WorldWideScience

Sample records for alkanesulfonates

  1. Comparative mutagenicity of alkylsulfate and alkanesulfonate derivatives in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, D B; Forbes, N L; Hsie, A W

    1978-05-01

    Mutation induction and cell killing produced by selected alkylsulfates and alkanesulfonates have been quantitated using the Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxanthine--guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) system. Dose--response relationships of cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are presented for two alkylsulfates [dimethylsulfate (DMS), diethylsulfate (DES)] and three alkyl alkanesulfonates [methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), and isopropyl methanesulfonate (iPMS)]. Under the experimental conditions employed, cytotoxicity decreased with the size of the alkyl group. DMS was more toxic than DES, and MMS was more toxic than EMS and iPMS. All agents produced linear dose--response of mutation induction: DMS was more mutagenic than DES, and MMS was more mutagenic than EMS and iPMS based on mutants induced per unit mutagen concentration. However, the following relative mutagenic potency was observed when comparisons were made at 10% survival: DES greater than DMS; EMS greater than MMS greater than iPMS.

  2. Alkanesulfonate degradation by novel strains of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Tsukamurella wratislaviensis and Rhodococcus sp., and evidence for an ethanesulfonate monooxygenase in A. xylosoxidans strain AE4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdlenbruch, B N; Kelly, D P; Murrell, J C

    2001-12-01

    Novel isolates of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Tsukamurella wratislaviensis and a Rhodococcus sp. are described. These grew with short-chain alkanesulfonates as their sole source of carbon and energy. T. wratislaviensis strain SB2 grew well with C(3)-C(6) linear alkanesulfonates, isethionate and taurine, Rhodococcus sp. strain CB1 used C(3)-C(10) linear alkanesulfonates, taurine and cysteate, but neither strain grew with ethanesulfonate. In contrast, A. xylosoxidans strain AE4 grew well with ethanesulfonate, making it the first bacterium to be described which can grow with this compound. It also grew with unsubstituted C(3)-C(5) alkanesulfonates and isethionate. Hydrolysis was excluded as a mechanism for alkanesulfonate metabolism in these strains; and evidence is given for a diversity of uptake and desulfonatase systems. We provide evidence for an initial monooxygenase-dependent desulfonation in the metabolism of ethanesulfonate and propanesulfonate by A. xylosoxidans strain AE4.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the alkanesulfonate FMN reductase from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Benlian; Bertrand, Adam; Boles, William H.; Ellis, Holly R.; Mallett, T. Conn

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of the native and SeMet FMN reductase protein of the E. coli alkanesulfonate monooxygenase two-component enzyme system is reported. The alkanesulfonate FMN reductase (SsuE) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the reduction of FMN by NADPH to provide reduced flavin for the monooxygenase (SsuD) enzyme. The vapor-diffusion technique yielded single crystals that grow as hexagonal rods and diffract to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron X-ray radiation. The protein crystallizes in the primitive hexagonal space group P622. The SsuE protein lacks any cysteine or methionine residues owing to the role of the SsuE enzyme in the acquisition of sulfur during sulfate starvation. Therefore, substitution of two leucine residues (Leu114 and Leu165) to methionine was performed to obtain selenomethionine-containing SsuE for MAD phasing. The selenomethionine derivative of SsuE has been expressed and purified and crystals of the protein have been obtained with and without bound FMN. These preliminary studies should lead to the structure solution of SsuE. It is anticipated that this new protein structure will provide detailed structural information on specific active-site regions of the protein and insight into the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer of reduced flavin

  4. The weathervane model, a functional and structural organization of the two-component alkanesulfonate oxidoreductase SsuD from Xanthomonas citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegos, V.R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Oliveira, P.S.L.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogen responsible for the canker citrus disease, we identified in the ssuABCDE operon, genes encoding the alkanesulfonate ABC transporter as well as the two enzymes responsible for oxido reduction of the respective substrates. SsuD and SsuE proteins represent a two-component system that can be assigned to the group of FMNH{sub 2} -dependent monooxygenases. How- ever, despite of the biochemical information about SsuD and SsuE orthologs from Escherichia coli, there is no structural information of how the two proteins work together. In this work, we used ultracentrifugation, SAXS data and molecular modeling to construct a structural/functional model, which consists of eight molecules organized in a weathervane shape. Through this model, SsuD ligand-binding site for NADPH{sub 2} and FMN substrates is clearly exposed, in a way that might allow the protein-protein interactions with SsuE. Moreover, based on molecular dynamics simulations of SsuD in apo state, docked with NADPH{sub 2}, FMN or both substrates, we characterized the residues of the pocket, the mechanism of substrate interaction and transfer of electrons from NADPH{sub 2} to FMN. This is the first report that links functional and biochemical data with structural analyses. (author)

