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Sample records for alkanes

  1. Semifluorinated alkanes and alkanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runnsjo, Anna; Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Graf, Gesche

    2017-01-01

    The binary system perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8)–tetradecane (C14) was investigated in order to increase understanding of interactions of semifluorinated alkanes (SFAs) with hydrophobic molecules. The thermal phase behavior for F6H8 and C14 and their mixtures was determined using DSC. The activity...

  2. Alkane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-03-29

    Catalytic activation of alkanes which directly transforms light alkanes into higher homologs is a major area in organometallic chemistry and petrochemical chemistry. This transformation is a chemical challenge considering the inertness of the sp3 carbon-hydrogen bond. It is generally accepted that this catalytic process involves the formation of olefins. This reaction is defined as alkane metathesis. To date, two catalytic systems of alkane metathesis exist: (i) a single catalytic system prepared by surface organometallic chemistry, acting as multifunctional-supported catalyst which transforms any alkanes into a mixture of their lower and higher homologs and (ii) the other catalytic systems employing a tandem strategy with two different metals, one metal for alkane (de)hydrogenation and another for olefin metathesis in which the activity of these catalysts is essentially driven by the performance of the (de)hydrogenation steps. In this book chapter, we would focus on the evolution of these two classes of catalysts by looking at their specific reactivity of the catalysts towards alkanes, comparing their performances and studying the mechanism.

  3. Alkane dimers interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Madsen, Georg Kent Hellerup; Hammer, Bjørk

    2010-01-01

    The interaction energies of a series of n-alkane dimers, from methane to decane, have been investigated with Density Functional Theory (DFT), using the MGGA-M06-L density functional. The results are compared both to the available wavefunction-based values as well as to dispersion corrected DFT...... values. The MGGA-M06-L density functional is a semi-local functional designed and has proven to provide accurate estimates of dispersion interactions for several systems at moderate computational cost. In the present application, it reproduces the trends obtained by the more expensive wavefunction...

  4. Nanorheology of Liquid Alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, S.A., Cochran, H.D., Cummings, P.T. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering], [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of liquid alkanes, squalane and tetracosane, confined between moving walls to which butane chains are tethered, effectively screening the details of the wall. As in an experiment, heat is removed by thermostatting the tethered molecules. Results obtained at high strain rates, typical of practical applications, suggest little or no difference between the bulk rheology and confined flow, and the occurrence of a high degree of slip at the wall-fluid interface at the conditions studied. At relatively low velocities and high densities, tetracosane shows the formation of fully-extended chains at certain wall spacings.

  5. Alkane oxidation by osmium tetroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Brian C; Brown, Peter; Dehestani, Ahmad; Mayer, James M

    2005-03-09

    Aqueous alkaline OsO4 at 85 degrees C oxidizes saturated alkanes, including primary, secondary, and tertiary C-H bonds. Isobutane affords tert-butanol in quantitative yield based on consumed OsO4. Cyclohexane is oxidized to a mixture of adipate and succinate. Ethane and propane are oxidized to acetate, which itself is further oxidized under the reaction conditions. A few turnovers of isobutane oxidation have been accomplished using NaIO4 as the terminal oxidant. The alkane oxidation is an example of ligand accelerated catalysis, as hydroxide binding to OsO4 is required for reaction. A concerted mechanism involving [3+2] addition of a C-H bond to two oxo groups of OsO4(OH)- is suggested, analogous to the pathways for dihydroxylation of alkenes by OsO4(L) and for addition of H2 to OsO4(L).

  6. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  7. Transcriptome response to alkane biofuels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: identification of efflux pumps involved in alkane tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrocarbon alkanes have been recently considered as important next-generation biofuels because microbial production of alkane biofuels was demonstrated. However, the toxicity of alkanes to microbial hosts can possibly be a bottleneck for high productivity of alkane biofuels. To tackle this toxicity issue, it is essential to understand molecular mechanisms of interactions between alkanes and microbial hosts, and to harness these mechanisms to develop microbial host strains with improved tolerance against alkanes. In this study, we aimed to improve the tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryotic host of industrial significance, to alkane biofuels by exploiting cellular mechanisms underlying alkane response. Results To this end, we first confirmed that nonane (C9), decane (C10), and undecane (C11) were significantly toxic and accumulated in S. cerevisiae. Transcriptome analyses suggested that C9 and C10 induced a range of cellular mechanisms such as efflux pumps, membrane modification, radical detoxification, and energy supply. Since efflux pumps could possibly aid in alkane secretion, thereby reducing the cytotoxicity, we formed the hypothesis that those induced efflux pumps could contribute to alkane export and tolerance. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrated the roles of the efflux pumps Snq2p and Pdr5p in reducing intracellular levels of C10 and C11, as well as enhancing tolerance levels against C10 and C11. This result provided the evidence that Snq2p and Pdr5p were associated with alkane export and tolerance in S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae response to alkane biofuels at a systems level through transcriptome analyses. Based on these mechanisms, we identified efflux pumps involved in alkane export and tolerance in S. cerevisiae. We believe that the results here provide valuable insights into designing microbial engineering strategies to improve cellular tolerance for

  8. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  9. Metathesis of alkanes and related reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2010-02-16

    (Figure Presented) The transformation of alkanes remains a difficult challenge because of the relative inertness of the C-H and C-C bonds. The rewards for asserting synthetic control over unfunctionalized, saturated hydrocarbons are considerable, however, because converting short alkanes into longer chain analogues is usually a value-adding process. Alkane metathesis is a novel catalytic and direct transformation of two molecules of a given alkane into its lower and higher homologues; moreover, the process proceeds at relatively low temperature (ambient conditions or higher). It was discovered through the use of a silica-supported tantalum hydride, (=SiO)2TaH, a multifunctional catalyst with a single site of action. This reaction completes the story of the metathesis reactions discovered over the past 40 years: olefin metathesis, alkyne metathesis, and ene-yne cyclizations. In this Account, we examine the fundamental mechanistic aspects of alkane metathesis as well as the novel reactions that have been derived from its study. The silica-supported tantalum hydride catalyst was developed as the result of systematic and meticulous studies of the interaction between oxide supports and organometallic complexes, a field of study denoted surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). A careful examination of this surface-supported tantalum hydride led to the later discovery of aluminasupported tungsten hydride, W(H)3/Al 2O3, which proved to be an even better catalyst for alkane metathesis. Supported tantalum and tungsten hydrides are highly unsaturated, electron-deficient species that are very reactive toward the C-H and C-C bonds of alkanes. They show a great versatility in various other reactions, such as cross-metathesis between methane and alkanes, cross-metathesis between toluene and ethane, or even methane nonoxidative coupling. Moreover, tungsten hydride exhibits a specific ability in the transformation of isobutane into 2,3-dimethylbutane as well as in the metathesis of

  10. Alkane Energy plc annual report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    Alkane Energy plc (Alkane) is the UK's leading commercial producer of methane gas from abandoned coal mines. It currently operates five Green Energy Parks in the East Midlands and Yorkshire two of which were opened in the reporting year. Two agreements have been signed to develop sites to supply sites with a capacity of 50 MW of electricity. The annual report outlines achievements and plans and describes the technologies developed to capture methane. It discusses the environmental benefits of producing coal mine methane (CMM), particularly in reducing global warming, and benefits to the deprived former mining communities of the UK.

  11. Alkane Energy plc annual report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    Alkane Energy plc (Alkane) is the UK's leading commercial producer of methane gas from abandoned coal mines. It currently operates five Green Energy Parks in the East Midlands and Yorkshire two of which began delivering gas in the reporting year. In March 2003 a contract was signed to develop a 2.7 MW generation facility in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. The annual report outlines achievements and plans and describes the technologies developed to capture methane. It discusses the environmental benefits of producing coal mine methane (CMM), particularly in reducing global warming, and benefits to the deprived former mining communities of the UK.

  12. Enzymes and Genes Involved in Aerobic Alkane Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongze eShao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes , transport across cell membrane of alkanes , the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation.

  13. A chemotaxonomic approach to the alkane content of three species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemotaxonomic significance of leaf wax n-alkanes was studied in three species of Anthocleista Afzel. Identification of alkane components were determined by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data. In all, fourteen alkanes were identified, ranging from tetracosane ...

  14. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  15. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  16. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  17. Alkane metathesis by tandem alkane-dehydrogenation-olefin-metathesis catalysis and related chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haibach, Michael C; Kundu, Sabuj; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S

    2012-06-19

    Methods for the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels that are both efficient and economically viable could greatly enhance global security and prosperity. Currently, the major route to convert natural gas and coal to liquids is Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, which is potentially applicable to any source of synthesis gas including biomass and nonconventional fossil carbon sources. The major desired products of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis are n-alkanes that contain 9-19 carbons; they comprise a clean-burning and high combustion quality diesel, jet, and marine fuel. However, Fischer-Tropsch catalysis also results in significant yields of the much less valuable C(3) to C(8)n-alkanes; these are also present in large quantities in oil and gas reserves (natural gas liquids) and can be produced from the direct reduction of carbohydrates. Therefore, methods that could disproportionate medium-weight (C(3)-C(8)) n-alkanes into heavy and light n-alkanes offer great potential value as global demand for fuel increases and petroleum reserves decrease. This Account describes systems that we have developed for alkane metathesis based on the tandem operation of catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation and olefin metathesis. As dehydrogenation catalysts, we used pincer-ligated iridium complexes, and we initially investigated Schrock-type Mo or W alkylidene complexes as olefin metathesis catalysts. The interoperability of the catalysts typically represents a major challenge in tandem catalysis. In our systems, the rate of alkane dehydrogenation generally limits the overall reaction rate, whereas the lifetime of the alkylidene complexes at the relatively high temperatures required to obtain practical dehydrogenation rates (ca. 125 -200 °C) limits the total turnover numbers. Accordingly, we have focused on the development and use of more active dehydrogenation catalysts and more stable olefin-metathesis catalysts. We have used thermally

  18. Hydrogen Bonding to Alkanes: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen; Olesen, Solveig Gaarn

    2009-01-01

    The structural, vibrational, and energetic properties of adducts of alkanes and strong cationic proton donors were studied with composite ab initio calculations. Hydrogen bonding in [D-H+ H-alkyl] adducts contributes to a significant degree to the interactions between the two components, which...... are stronger in adducts of isobutane and in adducts of stronger acids. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in protonated long-chain alcohols manifests itself in the same manner as intermolecular hydrogen bonding and can be equally strong. Udgivelsesdato: 12 juni 2009...

  19. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for application in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia

    2014-01-01

    relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter...

  20. Alkane oxidation by Pseudomonas oleovorans : genes and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Jan Berthold

    1994-01-01

    This thesis deals with the molecular genetics and biochemistry of oxidation of medium chainlength alkanes by P. oleovorans, as part of a program to develop biotechnological processes, based on oxygenases.

  1. Reaction of atomic oxygen with alkanes. Regioselective alcohol formation on γ-radiolysis of liquid carbon dioxide solutions of alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, A.; Takamuku, S.; Sakurai, H.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma-radiolysis of liquid carbon dioxide in the presence of cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, and cis- or trans-decalin has been studied at 0 0 C. The main products were corresponding alcohols and carbonyl compounds. The oxidizing species from carbon dioxide apparently shows selective attack on C--H bonds of alkane in the order tertiary greater than secondary greater than primary. The observed tendency could be rationalized in terms of the reaction of ground state triplet oxygen atoms, O( 3 P), with alkane in liquid carbon dioxide. In the case of cis- and trans-decalin, highly configurational retention of decalol-9 was observed. The formation of a dimer of alkane was negligibly small. The rapid recombination of radical pairs initially formed by the reaction of O( 3 P) atoms with alkane in a solvent cage is proposed. In addition, the production of cyclohexanone from cyclohexanol is described

  2. Alkane inducible proteins in Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Tomohisa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Initial step of β-oxidation is catalyzed by acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in prokaryotes and mitochondria, while acyl-CoA oxidase primarily functions in the peroxisomes of eukaryotes. Oxidase reaction accompanies emission of toxic by-product reactive oxygen molecules including superoxide anion, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities are essential to detoxify them in the peroxisomes. Although there is an argument about whether primitive life was born and evolved under high temperature conditions, thermophilic archaea apparently share living systems with both bacteria and eukaryotes. We hypothesized that alkane degradation pathways in thermophilic microorganisms could be premature and useful to understand their evolution. Results An extremely thermophilic and alkane degrading Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23 was previously isolated from a deep subsurface oil reservoir in Japan. In the present study, we identified novel membrane proteins (P16, P21 and superoxide dismutase (P24 whose production levels were significantly increased upon alkane degradation. Unlike other bacteria acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activities were also increased in strain B23 by addition of alkane. Conclusion We first suggested that peroxisomal β-oxidation system exists in bacteria. This eukaryotic-type alkane degradation pathway in thermophilic bacterial cells might be a vestige of primitive living cell systems that had evolved into eukaryotes.

  3. C14–22 n-Alkanes in Soil from the Freetown Layered Intrusion, Sierra Leone: Products of Pt Catalytic Breakdown of Natural Longer Chain n-Alkanes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. W. Bowles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil above a platinum-group element (PGE-bearing horizon within the Freetown Layered Intrusion, Sierra Leone, contains anomalous concentrations of n-alkanes (CnH2n+2 in the range C14 to C22 not readily attributable to an algal or lacustrine origin. Longer chain n-alkanes (C23 to C31 in the soil were derived from the breakdown of leaf litter beneath the closed canopy humid tropical forest. Spontaneous breakdown of the longer chain n-alkanes to form C14–22 n-alkanes without biogenic or abiogenic catalysts is unlikely as the n-alkanes are stable. In the Freetown soil, the catalytic properties of the PGE (Pt in particular may lower the temperature at which oxidation of the longer chain n-alkanes can occur. Reaction between these n-alkanes and Pt species, such as Pt2+(H2O2(OH2 and Pt4+(H2O2(OH4 can bend and twist the alkanes, and significantly lower the Heat of Formation. Microbial catalysis is a possibility. Since a direct organic geochemical source of the lighter n-alkanes has not yet been identified, this paper explores the theoretical potential for abiogenic Pt species catalysis as a mechanism of breakdown of the longer n-alkanes to form C14–22 alkanes. This novel mechanism could offer additional evidence for the presence of the PGE in solution, as predicted by soil geochemistry.

  4. Squeezing molecularly thin alkane lubrication films: Layering transistions and wear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V. N.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of alkane lubricants confined between two approaching solids are investigated by a model that accounts for the curvature and the elastic properties of the solid surfaces. We consider linear alkane molecules of different chain lengths, C(3)H(8); C(4)H(10); C(8)H(18); C(9)H(20); C(10)H......(22); C(12)H(26), and C(14)H(30) confined between smooth gold surfaces. We observe well-defined molecular layers develop in the lubricant film when the width of the film is of the order of a few atomic diameters. An external squeezing-pressure induces discontinuous changes in the number n of lubricant...

  5. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  6. Selective conversion of butane into liquid hydrocarbon fuels on alkane metathesis catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Szeto, Kaï Chung

    2012-01-01

    We report a selective direct conversion of n-butane into higher molecular weight alkanes (C 5+) by alkane metathesis reaction catalysed by silica-alumina supported tungsten or tantalum hydrides at moderate temperature and pressure. The product is unprecedented, asymmetrically distributed towards heavier alkanes. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Solid acid catalysts in heterogeneous n-alkanes hydroisomerisation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the current global environmental concerns have prompted regulations to reduce the level of aromatic compounds, particularly benzene and its derivatives in gasoline, ydroisomerisation of n-alkanes is becoming a major alternative for enhancing octane number. Series of solid acid catalysts comprising of Freidel crafts, ...

  8. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    characterised at molecular level, they provide valu- able information on the sources of OM (Meyers. 2003; Volkman 2006). For example, lipid com- pounds such as n-alkanes, sterols, alcohols and fatty acids are used to assess sources of OM in marine and terrestrial sediments (Volkman et al. 1992; Tolosa et al. 2009).

  9. Catalytic dehydrogenation of light alkanes on metals and metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattler, Jesper J H B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328235601; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386405; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323171958; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2014-01-01

    A study is conducted to demonstrate catalytic dehydrogenation of light alkanes on metals and metal oxides. The study provides a complete overview of the materials used to catalyze this reaction, as dehydrogenation for the production of light olefins has become extremely relevant. Relevant factors,

  10. Aerobic Oxidations of Light Alkanes over Solid Metal Oxide Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joseph T; Venegas, Juan M; McDermott, William P; Hermans, Ive

    2017-11-07

    Heterogeneous metal oxide catalysts are widely studied for the aerobic oxidations of C 1 -C 4 alkanes to form olefins and oxygenates. In this review, we outline the properties of supported metal oxides, mixed-metal oxides, and zeolites and detail their most common applications as catalysts for partial oxidations of light alkanes. By doing this we establish similarities between different classes of metal oxides and identify common themes in reaction mechanisms and research strategies for catalyst improvement. For example, almost all partial alkane oxidations, regardless of the metal oxide, follow Mars-van Krevelen reaction kinetics, which utilize lattice oxygen atoms to reoxidize the reduced metal centers while the gaseous O 2 reactant replenishes these lattice oxygen vacancies. Many of the most-promising metal oxide catalysts include V 5+ surface species as a necessary constituent to convert the alkane. Transformations involving sequential oxidation steps (i.e., propane to acrylic acid) require specific reaction sites for each oxidation step and benefit from site isolation provided by spectator species. These themes, and others, are discussed in the text.

  11. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption of volatile n-alkane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption of volatile n-alkane hydrocarbons on water hyacinth. (Eichhornia crassipes) root biomass: Effect of organic solvent and mineral acid treatment. Netai Mukaratirwa-Muchanyereyi1,2, Jameson Kugara1 and Mark Fungayi Zaranyika1*. 1Chemistry Department, University of ...

  12. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption of volatile n-alkane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    alkanes hexane to nonane on ground dried water hyacinth (E. crassipes) root biomass were studied between 40 and 70°C column temperature using inverse gas chromatography, before and after treatment of the root biomass with mineral acid ...

  13. Distribution and sources of n-alkanes in surface sediments of Taihu Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The last study on n-alkanes in surface sediments of Taihu Lake was in 2000, only 13 surface sediment samples were analysed, in order to have a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of n-alkanes in the surface sediments of Taihu Lake, 41 surface sediment samples were analyzed by GC-MS. C10 to C37 were detected, the total concentrations of n-alkanes ranged from 2109 ng g−1 to 9096 ng g−1 (dry weight. There was strong odd carbon predominance in long chain n-alkanes and even carbon predominance in short chain n-alkanes. When this finding was combined with the analysis results of wax n-alkanes (WaxCn, carbon preference index (CPI, unresolved complex mixture (UCM, hopanes and steranes, it was considered that the long chain n-alkanes were mainly from terrigenous higher plants, and that the short chain n-alkanes mainly originated from bacteria and algae in the lake, compared with previous studies, there were no obvious anthropogenic petrogenic inputs. Terrestrial and aquatic hydrocarbons ratio (TAR and C21−/C25+ indicated that terrigenous input was higher than aquatic sources and the nearshore n-alkanes were mainly from land-derived sources. Moreover, the distribution of short chain n-alkanes presented a relatively uniform pattern, while the long chain n-alkanes presented a trend that concentrations dropped from nearshore places to the middle of lake.

  14. Image Charge Effects in the Wetting Behavior of Alkanes on Water with Accounting for Water Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill A. Emelyanenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Different types of surface forces, acting in the films of pentane, hexane, and heptane on water are discussed. It is shown that an important contribution to the surface forces originates from the solubility of water in alkanes. The equations for the distribution of electric potential inside the film are derived within the Debye-Hückel approximation, taking into account the polarization of the film boundaries by discrete charges at water-alkane interface and by the dipoles of water molecules dissolved in the film. On the basis of above equations we estimate the image charge contribution to the surface forces, excess free energy, isotherms of water adsorption in alkane film, and the total isotherms of disjoining pressure in alkane film. The results indicate the essential influence of water/alkane interface charging on the disjoining pressure in alkane films, and the wettability of water surface by different alkanes is discussed.

  15. Plant n-alkane production from litterfall altered the diversity and community structure of alkane degrading bacteria in litter layer in lowland subtropical rainforest in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Chao, Wei-Chun; Fan, Cheng-Wei

    2018-03-01

    n-Alkane and alkane-degrading bacteria have long been used as crucial biological indicators of paleoecology, petroleum pollution, and oil and gas prospecting. However, the relationship between n-alkane and alkane-degrading bacteria in natural forests is still poorly understood. In this study, long-chain n-alkane (C14-C35) concentrations in litterfall, litter layer, and topsoil as well as the diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacterial communities in litter layers were investigated in three habitats across a lowland subtropical rainforest in southern Taiwan: ravine, windward, and leeward habitats in Nanjenshan. Our results demonstrate that the litterfall yield and productivity of long-chain n-alkane were highest in the ravine habitats. However, long-chain n-alkane concentrations in all habitats were decreased drastically to a similar low level from the litterfall to the bulk soil, suggesting a higher rate of long-chain n-alkane degradation in the ravine habitat. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU) analysis using next-generation sequencing data revealed that the relative abundances of microbial communities in the windward and leeward habitats were similar and different from that in the ravine habitat. Data mining of community amplicon sequencing using the NCBI database revealed that alkB-gene-associated bacteria (95 % DNA sequence similarity to alkB-containing bacteria) were most abundant in the ravine habitat. Empirical testing of litter layer samples using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for determining alkB gene levels confirmed that the ravine habitat had higher alkB gene levels than the windward and leeward habitats. Heat map analysis revealed parallels in pattern color between the plant and microbial species compositions of the habitats, suggesting a causal relationship between the plant n-alkane production and microbial community diversity. This finding indicates that the diversity and relative abundance of microbial communities in the

  16. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures.

  17. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R., E-mail: wolfgang.hess@biologie.uni-freiburg.de [Genetics and Experimental Bioinformatics, Institute of Biology 3, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria.

  18. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria.

  19. Alkane biosynthesis genes in cyanobacteria and their transcriptional organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eKlähn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (AAR and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado and sll0209 (aar, that give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313 and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in

  20. Chromium oxide catalysts in the dehydrogenation of alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    Airaksinen, Sanna

    2005-01-01

    Light alkenes, such as propene and butenes, are important intermediates in the manufacture of fuel components and chemicals. The direct catalytic dehydrogenation of the corresponding alkanes is a selective way to produce these alkenes and is frequently carried out using chromia/alumina catalysts. The aim of this work was to obtain structure–activity information, which could be utilised in the optimisation of this catalytic system. The properties of chromia/alumina catalysts were investigated ...

  1. UNIQUAC interaction parameters for alkane/amine systems determined by Molecular Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Klein, R. A.; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    1996-01-01

    UNIQUAC interaction parameters have been successfully determined for three alkane/primary amine systems using a Molecular Mechanics method called the Consistent Force Field. Interaction parameters for alkane/alkane and alkane/ketone systems had been determined previously using this method...... and in this contribution the method has been extended to polar systems with extensive hydrogen bonding. It is thus possible to predict reliable vapor liquid equilibrium data using pure component data only. A method for finding the global minimum on the potential energy surface of a pair of molecules was developed. Good...

  2. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  3. Two novel alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion genes isolated from a Dietzia bacterium and the functions of fused rubredoxin domains in long-chain n-alkane degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yong; Liang, Jieliang; Fang, Hui; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2011-10-01

    Two alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene homologs (alkW1 and alkW2) were cloned from a Dietzia strain, designated DQ12-45-1b, which can grow on crude oil and n-alkanes ranging in length from 6 to 40 carbon atoms as sole carbon sources. Both AlkW1 and AlkW2 have an integral-membrane alkane monooxygenase (AlkB) conserved domain and a rubredoxin (Rd) conserved domain which are fused together. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two AlkB-fused Rd domains formed a novel third cluster with all the Rds from the alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene clusters in Gram-positive bacteria and that this third cluster was distant from the known AlkG1- and AlkG2-type Rds. Expression of the alkW1 gene in DQ12-45-1b was induced when cells were grown on C(8) to C(32) n-alkanes as sole carbon sources, but expression of the alkW2 gene was not detected. Functional heterologous expression in an alkB deletion mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1 suggested the alkW1 could restore the growth of KOB2Δ1 on C(14) and C(16) n-alkanes and induce faster growth on C(18) to C(32) n-alkanes than alkW1ΔRd, the Rd domain deletion mutant gene of alkW1, which also caused faster growth than KOB2Δ1 itself. In addition, the artificial fusion of AlkB from the Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and the Rds from both Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and Gram-positive Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b significantly increased the degradation of C(32) alkane compared to that seen with AlkB itself. In conclusion, the alkW1 gene cloned from Dietzia species encoded an alkane hydroxylase which increased growth on and degradation of n-alkanes up to C(32) in length, with its fused rubredoxin domain being necessary to maintain the functions. In addition, the fusion of alkane hydroxylase and rubredoxin genes from both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria can increase the degradation of long-chain n-alkanes (such as C(32)) in the Gram-negative bacterium.

  4. Optimized reaction mechanism rate rules for ignition of normal alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2016-08-11

    The increasing demand for cleaner combustion and reduced greenhouse gas emissions motivates research on the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and their surrogates. Accurate detailed chemical kinetic models are an important prerequisite for high fidelity reacting flow simulations capable of improving combustor design and operation. The development of such models for many new fuel components and/or surrogate molecules is greatly facilitated by the application of reaction classes and rate rules. Accurate and versatile rate rules are desirable to improve the predictive accuracy of kinetic models. A major contribution in the literature is the recent work by Bugler et al. (2015), which has significantly improved rate rules and thermochemical parameters used in kinetic modeling of alkanes. In the present study, it is demonstrated that rate rules can be used and consistently optimized for a set of normal alkanes including n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane, thereby improving the predictive accuracy for all the considered fuels. A Bayesian framework is applied in the calibration of the rate rules. The optimized rate rules are subsequently applied to generate a mechanism for n-dodecane, which was not part of the training set for the optimized rate rules. The developed mechanism shows accurate predictions compared with published well-validated mechanisms for a wide range of conditions.

  5. The Effect of Compositional Changes of Binary Mixtures of n-alkane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Effect of Compositional Changes of Binary Mixtures of n-alkane solvents on the Precipitation of Heavy Organics from a Solution of Crude Oil Residue. ... The results have shown that the quantity of HO precipitate decreases with increasing quantity of higher carbon number of n-alkane solvent to a minimum value at 2:1 ...

  6. The use of n-alkane markers to estimate the intake and apparent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The n-alkane marker (dosed marker, dotriacontane, C32, herbage markers C31, C33 and C35) technique was evaluated for use in feed intake and digestibility studies with horses. The mean retention time of digesta in the digestive tract was determined in horses following a single dose of C32. The n-alkane technique was ...

  7. Thermal, Catalytic Conversion of Alkanes to Linear Aldehydes and Linear Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinxin; Jia, Xiangqing; Huang, Zheng

    2018-03-21

    Alkanes, the main constituents of petroleum, are attractive feedstocks for producing value-added chemicals. Linear aldehydes and amines are two of the most important building blocks in the chemical industry. To date, there have been no effective methods for directly converting n-alkanes to linear aldehydes and linear amines. Here, we report a molecular dual-catalyst system for production of linear aldehydes via regioselective carbonylation of n-alkanes. The system is comprised of a pincer iridium catalyst for transfer-dehydrogenation of the alkane using t-butylethylene or ethylene as a hydrogen acceptor working sequentially with a rhodium catalyst for olefin isomerization-hydroformylation with syngas. The system exhibits high regioselectivity for linear aldehydes and gives high catalytic turnover numbers when using ethylene as the acceptor. In addition, the direct conversion of light alkanes, n-pentane and n-hexane, to siloxy-terminated alkyl aldehydes through a sequence of Ir/Fe-catalyzed alkane silylation and Ir/Rh-catalyzed alkane carbonylation, is described. Finally, the Ir/Rh dual-catalyst strategy has been successfully applied to regioselective alkane aminomethylation to form linear alkyl amines.

  8. Crystallisation and chain conformation of long chain n-alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorce, J.

    2000-06-01

    Hydrocarbon chains are a basic component in a number of systems as diverse as biological membranes, phospholipids and polymers. A better understanding of the physical properties of n-alkane chains should provide a better understanding of these more complex systems. With this aim, vibrational spectroscopy has been extensively used. This technique, sensitive to molecular details, is the only one able to both identify and quantify conformational disorder present in paraffinic systems. To achieve this, methyl deformations have been widely used as ''internal standards'' for the normalisation of peak areas. However, in the case of n-alkanes with short chain length, such as n-C 44 H 90 for example, the infrared spectra recorded at liquid nitrogen temperature and reported here show the sensitivity of these latter peaks to the various crystal structures formed. Indeed, the main frequencies of the symmetric methyl bending mode were found between 1384 cm -1 and 1368 cm -1 as a function of the crystal form. Changes in the frequency of the first order of the L.A.M. present in the Raman spectra were also observed. At higher temperatures, non all-trans conformers, inferred from different infrared bands present in the wagging mode region, were found to be essentially placed at the end of the n-alkane chains. At the monoclinic phase transition, the concentration of end-gauche conformers, proportional to the area of the infrared band at 1342 cm -1 , increases abruptly. On the contrary, in the spectra recorded at liquid nitrogen temperature no such band is observed. We also studied the degree of disorder in two purely monodisperse long chain n-alkanes, namely n-C 198 H 398 and n-C 246 H 494 . The chain conformation as well as the tilt angle of the chains from the crystal surfaces were determined by means of low frequency Raman spectroscopy and S.A.X.S. measurements on solution-crystallised samples. The increase in the number of end-gauche conformers which was expected to occur with

  9. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita eBose

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2-C5 and longer alkanes. C2-C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1-C4 then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist. Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4‰ and 4.5‰ respectively. The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (-3.5 and -6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively. Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1-C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3-C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial community

  10. Functional screening of aldehyde decarbonylases for long-chain alkane production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Min-Kyoung; Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A.

