分子量及分散度都有所增加,其中环氧/AA/St改性的醇酸树脂分子量最大,分子量分布最宽,环氧/AA/St 改性的醇酸树脂耐热性能得到了改善。最后对漆膜性能进行比较,结果表明,在水分散性方面,环氧/AA/St 改性醇酸略弱于偏酐改性醇酸,产物粘度也相对较大,但是其稳定性、漆膜的附着力、耐水性以及耐盐水性能等与偏酐改性醇酸相比都明显得到了提高。%Waterborne alkyd resin(WAR )was synthesized by linsee d oil,glycerol,phthalic anhydride,maleic anhydride used as raw materials,while epoxy resin,styrene and acrylic monomers were used to modify the waterborne alkyd res-in,a epoxy acrylate modified waterborne alkyd resin was prepared.The structure of the products synthesized in each step were characterized with infrared spectroscopy,which proved that epoxy acrylate modified segment was introduced to the alkyd resin segment successfully.The properties of the waterborne alkyd resins before and after modified were stud-ied with Thermogravimetric Analysis and Gel Permeation Chromatography,the results showed that the molecular weight and the dispersity of the alkyd resin modified by TMA and epoxy acrylate had increased to some extent,respec-tively.the molecular weight of the alkyd resin modified by epoxy/AA/St was largest,and the molecular weight distri-bution was widest,while the heat resistance had improved greatly.Finally,the film properties of these three

  12. 丙烯酸改性醇酸树脂的合成、应用及发展趋势%Synthesis, Application and Development of Acrylate Modified Alkyd Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈剑棘

    2012-01-01

    An acrylate modified alkyd resin which has good drying property, color and gloss retention, good weather resistance and moderate cost was prepared by using Xinjiang local rich sunflower oil and petrochemical resources and by monoglyceride method. The applicalion field and development trend of acrylic acid modified alkyd resin were also described.%利用新疆本地丰富的葵花油和石化资源,通过单甘油酯法研制出一种干燥迅速,保光保色和耐候性好且成本适中的丙烯酸改性醇酸树脂。并对丙烯酸改性醇酸树脂的应用领域及发展趋势进行了阐述。

  13. 双组分聚氨酯涂料用改性醇酸树脂的研究%Research of Modified Alkyd Resin for Two-Component Polyurethane Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘清福; 徐朝华; 夏德慧

    2012-01-01

    The two-component polyurethane coatings were compounded with modified short oil alkyd resin as A component and isocyanate prepolymers as B component. The effect of A component on two-component polyurethane coatings were investigated. The results showed that coconut oil modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as gloss paint, yellowing resistance finish for its pure white color, yellowing resistance properties and good fullness. Castor oil modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as ordinary finish painted resin for its deep color, good fullness, lower drying rate and excellent flexility. Soybean oil modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as primer and matte paint for its fast drying rate. Synthetic fatty acid modification short oil alkyd resin could be used as high-grade finish painted resin for the pure while color, good level ability, slow-speeded drying, nice fullness and high hardness.%采用不同改性的短油度醇酸树脂作甲组分,异氰酸酯预聚物作乙组分,配制双组分聚氨酯涂料,探讨甲组分对双组分聚氨酯涂料性能的影响.结果表明,椰子油改性短油度醇酸树脂,颜色水白、耐黄变性能和丰满度好,可以作为高档的亮光清面漆、耐黄变的面漆用树脂;蓖麻油改性短油度醇酸树脂,颜色较深、丰满度较好、干燥速度慢及柔韧性好,可以作为普通的亮光面漆用树脂;豆油改性短油度醇酸树脂,干燥速度较快,应用于底漆和哑光面漆;合成脂肪酸改性短油度醇酸树脂,颜色水白、流平好、干燥速度慢、丰满度高及硬度高,可以作为高档的亮光面漆用树脂.

  14. Advances in acrylic-alkyd hybrid synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziczkowski, Jamie

    2008-10-01

    In situ graft acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were formed by polymerizing acrylic and acrylic-mixed monomers in the presence of alkyds by introduction of a free radical initiator to promote graft formation. Two-dimensional NMR, specifically gradient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), was used to clarify specific graft sites of the hybrid materials. Both individual and mixed-monomer systems were produced to determine any individual monomer preferences and to model current acrylic-alkyd systems. Different classes of initiators were used to determine any initiator effects on graft location. The 2D-NMR results confirm grafting at doubly allylic hydrogens located on the fatty acid chains and the polyol segment of the alkyd backbone. The gHMQC spectra show no evidence of grafting across double bonds on either pendant fatty acid groups or THPA unsaturation sites for any of the monomer or mixed monomer systems. It was also determined that choice of initiator has no effect on graft location. In addition, a design of experiments using response surface methodology was utilized to obtain a better understanding of this commercially available class of materials and relate both the chemical and physical properties to one another. A Box-Behnkin design was used, varying the oil length of the alkyd phase, the degree of unsaturation in the polyester backbone, and acrylic to alkyd ratio. Acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were reduced with an amine/water mixture. Hydrolytic stability was tested and viscoelastic properties were obtained to determine crosslink density. Cured films were prepared and basic coatings properties were evaluated. It was found that the oil length of the alkyd is the most dominant factor for final coatings properties of the resins. Acrylic to alkyd ratio mainly influences the resin properties such as acid number, average molecular weight, and hydrolytic stability. The degree of unsaturation in the alkyd backbone has minimal effects on resin and film

  15. Enamel, Silicone Alkyd Copolymer (Metric)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    shall consist of a copolymerized, air- drying, silicone modified long oil soya alkyd conforming to the requirements of table IV (see table VI...anhydride, percent by weight of nonvolatile vehicle Drying oil acids, percent by weight of nonvolatile vehicle Soya oil Rosin Phenolic resin...FED-STD-141 method Test Drying time 1/ Table V 4.6.17 Accelerated weathering 3.5.13 4061.2 D 523, D 569, D 2244, E 97, G 53 4.6.18 Soya

  16. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  17. The influence of Co/Sr and Fe/Sr driers on film formation of high solid alkyd coatings:

    OpenAIRE

    Berce, Peter; Godnjavec, Jerneja; Pirš, Barbara; Skale, Saša; Venturini, Peter; Zabret, Joži; Znoj, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    High solid (HS) alkyd resins with low amount of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were developed as the result of new VOC solvent directive that limit the amount of VOC in decorative paints. Due to specific chemical structure of HS alkyd resins and possible deterioration of some applicative properties the optimal combination of driers is an important subject of research. In our present work we studied the influence of Fe bispidon (Fe drier) and Co ethylhexanoate (Co drier) surface driers with ...

  18. Microcapsules Filled with a Palm Oil-Based Alkyd as Healing Agent for Epoxy Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshafiza Shahabudin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches to prolong the service lifespan of polymeric material is the development of self-healing ability by means of embedded microcapsules containing a healing agent. In this work, poly(melamine-urea-formaldehyde (PMUF microcapsules containing a palm oil-based alkyd were produced by polymerization of melamine resin, urea and formaldehyde that encapsulated droplets of the suspended alkyd particles. A series of spherical and free-flowing microcapsules were obtained. The chemical properties of core and shell materials were characterized by Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis showed a glass transition around −15 °C due to the alkyd, and a melting temperature at around 200 °C due to the shell. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results showed that the core and shell thermally degraded within the temperature range of 200–600 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM examination of the ruptured microcapsule showed smooth inner and rough outer surfaces of the shell. Flexural strength and microhardness (Vickers of the cured epoxy compound were not affected with the incorporation of 1%–3% of the microcapsules. The viability of the healing reactions was demonstrated by blending small amounts of alkyd with epoxy and hardener at different ratios. The blends could readily cure to non-sticky hard solids at room temperature and the reactions could be verified by ATR-FTIR.

  19. Influence of Nano Silica on Alkyd Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav

    . The present work centers on the reinforcement of alkyd binders emulsified in water and used in exterior wood coatings with nano silica. Raman spectroscopy was used throughout the study to maintain the reproducibility of results as it was found that colloidal nano silica can increase or decrease the speed...... the interactions with the alkyd polymer while keeping the nano filler stable in the water phase did not show further improvements of mechanical properties. The best results in respect to mechanical properties, as measured under static and dynamic loading, were obtained with the use of hexamethyldisilazane treated...... of premature cracking. In this study we have shown that increased stiffness in the first stage of coating lifetime is just one of the parameters and that behavior during the aging needs to be taken into account before drawing conclusions....

  20. FTIR study of ageing of fast drying oil colour (FDOC) alkyd paint replicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duce, Celia; Della Porta, Valentina; Tiné, Maria Rosaria; Spepi, Alessio; Ghezzi, Lisa; Colombini, Maria Perla; Bramanti, Emilia

    2014-09-01

    We propose ATR-FTIR spectroscopy for the characterization of the spectral changes in alkyd resin from the Griffin Alkyd Fast Drying Oil Colour range (Winsor & Newton), occurring over 550 days (∼18 months) of natural ageing and over six months of artificial ageing under an acetic acid atmosphere. Acetic acid is one of the atmospheric pollutants found inside museums in concentrations that can have a significant effect on the works exhibited. During natural ageing we observed an increase and broadening of the OH group band around 3300 cm-1 and an increase in bands in the region 1730-1680 cm-1 due to carbonyl stretching. We found a broad band around 1635 cm-1 likely due to Cdbnd O stretching vibrations of β dichetons. These spectral changes are the result of autooxidation reactions during natural ageing and crosslinking, which then form f alcohols and carbonyl species. The increase in absorbance at 1635 cm-1 was selected as a parameter to monitor the ageing process of paintings prepared with FDOC, without the need for any extractive procedure. FTIR spectra of paint replicas kept under an acetic acid atmosphere indicated the chemical groups involved in the reaction with acid, thus suggesting which spectral FTIR regions could be investigated in order to follow any degradation in real paintings. A red paint sample from a hyper-realistic artwork (“Racconta storie”, 2003) by the Italian painter Patrizia Zara was investigated by FTIR in order to evaluate the effects of 10 years natural ageing on alkyd colours. The results obtained suggested that after the end of chemical drying (autooxidation), alkyd colours are very stable.

  1. Bio-based alkyds by direct enzymatic bulk polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Hiep Dinh

    Alkyd coating systems have been largely used to preserve exterior wood applications as well as to provide them with a decorative appearance. In the current stage of sustainability concerns, there has been a stronger focus on development and production of bio-based coating components, heading toward....... Moreover, the studies on more sensitive monomers such as itaconic acid in enzymatic polymerization has showed that the method is useful in the production of alkyds from such building blocks, which could not be prepared by the corresponding classical boiling method at high temperature. Such systems...... that their functionalized surface markedly altered their solubility, but provided only moderate improvement in the mechanical properties of the alkyd....

  2. EXPOSURE AND EMISSION EVALUATIONS OF METHYL ETHYL KETOXIME (MEKO) IN ALKYD PAINTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small environmental chamber tests were conducted to characterize the emissions of a toxic chemical compound -- methylethylketoxime (MEKO) -- from three different alkyd paints. It was found that MEKO emissions occurred almost immediately after each alkyd paint was applied to a pin...

  3. Evaluation of Biosourced Alkyd Nanoemulsions as Drug Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Yong Teo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel oil-in-water (O/W nanoemulsions were formulated using short, medium, and long oil length alkyds synthesized from palm kernel oil by a two-stage alcoholysis-polyesterification reaction. Alkyd/surfactant/water ternary phase diagrams identified a composition of 1% alkyd, 9% Tween 80, and 90% water where spontaneous production of nanoemulsions occurred. The pH, droplet size, and zeta potential of all formulations were in the range of 6.4–6.6, 11–14 nm, and −6 mV to −8 mV, respectively. Rheological studies showed that the nanoemulsions displayed non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior at low shear rates up to 20 s−1 with conversion to Newtonian behavior above this shear rate. All nanoemulsions were found to be stable against phase separation on storage at 4°C and 25°C for three months. Short oil length alkyd nanoemulsions exhibited significantly higher stability compared with medium and long oil length alkyd nanoemulsions, as demonstrated by an absence of phase separation and only minor changes of droplet size on storage at an elevated temperature of 45°C for 3 months. The drug carrying capacity and storage stability of the nanoemulsions were assessed using phenytoin. The entrapment efficiency of alkyd nanoemulsions was in excess of 90% and loss of phenytoin content was restricted to less than 4% during storage of the nanoemulsions for three months at 4°C, 25°C, and 45°C. Taken together, these findings indicate that nanoemulsions prepared from palm kernel oil-based alkyds offer potential as nanocarriers for drug delivery applications.

  4. Effects of Nano Pigments on the Corrosion Resistance of Alkyd Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alkyd coatings embedded with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO pigments were prepared. The effects of nano pigments on anticorrosion performance of alkyd coatings were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS). For the sake of comparison, the corrosion protection of alkyd coatings with conventional TiO2 and ZnO was also studied. It was found that nano-TiO2 pigment improved the corrosion resistance as well as the hardness of alkyd coatings. The optimal amount of nano-TiO2 in a colored coating for corrosion resistance was 1%. The viscosities of alkyd coatings with nanometer TiO2 and ZnO and conventional TiO2 and ZnO pigments were measured and the relation between viscosity and anticorrosion performance was discussed.

  5. Comparative analysis of urethane-alkyd and water based coatings for exterior wood

    OpenAIRE

    Jaić, Milan

    2012-01-01

    The protection of wood elements in the exterior use, such as window frames and doors, can be performed with various type of coatings. The most diffused in use are conventional coatings – solvent-based (alkyd, modified alkyds etc.). Last years, because of the restrictive normative regarding the solvent emission, the trend of coatings development leads to the reduction of volatile organic components. Organic solvents are reduced or substituted by environmentally safer solvents such as water or ...

  6. A depth-resolved look at the network development in alkyd coatings by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marton, Beáta; Ven, van der Leo G.J.; Otto, Cees; Uzunbajakava, Natalia; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2005-01-01

    The formation of molecular networks related to the consumption of unsaturated carbon–carbon double bonds (CC) during oxidative drying of alkyd coating films incorporating unsaturated fatty acids was studied. The concentration of CC bonds was measured as a function of drying time and distance from th

  7. Influence of surface modified nano silica on alkyd binder before and after accelerated weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Nguyen, Hiep Dinh; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of nano fillers in exterior wood coatings is not straight forward. Influence on aging of polymer binder needs to be taken into account along with possible benefits that nano fillers can provide immediately after application. This study shows the influence of two differently modified...... hydrophobic nano silica on an alkyd binder for exterior wood coatings. One month after application, the highest strength and energy required to break the films was obtained with addition of 3% disilazane modified silica. Changes in tensile properties were accompanied with a small increase in glass transition...... temperature. However, the highest stability upon accelerated weathering, measured by ATR-IR and DMA, was for nano composites with the highest amount of nano filler. The reasons for the observed changes are discussed together with the appearance of a feature that is possibly a secondary relaxation of alkyd...

  8. 醇酸树脂反应釜的失效模式及其影响分析%The Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of Alkyd Reaction Kettle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒宜; 宋文华; 刘畅

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the definition and classification of FMEA,and concludes the steps of analysis. A preliminary discussion of quantitative criteria of FMEA has been put forward. This article introduces the function of each component of the alkyd reaction kettle, and according to the basic principles of failure mode and effects analysis and based on the specific situation of alkyd production, author discussed the potential failure modes of the alkyd reaction kettle .consequences of it could lead to and causes. Based on quantitative criteria of severity and occurrence and detection degrees and RPN value,author carried out quantitative analysis to each object,and give suggestions to the one which exceeded the standard. FMEA method for the alkyd resin in the reactor to make up for the current application would greatly endanger the existence of a comprehensive identification and analysis, and provide useful information and data to guide the production. It will provide strong data support to protect the safety of production,the development of the maintenance repair for decision-making and optimize the costeffectiveness ratio.%本文介绍了失效模式及其影响分析的定义、分类及基本构成,并概括了其分析步骤.文中介绍了醇酸树脂反应釜各部件的功能,讨论了醇酸树脂反应釜的潜在失效模式、可能导致的后果及其原因;依据严重度、频度数、不易探测度及风险顺序值的量化标准,对各个项目进行了量化分析,对超出标准的项目提出了整改措施.对于FMEA方法 在醇酸树脂反应釜中的应用会大大弥补当前存在的危害进行全面的识别和分析,并提供有效的信息和数据指导生产,能够为保障安全生产、制定维护维修决策以及优化成本效益比率提供强有力的数据支持.

  9. Volatile of alkyd varnish inhibits the expression of neuronal growth associated protein-43 in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Huang; Hongxia Wang; Wei Zou

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that coating materials used commonly in the interior decoration contain volatile of alkyd varnish, which has obvious effects on the structure of endothelial cells of respiratory tract.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of volatile of alkyd varnish in the decoration materials on the expression of neuronal growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in mice, and to analyze the influencing mechanism of interior environmental pollutants for brain mechanism.DESIGN: A randomized grouping and controlled experiment.SETTING: College of Life Science, Liaoning Normal University.MATERIALS: This study was carried out in the College of Life Science, Liaoning Normal University between February and December 2006. Twenty one-month-old Kunming mice, weighing (20 + 2) g, male and female in half, were involved in this study. The involved mice were divided into 2 groups by random lot method: chronic poisoning group (n =10) and control group (n =10). Alkyd varnish used commonly for house decoration was purchased from Furnishing World of Liberation Plaza of Dalian City. Alkyd varnish used commonly for house decoration was purchased from Furnishing World of Liberation Plaza of Dalian City. Rabbit GAP-43 polyclonal antibody, rat P -actin monoclonal antibody, goat anti-rat IgG-HRP and goat ant-rabbit IgG-HRP were purchased from Boster Company (Wuhan). ECL was purchased from Amersham Company (Britain), other related reagents were all purchased from Sigma Company and Promega Company(USA). All the other reagents were home-made analytical pure.METHODS:①Poisoning test: The mice were poisoned by static inhalation poisoning method. Mice in the chronic poisoning group were placed in the 0.024 m3 poisoning cabinet. Alkyd varnish (8g,3-time dosage of house decoration) was daily spread once on a 40 cm×21 cm kraft paper evenly. Mice were poisoned for 14 hours within 3 weeks successively. Mice in the control group were placed in the same environment without alkyd

  10. CAPSTONE REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF A STANDARD TEST METHOD FOR VOC EMISSIONS FROM INTERIOR LATEX PAINT AND ALKYD PAINTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives details of a small-chamber test method developed by the EPA for characterizing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior latex and alkyd paints. Current knowledge about VOC, including hazardous air pollutant, emissions from interior paints generated...

  11. Discrimination of aromas from several kinds of alcohol using synthetic-resin-film-coated quartz resonator smell sensor; Gosei jushimaku wo tofushita suisho shindoshishiki nioi sensor ni yoru sake no shurui hanbetsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Morita, T. Dogami, N.; Nanto, H. [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Ishikawa (Japan); Doguchi, Y. [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa Prefecture, Ishikawa (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    Transient response curves for aromas from several kinds of alcohol such as Fruit Liquor (8%), Wine (14%), Japanese Sake (15%) and Whisky (43%) are observed using quartz-crystal-resonator gas sensor coated with synthetic-resin-film(acrylic resin, alkyd resin or urethane resin). The pattern recognition analysis using principal component analysis or neural network analysis is carried out using four parameters which characterize the transient response curves. The recognition probability of neural network for four kinds of alcohol is 100% for 20 trials. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. 改性硅树脂的研究进展%Research Development of Modified Silicone Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏元博; 安秋凤

    2015-01-01

    The types and properties of the modified silicone resin were reviewed. Preparations of alkyd resin, polyester resin, epoxy resin, phenolic resin, acrylic ester, polyurethane and boric acid, and their ap-plications in various fields were introduced. The prospects for the future research of modified silicone resin were introduced.%综述了改性硅树脂的种类和性能,介绍了醇酸树脂、聚酯树脂、环氧树脂、酚醛树脂、丙烯酸酯树脂、聚氨酯以及硼酸改性硅树脂的制备方法及其在不同领域的应用,并对改性硅树脂的未来研究方向进行了展望。

  13. Preparation and properties of environmental-friendly coatings based on carboxymethyl cellulose nitrate ester & modified alkyd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongtao; Shao, Ziqiang; Zhao, Ming; Zhou, Zhenwen

    2016-02-10

    Amphipathic coating basic film-forming material carboxymethyl cellulose nitrate ester (CMCN) was synthesized and characterizations of CMCN with different ratio of functional groups were studied. Ratios of functional groups on each repeating units of CMCN have great importance in the decision of CMCN properties using as an amphipathic coating basic film-forming material and ratios of functional groups were the most concerned of the study. Ratios of functional groups on each repeating units of CMCN were measured by elemental analyzer and calculated. Series of experiments were conducted using different ratios of functional groups of CMCN. Thermal properties of CMCN were measured by FT-IR and TG. Densities of CMCN powders were measured. Aqueous coatings based on CMCN/alkyd (after chemical modified by coconut oil) were prepared and morphology & rheology of CMCN hydrophilic dispersions were measured using an Anton-Paar-Strasse 20A-8054 Graz analyzer. Contact angles between films based on CMCN and deionized water were recorded. Other properties of films were measured. CMCN with the etherification of carboxymethyl groups at 0.35-0.40, nitrate ester groups at 1.96-2.19 and hydroxyl groups at 0.46-0.64 per d-glucose was considered as the best film forming material.

  14. Epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, P G

    1999-01-01

    Epoxy resins have an extraordinarily broad range of commercial applications, especially as protective surface coatings and adhesives. Epoxy resin systems include combinations of epoxy monomers, hardeners, reactive diluents, and/or a vast array of other additives. As a result, an epoxy resin system may have a number of chemical ingredients with the potential for attendant health hazards. Most, but not all, of these health hazards arise in the occupational setting. The most frequent adverse effects are irritation or allergic mechanisms involving the dermal and respiratory systems. Sensitization usually is caused by low molecular weight or short-chain compounds. This review discusses the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of epoxy resin-related adverse health effects.

  15. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  16. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  17. Study of Water Resistance of Wood Coated with Epoxy Resin%环氧树脂胶黏剂涂覆木材的防水性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨友龙; 尹业高; 熊光晶

    2013-01-01

    为提高木构件的增强与防护效率,提出将粘贴增强纤维用环氧树脂(epoxy)胶黏剂兼作木构件表面防水剂的思路.选择3种木材小试样,分别涂覆1~2层Epoxy胶黏剂或醇酸清漆,进行防水性能对比试验,探讨了试样的吸水动力学特性.结果表明,Epoxy胶黏剂兼具良好的防水功能,涂覆Epoxy胶黏剂的试样其吸水率比醇酸清漆组试样低50%以上.Epoxy胶黏剂可作为高质量的木构件防水剂.%In order to increase the efficiency of strengthening and protecting of wood members, a thought for taking the epoxy resin(used for gluing fiber sheets) as a surface water repellent for wood members was proposed. Small wood samples were made from three wood species, and coated with one or two layers of epoxy resin and alkyd varnish, respectively. A comparative experiment study on water resistance of the different samples was carried out. The characteristics of the water absorption dynamics of the various samples were investigated. The results show that the epoxy resin has an excellent water resistance, and the water absorption of the samples coated with epoxy resin is over 50% lower than that of those coated with alkyd varnish. The epoxy resin can be used as a high-quality water repellent for wood members.

  18. 醇酸改性硝化纤维素水乳液的制备研究%Preparation of Alkyd Resin Modified Waterborne Nitrocellulose Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包汇川; 傅和青; 曾朝霞; 燕冲; 陈焕钦

    2007-01-01

    采用醇酸树脂相反转乳化法制备了硝化纤维素乳液.分析了反相乳液聚合过程中电导率的变化规律,研究了乳化剂HLB值、乳化剂用量和乳化温度等因素对乳液临界含水量Rf值及其稳定性的影响.

  19. 自干型水溶性醇酸树脂的配方设计%Formulating of Recipe of Self-Drying Water-Soluble Alkyd Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘毅; 阚成友; 刘德山

    2004-01-01

    建立了适合于水溶性醇酸树脂配方设计的通用程序.讨论了醇酸树脂的基本参数K、油度L、醇超量R及酸值Sv对醇酸树脂干燥时间和硬度的影响.结果表明当K=1、L=50%、R=1.2时,醇酸树脂膜有最短的干燥时间,所得膜的硬度也最高;Sv越大,干燥时间越长,但是膜的硬度越大.

  20. Study on the synthesis of air dry water-based alkyd resin%自干型水性醇酸树脂的合成研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周显宏; 袁腾; 赵韬; 王锋; 涂伟萍

    2014-01-01

    采用偏苯三酸酐(TMA)制备了水性醇酸树脂,通过涂膜性能测试及红外光谱分析研究了反应中各项因素对水性醇酸树脂性能的影响.结果表明,最佳的反应条件如下:采用亚麻油、甘油、邻苯二甲酸酐(PA)、TMA为原料,油与甘油物质的量比1∶2.07,油度45%~50%,醇超量7%,最终酸值(KOH) 50~55 mg/g.醇解催化剂选用LiOH,添加质量分数为油量0.04%.PA的酯化温度从180℃开始以20℃/h的速度升温至235℃,TMA的酯化温度为170~180℃.助溶剂选用丙二醇甲醚,中和剂选用N,N'-二甲基乙醇胺,中和度控制在100%,pH约在7.5 ~8左右.最终得到了棕色透明的水性醇酸树脂,其干燥性能、光泽、硬度、柔韧性等性能较好.

  1. Preparation of Amino Alkyd Varnish Based on Waste Cooking Oils%采用废弃食用油制备氨基醇酸浸渍漆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐旭; 黄超; 饶保林

    2016-01-01

    采用酸化法对废弃食用油进行脱胶处理,采用活性白土进行脱臭脱色处理,并采用精制后的废弃食用油制备氨基醇酸浸渍漆,探讨了精制处理前后废弃食用油理化性能的变化和氨基醇酸浸渍漆的性能.结果表明:废弃食用油经过精制处理后色泽变浅,臭味基本消除,碘值和酸值等理化性能变化不大,氨基醇酸浸渍漆的性能可以达到JB/T 9559—1999标准的技术指标要求.不同来源的餐饮废油酸值差别较大,有些酸值甚至超过90 mgKOH/g.餐饮废油的酸值过大虽然会对醇解反应有一定影响,但通过适当调整反应条件,仍可以使醇解物的容忍度达到中控指标要求.%Waste cooking oils were treated for degumming with acidification method, and for deodorizing and decolorizing with atlapulgite in this paper. An amino alkyd varnish was prepared based on the puri-fied waste cooking oils. The physical and chemical properties of the waste cooking oils before and after purification treatment and the performance of the amino alkyd varnish were discussed. The results show that after purification treatment, the color of the waste cooking oil becomes shallow, the stink basically disappears, and the iodine value and acid value change little. The performance of the amino alkyd var-nish can completely meet the technical requirements of industry standard JB/T 9559—1999. The acid value of waste cooking oils from different recycling sources changes greatly, and the acid value of some waste cooking oils is greater than 90 mgKOH/g. The overlarge acid value may affect the alcoholysis reac-tion, but the tolerance of alcoholysate still can satisfy the central control requirements by adjusting the reaction condition.

  2. Corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel with alkyd paint coatings composited with submicron-structure types polypyrrole-modified nano-size alumina and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely, Andras, E-mail: andras.gergely@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, 1025 Budapest (Hungary); Paszti, Zoltan; Hakkel, Orsolya; Drotar, Eszter [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, 1025 Budapest (Hungary); Mihaly, Judith [Institute of Molecular Pharmacology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, 1025 Budapest (Hungary); Kalman, Erika [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, 1025 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-11-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alumina/carbon nanotube (CNT) supported polypyrrole (PPy) particles were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Various paint compositions with alkyd binder were immersion tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alumina-supported PPy based coating provided steel protection in NaCl solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyelectrolyte modified CNT embedded coating afforded long-term stable protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sulphonated CNT loaded coating indicated firm corrosion resistance in HCL solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results are interpreted on the basis of nano and microstructure of the particles. - Abstract: This paper is focused on studying corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel with alkyd paint coatings comprising nano-size alumina and either polystyrene-sulphonate (PSS) modified or sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) supported polypyrrole (PPy). Single layer coatings (in thickness of 40 {+-} 5 {mu}m) comprising PPy deposited alumina and PSS modified MWCNT supported PPy afforded viable protection during the 1 M sodium chloride test. The coatings containing PSS modified and weakly sulphonated MWCNTs (at volume fractions of 9.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}) with PPy volume fractions of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} provided effective corrosion prevention during the 1 M sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid solution tests. While inhibitor particles were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, corrosion products formed at the paint-steel interface were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Apart from the electron microscopy observations, rheology study of three-dimensional structure of the inhibitor particles was performed in dispersions at similar compositions to those used for the paint formulations. Thus, protection mechanism relating to both types of immersion tests is discussed in terms of

  3. Resin Catalyst Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Asaoka

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction: What are resin catalyst hybrids? There are typically two types of resin catalyst. One is acidic resin which representative is polystyrene sulfonic acid. The other is basic resin which is availed as metal complex support. The objective items of this study on resin catalyst are consisting of pellet hybrid, equilibrium hybrid and function hybrid of acid and base,as shown in Fig. 1[1-5].

  4. Influence of alkyd varnish on combustion behavior and smoke property of decorative wood%醇酸清漆对典型装饰木材燃烧特性和生烟特性的影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜龙; 徐志胜; 刘顶立

    2015-01-01

    为了探讨醇酸清漆对典型装饰木材火灾危险性的影响,利用热重分析、差热分析、木垛法、隧道法和塑料烟密度仪对装饰木材的燃烧性能、热解特性和生烟特性进行了分析。结果表明,木材及其表面涂覆的醇酸清漆主要热失重发生在200~500℃,其中木材的热解过程为先吸热、后放热的过程,而醇酸清漆为吸热过程。与未涂覆清漆的木材相比,清漆使木材在燃烧过程中质量损失、有焰燃烧时间及火焰传播比值明显增加。同时,醇酸清漆的烯烃结构和苯环结构还导致木材的比光密度、质量光密度增大,烟气危害增大,从而进一步增大了火灾危险性。此外,装饰木材的生烟特性还受火焰条件和辐射功率的影响,高辐射功率和有焰条件下材料的比光密度和质量光密度均较低。%To explore the influence of alkyd varnishon fire risk of decorative wood, the thermo-gravimetric analyzer, differential scanning calorimeter, wood stack method, tunnel method and plastic smoke density tester were used to analyze the flammability, pyrolysis characteristics and smoke properties of thedecorative materials. The results show that the loss of maximum mass of the wood and alkyd varnish occurs in the range of 200~500℃. In the pyrolysis process, the wood exhibits an obvious endothermic process and then an exothermic one, while the alkyd varnish ex-hibits an obvious endothermic process only. Compared with the wood without alkyd varnish, the mass loss, during of flaming and fire spread ratio of the wood consisted alkyd varnish are increased significantly. Otherwise, due to the olefin structure and benzene ring structure of alkyd varnish, both the special optical density and mass optical density of the decorative wood consisted alkyd varnish are increased. Moreover, external heat flux and ignition source all affect the smoke properties of the decorative wood. The high external heat flux and application of

  5. [Radiopacity of composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburús, J R

    1990-01-01

    The author studied the radiopacity of six composite resins, submitted to radiographic examination in standardized conditions, only with kilovoltage variations. Along with resins it was radiographed an aluminium penetrometer, to compare their optical densities. The results showed that kilovoltagem variations interfered in optical densities of the resins, being more pronounced in 50-55, 55-60 and 60-65 kilovoltages. Despite this, the relations of optical densities as compared with that of penetrometer steps kept unaltered most fo the kilovoltages used.

  6. RESEARCH ON IMPROVED EPOXY RESINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    another ’million-modulus’ epoxy resin. Cast resin properties from a series of epoxy resins hardened with several aromatic diamines are reported, but these data are sufficient to advance only speculative conclusions. (Author)

  7. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity.

  8. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  9. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  10. 水性丙烯酸铝粉浸涂漆的研究%Study on Waterborne Acrylic Resin Aluminium Dipping Paint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀苗; 董红专

    2001-01-01

    A waterborne aluminium dipping paint has been prepared based on non- water soluble melamine - alkyd resin as grafting precursor, diluted with water- soluble organic solvents,then graft polymerized with acrylic monomers and styrene, mixedwith special aluminium pigment and additives. The influences of types of melamine resins, initiators and additives on film properties are discussed. Application guides are also given.%以非水溶性氨基树脂为接枝聚合母体,先将其用水溶性有机溶剂配成稀溶液,然后加入丙烯酸单体及苯乙烯混合物进行接枝聚合,所得的树脂中加入特种铝粉及各种助剂,配制成水性铝粉浸涂漆。讨论了氨基树脂类型、引发剂、助剂等对漆膜性能的影响,并介绍了施工注意事项。

  11. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  12. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  13. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  14. TDI/TMP Prepolymer Cured Air Dry Alkyd/Melamine Resin Coatings%TDI/TNP 预聚物固化型自干氨基醇酸树脂漆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    热合曼

    2000-01-01

    讨论了葵花油改性醇酸树脂的合成、TDI/TMP预聚物固化剂的制备及氨基树脂的选择,确定了氨基树脂和醇酸树脂与固化剂的配比,简介了自干型氨基漆的技术指标.