  5. Synthesis, characterization and reaction behaviour of lamellar AFm phases with aliphatic sulfonate-anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poellmann, Herbert; Stefan, Stoeber; Stern, Edda

    2006-01-01

    The addition of alkanesulfonates as admixtures to cementitious materials allows the formation of new lamellar phases (AFm), which was proofed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The course of hydration was investigated by heat flow calorimetry. The layered structures of AFm phases are composed of brucite-like main layers and interlayers containing alkanesulfonate ions and additional H 2 O molecules. These structural not necessary H 2 O molecules release gradually at definite steps with increasing temperature. With varying relative humidity the layer thickness c' of short aliphatic chained calcium aluminate alkanesulfonate hydrates changes considerably, whereas large organic molecules dominate the layer thickness of those with longer aliphatic chains. By means of the increase of layer thickness with increasing chain lengths it is possible to determine the tilt angles of the aliphatic chains in the interlayers

  6. Effect of counterions on properties of micelles formed by alkylpyridinium surfactants .1. Conductometry and H-1-NMR chemical shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, K; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper delineates the influence of counterions on the aggregation behavior of 1-methyl-4-n-dodecylpyridinium surfactants, using conductometry and H-1-NMR spectroscopy. Three types of counterions have been studied: (i) halides, (ii) alkanesulfonates, and (iii) aromatic counterions. The critical.

  7. Synthesis and properties of new anionic photoacid generators bound polymer resists for e-beam and EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxing; Lee, Cheng-Tsung; Henderson, Clifford L.; Yueh, Wang; Roberts, Jeanette M.; Gonsalves, Kenneth E.

    2008-03-01

    A new series of methacrylate substituted benzene sulfonic photoacid generators (PAGs) and a perfluoro alkanesulfonic PAG, bound polymeric resists based on hydroxystyrene (HS) and 2-ethyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate (EA) were prepared and characterized. The acid yield of these PAG bound polymer resists was among the range of 54-81% under deep ultraviolet exposure (254 nm) that agrees well with the electron withdrawing effect of the substituents on the PAG anion for enhancing acid generation efficiency. The intrinsic lithography performance of these polymer-bound PAG resists showed sub-50 nm half-pitch resolution and < 5 nm LER (3σ).

  8. Increments to chiral recognition facilitating enantiomer separations of chiral acids, bases, and ampholytes using Cinchona-based zwitterion exchanger chiral stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernisch, Stefanie; Pell, Reinhard; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    The intramolecular distances of anion and cation exchanger sites of zwitterionic chiral stationary phases represent potential tuning sites for enantiomer selectivity. In this contribution, we investigate the influence of alkanesulfonic acid chain length and flexibility on enantiomer separations of chiral acids, bases, and amphoteric molecules for six Cinchona alkaloid-based chiral stationary phases in comparison with structurally related anion and cation exchangers. Employing polar-organic elution conditions, we observed an intramolecular counterion effect for acidic analytes which led to reduced retention times but did not impair enantiomer selectivities. Retention of amphoteric analytes is based on simultaneous double ion pairing of their charged functional groups with the acidic and basic sites of the zwitterionic selectors. A chiral center in the vicinity of the strong cation exchanger site is vital for chiral separations of bases. Sterically demanding side chains are beneficial for separations of free amino acids. Enantioseparations of free (un-derivatized) peptides were particularly successful in stationary phases with straight-chain alkanesulfonic acid sites, pointing to a beneficial influence of more flexible moieties. In addition, we observed pseudo-enantiomeric behavior of quinine and quinidine-derived chiral stationary phases facilitating reversal of elution orders for all analytes. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Michelle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  10. The cys regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutran, A.; Balan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: In Escherichia coli, genes involved in metabolic pathway of sulfate and sulfonate compounds are clustered in a cys regulon, which includes three ABC transport system (operons: sbpcysWUA; ssuABC and tauABC), thirteen genes involved in the sulfur reduction (ssuDE; tauD and cysDNCHIJGK) and two regulatory proteins that belong to LysR transcription family: CysB and Cbl. Notably, a search and comparative analysis of these genes in the genomes of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri and other phylogenetically related Xanthomonas species revealed the presence of genes involved with alkanesulfonate, sulfate ester and taurine, only in X. citri, suggesting that proteins from this regulon might be associated with pathogenicity in citrus. Using the molecular modeling associated with a system biology view, we modeled all the protein structures of the X. citri cys regulon as well as characterized the important residues forming the putative active sites. Comparison with orthologs from different microorganisms was made in order to get a phylogenetic relationships. We showed that proteins that are responsible for the affinity and specificity of the alkanesulfonate, sulfate and taurine transport systems conserved the residues involved in the sulfate coordination but are organized in different branches in evolution. Inside these phylogenetic branches, proteins involved in the sulfate transporter are highly conserved when compared to the others. Moreover, we identified that the taurine-binding protein (TauA) of the X. citri belongs to a different evolutionary branch from that one that described for E. coli. These differences were also noticed for components of the tau operon, including a putative new regulator. The function and mechanism of action of each protein is discussed in order to bring light for the sulfur assimilation processes and their importance for X. citri physiology. (author)