    2017-01-01

    performed functional screening to identify efficient ADs that can improve alkane production by S. cerevisiae. Results: A comparative study of ADs originated from a plant, insects, and cyanobacteria were conducted in S. cerevisiae. As a result, expression of aldehyde deformylating oxygenases (ADOs), which......Background: Low catalytic activities of pathway enzymes are often a limitation when using microbial based chemical production. Recent studies indicated that the enzyme activity of aldehyde decarbonylase (AD) is a critical bottleneck for alkane biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We therefore...... are cyanobacterial ADs, from Synechococcus elongatus and Crocosphaera watsonii converted fatty aldehydes to corresponding Cn-1 alkanes and alkenes. The CwADO showed the highest alkane titer (0.13 mg/L/OD600) and the lowest fatty alcohol production (0.55 mg/L/OD600). However, no measurable alkanes and alkenes were...

  11. Genes involved in alkane degradation in the Alcanivorax hongdengensis strain A-11-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wanpeng [State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources; Xiamen Univ. (China). School of Life Sciences; Shao, Zongze [State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources

    2012-04-15

    Alcanivorax hongdengensis A-11-3 is a newly identified type strain isolated from the surface water of the Malacca and Singapore Straits that can degrade a wide range of alkanes. To understand the degradation mechanism of this strain, the genes encoding alkane hydroxylases were obtained by PCR screening and shotgun sequencing of a genomic fosmid library. Six genes involved in alkane degradation were found, including alkB1, alkB2, p450-1, p450-2, p450-3 and almA. Heterogeneous expression analysis confirmed their functions as alkane oxidases in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47{delta}B) or Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2{delta}1. Q-PCR revealed that the transcription of alkB1 and alkB2 was enhanced in the presence of n-alkanes C{sub 12} to C{sub 24}; three p450 genes were up-regulated by C{sub 8}-C{sub 16} n-alkanes at different levels, whereas enhanced expression of almA was observed when strain A-11-3 grew with long-chain alkanes (C{sub 24} to C{sub 36}). In the case of branched alkanes, pristane significantly enhanced the expression of alkB1, p450-3 and almA. The six genes enable strain A-11-3 to degrade short (C{sub 8}) to long (C{sub 36}) alkanes that are straight or branched. The ability of A. hongdengensis A-11-3 to thrive in oil-polluted marine environments may be due to this strain's multiple systems for alkane degradation and its range of substrates. (orig.)

  12. n-Alkane distributions as palaeoclimatic proxies in ombrotrophic peat: The role of decomposition and dominant vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, J.; Buurman, P.

    2011-01-01

    n-Alkane distributions are frequently used as palaeoclimate proxies in ombrotrophic peat deposits. Although n-alkane distributions differ strongly between plant species, n-alkanes are not species-specific molecules. For a proper interpretation, it is important to understand the different abundances

  13. On the large σ-hyperconjugation in alkanes and alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Judy I-Chia; Wang, Changwei; McKee, William Chadwick; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2014-06-01

    The conventional view that the σCC and σCH bonds in alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons are so highly localized that their non-steric interactions are negligible is scrutinized by the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method. Even molecules considered conventionally to be "strain free" and "unperturbed" have surprisingly large and quite significant total σ-BLW-delocalization energies (DEs) due to their geminal and vicinal hyperconjugative interactions. Thus, the computed BLW-DEs (in kcal mol(-1)) for the antiperiplanar conformations of the n-alkanes (C(N)H(2N+2), N = 1-10) range from 11.6 for ethane to 82.2 for n-decane and are 50.9 for cyclohexane and 91.0 for adamantane. Although σ-electron delocalization in unsaturated hydrocarbons usually is ignored, the σ-BLW-DEs (in kcal mol(-1)) are substantial, as exemplified by D2h ethylene (9.0), triplet D2d ethylene (16.4), allene (19.3), butadiene (19.0), hexatriene (28.3), benzene (28.1), and cyclobutadiene (21.1). While each individual geminal and vicinal hyperconjugative interaction between hydrocarbon σ-bonding and σ-antibonding orbitals tends to be smaller than an individual π conjugative interaction (e.g., 10.2 kcal mol(-1) in anti-1,3-butadiene, the presence of many σ-hyperconjugative interactions (e.g., a total of 12 in anti-1,3-butadiene, see text), result in substantial total σ-stabilization energies (e.g., 19.0 kcal mol(-1) for butadiene), which may surpass those from the π interactions. Although large in magnitude, σ-electron delocalization energies often are obscured by cancellation when two hydrocarbons are compared. Rather than being strain-free, cyclohexane, adamantane, and diamantane suffer from their increasing number of intramolecular 1,4-C…C repulsions resulting in elongated C-C bond lengths and reduced σ-hyperconjugation, compared to the (skew-free) antiperiplanar n-alkane conformers. Instead of being inconsequential, σ-bond interactions are important and merit consideration.

  14. Biodegradation of Variable-Chain-Length Alkanes at Low Temperatures by a Psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Lyle G.; Hawari, Jalal; Zhou, Edward; Bourbonnière, Luc; Inniss, William E.; Greer, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5°C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C10 to C21 alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5°C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5°C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-dodecanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25°C. PMID:9647833

  15. Effect of nanoparticles on the RII -RI -RV rotator phase transitions of alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that nanoparticles play an important role on the rotator phase transitions of n-alkanes. A phenomenological model for predicting the RII -RI -RV phase transitions in mixtures of alkanes and nanoparticles has been proposed by combining Flory-Huggins free energy of isotropic mixing and Landau free energy. The impact of nanoparticles on the RII -RI -RV phase transitions and their transition temperatures is discussed by means of phenomenological theory. The possibility of the tricritical behavior of the RI -RV phase transition in the mixtures of alkanes and nanoparticles is discussed. The theoretical predictions are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental results.

  16. Chromium oxide catalysts in the dehydrogenation of alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airaksinen, S.

    2005-07-01

    Light alkenes, such as propene and butenes, are important intermediates in the manufacture of fuel components and chemicals. The direct catalytic dehydrogenation of the corresponding alkanes is a selective way to produce these alkenes and is frequently carried out using chromia/alumina catalysts. The aim of this work was to obtain structure-activity information, which could be utilised in the optimisation of this catalytic system. The properties of chromia/alumina catalysts were investigated by advanced in situ and ex situ spectroscopic methods, and the activities were measured in the dehydrogenation of isobutane. The dehydrogenation activity of chromia/alumina was attributed to coordinatively unsaturated redox and non- redox Cr{sup 3+} ions at all chromium loadings. In addition, the oxygen ions in the catalyst appeared to participate in the reaction. The reduction of chromia/alumina resulted in formation of adsorbed surface species: hydroxyl groups bonded to chromia and alumina were formed in reduction by hydrogen and alkanes, and carbon- containing species in reduction by carbon monoxide and alkanes. Prereduction with hydrogen or carbon monoxide decreased the dehydrogenation activity. The effect by hydrogen was suggested to be related to the amount of OH/H species on the reduced surface affecting the number of coordinatively unsaturated chromium sites, and the effect by carbon monoxide to the formation of unselective chromium sites and carboncontaining species. The chromia/alumina catalysts were deactivated with time on stream and in cycles of (pre)reduction- dehydrogenation-regeneration. The deactivation with time on stream was caused mainly by coke formation. The nature of the coke species changed during dehydrogenation. Carboxylates and aliphatic hydrocarbon species formed at the beginning of the reaction and unsaturated/aromatic hydrocarbons and graphite- like species with increasing time on stream. The deactivation in several dehydrogenation- regeneration

  17. ESR and electronic spectra of alkane radical cations formed in γ-irradiated 3-methylpentane and 3-methylhexane glasses containing alkane solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Ohta, N.

    1987-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and optical difference spectra of photobleaching are measured, and the radical cations from some higher alkanes (C 9 -C 11 ) and some methyl-branched butanes are found to be trapped in 3-methylpentane or 3-methylhexane matrices at 77 K. The ESR spectra show close agreement with those of radical cations produced in CCl 2 FCClF 2 matrices. The cations of methyl-branched butanes give the absorption bands with λ/sub max/ ranging from 300 to 260 nm and the bands are attributed to σ-localized cations, while the higher alkane cation bands appearing in the near-IR region are ascribed to σ-delocalized cations. The cations of higher alkanes are found to be mobilized by light with λ > 900 nm to recombine with the negative ions formed by electron scavenging

  18. Abundance of macroalgal organic matter in biofilms: Evidence from n-alkane biomarkers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Garg, A.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Biofilm development on titanium panels immersed in the surface waters of Dona Paula Bay, Goa, India was investigated using molecular biomarkers such as n-alkanes and other chemical and biological parameters. Biofilm biomass measured as organic...

  19. Critical constants and acentric factors for long-chain alkanes suitable for corresponding states applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Dimitrios, Tassios

    1997-01-01

    Several methods for the estimation of the critical temperature T-c, the critical pressure P-c, and the acentric factor omega for long-chain n-alkanes are reviewed and evaluated for the prediction of vapor pressures using Corresponding States (CS) methods, like the Lee-Kesler equation and the cubic...... equations of state. Most reliable and recent literature methods proposed for the estimation of the acentric factor of heavy alkanes yield similar values and the emphasis is, thus, given to the determination of the best sets of T-c and P-c. Various extrapolation schemes proposed for this purpose and several....... Anselme, Correlation of the critical properties of alkanes and alkanols, Fluid Phase Equilibria, 56 (1990) 153-169; W. Hu, J. Lovland and P. Vonka. Generalized vapor pressure equations for n-alkanes, 1-alkenes, and 1-alkanols, Presented at the 11th Int. Congress of Chemical Engineering, Chemical Equipment...

  20. Biobased production of alkanes and alkenes through metabolic engineering of microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Min Kyoung; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Advancement in metabolic engineering of microorganisms has enabled bio-based production of a range of chemicals, and such engineered microorganism can be used for sustainable production leading to reduced carbon dioxide emission there. One area that has attained much interest is microbial...... hydrocarbon biosynthesis, and in particular, alkanes and alkenes are important high-value chemicals as they can be utilized for a broad range of industrial purposes as well as ‘drop-in’ biofuels. Some microorganisms have the ability to biosynthesize alkanes and alkenes naturally, but their production level...... is extremely low. Therefore, there have been various attempts to recruit other microbial cell factories for production of alkanes and alkenes by applying metabolic engineering strategies. Here we review different pathways and involved enzymes for alkane and alkene production and discuss bottlenecks...

  1. Simulation studies on structural and thermal properties of alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, J Meena

    2017-06-01

    The structural and thermal properties of the passivated gold nanoparticles were explored employing molecular dynamics simulation for the different surface coverage densities of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of alkane thiol. The structural properties of the monolayer protected gold nanoparticles such us overall shape, organization and conformation of the capping alkane thiol chains were found to be influenced by the capping density. The structural order of the thiol capped gold nanoparticles enhances with the increase in the surface coverage density. The specific heat capacity of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles was found to increase linearly with the thiol coverage density. This may be attributed to the enhancement in the lattice vibrational energy. The present simulation results suggest, that the structural and thermal properties of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles may be modified by the suitable selection of the SAM coverage density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Conformational problem of alkanes in liquid crystals by NMR spectroscopy: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Adrian C J; Chen, Daniel H J

    2014-10-01

    Recent discoveries of the role of alkane flexibility in determining liquid-crystal behaviour are surveyed. With the impetus for understanding the alkane conformational problem established, recent model dependent (1)H NMR work on the topic will be reviewed where progress is made but the need to circumvent models eventually becomes evident. A closer look at the rigid basic units of alkanes will provide the way forward where it is shown that the orientational ordering and anisotropic potentials of these molecules dissolved in liquid crystals scale with each other. Once this relationship is established, a series of works using anisotropic and isotropic (1)H NMR spectroscopy to study alkane conformational statistics will be covered, wherein the influence of the gas, isotropic condensed and anisotropic condensed phases will be described. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-11-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Microaerophilic alkane degradation in Pseudomonas extremaustralis: a transcriptomic and physiological approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribelli, Paula Maria; Rossi, Leticia; Ricardi, Martiniano M

    2017-01-01

    Diesel fuel is one of the most important sources of hydrocarbon contamination worldwide. Its composition consists of a complex mixture of n-alkanes, branched alkanes and aromatic compounds. Hydrocarbon degradation in Pseudomonas species has been mostly studied under aerobic conditions; however, a...... conditions for cell maintenance or slow growth in a Pseudomonas species and this metabolism could represent an adaptive advantage in polluted environments....

  5. Application of a Crossover Equation of State to Describe Phase Equilibrium and Critical Properties of n-Alkanes and Methane/n-Alkane Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. C. M. Vinhal, Andre; Yan, Wei; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2017-01-01

    and the asymptotic one near the critical point. Although several crossover EOSs have been developed in the last decades their use in modeling industrial processes is rather limited. In this work, we use the crossover Soave–Redlich–Kwong (CSRK) to describe phase equilibrium and critical properties of pure n......-alkanes and methane/n-alkane binary mixtures and compare the results to two other modeling approaches of the SRK EOS. In the case of the pure fluids, CSRK gives an accurate overall description of the phase equilibrium and critical properties; nevertheless, a minor increase in the deviation of the saturation pressure...

  6. Bidirectional gene sequences with similar homology to functional proteins of alkane degrading bacterium pseudomonas fredriksbergensis DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megeed, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for two overlapping fragments of DNA from a clone of newly isolated alkanes degrading bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis encoding sequences with similar homology to two parts of functional proteins is described. One strand contains a sequence with high homology to alkanes monooxygenase (alkB), a member of the alkanes hydroxylase family, and the other strand contains a sequence with some homology to alcohol dehydrogenase gene (alkJ). Overlapping of the genes on opposite strands has been reported in eukaryotic species, and is now reported in a bacterial species. The sequence comparisons and ORFS results revealed that the regulation and the genes organization involved in alkane oxidation represented in Pseudomonas frederiksberghensis varies among the different known alkane degrading bacteria. The alk gene cluster containing homologues to the known alkane monooxygenase (alkB), and rubredoxin (alkG) are oriented in the same direction, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (alkJ) is oriented in the opposite direction. Such genomes encode messages on both strands of the DNA, or in an overlapping but different reading frames, of the same strand of DNA. The possibility of creating novel genes from pre-existing sequences, known as overprinting, which is a widespread phenomenon in small viruses. Here, the origin and evolution of the gene overlap to bacteriophages belonging to the family Microviridae have been investigated. Such a phenomenon is most widely described in extremely small genomes such as those of viruses or small plasmids, yet here is a unique phenomenon. (author)

  7. Optimization of linear and branched alkane interactions with water to simulate hydrophobic hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Liu, Lixin; Surampudi, Lalitanand N.

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies of simple gas hydration have demonstrated that the accuracy of molecular simulations at capturing the thermodynamic signatures of hydrophobic hydration is linked both to the fidelity of the water model at replicating the experimental liquid density at ambient pressure and an accounting of polarization interactions between the solute and water. We extend those studies to examine alkane hydration using the transferable potentials for phase equilibria united-atom model for linear and branched alkanes, developed to reproduce alkane phase behavior, and the TIP4P/2005 model for water, which provides one of the best descriptions of liquid water for the available fixed-point charge models. Alkane site/water oxygen Lennard-Jones cross interactions were optimized to reproduce the experimental alkane hydration free energies over a range of temperatures. The optimized model reproduces the hydration free energies of the fitted alkanes with a root mean square difference between simulation and experiment of 0.06 kcal/mol over a wide temperature range, compared to 0.44 kcal/mol for the parent model. The optimized model accurately reproduces the temperature dependence of hydrophobic hydration, as characterized by the hydration enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities, as well as the pressure response, as characterized by partial molar volumes.

  8. Effect of pore confinement on the adsorption of mono-branched alkanes of naphtha in ZSM-5 and Y zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jia; Feng, Xiang; Liu, Yibin; Yang, Chaohe

    2017-11-01

    Branched alkanes are important parts of naphtha, and their conversions are related to the adsorption stabilities in the pore of zeolites. In this work, the adsorption stabilities of C7-C10 mono-branched alkanes in the pores of HY (ca. 0.74 nm) and HZSM-5 (ca. 0.55 nm) zeolites are investigated using DFT calculation. After excluding the effect of Brønsted acid by subtracting the adsorption energy on 8T cluster from the total adsorption energy, it is found that confinement effect plays an essential role in stabilizing mono-branched alkanes. With the increase in the carbon number of alkanes, there is gradual increase of adsorption energy on both HZSM-5 and HY zeolites. Moreover, in the narrow channel of HZSM-5 zeolite, the change of adsorption energy (ethyl-alkane methyl-alkane > n-alkane), which is mainly due to confinement effect rather than effect of Brønsted acid. Methyl-alkanes prefer to stay in the pore of HZSM-5, while ethyl-alkanes and propyl-alkanes are more likely absorbed in the pore of HY zeolite. By analyzing the total electron densities of adsorbates, it is concluded that only when there is a certain distance between zeolite fragment and the adsorbate and low electron density region occupies the remaining space of the pore, the confinement effect is the strongest.

  9. Exchange of alkanes with deuterium over γ-alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.S.; Kemball, C.; Pearce, E.A.; Pearman, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Exchange reactions of hydrocarbons with deuterium over γ-alumina have been extensively studied but less attention has been directed to the effect of catalyst activation temperature. It has been shown that activity for propane/D 2 exchange passes through a sharp maximum at approximately 823 K and similar behaviour has been shown for the various exchange processes of propene. In this work, the first objective was to examine the effect of varying catalyst activation temperature, Tsub(a), on the subsequent activity of γ-alumina for the exchange of cyclopentane with D 2 ; the effect of chloriding the alumina was also studied. The second objective was to study the influence on the activity for cyclopentane/D 2 exchange of pretreating the catalyst with alkene at various temperatures to determine whether poisoning occurred. The literature indicates that for alkene exchange with deuterium on alumina reaction occurs preferentially for the vinyl hydrogen atoms as opposed to the hydrogen atoms attached to saturated carbon atoms. On this evidence one might expect the presence of alkene to interfere with the exchange of alkanes and indeed there is work which reports that alkene poisons both CH 4 /D 2 and H 2 /D 2 exchange. Finally, the effect of chain-length on the relative rates of methylene and methyl exchange in straight-chain hydrocarbons was examined to follow up previous work on propane and butane. The results are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Chemotaxonomic significance of distribution and stable carbon isotopic composition of long-chain alkanes and alkan-1-ols in C{sub 4} grass waxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rommerskirchen, F.; Plader, A. [Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg (Germany). Institute of Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment; Eglinton, G. [Hanse Institute for Advanced Study, Delmenhorst (Germany); Chikaraishii, Yoshito [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka (Japan). Institute for Research on Earth Evolution

    2006-10-15

    Grasses (Poaceae) are distributed across the world in broad latitudinal belts and are an important source of C4 biomass in the geological record of soils as well as lake and marine sediments. We examined long-chain leaf wax components of thirty-five C{sub 4} grasses of the subfamilies Aristidoideae, Chloridoideae and Panicoideae from the southern African grasslands and savannas and three C{sub 3} grasses of the subfamily Pooideae from Peru and Australia and review the relevant botanical, phytogeographic and leaf wax compositional background information. Contents, distribution patterns and molecular stable carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain n-alkanes (n-C{sub 27} to n-C{sub 35}) and n-alkan-1-ols (n-C{sub 22} to n-C{sub 32}) were used to estimate the chemotaxonomic relevance of wax signatures of whole plants, separately for different subfamilies and for members of the three C{sub 4} subtypes (NADP-ME, NAD-ME and PCK). Two grass species were separated into flower heads, leaves and stems and the parts analysed separately. Grass flowers contain remarkable amounts of short-chain n-alkanes, which may have a significant influence on the chemical signature of the whole plant, whereas n-alkanol distribution patterns exhibit no systematics. The stable carbon isotopic composition of both biomarker types in different plant parts is remarkably uniform. Chemotaxonomic differentiation was not possible on a species level based on whole plant samples, but was more successful for averages of subfamily and photosynthetic subtype data. Wax signatures of C{sub 4} grasses are generally distinguishable from those of C{sub 3} species by heavier isotopic values, higher contents of n-C{sub 31} and n-C{sub 33} alkanes and the abundance of the n-C{sub 32} n-alkanol, which is largely absent in C{sub 3} grass waxes. Especially the waxes of the NAD-ME and PCK C{sub 4}-subtype grasses, which thrive in extremely arid tropical and subtropical areas, contain high relative amounts of longer

  11. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Musat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the CH bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane.

  12. Thermal analysis as an aid to forensics: Alkane melting and oxidative stability of wool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alan Riga, D.

    1998-01-01

    Interdisciplinary methods and thermal analytical techniques in particular are effective tools in aiding the identification and characterization of materials in question involved in civil or criminal law. Forensic material science uses systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through analysis, observation and experimentation. Thermal analytical data can be used to aid the legal system in interpreting technical variations in quite often a complex system.Calorimetry and thermal microscopic methods helped define a commercial product composed of alkanes that was involved in a major law suit. The solid-state structures of a number of normal alkanes have unique crystal structures. These alkanes melt and freeze below room temperature to more than 60C below zero. Mixtures of specific alkanes have attributes of pure chemicals. The X-ray diffraction structure of a mixture of alkanes is the same as a pure alkane, but the melting and freezing temperature are significantly lower than predicted. The jury ruled that the product containing n-alkanes had the appropriate melting characteristics. The thermal-physical properties made a commercial fluid truly unique and there was no advertising infringement according to the law and the jury trialA combination of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and macrophotography were used to conduct an extensive modeling and analysis of physical evidence obtained in a mobile home fire and explosion. A person's death was allegedly linked to the misuse of a kerosene space heater. The thermal analytical techniques showed that external heating was the cause of the space heater's deformation, not a firing of the heater with gasoline and kerosene. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Alkane Hydroxylase Gene (alkB Phylotype Composition and Diversity in Northern Gulf of Mexico Bacterioplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Blake Smith

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural and anthropogenic activities introduce alkanes into marine systems where they are degraded by alkane hydroxylases expressed by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Partial sequences for alkB, one of the structural genes of alkane hydroxylase, have been used to assess the composition of alkane-degrading communities, and to determine their responses to hydrocarbon inputs. We present here the first spatially extensive analysis of alkB in bacterioplankton of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM, a region that experiences numerous hydrocarbon inputs. We have analyzed 401 partial alkB gene sequences amplified from genomic extracts collected during March 2010 from 17 water column samples that included surface waters and bathypelagic depths. Previous analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences for these and related samples have shown that nGoM bacterial community composition and structure stratify strongly with depth, with distinctly different communities above and below 100 m. Although we hypothesized that alkB gene sequences would exhibit a similar pattern, PCA analyses of operational protein units (OPU indicated that community composition did not vary consistently with depth or other major physical-chemical variables. We observed 22 distinct OPUs, one of which was ubiquitous and accounted for 57% of all sequences. This OPU clustered with alkB sequences from known hydrocarbon oxidizers (e.g., Alcanivorax and Marinobacter. Some OPUs could not be associated with known alkane degraders, however, and perhaps represent novel hydrocarbon-oxidizing populations or genes. These results indicate that the capacity for alkane hydrolysis occurs widely in the nGoM, but that alkane degrader diversity varies substantially among sites and responds differently than bulk communities to physical-chemical variables.

  14. Cyclooctane metathesis catalyzed by silica-supported tungsten pentamethyl [(ΞSiO)W(Me)5]: Distribution of macrocyclic alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Riache, Nassima

    2014-10-03

    Metathesis of cyclic alkanes catalyzed by the new surface complex [(ΞSiO)W(Me)5] affords a wide distribution of cyclic and macrocyclic alkanes. The major products with the formula CnH2n are the result of either a ring contraction or ring expansion of cyclooctane leading to lower unsubstituted cyclic alkanes (5≤n≤7) and to an unprecedented distribution of unsubstituted macrocyclic alkanes (12≤n≤40), respectively, identified by GC/MS and by NMR spectroscopies.

  15. Synthesis of Renewable Lubricant Alkanes from Biomass-Derived Platform Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mengyuan; Xia, Qineng; Liu, Xiaohui; Guo, Yong; Wang, Yanqin

    2017-10-23

    The catalytic synthesis of liquid alkanes from renewable biomass has received tremendous attention in recent years. However, bio-based platform chemicals have not to date been exploited for the synthesis of highly branched lubricant alkanes, which are currently produced by hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain n-paraffins. A selective catalytic synthetic route has been developed for the production of highly branched C 23 alkanes as lubricant base oil components from biomass-derived furfural and acetone through a sequential four-step process, including aldol condensation of furfural with acetone to produce a C 13 double adduct, selective hydrogenation of the adduct to a C 13 ketone, followed by a second condensation of the C 13 ketone with furfural to generate a C 23 aldol adduct, and finally hydrodeoxygenation to give highly branched C 23 alkanes in 50.6 % overall yield from furfural. This work opens a general strategy for the synthesis of high-quality lubricant alkanes from renewable biomass. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Alkanes as Components of Soil Hydrocarbon Status: Behavior and Indication Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennadiev, A. N.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Pikovskii, Yu. I.; Smirnova, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Studies of soils on three key plots with different climatic conditions and technogenic impacts in Volgograd, Moscow, and Arkhangelsk oblasts have showed that alkanes in the soil exchange complex have some indication potential for the identification of soil processes. The following combinations of soil-forming factors and processes have been studied: (a) self-purification of soil after oil pollution; (b) accumulation of hydrocarbons coming from the atmosphere to soils of different land use patterns; and (c) changes in the soil hydrocarbon complex beyond the zone of technogenic impact due to the input of free hydrocarbon-containing gases. At the injection input of hydrocarbon pollutants, changes in the composition and proportions of alkanes allow tracing the degradation trend of pollutants in the soil from their initial content to the final stage of soil self-purification, when the background concentrations of hydrocarbons are reached. Upon atmospheric deposition of hydrocarbons onto the soil, from the composition and mass distribution of alkanes, conclusions can be drawn about the effect of toxicants on biogeochemical processes in the soil, including their manifestation under different land uses. Composition analysis of soil alkanes in natural landscapes can reveal signs of hydrocarbon emanation fluxes in soils. The indication potentials of alkanes in combination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other components of soil hydrocarbon complex can also be used for the solution of other soil-geochemical problems.

  17. Thermodynamics of mixtures containing alkoxyethanols. XXVIII: Liquid-liquid equilibria for 2-phenoxyethanol + selected alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Victor; Garcia, Mario; Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia De La Fuente, Isaias; Cobos, Jose Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → LLE coexistence curves were determined for mixtures of 2PhEE with alkanes. → UCST values are higher for n-alkane systems than for solutions with cyclic alkanes. → For the latter mixtures, UCST increases with the size of the alkyl group attached. → Alkoxyethanol-alkoxyethanol interactions are enhanced by aromatic group in cellosolve. - Abstract: The coexistence curves of the liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) for systems of 2-phenoxyethanol (2PhEE) with heptane, octane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane or ethylcyclohexane have been determined by the method of the critical opalescence using a laser scattering technique. All the curves show an upper critical solution temperature (UCST), have a rather horizontal top and their symmetry depends on the relative size of the mixture compounds. UCST values are higher for systems with linear alkanes than for solutions including cyclic alkanes. For these mixtures, the UCST increases with the size of the alkyl group attached to the cyclic part of the molecule. It is shown that interactions between alkoxyethanol molecules are stronger when the hydroxyether contains an aromatic group. Data are used to determine the critical exponent for the order parameter mole fraction. Values obtained are consistent with those provided by the Ising model or by the renormalization group theory.