  15. Dry PMR-15 Resin Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Roberts, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    Shelf lives of PMR-15 polymides lengthened. Procedure involves quenching of monomer reactions by vacuum drying of PRM-15 resin solutions at 70 to 90 degree F immediately after preparation of solutions. Absence of solvent eliminates formation of higher esters and reduces formation of imides to negligible level. Provides fully-formulated dry PMR-15 resin powder readily dissolvable in solvent at room temperature immediately before use. Resins used in variety of aerospace, aeronautical, and commercial applications.

  16. Resin regeneration device for condensate desalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, Yoshihiro [Toshiba Engineering Co. Ltd., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Hirose, Yuki

    1998-07-28

    The present invention provides a resin regeneration device for a condensate desalter of a nuclear power plant. Namely, both anionic and cationic exchange resins are supplied in a mixed state from a forwarding water desalting tower to an anionic resin regeneration tower. In the anionic resin generation tower, the resin is once separated to an anionic exchange region layer, a mixed resin layer and an cationic exchange resin layer in this order from the upper portion by water injected from a stirring water injection tube disposed at the bottom. Then, water is injected from a developing water injection tube disposed at the lower portion of the mixed resin layer to develop the cationic exchange resin layer and the mixed resin layer to the upper portion of the cationic resin regeneration tower. Subsequently, the amount of the injection of the developing water is reduced to such a flow rate that only the anionic exchange resin is precipitated. Then, a cationic exchange resin layer is formed at the upper portion and an anion exchange resin layer is formed at the lower portion of the developing water injection tube of the cationic resin regeneration tower. The anionic exchange resin is transferred to the anionic exchange resin regeneration tower in this state. According to the present invention, the mixed resin layer can be separated to anionic and cationic exchange resins easily and reliably. (I.S.)

  17. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  18. Brisk Demand of Neopentyl Glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Neopentyl glycol (NPG) is an important chemical raw material. It is mainly used to produce saturated polyester resin for powder coatings,unsaturated polyester resin, polyester polyols, esters for synthetic lubricants, plasticizers and alkyd resins.

  19. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nylon resins. 177.1500 Section 177.1500 Food and... Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1500 Nylon resins. The nylon resins listed in paragraph (a) of... packaging food, subject to the provisions of this section: (a) The nylon resins are manufactured...

  20. 21 CFR 177.2440 - Polyethersulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethersulfone resins. 177.2440 Section 177.2440... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2440 Polyethersulfone resins. Polyethersulfone resins... the purpose of this section, polyethersulfone resins are: (1)...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polysulfone resins. 177.1655 Section 177.1655 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1655 Polysulfone resins. Polysulfone resins... purpose of this section, polysulfone resins are: (1)...

  2. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this... the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as components...

  3. Indirect resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ′indirect resin composites,′ composite inlays,′ and ′fiber-reinforced composites.′

  4. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    . Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to epoxy resin monomer (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; MW 340) among patients with suspected contact dermatitis and relate this to occupation and work-related consequences. Patients/methods. The dataset comprised 20 808 consecutive dermatitis...... in an educational programme. Conclusion. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required....

  5. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  6. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  7. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  8. EPOXY RESIN TOUGHENED BY THERMOPLASTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zengli; SUN Yishi

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of tough ductile heatresisting thermoplastic, namely bisphenol A polysulfone (PSF) and polyethersulfone (PES) were used to toughen thermoset epoxy resin. A systematic study on the relationship between the molecular weight and the terminal group of the thermoplastic modifier and the fracture toughness of the modified resin was carried out. The morphology of PSF modified epoxy resin was surveyed. With the same kind of PSF the structure of the epoxy resin and the toughening effect of PSF was also investigated. The fractography of PSF, particle modified epoxy was examined in detail with SEM. The contribution of every possible energy absorption process has been discussed. Crack pinning mechanism seems to be the most important toughening mechanism for tough ductile thermoplastic PSF particle modified epoxy system.

  9. Karakteristik Komposit Resin Berkemampuan Mengalir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resin composites as posterior restoratives has markedly increased over the past decade. The patients demand for better esthetics, concerns related to possible mercury toxicity from amalgam and improvements in resin composite materials have significantly contributed the popularity of these materials. Early problems related to composites included excessive wear, less of anatomic form, post operative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal leakage. Marginal adaptation still remains an unavoidable problem for composite restoration, especially at the gingival wall of cervical or Class II restoration. In an attempt to improve marginal sealing, many techniques and lining materials have been designed. To reduce stress generated by polymerization shrinkage, applying and curing of resin composites in layers is often recommended. Using a thick adhesive layer or low-viscosity resin may, due to its elastic properties, serve as a flexible intermediate layer and compensate for the polymerization stress created in resin composite. Flowable composites were created by retaining the same small particle size of traditional hybrid composite but reducing the filler content and allowing the increased resin to reduce the viscosity of the mixture. Flowable composites were introduced in 1996 as liners, fissure sealants and also in tunnel preparations. They have been suggested for Class I, II, III and V cavity restorations, preventive resin restorations and composite, porcelain and amalgam repairing. Their usage as a liner under high filled resins in posterior restorations has been shown to improve the adaptation of composites and effectively achieve clinically acceptable results. This article attempts to give a broad characteristics of different types of flowable composites. 

  10. Karakteristik Komposit Resin Berkemampuan Mengalir

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-01-01

    The use of resin composites as posterior restoratives has markedly increased over the past decade. The patients demand for better esthetics, concerns related to possible mercury toxicity from amalgam and improvements in resin composite materials have significantly contributed the popularity of these materials. Early problems related to composites included excessive wear, less of anatomic form, post operative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal leakage. Marginal adaptation still remains...

  11. New Low Cost Resin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-31

    DGEBA ). 30 % of the epoxy groups of RDGE were reacted with the dihydroxyl acid and resulted 3.2 wt% phosphorous and a new epoxide equivalent weight...of 207. Adducts were also made with DGEBA and the dihydroxyl phosphorous based acid but resulted in a substantial increased viscosity and therefore...70 wt% with a standard DGEBA resin, this material accelerated the epoxy reaction too much to make a VaRTM processable resin. Due to the processing

  12. THE SYNTHESIS OF MODIFIED DIPHENYL OXIDE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOMingfei; LIUZhifang; 等

    2002-01-01

    Modified diphenyl oxide resin was synthesized by co-polymerization of unsaturated acid and diphenyl oxide derivants.And then modified bismaleimide resin and expoxide linear phenolic resin were added into modified diphenyl oxide resin to co-polymerized and modify once more.The system was applied in composites.Their properties wrer investigated and found that they met the requirements as a heat-resisting adhesive.

  13. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  14. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  15. 21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyetherimide resin. 177.1595 Section 177.1595... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1595 Polyetherimide resin. The polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely used as an article or component of an...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyaryletherketone resins. 177.1556 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1556 Polyaryletherketone resins. The poly...) resins (CAS Reg. No. 55088-54-5 and CAS Reg. No. 60015-05-6 and commonly referred to...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyarylate resins. 177.1555 Section 177.1555 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1555 Polyarylate resins. Polyarylate resins... contact with food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identity. Polyarylate...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1560 - Polyarylsulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyarylsulfone resins. 177.1560 Section 177.1560... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1560 Polyarylsulfone resins. Polyarylsulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 79293-56-4) may be safely used as articles or components of articles...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section... Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  1. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and..., Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used... polymer obtained by polymerizing terpene hydrocarbons derived from wood. It has a softening point of...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane...) For the purpose of this section, polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of...

  3. [Epoxy resin systems and contact dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietranek, Jolanta Eliza

    2007-01-01

    Contact dermatitis is the major chronic skin disease that represents a global health problem. Its prevalence has been significant increasing in the latest decades. Contact dermatitis substantially alters the social life of patients and affects their work productivity. Epoxy resin systems are a frequent cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Epoxy resins have an extremely wide range of commercial applications. Epoxy resin systems include combinations of epoxy monomers, hardeners, reactive diluents, and/or a vast array of other additives. In occupational settings, sensitization occurs not only to resins, but also to hardeners and reactive diluents. In this article adverse effects of epoxy resin systems are discussed.

  4. Stochastic resin transfer molding process

    CERN Document Server

    Park, M

    2016-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of stochastic resin transfer molding process, which are formulated as random moving boundary problems. We study their properties, analytically in the one-dimensional case and numerically in the two-dimensional case. We show how variability of time to fill depends on correlation lengths and smoothness of a random permeability field.

  5. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin d

  6. [Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Okamoto, F; Ogata, K; Sato, T

    1989-02-01

    Recently, microwave-cured denture base resin was developed, and the resin solved the problem of internal porosity which had been generated by curing the conventional denture base resins with microwave irradiation. In this study, the dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin was compared with that of other denture base resins, such as pour-type resin, heat-cured resin and heat-shock resin. From the experiment, the following results were obtained. 1. Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin was better than that of heat-cured resin and heat-shock resin, and was similar to that of pour-type resin. 2. Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin by slow cooling method and rapid cooling method was almost the same. Those findings suggest that microwave-cured denture base resin is valuable in clinic.

  7. Photoacoustic analysis of dental resin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloiano, E. C. R.; Rocha, R.; Martin, A. A.; da Silva, M. D.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we use the photoacoustic technique to monitor the curing process of diverse dental materials, as the resins chemically activated (RCA). The results obtained reveal that the composition of a determined RCA significantly alters its activation kinetics. Photoacoustic data also show that temperature is a significant parameter in the activation kinetics of resins. The photoacoustic technique was also applied to evaluate the polymerization kinetics of photoactivated resins. Such resins are photoactivated by incidence of continuous light from a photodiode. This leads to the polymerization of the resin, modifying its thermal properties and, consequently, the level of the photoacoustic signal. Measurements show that the polymerization of the resin changes the photoacoustic signal amplitude, indicating that photoacoustic measurements can be utilized to monitor the polymerization kinetic and the degree of polymerization of photoactivated dental resins.

  8. Resin Diterpenes from Austrocedrus chilensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Rachel Olate

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen diterpenes belonging to the labdane, abietane and isopimarane skeleton classes were isolated from the resin of the Chilean gymnosperm Austrocedrus chilensis and identified by spectroscopic and spectrometric methods. The diterpene 12-oxo-labda-8(17,13E-dien-19 oic acid is reported for the first time as a natural product and 14 diterpenes are reported for the first time for the species.

  9. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  10. Environmentally Compliant Vinyl Ester Resin (VER) Composite Matrix Resin Derived from Renewable Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    UV Ultraviolet VARTM vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding VE vinyl ester VER QNA vinyl ester resin QinetiQ North America -v...tempera- ture using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) into massive carbon-fiber- reinforced composite structures such as ship hulls and...weapons system components using a low-cost vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded ( VARTM ) process. Steps to commercialize the pro- cess would

  11. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-01-01

    The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS) systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium co...

  12. Epoxy Resins Modified with Vegetable Oils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Czub

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The application of modified natural oils, nontoxic, biodegradable and renewable materials, for the modification and the synthesis of epoxy resins were presented. Firstly, the application of epoxidized vegetable oils (soybean, rapeseed, linseed and sunflower):as reactive diluents for epoxy resins was proposed and studied[1-2]. Viscosity reducing ability of epoxidized oils was tested in the compositions with Bisphenol A based low-molecular-weight epoxy resins. The rheological behaviour of the mi...

  13. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Saurabh K Gupta; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies h...

  14. Relative Molecular Mass Distribution of BG Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Benzoguanamine-formaldehyde (BG-F) resins are a class of amino resins, which are important cross-linking agents for epoxy, alkyol and acrylic resins, etc. The cross-linking performance is the best one when the polymerization degree is 2-4. This paper discusses the effects of the pH value for polycondensation and the formaldehyde to benzoguanamine mole ratio in a methanol system, and compares the relative molecular mass distribution using the Flory statistics method.

  15. Curing Mechanism of Condensed Polynuclear Aromatic Resin and Thermal Stability of Cured Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shibin; Sun Qiqian; Wang Yuwei; Wu Mingbo; Zhang Zailong

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the thermal stability of condensed polynuclear aromatic (COPNA) resin synthesized from vacuum residue, 1,4-benzenedimethanol was added to cure COPNA resin. The curing mechanism was investigated by pro-ton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, solid carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry and Fourier trans-form infrared spectroscopy. Microstructures of the uncured and the cured COPNA resins were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The thermal stability of COPNA resins before and after curing was tested by thermo-gravimetric analysis. The element composition of the cured COPNA resin heated at different temperatures was analyzed by an element analyzer. The results showed that the uncured COPNA resin reacted with the cross-linking agent during the cur-ing process, and the curing mechanism was conifrmed to be the electrophilic substitution reaction. Compared with the un-cured COPNA resin, the cured COPNA resin had a smooth surface, well-ordered and streamlined sheet structure with more crystalline solids, better molecular arrangement and orientation. The weight loss process of the uncured and cured COPNA resins was divided into three stages. Carbon residue of the cured COPNA resin was 41.65%at 600℃, which was much higher than 25.02%of the uncured COPNA resin, which indicated that the cured COPNA resin had higher thermal stability.

  16. Damping Properties of Flexible Epoxy Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiang; LIU Hanxing; OUYANG Shixi

    2008-01-01

    Amino-terminated polyethers and amino-terminated polyurethane were used as curing agent to cure the epoxy resin together and get a series of cured products. The damping properties of the composites were studied by DMA test at different measurement frequencies. Damping mechanical tests show that the flexible epoxy resin has higher loss factor than common epoxy. The highest loss factor reaches 1.57. Also the height and position of loss factor peak of the flexible epoxy resin varies by changing the content of amino-terminated polyethers. Results shows that the flexible epoxy resin can be used as damping polymer materials at room temperature or in common frequency range.

  17. Resin composites in minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive dentistry will provide favorable conditions for the use of composite resin. However, a number of factors must be considered when placing composite resins in conservatively prepared cavities, including: aspects on the adaptation of the composite resin to the cavity walls; the use of adhesives; and techniques for obtaining adequate proximal contacts. The clinician must also adopt an equally conservative approach when treating failed restorations. The quality of the composite resin restoration will not only be affected by the outline form of the preparation but also by the clinician's technique and understanding of the materials.

  18. Advanced resin systems for graphite epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Jayarajan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The value of resin/carbon fiber composites as lightweight structures for aircraft and other vehicle applications is dependent on many properties: environmental stability, strength, toughness, resistance to burning, smoke produced when burning, raw material costs, and complexity of processing. A number of woven carbon fiber and epoxy resin composites were made. The epoxy resin was commercially available tetraglycidylmethylene dianiline. In addition, composites were made using epoxy resin modified with amine and carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer. Strength and toughness in flexure as well as oxygen index flammability and NBS smoke chamber tests of the composites are reported.

  19. Dentine sealing provided by smear layer/smear plugs vs. adhesive resins/resin tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Sword, Jeremy; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Sadek, Fernanda T; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of five experimental resins, which ranged from hydrophobic to hydrophilic blends, to seal acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. The experimental resins (R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5) were evaluated as neat bonding agents (100% resin) or as solutions solvated with absolute ethanol (70% resin/30% ethanol). Fluid conductance was measured at 20 cm H(2)O hydrostatic pressure after sound dentine surfaces were: (i) covered with a smear layer; (ii) acid-etched; or (iii) bonded with neat or solvated resins, which were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. In general, the fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine was significantly higher than that of smear layer-covered dentine. However, when the most hydrophobic neat resins (R1 and R2) were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with ethanol, the fluid conductance was as low as that produced by smear layers. The fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine saturated with ethanol was significantly lower than for resin bonded to water-saturated dentine, except for resin R4. Application of more hydrophobic resins may provide better sealing of acid-etched dentine if the substrate is saturated with ethanol instead of with water.

  20. MODIFICATION OF X-5 RESIN AND ADSORPTION PROPERTY OF THE MODIFIED RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Three polymeric adsorbents with hydrogen bonding acceptors, methylamine,N-methyl-acetamide and aminotri(hydroxymethyl)methane modified resins are synthesized fromchloromethylated X-5 resin. Adsorption isotherms of phenol and theophylline onto the three modifiedresins and the original X-5 resin from aqueous solution are measured. The results show thatadsorption of compounds with hydrogen bonding donor onto methylamine and N-methylacetamidemodified resins is enhanced as compared with that onto X-5 resin, and adsorption mechanismbetween the adsorbents and the adsorbates is mainly based on hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicinteraction. While adsorption of compounds with hydrogen bonding donor ontoaminotri(hydroxymethyl)methane modified resin is lowered as compared with that onto X-5 resin, andadsorption mechanism between the adsorbent and the adsorbates is mainly based on hydrophobicinteraction.

  1. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gula, M.; Harvey, J.

    1996-12-31

    Shortcomings of chelating resins have been addressed by a new class of ion exchange resins called dual mechanism bifunctional polymers (DMBPs). DMBPs use hydrophilic cation exchange ligands with rapid uptake kinetics and use chelating ligands for selectivity for one or more metals; result is a resin that quickly recognizes and removes targeted metals from waste, remediation, and process streams. Eichrom`s Diphonix {reg_sign} resin is the first DMBP to be widely released as a commercial product; it is polystyrene based. Objective of this work is to synthesize commercial quantities of a silica-based ion exchange resin with the same or better metal ion selectivity, metal uptake kinetics, and acid stability as Diphonix. Feasibility was determined, however the process needs to be optimized. Studies at Eichrom and ANL of the performance of Diphonix resin over a broad range of HNO3 and HCl conditions and inorganic salt loadings are discussed together with the proposed method of incorporating similar characteristics into a silica-based resin. The new, silica-based resin functionalized with diphosphonic acid ligands can be used in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving processing of low-level, transuranic, and high-level radioactive wastes; it can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste including wastes contaminated with organic compounds.

  2. Dental resin cure monitoring by inherent fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Zhou, Jack X.; Li, Qingxiong; Wang, Sean X.

    2008-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the inherent fluorescence of a dental composite resin can be utilized to monitor the curing status, i.e. degree of conversion of the resin. The method does not require any sample preparation and is potentially very fast for real time cure monitoring. The method is verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  3. TMI-2 purification demineralizer resin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J D; Osterhoudt, T R

    1984-05-01

    Study of the Makeup and Purification System demineralizers at TMI-2 has established that fuel quantities in the vessels are low, precluding criticality, that the high radioactive cesium concentration on the demineralizer resins can be chemically removed, and that the demineralizer resins can probably be removed from the vessels by sluicing through existing plant piping. Radiation measurements from outside the demineralizers establishing that there is between 1.5 and 5.1 (probably 3.3) lb of fuel in the A vessel and less than that amount in the B vessel. Dose rates up to 2780 R per hour were measured on contact with the A demineralizer. Remote visual observation of the A demineralizer showed a crystalline crust overlaying amber-colored resins. The cesium activity in solid resin samples ranged from 220 to 16,900 ..mu..Ci/g. Based on this information, researchers concluded that the resins cannot be removed through the normal pathway in their present condition. Studies do show that the resins will withstand chemical processing designed to rinse and elute cesium from the resins. The process developed should work on the TMI-2 resins.

  4. [Delayed asthma bronchiale due to epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authried, Georg; Al-Asadi, Haifaa; Møller, Ulla; Sherson, David Lee

    2013-10-28

    Epoxy resin is a low molecular weight agent, which can cause both acute and delayed allergic reactions. However, it is known causing skin reactions with direct or airborne contact. Rarely it can cause airway reactions like asthma bronchiale. We describe a case of a windmill worker who developed delayed asthma bronchiale due to airborne contact with epoxy resin.

  5. Ethylated Urea - Ether - Modified Urea - Formaldehyde Resins,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Obichukwu EDOGA

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available First, phenol - formaldehyde (PF and urea - formaldehyde (UFII resins were separately conventionally prepared in our laboratory. Also, UF resin synthesized from the acid modified synthesis procedure was synthesized in a purely acid medium of pH 1.0, FU molar ratio of 1.0 and at 50oC (one-stage acid modified-synthesis procedure. Subsequently, the UF resin II was modified during synthesis by incorporating ethylated urea-ether (EUER (i.e. UFIII and glycerol (GLYC (i.e. UFV cured with and without acid curing agent. The structural and physicochemical analyses of the various resin samples were carried out.The results showed that the unmodified UF resin (UF II synthesized in acid medium of pH 1.0, F/U molar ratio 1.0, and at 50oC, cured in absence of acid curing catalyst, showed features in their spectra which are consistent with a tri-, and/or tetra-substituted urea in the reaction to give a 3 - dimensional network cured UF resin. Modification of the UF resin(UF II with ethylated urea-ether and glycerol to produce UF resins III and respectively V prominently increased the absorbance of methylene and ether groups in the spectra which are consistent with increased hydrophobicity and improved hydrolytic stability. For the conventional UF resin (UF I, the only clear distinction between spectra for the UF resin II and UF resins (III/V is the presence of diminished peaks for methylene groups at 2.2 ppm. The relationship between the logarithmic viscosity of cured PF resin with time showed continuos dependence of viscosity with time during cure up to 70 minutes. Similar trends were shown by UF resins (III/V, cured in absence of acid catalyst. In contrast, the conventional UF resins I and UF IV (i.e. UF II cured with NH4CL showed abrupt discontinuity in viscosity with time just after about 20 minutes of cure.

  6. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

  7. Posterior adhesive composite resin: a historic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusayama, T

    1990-11-01

    Since development of the BIS-GMA composite resin, there have been many innovations to improve the physical properties for posterior use. Subsequent development of a caries detector and chemically adhesive composite resin has further revolutionally raised the value of composite resin restoration, replacing the traditional restorative system of mechanical approach by the new system of biological approach. In this system only the infected irreversibly deteriorated insensitive tissue, stainable with the caries detector, is removed painlessly. The cavity is immediately filled with the composite resin with no further tissue reduction for retention or resistance form or extension for prevention. Both enamel and dentin walls are etched by a single etchant without lining. The chemical adhesion to the cavity margin and wall minimizes the marginal failure in size and prevalence and prevents secondary caries penetration along the wall. The chemically adhesive composite resin is thus a useful restorative material much kinder to teeth than amalgam.

  8. EPOXY RESINS TOUGHENED WITH CARBOXYL TERMINATED POLYETHERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yunchao; LI Yiming

    1983-01-01

    Carboxyl terminated polyethers, the adducts of hydroxyl terminated polytetrahydrofuran and maleic anhydride, were used as toughener for epoxy resins. The morphology of the toughened resins was investigated by means of turbidity measurement, dynamic mechanical testing and scanning electron microscope observation. It turned out that the molecular weight and the carboxyl content of the polyether and the cure conditions are important factors, which affect the particle size of the polyether-rich domains and, in turn, the mechanical properties of the cured resin. Carboxyl terminated polytetrahydrofurans have a low glass transition temperature, and in appropriate amount they do not affect the thermal resistance of the resin. These advantages make them preferable as toughener for epoxy resins.

  9. Reinforcement of Denture Base Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nejatiant

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: PMMA has been the most popular denture base material because of its advantages including good aesthetics, accurate fit, stability in the oral environment, easy laboratory and clinical manipulation and inexpensive equipments since the 1930’s. However, its fracture resistance is not satisfactory. Aim: The aim of this study is to improve the fracture resistance of denture bases made of PMMA by assessing the effect of resin type, packing and processing variables on biaxial flexural strength (BFS. Materials & methods: 930 discs, 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared with the following variables: a. Veined (V and Plain (P PMMA. b. 5 different powder/liquid ratios by volume (1.5:1, 2:1, 2.5:1, 3:1, 3.5:1. c. Conventional (C and Injection packing methods (I. d. Dry heat (D Water bath (W; and e. different curing times. The discs were trimmed and stored in 37°C tap water for 50 hours before carrying out BFS test, according to BS EN ISO 1567: 2001. BFS test was carried out using a tensile-testing machine (Lloyd LRX, Lloyd instruments Ltd (Figure.1 b, with a x-head speed of 1mm/min. ONE-WAY ANOVA analysis and TUKEY’S comparison were carried out (MINITAB. The temperature within the curing baths and inside of curing resin was evaluated by using a thermocouple. Results: BFS of Powder/liquid ratio of 1.5:1 is significantly lower than the other four ratios. Among the last four ratios, 2.5:1 was the strongest one although the difference was not significant. BFS of the plain type of PMMA is significantly higher than the veined type.• BFS of conventionally packed PMMA discs was greater than the injectional packed ones and the difference is significant. Water bath cured resin showed a significant higher BFS compared with dry heat curing. • Changing the curing time in the dry heat bath from 7h @ 75º C and 2hrs @ 95º C to 5hrs @ 75º C and 3hrs @ 95º C and then 2hrs @ 95º C improves BFS of PMMA. In the water bath the trend is identical

  10. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  11. 76 FR 4936 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy AGENCY: United States International Trade... antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin (``granular PTFE resin'') from Italy. DATES... on granular PTFE resin from Italy and Japan (75 FR 67082-67083 and 67105-67108, November 1,...

  12. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) resins) may be safely used as coatings or components...

  13. 21 CFR 177.2450 - Polyamide-imide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyamide-imide resins. 177.2450 Section 177.2450... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2450 Polyamide-imide resins. Polyamide-imide resins...) For the purpose of this section the polyamide-imide resins are derived from the condensation...

  14. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section... Ingredients § 181.32 Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. (a) Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins listed in... of the vinyl chloride resin) resin—for use only in contact with oleomargarine. (iv)...

  15. Restorative resins: abrasion vs. mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, K D

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to examine whether it is possible by simple and reliable laboratory tests to evaluate the abrasion by food of Class 1 restorative resins. The results point to the following main conclusions: for the smooth-surface resins, i.e. the micro-filled composite and the unfilled resins, the Wallace hardness test appears to be a valid parameter for abrasion; the greater the depth of penetration of the Vickers diamond of this apparatus, the more severe abrasion is to be expected. The mode of abrasion in this type of resin is scratching. Porosity in the resins strongly enhances the abrasion. For the rough-surface resins, i.e. the conventional composites, a dual effect of the filler particles was concluded. The filler particles on the one hand protect the matrix against abrasion, but cause, on the other hand, in time an increase of the surface roughness of the composite and thereby via increased friction an increase of the abrasion. Considerations on possible ways to improve the present-day restorative resins are presented. It is stressed that the results obtained refer only to abrasion of Class 1 fillings by food.

  16. Eleventh All-Union Conference on High-Molecular-Weight Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-07-18

    sulfonation , phosphorylization, and mercaptylization [merkaptilirovaniye]. The lecturer includes in this group of transformations also the reactions of...with alkyd and alkyd- melamine resins; the communication of V. V. Zhebrovskiy, M. I. Karyakina, F. I. Rubenshteyn and S. V. Yakubovich (State Research...based on epoxy resins, combined with phenol- formaldehyde resins and mixed methacrylic esters. K. I. Zabyrina, M. B. Fromberg, Ye. P. Gruzdova, and V

  17. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  18. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  19. EP-toxicity test of saturated GT-73 resin and resin in grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, J.P.

    1985-04-24

    The results of EP-toxicity tests on mercury saturated Duolite{reg_sign} GT-73 cation exchange resin clarify options for the ultimate disposal of spent resin. Samples of GT-73 saturated with mercury passed the EP-toxicity test, indicating that fully spent resin may be classifed as ``solid``-not``hazardous``-waste and stored or disposed-of as such. Samples of GT-73 resin saturated with mercury and then incorporated into Portland Type 1 cement did not pass the EP-toxicity test and fall into the ``hazardous waste`` category. Samples of GT-73 resin less-than-saturated with mercury which were in corporated in Portland Type 1 cement passed the EP-toxicity test and may be classified as ``solid waste.`` Other commercially available materials are being investigated for incorporating fully spent GT-73 resin in a solid waste form.

  20. The flexible resin transfer molding (FRTM) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Michael F.

    1992-12-01

    An innovative composite manufacturing process, FRTM, which is based on detailed cost analysis intended to be 'cost effective by design', is described. FRTM is based on a combination of the technical characteristics and respective favorable economics of diaphragm forming, and resin transfer molding. The process control system determines the optimal time for compaction and forming using an empirical resin polymerization model, a fluid flow model, and dielectric sensing of in-situ resin properties. The modified FRTM process is capable of producing high-quality parts with low thickness variation, low void content, and high fiber volume.

  1. Advanced Fibre Reinforced Methyl Nadicimide Resins .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz Alam

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass/carbon/kevlar-reinforced composites were fabricated using two structurally different methl nadicimide resins. The resin content of the laminates was in the range of 32-39 per cent. Interlaminar shear strength (ILSSand flexual strength (FS depended on the structure of the methyl nadicimide resins. A significant decrease in the ILSS was observed on treatment with boiling water for 500 h and on isothermal ageing at 300 degree celsius for 100,250 and 500 h. The limiting oxygen index (LOI was the lowest for laminates based on Kevlar fabrics (i.e.54 whereas the laminates based on glass/carbon showed very high LOI(>90.

  2. Luminous Efficient Compositions Based on Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Palaiah

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium/sodium nitrate illuminating compositions with epoxy resin - E 605 have beenstudied for luminosity and luminous efficiency by varying fuel oxidizer ratio and binder content.The compositions have been evaluated for impact and friction sensitivities, burn rate, thermalcharacteristics, and mechanical properties. Flame temperature and combustion products areevaluated theoretically by using REAL program. Experimental results show that, luminosity,burn rate, and calorimetric value are higher for polyester resin-based compositions. The highluminous efficiency composition is achieved with magnesium/sodium nitrate ratio of 70/30 with4 per cent epoxy resin.

  3. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  4. Magnetic ion-exchange resin treatment: Impact of water type and resin use

    OpenAIRE

    Mergen, Maxime Rodolphe Denis; Jefferson, Bruce; Parsons, Simon A.; Jarvis, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Three raw waters of fundamentally different natural organic matter (NOM) character were treated by magnetic resin using a bench-scale method designed to mimic how the resin is used in continuous operation. Increasing water hydrophobicity resulted in reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal with removal of 56%, 33% and 25% for waters containing 21%, 50% and 75% hydrophobic NOM, respectively. Study of consecutive resin uses showed that the NOM in the hydrophobic water ha...

  5. Compaction and Cure of Resin Film Infusion Prepregs

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Joseph E.

    2004-01-01

    Gutowski et al.'s model has been employed to describe the cure and consolidation of prepregs used for resin film infusion. Resin kinetics, rheology, flow and fiber deformation are considered. Resin kinetics are simulated with an isothermal autocatalytic-1 type relation. The non-Newtonian viscosity of the Cytec™ 754 resin is represented with a gel type expression. The one dimensional flow of resin through a deformable, partially saturated porous medium is studied. A nonlinear partial...

  6. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  7. Light-cured resin for post patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmeier, M D; Grasso, J E

    1992-09-01

    A method of using light-cured acrylic resin as an alternative to the use of chemically-cured acrylic resins with elastomeric impressions for direct post patterns is presented. The GC Unifast LC acrylic resin is a powder/liquid type resin cured by exposure to visible light. The polymerization process has four stages before final curing: slurry, stringy, dough-like (plastic), and rubber-like (elastic). Advantages over current direct and indirect procedures include ease of manipulation of the material and no change in laboratory handling procedures. While in the dough-like state, the material can be contoured. In the rubber-like state, it is flexible to disengage from minor undercut areas.

  8. Indirect composite resin materials for posterior applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellard, E; Duke, E S

    1999-12-01

    Indirect composite resin restorations were introduced a number of years ago as possible alternatives to traditional metallic or ceramic-based indirect restorations. However, the earlier formulations did not provide evidence of improvement in mechanical and physical properties over chairside-placed direct composite resin materials. Because they required more tooth structure removal than direct restorations, their use became unpopular and was abandoned by most clinicians. Over the past few years, a new class of composite resin indirect materials has surfaced in the profession. Various technologies have been suggested as reinforcement mechanisms. Fibers, matrix modifications, and an assortment of innovations have been proposed for enhancing indirect composite resin restorations. Applications are from inlay restorations all the way to multi-unit fixed prostheses. This manuscript summarizes some of the progress made in this area. When available, data is presented to provide clinicians with guidelines and indications for the use of these materials.

  9. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... molecular weight of 27,000, as determined by gel permeation chromatography using polystyrene standards. (2.... (ii) Polyestercarbonate resins, when extracted with 50 percent (by volume) ethyl alcohol in...

  10. Amine chemistry. Update on impact on resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, Gregory; Kellogg, Douglas [Siemens Industry, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States). Technology and Lab Services; Wilkes, Marty [Siemens Industry, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States). Water Technologies Div.