  11. The cys regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutran, A.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In Escherichia coli, genes involved in metabolic pathway of sulfate and sulfonate compounds are clustered in a cys regulon, which includes three ABC transport system (operons: sbpcysWUA; ssuABC and tauABC), thirteen genes involved in the sulfur reduction (ssuDE; tauD and cysDNCHIJGK) and two regulatory proteins that belong to LysR transcription family: CysB and Cbl. Notably, a search and comparative analysis of these genes in the genomes of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri and other phylogenetically related Xanthomonas species revealed the presence of genes involved with alkanesulfonate, sulfate ester and taurine, only in X. citri, suggesting that proteins from this regulon might be associated with pathogenicity in citrus. Using the molecular modeling associated with a system biology view, we modeled all the protein structures of the X. citri cys regulon as well as characterized the important residues forming the putative active sites. Comparison with orthologs from different microorganisms was made in order to get a phylogenetic relationships. We showed that proteins that are responsible for the affinity and specificity of the alkanesulfonate, sulfate and taurine transport systems conserved the residues involved in the sulfate coordination but are organized in different branches in evolution. Inside these phylogenetic branches, proteins involved in the sulfate transporter are highly conserved when compared to the others. Moreover, we identified that the taurine-binding protein (TauA) of the X. citri belongs to a different evolutionary branch from that one that described for E. coli. These differences were also noticed for components of the tau operon, including a putative new regulator. The function and mechanism of action of each protein is discussed in order to bring light for the sulfur assimilation processes and their importance for X. citri physiology. (author)

  12. Purification and characterization of dimethylsulfide monooxygenase from Hyphomicrobium sulfonivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Rich; Borodina, Elena; Wood, Ann P; Kelly, Donovan P; Murrell, J Colin; Schäfer, Hendrik

    2011-03-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a volatile organosulfur compound which has been implicated in the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and in climate control. Microbial degradation is a major sink for DMS. DMS metabolism in some bacteria involves its oxidation by a DMS monooxygenase in the first step of the degradation pathway; however, this enzyme has remained uncharacterized until now. We have purified a DMS monooxygenase from Hyphomicrobium sulfonivorans, which was previously isolated from garden soil. The enzyme is a member of the flavin-linked monooxygenases of the luciferase family and is most closely related to nitrilotriacetate monooxygenases. It consists of two subunits: DmoA, a 53-kDa FMNH₂-dependent monooxygenase, and DmoB, a 19-kDa NAD(P)H-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. Enzyme kinetics were investigated with a range of substrates and inhibitors. The enzyme had a K(m) of 17.2 (± 0.48) μM for DMS (k(cat) = 5.45 s⁻¹) and a V(max) of 1.25 (± 0.01) μmol NADH oxidized min⁻¹ (mg protein⁻¹). It was inhibited by umbelliferone, 8-anilinonaphthalenesulfonate, a range of metal-chelating agents, and Hg²(+), Cd²(+), and Pb²(+) ions. The purified enzyme had no activity with the substrates of related enzymes, including alkanesulfonates, aldehydes, nitrilotriacetate, or dibenzothiophenesulfone. The gene encoding the 53-kDa enzyme subunit has been cloned and matched to the enzyme subunit by mass spectrometry. DMS monooxygenase represents a new class of FMNH₂-dependent monooxygenases, based on its specificity for dimethylsulfide and the molecular phylogeny of its predicted amino acid sequence. The gene encoding the large subunit of DMS monooxygenase is colocated with genes encoding putative flavin reductases, homologues of enzymes of inorganic and organic sulfur compound metabolism, and enzymes involved in riboflavin synthesis.