  18. Thermodynamics of mixtures containing alkoxyethanols. XXVIII: Liquid-liquid equilibria for 2-phenoxyethanol + selected alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Victor; Garcia, Mario [G.E.T.E.F., Grupo Especializado en Termodinamica de Equilibrio entre Fases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Gonzalez, Juan Antonio, E-mail: jagl@termo.uva.es [G.E.T.E.F., Grupo Especializado en Termodinamica de Equilibrio entre Fases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Garcia De La Fuente, Isaias; Cobos, Jose Carlos [G.E.T.E.F., Grupo Especializado en Termodinamica de Equilibrio entre Fases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-07-10

    Highlights: {yields} LLE coexistence curves were determined for mixtures of 2PhEE with alkanes. {yields} UCST values are higher for n-alkane systems than for solutions with cyclic alkanes. {yields} For the latter mixtures, UCST increases with the size of the alkyl group attached. {yields} Alkoxyethanol-alkoxyethanol interactions are enhanced by aromatic group in cellosolve. - Abstract: The coexistence curves of the liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) for systems of 2-phenoxyethanol (2PhEE) with heptane, octane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane or ethylcyclohexane have been determined by the method of the critical opalescence using a laser scattering technique. All the curves show an upper critical solution temperature (UCST), have a rather horizontal top and their symmetry depends on the relative size of the mixture compounds. UCST values are higher for systems with linear alkanes than for solutions including cyclic alkanes. For these mixtures, the UCST increases with the size of the alkyl group attached to the cyclic part of the molecule. It is shown that interactions between alkoxyethanol molecules are stronger when the hydroxyether contains an aromatic group. Data are used to determine the critical exponent for the order parameter mole fraction. Values obtained are consistent with those provided by the Ising model or by the renormalization group theory.

  19. The fate of primary cations in radiolysis of alkanes as studied by ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, M.; Toriyama, K.; Nunome, K.

    1983-01-01

    The structures and reactions of alkane cations (RH + ) have been studied by ESR to elucidate the fate of primary cations in radiolysis of alkanes. Radical cations of prototype alkanes such as C 2 H 6 , C 3 H 8 , iso-C 4 H 10 and neo-C 5 H 12 etc. as well as their partially deuterated analogues were stabilized in irradiated frozen matrices such as SF 6 , CFCl 2 CF 2 Cl and CFCl 3 having a higher ionization potential than that of these alkanes contained as dilute solutes. RH + in SF 6 and in CFCl 2 CF 2 Cl converts into alkyl radicals by deprotonation probably through bimolecular reactions, whereas RH + in CFCl 3 unimolecularily decomposes into olefinic cations by H 2 and/or CH 4 elimination reactions. It is further found that the electronic structures of propane and isobutane cations in halocarbon matrices are different from those in SF 6 and the difference is drastically reflected in the site preference of their deprotonation reactions. The results are discussed in relation to the mechanisms of pairwise formation of alkyl radicals in low temperature radiolysis of neat alkanes and its suppression by addition of electron scavengers. (author)

  20. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M Adams

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2, propane (C3, and butane (C4 in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1. In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1-C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1-C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 °C anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR measurements provide clear evidence for C1-C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2-C4 alkanes. Maximum C1-C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 °C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM. Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2-C4 alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  1. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Global geochemical analyses suggest that C2-C4 short chain alkanes are a common component of the utilizable carbon pool in deep-sea sediments worldwide and have been found in diverse ecosystems. From a thermodynamic standpoint, the anaerobic microbial oxidation of these aliphatic hydrocarbons is more energetically yielding than the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Therefore, the preferential degradation of these hydrocarbons may compete with AOM for the use of oxidants such as sulfate, or other potential oxidants. Such processes could influence the fate of methane in the deep-sea. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Gulf of Mexico and Guaymas Basin have previously been enriched that anaerobically oxidize short chain alkanes to generate CO2 with the preferential utilization of 12C-enriched alkanes (Kniemeyer et al. 2007). Different temperature regimens along with multiple substrates were tested and a pure culture (deemed BuS5) was isolated from mesophilic enrichments with propane or n-butane as the sole carbon source. Through comparative sequence analysis, strain BuS5 was determined to cluster with the metabolically diverse Desulfosarcina / Desulfococcus cluster, which also contains the SRB found in consortia with anaerobic, methane-oxidizing archaea in seep sediments. Enrichments from a terrestrial, low temperature sulfidic hydrocarbon seep also corroborated that propane degradation occurred with most bacterial phylotypes surveyed belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Desulfobacteraceae (Savage et al. 2011). To date, no microbes capable of ethane oxidation or anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation at thermophilic temperature have been isolated. The sediment-covered, hydrothermal vent systems found at Middle Valley (Juan de Fuca Ridge, eastern Pacific Ocean) are a prime environment for investigating mesophilic to thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved

  2. Effects of surfactants on bacteria and the bacterial degradation of alkanes in crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruheim, Per

    1998-12-31

    This thesis investigates the effects of surfactants on the bacterial degradation of alkanes in crude oil. Several alkane oxidising Gram positive and Gram negative were tested for their abilities to oxidise alkanes in crude oil emulsified with surfactants. The surfactants used to make the oil in water emulsions were either of microbial or chemical origin. Oxidation rates of resting bacteria oxidising various crude oil in water emulsions were measured by Warburg respirometry. The emulsions were compared with non-emulsified oil to see which was the preferred substrate. The bacteria were pregrown to both the exponential and stationary phase of growth before harvesting and preparation for the Warburg experiments. 123 refs., 4 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Liquid + liquid equilibria for ternary mixtures of (solvent + aromatic hydrocarbon + alkane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen-Nia, M.; Modarress, H.; Doulabi, F.; Bagheri, H.

    2005-01-01

    Liquid + liquid equilibrium (LLE) results for the ternary mixtures of (solvent + aromatic hydrocarbon + alkane) at different temperatures from (298.15 to 313.15) K are reported, where the aromatic hydrocarbon is toluene or m-xylene and the alkane is n-heptane or n-octane or cyclohexane and the solvent is tetramethylene sulfone (i.e., sulfolane) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or ethylene carbonate. The data were correlated with the UNIQUAC and NRTL equations. The partition coefficients and the selectivity factor of the solvents are calculated. Then, the selectivity of solvents for the extraction of aromatic hydrocarbons from alkanes has been compared. The phase diagrams for the ternary mixtures are presented and the correlated tie line results have been compared with the experimental data. The comparisons indicate the applicability of the UNIQUAC and NRTL activity coefficients model for liquid + liquid equilibrium calculations of the studied mixtures

  4. Hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates to liquid alkanes for transportation fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert oxygenates into alkanes. In this paper, C5–C20 alkanes formed via the hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of the oligomers of furfuryl alcohol(FA can be used as gasoline, diesel and jet fuel fraction. The first step of the process is the oligomers of FA convert into hydrogenated products over Raney Ni catalyst in a batch reactor. The second step of the process converts hydrogenated products to alkanes via hydrodeoxygenation over different bi-functional catalysts include hydrogenation and acidic deoxidization active sites. After this process, the oxygen content decreased from 22.1 wt% in the oligomers of FA to 0.58 wt% in the hydrodeoxygenation products.

  5. Chemical similarity among domesticated and wild genotypes of peanut based on n-alkanes profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Janaína Carvalho de Souza

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to analyze the epicuticular n-alkane profile of domesticated and wild peanut genotypes. Foliar epicuticular n-alkanes of four Arachis hypogaea genotypes and two wild species - A. monticola and A. stenosperma - were analyzed by gas chromatography. Chemical relationships between them were evaluated using the Dice coefficient and UPGMA method. Two clusters were formed: one with four A. hypogaea genotypes and the other with the two wild species. There is more similarity between the BR1 and LIGO-PE06 genotypes and between the BRS 151 L-7 and BRS Havana genotypes.

  6. Toxics release inventory: List of toxic chemicals within the polychlorinated alkanes category and guidance for reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires certain facilities manufacturing, processing, or otherwise using listed toxic chemicals to report their environmental releases of such chemicals annually. On November 30, 1994 EPA added 286 chemicals and chemical categories. Six chemical categories (nicotine and salts, strychnine and salts, polycyclic aromatic compounds, water dissociable nitrate compounds, diisocyanates, and polychlorinated alkanes) are included in these additions. At the time of the addition, EPA indicated that the Agency would develop, as appropriate, interpretations and guidance that the Agency determines are necessary to facilitate accurate reporting for these categories. This document constitutes such guidance for the polychlorinated alkanes category.

  7. Solid-Liquid equilibrium of n-alkanes using the Chain Delta Lattice Parameter model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    -liquid equilibrium of n-alkanes ranging from n-C_20 to n-C_40.The model is further modified to achieve a more correct temperature dependence because it severely underestimates the excess enthalpy. It is shown that the ratio of excess enthalpy and entropy for n-alkane solid solutions, as happens for other solid...... mixtures, is related with the values of the melting temperatures by a function common to the entire homologous series. When applied to systems with a symmetric behavior, this yields a correct description of both the enthalpic and entropic parts of the excess Gibbs free energy with the CDLP model...

  8. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant CYP153A6 enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-01-29

    Cytochrome P450 CYP153A6 from Myobacterium sp. strain HXN1500 was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small-chain alkanes regioselectively. Mutant CYP153A6-BMO1 selectively hydroxylates butane and pentane at the terminal carbon to form 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively, at rates greater than wild-type CYP153A6 enzymes. This biocatalyst is highly active for small-chain alkane substrates and the regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  9. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2009-03-09

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  10. Stable isotope labeled n-alkanes to assess digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Breuer, M.J.H.; Dijkstra, J.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon stable isotope (13C) labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically 13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four

  11. QSPR models based on molecular mechanics and quantum chemical calculations. 2. Thermodynamic properties of alkanes, alcohols, polyols, and ethers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyekjær, Jane Dannow; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk

    2003-01-01

    for alkanes, alcohols, diols, ethers, and oxyalcohols, including cyclic alkanes and alcohols. Several good models, having good predictability, have been developed. To enhance the applicability of the QSPR models, simpler expressions for each descriptor have also been developed. This allows for the prediction...

  12. Data from: Stable isotope labeled n-alkanes to assess digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Breuer, M.J.H.; Dijkstra, J.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon stable isotope (13C) labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically 13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four

  13. Evaluation of n-alkanes and their carbon isotope enrichments (d13C) as diet composition markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derseh, M.B.; Pellikaan, W.F.; Tolera, A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Plant cuticular n-alkanes have been successfully used as markers to estimate diet composition and intake of grazing herbivores. However, additional markers may be required under grazing conditions in botanically diverse vegetation. This study was conducted to describe the n-alkane profiles and the

  14. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  15. Alkane-degrading bacteria at the soil-litter interface: comparing isolates with T-RFLP-based community profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebler, Julia; Wick, Lukas Y; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke

    2013-10-01

    Alkane-degrading bacteria were isolated from uncontaminated soil microcosms, which had been incubated with maize litter as natural alkane source. The isolates served to understand spatio-temporal community changes at the soil-litter interface, which had been detected using alkB as a functional marker gene for bacterial alkane degraders. To obtain a large spectrum of isolates, liquid subcultivation was combined with a matrix-assisted enrichment (Teflon membranes, litter). Elevated cell numbers of alkane degraders were detected by most probable number counting indicating enhanced alkane degradation potential in soil in response to litter treatment. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 395 isolates revealed forty different phylogenetic groups [operational taxonomic units (OTUs)] and spatio-temporal shifts in community composition. Ten OTUs comprised so far unknown alkane degraders, and five OTUs represented putative new bacterial genera. The combination of enrichment methods yielded a higher diversity of isolates than liquid subcultivation alone. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP profiles indicated that many alkane degraders present in the enrichments were not detectable in the DNA extracts from soil microcosms. These possibly rare specialists might represent a seed bank for the alkane degradation capacity in uncontaminated soil. This relevant ecosystem function can be fostered by the formation of the soil-litter interface. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-alkane, branched and linear. 721.10103 Section 721.10103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., branched and linear. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS No...

  17. Distribution and variability of n-alkanes in epicuticular waxes of sedum species from the central Balkan Peninsula: chemotaxonomic importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Snežana Č; Zlatković, Bojan K; Stojanović, Gordana S

    2015-05-01

    For the first time, the n-alkane distribution and variability of the epicuticular waxes within 22 Sedum taxa was reported with focus on the chemotaxonomy of native Sedum representatives from the central Balkan Peninsula, compared to their relations with four other species of the Crassulaceae family. By GC/MS and GC-FID identification and quantification, it was established that n-alkanes C27 , C29 , C31 , C33 , and C35 were the dominant constituents of the examined epicuticular wax samples. Applying multivariate statistical analyses including agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) and principal component analysis (PCA), the relation according to the n-alkane composition between the examined samples was established. It was shown that the n-alkane variability of the central Balkan Sedum species was considerable and that n-alkanes might not be very reliable taxonomic markers for these species. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  18. Diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with plants in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andria, V.; Yousaf, S.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Smalla, K.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Among twenty-six different plant species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo), and the combination of both plants performed well in a petroleum oil contaminated soil. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Higher numbers of culturable, degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Our results indicated that alkB genes have spread through horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the Italian ryegrass rhizosphere, and suggested mobility of catabolic genes between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We furthermore studied the colonization behaviour of selected hydrocarbon-degrading strains (comprising an endopyhte and a rhizosphere strain) as well as the expression of their alkane monooxygenase genes in association with Italian ryegrass. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior.

  19. The Roles of Microbial Communities in n-Alkane Distribution of The Nanjenshan Lowland Subtropical Rainforest in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. W.; Huang, T. Y.; Fan, C. W.; Chao, W. C.; Yang, T. N.; Huang, C. P.; Hsu, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of total organic carbon in Nanjenshan, a lowland subtropical rainforest in southern Taiwan, revealed that the carbon storage of litter-layer was about 35% lower in ravine area than in windward and leeward areas, while the soil storage in these areas were similar. In this one year follow-up study, we aimed to investigate the kinetic changes of n-alkane (C14-C35) concentration from litter fall, litter-layer, surface soil, soil in -10 cm depth, and soil in -30 cm depth by a GC-FID method. The n-alkane distribution and n-alkane flux of these areas were also analyzed. Next generation sequencing was carried out to examine the metagenomics of uncultured microbial community in litter-layer of these areas. Our results showed that the net weight of one year-litter fall in ravine area was 30% higher than the others. The average concentration of n-alkane in leaves in ravine was 90% and 50% higher than in windward area and leeward area, respectively. Although the n-alkane flux in ravine area was twice higher than the other areas, the n-alkane concentrations in litter-layer and soils of different layers were similar among all areas, suggesting a rapid degradation of n-alkane in liter layer in ravine area. Interestingly, the character of odd over even predominance of n-alkane was gradually lost in soil layer in ravine area. Metagenomic data have showed that the structure of microbial abundance in ravine area was different from windward and leeward areas. In ravine area, the numbers in phyla of Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were higher than the other areas, while in phyla of Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes were lower. Our data provided evidence that microbial communities may not only play a role on n-alkane degradation but also change the profile in abundance of high-chain length n-alkanes.

  20. Alkane activation at ambient temperature - Unusual selectivities, C-C, C-H bond scission vs C-C bond coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trionfetti, C.; Agiral, A.; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Availability and low cost of light alkanes make them interesting as feedstock for commercial fuels and chemicals. However, direct conversion of lower alkanes for such purposes is a challenging problem. A discussion covers the oxidative conversion of light alkanes in the presence of cold plasma in a

  1. The Calculation of Standard Enthalpies of Formation of Alkanes: Illustrating Molecular Mechanics and Spreadsheet Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Eric Leigh

    1999-02-01

    How group increment methods may be used to predict standard enthalpies of formation of alkanes is outlined as an undergraduate computational chemistry experiment. The experiment requires input and output data sets. Although users may create their own data sets, both sets are provided. The input data set contains experimentally determined gas-phase standard enthalpies of formation and calculated steric energies for 10 alkanes. The steric energy for an alkane is calculated via a Molecular Mechanics approach employing Allinger's MM3 force field. Linear regression analysis on data contained in the input data set generates the coefficients that are used with the output data set to calculate standard enthalpies of formation for 15 alkanes. The average absolute error for the calculated standard enthalpies of formation is 1.22 kcal/mol. The experiment is highly suited to those interested in incorporating more computational chemistry in their curricula. In this regard, it is ideally suited for a physical chemistry laboratory, but it may be used in an organic chemistry course as well.

  2. Interrogation of Chesapeake Bay sediment microbial communities for intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie M; Wawrik, Boris; Isom, Catherine; Boling, Wilford B; Callaghan, Amy V

    2015-02-01

    Based on the transient exposure of Chesapeake Bay sediments to hydrocarbons and the metabolic versatility of known anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms, it was hypothesized that distinct Bay sediment communities, governed by geochemical gradients, would have intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under sulfate-reducing and/or methanogenic conditions. Sediment cores were collected along a transect of the Bay. Community DNA was interrogated via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, PCR of anaerobic hydrocarbon activation genes, and qPCR of 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in sulfate reduction/methanogenesis. Site sediments were used to establish microcosms amended with n-hexadecane under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that sediments associated with hypoxic water columns contained significantly greater proportions of Bacteria and Archaea consistent with syntrophic degradation of organic matter and methanogenesis compared to less reduced sediments. Microbial taxa frequently associated with hydrocarbon-degrading communities were found throughout the Bay, and the genetic potential for hydrocarbon metabolism was demonstrated via the detection of benzyl-(bssA) and alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) genes. Although microcosm studies did not indicate sulfidogenic alkane degradation, the data suggested that methanogenic conversion of alkanes was occurring. These findings highlight the potential role that anaerobic microorganisms could play in the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in the Bay. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Aromatization of alkanes over Pt promoted conventional and mesoporous gallosilicates of MEL zeolite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akhtar, M. N.; Al-Yassir, N.; Al-Khattaf, S.; Čejka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 179, č. 1 (2012), s. 61-72 ISSN 0920-5861 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : alkane aromatization * ZSM-11 * GaHZSM-11 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  4. Cool-flame Extinction During N-Alkane Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent droplet combustion experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed that large n-alkane droplets can continue to burn quasi-steadily following radiative extinction in a low-temperature regime, characterized by negative-temperaturecoefficient (NTC) chemistry. In this study we report experimental observations of n-heptane, n-octane, and n-decane droplets of varying initial sizes burning in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/helium/nitrogen environments at 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 atmospheric pressures. The oxygen concentration in these tests varied in the range of 14% to 25% by volume. Large n-alkane droplets exhibited quasi-steady low-temperature burning and extinction following radiative extinction of the visible flame while smaller droplets burned to completion or disruptively extinguished. A vapor-cloud formed in most cases slightly prior to or following the "cool flame" extinction. Results for droplet burning rates in both the hot-flame and cool-flame regimes as well as droplet extinction diameters at the end of each stage are presented. Time histories of radiant emission from the droplet captured using broadband radiometers are also presented. Remarkably the "cool flame" extinction diameters for all the three n-alkanes follow a trend reminiscent of the ignition delay times observed in previous studies. The similarities and differences among the n-alkanes during "cool flame" combustion are discussed using simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon

  5. The influence of extra framework aluminium on H-fak catalyzed cracking of light alkanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narbeshuber, T.; Narbeshuber, T.F.; Brait, A.; Brait, A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lercher, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The conversion of light linear and branched alkanes on two faujasite samples containing different concentrations of free Brønsted acid sites and extraframework alumina (EFAL) was studied between 733 K and 813 K. Protolytic cracking and bimolecular hydride transfer proceeded solely on Brønsted acid

  6. Feasibility limits and performance of an absorption cooling machine using light alkane mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardour, H.; Mazouz, S.; Reneaume, J.-M.; Cézac, P.; Bourouis, M.; Bellagi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a heat-driven vapor absorption chiller with various alkane mixtures as working pairs was studied. A Thermodynamic analysis showed that under specified operating conditions and with a generator temperature below 130 °C, temperature achievable with a simple flat plate collector when solar energy is expected as the driving heat source, the application of some of the proposed alkane mixtures is not feasible. Simulations using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting program are then done with the selected working pairs. All simulations were done specifying the Peng-Robinson equation of state as the property method. A parametric study was carried out allowing the investigation of the generator temperature effect on the system performance and the comparison between performances released with each working pair. Results revealed that a water-cooled absorption machine using the C3H8/n-C9H20 pair as working fluid releases the best performances from a heat driving temperature level of about 100 °C. - Highlights: • Performance of an absorption chiller with various alkane mixtures was studied. • Some of the proposed alkane mixtures is not feasible. • Only the n-C4/n-C6 mixture may be considered for air-cooled machine. • In case of water cooling, C3/n-C9 and n-C4/n-C9 give the best COP

  7. Localized diffusive motion on two different time scales in solid alkane nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, S. K.; Mamontov, E.; Bai, M.

    2010-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering on three complementary spectrometers has been used to investigate molecular diffusive motion in solid nano- to bulk-sized particles of the alkane n-C32H66. The crystalline-to-plastic and plastic-to-fluid phase transition temperatures are obse...

  8. Morphological factor in the melting point depression of polypropylene by alkanes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, L.; Dostál, J.; Bohdanecký, Miloslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 21 (2001), s. 8897-8900 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : isotactic polypropylene * n-alkanes * melting point depression Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.681, year: 2001

  9. Growth of n-alkane films on a single-crystal substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Z. U.; Ehrlich, S. N.; Matthies, B.

    2001-01-01

    The structure and growth mode of alkane films (n-C/sub n/H/sub 2n+2/; n=4, 6, 7) adsorbed on a Ag(111) surface have been investigated by synchrotron X-ray scattering. New models are proposed for the butane (n=4) and hexane (n=6) monolayer and butane bilayer structures. Specular reflectivity scans...

  10. Investigating C4 Grass Contributions to N-alkane Based Paleoclimate Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doman, C. E.; Enders, S. K.; Chadwick, O.; Freeman, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Plant wax n-alkanes are long-chain, saturated hydrocarbons contained within the protective waxy cuticle on leaves. These lipids are pervasive and persistent in soils and sediments and thus are ideal biomarkers of ancient terrestrial organic matter. In ecosystems dominated by C3 plants, the relationship between the carbon isotopic value of whole leaves and lipids is fairly well documented, but this relationship has not been fully investigated for plants that use C4 photosynthesis. In both cases, it is unclear if the isotopic relationships are sensitive to environmental conditions, or reflect inherited characteristics. This study used a natural climate gradient on the Kohala peninsula of Hawaii to investigate relationships between climate and the δ13C and δ2H values of n-alkanes in C3 and C4 plants. δ13C of C3 leaves and lipids decreased 5 ‰ from the driest to the wettest sites, consistent with published data. Carbon isotope values of C4 plants showed no relationship to moisture up to 1000 mm mean annual precipitation (MAP). Above this threshold, δ 13C values were around 10‰ more depleted, likely due to a combination of canopy effects and C4 grasses growing in an uncharacteristically wet and cold environment. In C3 plants, the fractionation between leaf and lipid carbon isotopes did not vary with MAP, which allows estimations of δ13C leaf to be made from alkanes preserved in ancient sediments. Along this transect, C3 plants produce around twice the quantity of n-alkanes as C4 grasses. C4 grasses produce longer carbon chains. As a result, n-alkanes in the geologic record will be biased towards C3 plants, but the presence of alkanes C33 and C35 indicate the contributions of C4 grasses. In both C3 and C4 plants, average chain length increased with mean annual precipitation, but the taxonomic differences in chain length were greater than environmental differences. Hydrogen isotopes of n-alkanes show no trends with MAP, but do show clear differences between plant

  11. Pure and Au nanoparticles doped higher alkanes for an optical fiber temperature threshold sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybysz, Natalia; Marć, Paweł; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Grobelny, Jarosław; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    2017-05-01

    Development of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) technology has created new research fields for optical sensors and telecommunication. The cross section geometry modifications of this type of fibers allow to influence their optical parameters. These modifications are not limited to change sizes and arrangements of an air holes' lattice, but also replacing air with another material. In the paper we have shown how to change thermo-optical properties of a large mode area commercially available LMA-10 PCF by filling it with different chemical substances. Our previous research has led us to develop a class of optical fiber temperature threshold sensor transducers based on a partially filled PCF with higher alkanes. The principle of work of such a sensor transducer is to use a temperature bi-stability of a filling material because when the higher alkane is in the solid state light cannot pass through the transducer, and when it is in the liquid state light can be transmitted. One of the most important advantages of higher alkanes we used in the experiments are their different melting points, but the most important disadvantage is discrepancy between melting and crystallization temperatures and the sensor switches on and off for different temperatures. This effect called supercoiling appears due to the lack of nucleation centers. To reduce this effect the gold nanoparticels (NPs) in hexane colloid were used. We have prepared samples with three higher alkanes doped with 1% of Au NPs and we have shown their temperature and time responses. The proper selection of melting points of higher alkanes allows to design the multilevel temperature threshold sensor which can cover the temperature range from -20°C up to 70°C, and can be applied in chemical, oil, gas and energy industry.

  12. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Lilian M.; Loviso, Claudia L.; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Lozada, Mariana

    2015-11-07

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  13. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes: a time-resolved EPR study - Part I. Alkyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved EPR was applied to detect short-lived alkyl radicals in pulse radiolysis of liquid alkanes. Two problems were addressed: (i) the mechanism of radical formation and (ii) the mechanism of chemically-induced spin polarization in these radicals. (i) The ratio of yields of penultimate and interior radicals in n-alkanes at the instant of their generation was found to be ≅ 1.25 times greater than the statistical quantity. This higher-than-statistical production of penultimate radicals indicates that the proton transfer reaction involving excited radical cations must be a prevailing route of radical generation. The relative yields of hydrogen abstraction and fragmentation for various branched alkanes are estimated. It is concluded that the fragmentation occurs prior to the formation of radicals in an excited precursor species. (ii) The analysis of spin-echo kinetics in n-alkanes suggests that the alkyl radicals gain the emissive polarization in spur reactions. This initial polarization increases with shortening of the aliphatic chain. We suggest that the origin of this polarization is the ST mechanism operating in the pairs of alkyl radicals and hydrogen atoms generated in dissociation of excited alkane molecules. It is also found that a long-chain structure of alkyl radicals results in much higher rate of Heisenberg spin exchange relative to the recombination rate (up to 30 times). That suggests prominent steric effects in recombination or the occurrence of through-chain electron exchange. The significance of these results in the context of cross-linking in polyethylene and higher paraffins is discussed. (Author)

  14. Variability of n-alkanes and nonacosan-10-ol in natural populations of Picea omorika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Biljana; Tešević, Vele; Ðorđević, Iris; Todosijević, Marina; Jadranin, Milka; Bojović, Srdjan; Marin, Petar D

    2013-03-01

    This is the first report of population variability of the contents of n-alkanes and nonacosan-10-ol in the needle epicuticular waxes of Serbian spruce (Picea omorika). The hexane extracts of needle samples originated from three natural populations in Serbia (Vranjak, Zmajevački potok, and Mileševka Canyon) were investigated by GC and GC/MS analyses. The amount of nonacosan-10-ol varied individually from 50.05 to 74.42% (65.74% in average), but the differences between the three investigated populations were not statistically confirmed. The results exhibited variability of the composition of n-alkanes in the epicuticular waxes with their size ranging from C(18) to C(35). The most abundant n-alkanes were C(29), C(31), and C(27) (35.22, 13.77, and 12.28% in average, resp.). The carbon preference index of all the n-alkanes (CPI(total)) of the P. omorika populations (average of populations I-III) ranged from 3.3 to 11.5 (mean of 5.9), while the average chain length (ACL) ranged from 26.6 to 29.2. The principal component and cluster analyses of the contents of nine n-alkanes showed the greatest difference for the population growing in the Mileševka Canyon. The obtained results were compared with previous literature data given for other Picea species, and this comparison was briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  15. Enhanced biodegradation of alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil by mixed strains and bacterial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Li, Chen; Zhou, Zhengxi; Wen, Jianping; You, Xueyi; Mao, Youzhi; Lu, Chunzhe; Huo, Guangxin; Jia, Xiaoqiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two strains, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 and Pseudomonas sp. XM-01, were isolated from soil samples polluted by crude oil at Bohai offshore. The former one could degrade alkane hydrocarbons (crude oil and diesel, 1:4 (v/v)) and crude oil efficiently; the latter one failed to grow on alkane hydrocarbons but could produce rhamnolipid (a biosurfactant) with glycerol as sole carbon source. Compared with pure culture, mixed culture of the two strains showed higher capability in degrading alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil of which degradation rate were increased from 89.35 and 74.32 ± 4.09 to 97.41 and 87.29 ± 2.41 %, respectively. In the mixed culture, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 grew fast with sufficient carbon source and produced intermediates which were subsequently utilized for the growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01 and then, rhamnolipid was produced by Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. Till the end of the process, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 was inhibited by the rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. In addition, alkane hydrocarbon degradation rate of the mixed culture increased by 8.06 to 97.41 % compared with 87.29 % of the pure culture. The surface tension of medium dropping from 73.2 × 10(-3) to 28.6 × 10(-3) N/m. Based on newly found cooperation between the degrader and the coworking strain, rational investigations and optimal strategies to alkane hydrocarbons biodegradation were utilized for enhancing crude oil biodegradation.