    2012-03-15

    Impurity removal in the steam cycle and the associated prevention of corrosion and/or fouling of system components are the goals of ion exchange resins. However, in many instances (such as a switch to amine chemistry or a change in product specifications), resins do not remove, and, in fact, contribute impurities to the steam cycle. This paper reviews recent data compiled to determine the direct and indirect effects of amines on ion exchange resins used in the power industry. Water chemistries have improved in recent years, in large part due to changes in chemistry and resins, but it is necessary to continue to develop products, processes and techniques to reduce impurities and improve overall water chemistry in power plant systems. (orig.)

  11. Phenolic Resin Sector Enters New Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Zeshuang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Rapid output increase With the importation of new production technologies and the boom of large timber processing, insulation refractory material, composite material and foam plastics sectors in recent years, the phenolic resin production in China has developed rapidly.

  12. Contraction stresses of composite resin filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegdahl, T; Gjerdet, N R

    1977-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resin filling materials and the tensile stresses developed when the shrinkage is restrained were measured in an in vitro experiment. This allows an estimation to be made of the forces exerted upon the enamel walls of cavities filled with the resin in the acid etch technique. The results indicate that the stresses acting on the enamel are low compared to the tensile strength of the enamel.

  13. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  14. Clinical applications of preheated hybrid resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, L J; Padipatvuthikul, P; Chee, B

    2011-07-22

    This clinical article describes and discusses the use of preheated nanohybrid resin composite for the placement of direct restorations and luting of porcelain laminate veneers. Two clinical cases are presented. Preheating hybrid composite decreases its viscosity and film thickness offering the clinician improved handling. Preheating also facilitates the use of nanohybrid composite as a veneer luting material with relatively low polymerisation shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion compared to currently available resin luting cements.

  15. Biocompatibility of Resin-based Dental Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Keyvan Moharamzadeh; Ian M. Brook; Richard van Noort

    2009-01-01

    Oral and mucosal adverse reactions to resin-based dental materials have been reported. Numerous studies have examined thebiocompatibility of restorative dental materials and their components, and a wide range of test systems for the evaluation of the biological effects of these materials have been developed. This article reviews the biological aspects of resin-based dental materials and discusses the conventional as well as the new techniques used for biocompatibility assessment of dental mat...

  16. Preliminary Study of Performance of TTA Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Kun; MAO; Guo-shu

    2013-01-01

    TTA(thenoyl trifluoroacetone)extraction can effectively remove large amounts of uranium in the analysis of trace neptunium in the presence of large amounts of uranium.While it is not conducive to achieve the automation of the rapid analysis of neptunium with the TTA solution,the TTA resin was prepared and its properties were studied in this work.TTA resin in this work was a kind of mixture combining styrene-divinylbenzene skeleton with TTA

  17. Resin composites : Sandwich restorations and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s resin composite has been used for Class II restorations in stress-bearing areas as an alternative to amalgam. Reasons for this were the patients’ fear of mercury in dental amalgam and a growing demand for aesthetic restorations. During the last decades, the use of new resin composites with more optimized filler loading have resulted in reduced clinical wear. Improved and simplified amphiphilic bonding systems have been introduced. However, one of the main problems with res...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Epoxy Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-07

    cyclohexanedicarboxylic anhydride (CHCA) with tripropylamine (TPA), and the MY720 was cured with DDH. The calculated stoichiometric mixtures for the systems ...investigate main-chain molecular motions in the epoxy resins tetraglycidyldiaminodiphenylmethane (TGDDM) and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) cured ...elimination reaction to release a stable nitroxide spin probe. In the dry cured epoxy resins at each temperature, the EPR lineshapes of the spin labels

  19. [Classification and several mechanical properties of core composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Hosoda, H; Tsurugai, T

    1990-03-01

    According to the classification proposed by Hosoda, six core resins could be divided into two categories on the basis of the elemental composition and size distribution of filler particles by SEM observation and EDX analysis. Furthermore, several mechanical properties of the resins were determined. The following facts were found: Bell Feel Core, Clearfil Core, Clearfil PhotoCore, Core Max, and Core Max II resins were classified as a semihybrid resin, and Microrest Core resin as a hybrid type resin. The elements detected in the resins by the EDX were Si, Zr, Al, Ba and La. The mechanical properties of the resins were shown to be highly stable at one day or one week after curing. The mechanical properties of the resins suggest that the subsequent crown preparation and impression taking should be postponed until the next appointment.

  20. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  1. Thermal rearrangement of novolak resins used in microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Ricky; Zampini, Anthony; Monaghan, Michael J.; O'Leary, Michael J.; Cardin, William J.; Eugster, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    Changes in phenolic-formaldehyde resin properties are described in terms of thermal exposure. At high temperature, resin molecular weight, dissolution properties and chemical composition change depending on the presence or absence of monomers. Without monomer in the resin melt at 220 degree(s)C, resin molecular weight increases with a corresponding decrease in dissolution rate. In the presence of monomer, molecular weight generally decreases. Dissolution rate may fluctuate depending on the monomer mixture. Three,five- Xylenol and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol co-monomers induced the most extreme changes in resin properties with thermal treatment. Resin degradation-recombination processes suggest a classical Friedel-Craft rearrangement mechanism.

  2. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  3. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions.

  4. Clinical evaluation of a flowable resin composite and flowable compomer for preventive resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Man; Liu, HongSheng

    2005-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the retention and caries protection of a flowable resin composite (Flow Line) and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow) used in preventive resin restorations as compared to the conventional preventive resin technique which uses a resin composite (Brilliant) and a sealant (Concise). This study observed 205 permanent molars with small carious cavities less than 1.5 mm in width, which were obtained from 165 children aged 7 to 15 years. Flowable resin composite was used to treat 75 teeth, and 71 teeth were treated with flowable compomer in both cavities and caries-free fissures. For the control group, 59 teeth were treated with resin composite in cavities and sealant in caries-free fissures. The teeth were evaluated at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24-month intervals. After three months, all 205 treated teeth were completely intact. After six months, 66 of the 71 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 65 of the 70 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 57 of the 58 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 12 months, 60 of the 67 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 61 of the 67 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 51 of the 55 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 18 months, 53 of the 61 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 54 of the 62 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 47 of the 53 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 24 months, 49 of the 58 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 45 of the 57 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 42 of the 52 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. There were no statistically significant differences in retention rates among all groups after 3, 6, 12, 18 or 24-months (p>0.05). One tooth treated with flowable resin composite and one tooth treated with flowable

  5. Ponderosa pine resin defenses and growth: metrics matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sharon; Sala, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) cause widespread tree mortality in coniferous forests worldwide. Constitutive and induced host defenses are important factors in an individual tree's ability to survive an attack and in bottom-up regulation of bark beetle population dynamics, yet quantifying defense levels is often difficult. For example, in Pinus spp., resin flow is important for resistance to bark beetles but is extremely variable among individuals and within a season. While resin is produced and stored in resin ducts, the specific resin duct metrics that best correlate with resin flow remain unclear. The ability and timing of some pine species to produce induced resin is also not well understood. We investigated (i) the relationships between ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) resin flow and axial resin duct characteristics, tree growth and physiological variables, and (ii) if mechanical wounding induces ponderosa pine resin flow and resin ducts in the absence of bark beetles. Resin flow increased later in the growing season under moderate water stress and was highest in faster growing trees. The best predictors of resin flow were nonstandardized measures of resin ducts, resin duct size and total resin duct area, both of which increased with tree growth. However, while faster growing trees tended to produce more resin, models of resin flow using only tree growth were not statistically significant. Further, the standardized measures of resin ducts, density and duct area relative to xylem area, decreased with tree growth rate, indicating that slower growing trees invested more in resin duct defenses per unit area of radial growth, despite a tendency to produce less resin overall. We also found that mechanical wounding induced ponderosa pine defenses, but this response was slow. Resin flow increased after 28 days, and resin duct production did not increase until the following year. These slow induced responses may allow

  6. Biocompatibility of polymethylmethacrylate resins used in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rupali; Singh, Raghuwar D; Sharma, Vinod P; Siddhartha, Ramashanker; Chand, Pooran; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    Biocompatibility or tissue compatibility describes the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response when applied as intended. Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) based resins are most widely used resins in dentistry, especially in fabrication of dentures and orthodontic appliances. They are considered cytotoxic on account of leaching of various potential toxic substances, most common being residual monomer. Various in vitro and in vivo experiments and cell based studies conducted on acrylic based resins or their leached components have shown them to have cytotoxic effects. They can cause mucosal irritation and tissue sensitization. These studies are not only important to evaluate the long term clinical effect of these materials, but also help in further development of alternate resins. This article reviews information from scientific full articles, reviews, or abstracts published in dental literature, associated with biocompatibility of PMMA resins and it is leached out components. Published materials were searched in dental literature using general and specialist databases, like the PubMED database.

  7. Structural Evaluation of High Strain Fiber and Resin Composite Material Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    6 2. Resin Properties Necessary to Improve Laminate Properties ......................................... 6 3. Neat Resin Stress...Ratio, E/Eo OPSop 14Sl R Figure 2. Resin Properties Necessary to Improve Laminate Properties I 6 failure and normalized resin modulus. These...normalized resin-related parameters bound the resin properties which result in improvements in laminate transverse strength, transverse modulus, strain energy

  8. The influence of resin flexural modulus on the magnitude of ceramic strengthening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to determine the magnitude of ceramic resin-strengthening with resin-based materials with varying flexural moduli using a regression technique to assess the theoretical strengthening at a \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness. The hypothesis tested was that experimentally, increasing resin flexural modulus results in increased resin-strengthening observed at a theoretical \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness.

  9. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... thermosetting resins subcategory. 414.50 Section 414.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Thermosetting Resins § 414.50 Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory. The provisions... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin...

  10. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  11. 76 FR 8774 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury....

  12. Composite resin fillings and inlays: An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Qvist, V.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth......Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth...

  13. Development of Polymer Resins using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano A. N. Fernandes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of polymer resins can benefit from the application of neural networks, using its great ability to correlate inputs and outputs. In this work we have developed a procedure that uses neural networks to correlate the end-user properties of a polymer with the polymerization reactor's operational condition that will produce that desired polymer. This procedure is aimed at speeding up the development of new resins and help finding the appropriate operational conditions to produce a given polymer resin; reducing experimentation, pilot plant tests and therefore time and money spent on development. The procedure shown in this paper can predict the reactor's operational condition with an error lower than 5%.

  14. Smooth coronal surface, resin restoration and microleakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanikoğlu, F; Türkmen, C; Kartal, N; Başaran, B

    1997-09-01

    The space between the resin and the cavity walls has always become interesting to search. The aim of this study was to evaluate any differences on leakage values of Class 5 type resin restorations prepared on surrounding surfaces of the tooth crown. Ninety human teeth were prepared as Class 5 cavities on buccal, lingual, mesial and distal surfaces and were randomly divided into groups for bevelling, groove preparation and as control. The subgroups were arranged as fluoride gel and/or sealant applications. Fluoride gel was applied following the cavity preparations. Sealant was applied over composite resin restorations. Treated teeth were thermocycled and immersed into dye solution for 96 hours. The restorations were evaluated in a stereo-microscope following the sectioning. Bevelling of the cavosurfaces and/or preparation of a groove addition to cavity procedures did not make any difference on the microleakage scores of the restorations done on either surfaces statistically.

  15. Composite resin in medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Pamela S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haubenreich, James E; Osborne, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. Use of this material has recently increased as a result of consumer demands for esthetic restorations, coupled with the public's concern with mercury-containing dental amalgam. Composite is now used in over 95% of all anterior teeth direct restorations and in 50% of all posterior teeth direct restorations. Carbon fiber reinforced composites have been developed for use as dental implants. In medicine, fiber-reinforced composites have been used in orthopedics as implants, osseous screws, and bearing surfaces. In addition, hydroxyapatite composite resin has become a promising alternative to acrylic cement in stabilizing fractures and cancellous screw fixation in elderly and osteoporotic patients. The use of composite resin in dentistry and medicine will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to its physical properties, chemical composition, clinical applications, and biocompatibility.

  16. The Creep of Laminated Synthetic Resin Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkuhn, H

    1941-01-01

    The long-time loading strength of a number of laminated synthetic resin plastics was ascertained and the effect of molding pressure and resin content determined. The best value was observed with a 30 to 40 percent resin content. The long-time loading strength also increases with increasing molding pressure up to 250 kg/cm(exp 2); a further rise in pressure affords no further substantial improvement. The creep strength is defined as the load which in the hundredth hour of loading produces a rate of elongation of 5 X 10(exp -4) percent per hour. The creep strength values of different materials were determined and tabulated. The effect of humidity during long-term tests is pointed out.

  17. Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin coating for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Roopa S; Wang, Qinggang; Lee, Milton L

    2002-04-05

    Coating the interior surface of a fused-silica capillary with a polymeric material has long been used in capillary electrophoresis (CE) to reduce or eliminate electroosmotic flow and suppress adsorption. A cycloaliphatic epoxide-based resin was bonded to silane treated capillaries and crosslinked with a curing agent. The epoxy resin coating significantly reduced electroosmotic flow over a pH range of 3-10. This coating was sufficiently hydrophilic to suppress protein adsorption. The epoxy resin coated capillary was used to separate several acidic and basic proteins and peptides. Separation efficiencies greater than 400,000 theoretical plates were achieved. The relative standard deviations in migration times for proteins were methods.

  18. Investigations of toughening mechanisms of epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T.

    1986-01-01

    Composite material technology was applied to the solid rocket booster by the development of a carbon filament-epoxy resin case which yields a net increase of 4000 lbs. in payload in the shuttle. The question of reusability of the new composite tanks has not yet been answered and will depend on the toughness of the matrix resin. The present study was aimed at providing conditions whereby test specimens of the epoxy resin (EPON/85) and curing agents of systematically varied structures could be produced in a controlled manner. Three sets of conditions were found that might allow the isolation of the structural effects on toughness from the cure effects. The kinetic methods leading to the determination of these conditions are described.

  19. [Allergic contact eczema from epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Leticia; Ortiz-de Frutos, Francisco J; del Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Galera, Carmen María; Valverde, Ricardo; Vanaclocha, Francisco

    2005-11-01

    Epoxy resins are plastics that are widely used as electrical insulation, in coatings, and as adhesives and paints. They have strong sensitizing power and are one of the main causes of allergic contact eczema, both in the workplace and elsewhere. We present the case of a worker at a plastics/chemical plant, who handled aeronautical components in the process of manufacturing fuselage parts. He consulted his physician because of eczematous lesions on his fingers, hands and forearms which had developed over a two-year period and were clearly related to his work. The standard battery of skin tests was performed, along with the plastics and adhesives series and tests using the products from his workplace. Positivity was shown to epoxy resins (standard battery) and to the products from his workplace, which included different fiberglass and carbon fiber sheets impregnated with epoxy resins and epoxy adhesives.

  20. Resin injection in clays with high plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Regarding the injection process of polyurethane resins in clays with high plasticity, this paper presents the experimental results of the pressuremeter and cone penetration tests before and after injection. A very important increase in pressure limit or in soil resistance can be observed for all the studied depths close to the injection points. An analytical analysis for cylindrical pore cavity expansion in cohesive frictional soils obeying the Mohr-Coulomb criterion was then used to reproduce the pressuremeter tests before and after injection. The model parameters were calibrated by maintaining constant the elasticity parameters as well as the friction angel before and after injection. A significant increase in cohesion was observed because of soil densification after resin expansion. The estimated undrained cohesions, derived from the parameters of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, were also compared with the cone penetration tests. Globally, the model predictions show the efficiency of resin injection in clay soils with high plasticity.

  1. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  2. Adsorption of D113 Resin for Dysprosium(Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of D113 resin for Dy(Ⅲ) was investigated by using the method of resin adsorption. Experimental results show that the optimum medium pH of adsorption of D113 resin for Dy3+ is pH=6.00 in the HAc-NaAc medium. The static adsorption capacity of D113 resin for Dy3+chemical analysis and IR spectra.

  3. Improved Graphite Fiber/Acetylene Terminated Matrix Resin Prepreg Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Neat Resin Properties Cured by Different Cure Cycles .............. 22 2.5 Effect of Cure Cycles on Water Absorption in m-ATS Neat Resins...Characterization of ATB Laminates ...... 81 3.4 Effect of Intermediate Temperature Hold on Neat Resin Properties for m-ATB Formulations ......... 86 3.5...using procedures described in Appendix A, are shown in Table 2.1. For comparison, the resin properties of a first generation epoxy, a state-of-the

  4. Preparative Purification of Liriodendrin from Sargentodoxa cuneata by Macroporous Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Di-Hua Li; Yan Wang; Yuan-Shan Lv; Jun-Hong Liu; Lei Yang; Shu-Kun Zhang; Yu-Zhen Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    The preparative purification of liriodendrin from Sargentodoxa cuneata using macroporous resin combined with crystallization process was evaluated. The properties of adsorption/desorption of liriodendrin on eight macroporous resins were investigated systematically. X-5 resin was selected as the most suitable medium for liriodendrin purification. The adsorption of liriodendrin on X-5 resin fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model. Dynamic adsorption/de...

  5. Investigation of Resin Systems for Improved Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    and synthe- sized in Task I. " Commercial Sources: Monsanto - Skybond 700 (polyimide), and Narmco - Polybenzimidazole. Optimization of the resins will...tested in Contract NAS3-4188 (DuPont SP-I and SP-2), a new polyimide resin produced by Monsanto (Skybond 700) has recently been added to those resins...laminates from the improved modified polyimides being synthesized in Task I. The new resin selected for evaluation was Monsanto Chemical Company’s Skybond 700

  6. Study on the Novel Dicyanate Ester Resin Containing Naphthalene Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Qiang YAN; Hong Yun PENG; Li JI; Guo Rong QI

    2004-01-01

    The novel dicyanate ester resin containing naphthalene unit (DNCY) was synthesized, and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and elemental analysis (EA).The thermal properties of DNCY resin was studied by thermal degradation analysis at a heating rate of 10 (C /min-1 in N2 and air. The DNCY resin exhibited better thermal and thermal-oxidative stability than bisphenol A dicyanate (BACY) resin.

  7. Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

    1992-01-01

    Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

  8. PMR Resin Compositions For High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to identify polymer matrix resins suitable for making graphite-fiber laminates used at 700 degree F (371 degree C) in such applications as aircraft engines to achieve higher thrust-to-weight ratios. Two particular high-molecular-weight formulations of PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) resins most promising. PMR compositions of higher FMW exhibit enhanced thermo-oxidative stability. Formation of high-quality laminates with these compositions requires use of curing pressures higher than those suitable for compositions of lower FMW.

  9. Clinical guidelines for indirect resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, A

    1997-06-01

    Ongoing advances in adhesive dentistry have made it possible to successfully and predictably bond tooth-supporting restorations using conservative preparation techniques. Improvements in the durability and esthetic properties of tooth-colored restorative materials have also increased the range of available treatment options. However, dentists have been slow to accept both direct and indirect posterior esthetics. This article provides a step-by-step technique for practitioners who choose to treat their patients with indirect resin esthetic restorations. It will not discuss other posterior restorative treatment techniques or materials (i.e. gold, porcelain, amalgam, bonded amalgam, or direct resin).

  10. Advances in the history of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguez, Nieves; Ellacuria, Joseba; Soler, José Ignacio; Triana, Rodrigo; Ibaseta, Guillermo

    2003-11-01

    The use of composite resins as direct restoration material in posterior teeth has demonstrated a great increase, due to esthetic requirements and the controversy regarding the mercury content in silver amalgams. In this article, we have reviewed the composition modifications which have occurred in materials based on resins since their introduction over a half a century ago which have enabled great improvements in their physical and mechanical properties. Likewise, we have highlighted current lines of research, centered on finding the ideal material for replacing silver amalgam as a direct filling material.

  11. Synthesis of a boron modified phenolic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resin has long been used as matrix for composites mainly because of its flame retardant behavior and high char yield after pyrolysis, which results in a self supporting structure. The addition of ceramic powders, such as SiC and B4C, as fillers to the phenolic resin, results in better thermo-oxidative stability, but as drawbacks, it has poor homogeneity, adhesion and processing difficulties during molding of the composites. The addition of single elements, such as boron, silicon and phosphorus in the main backbone of the thermo-set resin is a new strategy to obtain special high performance resins, which results in higher mechanical properties, avoiding the drawbacks of simply adding fillers, which results in enhanced thermo-oxidative stability compared to conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins. Therefore, the product can have several applications, including the use as ablative thermal protection for thermo-structural composites. This work describes the preparation of a boron-modified phenolic resin (BPR using salicyl alcohol and boric acid. The reaction was performed in refluxing toluene for a period of four hours, which produced a very high viscosity amber resin in 90% yield.The final structure of the compound, the boric acid double, substituted at the hydroxyl group of the aromatic ring, was determined with the help of the Infrared Spectroscopy, ¹H-NMR, TGA-DSC and boron elemental analysis. The absorption band of the group B-O at 1349 cm ˉ¹ can be visualized at the FT-IR spectrum. ¹H-NMR spectra showed peaks at 4.97-5.04 ppm and 3.60-3.90 ppm assigned to belong to CH2OH groups from the alcohol. The elemental analysis was also performed for boron determination.The product has also been tested in carbon and silicon fibers composite for the use in thermal structure. The results of the tests showed composites with superior mechanical properties when compared with the conventional phenolic resin.

  12. Solid-State Microwave Synthesis of Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash Bajia; Rashmi Sharma; Birbal Bajia

    2009-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of melamine-formaldehyde resin has been achieved using conventional as well as microwave irradiations (without and with solid support) in different molar ratio. Resin samples were tested for their chemical as well as physical properties. The structure of all the resin has been supported by their spectral data

  13. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as...

  15. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2 and after (B2. It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  16. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  19. 76 FR 39896 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy would be likely to lead to... Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin from Italy: Investigation No. 731-TA-385 (Third Review). By order...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649)...

  1. 75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan AGENCY: United States International... granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  3. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  4. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1650 - Polysulfide polymer-polyepoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polysulfide polymer-polyepoxy resins. 177.1650...-polyepoxy resins. Polysulfide polymer-polyepoxy res- ins may be safely used as the food-contact surface of... with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Polysulfide polymer-polyepoxy resins are the...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  8. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified in this section may be safely used as the food-contact surface of...

  9. 21 CFR 177.2415 - Poly(aryletherketone) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(aryletherketone) resins. 177.2415 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2415 Poly(aryletherketone) resins. Poly(aryletherketone) resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles or...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely used as components of food-contact coatings...

  12. 21 CFR 172.215 - Coumarone-indene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Coumarone-indene resin. 172.215 Section 172.215... CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.215 Coumarone-indene resin. The food additive coumarone-indene resin may be safely used on grapefruit, lemons, limes, oranges, tangelos, and tangerines...

  13. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1) identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...

  16. 21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  17. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions:...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A glycidyl... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings....

  1. TRIMETHYLSILYLATED SILICA AS RHEOLOGY MODIFIER FOR SILICONE RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Huang; Ying Huang; Yunzhao Yu

    2000-01-01

    Trimethylsilylated silica was synthesized through hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane followed by trimethylsilylation. Rheological properties of the silicone resin with trimethylsilylated silica as modifier were studied. It turned out that the particle size of silica was important to the rheological behavior of the modified resin. Trimethylsilylated silica of medium particle size shows the strongest tendency of forming physical network in the resin.

  2. Solid-State Microwave Synthesis of Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Bajia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient synthesis of melamine-formaldehyde resin has been achieved using conventional as well as microwave irradiations (without and with solid support in different molar ratio. Resin samples were tested for their chemical as well as physical properties. The structure of all the resin has been supported by their spectral data

  3. Effect of epoxy resin properties on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hong-Wei; Gao, Feng [Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering; Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China). Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials; Li, Kai-Xi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China). Key Laboratory of Carbon Materials

    2013-09-15

    Three kinds of epoxy resins, i.e. tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (AG80), difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (E51) and novolac type epoxy resin (F46) were selected as matrices for carbon fiber/epoxy composites. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical properties of fiber/epoxy composites by using these three kinds of epoxy resins with different physical and chemical performance. The results show that the composites fabricated with AG80 present the best stiffness and the composites prepared with E5 1have the best toughness. The stiffness and toughness of the composites prepared with F46 are middle values located between those for AG80/epoxy and E51/epoxy composites. Thus, the mixed epoxy resin is a promising approach for industrial production. (orig.)

  4. A temporary space maintainer using acrylic resin teeth and a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochavi, D; Stern, N; Grajower, R

    1977-05-01

    A one-session technique for preparing a temporary space maintainer has been described. The technique consists of attaching an acrylic resin pontic to etched surfaces of natural adjacent teeth by means of a composite resin. The main advantages of this technique are elimination of premature tooth preparation, good esthetics, fair strength, low cost, and rapid completion of the restoration without the need of a dental laboratory.

  5. [Studies of dental methacrylic resin. (Part 8) Flexural and impact adhesive strength of self-curing methacrylic resin to cross-linked polymethyl methacrylate resins (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, T; Hirabayashi, S; Harashima, I

    1981-10-01

    Heat-curing methacylic resins cross-linked with three kinds of dimethacrylates, i.e. EDMA, tri-EDMA and nona-EDMA, were prepared, and the flexural and the impact adhesive strength of the dough moulding type and the pour type self-curing methacrylic resins to them were examined. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The flexural and the impact adhesive strength of the pour type self-curing resin were higher and more stable than those of the dough moulding type one. (2) The flexural and the impact adhesive strength of self-curing resins to cross-linked adherent resins rised in order of nona-EDMA greater than tri-EDMA greater than EDMA in the range of higher concentration of cross-linking agents. This tendency was marked for the pour type resin. (3) When the dough moulding type resin was used as adhesive resin, to adherent resin cross-linked with EDMA or tri-EDMA which had relatively short chain, the respective adhesive strength of that decreased with increasing the concentration of cross-linking agent. While, to adherent resin cross-linked with nona-EDMA, which had relatively long and more flexible chain, the respective adhesive strength of the dough moulding type resin increased with increasing the concentration of cross-linking agent. (4) When the pour type resin was used as adhesive resin, to adherent resin cross-linked with EDMA or tri-EDMA, the respective adhesive strength of that showed the maximum at the concentration near 2 to 5 mole% and decreased with increasing the concentration. While, to adherent resin cross-linked with nona-EDMA, the flexural adhesive strength of the pour type resin was approximately constant without the effect of the concentration, but the impact adhesive strength of that increased with increasing the concentration. (5) The flexural adhesive strength of the dough moulding and the pour type resin under the wet condition decreased about 30 to 60% compared with under the dry condition, but the percentage of the falling for the impact

  6. Preparation of montmorillonite modified phenolic resin for shell process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Jianmin; Li Yuancai; Wang Wenqing; Xia Chun

    2009-01-01

    The development of montmodllonite modified phenolic resin under microwave irradiation heating was investigated. The effect of montmorillonite content and stirring time on the structure and morphology of synthetic resin was analyzed. The optimum processing procedure was found to be 45 rain stirring time with 5.4% montmorillonite addition. Further, the platelet spacing increases with stirring time till montmorillonite exfoliated to nanoscales platelet. When montmorillonite is exfoliated, layered structure at nanoscale can be uniformly distributed in the resin. The overall performance of montmorillonite modified phenolic resin is improved remarkably, such as flow ability, tensile strength and toughness property of resin coated sand. However, the gelation speed decreased slightly by adding montmorillonite.

  7. NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

    2012-05-29

    Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same

  8. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic..., manufacturing, packing, processing, preparing, treating, packaging, transporting, or holding food, in accordance... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polycarbonate resins. 177.1580 Section...

  9. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Dept. Biotechnology, Mocow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  10. Resin diffusion through demineralized dentin matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO Ricardo M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has focused on the factors that may affect the permeability of adhesive resins into the demineralized dentin matrix during the development of the bonding process. The effects of surface moisture are discussed respectively to the adhesive systems, and the problems related to incomplete hybrid layer formation presented.

  11. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  12. Crack propagation directions in unfilled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, G; Sadeghipour, K; Jayaraman, S; Silage, D; Paul, D; Boberick, K

    1998-11-01

    Posterior composite restorative materials undergo accelerated wear in the occlusal contact area, primarily through a fatigue mechanism. To facilitate the timely development of new and improved materials, a predictive wear model is desirable. The objective of this study was to develop a finite element model enabling investigators to predict crack propagation directions in resins used as the matrix material in composites, and to verify these predictions by observing cracks formed during the pin-on-disc wear of a 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA resin and an EBPADMA resin. Laser confocal scanning microscopy was used to measure crack locations. Finite element studies were done by means of ABAQUS software, modeling a cylinder sliding on a material with pre-existing surface-breaking cracks. Variables included modulus, cylinder/material friction coefficient, crack face friction, and yield behavior. Experimental results were surprising, since most crack directions were opposite previously published observations. The majority of surface cracks, though initially orthogonal to the surface, changed direction to run 20 to 30 degrees from the horizontal in the direction of indenter movement. Finite element modeling established the importance of subsurface shear stresses, since calculations provided evidence that cracks propagate in the direction of maximum K(II)(theta), in the same direction as the motion of the indenter, and at an angle of approximately 20 degrees. These findings provide the foundation for a predictive model of sliding wear in unfilled glassy resins.

  13. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  14. Hyperbranched Polymers for Resin Transfer Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    refereed journals and referencing AFOSR support: 6 H. Qin, P.T. Mather, J.-B. Baek, and L.-S. Tan, "Modification of bisphenol-A based bismaleimide resin...Burstone, "Shape Memory Polymer Orthodontics ," SPE ANTEC Medical Plastics Division, May 9, 2006. b. Consultation and Advisory Functions with other

  15. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components...) Chlorotrifluoroethylene-1,1-difluoroethylene-tetrafluoroethylene co-polymer resins produced by copolymerization of..., Extrusion, and Coating Materials,” which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a)...

  16. Bisphenol-A epoxy resin reinforced and toughened by hyperbranched epoxy resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Daohong; JIA Demin; HUANG Xianbo

    2007-01-01

    The study on toughening and reinforcing of bisphenol-A epoxy resin is one of important developmental direction in the field.This paper reports a one-pot synthesis of aromatic polyester hyperbranched epoxy resin HTDE-2,an effect of HTDE-2 content on the mechanical and thermal performance of the bisphenol-A (E51)/HTDE-2 hybrid resin in detail.Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer,scanning electronic microscopy (SEM),differential scanning calorimetry (DSC),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA),dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMA) and molecular simulation technology are used to study the structure of HTDE-2,performance and toughening and reinforcing mechanism of the HTDE-2/E51 hybrid resin.It has been shown that the content of HTDE-2 has an important effect on the performance of the hybrid resin,and the performance of the HTDE-2/E51 blends has maximum with the increase in HTDE-2 content.The impact strength and fracture toughness of the hybrid resin with 9 wt-% HTDE-2 are almost 3.088 and 1.749 times of E51 performance respectively,furthermore,the tensile and flexural strength can also be enhanced about 20.7% and 14.2%,respectively.The glass transition temperature and thermal degradation temperature,however,are found to decrease to some extent.

  17. Curing depth of a resin-modified glass ionomer and two resin-based luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigemori, Ricardo Massao; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre M S

    2005-01-01

    The degree of conversion of resin-based luting agents used for retention of prefabricated posts has been questioned due to the difficulty of light penetration into the resin-filled root canal. This study evaluated the depth of cure of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Rely X--3M ESPE) and two resin-based luting agents (Rely X ARC--3M ESPE and Enforce-Dentsply). Twenty-four 14x2x2mm3 specimens were prepared in a Teflon split mold with the three luting agents (n=8). After preparation, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in a dark box for 24 hours prior to microhardness testing. Measurements of Knoop hardness were performed at three different depths: superficial, medium and deep thirds. The results (KHN) were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey test (0.05), which showed that resin-based luting agents presented the highest Knoop hardness values within the superficial third. Within the medium third, there were no significant differences among luting materials. However, within the deep third, Rely X presented the highest values. KHN values of resin-based luting agents decreased remarkably as depth increased.

  18. The influence of a packable resin composite, conventional resin composite and amalgam on molar cuspal stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, J D; Diefenderfer, K E; Strother, J M

    2002-01-01

    Packable resin composites may offer improved properties and clinical performance over conventional resin composites or dental amalgam. This in vitro study examined the cuspal stiffness of molars restored with a packable resin composite, a conventional posterior microfilled resin composite and amalgam. Forty-eight intact caries-free human third molars were distributed into four treatment groups (n=12) so that the mean cross-sectional areas of all groups were equal. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were made and specimens restored using one of four restorative materials: (1) a spherical particle amalgam (Tytin); (2) Tytin amalgam with a dentin adhesive liner (OptiBond Solo); (3) a conventional microfilled posterior resin composite (Heliomolar); (4) a packable posterior resin composite (Prodigy Posterior). Cuspal stiffness was measured using a Bionix 200 biomaterials testing machine (MTS). Specimens were loaded vertically to 300 N at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Stiffness was measured at 10 intervals: (1) prior to cavity preparation (intact); (2) following cavity preparation, but before restoration; (3) seven days after restoration; then (4) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 months after restoration. All specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in deionized water throughout the study and thermocycled (5 degrees/55 degrees C; 2000 cycles) monthly for 12 months. Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among treatment groups over time (presin composite increased cuspal stiffness over that of amalgam.

