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Sample records for alkanesulfonates

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the alkanesulfonate FMN reductase from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallization of the native and SeMet FMN reductase protein of the E. coli alkanesulfonate monooxygenase two-component enzyme system is reported. The alkanesulfonate FMN reductase (SsuE) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the reduction of FMN by NADPH to provide reduced flavin for the monooxygenase (SsuD) enzyme. The vapor-diffusion technique yielded single crystals that grow as hexagonal rods and diffract to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron X-ray radiation. The protein crystallizes in the primitive hexagonal space group P622. The SsuE protein lacks any cysteine or methionine residues owing to the role of the SsuE enzyme in the acquisition of sulfur during sulfate starvation. Therefore, substitution of two leucine residues (Leu114 and Leu165) to methionine was performed to obtain selenomethionine-containing SsuE for MAD phasing. The selenomethionine derivative of SsuE has been expressed and purified and crystals of the protein have been obtained with and without bound FMN. These preliminary studies should lead to the structure solution of SsuE. It is anticipated that this new protein structure will provide detailed structural information on specific active-site regions of the protein and insight into the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer of reduced flavin

  2. Effect of counterions on properties of micelles formed by alkylpyridinium surfactants .1. Conductometry and H-1-NMR chemical shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, K; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper delineates the influence of counterions on the aggregation behavior of 1-methyl-4-n-dodecylpyridinium surfactants, using conductometry and H-1-NMR spectroscopy. Three types of counterions have been studied: (i) halides, (ii) alkanesulfonates, and (iii) aromatic counterions. The critical.

  3. Effect of counterions on properties of micelles formed by alkylpyridinium surfactants .1. Conductometry and H-1-NMR chemical shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Bijma, K; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper delineates the influence of counterions on the aggregation behavior of 1-methyl-4-n-dodecylpyridinium surfactants, using conductometry and H-1-NMR spectroscopy. Three types of counterions have been studied: (i) halides, (ii) alkanesulfonates, and (iii) aromatic counterions. The critical. micelle concentration is found to decrease with increasing counterion size and increasing counterion hydrophobicity, whereas the degree of counterion binding increases. The aggregation behavior of ...

  4. Anaerobic taurine oxidation: a novel reaction by a nitrate-reducing Alcaligenes sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denger, K; Laue, H; Cook, A M

    1997-06-01

    Enrichment cultures were prepared under strictly anoxic conditions in medium representing fresh water and containing an organosulfonate as electron donor and carbon source, and nitrate as electron acceptor. The inoculum was from the anaerobic digestor of two communal sewage works. The natural organosulfonates 2-aminoethanesulfonate (taurine), DL-2-amino-3-sulfopropionate (cysteate) and 2-hydroxyethanesulfonate (isethionate) all gave positive enrichments, whereas unsubstituted alkanesulfonates, such as methanesulfonate and arenesulfonates, gave no enrichment. Two representative enrichments were used to obtain pure cultures, and strains NKNTAU (utilizing taurine) and NKNIS (utilizing isethionate) were isolated. Strain NKNTAU was examined in detail. Out of 18 tested organosulfonates, it utilized only one, taurine, and was identified as a novel Alcaligenes sp., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium. Carbon from taurine was converted to cell material and carbon dioxide. The amino group was released as ammonium ion and the sulfonate moiety was recovered as sulfate. Nitrate was reduced to nitrogen gas.

  5. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, M.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  6. The cys regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In Escherichia coli, genes involved in metabolic pathway of sulfate and sulfonate compounds are clustered in a cys regulon, which includes three ABC transport system (operons: sbpcysWUA; ssuABC and tauABC), thirteen genes involved in the sulfur reduction (ssuDE; tauD and cysDNCHIJGK) and two regulatory proteins that belong to LysR transcription family: CysB and Cbl. Notably, a search and comparative analysis of these genes in the genomes of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri and other phylogenetically related Xanthomonas species revealed the presence of genes involved with alkanesulfonate, sulfate ester and taurine, only in X. citri, suggesting that proteins from this regulon might be associated with pathogenicity in citrus. Using the molecular modeling associated with a system biology view, we modeled all the protein structures of the X. citri cys regulon as well as characterized the important residues forming the putative active sites. Comparison with orthologs from different microorganisms was made in order to get a phylogenetic relationships. We showed that proteins that are responsible for the affinity and specificity of the alkanesulfonate, sulfate and taurine transport systems conserved the residues involved in the sulfate coordination but are organized in different branches in evolution. Inside these phylogenetic branches, proteins involved in the sulfate transporter are highly conserved when compared to the others. Moreover, we identified that the taurine-binding protein (TauA) of the X. citri belongs to a different evolutionary branch from that one that described for E. coli. These differences were also noticed for components of the tau operon, including a putative new regulator. The function and mechanism of action of each protein is discussed in order to bring light for the sulfur assimilation processes and their importance for X. citri physiology. (author)