  16. Even-odd alternation of near-infrared spectra of alkane-α,ω-diols in their solid states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuta; Murakami, Kohei; Yoshimura, Norio; Takayanagi, Masao

    2018-05-15

    Even-odd alternation of the melting points of α,ω-disubstituted linear alkanes such as alkane-α,ω-diols, alkane-α,ω-dinitriles and α,ω-diaminoalkanes is well known. Melting points for compounds with an even number of carbons in their alkyl chains are systematically higher than those for compounds with an odd number of carbons. In order to clarify the origin of this alternation, near-infrared absorption spectra of linear alkane-α,ω-diols with 3 to 9 carbon atoms in their alkyl chains were measured in the liquid and solid states. The band due to the first overtone of the OH stretching mode was investigated. The temperature-dependent spectra of all alkane-α,ω-diols in their liquid states were found to be similar; no even-odd alternation was observed. In the solid state, however, spectra of alkane-α,ω-diols with even and odd numbers of carbon atoms differed greatly. Spectra of alkane-α,ω-diols with an odd number of carbon atoms in their solid states were similar to those in the liquid states, although the variation of spectra observed upon lowering the temperature of liquid seemed to continue when the liquids were frozen. In contrast, spectra of alkane-α,ω-diols with an even number of carbon atoms in their liquid and solid states were found to be quite different. New bands appeared upon freezing. The observed even-odd alternation of the spectra observed for alkane-α,ω-diols in their solid states is presumably caused by their even-odd alternation of crystal structures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Novel Cytochrome P450 Small-Alkane Hydroxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-02-27

    The goals of this project are to investigate (1) the kinetics and stabilities of engineered cytochrome P450 (P450) small alkane hydroxylases and their evolutionary intermediates, (2) the structural basis for catalytic proficiency on small alkanes of these engineered P450s, and (3) the changes in redox control resulting from protein engineering. To reach these goals, we have established new methods for determining the kinetics and stabilities of multicomponent P450s such as CYP153A6. Using these, we were able to determine that CYP153A6 is proficient for hydroxylation of alkanes as small as ethane, an activity that has never been observed previously in any natural P450. To elucidate the structures of the engineered P450s, we obtained x-ray diffraction data for two variants in the P450PMO (propane monooxygenase) lineage and a preliminary structure for the most evolved variant. This structure shows changes in the substrate binding regions of the enzyme and a reduction in active site volume that are consistent with the observed changes in substrate specificity from fatty acids in the native enzyme to small alkanes in P450PMO. We also constructed semi-rational designed libraries mutating only residues in the enzyme active site that in one round of mutagenesis and screening produced variants that achieved nearly half of the activity of the most evolved enzymes of the P450PMO lineage. Finally, we found that changes in redox properties of the laboratory-evolved P450 alkane hydroxylases did not reflect the improvement in their electron transfer efficiency. The heme redox potential remained constant throughout evolution, while activity increased and coupling efficiency improved from 10% to 90%. The lack of correlation between heme redox potential and enzyme activity and coupling efficiency led us to search for other enzyme properties that could be better predictors for activity towards small alkanes, specifically methane. We investigated the oxidation potential of the radical

  18. Relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Peng; Le, Jiawei; Wang, Lanlan; Pan, Tieying; Lu, Xilan; Zhang, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. • Effect of carbon structure in coal with different rank on formation of pyrolysis tar was studied. • Numerical interrelation between carbon types in coal structure and tar yield is elaborated. • Effect of carbon structure on formation of liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis is discussed. - Abstract: The relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis were discussed extensively. The pyrolysis tests were carried out in a tube reactor at 873 K and keep 15 min. The carbon distribution in coals was investigated by solid state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). The curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. The alkanes in coal tar were analyzed by Gas Chromatograph–Mass Spectrometer (GC–MS). The results show that oxygen-linked aromatic carbon decreases with the increasing of coal rank. The aliphatic carbon contents of Huainan (HN) coal are 44.20%, the highest among the four coals. The carbon types in coal structure have a significant influence on the formation of tar and liquid alkane. The coal tar yields are related to the aliphatic substituted aromatic carbon, CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and oxygen-linked carbon in coal so that the increasing order of tar yield is Inner Mongolia lignite (IM, 6.30 wt.%) < Sinkiang coal (SK, 7.55 wt.%) < Shenmu coal (SM, 12.84 wt.%) < HN (16.29 wt.%). The highest contents of oxygen-linked aromatic carbon in IM lead to phenolic compound of 41.06% in IM-tar. The contents of alkane in SM-tar are the highest because the appropriate CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and the highest aliphatic side chains on aromatic rings in SM leading to generate aliphatic hydrocarbon with medium molecular weight easily. The mechanism on formation of tar and liquid alkane plays an important role in guiding the industrialization of pyrolysis-based poly-generation producing tar with high

  19. Squeezing molecular thin alkane lubrication films between curved solid surfaces with long-range elasticity: Layering transitions and wear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V. N.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2003-01-01

    The properties of alkane lubricants confined between two approaching solids are investigated by a model that accounts for the curvature and the elastic properties of the solid surfaces. We consider linear alkane molecules of different chain lengths, C3H8, C4H10, C8H18, C9H20, C10H22, C12H26 and C14......H30 confined between smooth gold surfaces. In most cases we observe well defined molecular layers develop in the lubricant film when the width of the film is of the order of a few atomic diameters. An external squeezing-pressure induces discontinuous, thermally activated changes in the number n...... of lubricant layers. We find that with increasing alkane chain length, the transition from n to n-1 layers occurs at higher pressure, as expected based on the increasing wettability ~or spreading pressure with increasing chain length. Thus, the longer alkanes are better boundary lubricants than the shorter...

  20. Paleoclimatic implications of the hydrogen isotopic composition of terrigenous n-alkanes from Lake Yamzho, southern Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Zhonghuan; Xu Baiqing; Wu Guangjian; Zhu Liping; Muegler Ines; Gleixner, Gerd; Sachse, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of leaf water used for biosynthesis of n-alkanes can be modified by climate. Therefore, the δD can be considered as potential paleolimatic proxy to explore. We compared measured δD values of alkanes (n-C 25 to n-C 31 ) extracted from a short sediment profile spanning the past 50 years with a 7-year resolution from Lake Yamzho, southern Tibetan Plateau. Climatic control was reconstructed using meteorological records of the nearby Langkazi and Lhasa weather stations. We found that the δD values of the n-alkanes correlated with the mean annular air temperature and significantly correlated with the mean growing season air temperature. On the other hand, the δD values show poor correlations with both rainfall amount and relative humidity. These results indicate that stable isotope composition of n-alkanes could be an excellent proxy for paleotemperature reconstruction. (author)

  1. Selectivity of alkyl radical formation from branched alkanes studied by electron spin resonance and electron spin echo spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuneki, Ichikawa; Hiroshi, Yoshida

    1992-01-01

    Alkyl radicals generated from branched alkanes by γ radiation are being measuring by electron spin resonance and electron spin echo spectroscopy. This research is being conducted to determine the mechanism of selective alkyl radical formation in low-temperature solids

  2. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. I. Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Diama, A.

    2007-01-01

    their backbone and squalane has, in addition, six methyl side groups. Upon adsorption, there are significant differences as well as similarities in the behavior of these molecular films. Both molecules form ordered structures at low temperatures; however, while the melting point of the two-dimensional (2D......The structure of a monolayer film of the branched alkane squalane (C30H62) adsorbed on graphite has been studied by neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and compared with a similar study of the n-alkane tetracosane (n-C24H52). Both molecules have 24 carbon atoms along...... temperature. The neutron diffraction data show that the translational order in the squalane monolayer is significantly less than in the tetracosane monolayer. The authors' MD simulations suggest that this is caused by a distortion of the squalane molecules upon adsorption on the graphite surface. When...

  3. Biodegradation of crude oil and n-alkanes by fungi isolated from Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshafie, Abdulkadir; AlKindi, Abdulaziz Yahya; Al-Busaidi, Sultan; Bakheit, Charles; Albahry, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Ten fungal species isolated from tar balls collected from the beaches of Oman were tested for their abilities to grow and degrade n-alkanes and crude oil. The abilities of Aspergillus niger, A. ochraceus and Penicillium chrysogenum to degrade n-alkanes (C13-C18), crude oil were compared and their mycelial biomass was measured. Significant differences were found in the utilization of C15, C16, C17 and C18 by the three fungi. Similarly, significant differences we found in the amount of biomass produced by the three fungi growing on C13, C17, C18 and crude oil. The correlation coefficient of biomass and oil utilization was not statistically significant for Aspergillus niger, significant for Aspergillus terreus and highly significant for P. chrysogenum

  4. Measurement and modelling of hydrogen bonding in 1-alkanol plus n-alkane binary mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Solms, Nicolas; Jensen, Lars; Kofod, Jonas L.

    2007-01-01

    Two equations of state (simplified PC-SAFT and CPA) are used to predict the monomer fraction of 1-alkanols in binary mixtures with n-alkanes. It is found that the choice of parameters and association schemes significantly affects the ability of a model to predict hydrogen bonding in mixtures, eve...... studies, which is clarified in the present work. New hydrogen bonding data based on infrared spectroscopy are reported for seven binary mixtures of alcohols and alkanes. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....... though pure-component liquid densities and vapour pressures are predicted equally accurately for the associating compound. As was the case in the study of pure components, there exists some confusion in the literature about the correct interpretation and comparison of experimental data and theoretical...

  5. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes (C1-C4) by heteropoly compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Miao

    2014-01-22

    Heteropoly compounds (HPC) have revealed their potential to generate catalyst for selectively converting light alkanes to oxygenated products. There are various structures in which they are active the primary structure being that of the heteropolyanion itself, the secondary structure is the three-dimensional arrangements of polyanions, and the tertiary structure representing the manner in which the secondary structure assembles into solid particles. There are also a huge variety of elements inside the HPA. The heteropoly acids can have acidity, which varies dramatically depending on composition. This complexity of situation makes it very difficult to really have a predictive vision of their ability to activate and functionalize alkanes. However, a large amount of data reported suggests that the initial formula of the precatalyst is pivotal to direct the selectivity of the reaction toward different oxygenates. Inclusion of alternative transition metal atoms as addenda is highly influential with iron, vanadium, and antimony being particularly outstanding.

  6. Experimental measurements and prediction of liquid densities for n-alkane mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Estrada, Mariana; Iglesias-Silva, Gustavo A.; Hall, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental liquid densities for n-pentane, n-hexane and n-heptane and their binary mixtures from (273.15 to 363.15) K over the entire composition range (for the mixtures) at atmospheric pressure. A vibrating tube densimeter produces the experimental densities. Also, we present a generalized correlation to predict the liquid densities of n-alkanes and their mixtures. We have combined the principle of congruence with the Tait equation to obtain an equation that uses as variables: temperature, pressure and the equivalent carbon number of the mixture. Also, we present a generalized correlation for the atmospheric liquid densities of n-alkanes. The average absolute percentage deviation of this equation from the literature experimental density values is 0.26%. The Tait equation has an average percentage deviation of 0.15% from experimental density measurements

  7. Fossil Leaves and Fossil Leaf n-Alkanes: Reconstructing the First Closed Canopied Rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Although the age and location is disputed, the rise of the first closed-canopy forest is likely linked with the expansion of angiosperms in the late Cretacous or early Cenozoic. The carbon isotope 'canopy effect' reflects the extent of canopy closure, and is well documented in δ13C values of the leaves and leaf lipids in modern forests. To test the extent of canopy closure among the oldest documented angiosperm tropical forests, we analyzed isotopic characteristics of leaf fossils and leaf waxes from the Guaduas and Cerrejón Formations. The Guaduas Fm. (Maastrichtian) contains some of the earliest angiosperm fossils in the Neotropics, and both leaf morphology and pollen records at this site suggest an open-canopy structure. The Cerrejón Fm. (Paleocene) contains what are believed to be the first recorded fossil leaves from a closed-canopy forest. We analyzed the bulk carbon isotope content (δ13Cleaf) of 199 fossil leaves, as well as the n-alkane concentration and chain-length distribution, and δ13C of alkanes (δ13Clipid) of 73 fossil leaves and adjacent sediment samples. Fossil leaves are dominated by eudicots and include ten modern plant families (Apocynaceae, Bombaceae, Euphorbaceae, Fabaceae, Lauraceae, Malvaceae, Meliaceae, Menispermaceae, Moraceae, Sapotaceae). We interpreted extent of canopy coverage based on the range of δ13Cleaf values. The narrow range of δ13C values in leaves from the Guaduas Fm (2.7‰) is consistent with an open canopy. A significantly wider range in values (6.3‰) suggests a closed-canopy signature for site 0315 of the Cerrejón Fm,. In contrast, at Site 0318, a lacustrine deposit, leaves had a narrow range (3.3‰) in δ13C values, and this is not consistent with a closed-canopy, but is consistent with leaf assemblages from a forest edge. Leaves that accumulate in lake sediments tend to be biased toward plants living at the lake edge, which do not experience closed-canopy conditions, and do not express the isotopic

  8. Developing Selective Oxidation Catalysts of Light Alkanes:. from Fundamental Understanding to Rational Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gang; Yi, Xiaodong; Huang, Chuanjing; Xu, Xin; Weng, Weizheng; Xia, Wensheng; Wan, Hui-Lin

    Selective oxidation of light alkanes remains to be a great challenge for the wider use of alkanes as feedstocks. To achieve high activity and at the same time high selectivity, some key issues have to be addressed: (1) the stability of the desired products with respect to the reactants; (2) the roles of the active components in the catalysts, the structure and the functionality of the active centers; (3) the reducibility of the metal cations, the Lewis acid sites and their synergic effects with the basic sites of the lattice oxygen anions; (4) spatial isolation of the active centers; and (5) the mechanisms for the formation and transformation of the intermediates and their kinetic controls. In this contribution, we took selective oxidation of propane to acrolein as our target reaction, and reviewed mainly our own work, trying to provide some thinking and answers to these five questions.

  9. High Selectivity of Alkanes Production by Calcium Basic Soap Thermal Decarboxylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neonufa Godlief F.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable fuel production from vegetable oil and fat or its fatty acids by direct decarboxylation has been widely reported. An innovative approach to produce drop-in fuel via thermal catalytic decarboxylation of basic soap derived from palm stearin reported in this research. The catalytic effect of the calcium and magnesium metals in the basic soap and its decarboxylation on drop-in fuel yield and product distribution was studied. The catalytic effect was tested in the temperature range up to 370°C and atmospheric pressure for 5 hours in a batch reactor. It has been proved that the calcium basic soap decarboxylation, effectively produce the drop-in fuel in carbon ranges C8 – C20, in which more than 78% selectivity toward alkane. Whereas, only 70% selectivity toward alkane has been resulted from the magnesium basic soap decarboxylation.

  10. Localized diffusive motion on two different time scales in solid alkane nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.-K.; Mamontov, Eugene; Bai, M.; Hansen, F.Y.; Taub, H.; Copley, J.R.D.; Garcia Sakai, V.; Gasparovic, Goran; Jenkins, Timothy; Tyagi, M.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Neumann, D.A.; Montfrooij, W.; Volkmann, U.G.

    2010-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering on three complementary spectrometers has been used to investigate molecular diffusive motion in solid nano- to bulk-sized particles of the alkane n-C32H66. The crystalline-to-plastic and plastic-to-fluid phase transition temperatures are observed to decrease as the particle size decreases. In all samples, localized molecular diffusive motion in the plastic phase occurs on two different time scales: a 'fast' motion corresponding to uniaxial rotation about the long molecular axis; and a 'slow' motion attributed to conformational changes of the molecule. Contrary to the conventional interpretation in bulk alkanes, the fast uniaxial rotation begins in the low-temperature crystalline phase.

  11. Light scattering by low-frequency excitations in quasi-periodic n-alkane/urea adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, J.; Ecolivet, C.; Beaufils, S.; Guillaume, F.; Breczewski, T.

    1998-09-01

    High-resolution light scattering spectroscopy has been performed on a series of n-alkane CnH2n + 2/urea inclusion compounds with n = 12,14,17 - 19. The elastic constants of these incommensurate composite crystals have been determined and found to be independent of the chain length of the guest molecules. In addition, no extraneous acoustic-like mode appeared in all spectra. However, quasi-elastic components with different widths are observed for different polarizations. In one of them the characteristics of the scattered light suggest that the quasi-elastic broadening could be generated by a sliding mode, whereas the other detected component is assigned to the reorientational motions of the n-alkane chains about their long axis.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of (an ester + an alkane). XVIII. Experimental HmEandVmE values for (an alkyl butanoate + an alkane) at T = 318.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.; Navas, A.; Sabater, G.; Ascanio, M.; Placido, J.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the experimental values of H m E andV m E obtained at a temperature of 318.15 K and atmospheric pressure for a group of 24 binary mixtures comprised of the first four alkyl butanoates (methyl to butyl) with six odd alkanes, from heptane to heptadecane. All the mixtures are endothermic, and present a regular increase in H m E with the molecular weight of the saturated hydrocarbon, while, for a same alkane, the enthalpic effects diminish with increasing alcoholic chain of the butanoate. The variation in V m E occurs in the same direction. In this paper the structural behaviour of these systems and the influence of temperature on excess properties are analysed. Experimental data are correlated with a suitable polynomial equation which is given as a function of concentration and temperature, that permits a simultaneous correlation to be established with other properties of the mixture, such as (vapour + liquid) equilibria; and acceptable results are obtained. Finally, an estimation of H m E is made with two known versions of the UNIFAC model. In the version by Dang and Tassios [J. Dang, D.P. Tassios, Ind. Eng. Chem. Process Des. Dev. 25 (1986) 22-31.], a method is proposed that considers the interaction parameters as a function of the butanoate alkanolic chain. The estimations obtained for H m E are good

  13. Stable isotope labeled n-alkanes to assess digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of ruminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Warner

    Full Text Available We describe the use of carbon stable isotope ((13C labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically (13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four rumen-cannulated lactating dairy cows receiving four contrasting ryegrass silage treatments that differed in nitrogen fertilization level (45 or 90 kg nitrogen ha(-1 and maturity (early or late. Passage kinetics through the gastrointestinal tract were derived from the δ(13C (i.e. the ratio (13C:(12C in apparently undigested fecal material. Isotopic enrichment was observed in a wide range of long-chain n-alkanes (C27-C36 and passage kinetics were determined for the most abundant C29, C31 and C33 n-alkanes, for which a sufficiently high response signal was detected by combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Basal diet treatment and carbon chain length of n-alkanes did not affect fractional passage rates from the rumen (K 1 among individual n-alkanes (3.71-3.95%/h. Peak concentration time and transit time showed a quantitatively small, significant (p≤0.002 increase with carbon chain length. K 1 estimates were comparable to those of the (13C labeled digestible dry matter fraction (3.38%/h; r = 0.61 to 0.71; p≤0.012. A literature review has shown that n-alkanes are not fermented by microorganisms in the rumen and affirms no preferential depletion of (13C versus (12C. Our results suggest that (13C labeled n-alkanes can be used as nutrient passage tracers and support the reliability of the δ(13C signature of digestible feed nutrients as a tool to measure nutrient-specific passage kinetics.

  14. Novel Mesoporous Silica Materials with Hierarchically Ordered Nanochannel: Synthesis with the Assistance of Straight-Chain Alkanes and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The straight-chain alkane-assisted synthesis of hierarchical mesoporous silica materials (MSM results in variable mesostructures and morphologies due to remarkably different self-assembly routes of template agent from those without the assistance of straight-chain alkanes. The textural properties, particularly pore size, channel structure, morphology, and hierarchical structure of those MSM make them demonstrate peculiar effects in the immobilization of homogeneous catalysts.

  15. The effect of environmental factors on stable isotopic composition of n-alkanes in Mediterranean olive oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Mihailova, Alina; Abbado, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    Traceability of the geographic origin of olive oils is an important issue from both commercial and health perspectives. This study evaluates the impact of environmental factors on stable C and H isotope compositions of n-alkanes in extra virgin olive oils from Croatia, France, Greece, Italy, Morocco, Portugal, Slovenia, and Spain. The data are used to investigate the applicability of stable isotope methodology for olive oil regional classification in the Mediterranean region. Analysis of stable C isotope composition of n-C29 alkane showed that extra virgin olive oils from Portugal and Spain have the most positive n-C29 alkane delta13C values. Conversely, olive oils from Slovenia, northern and central Italy are characterized by the most negative values. Overall, the n-C29 alkane delta13C values show a positive correlation with the mean air temperature during August-December and a negative correlation with the mean relative humidity during these months. Analysis of stable H isotope composition of n-C29 alkane revealed that the deltaD values are the most positive in olive oils from Greece and Morocco and the most negative in oils from northern Italy. The deltaD values of oils show significant correlation with all the analyses geographical parameters: the mean air temperature and relative humidity during August-December, the total amount of rainfall (the same months) and the annual deltaD values of precipitation. As predictor variables in the Categorical Data Analysis, the n-C29 alkane deltaD values show the most significant discriminative power, followed by the n-C29 alkane delta13C values. Overall, 93.4% of olive oil samples have been classified correctly into one of the production regions. Our findings suggest that an integrated analysis of C and H isotope compositions of n-alkanes extracted from extra virgin olive oil could become a useful tool for geographical provenancing of this highly popular food commodity.

  16. Angiosperm n-alkane distribution patterns and the geologic record of C4 grassland evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, A.; Graham, H. V.; Patzkowsky, M.; Fox, D. L.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    n-Alkane average chain-length (ACL) patterns vary regionally with community composition and climate. To clarify the influence of phylogenetic and community patterns, we compiled and analyzed a global database of published n-alkane abundance for n-C27 to C35 homologs in modern plant specimens (n=205). ACL for waxes in C4 non-woody plants are longer than for woody plants, suggesting ACL can serve as an indicator of the three-dimensional structure of local vegetation. Further, these findings suggest compound-specific isotopic data for longer alkane homologs (C31, C33, C35) will proportionately represent non-woody vegetation and isotope measurements of C29 are more representative of woody vegetation. Thus, the combination of ACL and carbon isotope compositions should allow us to disentangle C3 woody, C3 non-woody, and C4 non-woody signals in terrestrial paleorecords. Application of this approach to the geologic record of Miocene C4 grassland expansion in the US Great Plains and the Siwaliks in Pakistan illustrate two very different transition scenarios. Alkane-specific isotopic data indicate C4 grasslands appeared 2.5 Ma in the Great Plains and 6.5 Ma in the Siwaliks, and ACL analysis indicates that this transition involved the replacement of woody vegetation in the US and the replacement of C3 grasses in Pakistan. Our analysis illustrates that, consistent with differences in the timing of C4 grassland, the drivers of change were likely not the same in these regions. Oxygen isotope records suggest that the more recent transition in the Great Plains was associated with climate cooling and possibly changes in disturbance regimes and that the transition in the Siwaliks was likely associated with warming and drying.

  17. A novel growth mode of alkane films on a SiO2 surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, H.; Taub, H.; Volkmann, U.G.

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray specular scattering measurements confirm microscopically a structural model recently inferred by very-high-resolution ellipsometry of a solid dotriacontane (n-C32H66 or C32) film formed by adsorption from solution onto a SiO2 surface. Sequentially, one or two layers adsorb on th...... previously for shorter alkanes deposited from the vapor phase onto solid surfaces....

  18. Enabling the synthesis of medium chain alkanes and 1-alkenes in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yongjin J.; Kang, Min Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Microbial synthesis of medium chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, attractive drop-in molecules to gasoline and jet fuels, is a promising way to reduce our reliance on petroleum-based fuels. In this study, we enabled the synthesis of straight chain hydrocarbons (C7–C13) by yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae...... of fatty acids to 1-alkenes, which could be synthesized at a level of 3 mg/L, 25-fold higher than that of alkanes produced via aldehydes....

  19. Alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments and benthic invertebrates of the northern Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Rodger; Taylor, Karen A.

    2017-10-01

    The Hanna Shoal region represents an important northern gateway for transport and deposition in the Chukchi Sea. This study determined the concentration and distribution of organic contaminants (aliphatic hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) in surface sediments from 34 sites across Hanna Shoal. Up to 31 total PAHs, including parent and alkyl homologues were detected with total concentrations ranging from a low of 168 ng g-1 the western flank of Hanna Shoal (station H34) to 1147 ng g-1 at station in Barrow Canyon (station BarC5). Alkyl PAHs were more abundant than parent structures and accounted for 53-64% of the summed concentrations suggesting overall at background levels (< 1600 ng g-1) in sediments. Alkane (C15-C33) hydrocarbons ranged from 4.3 μg g-1 on the southern flank of Hanna shoal to 31 μg g-1 at a northern station. Sediments were often dominated by short chain (C15-C22) alkanes with overall terrestrial aquatic ratios (TAR) for the region averaging 0.20. Based on the ratio of Fl/(Fl+ Py) and BaF/(Baf+BeP) verses (BA/BA+Ch) in sediments, PAHs are largely derived from petrogenic sources with minor amounts of mixed combustion sources. A diversity of PAHs were detected in the northern whelk Neptunea heros foot muscle with total concentrations ranging from 0.14 to 1.5 μg g-1 dry tissue wt. Larger (and presumably older) animals showed higher levels of PAH per unit muscle tissue, suggesting that animals may bioaccumulate PAHs over time, with low but increasing concentrations also present in internal and external eggs. Alkane hydrocarbons were also higher in whelks with distributions similar to that seen in sediments. The mussel Muscularus discors collected in Barrow Canyon showed constrained distributions and substantially lower concentrations of both PAHs and alkanes than the surrounding surface sediments.

  20. Modelling and parameter estimation in reactive continuous mixtures: the catalytic cracking of alkanes - part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. PEIXOTO

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentation kinetics is employed to model a continuous reactive mixture of alkanes under catalytic cracking conditions. Standard moment analysis techniques are employed, and a dynamic system for the time evolution of moments of the mixture's dimensionless concentration distribution function (DCDF is found. The time behavior of the DCDF is recovered with successive estimations of scaled gamma distributions using the moments time data.

  1. Analysis of alkane-dependent methanogenic community derived from production water of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Li, Kai-Ping; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Li-Ying; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Mu, Bo-Zhong [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Bioreactor Engineering and Inst. of Applied Chemistry; Gu, Ji-Dong [Hong Kong Univ. (China). School of Biological Sciences

    2012-10-15

    Microbial assemblage in an n-alkanes-dependent thermophilic methanogenic enrichment cultures derived from production waters of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir was investigated in this study. Substantially higher amounts of methane were generated from the enrichment cultures incubated at 55 C for 528 days with a mixture of long-chain n-alkanes (C{sub 15}-C{sub 20}). Stoichiometric estimation showed that alkanes-dependent methanogenesis accounted for about 19.8% of the total amount of methane expected. Hydrogen was occasionally detected together with methane in the gas phase of the cultures. Chemical analysis of the liquid cultures resulted only in low concentrations of acetate and formate. Phylogenetic analysis of the enrichment revealed the presence of several bacterial taxa related to Firmicutes, Thermodesulfobiaceae, Thermotogaceae, Nitrospiraceae, Dictyoglomaceae, Candidate division OP8 and others without close cultured representatives, and Archaea predominantly related to uncultured members in the order Archaeoglobales and CO{sub 2}-reducing methanogens. Screening of genomic DNA retrieved from the alkanes-amended enrichment cultures also suggested the presence of new alkylsuccinate synthase alpha-subunit (assA) homologues. These findings suggest the presence of poorly characterized (putative) anaerobic n-alkanes degraders in the thermophilic methanogenic enrichment cultures. Our results indicate that methanogenesis of alkanes under thermophilic condition is likely to proceed via syntrophic acetate and/or formate oxidation linked with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. (orig.)

  2. Distribution and sources of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in shellfish of the Egyptian Red Sea coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El Nemr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic hydrocarbons and n-alkanes were analyzed in shellfish collected from 13 different sites along the Egyptian Red Sea coast. All samples were analyzed for n-alkanes (C8–C40 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (EPA list of PAHs. n-Alkanes in shellfish samples from 13 locations were found to be in the range of 71.0–701.1 ng/g with a mean value of 242.2 ± 192.1 ng/g dry wt. Different indices were calculated for the n-alkanes to assess their sources. These were carbon preference index (CPI, average chain length (ACL, terrigenous/aquatic ratio (TAR, natural n-alkane ratio (NAR and proxy ratio (Paq. Most of the collected samples of n-alkanes were discovered to be from natural sources. Aromatic hydrocarbons (16 PAHs from 13 sites varied between 1.3 and 160.9 ng/g with an average of 47.9 ± 45.5 ng/g dry wt. Benzo(apyrine (BaP, a cancer risk assessment, was calculated for the PAHs and resulted in ranges between 0.08 and 4.47 with an average of 1.25 ng/g dry wt.