  19. High Voltage Design Guide. Volume IV. Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    by the reaction of urea with formaldehyde. An amino resin. Urethane. See Isocyanate Resins. Vinyl Resin. A synthetic resin formed by the polymerization...oxidation reactions are sludge, asphalt , a:ids, organic esters, soaps, and oxides. Oil color, as an index of the degree of refineme.. for unused oils...Materials Alkyd resins Acrylic plastics Cellulose esters Asphalt Cork Chloride flux Epoxy resins Copper (bare) Masonite Fiber board Melamine resins Greases

  20. [Antibacterial actions of denture base resin on oral bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M; Nigauri, A; Yamamoto, K; Nakazato, G; Kawano, J; Kimura, K

    1989-06-01

    Antibacterial action of various denture base resins on thirteen species of bacteria were studied in vitro. Antibacterial effect of 5% tannin-fluoride preparation, 5% tannic acid and 5% chlorhexidine added to resins on these thirteen bacterial species were also investigated using heat-curing denture base resins. Fresh microwave-curing resin and pour-type resin each showed an antibacterial action on one bacterial strain. Fresh self-curing resins had antibacterial actions on several bacterial strains. However, after storage in water at 37 degrees C for one week, antibacterial action of microwave-curing and pour-type resin were diminished and self-curing resins partially lost their antibacterial actions. Denture base resin containing tannin-fluoride preparation or tannic acid showed an antibacterial effect on one bacterial strain. On the other hand, denture base resin containing chlorhexidine had an antibacterial action on eleven bacterial strains. However, color and mechanical properties of the drug-containing resins were not satisfactory.

  1. Synthesis and Characterizations of Melamine-Based Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I or by adding a silane derivative (resin II. The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials.

  2. Synthesis and characterizations of melamine-based epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-09-05

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials.

  3. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  4. Resin Material Dependence of Pit Shape in Thermal Direct Mastering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshihiko; Shimo, Masanori; Takamori, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Yoshiteru; Takahashi, Akira

    2007-06-01

    We report the resin material dependence of the shape of pits obtained by thermal direct mastering (TDM), which is a heat-mode mastering method utilizing the thermal decomposition of resins. By applying suitable resins, both circular and crescent pits can be obtained by TDM. This difference in shape was considered to originate from the temperature difference between the glass transition temperature and the thermal decomposition temperature of the resins. The resin with a relatively small temperature difference was suitable for the fabrication of the circular pits and random patterns, and the resin with a large temperature difference was suitable for the fabrication of the crescent pits and monotone patterns with high linear density. By using a deep ultraviolet (DUV) laser mastering system with a wavelength of 257 nm and a numerical aperture of 0.90, a monotone pattern of 40-nm-length pits was fabricated by applying a novolak-type resin with a relatively large temperature difference.

  5. FDI report on adverse reactions to resin-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, P L; Meyer, D M

    2007-02-01

    Resin-based restorative materials are considered safe for the vast majority of dental patients. Although constituent chemicals such as monomers, accelerators and initiators can potentially leach out of cured resin-based materials after placement, adverse reactions to these chemicals are rare and reaction symptoms commonly subside after removal of the materials. Dentists should be aware of the rare possibility that patients could have adverse reactions to constituents of resin-based materials and be vigilant in observing any adverse reactions after restoration placement. Dentists should also be cognisant of patient complaints about adverse reactions that may result from components of resin-based materials. To minimise monomer leaching and any potential risk of dermatological reactions, resin-based materials should be adequately cured. Dental health care workers should avoid direct skin contact with uncured resin-based materials. Latex and vinyl gloves do not provide adequate barrier protection to the monomers in resin-based materials.

  6. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Poole, K.; Erich, D.; Harden, J. [Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory, Anderson, SC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper.

  7. Quantitative characterization of interdiffusion at the resin-resin and resin-prepreg interphases of epoxy systems processed by model SQ-RTM

    OpenAIRE

    Ballout, Wael; Coulon, B.; Janssens, Y.-A.; Van Velthem, Pascal; Sclavons, Michel; Magnin, Delphine; Pardoen, Thomas; Bailly, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The interdiffusion between a low and a high viscosity epoxy resin was studied on model systems representing the novel composite manufacturing process called “Same Qualified-Resin Transfer Molding” (SQ-RTM). Neat resin model systems were first characterized after curing by Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray microscopy, and nano-indentation, all methods reveal an interdiffusion distance of about 700–900 mm. Transmission electron microscopy further revealed a complex morphological gradi...

  8. Synthesis and Application of a New Acrylic Ester Resin for Recycling SIPA from its Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new acrylic ester polymer YWB-7 resin was prepared and characterized. The properties of YWB-7 resin were compared with those of the commercial Amberlite XAD-7, Diaion HP2MG and hypercrosslinked macroporous polymer NDA-150 resins. Both surface area and micropore area of YWB-7 resin were bigger than those of XAD-7 resin and HP2MG resin. The YWB-7 resin was successfully employed to recycle 5-sodiosulfoisophthalic acids (SIPA) from its solutions with and without methanol.

  9. Uranium Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins - Batch Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of five resins (Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 [fresh], Dowex 21K 16-30 [regenerated], Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200) were tested using unspiked, nitrate-spiked, and nitrate-spiked/pH adjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests were conducted in support of a resin selection process in which the best resin to use for uranium treatment in the 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system will be identified. The results from these tests are as follows: • The data from the high-nitrate (1331 mg/L) tests indicated that Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 all adsorbed uranium similarly well with Kd values ranging from ~15,000 to 95,000 ml/g. All four resins would be considered suitable for use in the treatment system based on uranium adsorption characteristics. • Lowering the pH of the high nitrate test conditions from 8.2 to 7.5 did not significantly change the uranium adsorption isotherms for the four tested resins. The Kd values for these four resins under high nitrate (1338 mg/L), lower pH (7.5) ranged from ~15,000 to 80,000 ml/g. • Higher nitrate concentrations greatly reduced the uranium adsorption on all four resins. Tests conducted with unspiked (no amendments; nitrate at 337 mg/L and pH at 8.2) source water yielded Kd values for Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 resins ranging from ~800,000 to >3,000,000 ml/g. These values are about two orders of magnitude higher than the Kd values noted from tests conducted using amended source water. • Compared to the fresh resin, the regenerated Dowex 21K 16-30 resin exhibited significantly lower uranium-adsorption performance under all test conditions. The calculated Kd values for the regenerated resin were typically an order of magnitude lower than the values calculated for the fresh resin. • Additional testing using laboratory columns is recommended to better

  10. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  11. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  12. Salivary contamination and post-cured resin/resin lute bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A N; Pereira, B P

    1994-01-01

    A previous study has shown that sandblasting and silane priming a post-cured inlay resin gave a secure bond to dual-cure luting resin. To determine the influence of salivary contamination 4 additional groups of 15 post-cured resin discs were mounted in acrylic cylinders, their faces sandblasted with 50 microns alumina and silane primed. Surface treatments with saliva (sa), air/water spray (a/w), phosphoric acid gel (pa), and silane (si) followed in the order listed: A) control, no further treatment; B) sa, a/w; C) sa, a/w, si; D) sa, a/w, pa a/w; E) sa, a/w, pa, a/w, si. A 3.9 mm diameter column of dual-cure resin lute was then bonded to the dry stored in water surfaces. Specimens were stored in water for 2 weeks after which the dual-cure resin columns were sheared off the post-cured resin discs. Shear bond strengths were A) 19.2 +/- 3.7, B) 17.4 +/- 3.9, C) 16.7 +/- 3.1, D) 15.6 +/- 3.5, E) 15.4 +/- 2.3 MPa. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Procedure showed groups D and E to be significantly lower than the uncontaminated control group A (p < 0.05). There were 2 adhesive failures in group B and all others were cohesive within the post-cured resin discs. This implies that air/water alone after salivary contamination is an unreliable cleansing method. The low shear bond values for Groups D and E may have been related to inadequate clearance of the phosphoric acid gel. It was concluded that salivary contamination adversely affected the quality of the bonds studied and decontamination using phosphoric acid gel resulted in significantly reduced shear bond strengths.

  13. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  14. Petroleum Resins: Separation, Character, and Role in Petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Ivar; Speight, James

    2001-01-01

    In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes are precipi......In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes...... are precipitated, adsorbents are added to the n-pentane solutions of the resins and oils, by which process the resins are adsorbed and subsequently recovered by the use of a more polar solvent, and the oils remain in solution. The resin fraction plays an important role in the stability of petroleum and prevents...... of the fact that the resin fraction is extremely important to the stability of petroleum, there is surprisingly little work reported on the characteristics of the resins. This article summarizes the work that has been carried out in determining the character and properties of the resin constituents...

  15. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

    1994-01-01

    The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.

  16. The effect of resin shades on microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Tae-Sung; Kang, Ho-Seung; Kim, Sung-Ki; Kim, Shin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2009-07-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the effect of resin shades on the degree of the polymerization. To this end, response variables affected by the degree of polymerization were examined in this study - namely, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change. Two commercial composite resins of four different shades were employed in this study: shades A3, A3.5, B3, and C3 of Z250 (Z2) and shades A3, A3.5, B3, and B4 of Solitaire 2 (S2). After light curing, the reflectance/absorbance, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of the specimens were measured. On reflectance and absorbance, Z2 and S2 showed similar distribution curves regardless of the resin shade, with shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2 exhibiting the lowest/highest distributions. Similarly for attenuation coefficient and microhardness, the lowest/highest values were exhibited by shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2. On polymerization shrinkage, no statistically significant differences were observed among the different shades of Z2. Similarly for color change, Z2 specimens exhibited only a slight (DeltaE*=0.5-0.9) color change after immersion in distilled water for 10 days, except for shades A3 and A3.5. Taken together, results of the present study suggested that the degree of polymerization of the tested composite resins was minimally affected by resin shade.

  17. Resin gathering in neotropical resin bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Reduviidae): functional and comparative morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Dimitri; Choe, Dong-Hwan; Weirauch, Christiane

    2011-02-01

    Apiomerini (Reduviidae: Harpactorinae) collect plant resins with their forelegs and use these sticky substances for prey capture or maternal care. These behaviors have not been described in detail and morphological structures involved in resin gathering, transfer, and storage remain virtually undocumented. We here describe these behaviors in Apiomerus flaviventris and document the involved structures. To place them in a comparative context, we describe and document leg and abdominal structures in 14 additional species of Apiomerini that represent all but one of the 12 recent genera in the tribe. Based on these morphological data in combination with the behavioral observations on A. flaviventris, we infer behavioral and functional hypotheses for the remaining genera within the tribe Apiomerini. Setal abdominal patches for resin storage are associated with maternal care so far only documented for species of Apiomerus. Based on the occurrence of these patches in several other genera, we propose that maternal care is widespread within the tribe. Ventral abdominal glands are widespread within female Apiomerini. We propose that their products may prevent hardening of stored resins thus providing long-term supply for egg coating. Judging from the diverse setal types and arrangements on the front legs, we predict six different behavioral patterns of resin gathering within the tribe.

  18. 40 CFR 63.5714 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... use filled resins? 63.5714 Section 63.5714 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Molding Resin and Gel Coat Operations § 63.5714 How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins? (a) If you are using a filled production resin or filled tooling resin, you must demonstrate...

  19. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  20. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos, E-mail: nccf@cdtn.br, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, E-mail: reissc@cdtn.br, E-mail: amms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  1. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers.

  2. Microwave Study of Recycled ABS Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A; M; Hasna

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a review of the research unde rt aken in order to determine the suitability of utilizing microwave technology in the production of Recycled ABS Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene resin for mouldin gs. The experimental investigation determined the suitability of the existing re cycled ABS material, the mould material used with respect to performance and lon gevity, potential commercial plant and equipment, end mould compression. Introduction Frequency Characterization of ABS The first ...

  3. Synthesis of Resins with Chiral Salen Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ The enormous growth in the use of polymer resin supports in solid phase combinatorial synthesis, and related methodologies, has re-stimulated interest in the area of polymer-supported transition metal complex catalyst .The recently developed chiral salen-based for the enantioselective ring opening of meso epoxides and kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides are appealing candidates for immobilization on solid support. The catalysts are reading prepare from inexpensive components, and are amenable to modification for attachment to a solid support.

  4. Four Pentasaccharide Resin Glycosides from Argyreia acuta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang-Wei Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Four pentasaccharide resin glycosides, acutacoside F–I (1–4, were isolated from the aerial parts of Argyreia acuta. These compounds were characterized as a group of macrolactones of operculinic acid A, and their lactonization site of 11S-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was esterified at the second saccharide moiety (Rhamnose at C-2. The absolute configuration of the aglycone was S. Their structures were elucidated by established spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2010-02-23

    This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first

  6. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  7. Adsorption of Iminodiacetic Acid Resin for Lutetium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊春华; 姚彩萍; 王惠君

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of a novel chelate resin,iminodiacetic acid resin(IDAAR) for Lu(Ⅲ) were investigated.The statically saturated adsorption capacity is 210.8 mg·g-1 at 298 K in HAc-NaAc medium.The Lu(Ⅲ) adsorbed on IDAAR can be eluted by 0.5 mol·L-1 HCl and the elution percentage reaches 96.5%.The resin can be regenerated and reused without obvious decrease in adsorption capacity.The apparent adsorption rate constant is k298=2.0×10-5 s-1.The adsorption behavior of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) obeys the Freundlich isotherm.The thermodynamic adsorption parameters,enthalpy change ΔH,free energy change ΔG and entropy change ΔS of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) are 13.1 kJ·mol-1,-1.37 kJ·mol-1 and 48.4 J·mol-1·K-1,respectively.The apparent activation energy is Ea=31.3 kJ·mol-1.The molar coordination ratio of the functional group of IDAAR to Lu(Ⅲ) is about 3∶1.The adsorption mechanism of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) was examined by chemical method and IR spectrometry.

  8. Epoxy resin developments for large superconducting magnets impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J. M.; Gallet, B.; Kircher, F.; Lottin, J. C.

    The future detectors ATLAS and CMS of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will use two huge superconducting magnets. Both are now under design, and their electrical insulation could be realized using epoxy resin and a wet impregnation technique. Because of their large dimensions, and the indirect cooling of the superconductor, the strengths of the resin and of the resin/conductor interface are of major importance. A new generation of epoxy resins for vacuum/pressure impregnation methods has been tested, and compared with some classical and well-known epoxy resins used in impregnation techniques. In order to understand the mechanical behaviour at 4 K, the complete evolution from liquid state to low temperature service condition is considered. The paper will present some results on the mechanical properties, the density and the chemical shrinkage occurring during the polymerization and the thermal contraction between room temperature and 4 K for these different types of epoxy resins.

  9. Preparative Purification of Liriodendrin from Sargentodoxa cuneata by Macroporous Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di-Hua; Wang, Yan; Lv, Yuan-Shan; Liu, Jun-Hong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shu-Kun; Zhuo, Yu-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The preparative purification of liriodendrin from Sargentodoxa cuneata using macroporous resin combined with crystallization process was evaluated. The properties of adsorption/desorption of liriodendrin on eight macroporous resins were investigated systematically. X-5 resin was selected as the most suitable medium for liriodendrin purification. The adsorption of liriodendrin on X-5 resin fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model. Dynamic adsorption/desorption tests were performed using a glass column packed with X-5 resin to optimize the separation process of liriodendrin. After one treatment with X-5 resin, the content of liriodendrin in the product was increased 48.73-fold, from 0.85% to 41.42%, with a recovery yield of 88.9%. 97.48% liriodendrin was obtained by further crystallization and determined by HPLC. The purified product possessed strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, purification of liriodendrin might expend its further pharmacological researches and further applications in pharmacy.

  10. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Styrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmukh S. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel unsaturated poly (ester-amide resins (UPEAs were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Styrene (STY. to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-STY. resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO as a catalyst and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The glass fibre reinforced composites (i.e. laminates of these UPEA-STY. resin blends were fabricated using the DSC data. The chemical, mechanical and electrical properties of the glass fibre composites have also been evaluated. The unreinforced cured samples of the UPEA-STY. resin blends were also analyzed by thermogravimetry (TGA.

  11. SYNTHESIS OF A NEW SILICONE-CONTAINING BISMALEIMIDE COPOLYMER RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Wenfeng; CAI Xingxian; JIANG Luxia

    1997-01-01

    A copolymer of bismaleimide-diallylbisphenol A-diphenylsilandiol was synthesized and the copolymerization was studied by using N-phenylmaleimide, bisphenol A and diphenylsilandiol as model compounds. The copolymer could be well cured around 200 ℃, and the cured resins had good thermal stability. In the range of 170-210 ℃, a higher curing temperature was favorable to obtain more thermal stable resin by reducing the content of diphenylsilandiol cyclo-homopolymer in resin which would spoil its thermal stability.

  12. Low HAP/VOC Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    transition temperature UPE unsaturated polyester U.S. EPA Environmental Protection Agency VARTM vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding VE vinyl ester...resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) dorsal cover replacement, in combination with the resin, Hexion 781-2140, containers 47 wt% styrene (Bartling, 2005...large amounts of styrene HAP during production. The VARTM HMMWV hood is in production from TPI Composites (in an expanded capacity vehicle [ECV] HMMWV

  13. Adding Effects of Reactive Oligomers for Epoxy Resin

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 英介; 稲垣, 慎二; 岡本, 弘

    1991-01-01

    Reactive oligomers with both functional end groups were prepared by the radical telomerization and the effect of oligomers added to bisphenol-A-glycidylehter type epoxy resin was investigated by measuring mechanical properties, adhesive properties and dynamic viscoelasticities. These oligomers were high viscous liquid except the one prepared from methyl methacrylate, therefore the blend of oligomers with epoxy resin is easy. Adding oligomers, the cured epoxy resins showed the lower glass-tran...

  14. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  15. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2007-01-01

    of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application...... of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  16. Wear behaviour of epoxy resin filled with hard powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, A.; Boccarusso, L.; Minutolo, F. Capece; Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Langella, A.

    2016-10-01

    The development of high performance materials based on epoxy resin finds a growing number of applications in which high wear resistance is required. One major drawback in many of these applications is the relatively poor wear resistance of the epoxy resin. Therefore, in order to investigate on the possibility of increasing wear resistance of thermoset polymers filled with hard powders, sliding tests are carried out by means of a pin on disc apparatus. In particular, composite resins, constituted by an epoxy resin filled with different contents and sizes of Silicon Carbide powder, are analyzed; the wear resistance, in terms of volume loss, is measured for different abrasive counterfaces and loads.

  17. Effect of praseodymium on catalytic graphitization of furan resin carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易守军; 陈金华; 肖雄; 刘露; 樊桢

    2010-01-01

    We introduced a new catalyst,rare earth element praseodymium,for the catalytic graphitization of furan resin carbon.The extent of graphitization of the furan resin carbon was examined by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.The morphology of furan resin carbon was characterized by scanning electron microscopy.The effects of the praseodymium content and the heat-treatment temperature on the catalytic graphitization of furan resin carbon were also investigated.The results indicated that the praseodymium c...

  18. Study on sorption of D155 resin for gadolinium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Chunhua

    2008-01-01

    The sorption behavior and mechanism of a Macroporous weak acid resin,(D155 resin,)for Gd(III) were investigated. The statically saturated sorption capacity is 283 mg/g resin at 298 K in HAc-NaAc medium. The Gd(III) adsorbed on macroporous weak acid resin,(D155 resin,)could be reductively eluted with the mixed solution of HCl and NaCl, and the elution percentage was as high as 100%. The resin could be regenerated and reused without remarkable decrease in sorption capacity. The apparent sorption rate constant was k298=1.98×10-5 s-1. The apparent activation energy was Ea=2.78 kJ/mol. The sorption behavior of D155 resin for Gd(III) obeyed the Langmuir isotherm. The thermodynamic sorption parameters were (H=33.0 kJ/mol, (S=192 J/mol/K, and (G298=-24.3 kJ/mol. The sorption mechanism of D155 resin for Gd(III) was examined by using chemical method and IR spectrometry. The coordination compound was formed between oxygen atoms in the functional group of D155 resin and Gd (III).

  19. STUDY ON CONTINUOUS ELECTROREGENERATION OF ION EXCHANEG RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuTaishun

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,the continuous electroregeneration of ion exchange resin is investegated.The mixed resin is inserted between a cation exchange membrane and an anion exchange membrane.The effluent water of fresh water room meets the demand for power plant on water treatment.The B2 that is the cumulative formation constant of the metal complexes of resin is very differente with or without electric field.It indicates that the dissociation degree of metal complexes of resin is greater wit electric field than that without electric field.

  20. Modified ion exchange resins - synthesis and properties. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doescher, F.; Klein, J.; Pohl, F.; Widdecke, H.

    1982-01-22

    Sulfomethylated resins are prepared by polymer analogous reactions, starting from macroporous poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) matrices. Different reaction paths are discussed and used in the synthesis. Sulfomethylation can be achieved by reaction of a chloromethylated resin with dimethyl sulfide and sodium sulfonate or alternatively by oxidation of polymer-bound thiol groups. Both methods give high conversions as shown by IR spectra and titration of the sulfonic acid groups. Poly(1-(4-hydroxysulfomethylphenyl)ethylene) (3) is obtained by reaction of poly(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylene) (2) resin with formaldehyde/sodium sulfonate. The thermal stability, catalytic activity, and ion exchange equilibria of the sulfomethylated resin are investigated.

  1. The creep behavior of acrylic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiku, E R; Biotidara, F O

    1996-01-01

    The creep behavior of acrylic dental base resins, at room temperature and at different loading conditions, has been examined. The behaviors of these resins are similar to that of "commercial perspex" at room temperature over a period of 1000 seconds. The pseudo-elastic moduli of the blends of PMMA VC show a significant increase compared with PMMA alone. The addition of the PVC powder to the heat-cured acrylic resin increased the time-dependent elastic modulus. This increase in elastic modulus is advantageous in the production of denture based resins of improv mechanical properties.

  2. THE POLYMERIZATION OF ROOM TEMPERATURE CURING EPOXY RESINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPOXY RESINS , *PLASTICS, *POLYMERIZATION, AGING (PHYSIOLOGY), CHEMICAL BONDS, ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES, EMBEDDING SUBSTANCES, MONITORS, POLYMERS, RESISTANCE (ELECTRICAL), STORAGE, STRUCTURES, TEMPERATURE, TEST METHODS, VOLUME

  3. Report on use of XAD resins in racing chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    This report comprises a summary of the work done with XAD resin extraction by racing chemists and reported in the Association of Official Racing Chemists publications. It is apparent that the use of XAD resins is becoming more popular in racing laboratories as a technique for routine screening and also for the extraction of certain conjugated drugs. Most laboratories employ variations on the original Brinkmann Drug-Skreen Technique. Comparisons of the efficiency of extraction of drugs from horse urine by XAD-2 resin and by chloroform column extraction indicate that some drugs can be extracted with equal or greater efficiency by the resin technique. PMID:1000159

  4. Acetylene-chromene terminated resins as high temperature thermosets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godschalx, J. P.; Inbasekaran, M. N.; Bartos, B. R.; Scheck, D. M.; Laman, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    A novel phase transfer catalyzed process for the preparation of propargyl ethers has been developed. The propargyl ethers serve as precursors to a new class of thermosetting resins called acetylene-chromene terminated (ACT) resins. Heat treatment of a solution of propargyl ethers with various catalysts, followed by removal of solvent leads to the ACT resins via partial conversion of the propargyl ether groups to chromenes. This process reduces the energy content of the resin systems and reduces the amount of shrinkage found during cure. Due to the presence of the solvent the process is safe and gives rise to low viscosity products suitable for resin transfer molding and filament winding type applications. Due to the high glass transition temperature, high modulus, and low moisture uptake the cured resins display better than 232 C/wet performance. The thermal stability of the ACT resins in air at 204 C is superior to that of conventional bismaleimide resins. The resins also display excellent electrical properties.

  5. PEG-related polymer resins as synthetic supports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry has become a significant part of the discovery and optimization process for novel drugs,affinity ligands,and catalysts.The polymeric supports play a key role in combinatory chemistry.Therefore,various kinds of functional polymer resins have been exploited as supports,reagents,and catalysts in organic synthesis.In comparison to the conventional Merrifield resins,the poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-related polymer resins have advantages including good compatibilities with polar solvents,good solvent absorbency and swelling properties.This review focuses primarily on the more recent work in the field of developing PEG-related polymer resins as supports for organic synthesis.

  6. Separation of matrine and oxymatrine from Sophora flavescens extract through cation exchange resin coupled with macroporous absorption resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Haohao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for separation of matrine and oxymatrine from Sophora flavescens was developed with cation exchange resin coupled with macroporous resin. Based on the adsorption characteristics of matrine and oxymatrine, 001×732 cation exchange resin was used to absorb target alkaloids for removing most of the foreign matter, while BS-65 macroporous resin was chosen to purify these alkaloids. The result showed that the equilibrium adsorption data of matrine and oxymatrine on 001×732 resin and BS-65 resin at 30°C was fitted to Langmuir isotherm and Freundlich isotherm, respectively. The contents of matrine and oxymatrine were increased from 0.73% and 2.2% in the crude extract of the root of Sophora flavescens to 67.2% and 66.8% in the final eluent products with the recoveries of 90.3% and 86.9%, respectively.

  7. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment.

  8. 77 FR 16508 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ...: Group IV Polymers and Resins; Pesticide Active Ingredient Production; and Polyether Polyols Production... pollutants: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins...: Group IV Polymers and Resins; Pesticide Active Ingredient Production; and Polyether Polyols...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carbomonocycle resin (generic). 721.9480 Section 721.9480 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... carbomonocycle resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin...

  10. In vitro mutagenicity testing. I. Kermide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, and Sylgard 184 curing agent. [Ames Salmonella assay system used

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.Y.; Smith, D.M.

    1978-08-01

    Five compounds, Kerimide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, Sylgard 184 curing agent, benzo(a)pyrene, and acridine orange were tested for in vitro mutagenicity using the Ames Salmonella assay system. Kerimide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, and Sylgard 184 curing agent were not mutagenic under the described experimental conditions, while benzo(a)pyrene and acridine orange were both mutagenic.

  11. PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF ALKYL SUBSTITUTED PHENOLIC EPOXY RESIN

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Chaudhary*, Supriya Dadhich, Giriraj Tailor

    2017-01-01

    The present article deals with the synthesis of phenolic epoxy resin by the reaction of phenolic resin and epichlorohydrin. The synthesis of phenolic resin was carried out by using p-ethylphenol, formaldehyde and naphthol. The structures of phenolic and epoxy resins were confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The synthesized epoxy resin showed solubility in polar solvents like DMF, dioxane, acetone, DMSO, THF, ethyl acetate, and chloroform. Thermal characterization of epoxy resin was monitored ...

  12. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study...

  13. Selective adsorption of flavor-active components on hydrophobic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarionpour, Shima; Sevillano, David Mendez; Van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Noordman, T Reinoud; Brouwer, Eric; Ottens, Marcel

    2016-12-09

    This work aims to propose an optimum resin that can be used in industrial adsorption process for tuning flavor-active components or removal of ethanol for producing an alcohol-free beer. A procedure is reported for selective adsorption of volatile aroma components from water/ethanol mixtures on synthetic hydrophobic resins. High throughput 96-well microtiter-plates batch uptake experimentation is applied for screening resins for adsorption of esters (i.e. isoamyl acetate, and ethyl acetate), higher alcohols (i.e. isoamyl alcohol and isobutyl alcohol), a diketone (diacetyl) and ethanol. The miniaturized batch uptake method is adapted for adsorption of volatile components, and validated with column breakthrough analysis. The results of single-component adsorption tests on Sepabeads SP20-SS are expressed in single-component Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips isotherm models and multi-component versions of Langmuir and Sips models are applied for expressing multi-component adsorption results obtained on several tested resins. The adsorption parameters are regressed and the selectivity over ethanol is calculated for each tested component and tested resin. Resin scores for four different scenarios of selective adsorption of esters, higher alcohols, diacetyl, and ethanol are obtained. The optimal resin for adsorption of esters is Sepabeads SP20-SS with resin score of 87% and for selective removal of higher alcohols, XAD16N, and XAD4 from Amberlite resin series are proposed with scores of 80 and 74% respectively. For adsorption of diacetyl, XAD16N and XAD4 resins with score of 86% are the optimum choice and Sepabeads SP2MGS and XAD761 resins showed the highest affinity towards ethanol.

  14. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... *Polyimides *Polypropylene Resins Polystyrene (Crystal) Polystyrene (Crystal) Modified *Polystyrene—Copolymers *Polystyrene—Acrylic Latexes Polystyrene Impact Resins Polystyrene Latex Polystyrene, Expandable...

  15. HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

    2007-09-27

    A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit.

  16. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a weigh

  17. Does Adhesive Resin Application Contribute to Resin Bond Durability on Etched and Silanized Feldspathic Ceramic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of adhesive application and aging on the bond durability of resin cement to etched and silanized feldspathic ceramic. Materials and Methods: Twenty blocks (6.4 x 6.4 x 4.8 mm) of feldspathic ceramic (Vita VM7) were produced. The ceramic surfaces were conditioned with 10

  18. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  19. Synthesis of Resins with Chiral Salen Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; YunPu

    2001-01-01

    The enormous growth in the use of polymer resin supports in solid phase combinatorial synthesis, and related methodologies, has re-stimulated interest in the area of polymer-supported transition metal complex catalyst .The recently developed chiral salen-based for the enantioselective ring opening of meso epoxides and kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides are appealing candidates for immobilization on solid support. The catalysts are reading prepare from inexpensive components, and are amenable to modification for attachment to a solid support.  ……

  20. Isothermal aging effects on PMR-15 resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1993-01-01

    Specimens of PMR-15 polyimide neat resin were aged in air at temperatures of 288, 316, and 343 C. Weight losses and dimensional changes were monitored during the course of the exposure time. Physical changes were also observed by optical and electron microscopy. It was found that polyimide polymer degradation occurred within a thin surface layer that developed and grew during thermal aging. The cores of the polymer specimens were protected from oxidative degradation, and they were relatively unchanged by the thermal treatment. Surface cracking was observed at 343 C and was probably due to an interaction between voids and stresses that developed in the surface layer.

  1. Two pentasaccharide resin glycosides from Argyreia acuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yong-Qin; Pan, Jie-Tao; Yu, Bang-Wei; Cui, Hong-Hua; Yan, You-Shao; Chen, Yan-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Two new compounds of acutacosides 1 and 2, pentasaccharide resin glycosides were isolated from the aerial parts of Argyreia acuta. The core of the two compounds was operculinic acid A, and they were esterfied at the same position, just one substituent group was linked at C-2 of Rha. The absolute configuration of the aglycone in the two compounds was established by Mosher's method, which was (11S)-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid). Their structures were established by a combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  2. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1986-12-16

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  3. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF EPOXY RESIN WATERBORNE DISPERSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-zhong Yang; Yuan-ze Xu; De-lu Zhao

    2001-01-01

    The waterborne dispersions of epoxy resin were prepared by the phase inversion emulsification technique.Rheological behavior and its relationship with the structural change of the systems were studied. It was shown that the concentrated dispersions were highly viscoelastic and pseudoplastic, which was attributed to the formation of a physical network among the waterborne particles via hydrogen bond. The dilute dispersions were Newtonian fluids. The discrete clusters composed of small waterborne particles were found in diluted dispersions. With increasing solid content, there existed a structural transition via percolation through a cluster-cluster aggregation mode to form the physical network, which was qualitatively evidenced by the TEM morphologies.``

  4. The Durability of Epoxy Resin Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Fujun; BA Hengjing; GAO Xiaojian

    2008-01-01

    The durability of epoxy resin coating was studied under environments with relative humidity(RH) of 98%-100%, at 55 ℃ for 900 h, at 65℃ for 700 h and at 75 ℃ for 400 h, respectively. Peel strength test, dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were employed for measurements. Peel strength indicated the development of adhesive property of the coating, DMTA indicated the development of physical property, IR revealed the development of chemical structure, and EDX showed surface element change of the coating. All these results show a good time-temperature equivalence characteristic between humidity aging time and temperature.

  5. Integrating Porous Resins In Enzymatic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Haque, Naweed

    Increasing pressure mandated by different government policies, for developing sustainable chemical processes for the synthesis of optically pure compounds, has resulted in increased considerations of biocatalysis as a viable option by many industries. Biocatalysis, with its exquisite selective...... capacity points towards the need for higher resin loading, which in turn determines the equilibrium concentration of the substrate in the reactor and the type of reactor that can be used (stirred tank reactor or packed bed reactor). Similarly low product selectivity would result in higher product...