  7. The cys regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutran, A.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In Escherichia coli, genes involved in metabolic pathway of sulfate and sulfonate compounds are clustered in a cys regulon, which includes three ABC transport system (operons: sbpcysWUA; ssuABC and tauABC), thirteen genes involved in the sulfur reduction (ssuDE; tauD and cysDNCHIJGK) and two regulatory proteins that belong to LysR transcription family: CysB and Cbl. Notably, a search and comparative analysis of these genes in the genomes of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri and other phylogenetically related Xanthomonas species revealed the presence of genes involved with alkanesulfonate, sulfate ester and taurine, only in X. citri, suggesting that proteins from this regulon might be associated with pathogenicity in citrus. Using the molecular modeling associated with a system biology view, we modeled all the protein structures of the X. citri cys regulon as well as characterized the important residues forming the putative active sites. Comparison with orthologs from different microorganisms was made in order to get a phylogenetic relationships. We showed that proteins that are responsible for the affinity and specificity of the alkanesulfonate, sulfate and taurine transport systems conserved the residues involved in the sulfate coordination but are organized in different branches in evolution. Inside these phylogenetic branches, proteins involved in the sulfate transporter are highly conserved when compared to the others. Moreover, we identified that the taurine-binding protein (TauA) of the X. citri belongs to a different evolutionary branch from that one that described for E. coli. These differences were also noticed for components of the tau operon, including a putative new regulator. The function and mechanism of action of each protein is discussed in order to bring light for the sulfur assimilation processes and their importance for X. citri physiology. (author)

  8. Taurine reduction in anaerobic respiration of Bilophila wadsworthia RZATAU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laue, H; Denger, K; Cook, A M

    1997-05-01

    Organosulfonates are important natural and man-made compounds, but until recently (T. J. Lie, T. Pitta, E. R. Leadbetter, W. Godchaux III, and J. R. Leadbetter. Arch. Microbiol. 166:204-210, 1996), they were not believed to be dissimilated under anoxic conditions. We also chose to test whether alkane- and arenesulfonates could serve as electron sinks in respiratory metabolism. We generated 60 anoxic enrichment cultures in mineral salts medium which included several potential electron donors and a single organic sulfonate as an electron sink, and we used material from anaerobic digestors in communal sewage works as inocula. None of the four aromatic sulfonates, the three unsubstituted alkanesulfonates, or the N-sulfonate tested gave positive enrichment cultures requiring both the electron donor and electron sink for growth. Nine cultures utilizing the natural products taurine, cysteate, or isethionate were considered positive for growth, and all formed sulfide. Two clearly different pure cultures were examined. Putative Desulfovibrio sp. strain RZACYSA, with lactate as the electron donor, utilized sulfate, aminomethanesulfonate, taurine, isethionate, and cysteate, converting the latter to ammonia, acetate, and sulfide. Strain RZATAU was identified by 16S rDNA analysis as Bilophila wadsworthia. In the presence of, e.g., formate as the electron donor, it utilized, e.g., cysteate and isethionate and converted taurine quantitatively to cell material and products identified as ammonia, acetate, and sulfide. Sulfite and thiosulfate, but not sulfate, were utilized as electron sinks, as was nitrate, when lactate was provided as the electron donor and carbon source. A growth requirement for 1,4-naphthoquinone indicates a menaquinone electron carrier, and the presence of cytochrome c supports the presence of an electron transport chain. Pyruvate-dependent disappearance of taurine from cell extracts, as well as formation of alanine and release of ammonia and acetate, was

  9. Redox-Induced Backbiting of Surface-Tethered Alkylsulfonate Amphiphiles: Reversible Switching of Surface Wettability and Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Ramos, Lionel; de Beer, Sissi; Hempenius, Mark A; Vancso, G Julius

    2015-06-16

    The synthesis and characterization of electrode-supported poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) films bearing iodopropyl (PFS-I) and undecanesulfonate (PFS-SO3(-)) surface moieties are presented. The redox responsiveness of these PFS films allows for controlled and repeatable switching of the surface energy of the PFS-I and PFS-SO3(-) layers under electrochemical control. Static water/surface contact angle measurements showed a change in contact angle values for PFS-I from 80° (reduced state) to 70° (oxidized state) over repeated cycles. However, an opposite change in wettability was observed for PFS-SO3(-), where the values observed varied from 59° (reduced state) to 77° (oxidized state). Nanoscale adherence was assessed with colloid probe AFM. The adhesive forces between these surfaces and a polystyrene (PS) colloid probe in water alternated between 130 nN (reduced state) and 30 nN (oxidized state) for PFS-I layers and between 75 nN (reduced) and 180 nN (oxidized) for the PFS-SO3(-) films. The reversed response of PFS-I films to oxidation compared to that of PFS-SO3(-), in both contact angles and adhesive forces, suggests a different underlying mechanism for switching. As PFS-I is tuned from the reduced to the oxidized state, positively charged ferrocenium (Fc(+)) centers that formed in the film increase its wettability and reduce its adherence to the hydrophobic colloid probe. For PFS-SO3(-) in the reduced state, the exposed alkanesulfonate moieties increase the hydrophilicity of the surface. When oxidized, the Fc(+) units attract the negatively charged sulfonate groups, which results in a bending of the sulfonate groups toward the PFS surface, exposing the undecyl spacer. This alteration of the surface chemistry reduces the surface energy and increases the adherence between the bent alkyl chains and the hydrophobic PS colloid in water. The attraction of the charged sulfonate group to Fc(+) is in competition with the counterions present in the electrolyte solution