  3. Water solubility of selected C9-C18 alkanes using a slow-stir technique: Comparison to structure - property models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letinski, Daniel J; Parkerton, Thomas F; Redman, Aaron D; Connelly, Martin J; Peterson, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous solubility is a fundamental physical-chemical substance property that strongly influences the distribution, fate and effects of chemicals upon release into the environment. Experimental water solubility was determined for 18 selected C9-C18 normal, branched and cyclic alkanes. A slow-stir technique was applied to obviate emulsion formation, which historically has resulted in significant overestimation of the aqueous solubility of such hydrophobic liquid compounds. Sensitive GC-MS based methods coupled with contemporary sample extraction techniques were employed to enable reproducible analysis of low parts-per billion aqueous concentrations. Water solubility measurements for most of the compounds investigated, are reported for the first time expanding available data for branched and cyclic alkanes. Measured water solubilities spanned four orders of magnitude ranging from 0.3 μg/L to 250 μg/L. Good agreement was observed for selected alkanes tested in this work and reported in earlier literature demonstrating the robustness of the slow-stir water solubility technique. Comparisons of measured alkane water solubilities were also made with those predicted by commonly used quantitative structure-property relationship models (e.g. SPARC, EPIWIN, ACD/Labs). Correlations are also presented between alkane measured water solubilities and molecular size parameters (e.g. molar volume, solvent accessible molar volume) affirming a mechanistic description of empirical aqueous solubility results and prediction previously reported for a more limited set of alkanes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization and gene expression of alkane degradation genes by endophytic Enterobacter ludwigii strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousaf, Sohail [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Afzal, Muhammad [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), Faisalabad (Pakistan); Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Environmental Resources and Technologies Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Brady, Carrie L. [Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sessitsch, Angela, E-mail: angela.sessitsch@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    The genus Enterobacter comprises a range of beneficial plant-associated bacteria showing plant growth promotion. Enterobacter ludwigii belongs to the Enterobacter cloacae complex and has been reported to include human pathogens but also plant-associated strains with plant beneficial capacities. To assess the role of Enterobacter endophytes in hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization, abundance and expression of CYP153 genes in different plant compartments, three plant species (Italian ryegrass, birdsfoot trefoil and alfalfa) were grown in sterile soil spiked with 1% diesel and inoculated with three endophytic E. ludwigii strains. Results showed that all strains were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and efficiently colonized the rhizosphere and plant interior. Two strains, ISI10-3 and BRI10-9, showed highest degradation rates of diesel fuel up to 68% and performed best in combination with Italian ryegrass and alfalfa. All strains expressed the CYP153 gene in all plant compartments, indicating an active role in degradation of diesel in association with plants. - Highlights: > E. ludwigii strains efficiently colonized plants in a non-sterile soil environment. > E. ludwigii strains efficiently expressed alkane degradation genes in plants. > E. ludwigii efficiently degraded alkane contaminations and promoted plant growth. > E. ludwigii interacted more effectively with Italian ryegrass than with other plants. > Degradation activity varied with plant and microbial genotype as well as with time. - Enterobacter ludwigii strains belonging to the E. cloacae complex are able to efficiently degrade alkanes when associated with plants and to promote plant growth.

  5. Fully atomistic molecular-mechanical model of liquid alkane oils: Computational validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariev, Tsvetan K; Slavchov, Radomir I; Tadjer, Alia V; Ivanova, Anela N

    2014-04-15

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed on liquid n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-heptane to derive an atomistic model for middle-chain-length alkanes. All simulations were based on existing molecular-mechanical parameters for alkanes. The computational protocol was optimized, for example, in terms of thermo- and barostat, to reproduce properly the properties of the liquids. The model was validated by comparison of thermal, structural, and dynamic properties of the normal alkane liquids to experimental data. Two different combinations of temperature and pressure coupling algorithms were tested. A simple differential approach was applied to evaluate fluctuation-related properties with sufficient accuracy. Analysis of the data reveals a satisfactory representation of the hydrophobic systems behavior. Thermodynamic parameters are close to the experimental values and exhibit correct temperature dependence. The observed intramolecular geometry corresponds to extended conformations domination, whereas the intermolecular structure demonstrates all characteristics of liquid systems. Cavity size distribution function was calculated from coordinates analysis and was applied to study the solubility of gases in hexane and heptane oils. This study provides a platform for further in-depth research on hydrophobic solutions and multicomponent systems. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Succession of Alkane Conformational Motifs Bound within Hydrophobic Supramolecular Capsular Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Wesley; Gibb, Bruce C; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2016-10-06

    n-Alkane encapsulation experiments within dimeric octa-acid cavitand capsules in water reveal a succession of packing motifs from extended, to helical, to hairpin, to spinning top structures with increasing chain length. Here, we report a molecular simulation study of alkane conformational preferences within these host-guest assemblies to uncover the factors stabilizing distinct conformers. The simulated alkane conformers follow the trends inferred from 1 H NMR experiments, while guest proton chemical shifts evaluated from Gauge Invariant Atomic Orbital calculations provide further evidence our simulations capture guest packing within these assemblies. Analysis of chain length and dihedral distributions indicates that packing under confinement to minimize nonpolar guest and host interior contact with water largely drives the transitions. Mean intramolecular distance maps and transfer free energy differences suggest the extended and helical motifs are members of a larger family of linear guest structures, for which the guest gauche population increases with increasing chain length to accommodate the chains within the complex. Breaks observed between the helical/hairpin and hairpin/spinning top motifs, on the other hand, indicate the hairpin and spinning top conformations are distinct from the linear family. Our results represent the first bridging of empirical and simulation data for flexible guests encapsulated within confined nanospaces, and constitute an effective strategy by which guest packing motifs within artificial or natural compartments can be rationalized and/or predicted a priori.

  7. Hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization and gene expression of alkane degradation genes by endophytic Enterobacter ludwigii strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, Sohail; Afzal, Muhammad; Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Brady, Carrie L.; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The genus Enterobacter comprises a range of beneficial plant-associated bacteria showing plant growth promotion. Enterobacter ludwigii belongs to the Enterobacter cloacae complex and has been reported to include human pathogens but also plant-associated strains with plant beneficial capacities. To assess the role of Enterobacter endophytes in hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization, abundance and expression of CYP153 genes in different plant compartments, three plant species (Italian ryegrass, birdsfoot trefoil and alfalfa) were grown in sterile soil spiked with 1% diesel and inoculated with three endophytic E. ludwigii strains. Results showed that all strains were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and efficiently colonized the rhizosphere and plant interior. Two strains, ISI10-3 and BRI10-9, showed highest degradation rates of diesel fuel up to 68% and performed best in combination with Italian ryegrass and alfalfa. All strains expressed the CYP153 gene in all plant compartments, indicating an active role in degradation of diesel in association with plants. - Highlights: → E. ludwigii strains efficiently colonized plants in a non-sterile soil environment. → E. ludwigii strains efficiently expressed alkane degradation genes in plants. → E. ludwigii efficiently degraded alkane contaminations and promoted plant growth. → E. ludwigii interacted more effectively with Italian ryegrass than with other plants. → Degradation activity varied with plant and microbial genotype as well as with time. - Enterobacter ludwigii strains belonging to the E. cloacae complex are able to efficiently degrade alkanes when associated with plants and to promote plant growth.

  8. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  9. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  10. Theory and Experiment of Binary Diffusion Coefficient of n-Alkanes in Dilute Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changran; McGivern, W Sean; Manion, Jeffrey A; Wang, Hai

    2016-10-10

    Binary diffusion coefficients were measured for n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-octane in helium and of n-pentane in nitrogen over the temperature range of 300 to 600 K, using reversed-flow gas chromatography. A generalized, analytical theory is proposed for the binary diffusion coefficients of long-chain molecules in simple diluent gases, taking advantage of a recently developed gas-kinetic theory of the transport properties of nanoslender bodies in dilute free-molecular flows. The theory addresses the long-standing question about the applicability of the Chapman-Enskog theory in describing the transport properties of nonspherical molecular structures, or equivalently, the use of isotropic potentials of interaction for a roughly cylindrical molecular structure such as large normal alkanes. An approximate potential energy function is proposed for the intermolecular interaction of long-chain n-alkane with typical bath gases. Using this potential and the analytical theory for nanoslender bodies, we show that the diffusion coefficients of n-alkanes in typical bath gases can be treated by the resulting analytical model accurately, especially for compounds larger than n-butane.

  11. Structural Exploration of the Two HBI Alkanes in the Chinese Maoming Oil Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, J.; Lu, H.; Wang, Q.; Zhou, Y., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    The Maoming oil shale is notable for its high rate of oil production and abundant biomarker compounds. Apart from the odd-numbered C31 and C33botryococcanes dominant and characteristic, two highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkanes (Fig. 1) were exclusively occurred (Brassell et al., 1986). The first identification of the two HBI alkanes in the Maoming oil shale was based on a comparison with the mass spectrum of C20 HBI (2,6,10-trimethyl-7-(3-methylbutyl)dodecane) (Yon et al., 1982; Rowland et al., 1985 ) from Rozel Point crude oil. Brassell et al (1986) thought that the characteristic ions at m/z 308 and 336 could be indicative of an additional C10 alkyl side chain on top of the characteristic ions of m/z 168 and 197 for the C20-HBI. However, the structural speculation seemed suspicious for not only their mass spectrum but also their co-chromatography results were not identical to the later synthesized C30 HBI alkane (Rowland and Robson, 1990). In addition, the source attribution of diatoms indicated by two C30 HBIs was inconsistent with the species of B race of Botryococcus braunii indicated by the dominant distribution of botryococcanes. Thus, the thirty-year-old structural assignment of the two C30 HBI alkanes may require confirmation. At first, the monomers of two HBIs were prepared by preparative gas chromatography. The HR-EI MS (436.5003) illustrated a formula of C31H64 rather than carbon numbered C30 HBIs. Moreover, two novel polymethyl alkane structures (I, II) could be yielded by 1D and 2D NMR results (Fig. 2), which completely different from that of previously speculated C30-HBIs (Fig. 2). According to the elucidated structure, the characteristic ions at m/z 308, 336, 434 and other irons at m/z 127, 211, 225, 281, 336 were mainly corresponded to relevant cleavages. Hence, their mass spectra were basically consistent with the structure determined from the NMR data. The new structural skeleton in our results for the two compounds does not support the

  12. Perspective: What is known, and not known, about the connections between alkane oxidation and metal uptake in alkanotrophs in the marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Rachel Narehood; Kenney, Grace E.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Should iron and copper be added to the environment to stimulate the natural bioremediation of marine oil spills? The key enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alkanes require either iron or copper, and the concentration of these ions in seawater is vanishingly low. Nevertheless, the dependence of alkane oxidation activity on external metal concentrations remains unclear. This perspective will summarize what is known about the co-regulation of alkane oxidation and metal acquisition and pose a...

  13. Vapour–liquid equilibria of the OPLS (Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations model for binary systems of alkanes and alkanes + alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLOBODAN P. SERBANOVIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The NpT - Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo computer simulationmethod was applied to predict the vapour–liquid equlibrium (VLE behavior of the binary systems ethane + pentane at 277.55 K and 310.95 K, ethane + hexane at 298.15 K, propane + methanol at 313.15 K and propane + ethanol at 325.15 K and 425.15 K. The optimised potentials for the liquid simulating (OPLS model were used to describe the interactions of alkanes and alcohols. The simulated VLE predictions are compared with experimental data available for the pressure and phase composition of the analyzed binary systems. The agreement between the experimental data and the simulation results is found to be generally good, although slightly better for system in which both components were nonpolar.

  14. Biodegradation of n-alkanes on oil-seawater interfaces at different temperatures and microbial communities associated with the degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthus, Synnøve; Netzer, Roman; Lewin, Anna S; Heggeset, Tonje M B; Haugen, Tone; Brakstad, Odd Gunnar

    2018-04-01

    Oil biodegradation studies have mainly focused on microbial processes in dispersions, not specifically on the interfaces between the oil and the seawater in the dispersions. In this study, a hydrophobic adsorbent system, consisting of Fluortex fabrics, was used to investigate biodegradation of n-alkanes and microbial communities on oil-seawater interfaces in natural non-amended seawater. The study was performed over a temperature range from 0 to 20 °C, to determine how temperature affected biodegradation at the oil-seawater interfaces. Biodegradation of n-alkanes were influenced both by seawater temperature and chain-length. Biotransformation rates of n-alkanes decreased by reduced seawater temperature. Low rate coefficients at a seawater temperature of 0 °C were probably associated with changes in physical-chemical properties of alkanes. The primary bacterial colonization of the interfaces was predominated by the family Oceanospirillaceae at all temperatures, demonstrating the wide temperature range of these hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. The mesophilic genus Oleibacter was predominant at the seawater temperature of 20 °C, and the psychrophilic genus Oleispira at 5 and 0 °C. Upon completion of n-alkane biotransformation, other oil-degrading and heterotrophic bacteria became abundant, including Piscirickettsiaceae (Cycloclasticus), Colwelliaceae (Colwellia), Altermonadaceae (Altermonas), and Rhodobacteraceae. This is one of a few studies that describe the biodegradation of oil, and the microbial communities associated with the degradation, directly at the oil-seawater interfaces over a large temperature interval.

  15. Comprehensive chemical kinetic modeling of the oxidation of C8 and larger n-alkanes and 2-methylalkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Togbe, C; Dagaut, P; Wang, H; Oehlschlaeger, M; NIemann, U; Seshadri, K; Veloo, P S; Ji, C; Egolfopoulos, F; Lu, T

    2011-03-16

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed and reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for singly methylated iso-alkanes (i.e., 2-methylalkanes) ranging from C{sub 8} to C{sub 20}. The mechanism also includes an updated version of our previously published C{sub 8} to C{sub 16} n-alkanes model. The complete detailed mechanism contains approximately 7,200 species 31,400 reactions. The proposed model is validated against new experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices including premixed and nonpremixed flames, perfectly stirred reactors and shock tubes. This new model is used to show how the presence of a methyl branch affects important combustion properties such as laminar flame propagation, ignition, and species formation.

  16. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  17. Cuticular n-alkane in leaves of seven Neotropical species of the family Lecythidaceae: a contribution to chemotaxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Maria da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Biosynthesized from very long-chain fatty acid wax precursors, n-alkanes make a valuable contribution to the taxonomy of plants. The alkane components of foliar epicuticles of seven Neotropical species of Lecythidaceae were investigated: Bertholletia excelsa, Cariniana legalis, Couroupita guianensis, Eschweilera alvimii, Eschweilera ovata, Gustavia augusta and Lecythis pisonis. Specimens were collected in the metropolitan area of Recife, Pernambuco, and their n-alkane fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography. The chemical relationships among the species were then evaluated using cophenetic correlation and UPGMA. Among the seven species, a total of 15 n-alkanes, with 21-35 carbon atoms, were identified and formed a consistent group of B. excelsa, C. guianensis, E. ovata, G. augusta, and L. pisonis with n-C31. The greatest similarities were found between B. excelsa and L. pisonis, and between C. guianensis and G. augusta. Nevertheless, a phenetic analysis based on a larger number of species is needed to better understand the chemotaxonomic value of epicuticular n-alkanes within the Lecythidaceae.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of mid-size liquid n-Alkanes, C12–C160

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Tae Woo; Lee, Song Hi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the results of molecular dynamics simulations (MD) for model systems of mid-size liquid n-alkanes (C 12 –C 160 ) at several temperatures (⁓2700 K) in canonical ensembles to calculate structural and dynamic properties (viscosity η, self-diffusion constant D, and monomeric friction constant ζ). For the small n-alkanes for n ≤ 80, the chains are clearly ≥ 1, which leads to the conclusion that the liquid n-alkanes are far away from the Rouse regime, but for the n-alkanes for n ≥ 120, the chains are ⁓ 1 and they are Gaussian. It is found that the long chains of these n-alkanes at high temperatures show abnormalities in density, viscosity, and monomeric friction constant. The mass and temperature dependences of structural and dynamic properties (η, D, and ζ) are discussed

  19. Role of cysteine residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD.

  20. Effects of surfactant mixtures, including Corexit 9527, on bacterial oxidation of acetate and alkanes in crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruheim, P.; Bredholt, H.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Biotechnology

    1999-04-01

    Mixtures of nonionic and anionic surfactants, including Corexit 9527, were tested to determine their effects on bacterial oxidation of acetate and alkanes in crude oil by cells pregrown on these substrates. Corexit 9527 inhibited oxidation of the alkanes in crude oil by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ATCC 31012, while Span 80, a Corexit 9527 constituent, markedly increased the oil oxidation rate. Another Corexit 9257 constituent, the negatively charged dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT), strongly reduced the oxidation rate. The combination of Span 80 and AOT increased the rate, but not as much as Span 80 alone increased it, which tentatively explained the negative effect of Corexit 9527. The results of acetate uptake and oxidation experiments indicated that the nonionic surfactants interacted with the acetate uptake system while the anionic surfactant interacted with the oxidation system of the bacteria. The overall effect of Corexit 9527 on alkane oxidation by A. calcoaceticus ATCC 31012 thus seems to be the sum of the independent effects of the individual surfactants in the surfactant mixture. When Rhodococcus sp. strain 094 was used, the alkane oxidation rate decreased to almost zero in the presence of a mixture of Tergitol 15-S-7 and AOT even though the Tergitol 15-S-7 surfactant increased the alkane oxidation rate and AOT did not affect it. This indicated that there was synergism between the two surfactants rather than an additive effect like that observed for A. calcoaceticus ATCC 31012.

  1. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-10-14

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ∼ M(β), is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from -1.8 to -2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature Tg where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔHa and entropy ΔSa of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a "critical" chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a "buckling transition" from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔSa ∝ ΔHa, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔHa and ΔSa with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  2. Critical wetting of n-alkanes on water; Mouillage critique des alcanes sur l`eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragil, K.

    1996-10-18

    This study concerns the wetting properties of n-alkanes on water under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, a problem that is interesting for the petroleum industry as well as for the fundamental understanding of wetting phenomena. An experimental study using ellipsometry reveals that pentane on water undergoes a continuous or critical wetting transition at a temperature equal to 53.1 deg. C. This is the first experimental observation of such a transition, confirming theoretical predictions made on this subject over ten years. This transition is characterized by a continuous and reversible evolution of the thickness of the film of pentane with temperature from a thick (but finite film) to a macroscopic film. The critical wetting transition occurs when the Hamaker constant of the system, which gives the net interaction between the two interfaces bounding the wetting layer of pentane in terms of the van der Waals forces, changes sign. A theoretical approach based on the Cahn-Landau theory, which takes into account long range forces (van der Waals forces), enables us to explain the mechanism of the critical wetting transition and to show that a first-order wetting transition should precede it. Because of their similar dispersive properties, linear alkanes could all be able to show such a succession of transitions. An ellipsometry study performed on a brine/hexane/vapor system confirms that a discontinuous transition from a thin microscopic film to a thick but finite adsorbed film takes place. THis study demonstrates that the wetting of alkanes on water is determined by subtle interplay between short range and long range forces, which can lead to an intermediary state between partial and complete wetting. (author)

  3. Short-chain alkane cycling in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, R.; Joye, S. B.; Hunter, K.

    2015-12-01

    Mixtures of light hydrocarbon gases are common in deep Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments, and are typically dissolved in pore fluids, adsorbed to sediment particles, trapped in methane ice, or as free gas. The dominant component in these natural gas mixtures is usually methane (>80% C1), but ethane (C2) and propane (C3) are nearly always present in trace amounts (95% of the methane produced at depth never reaches the water column. Production of C1 and C2 in deep-sea sediments has been historically attributed only to thermocatalytic processes, though limited data suggests production of C2/C3 compounds through the activity of archaea at depth. Furthermore, carbon isotopic data on ethane and propane from deep cores of Gulf of Mexico sediments suggest alkanogenesis at >3 m depth in the sediment column and alkane oxidation in uppermost oxidant-rich sediments. Additional studies have also isolated microorganisms capable of oxidizing ethane and propane in the laboratory, but field studies of microbial-driven dynamics of C2/C3 gases in cold-seep sediments are rare. Here, we present the results of a series of incubation experiments using sediment slurries culled from surface sediments from one of the most prolific natural oil and gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Rates of alkane oxidation were measured under a variety of conditions to assess the surface-driven microbial controls on C2/C3 cycling in cold-seep environments. Such microbial processes are important in terms of the possible 'oxidative overprinting' of alkane isotopic signatures produced at depth, possibly obscuring typical microbial isotopic signals.

  4. Influence of compost amendments on the diversity of alkane degrading bacteria in hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchloter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alkane degrading microorganisms play an important role for bioremediation of petrogenic contaminated environments. In this study, we investigated the effects of compost addition on the diversity of alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB harboring bacteria in oil-contaminated soil originated from an industrial zone in Celje, Slovenia, to improve our understanding about the bacterial community involved in alkane degradation and the effects of amendments. Soil without any amendments (control soil and soil amended with compost of different maturation stages, i 1 year and ii 2 weeks, were incubated under controlled conditions in a microcosm experiment and sampled after 0, 6, 12 and 36 weeks of incubation. By using quantitative real-time PCR higher number of alkB genes could be detected in soil samples with compost compared to the control soil after 6, 12 and 36 weeks mainly if the less maturated compost was added. To get an insight into the composition of the alkB harboring microbial communities, we performed next generation sequencing of alkB gene fragment amplicons. Richness and diversity of alkB gene harboring prokaryotes was higher in soil mixed with compost compared to control soil after 6, 12 and 36 weeks again with stronger effects of the less maturated compost. Comparison of communities detected in different samples and time points based on principle component analysis revealed that the addition of compost in general stimulated the abundance of alkB harboring Actinobacteria during the experiment independent from the maturation stage of the compost compared to the control soils. In addition alkB harboring proteobacteria like Shewanella or Hydrocarboniphaga as well as proteobacteria of the genus Agrobacterium responded positively to the addition of compost to soil The amendment of the less maturated compost resulted in addition in a large increase of alkB harboring bacteria of the Cytophaga group (Microscilla mainly at the early sampling

  5. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-01

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ˜ Mβ, is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from -1.8 to -2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature Tg where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔHa and entropy ΔSa of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a "critical" chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a "buckling transition" from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔSa ∝ ΔHa, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔHa and ΔSa with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  6. Interaction between Promoters Mn/Fe, Sulfate, and Zirconia in Accordingly Composed Alkane Isomerization Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Jentoft, F.; Hahn, A.; Wild, U.; Klose, B.; Jentoft, R.; Ressler, T.; Schlögl, R.; Häßner, C.; Köhler, K.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between Promoters Mn/Fe, Sulfate, and Zirconia in Accordingly Composed Alkane Isomerization Catalysts F.C. Jentoft, A. Hahn, U. Wild, B.S. Klose, R.E. Jentoft, T. Ressler, R. Schlögl Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin, Germany C. Häßner, K. Köhler Anorganisch-Chemisches Institut, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching, Germany Introduction Promotion of sulfated zirconia (SZ) with man...

  7. Interaction between Promoters Mn/Fe, Sulfate, and Zirconia in Accordingly Composed Alkane Isomerization Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Jentoft, Friederike C.; Hahn, Alexander; Wild, Ute; Klose, Barbara S.; Jentoft, Rolf E.; Ressler, Thorsten; Schlögl, Robert; Häßner, Christian; Köhler, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between Promoters Mn/Fe, Sulfate, and Zirconia in Accordingly Composed Alkane Isomerization Catalysts F.C. Jentoft, A. Hahn, U. Wild, B.S. Klose, R.E. Jentoft, T. Ressler, R. Schlögl Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin, Germany C. Häßner, K. Köhler Anorganisch-Chemisches Institut, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching, Germany Introduction Promotion of sulfated zi...

  8. Reversible Interconversion between Alkanes, Alkenes, Alcohols and Ketones under Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, J.; Hartnett, H. E.; Gould, I. R.; Shock, E.; Williams, L. B.

    2011-12-01

    Many transformation reactions involving hydrocarbons that occur in deep sedimentary systems and determine petroleum compositions occur in the presence of H2O. Hydrothermal transformations of organic material are thought to provide carbon sources for microbes in deep ocean sediments. Hydrothermal conditions may also mimic the conditions where life developed on an early Earth. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of hydrothermal organic reactions, including ways in which various reactions are interrelated and how reactions compete with each other. It can be argued that metastable equilibrium states develop over geological timescales and at geochemically relevant temperatures, suggesting that reactions occur under thermodynamic rather than kinetic control. The extent to which reactions are reversible, and how product distributions are determined, are primary tests of the metastable equilibrium model. Seewald (2001, GCA 65, 1641-1664) showed that under hydrothermal conditions and in the presence of a redox buffer, simple alkanes and alkenes undergo oxidation, reduction, and hydration reactions. He proposed a reaction scheme where alkanes interconvert with alkenes, followed by stepwise hydration of alkenes to alcohols, oxidation to ketones, and finally conversion to carboxylic acids, which can undergo decarboxylation. Here we describe experiments that further develop the scope of these functional group interconversions, determine relative reaction kinetics, and provide insight into competing reactions. Hydrothermal experiments were performed at 300°C and 100 MPa in gold capsules for 12 to 144 hours. The reactant structures were based on cyclohexane with one and two methyl groups that served as regio- and stereochemical markers for the reactions. Starting with the alkanes, the observed products include the corresponding alkenes, alcohols, ketones and enones, in support of the Seewald reaction scheme. Our experiments add a branch to this scheme

  9. Upgrading light hydrocarbons via tandem catalysis: a dual homogeneous Ta/Ir system for alkane/alkene coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, David C; Lam, Yan Choi; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2013-07-17

    Light alkanes and alkenes are abundant but are underutilized as energy carriers because of their high volatility and low energy density. A tandem catalytic approach for the coupling of alkanes and alkenes has been developed in order to upgrade these light hydrocarbons into heavier fuel molecules. This process involves alkane dehydrogenation by a pincer-ligated iridium complex and alkene dimerization by a Cp*TaCl2(alkene) catalyst. These two homogeneous catalysts operate with up to 60/30 cooperative turnovers (Ir/Ta) in the dimerization of 1-hexene/n-heptane, giving C13/C14 products in 40% yield. This dual system can also effect the catalytic dimerization of n-heptane (neohexene as the H2 acceptor) with cooperative turnover numbers of 22/3 (Ir/Ta).

  10. Effect of solid phase on the selectivity of alkyl radical formation by gamma-irradiation of branched alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Hashino, Masatoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    ESR and electron spin echo measurements of alkyl radicals generated by γ-irradiation of glassy and crystalline branched alkanes C 10 ∼ C 13 have been carried out to elucidate the effect of molecular structure and solid phase on the selectivity of alkyl radical formation. Alkyl radicals generated and stabilized at 77 K in the glassy alkanes are secondary penultimate radicals. Tertiary radicals and secondary radicals other than the penultimate one are not generated either by hydrogen abstraction or from ionized or excited molecules. In the crystalline alkanes, however, a small amount of secondary internal radicals are generated in addition to the predominant formation of the secondary penultimate radicals. It is concluded that the detachment of C-H hydrogen preferentially takes place at the location where the motion of carbon atoms assisting the detachment of the C-H hydrogen easily occurs. (author)

  11. Influence of N-alkanes on adhesion of an air bubble to the surface of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janczuk, B.; Wojcik, W.; Bialopiotrowicz, T. (Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland). Dept. of Physical Chemistry)

    1989-10-10

    Measurements of the detachment force of an air bubble from the surface of coals of the ranks: 31.1, 31.2, 32.1 and 32.2 were carried out. The coal surface was precovered with n-alkane film in the homologous series from n-hexane to n-hexadecane. The forces were compared with those calculated theoretically on the basis of the previously determined values of the surface free energy components and of the contact angles measured in a coal/n-alkane film-air bubble-water system. On the basis of the conducted measurements and calculations it was confirmed that the stability of the coal/n-alkane film-air bubble-water systems depends on the rank of the coal studied, the thickness and kind of the hydrocarbon film present on the coal surface, and on the water film pressure under the air bubble. The stability of n-alkane films on the surface of the coals studied is confirmed as smaller than the stability of these films on the surface of typical hydrophobic solids. By comparison of the measured and calculated stabilities of the coal/n-alkane film-air bubble-water system it appeared that the stabilities of such systems may be predicted on the basis of the contact angle of the coal/n-alkane film-air bubble-water system and of the dispersion and nondispersion components of the surface free energy of coal. 28 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes for bio-aviation fuel by metabolic engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Nie, Kaili; Cao, Hao; Xu, Haijun; Fang, Yunming; Tan, Tianwei; Baeyens, Jan; Liu, Luo

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the synthesis of medium-chain length alkanes (MCLA), as bio-aviation product. To control the chain length of alkanes and increase the production of MCLA, Escherichia coli cells were engineered by incorporating (i) a chain length specific thioesterase from Umbellularia californica (UC), (ii) a plant origin acyl carrier protein (ACP) gene and (iii) the whole fatty acid synthesis system (FASs) from Jatropha curcas (JC). The genetic combination was designed to control the product spectrum towards optimum MCLA. Decanoic, lauric and myristic acid were produced at concentrations of 0.011, 0.093 and 1.657mg/g, respectively. The concentration of final products nonane, undecane and tridecane were 0.00062mg/g, 0.0052mg/g, and 0.249mg/g respectively. Thioesterase from UC controlled the fatty acid chain length in a range of 10-14 carbons and the ACP gene with whole FASs from JC significantly increased the production of MCLA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Recommended Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Data. Part 2: Binary Alkanol-Alkane Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góral, Marian; Oracz, Paweł; Skrzecz, Adam; Bok, Andrzej; Ma̧czyński, Andrzej

    2003-12-01

    The recommended vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data for 36 binary systems involving primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols with n-alkanes and isoalkanes [with the exception of 1-alkanols-n-alkane systems, which were presented in Part 1 of this series—J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 31(3), 702 (2002)] have been obtained after critical evaluation of all data (744 data sets) reported in the open literature up to the middle of 2002. The evaluation procedure consisted in combining the thermodynamic consistency tests, data correlation, comparison with enthalpy of mixing data, and comparison of VLE data for various mixtures. The data were correlated with equations based on local compositions concept as well as with equation of state appended with chemical term (EoSC) proposed by Góral. The recommended data are presented in the form of sheets containing tables of data, figures and auxiliary information. Each sheet corresponds to one system and contains three isotherms (spaced by at least 15 K) and one isobar (preferably at 101.32 kPa). Experimental gaps were completed with the predicted data.