  6. Nonlinear time dependent behaviour of epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotzke, C.; Feldmann, T.

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear behaviour of epoxy resins is studied on standard tensile tests. A strain field measurement system is applied (Aramis) in order to monitor local strains. The residual strain is measured by recovering the specimens for up to 68 hours after unloading. The time span the specimen is exposed to load has a large influence on the creeping process and the residual strain after recovering. This is studied by comparison of instantaneous unloading with keeping the specimen under permanent load for thirty minutes. It is shown that moderate differences in the initial strain can lead to large differences in the creep behaviour as well as in the residual strain.

  7. A comparison of shear bond strength of ceramic and resin denture teeth on different acrylic resin bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial plan was designed and a three-way ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate if shear bond strength is affected by the following factors: (i) tooth material (ceramic or resin); (ii) base material (self-curing or thermal-curing resin); (iii) presence or absence of aluminium oxide sandblasting treatment at the tooth-base interface. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant difference between shear strength values measured for the dif-ferently prepared samples. It was found from ANOVA that the above mentioned factors all affect shear strength. Furthermore, post hoc analysis indi-cated that there are statistically significant differences (p-value=0.000) between measured shear strength values for: (i) teeth made of ceramic material vs. teeth made of acrylic resin material; (ii) bases made of self-curing resin vs. thermal-curing resin; (iii) specimens treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting vs. untreated specimens. Shear strength values measured for acryl-ic resin teeth were on average 70% higher than those measured for ceramic teeth. The shear bond strength was maximized by preparing samples with thermal-curing resin bases and resin teeth submitted to aluminium oxide sandblasting.

  8. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as... resins used in food-packaging adhesives complying with § 175.105 of this chapter. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified....

  9. [Adaptation of acrylic resin dentures polymerized using various activation modes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamata, T; Inoue, Y; Hashimoto, K; Sugitou, S; Arakawa, H; Kurasawa, I

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of maxillary dentures made using a conventional heat-activated PMMA resin, a pour resin, a visible light-activated resin, and a microwave-activated acrylic resin. Two simple methods for measuring dimensional accuracy were used: (1) weight of impression material entrapped between the base and master die and (2) measurement of the posterior border gap at five locations. The volume of space between the denture base and the master die was determined by (1) computation and (2) estimation. Statistical analysis (Bartlett, ANOVA and Tukey's Tests) supported the following conclusions: (1) all groups showed a processing contraction, most apparent from buccal flange to buccal flange, (2) the poorest fitting group was processed in a brass flask and a water bath at a temperature which rose from 70 to 100 degrees C, using a heat activated resin (Acron), (3) the visible light activated resin (Triad) produced dentures of intermediate accuracy, as did Acupac 20 when either heat or microwave activated, (4) the two best fitting groups were prepared from a chemically activated resin system using pressure at low heat (PER form), and the resin developed for microwave activation (Acron MC).

  10. Evaluation of resin adhesion to zirconia ceramic using some organosilanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Heikkinen, Mo; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated and compared the effect of three trialkoxysilane coupling agents on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA-based unfilled resin and a dimethacrylate-based resin composite luting cement to a zirconia ceramics (Procera(R) AllZircon, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden). Methods. S

  11. Resin-Bonded Bridges in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Johannes Hilbrandt van der

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis in vitro and in vivo studies on the clinical application of resin-bonded bridges are described and discussed. The development of different types of resin-bonded bridges is described in chapter 1. The bridges are often made by boding a cast metal retainer fitted with and artificial too

  12. STABLE PHOTOINDUCED RADICAL ACCUMULATION ON POLYPROPYLVIOLIGEN—RESIN COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    lIUFutian; LiWenhua; 等

    1998-01-01

    The photochemical properties of polypropylviologen(PPrV)-cation exchangeable resin complexes were studies.The color of these complexes changed to blue when irradiated by a mercury lamp.UV and ESR studies indicated that an efficient viologen radical accumulation occurs in PPrV- resin complexes.An explanation for the stable photoinduced redical accumulation is proposed.

  13. Comparison of activated chromatography resins for protein immobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, T.; Meng, L.; Ottens, M.; Beckhoven, van Ruud; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to an immobilized camelid-derived antibody fragment was investigated using six different activated resins, of which two are prototypes. The resins differed in base material, coupling chemistry and particle size. The adsorption, washing and desorption stag

  14. Self-encoding resin beads of combinatorial library screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Du; Zhao, Yuandi; Cheng, Tongsheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2003-07-01

    The latest self-encoding resin bead is a novel technology for solid phase synthesis combinatorial library screening. A new encode-positional deconvolution strategy which was based on that technology been illustrated compared with positional scanning and iterative strategies. The self-encoding resin beads technology provides an efficient method for improving the high-throughput screening of combinatorial library.

  15. Mechanism of Reduction Action of Unsaturated Polyester Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reduction action mechanism of the unsatrurated polyester resin reducer is analysed by the free space volume theory.Through measuring the reduction magnitude in each phase of solidification,the authors predicted the rate of reduction is in concordance with the results from experiments.From this we presented corresponding solutions to different causes of the reduction action of the unsaturated polyester resin.

  16. Teaching dental anatomy with light-activated resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Y; Denehy, G E; Schulein, T M

    1984-04-01

    A method has been described in which light-activated resins are incorporated into the dental anatomy laboratory. This procedure is a valuable addition to the anatomy course because students (1) work with a restorative material appropriate for anterior teeth, (2) learn the unique properties of the light-activated resins, and (3) apply the principles of dental anatomy to a clinically relevant task.

  17. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1242d - Levamisole resinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Levamisole resinate. 520.1242d Section 520.1242d Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242d Levamisole resinate. (a) Specifications. The drug is...

  19. Guayule resin detection and influence on guayule rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is a natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) producing crop, native to North America. Guayule also produces organic resins, complex mixtures of terpenes, triglycerides, guayulins, triterpenoids and other components. During natural rubber extraction, guayule resins can b...

  20. Application conditions for ester cured alkaline phenolic resin sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-he Huang; Bao-ping Zhang; Yao-ji Tang

    2016-01-01

    Five organic esters with different curing speeds: propylene carbonate (i.e. high-speed ester A); 1, 4-butyrolactone; glycerol triacetate (i.e. medium-speed ester B); glycerol diacetate; dibasic ester (DBE) (i.e. low-speed ester C), were chosen to react with alkaline phenolic resin to analyze the application conditions of ester cured alkaline phenolic resin. The relationships between the curing performances of the resin (including pH value, gel pH value, gel time of resin solution, heat release rate of the curing reaction and tensile strength of the resin sand) and the amount of added organic ester and curing temperature were investigated. The results indicated the folowing: (1) The optimal added amount of organic ester should be 25wt.%-30wt.% of alkaline phenolic resin and it must be above 20wt.%-50 wt.% of the organic ester hydrolysis amount. (2) High-speed ester A (propylene carbonate) has a higher curing speed than 1, 4-butyrolactone, and they were both used as high-speed esters. Glycerol diacetate is not a high-speed ester in alkaline phenolic resin although it was used as a high-speed ester in ester cured sodium silicate sand; glycerol diacetate and glycerol triacetate can be used as medium-speed esters in alkaline phenolic resin. (3) High-speed ester A, medium-speed ester B (glycerol triacetate) and low-speed ester C (dibasic ester, i.e., DBE) should be used below 15 ºC, 35 ºC and 50 ºC, respectively. High-speed ester A or low-speed ester C should not be used alone but mixed with medium-speed ester B to improve the strength of the resin sand. (4) There should be a suitable solid content (generaly 45wt.%-65wt.% of resin), alkali content (generaly 10wt.%-15wt.% of resin) and viscosity of alkaline phenolic resin (generaly 50-300 mPa·s) in the preparation of alkaline phenolic resin. Finaly, the technique conditions of alkaline phenolic resin preparation and the application principles of organic ester were discussed.

  1. A Quantum Chemistry Study on Structural Properties of Petroleum Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Daxi; Pan Yueqiu; Zhang Hongye

    2007-01-01

    The geometries of resins with single-layer (SG), double-layer (DG) and triple-layer (TG) were calculated with the quantum chemistry method. The geometries and net charges of atoms were obtained. The calculated average distances between layers were 0.5348 nm and 0.5051 nm and the action energies were -9.6355 kJ/mol and -32.2803 kJ/mol for resins DG and TG, respectively. Higher electronegative polar atoms can easily form hydrogen bonds with hydrogen atoms of other resin molecules, resulting in resin aggregates. The minimum cross-sectional diameters of resin molecules are too large to enter the pores of zeolite, so they are likely to crack on the surface of zeolite.

  2. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores.

  3. Occurrence of polycadinene in fossil and recent resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aarssen, B. G. K.; de Leeuw, J. W.; Collinson, M.; Boon, J. J.; Goth, K.

    1994-01-01

    Dammars produced by Dipterocarpaceae growing in Southeast Asia are partly composed of a macromolecule with a polycadinene structure. This polymer is the precursor of many specific compounds encountered in crude oils and sediment extracts from South Asia. Until recently there was no evidence for a more widespread geographical occurrence of this resinous polymer. Using different pyrolysis methods it is shown that the polymers present in a resinite from Utah, USA, and in resins contained in resin canals of Eocene fossil fruits from Germany and England are also polycadinenes. The fossil fruits were undoubtedly produced by ancient representatives of mastixioid Cornaceae, a group of plants which was widespread in the Tertiary of Europe and North America and which is not related to Dipterocarpaceae. These findings extend the known occurrence and origin of the sesquiterpenoid type resin polymer. It is to be expected that catagenetic products of these resin polymers should be present in oils, coals, and sediment extracts from areas outside Southeast Asia.

  4. Posterior resin-based composite: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J O; Walker, Richard; Davidson, J M

    2002-01-01

    The use of direct posterior resin-based composite has increased primarily due to patient esthetic desires and product improvements. Other factors (substantiated or not) contributing to increased use of resin-based composite are environmental and health concerns with dental amalgam. New visible light cured resin-based composite products are introduced yearly, as manufacturers continue to improve this tooth-colored restorative material. This paper will characterize current posterior resin-based composite materials (hybrid, microfill, flowable, and packable), review recent in vitro and clinical research, and recommend indications for these materials. In addition, the literature on compomers will be reviewed and recommendation made for their use. The data indicates that composite resin is a technique sensitive restorative material that can be used in large preparations if proper manipulation and isolation can be maintained. Compomers may also be used as an esthetic posterior restorative if proper isolation is provided.

  5. Effect of Resin on the Strength Characteristics of Thonnakkal Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SmithaAlex

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving the properties of soil by stabilization is considered as a means of fulfilling design criteria. Stabilization is usually performed to improve material properties of soil such as strength, stiffness, and permeability. The use of new materials for soil strengthening is crucial for geotechnical engineering, especially in foundation construction. Experiments were conducted using resins with different epoxy resin-to-water (ER/W ratios. . The results show that by increasing the resin in the soil, the maximum dry density increases, and the optimum water content decreases in the compaction tests.The results indicate that the epoxy resins improve the physical and mechanical properties of soil significantly, and if successfully grouted into a formation, the resins could provide a suitable solution for the stabilization of foundation material.

  6. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  7. Has resin-based composite replaced amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-02-01

    The major health organizations in the world continue to accept amalgam use, but the "amalgam war" of the 1800s is still going on. The end is not in sight. There is little disagreement that amalgam serves well and, although controversial, it appears to have minimal to no health hazards. There is a wide variation in the relative amount of amalgam placed in developed countries, and many dentists in North America do not use it. However, amalgam is still being used at least some of the time by the majority of practitioners in North America, and most of those practitioners also place resin-based composite in Class II locations. The evolution from amalgam to tooth-colored restorations has been a slow and tumultuous journey. The acceptability of resin-based composite in Class II locations continues to be a question for some dentists, while others have concluded that amalgam is "dead." It would be highly desirable if some of dentists using the alleged poisonous properties of amalgam as a "practice building" ploy would find more legitimate methods to increase their practice activity.

  8. Resin screening for the removal of pyridine-derivatives from waste-water by solvent impregnated resin technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, J.; Schuur, B.; Haan, de A.B.

    2013-01-01

    The selective removal of pyridine derivatives by solvent impregnated resins has been studied. A solvent impregnated resin consists of a macro-porous particle that is impregnated with a solvent. This technology allows the use liquid–liquid extraction in fixed-bed operation, and prevents problems like

  9. Removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate from wastewater by anion exchange resins: effects of resin properties and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shubo; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2010-10-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a new persistent organic pollutant of substantial environmental concern, and its removal from industrial wastewater is critical to eliminate its release into water environment. In this paper, six anion exchange resins with different polymer matrix, porosity, and functional group were evaluated for PFOS removal from simulated wastewater. Resin matrix displayed significant effect on the sorption kinetics and capacity of PFOS, and the polyacrylic resins including IRA67 and IRA958 exhibited faster sorption and higher sorption capacity for PFOS than the polystyrene resins due to the hydrophilic matrix. Sorption isotherms illustrated that the sorption capacity of PFOS on IRA67 and IRA958 was up to 4-5 mmol/g, and the amount of PFOS sorbed on the resins was more than chloride released from resins, indicating that other interactions besides anion exchange were involved in the sorption. Solution pH had little impact on the sorption of PFOS on IRA958, but displayed significant effect on IRA67 at pH above 10 due to the deprotonation of amine groups. The coexisting sulfate and hexavalent chromium in wastewater interfered with the sorption of PFOS because of their competitive sorption on the exchange sites. The spent resins were successfully regenerated using the mixture of NaCl and methanol solution. This work provided an understanding of sorption behavior and mechanism of PFOS on different anion exchange resins, and should result in more effective applications of ion exchange for PFOS removal from industrial wastewater.

  10. Extraction of Carbon Dioxide From Seawater by Ion Exchange Resin. Part 2. Using Strong Base Anion Exchange Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-29

    Figure 1. Table 2 - Resin Properties of Static Experiments Using Amberjet 4400 in OH Form (150 minute contact time). Sample Concentration (Molar...0.271 1 36 17.9 0.0075 150 0.267 134 19.0 Table 4 - Resin Properties of Static Experiments Using Amberjet 4400 in Cl Form (150 minute contact time

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM , size R4, embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37°C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN. Independent sample ′t′ test revealed a nonsignificant ( P < 0.385 difference between mean shear bond strength values of conventional and nanocomposite group. The bond strength values revealed that nanocomposite had slightly higher mean shear bond strength (21.04 ± 0.56 compared to conventional composite (20.78 ± 0.60. It was found that conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  12. Study on Chelating Resins XXXI Syntheses and Adsorption Properties of a New Type of Bead Resins Containing S and N

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new type of bead crosslinked chelating resins containing coordinate atoms N and S were synthesized by the reaction of polyethyleneimine with chloromethylthiirane in suitable sovent at temperature of 2080C. These chelating resins exhibited excellent adsorption properties for precious metal ions.

  13. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... required in the production of the resins or added to impart desired physical and technical properties. The optional adjuvant substances may include resins produced by the condensation of allyl ether of mono-, di... percent (by volume) ethyl alcohol in distilled water at 160 °F for 4 hours yields total extractives not...

  14. KINETIC MODELING OF ESTERIFICATION OF EPOXY RESIN IN THE PRESENCE OF TRIPHENYLPHOSPHINE FOR PRODUCING VINYL ESTER RESIN: MECHANISTIC RATE EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Rafizadeh; H. Ghasemi; V. Haddadi-Asl

    2006-01-01

    Due to its mechanical properties and ease of use, vinyl ester resin is enjoying increasing consideration. This resin normally is produced by reaction between epoxy resin and unsaturated carboxylic acid. In the present study, bis-phenol A based epoxy resin and methacrylic acid was used to produce vinyl ester resin. The reaction was conducted under both stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric conditions in the presence of triphenylphosphine as catalyst. The stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric experiments were conducted at 95, 100, 105 and 110℃ and at 90 and 95℃, respectively. The first order rate equation and mechanism based rate equation were examined. Parameters are evaluated by least square method. A comparison of mechanism based rate equation and experimental data show an excellent agreement. Finally, Arrhenius equation and activation energy were presented.

  15. Study for highly functional resin (macroporous resin) superior in removing micro particles in PWR primary circuit: on-site test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itou, A.; Kondo, K.; Kouzuma, Y., E-mail: ayumu_itou@kyuden.co.jp [Kyusyu Electric Power Co., Inc., Minami-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Umehara, R.; Shimizu, Y., E-mail: Ruyji_Umehara@mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Kogawa, N.; Nagamine, K., E-mail: nkogawa@ndc.hq.mhi.co.jp [Nuclear Development Corp., Tokaimura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    In Japanese PWR plants, efforts to remove particulate constituents containing radioactive cobalt which provides a source of radiation exposure, are needed. Performance evaluation study was conducted for macroporous resin which was said to possess excellent performance in removing particulate constituents and whose practical accomplishment at plants in USA was reported to be good. As one of the means for radiation exposure reduction in PWR, a study for application of crud removing resin to actual plant was executed by laboratory experiments using simulated crud (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particle). In this study, following two mechanisms were demonstrated as the particle capturing mechanism of macroporous resin; physical trapping by fine pores on resin surface; electrical adsorption onto resin surface. In addition, in parallel to the study for application of macroporous resin to actual PWR plant, on-site study was planned to investigate the primary system water chemistry during various stages of actual plant operation and to research performance of particle capturing in detail. As the on-site study, column experiments, there water was let pass through the column, were planned for various operation stage (startup period, power operation period and shutdown period). A kind of conventional gel-type resin and three kinds of macroporous resin were examined for onsite tests. As to particulate capturing, basic knowledge regarding capturing efficiency and influence of water chemistry on capturing performance were ordered. Capturing performance of each resin tested became clear and was ordered by comparison. Effectiveness of macroporous resin with regard to crud removal in primary coolant was confirmed. (author)

  16. Bond Strength of Repaired Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Máximo de ARAÚJO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the bond strength of direct composite resins and composite repairs, using 3 different commercial brands - GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (Tokuyama, GII: Filtek Z350 (3M/ESPE and GIII: Te Econon (Ivoclar/Vivadent - and the use of AdperTM Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE adhesive system at the base/repair interface. Method: Thirty conic bases (5 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm of each commercial brand of composite resin were fabricated. All bases of each group were submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 20,000 cycles (5ºC to 55ºC ± 2ºC, for 30 s. The bases of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub-groups, in which a combination of the commercial brands was performed for the repairs. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C during 7 days and were thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC - MEM 2000 with 500 kgf load cell running at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data in MPa were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (5%.Results: The following results were found: GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (11.22±4.00 MPa, Te Econom (12.03±3.47 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.66±2.89 MPa; GII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.88±2.04 MPa, Te Econom (7.77±1.64 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.50±6.14 MPa; and GIII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.41±2.50 MPa, Te Econom (12.33±3.18 MPa and Z350 (11.73±3.54 MPa.Conclusion: The bond strengths at the interface of the different composite resins submitted to repair were statistically similar regardless of the commercial brand.

  17. The Feasibility of Electrical Monitoring of Resin Cure with the Charge-Flow Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    inject charge into the resin. This may depend on resin properties , and it may be determined by oxide forma- tion on the electrode. C - An electrode-to...dependent on the resin properties . R - The bulk resin resistance, which represents the resistance through which the mid-channel region is coupled to the

  18. Low-Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP)/Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) - Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Illustration of VARTM (38). ...................................................................................205 Figure 141. Monomer synthesis steps...requirements for VARTM production of VE resins.....................................222 Table 95. Total material cost for incumbent and replacement resins with...resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) process for the T-38 dorsal cover in the following reference: • Bartling, E. T-38 Dorsal Cover Resin Infusion. U.S

  19. 21 CFR 178.3610 - α-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true α-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated... resins, hydrogenated. Hydrogenated α-methylstyrene-vinyltoluene copolymer resins having a molar ratio of...-vinyltoluene copolymer resins have a drop-softening point of 125° to 165 °C and a maximum absorptivity of...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1632 - Poly (phenyl-enetereph-thala-mide) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly (phenyl-enetereph-thala-mide) resins. 177.1632...-thala-mide) resins. Poly(phenyleneterephthalamide) resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section...) Identity. For the purpose of this section, the poly(phenylene- terephthalamide) resins (CAS Reg. No....

  1. 76 FR 42114 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... International Trade Administration Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Continuation of... the antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin (``PTFE resin'') from Italy would... sunset review of the antidumping duty order on PTFE resin from Italy, pursuant to section 751(c)(2)...

  2. 40 CFR 63.5728 - What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... molding resin operations? 63.5728 Section 63.5728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations § 63.5728 What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? (a) If a resin application operation meets the definition of closed molding specified in §...

  3. 76 FR 3614 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... International Trade Administration Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan: Final Results of Sunset... resin (``PTFE resin'') from Japan. See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 67082..., the Department published an antidumping duty order on imports of PTFE resin from Japan....

  4. 76 FR 12939 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... International Trade Administration Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Final Results of Expedited... granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin (``PTFE resin'') from Italy. The Department has conducted an... antidumping duty order on PTFE resin from Italy pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930,...

  5. VALIDATION FOR THE PERMANGANATE DIGESTION OF REILLEX HPQ ANION RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.

    2009-09-23

    The flowsheet for the digestion of Reillex{trademark} HPQ was validated both under the traditional alkaline conditions and under strongly acidic conditions. Due to difficulty in performing a pH adjustment in the large tank where this flowsheet must be performed, the recommended digestion conditions were changed from pH 8-10 to 8 M HNO{sub 3}. Thus, no pH adjustment of the solution is required prior to performing the permanganate addition and digestion and the need to sample the digestion tank to confirm appropriate pH range for digestion may be avoided. Neutralization of the acidic digestion solution will be performed after completion of the resin digestion cycle. The amount of permanganate required for this type of resin (Reillex{trademark} HPQ) was increased from 1 kg/L resin to 4 kg/L resin to reduce the amount of residual resin solids to a minimal amount (<5%). The length of digestion time at 70 C remains unchanged at 15 hours. These parameters are not optimized but are expected to be adequate for the conditions. The flowsheet generates a significant amount of fine manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) solids (1.71 kg/L resin) and involves the generation of a significant liquid volume due to the low solubility of permanganate. However, since only two batches of resin (40 L each) are expected to be digested, the total waste generated is limited.

  6. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  7. Resin infusion of large composite structures modeling and manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, A.C. [Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The resin infusion processes resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are cost effective techniques for the fabrication of complex shaped composite structures. The dry fibrous preform is placed in the mold, consolidated, resin impregnated and cured in a single step process. The fibrous performs are often constructed near net shape using highly automated textile processes such as knitting, weaving and braiding. In this paper, the infusion processes RTM, RFI and VARTM are discussed along with the advantages of each technique compared with traditional composite fabrication methods such as prepreg tape lay up and autoclave cure. The large number of processing variables and the complex material behavior during infiltration and cure make experimental optimization of the infusion processes costly and inefficient. Numerical models have been developed which can be used to simulate the resin infusion processes. The model formulation and solution procedures for the VARTM process are presented. A VARTM process simulation of a carbon fiber preform was presented to demonstrate the type of information that can be generated by the model and to compare the model predictions with experimental measurements. Overall, the predicted flow front positions, resin pressures and preform thicknesses agree well with the measured values. The results of the simulation show the potential cost and performance benefits that can be realized by using a simulation model as part of the development process. (au)

  8. Processing of continuous fiber composites using thermoplastic polyimide matrix resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranjc, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Composites have been produced which contain a solvent resistant polyimide matrix with favorable physical properties. The polyimide matrix resin has been designated as P12. The prepegs used to produce the composite contain a low molecular weight resin which is the polyamic acid precursor to P12. Polymerization and imidization of the precursor resin occurs in-situ during processing. Similar commercial systems are often processed in an autoclave and pressure is used at high temperatures to obtain consolidation between prepreg laminates. Pressure is generally applied after polymerization and imidization are complete and at temperatures above the melting point of the polymer. In this research a significant decrease in composite void content was obtained by applying pressure earlier in the cure. Obtaining composites with low void content with these types of systems can be difficult. This is due in part to the generation of low molecular weight reaction by products, water and methanol. High void content results in a decrease in the physical properties of the composite structure. This is especially true for fracture properties. An empirical equation was used to describe the rate of resin removal from the composite to the bleeder cloth during processing. This equation is based on Springer-Loos resin flow model. The conditions in which this model does not apply were also determined. Determining resin removal rates is helpful in producing composites with consistent fiber/resin ratios. In addition, conditions which favor void growth can be prevented.

  9. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of the Compressive Strength of a Direct Composite Resin and Two Laboratorial Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Costa Reis BRITO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the compressive strength of two commercially available laboratorial resins - Solidex® (Shofu and Cristobal® (Dentsply - to that of a direct composite resin (Concept®; Vigodent, as a control group.Method: Five specimens of each tested material were fabricated using stainless steel matrices with the following dimensions: 8 mm of internal diameter on the base, 9 mm of internal diameter on the top and 4 mm of height. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 72 hours and submitted to an axial load by the action of a 2-mm-diameter round-end tip adapted to a universal testing machine (EMIC 500. A 200 kgf load cell was used running at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load and the point of failure were recorded. Results: Means, in kgf, were: Concept® (Ct = 124.26; Cristobal® (C =184.63; Solidex® (S =173.58. Data (means and standard deviations were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s for comparisons among the groups using the SPSS software (version 10.0. Significance level was set at á=0.05 (95%. Concept® presented significantly lower (p<0.05 compressive strength than the other two materials, Cristobal® and Solidex®, which, in turn, did not differ significantly to each other.Conclusion: Cristobal® and Solidex® laboratorial resins did not show significant difference to each other and both presented compressive strength significantly higher than that of Concept® direct resin.

  11. Biocompatibility of acrylic resin after being soaked in sodium hypochlorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nike Hendrijatini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acrylic resin as basic material for denture will stay on oral mucosa for a very long time. The polymerization of acrylic resin can be performed by conventional method and microwave, both produce different residual monomer at different toxicity. Acrylic resin can absorb solution, porous and possibly absorb disinfectantt as well, that may have toxic reaction with the tissue. Sodium Hypochlorite as removable denture disinfectant can be expected to be biocompatible to human body. The problem is how biocompatible acrylic resin which has been processed by conventional method and microwave method after being soaked in sodium hypochlorite solution. Purpose: The aim of this study was to understand in vitro biocompatibility of acrylic resin which has polimerated by conventional method and microwave after being soaked in sodium hypochlorite using tissue culture. Methods: Four groups of acrylic resin plate were produced, the first group was acrylic resin plate with microwave polymeration and soaked in sodium hypochlorite, the second group was acrylic resin plate with microwave polymeration but not soaked, the thirdwas one with conventional method and soaked and the last group was one with conventional method but not soaked, and in 1 control group. Each group consists of 7 plates. Biocompatibility test was performed in-vitro on each material using fibroblast tissue culture (BHK-21 cell-line. Result: The percentage between living cells and dead cells from materials which was given acrylic plate was wounted. The data was analyzed statistically with T test. Conclusion: The average value of living cells is higher in acrylic resin poimerization using microwave method compared to conventional method, in both soaked and non soaked (by sodium hypochlorite group. This means that sodium hypochlorite 0.5% was biocompatible to the mouth mucosa as removable denture disinfectant for 10 minutes soaking and washing afterwards.

  12. Micromechanical properties of veneer luting resins after curing through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Elif; Hickel, Reinhard; Bolay, Sükran; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of light-cured luting resin after curing under the ceramic restoration in comparison to dual-cured luting resin, by evaluating the micromechanical properties. Two hundred seventy thin luting composite films of ca. 170 μm in thickness were prepared by using two light-cured luting resins (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent; RelyX Veneer, 3M ESPE) and a dual-cured luting resin (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent). The composites were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10, 20, and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent; IPS Empress® CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0, 0.75, and 2 mm). Forty-five groups were included, each containing six thin films. The samples were stored after curing for 24 h at 37°C by maintaining moisture conditions with distilled water. Micromechanical properties of the composites were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). For each sample, ten indentations were made, thus totalizing 60 measurements per group. Micromechanical properties of the luting resins were statistically analyzed (SPSS 17.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the luting resins (p mechanical properties compared to the light-cured luting resins. The effect of luting resin type on the micromechanical properties of the luting resins was higher than the effect of curing time, ceramic type and ceramic thickness respectively (*The values of reference without ceramics for 30 s curing time).

  13. Surface hardness properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2004-11-15

    In this study the top and bottom surface hardness of two polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and one composite resin were evaluated. The affect of water storage on their hardness was also investigated. The study was conducted using four different groups, each having five specimens obtained from fiberglass die molds with a diameter of 5 mm and a height of 2 mm. Measurements were made on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and recorded after 24 hours and again at 60 days. All tested materials showed different hardness values, and the values of top surfaces of the specimens were found to be higher than the bottom surface in all test groups. There was no statistical difference in the Vickers hardness (HV) values when the test specimens were kept in water storage. In conclusion Hytac displayed microhardness values higher than Vitremer and Dyract. We found the order of HV values to be Surfil > Hytac > Dyract > Vitremer, respectively. Vitremer presented the lowest microhardness level and Surfil the highest.

  14. Dimensional accuracy of acrylic resin maxillary denture base polymerized by a new injection pressing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takahiro; Kita, Seiichi; Nokubi, Takashi

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the dimensional accuracy of a newly developed injection pressing method for resin polymerization by making use of the internal electric resistance of resin to determine the optimal timing for resin injection. A new injection pressing polymerization pot with a built-in system to measure the internal electric resistance of resin was used for resin polymerization. Fluid-type resin was injected into the mold of a maxillary complete denture base under nine different conditions: three different timings for resin injection according to the electric resistance of resin dough (early stage: 11 Mohms; intermediate stage: 16 Mohms; final stage: 21 Mohms) and three different motor powers for resin injection (2000 N, 4000 N, and 6000 N). In the best polymerization condition (injected during the early stage of resin dough under a motor power of 6000 N), the adaptation of the denture base showed a statistically significant improvement compared with the conventional pouring method.

  15. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bonding of experimental composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Reza, Fazal

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation using an ordinary UV sterilizer would affect the bonding of experimental composite resins to an autopolymerizing acrylic resin. To this end, three composite resins and one unfilled resin--of which the compositions were similar to commercial composite resin artificial teeth--were prepared as repair composites. Their shear bond strengths after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes were significantly greater than those before UV irradiation regardless of composite resin type. Failure mode after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes was mainly cohesive failure of the composite resins, but that before UV irradiation and after 24 hours' irradiation was mainly adhesive failure. These results thus suggested that a short period of UV irradiation on composite resin teeth would improve the bonding efficacy of composite resin artificial teeth to autopolymerizing resin.

  16. Recyclability of PET from virgin resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancini Sandro Donnini

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Bottle grade virgin PET (polyethylene terephthalate resin was investigated through five consecutive injection molding steps to simulate recycling cycles. Tests were carried out after each recycling to evaluate degradation, crystallinity (by density and Differential Scanning Calorimetry-DSC measurements, hardness, and tensile and flexural properties. Consecutive recycling resulted in cumulative chain breaks caused by the material's contact with degrading agents such as temperature, oxygen, mechanical stresses, light, and water. In the fifth recycling step, for example, the number of carboxylic end groups, an indicator of the extent of chain-break, tripled in comparison to the initial molecule. The smaller chains that were formed fit more easily among the larger ones, thus increasing the percentage of crystalline phase in the structure. These two changes in the polymer's structure explained the recycled products' final properties, i.e., the injected samples became progressively harder and more fragile in each recycling step.

  17. Waterborne Epoxy Resin Modified by AMPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A stable epoxy emulsion was prepared with epoxy resin (EP) as raw material, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) as modifier and benzoyl peroxide as initiator. By criterion of yield of the copolymer AMPS-EP, water-solubility, change of the acid value and intrinsic viscosity [η] along with reaction time, the copolymerization course was deduced. It is found that during the process, AMPS takes part in both the grafting copolymerization with epoxy principal chain and the ring-opening polyaddition with epoxy group. It is also discovered that the yield of AMPS-EP and water dispersing varies with reaction time. When it reaches 1.5 h,AMPS-EP can obtain good water-solubility; but the water-solubility will go bad gradually ifit exceeds 3.5 h.( )R spectrum analysis indicates that partial epoxy group partially remains and the others create sulfonic ester.

  18. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  19. Properties of magnetically attractive experimental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, S; Yasukawa, H; Nomoto, R; Moriyama, K; Hirasawa, T

    1996-12-01

    SUS444 stainless steel filled chemically cured resin composites that can attract magnet were fabricated. The filler was treated with various concentrations of silane. The experimental composite was easy to handle and showed a good shelf life. The maximal properties obtained are as follows; The attraction force to a magnetic attachment was 1/3-1/4 lower than the commercially available magnet-keeper system for dental magnetic attachment. Flexural strength and Knoop hardness of the composite were 76MPa (7.7 kgf/mm2) and 64 KHN. These values were lower than the commercially available chemically cured composite used as a reference. Eluted metal from the composite in 1% lactic acid solution for 7 days showed 0.7 mg/cm2, but in 0.9% NaCl solution for 7 days, it could not be detected.