  13. Interaction of vanadium and sulfate in blood cells from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes: Observations using x-ray absorption edge structure and EPR spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, P.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Carlson, R.M.K.

    1994-08-17

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (S-K XAS) and EPR spectroscopy have been used to investigate the inorganic solution chemistry of vanadium, sulfate, and methanesulfonate, with application to blood cells from the tunicate Ascidia ceratodes. Three independent whole blood cell preparations (S85, S86, W87) collected over a period of 18 months were examined. Average blood cell vanadium concentrations were determined to be 0.099, 0.079, and 0.062 M, respectively. All three collections gave sulfur XAS spectra consistent with significant intracellular concentrations of low-valent sulfur, an alkanesulfonic acid, and sulfate. In model studies, the line width of the sulfate K-edge XAS spectrum was found to titrate with both pH and [V(III)]. Application of this finding to A. ceratodes blood cell sulfur XAS spectra provided evidence for direct interactions between endogenous dissolved sulfate and V(III) in two of the three collections. All three collections yielded sulfate XAS edge spectra consistent with low pH. Curve-fitting analysis of the S-K edge XAS spectra for the three whole blood cell collections yielded the ratios of intracellular sulfate:alkane sulfonate:low-valent sulfur to be as follows: S85, 1.0:0.9:0.36;S86, 1.0;0.5;1.5;W87,1.0;0.44:0.24. Comparisons with models indicated that the low-valent blood cell sulfur included various disulfide-like compounds unlike cystine. This all implies a surprisingly rich and variable sulfur biochemistry in these marine organisms. EPR spectroscopy of whole blood cells from one animal from the W87 collection revealed an endogenous VO{sup 2+}-sulfate interaction. Thus both V(III) and VO{sup 2+} can sense an intracellular pool of sulfate, implying the biological colocation of these two metal ions. The variations in blood chemistry observed over time as described herein caution against definitive application of single point experiments.

  14. A novel, fast responding, low noise potentiometric sensor containing a carbon-based polymeric membrane for measuring surfactants in industrial and environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardžić, Mirela; Galović, Olivera; Hajduković, Mateja; Sak-Bosnar, Milan

    2017-01-01

    A new high-sensitivity potentiometric sensor for anionic surfactants was fabricated using the dimethyldioctadecylammonium-tetraphenylborate (DDA-TPB) ion associate as an ionophore that was incorporated into a liquid PVC membrane. Carbon powder was used for immobilization of the ionophore in the membrane, thus significantly reducing its ohmic resistance and reducing its signal drift. The sensor exhibits a sub-Nernstian response for both dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) and dodecyl sulfate (DS) in H 2 O (55.3 and 58.5mV/decade of activity, respectively) in a range between 3.2×10 -7 and 4.6×10 -3 M for DS and 2.5×10 -7 and 1.2×10 -3 M for DBS. The sensor also exhibited a sub-Nernstian response for DS and DBS in 10mM Na 2 SO 4 (55.4 and 57.7mV/decade of activity, respectively) between 2.5×10 -7 and 4.6×10 -3 M for DS and 1.5×10 -7 and 8.8×10 -4 M for DBS. The detection limits for DS and DBS in H 2 O were 2.5×10 -7 and 2.0×10 -7 M and in 10mM Na 2 SO 4 the detection limits were 2.5×10 -7 and 1.2×10 -7 M, respectively. The response time of the sensor was less than 5s for changes at higher concentration levels (above 1×10 -4 M) in both water and 10mM Na 2 SO 4. At lower concentrations (below 1×10 -5 M) the response times were 8 and 6s in water and 10mM Na 2 SO 4 , respectively. The signal drift of the sensor was 1.2mV/hour. The new carbon-based sensor exhibited excellent selectivity performance for DS over almost all of the anions commonly present in commercial formulations and it was successfully employed as an end-point detector in potentiometric titrations of anionic surfactants in a pH range from 3 to 12. Three-component mixtures containing sodium alkanesulfonate (C 10 , C 12 and C 14 ) were successfully differentially titrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.