  14. Jet-stirred reactor oxidation of alkane-rich FACE gasoline fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Bingjie

    2016-06-23

    Understanding species evolution upon gasoline fuel oxidation can aid in mitigating harmful emissions and improving combustion efficiency. Experimentally measured speciation profiles are also important targets for surrogate fuel kinetic models. This work presents the low- and high-temperature oxidation of two alkane-rich FACE gasolines (A and C, Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) in a jet-stirred reactor at 10. bar and equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 2 by probe sampling combined with gas chromatography and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectrometry analysis. Detailed speciation profiles as a function of temperature are presented and compared to understand the combustion chemistry of these two real fuels. Simulations were conducted using three surrogates (i.e., FGA2, FGC2, and FRF 84), which have similar physical and chemical properties as the two gasolines. The experimental results reveal that the reactivity and major product distributions of these two alkane-rich FACE fuels are very similar, indicating that they have similar global reactivity despite their different compositions. The simulation results using all the surrogates capture the two-stage oxidation behavior of the two FACE gasolines, but the extent of low temperature reactivity is over-predicted. The simulations were analyzed, with a focus on the n-heptane and n-butane sub-mechanisms, to help direct the future model development and surrogate fuel formulation strategies.

  15. Ignition of alkane-rich FACE gasoline fuels and their surrogate mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum derived gasoline is the most used transportation fuel for light-duty vehicles. In order to better understand gasoline combustion, this study investigated the ignition propensity of two alkane-rich FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline test fuels and their corresponding PRF (primary reference fuel) blend in fundamental combustion experiments. Shock tube ignition delay times were measured in two separate facilities at pressures of 10, 20, and 40 bar, temperatures from 715 to 1500 K, and two equivalence ratios. Rapid compression machine ignition delay times were measured for fuel/air mixtures at pressures of 20 and 40 bar, temperatures from 632 to 745 K, and two equivalence ratios. Detailed hydrocarbon analysis was also performed on the FACE gasoline fuels, and the results were used to formulate multi-component gasoline surrogate mixtures. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling results are presented herein to provide insights into the relevance of utilizing PRF and multi-component surrogate mixtures to reproduce the ignition behavior of the alkane-rich FACE gasoline fuels. The two FACE gasoline fuels and their corresponding PRF mixture displayed similar ignition behavior at intermediate and high temperatures, but differences were observed at low temperatures. These trends were mimicked by corresponding surrogate mixture models, except for the amount of heat release in the first stage of a two-stage ignition events, when observed. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  16. The upper explosion limit of lower alkanes and alkenes in air at elevated pressures and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Schoor, F; Verplaetsen, F

    2006-01-16

    The upper explosion limit (UEL) of ethane-air, propane-air, n-butane-air, ethylene-air and propylene-air mixtures is determined experimentally at initial pressures up to 30 bar and temperatures up to 250 degrees C. The experiments are performed in a closed spherical vessel with an internal diameter of 200 mm. The mixtures are ignited by fusing a coiled tungsten wire, placed at the centre of the vessel, by electric current. Flame propagation is said to have taken place if there is a pressure rise of at least 1% of the initial pressure after ignition of the mixture. In the pressure-temperature range investigated, a linear dependence of UEL on temperature and a bilinear dependence on pressure are found except in the vicinity of the auto-ignition range. A comparison of the UEL data of the lower alkanes shows that the UEL expressed as equivalence ratio (the actual fuel/air ratio divided by the stoichiometric fuel/air ratio) increases with increasing carbon number in the homologous series of alkanes.

  17. Chemical characterization of organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol derived from the photooxidation of alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Matthieu; Da Silva Barbosa, Thais; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    We report the formation of aliphatic organosulfates (OSs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of C10-C12 alkanes. The results complement those from our laboratories reporting the formation of OSs and sulfonates from gas-phase oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both studies strongly support the formation of OSs from the gas-phase oxidation of anthropogenic precursors, as hypothesized on the basis of recent field studies in which aromatic and aliphatic OSs were detected in fine aerosol collected from several major urban locations. In this study, dodecane, cyclodecane and decalin, considered to be important SOA precursors in urban areas, were photochemically oxidized in an outdoor smog chamber in the presence of either non-acidified or acidified ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Effects of acidity and relative humidity on OS formation were examined. Aerosols collected from all experiments were characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Most of the OSs identified could be explained by formation of gaseous epoxide precursors with subsequent acid-catalyzed reactive uptake onto sulfate aerosol and/or heterogeneous reactions of hydroperoxides. The OSs identified here were also observed and quantified in fine urban aerosol samples collected in Lahore, Pakistan, and Pasadena, CA, USA. Several OSs identified from the photooxidation of decalin and cyclodecane are isobars of known monoterpene organosulfates, and thus care must be taken in the analysis of alkane-derived organosulfates in urban aerosol.

  18. Equivalent Alkane Carbon Number of Live Crude Oil: A Predictive Model Based on Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creton Benoit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We took advantage of recently published works and new experimental data to propose a model for the prediction of the Equivalent Alkane Carbon Number of live crude oil (EACNlo for EOR processes. The model necessitates the a priori knowledge of reservoir pressure and temperature conditions as well as the initial gas to oil ratio. Additionally, some required volumetric properties for hydrocarbons were predicted using an equation of state. The model has been validated both on our own experimental data and data from the literature. These various case studies cover broad ranges of conditions in terms of API gravity index, gas to oil ratio, reservoir pressure and temperature, and composition of representative gas. The predicted EACNlo values reasonably agree with experimental EACN values, i.e. determined by comparison with salinity scans for a series of n-alkanes from nC8 to nC18. The model has been used to generate high pressure high temperature data, showing competing effects of the gas to oil ratio, pressure and temperature. The proposed model allows to strongly narrow down the spectrum of possibilities in terms of EACNlo values, and thus a more rational use of equipments.

  19. Optimizing catalysis conditions to decrease aromatic hydrocarbons and increase alkanes for improving jet biofuel quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Tao; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2014-04-01

    To produce quality jet biofuel with high amount of alkanes and low amount of aromatic hydrocarbons, two zeolites of HY and HZSM-5 supporting Ni and Mo were used as catalysts to convert soybean oil into jet fuel. Zeolite HY exhibited higher jet range alkane selectivity (40.3%) and lower jet range aromatic hydrocarbon selectivity (23.8%) than zeolite HZSM-5 (13.8% and 58.9%). When reaction temperature increased from 330 to 390°C, yield of jet fuel over Ni-Mo/HY catalyst at 4 MPa hydrogen pressure increased from 0% to 49.1% due to the shift of reaction pathway from oligomerization to cracking reaction. Further increase of reaction temperature from 390 to 410°C resulted in increased yield of jet range aromatic hydrocarbons from 18.7% to 30%, which decreased jet fuel quality. A high yield of jet fuel (48.2%) was obtained at 1 MPa low hydrogen pressure over Ni (8 wt.%)-Mo (12 wt.%)/HY catalyst. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monisha Rastogi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  1. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Monisha [School of Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175 001 (India); Vaish, Rahul, E-mail: rahul@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175 001 (India); Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  2. Possible room temperature superconductivity in conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kawashima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistances of conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface have been investigated at room temperatures. Ring current in a ring-shaped container into which n-octane-soaked thin graphite flakes were compressed did not decay for 50 days at room temperature. After two HOPG plates were immersed into n-heptane and n-octane at room temperature, changes in resistances of the two samples were measured by four terminal technique. The measurement showed that the resistances of these samples decrease to less than the smallest resistance that can be measured with a high resolution digital voltmeter (0.1μV. The observation of persistent currents in the ring-shaped container suggests that the HOPG plates immersed in n-heptane and n-octane really entered zero-resistance state at room temperature. These results suggest that room temperature superconductor may be obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface.

  3. Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Liquid Thermal Conductivity for alkanes, ketones and silanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, G.; Di Nicola, G.; Pierantozzi, M.; Coccia, G.; Tomassetti, S.

    2017-11-01

    The values of thermal conductivity λ at different temperatures for organic and inorganic compounds in the liquid phase is essential in the study of numerous processes, but experimental data are frequently not available with acceptable reliability or not available at all, since rigorous theoretical or semi-theoretical models of the liquid state are usually of poor practical use for engineering purposes. The Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach is a very powerful tool and it can be a good indicator of the lowest limit achievable with a selected database and with a selected set of inputs. This study investigates the applicability of the ANN as an efficient tool for the prediction of pure organic compounds’ thermal conductivity of three important families such as alkanes, ketones and silanes, for a wide range of temperatures. The families of n-alkanes, ketones and silanes were chosen to verify the general reliability of the proposed method when used in large temperature ranges for very different organic families, above all the silanes (compounds containing silicon), whose liquid thermal conductivity is experimentally investigated in very few cases. This method appears to be successful: in all reduced temperature range, along or near the saturation line, the average absolute deviations between calculated and experimental thermal conductivity data are 0.19% and the maximum absolute ones 2.44%

  4. Tetradentate Schiff base ligands and their complexes: Synthesis, structural characterization, thermal, electrochemical and alkane oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Gökhan; Köse, Muhammet; McKee, Vickie; Uruş, Serhan; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Tümer, Mehmet

    Three Schiff base ligands (H2L1-H2L3) with N2O2 donor sites were synthesized by condensation of 1,5-diaminonapthalene with benzaldehyde derivatives. A series of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Mn(II) and Cr(III) complexes were prepared and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. Thermal, electrochemical and alkane oxidation reactions of the ligands and their metal complexes were investigated. Extensive application of 1D (1H, 13C NMR) and 2D (COSY, HETCOR, HMBC and TOSCY) NMR techniques were used to characterize the structures of the ligands and establish the 1H and 13C resonance assignments of the three ligands. Ligands H2L1 and H2L3 were obtained as single crystals from THF solution and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Both molecules are centrosymmetric and asymmetric unit contains one half of the molecule. Catalytic alkane oxidation reactions with the transition metal complexes investigated using cyclohexane and cyclooctane as substrates. The Cu(II) and Cr(III) complexes showed good catalytic activity in the oxidation of cyclohexane and cyclooctane to desired oxidized products. Electrochemical and thermal properties of the compounds were also investigated.

  5. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes -- research and proof-of-concept stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.; Hancock, A.W. II

    1993-12-31

    Objective is to find new catalysts for direct reaction of methane, ethane, propane, butanes with O{sub 2} to form alcohols, and to develop practical processes for direct oxidative conversion of natural gas and its C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} components to produce alcohol-rich liquid oxygenates for use as alternative transportation fuels/environmentally superior reformulated gasolines. The proposed mechanism for oxidation activity of cytochrome P-450 and methane monoxygenase suggested that a catalyst able to reductively bind oxygen, not between Fe(III) center and a proton, but between two Fe(III) centers, might give the desired dioxygenase activity for alkane hydroxylation. Selective oxidation of light alkanes could be done by oxidation-active metal (Fe) centers in electron-deficient prophyrin-like macrocycles, polyoxoanions, and zeolites. In the isobutane conversion to tert-butanol proof-of-concept, it was found that nitro groups on the periphery of Fe porphyrin complexes give the greatest increase in Fe(III)/(II) reduction potential. 8 figs, 6 tabs, 40 refs.

  6. Prediction of the Flash Point of Binary and Ternary Straight-Chain Alkane Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flash point is an important physical property used to estimate the fire hazard of a flammable liquid. To avoid the occurrence of fire or explosion, many models are used to predict the flash point; however, these models are complex, and the calculation process is cumbersome. For pure flammable substances, the research for predicting the flash point is systematic and comprehensive. For multicomponent mixtures, especially a hydrocarbon mixture, the current research is insufficient to predict the flash point. In this study, a model was developed to predict the flash point of straight-chain alkane mixtures using a simple calculation process. The pressure, activity coefficient, and other associated physicochemical parameters are not required for the calculation in the proposed model. A series of flash points of binary and ternary mixtures of straight-chain alkanes were determined. The results of the model present consistent experimental results with an average absolute deviation for the binary mixtures of 0.7% or lower and an average absolute deviation for the ternary mixtures of 1.03% or lower.

  7. Light alkane (mixed feed selective dehydrogenation using bi-metallic zeolite supported catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Nawaz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Light alkanes are the important intermediates of many refinery processes and their catalytic dehydrogenation gives corresponding alkenes. The aim behind this experimentation is to investigate reaction behavior of mixed alkanes during direct catalytic dehydrogenation and emphasis has been given to enhance propene. Bi-metallic zeolite supported catalyst Pt-Sn/ZSM-5 was prepared by sequentional impregnation method and characterized by BET, EDS and XRD. Direct dehydrogenation reaction is highly endothermic and its conversion is thermodynamically limited. Results showed that the increase in temperature increases the conversion to some extent but there is no overall effect on selectivity of propene. Increase in time-on-stream (TOS remarkably improves propene selectivity at the expense of lower conversion. The performances of bi-metallic zeolite based catalyst largely affected by coke deposition. The presence of butane and ethane adversely affected propane conversion. Optimum propene selectivity is about 48 %, obtained at 600 oC and time-on-stream 10 h.

  8. Growth factor controls on the distribution and carbon isotope composition of n-alkanes in leaf wax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C.; Xie, S.; Huang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Cuticular wax plays pivotal physiological and ecological roles in the interactions between plants and the environments in which they grow. Plant-derived long-chain alkanes are more resistant to decay than other biochemical polymers. n-Alkane distributions (Carbon Preference Index (CPI) values and Average Chain Length (ACL) values) and carbon isotopic values are used widely in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. However, there is little information available on how growth stages of the plant might influence the abundance of n-alkanes in the natural environment. In this study, we analyzed n-alkane distributions and carbon isotope data from two tree species (Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl. and Liquidambar formosana Hance) collected monthly from 2009 to 2011 in Nanwang Shan, Wuhan, Hubei Province. CPI values for n-alkanes from C. camphora remained stable in autumn and winter but fluctuated dramatically during spring and autumn each year. Positive correlations between CPI values and the relative content of (C27+C29) were observed in both sun and shade leaves of C. camphora from April to July. In L. formosana, CPI values decreased gradually from April to December. A similar trend was observed in all three years suggesting that growth stages rather than temperature or relative humidity affected the CPI values on a seasonal timescale. In the samples of L. formosana ACL values were negatively correlated with CPI values in the growing season (from April to July) and positively correlated with CPI values in the other seasons. The δ13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes displayed more negative carbon isotopic values in autumn and winter compared with leaves sampled at the start of the growing season from both trees. The δ13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes of L. formosana decreased from April to December. These results demonstrate the importance of elucidating the growing factors that influence the distribution and δ13C values of alkanes in modern leaves prior to using CPI

  9. Olefin metathesis over silica-supported molybdena catalysts activated by UV-irradiation in the presence of alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotina, I.R.; Shelimov, B.N.; Kazanskij, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    It is established that molybdenum-silica catalysts (MoO 3 /SiO 2 ) applied after their irradiation by UV-light in the alkanes atmosphere acquire high activity in the reaction of propylen and hexene metathesis at the temperature of 293 K. The efficiency of photoactivated catalysts during these reactions is determined. It is shown that by UV-irradiation of MoO 3 /SiO 2 in presence of alkanes there take place the Mo 6+ ions conversion to Mo 5+ and Mo 4+ , formation the of Mo 4+ solid π-complexes with olefins and, probably, the surface carbene complexes Mo=CH-R

  10. The effect of initial diameter on rainbow positions and temperature distributions of burning single-component n-Alkane droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Rosebrock, Christopher D.; Wriedt, Thomas; Mädler, Lutz

    2017-07-01

    The effect of initial diameter on rainbow positions of burning single-component n-Alkane droplets has been investigated experimentally for the first time. The droplet diameters are determined with interferometric laser imaging for droplet sizing, and the temperature distributions inside burning droplets are assessed by rainbow refractometry together with a droplet combustion model developed in our previous work. Temperature gradients inside burning droplets influence rainbow positions, which first make the experimental scattering angles of the rainbow maxima increase and then decrease. The variations of initial diameter lead to variations of both experimental rainbow maxima and simulated temperature of n-Alkane burning droplets.

  11. RNAi silencing of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase disrupts the ability of a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. to grow on short-chain gaseous alkanes and ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400), a filamentous fungus, is one of the few eukaryotes that grows on short-chain alkanes and ethers. In this study, we investigated the genetic underpinnings that enable this fungus to catalyze the first step in the alkane and ether oxidation pathway. A gene, CYP52L1, was iden...

  12. Biooxidation of n-octane by a recombinant Escherichia coli in a two-liquid-phase system: Effect of medium components on cell growth and alkane oxidation activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FAVREBULLE, O; Witholt, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    When Escherichia coli hosts are transformed with the alk genes, which encode the alkane oxidation pathway of Pseudomonas oleovorans, the recombinants are capable of converting alkanes to alkanoic acids during growth in two-liquid-phase (aqueous-organic) media. In such media, the cells grow on

  13. Sensitive detection of n-alkanes using a mixed ionization mode proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amador-Muñoz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS is a technique that is widely used to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs with proton affinities higher than water. However, n-alkanes generally have a lower proton affinity than water and therefore proton transfer (PT by reaction with H3O+ is not an effective mechanism for their detection. In this study, we developed a method using a conventional PTR-MS to detect n-alkanes by optimizing ion source and drift tube conditions to vary the relative amounts of different primary ions (H3O+, O2+, NO+ in the reaction chamber (drift tube. There are very few studies on O2+ detection of alkanes and the mixed mode has never been proposed before. We determined the optimum conditions and the resulting reaction mechanisms, allowing detection of n-alkanes from n-pentane to n-tridecane. These compounds are mostly emitted by evaporative/combustion process from fossil fuel use. The charge transfer (CT mechanism observed with O2+ was the main reaction channel for n-heptane and longer n-alkanes, while for n-pentane and n-hexane the main reaction channel was hydride abstraction (HA. Maximum sensitivities were obtained at low E ∕ N ratios (83 Td, low water flow (2 sccm and high O2+ ∕ NO+ ratios (Uso =  180 V. Isotopic 13C contribution was taken into account by subtracting fractions of the preceding 12C ion signal based on the number of carbon atoms and the natural abundance of 13C (i.e., 5.6 % for n-pentane and 14.5 % for n-tridecane. After accounting for isotopic distributions, we found that PT cannot be observed for n-alkanes smaller than n-decane. Instead, protonated water clusters of n-alkanes (M  ⋅  H3O+ species were observed with higher abundance using lower O2+ and higher water cluster fractions. M  ⋅  H3O+ species are probably the source for the M + H+ species observed from n-decane to n-tridecane. Normalized sensitivities to O2+ or to the sum of O2++

  14. Shock tube measurements of the rate constants for seven large alkanes+OH

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2015-01-01

    Reaction rate constants for seven large alkanes + hydroxyl (OH) radicals were measured behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The alkanes, n-hexane, 2-methyl-pentane, 3-methyl-pentane, 2,2-dimethyl-butane, 2,3-dimethyl-butane, 2-methyl-heptane, and 4-methyl-heptane, were selected to investigate the rates of site-specific H-abstraction by OH at secondary and tertiary carbons. Hydroxyl radicals were monitored using narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the R1(5) transition of the OH spectrum near 306.7 nm. The high sensitivity of the diagnostic enabled the use of low reactant concentrations and pseudo-first-order kinetics. Rate constants were measured at temperatures ranging from 880 K to 1440 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. High-temperature measurements of the rate constants for OH + n-hexane and OH + 2,2-dimethyl-butane are in agreement with earlier studies, and the rate constants of the five other alkanes with OH, we believe, are the first direct measurements at combustion temperatures. Using these measurements and the site-specific H-abstraction measurements of Sivaramakrishnan and Michael (2009) [1,2], general expressions for three secondary and two tertiary abstraction rates were determined as follows (the subscripts indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon): S20=1.58×10-11exp(-1550K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(887-1327K)S30=2.37×10-11exp(-1850K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(887-1327K)S21=4.5×10-12exp(-793.7K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(833-1440K)T100=2.85×10-11exp(-1138.3K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(878-1375K)T101=7.16×10-12exp(-993K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(883-1362K) © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  15. Reconstructing tropical cyclone frequency using hydrogen isotope ratios of sedimentary n-alkanes in northern Queensland, Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soelen, E.E. van; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2013-01-01

    A peat record from Quincan Crater (Queensland, Australia), spanning the past 200 years, was used to test if hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax long-chain n-alkanes derived of higher plants can be used to reconstruct past tropical cyclone activity. Queensland is frequently impacted by tropical

  16. Isolation and characterization of alkane degrading bacteria from petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran (Kerman and Tehran provenances).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Ahmadinejad, Mohammad; Tebyanian, Hamid; Kariminik, Ashraf

    2013-08-15

    Petroleum products spill and leakage have become two major environmental challenges in Iran. Sampling was performed in the petroleum reservoir waste water of Tehran and Kerman Provinces of Iran. Alkane degrading bacteria were isolated by enrichment in a Bushnel-Hass medium, with hexadecane as sole source of carbon and energy. The isolated strains were identified by amplification of 16S rDNA gene and sequencing. Specific primers were used for identification of alkane hydroxylase gene. Fifteen alkane degrading bacteria were isolated and 8 strains were selected as powerful degradative bacteria. These 8 strains relate to Rhodococcus jostii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter piechaudii, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa genera. The optimum concentration of hexadecane that allowed high growth was 2.5%. Gas chromatography results show that all strains can degrade approximately half of hexadecane in one week of incubation. All of the strains have alkane hydroxylase gene which are important for biodegradation. As a result, this study indicates that there is a high diversity of degradative bacteria in petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a λgt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  18. High-resolution ellipsometric study of an n-alkane film, dotriacontane, adsorbed on a SiO2 surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkmann, U.G.; Pino, M.; Altamirano, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    to the interface. At still higher coverages and at temperatures below the bulk melting point at T-b=341 K, solid bulk particles coexist on top of the "perpendicular film." For higher temperatures in the range T-bT-s, a uniformly thick fluid film wets to the parallel film phase. This structure of the alkane/SiO2...

  19. A nonequilibrium simulation method for calculating tracer diffusion coefficients of small solutes in n-alkane liquids and polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Briels, Willem J.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    The tracer diffusion coefficients of methane in n-alkane liquids of increasing chain length were calculated by measuring the friction from short time nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The frictional constant was calculated from the exponentially decaying distance between two methane

  20. Carbon isotope analysis of n-alkanes in dust from the lower atmosphere over the eastern Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schefuß, E.; Ratmeyer, V.; Stuut, J-B.W.; Jansen, J.H.F.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric dust samples collected along a transect off the West African coast have been investigated for their lipid content and compound-specific stable carbon isotope compositions. The saturated hydrocarbon fractions of the organic solvent extracts consist mainly of long-chain n-alkanes derived

  1. Spectroscopic Analyses on Reaction Intermediates Formed during Chlorination of Alkanes with NaOCl Catalyzed by a Nickel Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Codolà, Zoel; Gómez, Laura; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Browne, Wesley R; Costas, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    The spectroscopic, electrochemical, and crystallographic characterization of [((Me,H)PyTACN)Ni(II)(CH3CN)2](OTf)2 (1) ((Me,H)PyTACN = 1-(2-pyridylmethyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, OTf = CF3SO3) is described together with its reactivity with NaOCl. 1 catalyzes the chlorination of alkanes

  2. A new and selective cycle for dehydrogenation of linear and cyclic alkanes under mild conditions using a base metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowey, Douglas P.; Mane, Manoj V.; Kurogi, Takashi; Carroll, Patrick J.; Manor, Brian C.; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2017-11-01

    Selectively converting linear alkanes to α-olefins under mild conditions is a highly desirable transformation given the abundance of alkanes as well as the use of olefins as building blocks in the chemical community. Until now, this reaction has been primarily the remit of noble-metal catalysts, despite extensive work showing that base-metal alkylidenes can mediate the reaction in a stoichiometric fashion. Here, we show how the presence of a hydrogen acceptor, such as the phosphorus ylide, when combined with the alkylidene complex (PNP)Ti=CHtBu(CH3) (PNP=N[2-P(CHMe2)2-4-methylphenyl]2-), catalyses the dehydrogenation of cycloalkanes to cyclic alkenes, and linear alkanes with chain lengths of C4 to C8 to terminal olefins under mild conditions. This Article represents the first example of a homogeneous and selective alkane dehydrogenation reaction using a base-metal titanium catalyst. We also propose a unique mechanism for the transfer dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons to olefins and discuss a complete cycle based on a combined experimental and computational study.

  3. Oil contamination in surface sediment of Anzali Wetland in Iran is primarily even carbon number n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi-Yancheshmeh, Rokhsareh; Riyahi-Bakhtiari, Alireza; Savabieasfahani, Mozhgan

    2017-10-29

    To determine the extent of oil contamination and biodegradation in Anzali Wetland of Iran, we examined aliphatic hydrocarbons in surface sediment of this area (n=20). Petroleum hydrocarbon levels (mean 1585 ± 1117; range 316 to 4358 μg g- 1 dry weight) were similar in value to reports from other highly contaminated areas, such as New York Bight, Saudi and Kuwaiti coasts of the Persian Gulf, and Dubai shorelines. Even carbon homologs dominated distribution of n-alkanes in surface sediment of Anzali, which is rarely reported elsewhere. Multiple factors used in our study point to petrogenic source for n-alkanes in Anzali Wetland. Anzali receives multiple industrial and agricultural runoffs from the surrounding area. Shipping industry and oil industry are responsible for a major portion of pollutants entering Anzali. Municipal wastewater discharges are another source of Anzali pollution. To determine why even carbon number n-alkanes predominate in Anzali, we examined the following indices: existence of unresolved complex mixtures (UCM), ratio of UCM to resolved alkanes (RA), ratio of low-molecular weight to high-molecular weight molecules, presence of degraded oil residue, high-relative biodegradation, and the degree of hydrocarbon weathering in the surface sediment of the area. Our findings corroborate with such predominance.

  4. Predictive Local Composition Models for Solid/Liquid Equilibrium in n-Alkane Systems: Wilson Equation for Multicomponent Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    The predictive local composition model is applied to multicomponent hydrocarbon systems with long-chain n-alkanes as solutes. The results show that it can successfully be extended to highorder systems and accurately predict the solid appearance temperature, also known as cloud point, in solutions...

  5. Thermodynamic study of alkane-α,ω-diamines - evidence of odd-even pattern of sublimation properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulem, Michal; Růžička, K.; Červinka, C.; Bazyleva, A.; Della Gatta, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 371, Jun (2014), s. 93-105 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : alkane-diamines * odd–even effect * vapor pressure * sublimation and vaporization thermodynamic properties * statistical thermodynamics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2014

  6. Viscosity and Liquid Density of Asymmetric n-Alkane Mixtures: Measurement and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queimada, António J.; Marrucho, Isabel M.; Coutinho, João A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity and liquid density Measurements were performed, at atmospheric pressure. in pure and mixed n-decane. n-eicosane, n-docosane, and n-tetracosane from 293.15 K (or above the melting point) up to 343.15 K. The viscosity was determined with a rolling ball viscometer and liquid densities...... with a vibrating U-tube densimeter. Pure component results agreed, oil average, with literature values within 0.2% for liquid density and 3% for viscosity. The measured data were used to evaluate the performance of two models for their predictions: the friction theory coupled with the Peng-Robinson equation...... of state and a corresponding states model recently proposed for surface tension, viscosity, vapor pressure, and liquid densities of the series of n-alkanes. Advantages and shortcoming of these models are discussed....

  7. Recommended Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Data. Part 1: Binary n-Alkanol-n-Alkane Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góral, Marian; Oracz, Paweł; Skrzecz, Adam; Bok, Andrzej; Ma̧czyński, Andrzej

    2002-09-01

    The recommended vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data for 39 binary n-alcohol-n-alkane systems have been obtained after critical evaluation of all data (490 data sets) reported in the open literature up to the middle of 2001. The evaluation procedure consisted in combining the thermodynamic consistency tests, data correlation, comparison with enthalpy of mixing data, and comparison of VLE data for various mixtures. The data were correlated with equations based on the local compositions concept as well as with the equation of state appended with a chemical term (EoSC) proposed by Góral. The recommended data are presented in the form of individual pages containing tables of data, figures, and auxiliary information. Each page corresponds to one system and contains three isotherms (spaced by at least 15 K) and one isobar (preferably at 101.32 kPa). Experimental gaps were completed with the predicted data.