  20. [Stress profile during curing contraction of composite resin adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, K H; Hickel, R

    1990-11-01

    The wall-to-wall curing contraction of thin composite resin layers was recorded with a tensometer. The composite resin was applied to cylindrically shaped ceramic sample holders with diameters of 3 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm. The distances of the sample holders was set at 50 microns, 100 microns, 150 microns, 200 microns and 300 microns. The shrinkage stress recordings clearly show that the shrinkage forces are governed by the distance of the sample holders and not by the volume or the configuration factor of the composite resin layers.

  1. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, B. [Rohm and Haas Co. (United States); Tsuzuki, S. [Rohm and Haas Co. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  2. Investigation of Resin Systems for Improved Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-04-01

    67 C-I Equilibrium Decomposition Products Molar Composition for a B-N Type Resin with Empirical Formula C 6 H 1 5 B 2 N 3...82 C-II Equilibrium Decomposition Products Molar Composition for a Si-O Type Resin with Empirical Formula C8 HjoSiO 2 85 -xiii - NASA CR-54471 4176...6014-SOOO TABLES (Continued) Page C-Ill Equilibrium Decomposition Products Molar Composition for a Si-O Type Resin with Empirical Formula of CI 2 Hl

  3. The kinetics of fossil resin extraction from a flotation concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Yu, Q.; Miller, J.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The kinetics of fossil resin extraction from a flotation concentrate by heptane were investigated as a function of process variables using monosize particles. Experimental results provide for a better understanding of the refining process and the basis for subsequent design and construction of a continuous resin refining circuit. Based on the effect of process variables (particle size, stirring speed, and temperature) the resin extraction rate appears to be controlled by surface solvation phenomena. The initial extraction rate was found to be inversely proportional to the initial particle size and a kinetic model is being developed to describe the experimental results.

  4. [Influence Factors on Monomer Conversion of Dental Composite Resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yuntao; Wang, Fanghui; Wang, Qingshan

    2015-04-01

    Dental composite resin is a kind of material which has been widely used in dental restoration. Research has found that the influence of residual monomer on the material mechanical, chemical and biological properties cannot be ignored. This paper elaborates these harms of residual monomers. The effects of resin matrix, inorganic filler and initiating system, illumination, secondarily treatment on the degree of conversion were also analyzed. The paper also discusses the effective measures to increase the conversion, and offers theoretical basis for the clinical application and development of composite resin.

  5. Composite resin: a versatile, multi-purpose restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduced more than some 50 years ago, composite resin technology has simplified the manner in which clinicians practice restorative dentistry, offering greater predictability and improved physical properties. Decades of material science and laboratory development along with clinical trials in human subjects have culminated in composite resin being validated as a reliable, multifunctional restorative material. With a wide range of composite resins available today, clinicians can benefit from knowing the infrastructure of a given material in order to determine which type will work best in a particular clinical situation.

  6. PROGRESS IN PHASE INVERSION EMULSIFICATION FOR EPOXY RESIN WATERBORNE DISPERSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-zhong Yang

    2007-01-01

    In this review,our recent work in phase inversion emulsification (PIE)for polymer(especially epoxy resin) waterborne dispersions is summarized.Based on experimental results about PIE process,the physical model is proposed which Can guide the synthesis of the waterborne dispersions such as polymer/nanoparticle composite dispersion.In the presence of a latent curing catalyst,PIE can give a crosslinkable epoxy resin waterborne dispersion.The dispersions can form cured transparent coatings with some unique properties such as UV shielding.They are promising in functional coatings,waterborne resin matrices for composites,and sizing for high performance fibers.

  7. Resin flow and void formation in an autoclave cure cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Lucia, Massimo; Dell'Anna, Riccardo; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    A finite element (FE) model able to evaluate both the evolution of resin flow, degree of reaction and void formation during autoclave cure cycles was developed. The model was implemented using a commercial epoxy matrix widely used in aeronautic field. The FE model also included a kinetic and rheological model whose input parameters were experimentally determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and rheological analysis. The FE model was able to predict the evolution of degree of reaction with very good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the predicted resin losses were lower than 3% of the overall composite resin content.

  8. Preliminary toxicological study of Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.M.; Drake, G.A.; London, J.E.; Thomas, R.G.

    1978-06-01

    The acute oral LD/sub 50//sup 30/ values for Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin in mice and rats were greater than 5 g/kg. According to classical guidelines, the compound would be considered slightly toxic or practically nontoxic in both species. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated this material to be mildly irritating. Eye irritation studies, also in the rabbit, showed that Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin was a mild but transitory irritant. The sensitization study in guinea pigs did not show the resin to be deleterious in this regard.

  9. Attribute based selection of thermoplastic resin for vacuum infusion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhakaran, R.T. Durai; Lystrup, Aage; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The composite industry looks toward a new material system (resins) based on thermoplastic polymers for the vacuum infusion process, similar to the infusion process using thermosetting polymers. A large number of thermoplastics are available in the market with a variety of properties suitable...... be beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a new decision making tool for resin selection based on significant attributes. This article provides a broad overview of suitable thermoplastic material systems for vacuum infusion process available in today’s market. An illustrative example—resin selection...

  10. KEMAMPUAN LEKAT RESIN KOMPOSIT PADA REPARASI RESTORASI PORSELEN YANG FRAKTUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Noerdin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since ceramic and metal ceramic restorations in crown and bridge have the potential to fracture, repairing porcelain restorations has become a serious cosmetic and clinical problem. Composite resins have been the material of choice for porcelain repair intraorally because of the esthetic appearance and easy manipulation. However for the repair to withstand functional load, the bond between the repair material and remaining restoration must be strong and durable. Bond strength between composite resins and dental porcelain have been reported by several authors. Several studies reported that silane solution can significantly improve the bond strength of composite resin to dental porcelain.

  11. Evaluation of Cellular Toxicity of Three Denture Base Acrylic Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi Saravi, M.; M. Vojdani; Bahrani, F

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the cellular toxicity of two newly-released acrylic resins (Futura Gen and GC Reline Hard) in comparison with the conventional heat-cure resin (Meliodent). Materials and Methods: Sample discs from each acrylic resin were placed in 24-well culture plates along with L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. A mixture of the RPMI 1640 medium, antibiotics and 10% FBS was added to the plates and the specimens were incubated in a CO2 incubator. The amount of light abso...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF UP RESIN/GLASSFIBRE ADHERSIVE INTERFACE MICROSTRESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A fibre-optic interface stress sensor was used to characterize the mechanical property of UP resin/glassfibre adhersive interface.During the adhersion agent curing , the contract stress accompanies with dimension contracting, the thermal stress which is produced by the changes of environment temperature caused by curing heat and the procedure of interface stress transmitting were all traced and determined,the micro mechanical properties of UP resin/glassfibre adhersive interface are determined.Also, the longchain softness couple agent has effcet on decreasing the stress concentration of UP resin/glassfibre adhersive interface and enhance the interface adhersive strength is verified.

  13. Chromatographic zinc isotope separation by phenol formaldehyde benzo crown resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xingcheng; Nomura, Masao; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Kaneshiki, Toshitaka; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2006-04-28

    New types of phenol formaldehyde resin having benzo crown as a functional group were synthesized and applied to zinc isotope chromatographic operation. Zinc adsorption and isotope separation capacities were dramatically improved by using phenol formaldehyde benzo-15-crown-5 resin. Zinc batch adsorption tests were performed by various dehydrated organic solvents. Separation coefficient, epsilon 8.1 x 10(-4) and height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) 0.105 cm for the isotopic pair of 68Zn/64Zn in phenol formaldehyde benzo-15-crown-5 resin were obtained in the case of acetone as the solvent at 298+/-1K.

  14. Smile makeover utilizing direct composite resin veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczarski, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Creating a beautiful smile is more than restoring a single tooth back to its proper form. One must take into account the entire aesthetic zone, along with the mechanics of restoring the teeth to proper form and function. To make this effort even more challenging, the clinician is in full control and completely accountable for making the direct composite resin restorations from which the smile is created. Patients usually won't critique the aesthetics of a posterior direct resin, but once we move into the visible smile (along with the fact that most cosmetic procedures are patient desire- and want-driven) we must be able to deliver what the patient expects. Preplanning the case and avoiding the "prep and pray" approach to the smile-design process is the cornerstone of success. Utilizing tools for the creation of the restorations, such as a preoperative wax-up and silicone putty matrix, help the clinician break the procedure down to individual restorations that when created in harmony with the pre-operative design or wax-up, will allow a final "smile design" to emerge with predictability without getting lost in the daunting task of creating the entire smile all at once. Proper use of ideal composite materials adds the final touch on creating realistic results that even the most discerning patients demand. Layering colors, utilizing differing opacities and translucencies within the restorative process, is a must. Having a "recipe" to follow simplifies the process and gives the clinician confidence that the final result will have that realistic look. All in all, the easiest way to handle a challenging case is to break it down into smaller and more manageable increments in order to ensure a predictable outcome.

  15. [Studies on the pour type resin for denture. (I) Mechanical properties (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, K

    1976-09-01

    The influence of crosslinking agents in syrup type resins on the several mechanical properties was studied. These data were compared with those commercially available heat-curing resin and powder-liquid pour type resins. Addition of 2 to 3 mol% of crosslinking agents to the syrup gave best results, which were between those of the heat-curing resin and the powder-liquid pour type resin.

  16. Adhesion of adhesive resin cements to dental zirconia ceramic and human dentin

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the long-term bond strengths of adhesive resin cements to zirconia ceramic and human dentin were evaluated, and resin-ceramic and resin-dentin bonding mechanisms were investigated. In chapter 3, the influence of surface pre-treatment on the bonding durability of three resin cements (Super-Bond C&B resin cement : SB, Clearfil™ Esthetic cement: CEC, Chemiace II: CH) to zirconia ceramic was studied. Most importantly, the influence of chemical reactions of functional monomers in...

  17. STUDY ON THE EPOXY RESIN TOUGHENED BY HYDROXY-TERMINATED BUTADIENE-ACRYLONITRILE COPOLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xiaozu; LI Shaoying; ZHANG Qingyu

    1990-01-01

    Toughened epoxy resin with excellent properties was obtained by adding organic acid anhydride curing agent and hydroxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (HTBN), which is cheaper than CTBN. The anhydride reacts with both epoxy groups on epoxy resin and hydroxyl groups on HTBN. As a result the soft long chains of HTBN and the rigid chain of epoxy resin form one network, giving the resin toughness. Two-phase structure of the toughened resin was observed by SEM and TEM.

  18. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  19. Short Communication. Resin tapping activity as a contribution to the management of maritime pine forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, A.; Pereira, J.M.; Soares, P.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: In this work potential resin yield in a region of high forest ability where maritime pine is the main species was estimated in order to understand the viability of promoting resin exploitation. Area of study: This study was conducted in Castro Da ire County in central region of Portugal. Material and methods: To quantify the resin yield of trees tapped for the first time two plots were installed in a maritime pine stand with average tree age 65 years. Before the beginning of the resin tapping, dendrometric tree variables were measured. Also, in a neighbouring stand, 25 trees were selected to check the relation between tree dbh and resin yield. Gum resin from every tree was weighted during the season. Estimates of potential resin yield in Castro Daire County were made based on data from National Forest Inventory plots, resin tapping legislation and resin yield values obtained in the field. Two scenarios were considered: high and low resin yield. To understand the intentions of forest owners towards restarting resin tapping activity 16 maritime pine forest owners were interviewed. Main results: The results point out a high yield potential capacity for gum resin production in the County: values between 2,025 and 5,873 tons were obtained. Research highlights: Results may highlight the important socio-economical role of the resin tapping activity and can be used to support national forest policies to the resin sector and give forest owners motivation to reactivate resin tapping activity. (Author)

  20. Quantification and Purification of Mulberry Anthocyanins with Macroporous Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueming Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Total anthocyanins in different cultivars of mulberry were measured and a process for the industrial preparation of mulberry anthocyanins as a natural food colorant was studied. In 31 cultivars of mulberry, the total anthocyanins, calculated as cyanidin 3-glucoside, ranged from 147.68 to 2725.46 mg/L juice. Extracting and purifying with macroporous resins was found to be an efficient potential method for the industrial production of mulberry anthocyanins as a food colorant. Of six resins tested, X-5 demonstrated the best adsorbent capability for mulberry anthocyanins (91 mg/mL resin. The adsorption capacity of resins increased with the surface area and the pore radius. Residual mulberry fruit juice after extraction of pigment retained most of its nutrients, except for anthocyanins, and may provide a substrate for further processing.

  1. MODIFICATION OF EPOXY RESINS WITH PHENOLIC HYDROXYL-TERMINATED POLYSILOXANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Qingpu; HUANG Ying; YU Yunzhao

    1995-01-01

    Phenolic hydroxyl-terminated polysiloxanes were incorporated into epoxy resins to reduce the internal stress owing to the mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE).Polysiloxane-epoxy resin block copolymers were made by a pre-reaction step prior to the curing. In the cured resin, the domain size of the polysiloxane phase depended on the structure of the phenolic hydroxyl-terminated polysiloxane. It was found that the modulus of the cured resin depended largely on the level of the modifier, while the CTE was affected greatly by the structure of the polysiloxane. By means of incorporating a few percent of methylphenylsiloxane unit into the polydimethylsiloxane chain, or by introducing more compatible end-capping groups, the compounds of more effective low stress modifiers were synthesized.

  2. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  3. Degradation, fatigue, and failure of resin dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J L

    2008-08-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  4. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  5. Stabilization and volume reduction of radioactive spent ionexchange resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Stabilization and volume reduction of spent radioactive ion-exchange resins (IERs)were studied. Stabilization technology includes volume reduction with wet chemicaloxidation process and immobilization of the residue into cement. Undersuitable conditions, the exhaustedradioactive ion-exchange resins were dissolved successfully in aH2O2-Fe2+/Cu2+ catalytic oxidationsystem (Fenton reagent). The analytical results indicated that the radioactive nuclides loaded in the resins were concentrated in decomposed solution and solid residues. The process parameters ofwet chemical oxidation and solidification were also obtained. Thedecomposition ratios were 100%and more than 90% for cation and anion IERs respectively. The waste volume was decreased by40% compared with that of original spent resins.

  6. Ultrasonic extraction of resins from an historic textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezić, I; Krstić, D; Bokić, Lj

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound assisted extraction was applied on the historical textile as the most appropriate sample preparation step for the identification of the resinous binder. Fragile silk banner from the 19th century was analyzed for the presence of different resins. After the ultrasonic extraction with ethyl acetate in the ultrasonic bath, resinous materials and unknown sample from the banner were separated by thin layer chromatography. The multiple developments in benzene-methanol (95:5) system as mobile phase and silica gel layer as stationary phase were applied, and afterwards the video densitometry determination of the components was performed by means of video camera HV-C20. The shellac resin was determined as an important part of the complex binder.

  7. Destruction of Tributyl Phosphate and Exchange Resin by Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Spent tributyl phosphate and spent exchange resin are difficult to treat. It's important to develop an advanced treat method. Compared with traditional methods, electrochemical oxidation has obvious advantages, such as the operation can

  8. KARAKTERISASI PELIKEL YANG TERADSORPSI PADA PERMUKAAN RESIN AKRILIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sunarintyas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to determine the composiiton of adsorbed pellicle on acrylic resin surface. Fifteen plates of 10x10x2 mm were made from chemical, heat, and microwave activated acrylic resin. The plates were incubated in saliva for 1,2,3,4, and 5 hours. Pellicle characterization was done every hour by SDS PAGE electrophoresis. The result showed that: 1. chemical, heat, and microwave activated acrylic resin adsorbed salivary pellicle by molecular weight of 50-61 kDa (amylase band; 2. incubation of 1,2,3,4, and 5 hours in saliva resulted in similar pellicle composition. In conclusion, adsorbed salivary pellicle on acrylic resin surface during 5 hours showed similar characteristic in every hour, with the major protein adsorbed: amylase.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be painted on the interior of a prepared cavity of a tooth to improve retention of a restoration, such as...

  10. Resin Infusion Rigidized Inflatable Concept Development and Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing resin infusion to rigidize an inflatable structure and form fiber-reinforced composites on-orbit is a novel concept that builds on current NASA technology...

  11. DIFFUSIVITY OF ARRE EARTH ION IN POROUS ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LingDaren; LiuYucheng; 等

    1997-01-01

    The self-diffusion of Eu3+ ion in porous resins D72 and D751 was studied by isotope exchange reaction.Applying Kataoka's bidisperse pore model,the intraparticle effective diffusivity De were resolved into a solid diffusivity Dg and a macropore diffusivity Dp.The experiments show that De.Dp and Dg all increase with the increase of reaction temperature;the response Dp and Dg of D751 resin is smaller than that of D72 resin;the diffusivity of Eu3+ ion in solution is larger than Dp,which leads to the conclusion that the diffusion of ion in the pore of resin can not completely be equal to that in solution.

  12. Curing of Epoxy Resin Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yubin; ZHANG Zuoguang

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of curing of epoxy resin induced by femtosecond laser beam was explored through choosing different initiators . Absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to analyze the structure of epoxy resin systems after irradiation with a femtosecond laser beam. The experimental results show that the epoxy resin systems containing diaryliodonium salts can be cured by irradiation of Jemtosecond laser pulse, while the systems containing benzoin can not be cured. It is found that diaryliodonium salts decompose under the irradiation of femtosecond laser pulse through multi ( two ) -photon absorption, initiating the ring-opening polymerization of epoxy resin. And the appearance of cured area has a sheet structure consisting of many tiny lamellar structures.

  13. Application of mixed mode resins for the purification of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitl, Agnes; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-09-10

    The downstream processing of monoclonal antibodies from cell culture supernatant is usually done by a number of chromatographic and non-chromatographic steps. Efforts are taken to reduce the costs associated to those steps, while maintaining a high product purity. A possibility to reach this goal is the reduction of the number of chromatographic steps using mixed mode resins that offer more than one functionality in one chromatographic step. In this work, a commercially available mixed mode resin was evaluated systematically with respect to the adsorption of proteins. The Henry coefficient, which quantifies the adsorption strength, was measured for the full working range of the stationary phase as a function of the salt concentration and the pH. The results were compared to a conventional anion exchange and a hydrophobic interaction resin. Furthermore, the resin was applied for the polishing step of an antibody from an industrial clarified cell culture supernatant.

  14. Modification Bituminous Binders Petroleum Resin (Based on C9 Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Chigorina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to measure the basic parameters of a bituminous binder obtained by modification of the BND 60/90 binder with petroleum resin, for both dynamic and static modification modes.

  15. Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil); Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the

  16. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance

  17. Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM): Model development and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaolan

    2003-06-01

    In this investigation, a comprehensive Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process simulation model was developed and verified. The model incorporates resin flow through the preform, compaction and relaxation of the preform, and viscosity and cure kinetics of the resin. The computer model can be used to analyze the resin flow details, track the thickness change of the preform, predict the total infiltration time and final fiber volume fraction of the parts, and determine whether the resin could completely infiltrate and uniformly wet out the preform. Flow of resin through the preform is modeled as flow through porous media. Darcy's law combined with the continuity equation for an incompressible Newtonian fluid forms the basis of the flow model. During the infiltration process, it is well accepted that the total pressure is shared by the resin pressure and the pressure supported by the fiber network. With the progression of the resin, the net pressure applied to the preform decreases as a result of increasing local resin pressure. This leads to the springback of the preform, and is called the springback mechanism. On the other side, the lubrication effect of the resin causes the rearrangement of the fiber network and an increase in the preform compaction. This is called the wetting compaction mechanism. The thickness change of the preform is determined by the relative magnitude of the springback and wetting deformation mechanisms. In the compaction model, the transverse equilibrium equation is used to calculate the net compaction pressure applied to the preform, and the compaction test results are fitted to give the compressive constitutive law of the preform. The Finite Element/Control Volume (FE/CV) method is adopted to find the flow front location and the fluid pressure. The code features the ability of simultaneous integration of 1-D, 2-D and 3-D element types in a single simulation, and thus enables efficient modeling of the flow in complex mold

  18. Clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite with and without an intermediate layer of flowable resin composite: a 7-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite.......The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite....

  19. SABIC Innovative Plastics: Be the World Best Plastic Resin Manufacturer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jenny Du

    2007-01-01

    @@ "SABIC Innovative Plastics is a global supplier of plastic resins, manufacturing and compounding polycarbonate, ABS, SAN, ASA, PPE, PC/ABS, PBT and PEI resins, as well as the LNP* line of high performance specialty compounds," said Hiroshi Yoshida, the Global Market Director for Electronics of SABIC Innovative Plastics based in Tokyo at the press conference held by SABIC Innovative Plastics, November 8th 2007, Shanghai.

  20. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  1. [Effects of composite resin materials on gingiva and pulp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Ishikawa, I; Masunaga, H; Matsue, M; Matsue, I

    1989-09-01

    Composite resin materials are now widely used for dental therapy. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of composite resins on gingiva and pulp in case of application of them for temporally splint in periodontal treatment. 60 teeth in 6 female dogs ranging between 1 and 2 years of age with healty teeth and gingiva were divieded to 4 groups; (1) 12 teeth, controls; (2) 12 teeth, self-cured composite resin (Clearfil F II, CF II); (3) 18 teeth, light-cured resin (Belfel LX, BLX), curing time 20 sec. and (4) 18 teeth, BLX, 40 sec., and then 48 class V composite resins were restored supragingivally. The experimental procedure were carried out for 5 days and 30 days. Histopathological observations of 60 teeth inclusive of controls were made by applying to specimens with Hematoxylin eosin staining. For the materials and time periods in this study it was found that; 1. Light-cured composite resin was superior to self-cured composite resin on handlings. 2. There were no significant differences in periodontium between the experimentals (BLX, CF II) and controls in 5 days. At the 30 days the histologic score showed more gingivitis for the experimental teeth than for the controls (BLX-40 greater than BLX-20 greater than CF II greater than Cont.). 3. At 5 days hyperemia occurred in some cases of experimentals (both BLX and CF II). The appearance of predentin and changes of odontblastic layer were observed slightly in 30 days. But there were no significant differences between BLX and CF II. 4. The result suggested that applying to composite resin materials for temporally splint, both gingiva and pulp have to be protected.

  2. Affordable Resins and Adhesives From Optimized Soybean Varieties (ARA Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Richard WOol; Dr. X. Susan Sun; Rich Chapas

    2004-04-21

    The Mission of the ARA Program was to develop the Corporate Infrastructure to mass-produce new bio-based materials from Soybeans. The resins were integrated with the bio-fuels program. (1) to research, develop, and commercialize low cost adhesives and resins from soy oil and protein, the co-products of the soy bio-diesel process. (2) to study structure-functionality of soy oil and proteins at molecular and genomic levels

  3. Tackification of textile preforms for resin transfer molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wuyunqiqige; YI; Xiao-su

    2005-01-01

    Tackified textile fiber preforms are used widely in resin transfer molding (RTM) to produce aerospace-grade composite parts. In the present study, a new tackifier was developed to improve RTM laminate performance. The influence of tackifier concentration on spring back, thermal properties and mechanical performance was studied . It has showed that the new tackifier was compatible with the matrix resin and improved the textile handling ability; the ILSS was slightly increased without decreasing of thermal properties, modulus and flexural strength.

  4. Surface finishing of resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liporoni, Priscila; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Dos Santos Dias, Carlos Tadeu; Paradella, Thais Cachute

    2003-01-01

    This study utilized spectrophotometry to evaluate in vitro superficial dye deposition on resin-modified glass ionomer, following different surface finishing and polishing treatments. Materials that were photocured adjacent to the mylar strip produced the surfaces with the lowest mean after superficial staining. A restorative technique without excesses resulted in a smoother surface and prolonged the life of the restoration. The resin-modified glass ionomers tested offer adequate clinical performance.

  5. Bonded composite resin crowns for primary incisors: technique update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1990-02-01

    A technique for restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors with a hybrid visible light-curing composite resin and a dentinal bonding agent is described. Careful use of this technique and the new materials can provide a restoration that is esthetic and resistant to fracture and displacement. The technique requires careful preparation of the operative field and precise handling of the restorative materials. The method is illustrated by the placement of bonded composite resin crowns in a 3-year-old boy.

  6. Polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin-based restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultrase...

  7. Branched polymeric media: Perchlorate-selective resins from hyperbranched polyethyleneimine

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Dennis P.

    2012-10-02

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a persistent contaminant found in drinking groundwater sources in the United States. Ion exchange (IX) with selective and disposable resins based on cross-linked styrene divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads is currently the most commonly utilized process for removing low concentrations of ClO4 - (10-100 ppb) from contaminated drinking water sources. However, due to the low exchange capacity of perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins (∼0.5-0.8 eq/L), the overall cost becomes prohibitive when treating groundwater with higher concentration of ClO4 - (e.g., 100-1000 ppb). In this article, we describe a new perchlorate-selective resin with high exchange capacity. This new resin was prepared by alkylation of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension polymerization process. Batch and column studies show that our new PEI resin with mixed hexyl/ethyl quaternary ammonium chloride exchange sites can selectively extract trace amounts of ClO4 - from a makeup groundwater (to below detection limit) in the presence of competing ions. In addition, this resin has a strong-base exchange capacity of 1.4 eq/L, which is 1.75-2.33 times larger than those of commercial perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins. The overall results of our studies suggest that branched PEI beads provide versatile and promising building blocks for the preparation of perchlorate-selective resins with high exchange capacity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. In-situ cure monitoring of epoxy resin systems

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Graham

    1998-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. This thesis describes the work carried out at Brunel University to develop novel optical fibre sensors capable of monitoring the cure state of an epoxy/amine resin system. The sensors were of simple construction, consisting of an optical fibre from which the silicone cladding layer had been removed over a short length. This stripped length was embedded into the curing resin system. The sensor...

  9. Properties of Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jijun Tang; Haijun Zhou; Yunxia Liang; Xinlan Shi; Xin Yang; Jiaoxia Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) was obtained by pressurized oxidation method using natural graphite as raw materials. Then the GO/epoxy resin composites were prepared by casting. The mechanical and damping properties of composites were studied. As a result, the impact intensity of GO/epoxy resin composites was prominently improved with the content of the graphene oxide increasing. The glass transition temperature decreased and the damping capacity is improved.

  10. Compressive Strength of Epoxy Resin Chocks Subjected to Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    9 2. Pour-In-Place Chock (PIPC) .... ............. 11 3. Atomic Model of Liquid Resin DGEBA ... ......... 18 4. Properties of CHOCKFAST...resin is known as diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A ( DGEBA ) which is the general constituent of CHOCKFAST ORANGE. Due to the confidentiality that... DGEBA occurs by reacting epichlorohydrin with bisphenol A in the presence of sodium hydroxide. The raw material epichlorohydrin is synthesized from

  11. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin and Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Cyanate ester (or polycyanate) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14A polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. Process trials, tests and analyses were conducted in order to gain insight into factors that can affect final properties of the cured cyanate ester resin and its composites. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to cure is also crucial as it affects the T{sub g} of the resin and composite. Recommendations for reducing moisture contact with the resin during wet-winding are presented. High fiber volume fraction ({approximately}80%) composites wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent hoop tensile strengths (660 to 670 ksi average with individual rings failing above 700 ksi), which are believed to be the highest recorded strengths for this class of materials. The measured transverse properties were also exceptional for these high fiber fraction composites. Based on the available data, this cyanate ester resin system and its composites are recommended for space and vacuum applications only. Further testing is required before these materials can be recommended for long term use at elevated temperatures in an ambient air environment. The results of all analyses and tests performed as part of this study are presented as well as baseline process for fabricating thick, stage-cured composites. The manufacture of a 1 in. thick composite cylinder made with this process is also described.

  12. Change of asphaltene and resin properties after catalytic aquathermolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Yufeng; Li Shuyuan; Ding Fuchen; Yu Hang

    2009-01-01

    Resin and asphaltene were separated from Liaohe heavy oil.Catalytic aquathermolysis of asphaltene and resin was investigated by using water soluble catalysts (NiSO4 and FeSO4) and oil soluble catalysts (nickel naphthenate and iron naphthenate).Before and after aquathermolysis, the properties of the resin and asphaltene was compared by means of ultimate analysis, vapor pressure osmometer (VPO) average molecular weight, X-ray diffraction (XRD), 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).The conversion sequence was as follows: No-catalystresin increased after reaction without catalyst.But the catalysts restrained this trend.The H/C ratio of asphaitene and resin decreased after reaction.From the results of average structural parameters and molecular weight, it was found that asphaltene and resin were partly aggregated after aquathermolysis.

  13. Effect of end group on novolak resin properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Anthony; Monaghan, Michael J.; Xu, Cheng-Bai; Cardin, William J.

    1998-06-01

    Model compounds formed by the reaction of m-cresol with 2,6- bis(hydroxymethyl)-p-cresol, DMPC, were isolated and characterized by 13C NMR. DMPC was found to couple at the 2, 4, and 6-positions of m-cresol at a rate of 12%, 34% and 54% respectively. The condensation reactions of m-cresol and DMPC with 2-hydroxy-3,5-dimethylbenzyl alcohol, 2-HDBA, or 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethylbenzyl alcohol, 4-HDBA, were determined by 13C NMR to form novolak resins in a manner predicted by model compound data. The introduction of 2,4- dimethylphenol and 2,6-dimethylphenol as specific end-groups to novolak resins was demonstrated to affect both the resin dissolution and photoresist properties. Novolaks end-capped with the more highly o-o' coupled 2,4-dimethylphenol group have lower dissolution rates while the more p-p' coupled, intermolecular oriented, 2,6-dimethylphenol group show higher dissolution rates in TMAH. For the resins investigated, photoresist resolution properties appear to be dictated by the bulk resin structure. Photospeed, however, was greatly enhanced by the 2,6-dimethylphenol end-group. This knowledge was then applied towards the design of novolak resins having built-in dissolution and photospeed promoters, and a novolak/diazonaphthoquinone 0.25 micrometers capable i-line photoresist.

  14. Cytotoxicity evaluation of methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsah Goktolga Akin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate and compare the cytotoxic effects of four composite resin materials with different content.

    Material and Methods: Two traditional methacrylate-based (Clearfil AP-X, RefleXions, as well as a self-adhering methacrylate-based (Vertise Flow and a silorane-based (Filtek Silorane composite resin were tested in the experiment. Ten cylindrical specimens were made of each material, using a mould (2mm. thick and 8 mm. in diameter. An agar diffusion method was employed, and cytotoxicity rankings were determined using lysis index scores. For statistical analysis, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used.

    Results: Amongst the composite resins, the silorane-based composite was found to be less cytotoxic than the methacrylate-based composite resins, which all had the same cytotoxicity ranking.

    Conclusions: The silorane-based composite resin was considered more biocompatible than the methacrylate-based composite resins.

  15. Resin transfer molding of textile preforms for aircraft structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasko, Gregory H.; Dexter, H. Benson; Weideman, Mark H.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LaRC is conducting and supporting research to develop cost-effective fabrication methods that are applicable to primary composite aircraft structures. One of the most promising fabrication methods that has evolved is resin transfer molding (RTM) of dry textile material forms. RTM has been used for many years for secondary structures, but has received increased emphasis because it is an excellent method for applying resin to damage-tolerant textile preforms at low cost. Textile preforms based on processes such as weaving, braiding, knitting, stitching, and combinations of these have been shown to offer significant improvements in damage tolerance compared to laminated tape composites. The use of low-cost resins combined with textile preforms could provide a major breakthrough in achieving cost-effective composite aircraft structures. RTM uses resin in its lowest cost form, and storage and spoilage costs are minimal. Near net shape textile preforms are expected to be cost-effective because automated machines can be used to produce the preforms, post-cure operations such as machining and fastening are minimized, and material scrap rate may be reduced in comparison with traditional prepreg molding. The purpose of this paper is to discuss experimental and analytical techniques that are under development at NASA Langley to aid the engineer in developing RTM processes for airframe structural elements. Included are experimental techniques to characterize preform and resin behavior and analytical methods that were developed to predict resin flow and cure kinetics.

  16. Phenol resin-based supports of inclined workings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldin, V.M.; Krivoshchekova, N.P.; Fedorova, G.G.