  8. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

  9. Effect of Thermal Maturation on n-alkanes and Kerogen in Preserved Organic Matter: Implications for Paleoenvironment Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, O. D.; Longbottom, T. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Blackaby, E.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the effects of maturity on biomarkers is vital in assessing biomarker reliability in mature sediments. It is well known for n-alkanes that increased maturity shortens chain lengths and decreases the odd over even preference however, the amount of change in these variables has not been determined for different maturities and types of preserved organic matter. For this reason, it is difficult to judge the trustworthiness of even lightly matured samples for paleoenvironment reconstruction. Another complication is the difficulty of accurately determining maturity as many maturity indicators are error-prone or not appropriate at low maturities. Using hydrous pyrolysis, we artificially matured black shale samples with type I (lacustrine) and type II (marine) kerogen to measure changes in n-alkane length and odd over even preference. Whole rock samples underwent hydrous pyrolysis for 72 hours, at 250 °C, 300 °C, 325 °C, 350 °C, and 375 °C to cover a wide maturity range. From the immature and artificially matured samples, the bitumen was extracted and the saturate fraction was separated using column chromatography. The saturate fraction was analyzed for n-alkanes using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Kerogen structural changes were also measured using solid-state 13C NMR to relate changes in n-alkane biomarkers to changes in kerogen structure. Results show that for type I bitumen the n-alkanes did not change at low maturities considered premature in terms of oil generation (FaC) decreases greatly from immature to low maturities, leveling off between 300 °C and 325 °C, allowing FaC to be a tool for determining low maturities.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Oxygen Effect on NMR D-[Formula: see text] Relaxation-Diffusion Correlation of n-Alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhov, Igor; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion-relaxation correlation experiments ( D -[Formula: see text]) are widely used for the petrophysical characterisation of rocks saturated with petroleum fluids both in situ and for laboratory analyses. The encoding for both diffusion and relaxation offers increased fluid typing contrast by discriminating fluids based on their self-diffusion coefficients, while relaxation times provide information about the interaction of solid and fluid phases and associated confinement geometry (if NMR responses of pure fluids at particular temperature and pressure are known). Petrophysical interpretation of D -[Formula: see text] correlation maps is typically assisted by the "standard alkane line"-a relaxation-diffusion correlation valid for pure normal alkanes and their mixtures in the absence of restrictions to diffusing molecules and effects of internal gradients. This correlation assumes fluids are free from paramagnetic impurities. In situations where fluid samples cannot be maintained at air-free state the diffusion-relaxation response of fluids shift towards shorter relaxation times due to oxygen paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. Interpretation of such a response using the "standard alkane line" would be erroneous and is further complicated by the temperature-dependence of oxygen solubility for each component of the alkane mixture. We propose a diffusion-relaxation correlation suitable for interpretation of low-field NMR D -[Formula: see text] responses of normal alkanes and their mixtures saturating rocks over a broad temperature range, in equilibrium with atmospheric air. We review and where necessary revise existing viscosity-relaxation correlations. Findings are applied to diffusion-relaxation dependencies taking into account the temperature dependence of oxygen solubility and solvent vapour pressure. The effect is demonstrated on a partially saturated carbonate rock.

  11. [Eco-environmental evolution inferred from n-alkanes and delta13C records in the sediments of Shijiu Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jie; Wang, Yan-Hua; Yang, Hao; Hu, Jian-Fang; Chen, Xia; Zou, Jun; Xie, Yun

    2013-02-01

    The study of global changes has focused on the reconstruction of paleovegetation and paleoclimate by n-alkanes and delta13C. 210Pb contents were measured for dating. The distribution characteristics of n-alkanes and delta13C were used to indicate the source of the organic matter in the sediments of Shijiu Lake. The relationship between modern eco-environmental evolution and human behaviors was discussed in this paper. The combination characteristics of n-alkanes showed a significant odd-even predominance in high-carbon number and main peak at C29, suggesting that the organic matter in the sediments were mainly derived from macrophytes and terrestrial higher plants. The delta13C contents of C27, C29 and C31 n-alkanes were analyzed. Results indicated that C3 plants are the dominant species. The distribution characteristics of n-alkanes and delta13C in different periods revealed the impact of human behaviors on Shijiu Lake. From 1862 to 1970, the low relative content of TOC, TN, C17-C25 and the light delta13C25-31 values showed that there were less human behaviors effects on Shijiu Lake and the eco-environment around the lake was stable. From 1970 to 1983, the relative content of TOC, TN and C17-C25 increased significantly, the delta13C25-31 values became weight. In this period, large areas of Shijiu Lake turned into farmland; pollution by fertilizers and pesticides was serious; large amounts of industrial and domestic wastewater were discharged into the lake. All these human behaviors resulted in the degradation of terrestrial higher plants around the lake. Meanwhile, the eutrophication levels were significantly increased. From 1983 to 2010, the relative contents of TOC, TN and C17-C25 were still in high-value ranges, the problem of eutrophication was not effectively controlled and the eco-environment of Shijiu Lake was relatively degradated.

  12. Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens sp. nov., a chlorinated-alkane-dehalogenating bacterium isolated from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kimberly S; Nobre, M Fernanda; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2013-04-01

    Two strictly anaerobic bacterial strains, designated IP3-3(T) and SBP-1, were isolated from groundwater contaminated by chlorinated alkanes and alkenes at a Superfund Site located near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA). Both strains reductively dehalogenate a variety of polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes, including 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane and 1,2,3-trichloropropane, when provided with hydrogen as the electron donor. To clarify their taxonomic position, strains IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Both IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 are mesophilic, non-spore-forming, non-motile and Gram-stain-negative. Cells of both strains are irregular cocci with diameters of 0.4-1.1 µm. Both are resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin. The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 are 55.5±0.4 and 56.2±0.2 mol% (HPLC), respectively. Major cellular fatty acids include C18 : 1ω9c, C16 : 0, C14 : 0 and C16 : 1ω9c. 16S rRNA gene sequence based phylogenetic analyses indicated that the strains cluster within the phylum Chloroflexi most closely related to but distinct from the species Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens (96.2 % pairwise similarity) and Dehalococcoides mccartyi (90.6 % pairwise similarity). Physiological and chemotaxonomic traits as well as phylogenetic analysis support the conclusion that these strains represent a novel species within the genus Dehalogenimonas for which the name Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IP3-3(T) ( = JCM 17062(T) = NRRL B-59545(T)).

  13. Subnanometer-sized Pt/Sn alloy cluster catalysts for the dehydrogenation of linear alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Andreas W; Gomes, Joseph; Bajdich, Michal; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T

    2013-12-21

    The reaction pathways for the dehydrogenation of ethane, propane, and butane, over Pt are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT). Pt nanoparticles are represented by a tetrahedral Pt4 cluster. The objectives of this work were to establish which step is rate limiting and which one controls the selectivity for forming alkenes as opposed to causing further dehydrogenation of adsorbed alkenes to produce precursors responsible for catalyst deactivation due to coking. Further objectives of this work are to identify the role of adsorbed hydrogen, derived from H2 fed together with the alkane, on the reaction pathway, and the role of replacing one of the four Pt atoms by a Sn atom. A comparison of Gibbs free energies shows that in all cases the rate-determining step is cleavage of a C-H bond upon alkane adsorption. The selectivity to alkene formation versus precursors to coking is dictated by the relative magnitudes of the activation energies for alkene desorption and dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. The presence of an adsorbed H atom on the cluster facilitates alkene desorption relative to dehydrogenation of the adsorbed alkene. Substitution of a Sn atom in the cluster to produce a Pt3Sn cluster leads to a downward shift of the potential energy surface for the reaction and causes an increase of the activity of the catalyst as suggested by recent experiments due to the lower net activation barrier for the rate limiting step. However, the introduction of Sn does not alter the relative activation barriers for gas-phase alkene formation versus loss of hydrogen from the adsorbed alkene, the process leading to the formation of coke precursors.

  14. Quantifying alkane emissions in the Eagle Ford Shale using boundary layer enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Geoffrey; Schade, Gunnar

    2017-09-01

    The Eagle Ford Shale in southern Texas is home to a booming unconventional oil and gas industry, the climate and air quality impacts of which remain poorly quantified due to uncertain emission estimates. We used the atmospheric enhancement of alkanes from Texas Commission on Environmental Quality volatile organic compound monitors across the shale, in combination with back trajectory and dispersion modeling, to quantify C2-C4 alkane emissions for a region in southern Texas, including the core of the Eagle Ford, for a set of 68 days from July 2013 to December 2015. Emissions were partitioned into raw natural gas and liquid storage tank sources using gas and headspace composition data, respectively, and observed enhancement ratios. We also estimate methane emissions based on typical ethane-to-methane ratios in gaseous emissions. The median emission rate from raw natural gas sources in the shale, calculated as a percentage of the total produced natural gas in the upwind region, was 0.7 % with an interquartile range (IQR) of 0.5-1.3 %, below the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) current estimates. However, storage tanks contributed 17 % of methane emissions, 55 % of ethane, 82 % percent of propane, 90 % of n-butane, and 83 % of isobutane emissions. The inclusion of liquid storage tank emissions results in a median emission rate of 1.0 % (IQR of 0.7-1.6 %) relative to produced natural gas, overlapping the current EPA estimate of roughly 1.6 %. We conclude that emissions from liquid storage tanks are likely a major source for the observed non-methane hydrocarbon enhancements in the Northern Hemisphere.

  15. Nutrient-enhanced n-alkanes biodegradation and succession of bacterial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanyu; Wang, Hui; Li, Junde; Wang, Bin; Qi, Cancan; Hu, Xiaoke

    2017-11-01

    Bioremediation, is an effective and environment-friendly method of cleaning up crude oil pollution after an oil spill. However, the in situ bioremediation of crude oil is usually inhibited by deficiency of inorganic nutrients. To understand the effects of nutrient addition on the bioremediation of crude oil and the succession of bacterial communities during process of bioremediation, microcosms containing oil-contaminated sediments were constructed and biodegradation of crude oil was assessed based on the depletion of different ingredients. We used two culture-independent methods, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and a 16S rRNA gene based clone library, to analyze the succession of bacterial communities. The results suggested n-alkanes were degraded after 30 days and that nutrient amendments significantly improved the efficiency of their biodegradation. Moreover, oil contamination and nutrient amendments could dramatically change bacterial community structures. Lower diversity was detected after being contaminated with oil. For instance, bacterial clones affiliated with the phylum Armatimonadetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Planctomycetes and the class Deltaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria could not be identified after 30 days of incubation with crude oil. However, "professional hydrocarbonocastic bacteria" became abundant in samples treated with oil during the bioremediation period, while these clones were almost completely absent from the control plots. Interestingly, bioinformatics analysis showed that even when dramatic differences in oil biodegradation efficiency were observed, bacterial communities in the plots with nutrient amendments were not significantly different from those in plots treated with oil alone. These findings indicated that nutrient amendments could stimulate the process of biodegradation but had less impact on bacterial communities. Overall, nutrient amendments might be able to stimulate the growth of n-alkane degrading

  16. Quantum chemical and conventional TST calculations of rate constants for the OH + alkane reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo-Perez, Graciela; Alvarez-Idaboy, J. Raul; Jimenez, Annia Galano; Cruz-Torres, Armando

    2005-01-01

    Reactions of OH with methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, and n-butane have been modeled using ab initio (MP2) and hybrid DFT (BHandHLYP) methods, and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Furthermore, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level were carried out at the optimized geometries. The rate constants have been calculated using the conventional transition-state theory (CTST). Arrhenius equations are proposed in the temperature range of 250-650 K. Hindered Internal Rotation partition functions calculations were explicitly carried out and included in the total partition functions. These corrections showed to be relevant in the determination of the pre-exponential parameters, although not so important as in the NO 3 + alkane reactions [G. Bravo-Perez, J.R. Alvarez-Idaboy, A. Cruz-Torres, M.E. Ruiz, J. Phys. Chem. A 106 (2002) 4645]. The explicit participation of the tunnel effect has been taken into account. The calculated rate coefficients provide a very good agreement with the experimental data. The best agreement for the overall alkane + OH reactions seemed to occur when the BHandHLYP geometries and partition functions are used. For propane and i-butane, in addition to the respective secondary and tertiary H-abstraction channels, the primary one has been considered. These pathways are confirmed to be significant in spite of the large differences in activation energies between primary and secondary or primary and tertiary channels, respectively of propane and i-butane reactions and should not be disregarded

  17. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-02-08

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

  18. Perspective: what is known, and not known, about the connections between alkane oxidation and metal uptake in alkanotrophs in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rachel Narehood; Kenney, Grace E; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2014-06-01

    Should iron and copper be added to the environment to stimulate the natural bioremediation of marine oil spills? The key enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alkanes require either iron or copper, and the concentration of these ions in seawater is vanishingly low. Nevertheless, the dependence of alkane oxidation activity on external metal concentrations remains unclear. This perspective will summarize what is known about the co-regulation of alkane oxidation and metal acquisition and pose a series of critical questions to which, for the most part, we do not yet have answers. The paucity of answers points to the need for additional studies to illuminate the cellular biology connecting microbial growth on alkanes to the acquisition of metal ions.

  19. Even-odd alternation of the formation of dimer isomers in irradiated polycrystalline alkanes: evidence from product analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudson, T.; Tilquin, B.

    1984-01-01

    Recent ESR studies on n-alkanes from n-C 11 to n-C 25 have shown that a prominent chain end (-CH 2 -CH 2 ) alkyl radical is formed in odd members of the series. In this preliminary discussion of our study, we shall report the capillary chromatogram in the dimer isomers range for n-alkanes ranging from n-C 11 to n-C 17 irradiated at 80 kGy. Dimer isomers, produced in part by the combination of chain end radicals, are eluted at the end chromatogram. The combination of two chain end radicals gives the dimer (D 11 ) isomer eluted at the last place. It is shown that dimers produced by the combination of chain end alkyl radicals are more important for the odd members of the series than for the even members. (author)

  20. Re-assessing the role of plant community change and climate in the PETM n-alkane record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, R. T.; Baczynski, A. A.; McInerney, F. A.; Chen, D.

    2012-12-01

    The terrestrial leaf wax n-alkane record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, shows large excursions in both carbon isotope (δ13C) values and n-alkane average chain length (ACL). At the onset of the PETM, ACL values increase from ~28.5 to ~30.1 while the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) is 4-6‰ in magnitude and larger than δ13C records from other materials. It has been hypothesized previously that both the ACL excursion and the large magnitude of the CIE were caused by a concurrent turnover in the local flora from a mixed conifer/angiosperm community before the PETM to a different suite of angiosperm species during the PETM. Here, we present the results of a meta-analysis of data (>2000 data from 89 sources, both published and unpublished) on n-alkane amounts and chain length distributions in modern plants from around the world. We applied the data in two sets of comparisons: 1) within and among plant groups such as herbs and graminoids, and 2) between plants and climate, using reported collection locations for outdoor plants and climate values generated via GIS extraction of WorldClim modeled data. We show that angiosperms, as group, produce more n-alkanes than do gymnosperms by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and this means that the gymnosperm contribution to a mixed soil n-alkane pool would be negligible, even in an ecosystem where gymnosperms dominated (i.e. the pre/post-PETM ecosystems). The modern plant data also demonstrate that turnover of the plant community during the PETM, even among only the angiosperm species, is likely not the source of the observed ACL excursion. First, we constructed "representative" groups of PETM and pre/post-PETM communities using living relative species at the Chicago Botanic Garden and find no significant difference in chain length distributions between the two groups. Second and moreover, the modern plant data reveal that n-alkane chain length distributions are tremendously variable

  1. Chemotaxonomic implications of the n-alkane composition and the nonacosan-10-ol content in Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii, and Pinus peuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Biljana; Tešević, Vele; Bojović, Srdjan; Marin, Petar D

    2013-04-01

    The n-alkane composition and the nonacosan-10-ol content in the needle cuticular waxes of Serbian spruce (Picea omorika), Bosnian pine (Pinus heldreichii), and Macedonian pine (Pinus peuce) were compared. The amount of nonacosan-10-ol in the needle waxes of P. omorika was higher than those in P. heldreichii and P. peuce. The range of n-alkanes was also wider in P. omorika (C18 -C35 ) than in P. heldreichii and P. peuce (C18 -C33 ). The dominant n-alkanes were C29 in the needle waxes of P. omorika, C23 , C27 , and C25 in those of P. heldreichii, and C29 , C25 , C27 , and C23 in those of P. peuce. The waxes of P. omorika contained higher amounts of n-alkanes C29 , C31 , and C33 , while those of P. heldreichii and P. peuce had higher contents of n-alkanes C21 , C22 , C23 , C24 , and C26 . The principal component analysis of the contents of nine n-alkanes showed a clear separation of the Serbian spruce populations from those of the two investigated pine species, which partially overlapped. The separation of the species was due to high contents of the n-alkanes C29 and C31 (P. omorika), C19 , C20 , C21 , C22 , C23 , and C24 (P. heldreichii), and C28 (P. peuce). Cluster analysis also showed a clear separation between the P. omorika populations on one side and the P. heldreichii and P. peuce populations on the other side. The n-alkane and terpene compositions are discussed in the light of their usefulness in chemotaxonomy as well as with regard to the biogeography and phylogeny of these rare and endemic conifers. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  2. Physiological Adaptations Involved in Alkane Assimilation at a Low Temperature by Rhodococcus sp. Strain Q15†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, L. G.; Slagman, S. J.; Pietrantonio, F.; Bourbonnière, L.; Koval, S. F.; Lawrence, J. R.; Inniss, W. E.; Greer, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    We examined physiological adaptations which allow the psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 to assimilate alkanes at a low temperature (alkanes are contaminants which are generally insoluble and/or solid at low temperatures). During growth at 5°C on hexadecane or diesel fuel, strain Q15 produced a cell surface-associated biosurfactant(s) and, compared to glucose-acetate-grown cells, exhibited increased cell surface hydrophobicity. A transmission electron microscopy examination of strain Q15 grown at 5°C revealed the presence of intracellular electron-transparent inclusions and flocs of cells connected by an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) when cells were grown on a hydrocarbon and morphological differences between the EPS of glucose-acetate-grown and diesel fuel-grown cells. A lectin binding analysis performed by using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed that the EPS contained a complex mixture of glycoconjugates, depending on both the growth temperature and the carbon source. Two glycoconjugates [β-d-Gal-(1-3)-d-GlcNAc and α-l-fucose] were detected only on the surfaces of cells grown on diesel fuel at 5°C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed strain Q15 cells on the surfaces of octacosane crystals, and using CSLM, we observed strain Q15 cells covering the surfaces of diesel fuel microdroplets; these findings indicate that this organism assimilates both solid and liquid alkane substrates at a low temperature by adhering to the alkane phase. Membrane fatty acid analysis demonstrated that strain Q15 adapted to growth at a low temperature by decreasing the degree of saturation of membrane lipid fatty acids, but it did so to a lesser extent when it was grown on hydrocarbons at 5°C; these findings suggest that strain Q15 modulates membrane fluidity in response to the counteracting influences of low temperature and hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:10388690

  3. Excess enthalpies of binary mixtures of 1-hexene with some branched alkanes at the temperature 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Benson, George C.; Lu, Benjamin C.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of excess molar enthalpies at the temperature 298.15 K in a flow microcalorimeter are reported for the five binary mixtures formed by mixing 1-hexene with the branched alkanes: 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane. Smooth Redlich-Kister representations of the results are described. It was found that the Liebermann-Fried model also provided good representations of the results

  4. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy V. Callaghan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM. The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria via ‘reverse methanogenesis’ and is catalyzed by a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, intra-aerobic pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appears to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase. Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an ‘intra-aerobic’ denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘M. oxyfera.’

  5. Substrate specificity and reaction mechanism of purified alkane hydroxylase from the hydrocarbonoclastus bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis (AbAlkB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Swe-Htet; Parvez, Saba; Pender-Cudlip, Marilla; Groves, John T.

    2013-01-01

    An alkane hydroxylase from the marine organism Alcanivorax borkumensis (AbAlkB) was purified. The purified protein retained high activity in an assay with purified rubredoxin (AlkG), purified maize ferridoxin reductase, NADPH, and selected substrates. The reaction mechanism of the purified protein was probed using the radical clock substrates bicyclo[4.1.0]heptane (norcarane), bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane (bicyclohexane), methylphenylcyclopropane and deuterated and non-deuterated cyclohexane. The distribution of products from the radical clock substrates supports the hypothesis that purified AbAlkB hydroxylates substrates by forming a substrate radical. Experiments with deuterated cyclohexane indicate that the rate-determining step has significant C-H bond breaking character. The products formed from a number of differently shaped and sized substrates were characterized to determine the active site constraints of this AlkB. AbAlkB can catalyze the hydroxylation of a large number of aromatic compounds and linear and cyclic alkanes. It does not catalyze the hydroxylation of alkanes with a chain length longer than 15 carbons, nor does it hydroxylate sterically hindered C-H bonds. PMID:23337786

  6. Acidic ionic liquids for n-alkane isomerization in a liquid-liquid or slurry-phase reaction mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.; Hager, V.; Geburtig, D.; Kohr, C.; Wasserscheid, P. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Chemische Reaktionstechnik; Haumann, M. [Chemical Reaction Engineering, FAU Busan Campus, Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Highly acidic ionic liquid (IL) catalysts offer the opportunity to convert n-alkanes at very low reaction temperatures. The results of IL catalyzed isomerization and cracking reactions of pure n-octane are presented. Influence of IL composition, [C{sub 4}C{sub 1}Im]Cl / AlCl{sub 3} / H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and [C{sub 4}C{sub 1}Im]Cl / AlCl{sub 3} / 1-chlorooctane, on catalyst activity and selectivities to branched alkanes was investigated. Acidic chloroaluminate IL catalysts form liquid-liquid biphasic systems with unpolar organic product mixtures. Thus, recycling of the acidic IL is enabled by simple phase separation in the liquid-liquid biphasic reaction mode or the IL can be immobilized on an inorganic support with a large specific surface area. These supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts offer the advantage to get a macroscopically heterogeneous system while still preserving all benefits of the homogeneous catalyst which can be used for the slurry-phase n-alkane isomerization. The interaction of the solid support and acidic IL influences strongly the catalytic activity. (orig.)

  7. Similarity and Scaling of Turbulent Flame Speeds for Expanding Premixed Flames of C4-C8 n -alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fujia; Saha, Abhishek; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Yang, Sheng; Law, Chung K.

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally investigated the propagation speed of constant-pressure expanding flames in near isotropic turbulence using a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. The motivation is to test whether the fuel similarity concept among C4-C8 n-alkanes on laminar flames also holds for turbulent flames. Previously it was found that the laminar flame speed and Markstein length are almost identical for C4-C8 n-alkanes. If this fuel similarity concept can also be shown for turbulent flames, it will suggest a canonical flame structure for large hydrocarbon fuels, i . e . , large fuels always decompose to small C0-C4 fuel fragments before being oxidized, and would significantly simplify the description of the flames. Preliminary results show that in the flamelet and thin-reaction zone, turbulent flame speeds of C4-C8 n-alkanes are indeed largely similar at various conditions, thereby suggesting the fuel similarity for turbulent flames. In addition, it is found that the normalized turbulent flame speed also approximately scales with the square root of an appropriately-defined Reynolds number recently found for C0-C4 fuels. This work was supported by the AFOSR under the technical monitoring of Dr. Chiping Li.

  8. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Final report, January 1, 1990--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement (Phase I-III), we uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of fight alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of fight hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane>propane>ethane>methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase V). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases IV, VI), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases VII through IX). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phases V and VI so that further work is not anticipated. We made excellent progress during 1994 in generating a class of less costly new materials which have the potential for high catalytic activity. New routes were developed for replacing costly perfluorophenyl groups in the meso-position of metalloporphyrin catalysts with far less expensive and lower molecular weight perfluoromethyl groups.

  9. Observation of Weak C-H...O Hydrogen Bonding by Unactivated Alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Boggavarapu, Kiran; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-12

    Weak C-H...O hydrogen bonding has been recognized to play a major role in biological molecular structures and functions. A newly developed low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus is used here to study the C-H...O hydrogen bonding between unactivated alkanes and the carboxylate functional group. We observed that gaseous linear carboxylates, CH3(CH2)nCO2-, assume folded structures at low temperatures due to weak C-H...O hydrogen bonding between the terminal CH3 and CO2- groups for n-5. Temperature-dependent studies showed that the folding transition depends on both the temperature and the aliphatic chain length. Theoretical calculations revealed that for n = 3-8, the folded conformations are more stable than the linear structures, but C-H...O hydrogen bonding only forms for species with n-5 due to steric constraint in the smaller species. One C-H...O hydrogen-bond is formed in the n = 5 and 6 species, whereas two C-H...O hydrogen-bonds are formed for n = 7 and 8. Comparison of the photoelectron spectral shifts for the folded relative to the linear conformations yielded lower limits for the strength of the C-H...O hydrogen-bonds in CH3(CH2)nCO2-, ranging from 1.2 kcal/mol for n = 5 to 4.4 kcal/mol for n = 8.

  10. The effect of the naphthenic ring on the VLE of (carbon dioxide + alkane) mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sima, Sergiu; Milanesio, Juan Manuel; Ramello, Juan Ignacio; Cismondi, Martin; Secuianu, Catinca; Feroiu, Viorel; Geană, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Isothermal VLE data are reported for CO 2 + cyclopentane, +cyclohexane binary systems. • Critical points were measured for the carbon (dioxide + cyclopentane) system. • The phase behaviour of systems is predicted by RKPR and PR EoS. • Double retrograde behaviour phenomenon is predicted by RKPR model. - Abstract: Isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) data for the binary systems (carbon dioxide + cyclopentane) and (carbon dioxide + cyclohexane) were determined using a (static + analytical) method with phases sampling by rapid online sample injectors (ROLSI) coupled to a gas chromatograph (GC) for analysis. The VLE behaviour for these systems was also analysed based on the PR and RKPR equations of state (EoS) and different available data from the literature, both critical and subcritical. It is clearly shown how CO 2 is more soluble and miscible with normal alkanes than with the corresponding cycloalkanes. Predictions based on the general correlation of available data in wide ranges of conditions suggest the appearance of double retrograde behaviour at least for (CO 2 + cyclohexane) mixtures with very low contents of the hydrocarbon in CO 2 , being this phenomenon very much related to asymmetry of the system. The existence of this phenomenon has not been experimentally confirmed yet for these systems and should be explored.

  11. Emulsification of crude oil by an alkane-oxidizing Rhodococcus species isolated from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredholt, H.; Bruheim, P.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Scince and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Josefsen, K.; Vatland, A. [SINTEF SI, Oslo (Norway). Industrial Chemistry Div.

    1998-04-01

    A Rhodococcus species, which has proven to be the best of 99 oil-emulsifying bacteria isolated from seawater, was characterized. This bacterium produced very stable oil-in-water emulsions from different crude oils with various content of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, by utilizing C{sub 1}1 and C{sub 3}3 n-alkanes as carbon and energy sources. Bacteria that produce stable emulsions are often able to adhere strongly to hydrocarbons or hydrophobic surfaces. It was at these surfaces that extensive emulsification of the residual oil and accumulation of acidic oxidation products occurred. The acidic products were consumed in a second step. This step was characterized by linear growth and an increasing number of cells growing in the water phase. The most extensive emulsification occurred at the end of the exponential phase. There was no evidence of surfactants at the end of the exponential phase, however, a polymeric compound with emulsifying activity, tightly bound to the oil droplets, was isolated, suggesting that the emulsification resulted from the release of the hydrophobic cell surface discarded during growth limitations. 38 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames and autoignition theory for higher alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Priyank

    In order to enhance the fuel efficiency of an engine and to control pollutant formation, an improved understanding of the combustion chemistry of the fuels at a fundamental level is paramount. This knowledge can be gained by developing detailed reaction mechanisms of the fuels for various combustion processes and by studying combustion analytically employing reduced-chemistry descriptions. There is a need for small detailed reaction mechanisms for alkane and alcohol fuels with reduced uncertainties in their combustion chemistry that are computationally cheaper in multidimensional CFD calculations. Detailed mechanisms are the starting points in identifying reduced-chemistry descriptions of combustion processes to study problems analytically. This research includes numerical, experimental and analytical studies. The first part of the dissertation consists of numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames. Although ethanol has gained popularity as a possible low-pollution source of renewable energy, significant uncertainties remain in its combustion chemistry. To begin to address ethanol combustion, first a relatively small detailed reaction mechanism, commonly known as the San Diego Mech, is developed for the combustion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, methane, methanol, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene, in air or oxygen-inert mixtures. This mechanism is tested for autoignition, premixed-flame burning velocities, and structures and extinction of diffusion flames and of partially premixed flames of many of these fuels. The reduction in uncertainties in the combustion chemistry can best be achieved by consistently updating a reaction mechanism with reaction rate data for the elementary steps based on newer studies in literature and by testing it against as many experimental conditions as available. The results of such a testing for abovementioned fuels are reported here along with the modifications of reaction-rate parameters of the most important

  13. Heat capacities and thermal diffusivities of n-alkane acid ethyl esters—biodiesel fuel components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatishcheva, N. S.; Faizullin, M. Z.; Nikitin, E. D.