    1980-10-01

    This article evaluates experimental tubing supports produced in the Kuzbass. The tubings are formed from coal and phenol-formaldehyde resins. Benzene sulfonic acid is used as hardening agent. Coal with grains up to 10 mm is used as filling agent. Five phenol-formaldehyde resins (SFZh-3032U, SF-142, SF-40K0, SFZh-3032NV, SFZh-3032) are evaluated as the basis for support production. The results are given in a table. Experiments show that SFZh-3032 resin is superior to other resins as a means of improving strength and mechanical parameters of the coal body in which workings are driven. It is noted that until now 10 km of resin reinforced coal tubing support have been constructed. Capacity of equipment producing the supports is 2.5 km/year. Resin reinforced tubing is economical: it need not be removed, can be mined together with coal seam, it reduces hazard of wall or floor swelling, increases haulage capacity of workings used for underground haulage 3 to 4 times, and improves safety of work for miners. (In Russian)

  17. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Naeimi Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N=3 and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel shades had the highest translucency. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2 to C2 of regular body shades and also from A4 to C4 of opaque dentine shades of Esthet.X composite resin. Grey enamel shade had a significantly higher diffuse translucency compared to clear and yellow enamel shades. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2B to D2B and also in diffuse translucency from A4D to C6D shades of Filtek Supreme composite resin. It can be concluded that the color of the composite resins tested in this study had a significant effect on their translucency. Information on the translucency of different shades of composite resins can be very useful for the clinicians in achieving optimal esthetic restorative outcome.

  18. Preparative Purification of Liriodendrin from Sargentodoxa cuneata by Macroporous Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di-Hua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparative purification of liriodendrin from Sargentodoxa cuneata using macroporous resin combined with crystallization process was evaluated. The properties of adsorption/desorption of liriodendrin on eight macroporous resins were investigated systematically. X-5 resin was selected as the most suitable medium for liriodendrin purification. The adsorption of liriodendrin on X-5 resin fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model. Dynamic adsorption/desorption tests were performed using a glass column packed with X-5 resin to optimize the separation process of liriodendrin. After one treatment with X-5 resin, the content of liriodendrin in the product was increased 48.73-fold, from 0.85% to 41.42%, with a recovery yield of 88.9%. 97.48% liriodendrin was obtained by further crystallization and determined by HPLC. The purified product possessed strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, purification of liriodendrin might expend its further pharmacological researches and further applications in pharmacy.

  19. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  20. Analysis of surface hardness of artificially aged resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of artificially accelerated aging (AAA on the surface hardness of eight composite resins: Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, 4 Seasons, Herculite, P60, Tetric Ceram, Charisma, and Filtek Z100. Sixteen specimens were made from the test piece of each material, using an 8.0 × 2.0 mm teflon matrix. After 24 hours, eight specimens from each material were submitted to three surface hardness readings using a Shimadzu Microhardness Tester for 5 seconds at a load of 50 gf. The other eight specimens remained in the artificially accelerated aging machine for 382 hours and were submitted to the same surface hardness analysis. The means of each test specimen were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (p > 0.05, ANOVA and Tukey test (p < 0.05. With regard to hardness (F = 86.74, p < 0.0001 the analysis showed significant differences among the resin composite brands. But aging did not influence the hardness of any of the resin composites (F = 0.39, p = 0.53. In this study, there was interaction between the resin composite brand and the aging factors (F = 4.51, p < 0.0002. It was concluded that notwithstanding the type of resin, AAA did not influence surface hardness. However, with regard to hardness there was a significant difference among the resin brands.

  1. Curing mechanism of alkaline phenolic resin with organic ester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Renhe; Wang Yanmin; Zhang Baoping

    2014-01-01

    To study the curing mechanism of alkaline phenolic resin with organic ester, three esters were chosen to react with three systems - alkaline phenolic resin, potassium hydroxide aqueous solution containing phenol, and potassium hydroxide aqueous solution. The variations of pH, heat release and gel pH during the reactions were monitored and measured. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) and thermal gravity analysis (TG) techniques were used to characterize the curing reaction. It was found that organic ester is only partial y hydrolyzed and resin can be cured through organic ester hydrolysis process as wel as the reaction with redundant organic ester. The sequential curing mechanism of alkaline phenolic resin cured by organic ester was identified as fol ows: a portion of organic ester is firstly hydrolyzed owing to the effect of the strong alkaline; the gel is then formed after the pH decreases to about 10.8-10.88, meanwhile, the redundant organic ester (i.e. non-hydrolysis ester) starts the curing reaction with the resin. It has also been found that the curing rate depends on the hydrolysis velocity of organic ester. The faster the hydrolysis speed of the ester, the faster the curing rate of the resin.

  2. Direct composite resin layering techniques for creating lifelike CAD/CAM-fabricated composite resin veneers and crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSage, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Direct composite resin layering techniques preserve sound tooth structure and improve function and esthetics. However, intraoral placement techniques present challenges involving isolation, contamination, individual patient characteristics, and the predictability of restorative outcomes. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations enable dentists to better handle these variables and provide durable restorations in an efficient and timely manner; however, milled restorations may appear monochromatic and lack proper esthetic characteristics. For these reasons, an uncomplicated composite resin layering restoration technique can be used to combine the benefits of minimally invasive direct restorations and the ease and precision of indirect CAD/CAM restorations. Because most dentists are familiar with and skilled at composite resin layering, the use of such a technique can provide predictable and highly esthetic results. This article describes the layered composite resin restoration technique.

  3. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  4. Effect of polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan resinate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Priprem, Aroonsri; Chitropas, Padungkwan; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2005-09-30

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of different polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on physical properties of multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan (DMP) tablets. DMP resinates were formed by a complexation of DMP and strong cation exchange resins, Dowex 50 W and Amberlite IRP69. The tablets consisted of the DMP resinates and direct compression fillers, such as microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP), and spray-dried rice starch (SDRS). Physical properties of tablets, such as hardness, disintegration time, and in vitro release, were investigated. A good performance of the tablets was obtained when MCC or SDRS was used. The use of rod-like and plate-like particles of Amberlite IRP69 caused a statistical decrease in tablet hardness, whereas good tablet hardness was obtained when spherical particle of Dowex 50 W was used. The plastic deformation of the fillers, such as MCC and SDRS, caused a little change in the release of DMP. A higher release rate constant was found in the tablets containing DCP and Dowex 50 W, indicating the fracture of the resinates under compression, which was attributable to the fragmentation of DCP. However, the release of DMP from the tablets using Amberlite IRP69 was not significantly changed because of the higher degree of cross-linking of the resinates, which exhibited more resistance to deformation under compression. In conclusion, the properties of polysulfonate resin, such as particle shape and degree of cross-linking, and the deformation under compaction of fillers affect the physical properties and the drug release of the resinate tablets.

  5. Denitration of Rocky Flats Ion-Exchange Resins: Recommendation of Denitration Processes, October 19, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob Espinoza; Mary Barr; Wayne Smith

    1998-12-01

    Resin denitration via anion-exchange is an implementable process that can effectively mitigate the hazards associated with stored resins in which the bulk of the nitrate consists of an "exchangeable nitrate" ionically bound to the cationic sites of the anion-exchange resins. Salicylate has been selected as the exchange anion of choice because of its superior selectivity for the Rocky Flats resins and its unique potential for comprehensive recovery and recycle. This report outlines a single recommended resin denigration procedure that is reasonably independent of the resin composition and the current stored form. This procedure is not optimized but rather seeks to `over-treat' the resins so that a single procedure works for the variety of stored resins. The recommended treatment with sodium salicylate reduces resins by 95-99+% the measured exothermic behavior of the ion-exchange.

  6. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  7. Evaluation of bond strength between glass fiber and resin composite using different protocols for dental splinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral R Fabrício

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Many different polymeric materials to chair-side application on pre-impregnated glass fibers (PGF are available and different protocols are used in clinical procedure. Aims: This study evaluated protocols used for dental splinting on adhesion between PGF and resin. Settings and Design: 42 pair of nano composite resin blocks with (6 × 6 × 8 mm 3 were assigned into seven groups (n=6 and bonded according to the protocol: Gar adhesive, resin; Ggr glass fiber, resin; Ggar glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Gfgar flowable resin, glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Ggafr glass fiber, adhesive, flowable resin, resin; Ggfar glass fiber, flowable resin, adhesive, resin; Gfgr flowable resin, glass fiber, resin. Materials and Methods: Micro sticks obtained from each group were submitted to the micro tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically evaluated using ANOVA and Tukey`s test (5%. Results: The protocol had a significant effect on the bond strength results (P=0.00. Gar and Ggar resulted in the highest bond strength with no statistical difference. Conclusions: The use of adhesive agent showed to be efficient to promote initial adhesion between fiber and nano composite resin.

  8. New manganese-based catalyst systems for alkyd paint drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Z.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Bouwman, E.

    2007-01-01

    The autoxidation and oligomerisation of ethyl linoleate (EL) catalyzed by manganese salts in combination with several Schiff-base ligands has been studied making use of time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy. The results indicate that several of the combinations exhibit relatively high catalytic activity

  9. Preparation of codeine-resinate and chlorpheniramine-resinate sustained-release suspension and its pharmacokinetic evaluation in beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huan-Xiang; Cheng, Gang; Pan, Wei-San; Zhong, Guo-Ping; Huang, Min

    2007-06-01

    Using ion exchange resins (IERs) as carriers, a dual-drug sustained release suspension containing codeine, and chlorpheniramine had been prepared to elevate drug safety, effectiveness and conformance. The codeine resinate and chlorpheniramine resinate beads were prepared by a batch process and then impregnated with Polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG 4000), respectively. The PEG impregnated drug resinate beads were coated with ethylcellulose as the coating polymer and di-n-butyl-phthalate as plasticizer in ethanol and methylene chloride mixture by the Wurster process. The coated PEG impregnated drug resinate beads were dispersed in an aqueous suspending vehicle containing 0.5% w/w xanthan gum and 0.5% w/w of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose of nominal viscosity of 4000 cps, obtaining codeine resinate and chlorpheniramine resinate sustained-release suspension (CCSS). Codeine phosphate and chlorpheniramine maleate were respectively loaded onto AMBERLITE IRP 69, and PEG 4000 was used to impregnate drug resinate beads to maintain their geometry. Ethylcellulose with di-n-butyl-phthalate in ethanol and methylene chloride mixture for the coating of drug resinate beads was performed in Glatt fluidized bed coater, where the coating solution flow rate was 8-12 g/min, the inlet air temperature was 50-60 degrees C, the outlet air temperature was 32-38 degrees C, the atomizing air pressure was 2.0 bar and the fluidized air pressure was adjusted as required. Few significant agglomeration of circulating drug resinate beads was observed during the operation. The film weight gained 20% w/w and 15% w/w were suitable for the PEG impregnated codeine resinate and chlorpheniramine resinate beads, respectively. Residual solvent content increased with coating level, but inprocess drying could reduce residual solvent content. In the present study, the rates of drug release from both drug resinate beads were measured in 0.05 M and 0.5M KCl solutions. The increased ionic strength generally accelerated

  10. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Luis C.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a nonuniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hr. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. The nitrogen-aged specimens were assumed to have the same properties as the interior material in the air-aged specimens. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  11. Light color, low softening point hydrocarbon resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.L.; Hentges, S.G.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a hydrocarbon resin having a softening point of from 0{degrees} C to about 40{degrees} C, a Gardner color of about 7 or less, a number average molecular weight (Mn) of from about 100 to about 600, and a M{sub {ital w}}/M{sub {ital n}} ratio of from about 1.1 to about 2.7, prepared by Friedel Crafts polymerization of a hydrocarbon feed. It comprises: from about 5% to about 75% by weight of a C{sub 8} to C{sub 10} vinyl aromatic hydrocarbon stream; up to about 35% by weight of a piperylene stream; and from about 25% to about 70% by weight of a stream containing C{sub 4} to C{sub 8} monoolefin chain transfer agent of the formula RR{prime}C {double bond} CR{double prime}R triple{prime} where R and R{prime} are C{sub 1} to C{sub 5} alkyl, R{double prime} and R triple{prime} are independently selected from H and a C{sub 1} to C{sub 4} alkyl group.

  12. A new resin system for the impregnation and bonding of large magnet coils

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, D

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS is an instrument which forms part of the Large Hadron Collider, a high energy physics experiment which is under construction at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. The properties of the candidate resin systems developed for the impregnation of the Atlas End Cap Toroid magnets are presented. The resin systems contain a blend of two resins; a low viscosity Bisphenol F resin, with a long chain aliphatic epoxide resin. An aromatic amine curing agent was used. It was found that increased additions of the long chain aliphatic epoxide resin resulted in longer useable life, lower glass transition temperature, lower modulus, higher toughness and higher bond strength at 4 K. (4 refs).

  13. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. MATERIALS AND METHODS Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. RESULTS Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. CONCLUSION Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite. PMID:28243390

  14. Ultrafiltration Membrane Fouling and the Effect of Ion Exchange Resins

    KAUST Repository

    Jamaly, Sanaa

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is a challenging process for the ultrafiltration membrane during wastewater treatment. This research paper determines the organic character of foulants of different kinds of wastewater before and after adding some ion exchange resins. Two advanced organic characterization methods are compared in terms of concentration of dissolved organic carbons: The liquid chromatography with organic carbon (LC-OCD) and Shimadzu total organic carbon (TOC). In this study, two secondary wastewater effluents were treated using ultrafiltration membrane. To reduce fouling, pretreatment using some adsorbents were used in the study. Six ion exchange resins out of twenty were chosen to compare the effect of adsorbents on fouling membrane. Based on the percent of dissolved organic carbon’s removal, three adsorbents were determined to be the most efficient (DOWEX Marathon 11 anion exchange resin, DOWEX Optipore SD2 polymeric adsorbent, and DOWEX PSR2 anion exchange), and three other ones were determined to the least efficient (DOWEX Marathon A2 anion exchange resin, DOWEX SAR anion exchange resin, and DOWEX Optipore L493 polymeric adsorbent). Organic characterization for feed, permeate, and backwash samples were tested using LC-OCD and TOC to better understand the characteristics of foulants to prevent ultrafiltration membrane fouling. The results suggested that the polymeric ion exchange resin, DOWEX SD2, reduced fouling potential for both treated wastewaters. All the six ion exchange resins removed more humic fraction than other organic fractions in different percent, so this fraction is not the main for cause for UF membrane fouling. The fouling of colloids was tested before and after adding calcium. There is a severe fouling after adding Ca2+ to effluent colloids.

  15. Influence of argon laser curing on resin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoura, K; Miyazaki, M; Onose, H

    1993-04-01

    Light cured resin composites are usually cured with halogen lamps whose light output decreases with time and distance to the resin surface. This study compared bond strengths of resins to tooth structure cured with either an argon laser or a conventional halogen light. The enamel and dentin of bovine incisors were ground on the buccal surface with wet #600 grit SiC paper. A 4 x 2 mm mold was placed on the tooth surface and Scotchbond 2/Silux and Clearfil Photobond/Photo Clearfil A were placed into the molds and cured using a Quick Light or an argon laser for exposure times of 10, 20, and 30 seconds, and distances of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm from the resin surface. The intensity of the Quick Light was measured as 510 mW/cm2 at 470 +/- 15 nm and the intensity of the argon laser was adjusted to 510 mW/cm2 before curing. Shear bond tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min were performed after 24 hours of storage in water. The bond strengths obtained with the halogen lamp and the laser were not significantly different at the same exposure times and at 0.0 or 0.5 mm from the resin surface. The laser cured bond strengths did not decrease with increasing distance whereas there was a significant decrease in halogen bond strengths at distances greater than 0.5 mm for both resins. The use of the laser might provide a clinical advantage in cases where the curing light source cannot be brought into proximity to the surface of the resin.

  16. How biobased products contribute to the establishment of sustainable, phthalate free, plasticizers and coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Oostveen, E.A.; Micciche, F.; Weijnen, J.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Biobased components for the development of environmentally friendly, durable products are being described. The potential and versatility of isosorbide diesters as subsitutes for the currently phthalate based plasticisers for PVC and other resins, is shown. Also high solid alkyd resins for decorative

  17. The effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex trademark HPQ, a new macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin, and on four conventional polystyrene anion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    This study compares the effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex{trademark} HPQ, a recently available macroporous copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine/divinylbenzene, and on four conventional strong-base polystyrene anion exchange resins. The polystyrene resins investigated included one gel type, Dowex{trademark} 1 {times} 4, and three macroporous resins: Dow{trademark} MSA-1, Amberlite{trademark} IRA-900, and Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK. Each resin, in 7 M nitric acid, was subjected to seven different levels of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation ranging from 100 to 1000 megarads. Irradiated resins were measured for changes in dry weight, wet volume, chloride and Pu(IV) exchange capacities, and thermal stability. In separate experiments, each resin was subjected to approximately 340 megarads of in situ alpha particles from sorbed plutonium. Resin damage from alpha particles was less than half that caused by gamma rays, which may be a consequence of different production rates of radiolytic nitrite and nitro radicals in the two systems. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin provided the greatest radiation stability, whereas Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK was the least stable of the resins tested. Thermogravimetric analyses of dry, nitrate-form resin revealed that dry Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin offered the best thermal stability for absorbed gamma doses to 370 megarads, but the worst thermal stability after exposures of 550 megarads or more. 25 refs., 11 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Effects of the crisis in the resin sector on the demography of rural municipalities in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno Perez, S.; Garcia Robredo, F.; Ayuga Tellez, E.; Fullana Belda, C.

    2013-05-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this work is to test the positive effect of a substantially developed resin sector on rural demographic evolution. This work shows how in the period between 1970 and 2010 the demographic decline in the interior regions of Spain was more pronounced in areas characterized by the importance of resin-producing forest stands compared to other nearby rural municipalities where this natural resource is not present. Area of study: The study area consists of a set of rural municipalities in Central Spain, both resin and non-resin producing, in the provinces of Segovia, Avila, Valladolid, Burgos, Soria, Cuenca and Guadalajara. Material and methods: The relationship between resin production and population in resin and non-resin producing municipalities was modeled by means of linear regression analysis. Main results: Generally speaking, between 1950 and 1970 the production of resin halted demographic decline in the regions where this activity was substantially developed. However, when the resin sector entered into crisis in the 1970s, and the economic repercussions of this activity gradually ceased to be felt, the demographic decline in the regions which had been involved in resin production was much more acute than in other non-resin-producing rural areas. Research highlights: This work shows the relationship between resin extraction activity and population evolution in rural municipalities. Sustainable resin exploitation can contribute to the maintenance and development of rural communities, and should be used as a tool for generating employment in rural areas. (Author) 37 refs.

  19. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  20. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  1. Carbon isotope biogeochemistry of plant resins and derived hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, A.P.; Edwards, D.; Hope, J.M.; Boreham, C.J. [Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Canberra (Australia)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Hydrocarbons derived from plant resins are major components of some terrigenous oils and bitumens. These compounds are structurally distinct and this makes then useful biomarkers applicable in petroleum exploration as well as sources of biogeochemical information about palaeoenvironment and palaeobotany. Although recent studies have elucidated the molecular structure of resinites, very little information has been available for the carbon isotope composition of resinites and no studies of resin-derived compounds in oils had been performed prior to the present study. Hence, carbon stable isotope analyses were carried out on a suite of modern and fossil resins of diverse origins, including compound specific isotope analysis of individual hydrocarbons produced during resin pyrolysis. Oils derived from resinite source organic matter were also analysed. The results showed that ``Class I`` resinites derived from gymnosperms were enriched in the heavy carbon isotope compared with those from angiosperms (``Class I`` resinites). Furthermore, both fossil resinites themselves and individual hydrocarbons derived from them were isotopically heavy compared with modern plant resins. The isotopic signatures of diterpanes and triterpanes in various early Tertiary oils from Australasia and Southeast Asia reflect their origins from gymnosperms and angiosperms, respectively. (author)

  2. Influence of light intensity on contraction stress of flowable resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Akira; Inoue, Naoki; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Oto, Tatsuki; Irokawa, Atsushi; Tsubota, Keishi; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of power density on contraction stress of resin composite restorative materials during photo-polymerization. Six flowable resin composites, and a hybrid resin composite for comparison, were used. The composites were polymerized with the power density adjusted to either 100 or 600 mW/cm(2). Stress development was determined with a custom-made tensilometer. The adhesive was placed in a thin layer on a steel rod and resin paste was packed into the mold. The contraction force (N) generated during polymerization was continuously recorded and the maximum contraction stress (MPa) was calculated. Data were analyzed statistically. When the power density was adjusted to 100 mW/cm(2), the average contraction stress ranged from 0.30 to 0.50 MPa for the flowable composites, compared with 0.35 MPa for the hybrid composite. When the power density was adjusted to 600 mW/cm(2), the average contraction stress ranged from 0.34 to 1.00 MPa for the flowable composites and 0.69 MPa for the hybrid composite comparison. For all materials tested except Estelite Flow Quick, contraction stress increased with higher power density. The present results indicate that contraction stress during polymerization is influenced by power density and resin composite type.

  3. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-05-23

    Cyanate ester resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption, and radiation resistance. This paper describes the results of a processing study to develop a high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray TI 000G carbon fiber and YLA RS- 14A cyanate ester resin as the constituent materials. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to and during cure is also crucial as it affects the glass transition temperature of the resin and composite. Composite cylinders wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent ring tensile strengths both at room and elevated temperature. A summary of the measured mechanical and thermal property data for these composites is presented. Potential applications for these materials include flywheeI energy storage systems for space and satellite structures.

  4. [On the polymerization of pour type resin (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, K; Hirasawa, T; Masuhara, E

    1976-05-01

    The initial polymerization point and the polymerization progress have been observed on powder-liquid pour type acrylic resin and one-liquid pour type acrylic resin. The results are as follows: 1. In case of un-heating at the bottom of powder liquid resin, in the former stage the polymerization makes the regular progress from the bottom part to the upper of the mould, but in the latter stage it does some irregular one. In case of heating at the bottom, at first it shows a better regular progress as in the case of un-heating. 2. In case of un-heating at the bottom of one-liquid resin, in the first stage the polymerization makes the regular progress from the bottom part of the resin and at the same time from its middle of the mould, and then to the upper part and the sprue part. In case of heating at the bottom, it begins just from the heated part, then it goes quite regularly to the middle, the upper, and the sprue part, and lastly the polymerization shrinkage concentrates exclusively at the sprue part.

  5. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries.

  6. Selective separation of indium by iminodiacetic acid chelating resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. B. Fortes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Indium can be recovered by treating residues, flue dusts, slags, and metallic intermediates in zinc smelting. This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of indium and iron on an iminodiacetic acid chelating resin, Amberlite®IRC748 (Rohm and Haas Co.-USA. High concentrations of iron are always present in the aqueous feed solution of indium recovery. In addition, the chemical behaviour of iron in adsorptive systems is similar to that of indium. The metal concentrations in the aqueous solution were based on typical indium sulfate leach liquor obtained from zinc hydrometallurgical processing in a Brazilian plant. The ionic adsorption experiments were carried out by the continuous column method. Amberlite®IRC748 resin had a high affinity for indium under acidic conditions. Indium ions adsorbed onto the polymeric resin were eluted with a 0.5mol/dm³ sulphuric acid solution passed through the resin bed in the column. 99.5% pure indium sulfate aqueous solution was obtained using the iminodiacetic acid chelating resin Amberlite®IRC748.

  7. Selective flotation of fossil resin from western coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1992-03-20

    The test program has demonstrated that: (1) technically, the new flotation technologies discovered at the University of Utah and then improved upon by Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc. provide a highly efficient means to selectively recover fossil resin from coal. The proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit resulted in fossil resin recovery with the same separation efficiency as was obtained from laboratory bench-scale testing (more than 80% recovery at about 80% concentrate grade); and (2) economically, the selective flotation process has been shown to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry based on this new flotation process. The proof-of-concept testing has resulted in significant interest from several coal mining companies and has sparked the desire of local and state government to establish a fossil resin industry in the Wasatch Plateau coal field. In this view, the results from the current proof-of-concept testing program have been successful. This special report provides theoretical and analytical data on some surface chemistry work pertinent to fossil resin characterization, and other efforts carried out during the past months.

  8. Terpenoid composition and class of Tertiary resins from India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Suryendu; Mallick, Monalisa; Mathews, Runcie Paul [Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India); Bertram, Norbert [LTA-Labor fuer Toxikologie und Analytik, Friedrichshoeher Str. 28, D-53639 Koenigswinter (Germany); Greenwood, Paul F. [John De Laeter Mass Spectrometry and WA Biogeochemitry Centres (M090), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA, 6009 (Australia); WA - Organic and Isotope Geochemistry Centre, Curtin University of Technology, Kent St., Bentley 6102 (Australia)

    2009-10-01

    The terpenoid composition and class of Tertiary resins preserved within lignites of Cambay, Kutch and Cauvery Basins of India have been characterized using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Major pyrolysis products include cadalene-based C{sub 15}-bicyclic sesquiterpenoids with some C{sub 30} and C{sub 31} bicadinanes and bicadinenes typical of Class II or dammar resin. The occurrence of these terpenoids in Early Eocene sediments may extend the first appearance of Dipterocarpaceae angiosperms, the predominant source of this resin class, back to the Early Eocene epoch in India. The same terpenoid biomarkers have been detected in many SE Asian oils reflecting a close source relationship with these resins. Strong CH{sub 3} (1377 cm{sup -} {sup 1}) and other CH{sub x} (3000-2800 and 1460-1450 cm{sup -} {sup 1}) aliphatic absorptions of much larger intensity than the aromatic C = C (1560-1650 cm{sup -} {sup 1}) absorption were detected in the Indian resins by FTIR Spectroscopy, confirming the quantitative significance of the terpenoid pyrolysates. (author)

  9. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimmada Kesrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3 were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37∘C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (<0.05. The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (<0.05. Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN.

  10. CURING PROCESS OF PHOTOPOLYMER RESIN BOND DIAMOND TOOLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Tao; PENG Wei; YAO Chunyan

    2007-01-01

    Analytical simulation and corresponding proof-test are adopted to study the principle of the curing process of photopolymer resin diamond tools. The influence of the diamond as abrasives in photopolymer resin owing to the absorptivity of the diamond for the UV light on the photopolymer resin curing process is discussed. Based on the above, a kind of diamond tool-dicing blade is selected to analyze the curing process of photopolymer bond diamond tools. An analytical model of curing process is developed and a correlation curve between the depth of polymerization of the photopolymer resin diamond tools and the exposure time to represent the curing process of photopolymer bond dicing blade. A test is done to proof-test the validity of the analytical model and the correlation curve. The simulated data fit the experimental results, which demonstrates the analytical models and numerical algorithm are of high reliability. The analytical simulation method could possibly be used to optimize the curing cycle and improve the quality of the photopolymers resin bond diamond tools.

  11. Monitoring the Cure State of Thermosetting Resins by Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Maffezzoli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of low intensity ultrasound in a curing resin, acting as a high frequency oscillatory excitation, has been recently proposed as an ultrasonic dynamic mechanical analysis (UDMA for cure monitoring. The technique measures sound velocity and attenuation, which are very sensitive to changes in the viscoelastic characteristics of the curing resin, since the velocity is related to the resin storage modulus and density, while the attenuation is related to the energy dissipation and scattering in the curing resin. The paper reviews the results obtained by the authors’ research group in the last decade by means of in-house made ultrasonic set-ups for both contact and air-coupled ultrasonic experiments. The basics of the ultrasonic wave propagation in polymers and examples of measurements of the time-evolution of ultrasonic longitudinal modulus and chemical conversion of different thermosetting resins are presented. The effect of temperature on the cure kinetics, the comparison with rheological, low frequency dynamic mechanical and calorimetric results, and the correlation between ultrasonic modulus and crosslinking density will be also discussed. The paper highlights the reliability of ultrasonic wave propagation for monitoring the physical changes taking place during curing and the potential for online monitoring during polymer and polymer matrix composite processing.

  12. Selective separation of indium by iminodiacetic acid chelating resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, M.C.B.; Benedetto, J.S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martins, A.H. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais]. E-mail: ahmartin@demet.ufmg.br

    2007-04-15

    - Indium can be recovered by treating residues, flue dusts, slags, and metallic intermediates in zinc smelting. This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of indium and iron on an iminodiacetic acid chelating resin, Amberlite{sup R} IRC748 (Rohm and Haas Co.-USA). High concentrations of iron are always present in the aqueous feed solution of indium recovery. In addition, the chemical behaviour of iron in adsorptive systems is similar to that of indium. The metal concentrations in the aqueous solution were based on typical indium sulfate leach liquor obtained from zinc hydrometallurgical processing in a Brazilian plant. The ionic adsorption experiments were carried out by the continuous column method. Amberlite{sup R} IRC748 resin had a high affinity for indium under acidic conditions. Indium ions adsorbed onto the polymeric resin were eluted with a 0.5 mol/dm{sup 3} sulphuric acid solution passed through the resin bed in the column. 99.5% pure indium sulfate aqueous solution was obtained using the iminodiacetic acid chelating resin Amberlite{sup R} IRC748. (author)

  13. Modification of (DGEBA epoxy resin with maleated depolymerised natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DEGBA type epoxy resin has been modified with maleated depolymerised natural rubber (MDPR. MDPR was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride onto depolymerised natural rubber. MDPR has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MDPR was blended with epoxy resin at three different ratios (97/3, 98/2 and 99/1, by keeping the epoxy resin component as the major phase and maleated depolymerised natural rubber component as the minor phase. The reaction between the two blend components took place between the acid/anhydride group in the MDPR and the epoxide group of the epoxy resin. The proposed reaction schemes were supported by the FT-IR spectrum of the uncured Epoxy/MDPR blends. The neat epoxy resin and Epoxy/MDPR blends were cured by methylene dianiline (DDM at 100°C for three hours. Thermal, morphological and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy and the blends were investigated. Free volume studies of the cured, neat epoxy and Epoxy/MDPR blends were correlated with the morphological and mechanical properties of the same systems using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Studies.

  14. Property of nano-SiO2/urea formaldehyde resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Qiaojia; Yang Guidi; Liu Jinghong; Rao Jiuping

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,we discuss the effects of a nanometer silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2) coupling agent,dispersal methods and the amount of nano-SiO2/urea formaldehyde resin.The results of our study indicate that when nano-SiO2,using KH-550 silane as a coupling agent,was added to UF resin by discontinuous ultrasonic vibration its properties improved effectively.When the content of nano-SiO2 was below 1.5%, the amount of free formaldehyde decreased,and the viscosity and bonding strength of resin increased with an increase in the added nano-SiO2,which did not prolong the curing time.The performance indices of plywood,particleboard and medium density fiberboard (MDF),hot-pressed by nano-SiO2 (I%)/UF resin (F/U molar ratio=l.2), exceeded the requirements of the National Standard. Their free formaldehyde emission reached E1 grade.Finally,we analyzed the mechanism of the strengthening effects of nano-SiO2 on UF resin by means of infrared spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectronic spectrum (XPS).

  15. Development of a resin curing model for UV nanoimprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2005-10-01

    UV nanoimprint lithography uses UV light as an energy source. It is performed at room temperature and low pressure, and has its own merits as compared to thermal nanoimprint. In this paper, a measurement system was developed to measure the degree of resin curing in UV nanoimprint to improve our understanding of the resin solidification phenomenon. A curing model was then established based on the measurement results. The measurement system measured the degree of cure in real time and was composed of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy system, a UV light source, and an optical guide. Also, new UV-curable resins that had low viscosity values were developed for the UV nanoimprint process, and imprint tests using these resins were performed successfully. The curing model considered the UV irradiation time, power, and curing temperature, which are important parameters in the UV nanoimprint process. The degree of cure had an exponential relation to UV irradiation time, power, and temperature; thus, the curing model was expressed as an exponential function of the UV irradiation time, power, and temperature. The developed model was verified for various UV-curable resins.

  16. Preparation and properties of lignin-epoxy resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanfu Yin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A cross-linked biomass-polymer composite with a lignin content of up to 60% was prepared by blending lignin with an epoxy resin and polyamine using a hot press molding process. The characteristics of the curing reaction of lignin with epoxy resin were studied using DSC and FTIR analysis. The effect of molding temperature and molding pressure on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the lignin/epoxy resin composite was also studied by SEM, DMA, and TG analyses. The results showed that the epoxy resin can be cured by lignin, and the curing temperature for the blends can be reduced by the introduction of a polyamine cure agent. The properties of the composite, such as bending strength, impact strength, glass-transition temperature, and thermal stability, were evidently influenced by the molding process. A good interfacial combination was formed between lignin and epoxy resin. Increasing the molding temperature and pressure proved beneficial to achieve a better interfacial combination for the composite, and the degree of ductile fracture was increased in the fracture surface of the composite.

  17. Color Stability of IDM Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Discoloration of composite resins is considered to be a major factor in esthetic restoration"nfailures. The aim of this study was to evaluate color stability of IDM composite (both light and self cure"nsamples namely IL and IS, and to compare it with a self-cure composite (Degufill named DS and a light"ncure ormocer composite (Definite, called DL in the Report. 60 disk shaped samples of each composite"nwere prepared, according to ISO-7491. The samples were divided into 3 groups and aged as follows:"nA- (Control 7 days in dark 37°c chamber"nB- Foil covered and kept in 100% humidity, and 37°c in xenotest chamber for 24 hours, then transferred"nto a dark 37°c chamber for 6 more days."nC- Kept in 37°c, 100% humidity under the emission of xiiion lamp of xenotest chamber for 24 hours,"nand then transferred to 37°c dark chamber for 6 more days"nThe lightness and chromaticity values of samples were measured both before and after aging using a"nspectrophotometer (Data Flash. The total color changes as well as changes in lightness and chromaticity"nvalues were measured in the CIE L * a * b * scale, and analyzed. Color change was recorded to be"nsignificant in all samples after aging. The maximum change belonged to IL, which was significantly"ndifferent from DL and DS. It seems, in order to have a durable esthetic restoration using IDM, more"nscientific and professional consideration is needed in the production process.

  18. Correlation between the cytotoxicity of self-etching resin cements and the degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís FSA Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that photopolymerization of dual cure self-etching resin cements decrease toxic effects on cell culture. Adequate photopolymerization should be considered during cementation when using dual polymerization self-etching resin cements.

  19. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  20. 78 FR 3917 - Certain Rubber Resins & Processes for Manufacturing Same; Commission Determination Not To Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Rubber Resins & Processes for Manufacturing Same; Commission Determination Not To Review... importation into the United States of certain rubber resins by reason of misappropriation of trade...

  1. The effects of restorative composite resins on the cytotoxicity of dentine bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghwan; Son, Kyung Mi; Kwon, Ji Hyun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    During restoration of damaged teeth in dental clinics, dentin bonding agents are usually overlaid with restorative resin composites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of restorative resin composites on cytotoxicity of dentin bonding agents. Dentin bonding agents were placed on glass discs, pre-cured and uncured resin composite discs. Bonding agents on the glass discs and composite resins discs were light cured and used for agar overlay cytotoxicity testing. Dentin bonding agents on composite resin discs exhibited far less cytotoxicity than that on glass discs. The polymerization of resin composite increased the surface hardness and decreased the cytotoxicity of bonding agents. In conclusion, composite resins in dental restorations are expected to enhance the polymerization of dentin bonding agents and reduce the elution of resin monomers, resulting in the decrease of cytotoxicity.

  2. MODIFICATION OF EPOXY RESIN WITH POLYSILOXANE BEARING PENDANT QUATERNARY AMMONIUM GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo-xin Huang; Ying Huang; Yun-zhao Yu

    2002-01-01

    Polysiloxane bearing pendant quatemary ammonium groups (PSI) was used to modify the surface properties ofepoxy resins. In the cured resin, PSI formed the dispersed phase. Remarkable enrichment and gradient distribution ofpolysiloxane on the surface region of the epoxy resins were demonstrated by XPS analysis. The composition and propertiesof the surface of PSI-modified epoxy resin, which is in contact with the mold, are dependent on the material of the mold.Through the incorporation of PSI, epoxy resins with low surface energy and low friction coefficient were obtained.Polysiloxane with lower ionic group content shows a higher degree of enrichment on the resin surface and leads to a highercontact angle against water, while the polysiloxane having optimum compatibility with the epoxy resin shows a greater effectin reducing the static friction coefficient of the resin against glass.

  3. Mechanism and Effectiveness of Reduction Action of Unsaturated Polyester Resin Reducer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reduction action mechanism of unsaturated polyester resin reducer is analysed.The experimental results show that the active reducer bearing reactive functional group on the ends of molecules effectively lowers the curing shrinkage of unvaturated polyester resin.

  4. 76 FR 29008 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy; Correction of Notice of Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy; Correction of Notice of Scheduling AGENCY... expedited five-year review on an antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from...

  5. 78 FR 11627 - Certain Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Rescission of... on certain granular polytetrafluoroethylene (``PTFE'') resin from Italy. The period of review...

  6. STUDIES ON THE BLEND OF POLYACRYLATE EMULSIONS AND TACKIFIER RESIN EMULSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shuwen; YANG Yukun

    1996-01-01

    A series of polyacrylate emulsions were blended with tackifier resin emulsions such as modified rosin emulsion, C5 resin and C9 resin emulsion. The miscibility of the polyacrylates and tackifier resins was investigated by means of SEM and visual observation. The phase diagrams of the miscibility change systematically with the polarity of polyacrylates and tackifier resins. The influence of the content of the tackifier resins on the adhesion properties of the polyacrylate emulsions were also studied. The results show that the 180℃ peel strength is improved as the amount of the tackifier resin increases and comes to a maximum at a specific content. The ball tack property decreases slightly and the hold strength changes complicatedly as the tackifier resin increases.

  7. Synthesis of cardanol based phenolic resin with aid of microwaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Tiwari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardanol based novolac resin was prepared. Cardanol based novolac-type phenolic resin was prepared under microwave irradiation by the reaction of cardanol ( C and formaldehyde ( F with mole ratio 1:0.8 of C/F using tricarboxylic acid as catalyst. Analogical synthesize have been done using conventional heating for the comparison of the methods. The methylolation of cardanol was confirmed by Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR spectroscopic analysis and a reaction mechanism was proposed. The numberaverage molecular weight was found by gel permeation chromatographic (GPC technique. On the basis of the calculated value of kinetic chain length, the structure of the novolac-type phenolic resin was proposed. The main advantage of the process is twofold reduction of reaction time of the process carried at microwave reactors in comparison to the conventional heating.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Super Absorbent Resin from Natural Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰; 马凤国; 谭惠民

    2003-01-01

    The grafting polyacrylamide onto wood pulp cellulose (cell-g-PAM) was performed with cerous ammonium nitrate as the initiator and hydrolyzed to produce the super absorbent resin. The FTIR shows that the polyacrylamide is grafted on the cellulose. After hydrolyzation, part of acrylamino groups are transformed into carboxyl groups. The XRD analysis shows that the graft polymerization occurred at the amorphous section and the surface of the crystal section of cellulose. The SEM graph reveals that there is a layer of polymer on the surface of cellulose fiber and the fibril structure of the cellulose surface is covered. After hydrolyzation, the surface of the product is different from that of cell-g-PAM's and the surface is scraggy. The technical conditions to prepare high water absorbent resin were confirmed. Through the radical graft copolymerization, the high water absorbent resin can be produced from wood pulp cellulose.

  9. Preparation and Properties of Phenolic Resin/Montmorillonite Intercalation Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jian-ying; WEI Lian-qi; CAO Xian-kun

    2003-01-01

    Phenolic resin/ montmorillonite intercalation composites were prepared by using the methods of pressing intercalation and melt intercalation. Properties and structure of the composites were investigated by using XRD , TG and test of softening point. It is indicated that both the pressing intercalation and melt intercalation can be used to prepare the phenolic resin/organo-montmorillonite intercalation nanocomposites. Compared with phenolic resin, the intercalation nanocomposites have better heat-resistance, higher decomposition temperatures and less thermal weight-loss. However , these two intercalation methods have different effects on the softening point of the intercalation nanocomposites . Pressing intercalation almost does not affect the softening point of the intercalation nanocomposites, while melt intercalation signifwantly increases the softening point of the intercalation nanocomposites ,probably due to the chemical actions happening in the process of melt intercalation.

  10. Quantitative analysis of PMR-15 polyimide resin by HPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Lauver, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of individual components and of total solids of 50 wt pct PMR-15 resin solutions was determined using reverse-phase HPLC to within + or - 8 percent accuracy. Acid impurities, the major source of impurities in 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), were eliminated by recrystallizing the BTDE prior to esterification. Triester formation was not a problem because of the high rate of esterification of the anhydride relative to that of the carboxylic acid. Aging of PMR-15 resin solutions resulted in gradual formation of the mononadimide and bisnadimide of 4,4'-methylenedianiline, with the BTDE concentration remaining constant. Similar chemical reactions occurred at a reduced rate in dried films of PMR-15 resin.

  11. Resin glycosides from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenbing; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Wu, Ping; Xu, Liangxiong; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2012-09-01

    Three glycosidic acids, turpethic acids A-C, and two intact resin glycosides, turpethosides A and B, all having a common pentasaccharide moiety and 12-hydroxy fatty acid aglycones of different chain lengths, were obtained from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. The aglycones were characterized as 12-hydroxypentadecanoic acid in two compounds, 12-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid in two other components, and 12-hydroxyheptadecanoic acid in the fifth compound, which were all confirmed by synthesis. The absolute configurations of these aglycones were all established as S by Mosher's method. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides with a monohydroxylated 12-hydroxy fatty acid as an aglycone, and one compound is the first described resin glycoside having a hydroxylated C(17) fatty acid as its aglycone.

  12. The surface finish of light-cured composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S K; Henderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    A necessity for any dental restorative material is its ability to take and maintain a smooth surface finish. Composite resin restorative materials with fillers and matrix of differing hardness are difficult to finish and polish. The use of aluminum trioxide discs is a popular and acceptable method of finishing composite restorative materials where the material is accessible. Burs and stones are used for finishing and polishing inaccessible areas. This study was undertaken to compare the surface finish of composite resin restorative material when finished with white stones, superfine diamond burs and aluminum trioxide discs. The finished surface was measured with a profilometer and the roughness average value used to compare the surfaces. The aluminum trioxide discs gave the best and most consistent results. It was possible to attain similar results with the superfine diamond bur. However, the results were highly variable. None of the methods used achieved the smoothness of composite resin cured against a transparent matrix.

  13. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials.

  14. Viscoelastic behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes into phenolic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Edson Cocchieri; Costa, Michelle Leali; Braga, Carlos Isidoro, E-mail: ebotelho@feg.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia; Burkhart, Thomas [Institut fuer Verbundwerkstoffe GmbH, Kaiserslautern, (Germany); Lauke, Bernd [Leibniz-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multi-functional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. This study focuses on the viscoelastic evaluation of phenolic resin reinforced carbon nanotubes, processed by using two techniques: aqueous-surfactant solution and three roll calender (TRC) process. According to our results a relative small amount of CNTs in a phenolic resin matrix is capable of enhancing the viscoelastic properties significantly and to modify the thermal stability. Also has been observed that when is used TRC process, the incorporation and distribution of CNT into phenolic resin is more effective when compared with aqueous solution dispersion process. (author)

  15. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  16. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel); Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry (Israel); Domb, Abraham J., E-mail: avid@ekmd.huji.ac.i [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  17. New processable modified polyimide resins for adhesive and matrix applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A broad product line of bismaleimide modified epoxy adhesives which are cured by conventional addition curing methods is described. These products fill a market need for 232 C (450 F) service adhesives which are cured in a manner similar to conventional 177 C (350 F) epoxy adhesives. The products described include film adhesives, pastes, and a primer. Subsequent development work has resulted in a new bismaleimide modified epoxy resin which uses a unique addition curing mechanism. This has resulted in products with improved thermomechanical properties compared to conventional bismaleimide epoxy resins. A film adhesive, paste, and matrix resin for composites using this new technology are described. In all cases, the products developed are heat cured by using typical epoxy cure cycles i.e., 1 hour at 177 C (350 F) followed by 2 hours postcure at 246 C (475 F).

  18. Rear Bumper Laminated In Jute Fiber With Polyester Resin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga, R. A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, a growing interest exists in the use of natural of fibers (sisal, coconut, banana, and jute, as reinforcement in composites. The aim of the present study is shows the use of jute fiber agglutinated with polyester resin in the automobile industry in the production of a rear bumper of hatch vehicle. A simplified mathematical model was used for evaluation of the flaw on trunk center cover submitted to dynamic loads. The traverse section of the referred bumper is simplified by a channel formation. This study shows that a rear bumper made using jute fiber agglutinated with polyester resin will be possible. The molded part obtained good visual characteristics, good geometric construction and surface without bubbles and imperfections in the fiber and resin composite. The mathematical model to failure criterion showed that the rear bumper in jute fiber will not resist to an impact equivalent at 4.0 km/h.

  19. Glass Reinforcement of Various Epoxy Resins-Polyurea Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Medha; Jauhari, Smita

    2012-07-01

    Polyureas (PUs) were prepared by the polycondensation reaction of disperse dyes containing -NH2 group and toluene 2, 4-diisocyanate. The disperse dyes have been prepared by coupling of various 2-diazobenzothiazoles with 1,3-benzenediamine. All the PUs were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral studies, number average molecular weight ( {overline{{Mn}} } ), and thermogravimetry. Further reaction of PUs was carried out with an epoxy resin (i.e., DGEBA). The curing study of prepared resins was monitored by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Based on DSC, thermograms glass fiber-reinforced composites have been laminated and characterized by chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties. The unreinforced cured resins were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The laminated composites showed excellent resistance properties against chemicals and good mechanical and electrical properties.

  20. Water diffusion behavior in epoxy resins with various fluorine contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Yin; Li, Shanjun

    2006-04-01

    In this work, novolac resin with perfluorinated side chains was synthesized and cured with o-Cresol novolac epoxy resin to obtain epoxy resins with various fluorine contents. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR/FT-IR) was used to monitor the in situ water diffusion process in these systems. The diffusion coefficient of water first increased and then slightly decreased with increasing fluorine content, which could be attributed to two opposite effects induced by perfluorinated side chains: enhanced hydrophobicity and increased free volume. In addition, generalized two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was employed to investigate both the sorption and the desorption process of water diffusion, and two kinds of water molecules, named bound and free water, were found. It was interesting to find that in the sorption process, the change in the population of bound water molecules occurs earlier than the change in the population of free water molecules, while in the desorption process, the sequence was reversed.

  1. Separation of capsaicin from capsaicinoids by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changxia; Liu, Ruican; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yiming; Xu, Tao; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Liu, Chunqiao

    2015-12-01

    The aim of present study is to develop an efficient and low-cost method for capsaicin production isolated from capsaicinoids by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography. HZ816 resin has shown the best adsorption and desorption capacities for capsaicin among other resins. To optimize the operating parameters for separation, initial concentration, diameter-to-height ratio, mobile phase ratio, and crystallization method were investigated. When capsaicinoids solution (5 g/L) was loaded onto the column (diameter-to-height ratio = 1:12) with ethanol/1% w/w NaOH (4:6, v/v) as the mobile phase, capsaicin was purified most effectively. By using acid neutralization as the crystallization method, the purity of capsaicin improved from 90.3 to 99.5% with 82.3% yield. In conclusion, this study provides a simple and low-cost method for the industrial-scale production of high-purity capsaicin.

  2. Preparation and Property of the Water Absorbent Hybrid Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Water absorption material has been attracted much more attention for its wide use in soil and water conservation, agriculture, etc. But this material will actually apply in agriculture, soil and water conservation only when it is cheap enough. Pulp fiber and starch to prepare high absorbing-water resin is a good method for decreasing the cost [1,2]. However, it still has a long way to turn it into reality. Now the montmorillonite is widely used in preparing nanocomposites [3]. But used it in preparing absorbing-water resin has little report. In this article the water absorption hybrid resin has been prepared by one step intercalation polymerization method. In the process of intercalation the partly neutralization acrylic acid and urea have been used as intercalating reagent. Beside that, the urea also has been used as cross-linking agent.

  3. Preparation and Property of the Water Absorbent Hybrid Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; YunPu

    2001-01-01

    Water absorption material has been attracted much more attention for its wide use in soil and water conservation, agriculture, etc. But this material will actually apply in agriculture, soil and water conservation only when it is cheap enough. Pulp fiber and starch to prepare high absorbing-water resin is a good method for decreasing the cost [1,2]. However, it still has a long way to turn it into reality.  Now the montmorillonite is widely used in preparing nanocomposites [3]. But used it in preparing absorbing-water resin has little report. In this article the water absorption hybrid resin has been prepared by one step intercalation polymerization method. In the process of intercalation the partly neutralization acrylic acid and urea have been used as intercalating reagent. Beside that, the urea also has been used as cross-linking agent.   ……

  4. ADSORPTION OF MACROPOROUS PHOSPHONIC ACID RESIN FOR INDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huijun; XIONG Chunhua; YAO Caiping

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics and mechanism of a novel chelate resin, macroporous phosphonic acid resin (PAR) for In(III) were investigated. The statically saturated adsorption capacity is 216mg·g-1resin at 298K in HAc-NaAc medium. The apparent adsorption rate constant is k298=4.84×10-5 s-1. The adsorption behavior of PAR for In(III) obeys the Freundlich isotherm. The thermodynamic adsorption parameters, enthalpy change △H, free energy change △G and entropy change △S of PAR for In(III) are 11.5kJ/mol, -12.6kJ/mol and 80.8J/mol·K, respectively. The apparent activation energy is Ea=3.5kJ/mol. The molar coordination ratio of the functional group of PAR to In(III) is about 3∶1.

  5. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I.; Domb, Abraham J.

    2010-02-01

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  6. SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF HIGHLY OIL-ABSORPTIVE RESIN WITH HYDROXY ETHYLACRYLATE AS POTENTIAL CROSSLINKING AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yan; XIAO Changfa

    2006-01-01

    A concept of potential crosslinking agent was introduced into the synthesizing process of highly oil-absorptive resin that is traditionally prepared by single chemical crosslinking. The resin was heated after manufactured to obtain three-dimension network structure. The effects of potential crosslinking agent and the crosslinking conditions on the absorptive properties of resin were studied.The results showed that hydroxyl ethylacrylate got satisfied results, and the resin with it had good oil absorbency and oil retention.

  7. The Basic Ply Properties of a Kevlar 49/Epoxy Resin Composite System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Fibre 4 2.3 Composite 4 3 Results 7 3.1 Resin Properties 7 3.2 Composite Properties 9 4 Discussion 14 4.1 Resin System 14 4.2 Composite System 15 5...of the fibre creels before and after fabrication and from the weight of the composite. 3 RESULTS 3.1 Resin Properties TABLE I Resin Tensile Properties

  8. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Encarnação, Monalisa Olga Lessa da; Santos Junior,Gildo Coelho; Bottino, Marco Antonio [UNESP

    2010-01-01

    p. 110-115 OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC) photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal) disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light source. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light sourc...

  9. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    resins . Packable composite resins were first introduced as an alternative to amalgam .10 They are characterized by a high filler load and a filler...clearance: -"_Paper _Article _ Book _ Poster _ Presentation _Other 6. Title: Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative...Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material ABSTRACT A new nanohybrid composite activated by sonic energy (SonicFill

  10. The application of nanotechnology in the improvement of dental composite resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yang; Xie Haifeng; Zhang Feimin; Gu Ning

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, nanotechnology for the improvement of dental composite resins has been reviewed in the back- ground of the existing shortcomings, focusing on the improvement for polymerization shrinkage, anti-bacterial properties and mechanical properties of composite resins. The results show that the use of nanotechnology and nano materials can be an effective method to improve the performance of dental composite resins in a various ways. At last, the paper also discusses the perspective about the dental composite resins.

  11. Purification of total flavonoids from loquat leaves by macroporous resin and corresponding antioxidant capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Suhua; Lin Biaosheng; Li Binbin; Tan Bi; Hong Yanping

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids is one of the major active compounds in loquat leaves. In this study, the purification process of total flavonoids in loquat leaves by macroporous resin was researched and the antioxidant activity of total flavonoids was determined. The active compounds were extracted by 95% ethanol, and the total flavonoids was purified by macroporous resin. Comparing the static and dynamic adsorption and desorption characters of 6 macroporous resin, the best type of macroporous resin was determin...

  12. Preparation of liquefied wood-based resins and their application in molding material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qiu-hui; Zhao Guang-jie; Yu Li-li; Jie Shu-jun

    2007-01-01

    To investigate value in use of liquefied wood-based resin applications in molding material, Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) and poplar (Populus tomentosa) wood meal were liquefied in phenol. The reactant was co-condensed with formaldehyde to obtain liquefied wood-based resin. For this paper, we investigated the characterization of the resin and its application in molding material. The result shows that the basic properties of liquefied wood-based resin were satisfactory; the bonding strength of plywood prepared with liquefied Chinese fir and liquefied poplar resin can reach 1.54 and 1.00 MPa, respectively. The compression strengths of the molding material prepared with two kinds of liquefied wood resin were 73.01 and 73.58 MPa, almost the same as that of PF resin molding material. The limiting volume swelling of molding material made with liquefied Chinese resin and liquefied poplar resin were 8.5% and 8.3%, thickness swelling rates of water absorption were 3.3% and 4.2%, and the maximum weight ratios of water absorption were 25.9% and 26.2%, respectively. The soil burial test result shows that the weight loss rate of the molding materials made with liquefied Chinese resin and liquefied poplar resin were 8.3% and 9.1% and that of the PF resin molding material was 7.9%. After the soil internment test, the reduction ratio of compression strength of the two kinds of molding material achieved 16.9%and 17.7%, while that of the PF resin molding material was 15.4%. The test results of wood fungi inoculation on the three surfaces of the molding material indicate the breeding rate of molding material prepared with liquefied Chinese resin and liquefied poplar resin were at level 4 and that of PF resin molding material was at level 1 of the ISO standard.

  13. Mechanical and Physical Properties and Adhesion Durability of Flowable Resin Composite

    OpenAIRE

    金丸, 充徳; カナマル, ミツノリ; Mitsunori, KANAMARU

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanical and physical properties and adhesion durability to bovine dentin of the flowable resin composites in comparison with those of conventional resin composites and glass ionomers. In this experiment, four flowable resin composites, two conventional resin composites and two glass ionomers were used. The consistency, thermal expansion coefficiency, compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, brittleness, Vickers hardness, elastic modulus...

  14. A STUDY OF THE HEAT OF HYDRATION OF SULFONIC ACID RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XURongnan; JIJunyan; 等

    1992-01-01

    The heat of hydration of dry sulfonic acid resin in different comcentrations of sulfuric acid has been determined. The heat of hydration of the resin in H2O is 143.4J/g(resin). The greater the concentration of sulfuric acid,the less the heat will be released.The hydrate formed from three sulfonic acid groups and one water molecule is the most stable one of all the hydrates of sulfonic acid resin and water.

  15. STUDY ON COPOLYMER EPOXY RESIN MATRIX WITHOUT SHRINKAGE PART I VOLUME CHANGE DURING CURE PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pingsheng; ZHOU Zhiqiang; WANG Gengchao; PAN Caiyuan; WU Renjie

    1988-01-01

    The volume change of the copolymer epoxy resins can be controlled by copolymerizing epoxy resin E51 with 3,9-di (5-norbornene-2, 2)-1, 5, 7, 11-tetraoxaspiro [5, 5] undecane (NSOC). During curing,the volume changes of copolymer epoxy resins with various amounts of NSOC were measured with a dilatometer. Cure process does not produce volume change when epoxy resin E51: NSOC is 5.88: 1 in equivalent.

  16. Thermoset Blends of an Epoxy Resin and Polydicyclopentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Brian J.; Le, Kim Mai; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan L.

    2016-12-13

    The mechanical properties of two chemically distinct and complementary thermoset polymers were manipulated through development of thermoset blends. The thermoset blend system was composed of an anhydride-cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA)-based epoxy resin, contributing high tensile strength and modulus, and polydicyclopentadiene (PDCPD), which has a higher toughness and impact strength as compared to other thermoset polymers. Ultra-small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis explored the morphology of concurrently cured thermoset blends, revealing a macroscopically phase separated system with a surface fractal structure across blended systems of varying composition. The epoxy resin rich and PDCPD rich phases exhibited distinct glass transitions (Tg’s): the Tg observed at higher temperature was associated with the epoxy resin rich phase and was largely unaffected by the presence of PDCPD, whereas the PDCPD rich phase Tg systematically decreased with increasing epoxy resin content due to inhibition of dicyclopentadiene ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The mechanical properties of these phase-separated blends were in reasonable agreement with predictions by the rule of mixtures for the blend tensile strength, modulus, and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the tensile and fracture specimen fracture surfaces showed an increase in energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crazing, shear banding, and surface roughness, as the fraction of the more ductile component, PDPCD, increased. These results present a facile method to tune the mechanical properties of a toughened thermoset network, in which the high modulus and tensile strength of the epoxy resin can be largely retained at high epoxy resin content in the blend, while increasing the fracture toughness.

  17. Optical fibre grating refractometers for resin cure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggy, S. J.; Chehura, E.; James, S. W.; Tatam, R. P.

    2007-06-01

    The use of fibre grating refractometers as a means of monitoring the cure of a UV-cured epoxy resin is presented. The wavelength shift of the attenuation bands of a long period grating and the spectral response of a tilted fibre Bragg grating sensor were measured simultaneously during the cure of the resin and compared with measurements made using a fibre optic Fresnel-based refractometer. The results showed a good correlation (6 × 10-3 rius) and illustrate the potential of the techniques for non-invasive composite material cure monitoring.

  18. Cost benefit of patch testing with textile finish resins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1982-01-01

    Eleven years experience of textile finish resin patch testing of suspected textile dermatitis patients revealed 15 cases of allergic textile dermatitis among 428 patients tested. Ten of the 15 patients had a relevant positive patch test to one or more of a limited series of textile finishes; 1...... was negative and 4 were not tested with textile finishes. All 15 patients were formaldehyde sensitive. No unexpected, relevant, positive textile finish resin patch test was found. In this study a negative patch test to formaldehyde virtually excluded allergic contact dermatitis from textile finishes....

  19. PENYINARAN BERLEBIHAN PADA TAMBALAN RESIN KOMPOSIT DAN AKIBAT YANG DITIMBULKAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venita Tanusuwito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dentists are often taught that 'overcure' is better than ' undercure'. Undercure is said to cause serious problem with resin composite fillings. Actually it does not always happen this way. Overcure also has several bad impacts that have never been thought before by practitioners. Researchers claim that curing time informed by resin composite manufacturers is not always correct. Filling material is not the only factor that determines the correct curing time for each filling. Light cure unit performance also plays a major role.

  20. Solid support resins and affinity purification mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havis, Spencer; Moree, Wilna J; Mali, Sujina; Bark, Steven J

    2017-02-28

    Co-affinity purification-mass spectrometry (CoAP-MS) is a primary technology for elucidating the protein-protein interactions that form the basis of all biological processes. A critical component of CoAP-MS is the affinity purification (AP) of the bait protein, usually by immobilization of an antibody to a solid-phase resin. This Minireview discusses common resins, reagents, tagging methods, and their consideration for successful AP of tagged proteins. We discuss our experiences with different solid supports, their impact in AP experiments, and propose areas where chemistry can advance this important technology.

  1. Phase separation during radiation crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucić, Irina; Ranogajec, Franjo

    2003-06-01

    Phase separation during radiation-initiated crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin was studied. Residual reactivity of liquid phases and gels of partially cured samples was determined by DSC. Uncured resin and liquid phases showed double reaction exotherm, gels had a single maximum that corresponded to higher-temperature maximum of liquid parts. The lower-temperature process was attributed to styrene-polyester copolymerization. At higher temperatures, polyester unsaturations that remained unreacted due to microgel formation homopolymerized. FTIR revealed different composition of phases. In thicker samples, reaction heat influenced microgel formation causing delayed appearance of gel and faster increase in conversion.

  2. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF SOLID FLUIDIZATION IN A RESIN COLUMN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-24

    The objective of the present work is to model the resin particles within the column during fluidization and sedimentation processes using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The calculated results will help interpret experimental results, and they will assist in providing guidance on specific details of testing design and establishing a basic understanding of particle’s hydraulic characteristics within the column. The model is benchmarked against the literature data and the test data (2003) conducted at Savannah River Site (SRS). The paper presents the benchmarking results and the modeling predictions of the SRS resin column using the improved literature correlations applicable for liquid-solid granular flow.

  3. Application of living microbial cells entrapped with synthetic resin prepolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, S; Tanaka, A

    1989-12-01

    Living and growing microbial cells were immobilized by entrapping in synthetic resin gels prepared from their prepolymers, and used in the production of various useful substances. The production of the desired metabolites and also both the activity and the stability of the catalytic systems were seriously affected by the physico-chemical properties of the prepolymers, and those of the resin gels subsequently formed, such as gel network, hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance and ionic nature, as well as by the type of bioreactors. Hydroxylation of steroids and production of antibiotics, polypeptides and other biologically active substances, and the effects of gel properties on them are discussed as examples.

  4. Facile synthesis and characterization of novel pseudo-hypercrosslinked resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si Guo Yuan; Shao Hui Zhang; Wei Hua Zou; Yong Hao Zhou; Xiao Hui Zhou

    2008-01-01

    A kind of pseudo-hypercrosslinked polymer resin was firstly synthesized via a continuous Friedel--Crafts alkylation poly-merization of benzene, diphenyl and their dichloromethyl derivatives. And the micromorphology and adsorption properties of theseresins were investigated. The results demonstrated that the novel resins have high-specific surface area (581.26-974.88 m2/g), high-pore volume (0.56-1.65 mL/g), small average porous radius (1.93-3.67 nm) and excellent adsorption properties for small non-polarorganic molecules.2008 Si Guo Yuan. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural investigation of resin glycosides from Ipomoea lonchophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, J K; Ward, A; Oelrichs, P B

    1997-05-01

    A fraction from Ipomoea lonchophylla, which was toxic to mice, contained an inseparable mixture of resin glycosides with differing numbers of C5 ester groups on the hexasaccharide chain. After alkaline hydrolysis of the esters, the structure of the major component (1) was elucidated using high-field NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chemical studies, and comparison with known resin glycosides. Compound 1 was identified as 3,11-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid 11-O-beta-quinovopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)- [alpha-rhamnopyranosyl- (1-->4)]-quinovopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta -fucopyranoside.

  6. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  7. Long term stability of cannabis resin and cannabis extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian

    2010-01-01

      The aim of the present study was to investigate the stability of cannabinoids in cannabis resin slabs and cannabis extracts upon long-term storage. The levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG) on both neutral and acidic form were measured...... stored in extracted form at room temperature the degradation rate of acidic THC increased significantly relative to resin material with concentration halve-lives of 35 and 91 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. Once cannabis material is extracted into organic solvents, care should be taken...

  8. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  9. Viricidal Capability of Resin-Triiodide Demand-Type Disinfectant †

    OpenAIRE

    Fina, Louis R.; HASSOUNA, Nadia; Horacek, Gary L.; Lambert, John P.; Lambert, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    Polyoma, Newcastle disease virus, and adenovirus, as well as two coliphages, lambda and T4, were inactivated by strong base quaternary ammonium anion-exchange resin-triiodide. Organic matter interfered with viral inactivation capability of the resin-triiodide. The viruses, as they were being inactivated by the resin disinfectant beads, were not retained or filtered by the beads.

  10. Preparation of Phenolic Resin/Silver Nanocomposites via in-situ Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Resol type phenolic resin/silver nanocomposite was prepared by in-situ reduction method, in which the curing of phenolic resin and the formation of silver nano-particles took place simultaneously. The silver ions were reduced completely to silver nanoparticles, which were dispersed homogeneously in the resin matrix with narrow size distribution.

  11. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1900 Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. Urea-formaldehyde resins may be safely used as the food-contact...

  12. 77 FR 31875 - Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same, DN 2897; the Commission is... importation of certain rubber resins and processes for manufacturing same. The complaint names as...

  13. 77 FR 38083 - Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same Institution of Investigation Pursuant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Rubber Resins and Processes for Manufacturing Same Institution of Investigation Pursuant... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain rubber resins and processes... rubber resins and processes for manufacturing same by reason of misappropriation of trade secrets,...

  14. Strong cation exchange resin for improving physicochemical properties and sustaining release of ranitidine hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study strong cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRP69 was used to improve the physicochemical properties of ranitidine hydrochloride such as taste and bulk properties and to sustain dissolution rate. Drug-resin complexes were prepared using batch method. Drug loading was done under different processing conditions such as temperature, pH, drug-resin ratio, and drug concentration to get the optimum condition for resinate preparation. Resinate prepared under optimized condition was tested for taste, bulk properties and release rate. Degree of bitterness of ranitidine was found to reduce to zero after complexation with resin. Improvement in flow properties was also observed. Angle of repose for resinate was found to be 33.21 o as compared to 42.27 o for ranitidine HCl. Effect of dissolution medium and particle size on in vitro release of drug from resinate was also investigated. Resinate with drug to resin ratio of 2:3 and particle size> 90 µm showed about 90% of drug release within 12 h. The orodispersible tablet formulated from the resinate containing 10% croscarmellose sodium disintegrated within 35 sec in oral cavity and showed similar dissolution profile as the resinate. Tablets were found stable after stability studies with no change in dissolution profile.

  15. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  16. RTM用基体树脂研究进展%Progress In the RTM Matrix Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锐

    2011-01-01

    Research progesses of RTM processing for epoxy resin, unsaturated polyester, polyimide, phenolic resins and other resins were introduced.%介绍RTM用环氧树脂、不饱和聚酯、聚酰亚胺、酚醛树脂及其他树脂的研究进展.

  17. 21 CFR 173.70 - Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... resin. 173.70 Section 173.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene resin. Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer... resin dispersion. (c) The additive is used as a decolorizing and clarification agent for treatment...

  18. 76 FR 28455 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy AGENCY: United... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within...

  19. 40 CFR 63.524 - Standards for wet strength resins manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for wet strength resins... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Epoxy Resins Production and Non-Nylon Polyamides Production § 63.524 Standards for wet strength resins manufacturers. (a) Owners or operators...

  20. 76 FR 27663 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy AGENCY: United... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within...