    2017-09-01

    The heat capacities and thermal diffusivities of ethyl esters of liquid n-alkane acids C n H2 n-1O2C2H5 with the number of carbon atoms in the parent acid n = 10, 11, 12, 14, and 16 are measured. The heat capacities are measured using a DSC 204 F1 Phoenix heat flux differential scanning calorimeter (Netzsch, Germany) in the temperature range of 305-375 K. Thermal diffusivities are measured by means of laser flash method on an LFA-457 instrument (Netzsch, Germany) at temperatures of 305-400 K. An equation is derived for the dependence of the molar heat capacities of the investigated esters on temperature. It is shown that the dependence of molar heat capacity C p,m (298.15 K) on n ( n = 1-6) is close to linear. The dependence of thermal diffusivity on temperature in the investigated temperature range is described by a first-degree polynomial, but thermal diffusivity a (298.15 K) as a function of n has a minimum at n = 5.

  14. Determination and occurrence of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS) in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Nogueras, Rosa María; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2013-05-01

    A new methodology has been developed for the determination of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS), an anionic surfactant, in environmental matrices. Sediment and sludge samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction and sonication, whereas wastewater and surface water samples were processed using solid-phase extraction. Extraction recoveries were acceptable for both aqueous (78-120%) and solid samples (83-100%). Determination of SAS was carried out by high or ultra performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry using ion trap and time-of-flight detectors. The methodology was applied to samples from Guadalete River (SW Spain), where SAS concentrations below 1 μg L(-1) were measured in surface water, and from 72 to 9737 μg kg(-1) in sediments. Differential partitioning was observed for SAS homologues as those having a longer hydrocarbon chain which preferentially sorbed onto particulate matter. A preliminary environmental risk assessment also showed that SAS measured levels were not harmful to the aquatic community in the sampling area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermodynamics of the hydrophobic effect. III. Condensation and aggregation of alkanes, alcohols, and alkylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulis, D

    2001-10-18

    Knowledge of the energetics of the low solubility of non-polar compounds in water is critical for the understanding of such phenomena as protein folding and biomembrane formation. Solubility in water can be considered as one leg of the three-part thermodynamic cycle - vaporization from the pure liquid, hydration of the vapor in aqueous solution, and aggregation of the substance back into initial pure form as an immiscible phase. Previous studies on the model compounds n-alkanes, 1-alcohols, and 1-aminoalkanes have noted that the thermodynamic parameters (Gibbs free energy, DeltaG; enthalpy, DeltaH; entropy, DeltaS; and heat capacity, DeltaC(p)) associated with these three processes are generally linear functions of the number of carbons in the alkyl chains. Here we assess the accuracy and limitations of the assumption of additivity of CH(2) group contributions to the thermodynamic parameters for vaporization, hydration, and aggregation. Processes of condensation from pure gas to liquid and aqueous solution to aggregate are compared. Hydroxy, amino, and methyl headgroup contributions are estimated, liquid and solid aggregates are distinguished. Most data in the literature were obtained for compounds with short aliphatic hydrocarbon tails. Here we emphasize long aliphatic chain behavior and include our recent experimental data on long chain alkylamine aggregation in aqueous solution obtained by titration calorimetry and van't Hoff analysis. Contrary to what is observed for short compounds, long aliphatic compound aggregation has a large exothermic enthalpy and negative entropy.

  16. Oxidative dehydrogenation reaction of short alkanes on nanostructured carbon catalysts: a computational account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, XiaoYing; Han, Peng; Li, Bo; Mao, ShanJun; Liu, TianFu; Ali, Sajjad; Lian, Zan; Su, DangSheng

    2018-01-23

    Recent progress from first principles computational studies is presented for catalytic properties of nanostructured carbon catalysts in the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction of short alkanes. Firstly, a brief introduction is given on the development of carbon catalysts in ODH since 1970. Oxygen functional groups have pivotal importance for ODH on nanostructured carbon catalysts. We discuss the oxidation process by HNO 3 on pristine and defective carbon materials. The interactions between the oxygen molecule (oxidant) and the nanostructured carbon catalysts are quantitatively calibrated. Moreover the different nucleophilic abilities of oxygen functional groups are carefully compared and the strongest nucleophilic sites are proposed. The active sites and detailed reaction pathway are revealed from several computational studies. Diketone/quinone groups are generally considered to be the active centers in ODH. A reaction pathway via radical formation is considered as the favorable path. Furthermore, single ketone and carbon sites are verified to be active in ODH from the analysis of aromaticity. Heteroatom doping effects in ODH are examined. Nitrogen doping is found to be very reactive towards oxygen molecule activation. Other dopants such as boron, phosphorous and sulfur also have positive effects on the reactivity of ODH. Extensive calculations suggest that the BEP relation is applicable for the doped nanostructured carbon catalysts. In the end, an outlook for the future direction of the computational study is supplied.

  17. Laboratory spectroscopic analyses of electron irradiated alkanes and alkenes in solar system ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, K. P.; Carlson, R. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report results from laboratory experiments of 10 keV electron irradiation of thin ice films of water and short-chain hydrocarbons at ˜10-8 Torr and temperatures ranging from 70-100 K. Hydrocarbon mixtures include water with C3H8, C3H6, C4H10 (butane and isobutane), and C4H8, (1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). The double bonds of the alkenes in our initial mixtures were rapidly destroyed or converted to single carbon bonds, covalent bonds with hydrogen, bonds with -OH (hydroxyl), bonds with oxygen (C-O), or double bonds with oxygen (carbonyl). Spectra resulting from irradiation of alkane and alkene ices are largely indistinguishable; the initial differences in film composition are destroyed and the resulting mixture includes long-chain, branched aliphatics, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. Methane was observed as a product during radiolysis but CO was largely absent. We find that while some of the carbon is oxidized and lost to CO2 formation, some carbon is sequestered into highly refractory, long-chain aliphatic compounds that remain as a thin residue even after the ice film has been raised to standard temperature and pressure. We conclude that the high availability of hydrogen in our experiments leads to the formation of the formyl radical which then serves as the precursor for formaldehyde and polymerization of longer hydrocarbon chains.

  18. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 3. Topical report, January 1990--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in the first simple, economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to an alcohol-rich oxygenated product which can either be used as an environmentally friendly, high-performance liquid fuel, or a precursor to a liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. The authors have entered the proof-of-concept stage for converting isobutane to tert butyl alcohol in a practical process and are preparing to enter proof-of-concept of a propane to isopropyl alcohol process in the near future. Methane and ethane are more refractory and thus more difficult to oxidize than the C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} hydrocarbons. Nonetheless, advances made in this area indicate that further research progress could achieve the goal of their direct conversion to alcohols. Progress in Phase 3 catalytic vapor phase methane and ethane oxidation over metals in regular oxidic lattices are the subject of this topical report.

  19. SAXS study of transient pre-melting in chain-folded alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungar, G.; Wills, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    A pronounced pre-melting effect is observed in chain-folded crystals of pure monodisperse n-alkane C 246 H 494 . The effect is reversible on a short time scale, but at longer times the once-folded chain crystals are irreversibly lost as slow chain extension proceeds by solid diffusion well below the melting point. The melting process is thus monitored by rapid time-resolved small-angle X-ray (SAXS) measurements, using synchrotron radiation. The results show that the observed pronounced broadening of the DSC melting endotherm for chain-folded crystals is entirely due to genuine pre-melting of lamellar surfaces. Although a significant portion of material is already molten below the final melting point of chain-folded crystals T F , no recrystallization in the chain-extended form can occur until the cores of the crystalline lamellae melt at T F . Pre-melting of extended chain crystals is significantly less pronounced than that of folded chain crystals

  20. An investigation of heat effects in N-alkanes and asphaltenes systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, C.; Grolier, J.P.E.; Randzio, S.L. [Univ. Blaise Pascal, Lab. de Thermodynamiqueet Genie Chimique, Aubiere (France); Achard, C.; Rogalski, M.; Voguie, J.R. [Univ. de Metz, Lab. de Thermodynamique et d' Analyse Chimique, Metz (France)

    2000-08-01

    We report results of studies carried out on the heat effects observed during the dilution of asphaltenic crude oil by n-alkanes. The dilution process induces aspheltene flocculation. However, the flocculation is not a first order phase transition and no strong heat effect is expected. The experimental results show that significant endo- and exo-thermic effects occur in this case. Titration calorimetry and inverse chromatography were used to elucidate the nature and the intensity of these thermal phenomena. The calorimetric titration of two crude oils by n-heptane was performed at ambient temperature. Then, the two oils were stabilised with behenic and titrated by n-heptane. Behenic acid, CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 20} CO{sub 2}H, has dispersing effect on asphaltenes and influences the flocculation onset. The chromatographic study was performed using columns coated with asphaltenes or with mixtures containing asphaltenes, in the temperature range between 340 and 520 K. Indirect enthalpic data obtained by this method over wide temperature ranges complete the direct calorimetric measurements. It can be hypothesised that observed heat effects are mainly due to the modifications of the asphaltenes structure. The objective of this work is to evaluate the possibility of using calorimetric methods to controlling flocculation processes in crude oils. (ln)

  1. Modification by SiO2 of Alumina Support for Light Alkane Dehydrogenation Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyjaz E. Bekmukhamedov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the continuously rising demand for C3–C5 olefins it is important to improve the performance of catalysts for dehydrogenation of light alkanes. In this work the effect of modification by SiO2 on the properties of the alumina support and the chromia-alumina catalyst was studied. SiO2 was introduced by impregnation of the support with a silica sol. To characterize the supports and the catalysts the following techniques were used: low-temperature nitrogen adsorption; IR-spectroscopy; magic angle spinning 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance; temperature programmed desorption and reduction; UV-Vis-, Raman- and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR-spectroscopy. It was shown that the modifier in amounts of 2.5–7.5 wt % distributed on the support surface in the form of SiOx-islands diminishes the interaction between the alumina support and the chromate ions (precursor of the active component. As a result, polychromates are the compounds predominantly stabilized on the surface of the modified support; under thermal activation of the catalyst and are reduced to the amorphous Cr2O3. This in turn leads to an increase in the activity of the catalyst in the dehydrogenation of isobutane.

  2. n-alkanes from Paepalanthus Mart. species (Eriocaulaceae n-alcanos de espécies de Paepalanthus Mart. (Eriocaulaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Campaner dos Santos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the study of nonpolar compounds from plants belonging to the genus Paepalanthus Mart. (Eriocaulaceae. Long-chain linear aliphatic hydrocarbons were identified by GC-FID and GC-MS. The results indicate that Paepalanthus subg. Platycaulon species present a very homogenous profile, with carbon chains of n-alkanes ranging from C25 to C31, most samples presenting higher frequencies of C27 and C29 homologues. Paepalanthus subg. Paepalocephalus species may be distinguished from one another by the distribution of main n-alkanes. P. macrocephalus, subsect. Aphorocaulon species, presents alkanes with odd-carbon numbers and P. denudatus and P. polyanthus, Actinocephalus species, present alkanes with quite distinctive profiles, with many shorter chains and a high frequency of even-carbon number, especially P. polyanthus. The results obtained indicate that the distribution of alkanes can be a useful taxonomic character, as do polar compounds like flavonoid glycosides.Este trabalho apresenta o estudo de substâncias apolares obtidas a partir de plantas pertencentes ao gênero Paepalanthus Mart. (Eriocaulaceae. Hidrocarbonetos alifáticos de cadeias longas lineares foram identificados por CG-DIC e CG-EM. Os resultados indicam que as espécies de Paepalanthus subg. Platycaulon apresentam perfil homogêneo, com cadeias carbônicas de n-alcanos variando de C25 a C31, com a maioria das amostras apresentando freqüências maiores dos homólogos C27 e C29. As espécies do subgênero Paepalocephalus podem ser diferenciadas pela distribuição dos n-alcanos principais. P. macrocephalus, uma espécie da subseção Aphorocaulon, apresenta perfil com alcanos de cadeia ímpar, enquanto P. denudatus e P. polyanthus, espécies da seção Actinocephalus, apresentam perfil bem distinto, com grande número de cadeias mais curtas e alta freqüência de cadeias com número par de carbonos, especialmente P. polyanthus. Os resultados obtidos indicam que a

  3. Leaf physiological processes strongly affect δH2 values of leaf wax n-alkanes in C3 and C4 grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarra, Bruno; Sachse, Dirk; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2013-04-01

    Leaf wax n-alkanes are naturally synthesized saturated hydrocarbons. They are synthesized as part of plant leaf cuticle as a mechanism to prevent water losses. Two of the most important features of n-alkanes are their enormous environmental persistence and terrestrial ubiquity making them a solid and reliable long-term and large-scale biomarker. Their hydrogen isotopic composition (δH2) of leaf wax n-alkanes has been traditionally related to precipitation. Leaf wax n-alkanes and their δH2 values have thus been celebrated as biomarkers to reconstruct hydrological changes. δH2 values of leaf wax n-alkanes are yet to be fully comprehended. They are basically determined by three mechanisms: (1) The δH2 value of the plant source water (2) leaf water evaporative enrichment in H2 and (3) biosynthetic fractionation and depletion in H2during their biosynthesis from leaf water. Out of these three, the exact degree by which the evaporative H2-enrichment of leaf water influences the δH2 values of leaf wax n-alkanes is still unknown. We conducted an experiment where we tested and quantified the effects of leaf water evaporative H2-enrichment on the leaf wax n-alkane δH2 values of different grass species. We grew 12 C3 and C4 grass species under controlled environmental conditions in growth chambers. The plants were exposed to 3 different levels of air relative humidity (45, 65 and 85%). These treatments were to generate different degrees of leaf water H2-enrichment in the plants. The goal of our experiment was to determine by what degree the different levels of leaf water H2-enrichment influence the δH2 values of the different C3 and C4 grass species. Additional measurements of gas exchange, evapotranspiration and leaf length and area accompanied the isotopic analysis in order to explain species variability. Our experiments showed that leaf water evaporative H2-enrichment has a critical impact on leaf wax n-alkane δH2 values of all studied plants. The magnitude was

  4. Striking difference between alkane and olefin metathesis using the well-defined precursor [≡Si-O-WMe5]: Indirect evidence in favour of a bifunctional catalyst W alkylidene-hydride

    KAUST Repository

    Riache, Nassima

    2015-01-01

    Metathesis of linear alkanes catalyzed by the well-defined precursor (≡Si-O-WMe5) affords a wide distribution of linear alkanes from methane up to triacontane. Olefin metathesis using the same catalyst and under the same reaction conditions gives a very striking different distribution of linear α-olefins and internal olefins. This shows that olefin and alkane metathesis processes occur via very different pathways.

  5. Evaluation of the organic matter sources using the δ13C composition of individual n-alkanes in sediments from Brazilian estuarine systems by GC/C/IRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maioli, Otávio Luiz Gusso; de Oliveira, Cristiane Rossi; Dal Sasso, Marco Aurélio; Madureira, Luiz Augusto dos Santos; Azevedo, Débora de Almeida; de Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler

    2012-12-01

    The δ13C composition of individual n-alkanes (from C16 to C34) was measured from surface sediments of five Brazilian estuarine systems affected by different organic matter sources, such as harbor area, industries, urban centers and sugar cane crops, in order to determine the origins of the organic matter. The aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction was analyzed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). The levels of n-alkanes in the studied areas ranged from 0.34 to 18.14 μg kg-1, being relatively low in comparison to high polluted environments. The Carbon Preference Index (CPI) calculated in the C23-C34 range indicates that n-alkanes are mainly inherited from cuticular waxes of higher plants. The δ13C composition of all n-alkanes detected in the sediment samples ranged from -39.6 to -18.3‰ showing different sources for the studied estuarine systems. Through Principal Component Analysis (PCA) it was possible to verify the petrogenic influence in the n-alkane sources, especially in the Paraíba do Sul sediment samples. Differences up to 15‰ of the δ13C values between n-alkanes of odd and even carbon number (C26 and C27) also indicated mixture of petrogenic and biogenic sources in Paraíba do Sul River. High (less negative) δ13C n-alkane values of odd carbon number were obtained from two sampling sites located close to an ethanol plant, indicating residues discharge of sugar cane (C4 plant). Influence of C3 plants that are the main components of dense ombrophile forest was observed in the Itajaí-Açu sediments by the decrease of δ13C (about 10‰ compared to the Paraíba do Sul River δ13C).

  6. Emission of Methane and Heavier Alkanes From the La Brea Tar Pits Seepage Area, Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etiope, G.; Doezema, L. A.; Pacheco, C.

    2017-11-01

    Natural hydrocarbon (oil and gas) seeps are widespread in Los Angeles, California, due to gas migration, along faults, from numerous subsurface petroleum fields. These seeps may represent important natural contributors of methane (CH4) and heavier alkanes (C2-C4) to the atmosphere, in addition to anthropogenic fossil fuel and biogenic sources. We measured the CH4 flux by closed-chamber method from the La Brea Tar Pits park (0.1 km2), one of the largest seepage sites in Los Angeles. The gas seepage occurs throughout the park, not only from visible oil-asphalt seeps but also diffusely from the soil, affecting grass physiology. About 500 kg CH4 d-1 is emitted from the park, especially along a belt of enhanced degassing that corresponds to the 6th Street Fault. Additional emissions are from bubble plumes in the lake within the park (order of 102-103 kg d-1) and at the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Curson Avenue (>130 kg d-1), along the same fault. The investigated area has the highest natural gas flux measured thus far for any onshore seepage zone in the USA. Gas migration, oil biodegradation, and secondary methanogenesis altered the molecular composition of the original gas accumulated in the Salt Lake Oil Field (>300 m deep), leading to high C1/C2+ and i-butane/n-butane ratios. These molecular alterations can be important tracers of natural seepage and should be considered in the atmospheric modeling of the relative contribution of fossil fuel (anthropogenic fugitive emission and natural geologic sources) versus biogenic sources of methane, on local and global scales.

  7. Molecular Simulation of Flow-Enhanced Crystal Nucleation in Alkane Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, David; Rutledge, Gregory

    Under typical processing conditions, the crystallization of polymer materials occurs far from equilibrium. In particular, the application of a flow field is known to drastically accelerate the kinetics of crystallization, and in turn alter the morphology and properties of the resulting material. It remains a significant challenge to establish the processing-structure-property relationships associated with crystallization under flow. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation has proven to be a useful investigative tool for the study of the early stages of flow-induced crystallization, known as flow-enhanced nucleation. Using this technique, nucleation studies were performed under shear and uniaxial extension for monodisperse melts of short (C20) and long (C150) alkanes, as well as for bimodal mixtures composed of both short and long chains. Through the application of a mean first-passage time-based analysis method, the effect of flow on the nucleation kinetics was quantified and classified in terms of an increase in the driving force for crystallization, reflected in the reduction of the free energy barrier, as well as a diffusive enhancement, reflected in the increase of the monomer attachment pre-factor. In bimodal blends with C150 fractions of 3-9 wt% chains, a drastic acceleration in the nucleation kinetics relative to monodisperse C20 was observed for strain rates intermediate to the inverse Rouse times of C20 and C150. For this range of strain rates, the long chains were found to preferentially participate in the formation of small clusters, and therefore serve as templates for the crystallization of the short chain fraction.

  8. Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov., a chlorinated alkane-respiring bacterium isolated from contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Trent A; Bowman, Kimberly S; Lee, Imchang; Chun, Jongsik; Albuquerque, Luciana; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2017-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming bacterium designated NSZ-14T, isolated from contaminated groundwater in Louisiana (USA), was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Strain NSZ-14T reductively dehalogenated a variety of polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes, producing ethene from 1,2-dichloroethane, propene from 1,2-dichloropropane, a mixture of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethene from 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, vinyl chloride from 1,1,2-trichloroethane and allyl chloride (3-chloro-1-propene) from 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Formate or hydrogen could both serve as electron donors. Dechlorination occurred between pH 5.5 and 7.5 and over a temperature range of 20-37 °C. Major cellular fatty acids included C18 : 1ω9c, C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that the strain clusters within the class Dehalococcoidia of the phylum Chloroflexi, most closely related to but distinct from type strains of the species Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens (97.63 % similarity) and Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens (95.05 %). A complete genome sequence determined for strain NSZ-14T revealed a DNA G+C content of 53.96 mol%, which was corroborated by HPLC (54.1±0.2 mol% G+C). Genome-wide comparisons based on average nucleotide identity by orthology and estimated DNA-DNA hybridization values combined with phenotypic and chemotaxonomic traits and phylogenetic analysis indicate that strain NSZ-14T represents a novel species within the genus Dehalogenimonas, for which the name Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NSZ-14T (=HAMBI 3672T=JCM 19277T=VKM B-3058T). An emended description of Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens is also provided.

  9. Semifluorinated Alkane Eye Drops for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease--A Prospective, Multicenter Noninterventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Scherer, Dieter; Krösser, Sonja; Beckert, Michael; Cursiefen, Claus; Kaercher, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Evaporation of the tear film is heavily discussed as one core reason for dry eye disease (DED). Subsequently, new artificial tear products are developed that specifically target this pathomechanism. Perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8, NovaTears(®)) from the family of semifluorinated alkanes is a novel substance that has been approved as a medical device, as a nonblurring wetting agent for the ocular surface. Thirty patients with hyperevaporative dry eye received F6H8 during a prospective, multicenter, observational 6-week study. Patients were advised to apply 1 drop 4 times daily in both eyes. Parameters assessed included best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, Schirmer I test, tear fluid, tear film breakup time (TFBUT), corneal staining, meibum secretion, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI(©)). From the 30 patients recruited, 25 completed the trial per protocol. Four patients discontinued F6H8 and 1 patient did not present for follow-up. F6H8 treatment led to significant reduction of corneal staining and significant increase of Schirmer I and TFBUT. In addition, OSDI score dropped significantly from a mean of 55 (± 23.0) to 34 (± 22.4). Visual acuity and ocular pressure did not change. This prospective observational study shows significant beneficial effects in patients suffering from evaporative DED, using F6H8 in all the relevant parameters tested. The decrease of the OSDI by a mean of 21 points was particularly remarkable and clearly exceeds minimal, clinical important differences for mild or moderate and severe disease. Overall, F6H8 (NovaTears) seems to be safe and effective in treating mild to moderate hyperevaporative DED.

  10. Semifluorinated Alkane Eye Drops for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease Due to Meibomian Gland Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Augustin, Albert J; Geerling, Gerd; Kaercher, Thomas; Kretz, Florian; Kunert, Kathleen; Menzel-Severing, Johannes; Schrage, Norbert; Schrems, Wolfgang; Krösser, Sonja; Beckert, Michael; Messmer, Elisabeth M

    2017-11-01

    Meibomian gland disease is generally accepted as the leading cause for evaporative dry eye disease (DED). In a previous study, perfluorohexyloctane, a semifluorinated alkane, has been demonstrated to significantly increase tear film breakup time and to reduce corneal fluorescein staining in patients with evaporative DED, thereby vastly reducing dry eye-related symptoms. This study was set up to evaluate perfluorohexyloctane in a larger population of patients with Meibomian gland dysfunction. Seventy-two patients with Meibomian gland disease and associated dry eye received 1 drop of perfluorohexyloctane 4 times daily during an observational, prospective, multicenter, 6-8-week study. Clinical assessment included best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, Schirmer test I, tear film breakup time, anterior and posterior blepharitis assessment, number of expressible Meibomian glands, meibum quality and quantity, ocular surface fluorescein staining, lid margin and symptom assessment, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI © ). From the 72 patients recruited, 61 completed the trial per protocol. Nine patients did not apply the medication as recommended and 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Tear film breakup time, corneal and conjunctival fluorescein staining, number of expressible Meibomian glands, and severity of anterior and posterior blepharitis significantly improved after 6-8 weeks of perfluorohexyloctane application. In addition, symptoms improved as demonstrated by a significant decrease of OSDI-values from 37 (±13) to 26 (±16). In concordance with previous findings, 6-8 weeks of topical application of perfluorohexyloctane significantly improves clinical signs of Meibomian gland disease and associated mild to moderate DED.

  11. Semifluorinated Alkane Eye Drops for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease—A Prospective, Multicenter Noninterventional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Dieter; Krösser, Sonja; Beckert, Michael; Cursiefen, Claus; Kaercher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Evaporation of the tear film is heavily discussed as one core reason for dry eye disease (DED). Subsequently, new artificial tear products are developed that specifically target this pathomechanism. Perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8, NovaTears®) from the family of semifluorinated alkanes is a novel substance that has been approved as a medical device, as a nonblurring wetting agent for the ocular surface. Methods: Thirty patients with hyperevaporative dry eye received F6H8 during a prospective, multicenter, observational 6-week study. Patients were advised to apply 1 drop 4 times daily in both eyes. Parameters assessed included best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, Schirmer I test, tear fluid, tear film breakup time (TFBUT), corneal staining, meibum secretion, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI©). Results: From the 30 patients recruited, 25 completed the trial per protocol. Four patients discontinued F6H8 and 1 patient did not present for follow-up. F6H8 treatment led to significant reduction of corneal staining and significant increase of Schirmer I and TFBUT. In addition, OSDI score dropped significantly from a mean of 55 (±23.0) to 34 (±22.4). Visual acuity and ocular pressure did not change. Conclusions: This prospective observational study shows significant beneficial effects in patients suffering from evaporative DED, using F6H8 in all the relevant parameters tested. The decrease of the OSDI by a mean of 21 points was particularly remarkable and clearly exceeds minimal, clinical important differences for mild or moderate and severe disease. Overall, F6H8 (NovaTears) seems to be safe and effective in treating mild to moderate hyperevaporative DED. PMID:26296040

  12. Hopane, sterane and n-alkane distributions in shallow sediments hosting high arsenic groundwaters in Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongen, Bart E. van; Rowland, Helen A.L.; Gault, Andrew G.; Polya, David A.; Bryant, Charlotte; Pancost, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The presence of elevated As in ground waters exploited for drinking water and irrigation in South-East Asia is causing serious impacts on human health. A key mechanism that causes the mobilization of As in these waters is microbially mediated reductive transformation of As-bearing Fe(III) hydrated oxides and the role of degradable organic matter (OM) in this process is widely recognized. A number of different types of OM that drive As release in these aquifers have been suggested, including petroleum derived hydrocarbons naturally seeping into shallow sediments from deeper thermally mature source rocks. However, the amount of information on the characteristics of the OM in South-East Asian aquifers is limited. Here the organic geochemical analyses of the saturated hydrocarbon fractions and radiocarbon analysis, of two additional sites in SE Asia are reported. The results show that the OM in a given sedimentary horizon likely derives from multiple sources including naturally occurring petroleum. The importance of naturally occurring petroleum as one of the sources was clearly indicated by the n-alkane CPI of approximately 1, the presence of an unresolved complex mixture, and hopane (dominated by 17α(H),21β(H) hopanes) and sterane distribution patterns. The results also indicate that the OM in these aquifers varies tremendously in content, character and potential bioavailability. Furthermore, the presence of petroleum derived OM in sediments at both sites doubles the number of locations where their presence has been observed in association with As-rich, shallow aquifers, suggesting that the role of petroleum derived OM in microbially mediated As release might occur over a wider range of geographical locations than previously thought

  13. Contamination profiles of short-chain polychlorinated n-alkanes in foodstuff samples from Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukami, Hidenori; Kurunthachalam, S.; Ohi, Etsumasa; Takasuga, Takumi [Shimadzu Techno Research, Inc., Kyoto (Japan); Iino, Fukuya; Nakanishi, Junko [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated n-alkanes (PCAs) are group of chemicals manufactured by chlorination of liquid n-paraffin or paraffin wax that contain 30 to 70% chlorine by weight. Large amounts of PCAs are widely used as plasticizers for vinyl chloride, lubricants, paints, and flame retardants and number of other industrial applications. Annual global production of PCAs is approximately 300 kilo tones, with a majority having medium-carbon-chain (C14-C19) length. According to the investigation made by Kagaku Kogyo Nippon-Sha, the annual consumption of PCAs in Japan was about 83,000 tons in between 1986-2001. Short-carbon-chain (C10-C13) has been placed on the Priority Substance List under Canadian Environmental Protection Act and on the Environmental Protection Agency Toxic Release Inventory in the USA due to its potential to act as tumor promoters in mammals. Data on environment levels of PCAs is meager, nevertheless, PCAs have been measured at relatively high concentrations in biota from Sweden, biota, sediment from Canada and marine biota and human milk from the Canadian Arctic. In our earlier study, we reported concentrations of short-chain PCAs from sewage treatment plant (STP) collected from Tama River, Tokyo and river water and sediment from Tokyo and Osaka. STP influent water contained greater shortchain PCAs concentrations than STP effluent. In addition, some river water and sediment samples contained detectable concentrations of short-chain PCAs, which was similar to other industrial countries. However, there is no study conducted to explore the contamination profiles of short-chain PCAs in human foodstuff samples. In the present study, we analyzed eleven foodstuff samples that were purchased from various supermarkets in order to know the short-chain PCAs concentrations in the foodstuff and possible human total daily intake (TDI) amounts.

  14. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1 atm pressure from 420 to 1250 K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800 K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS). Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth\\'s troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. The results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have implications on atmospheric gas-phase chemistry and the oxidative stability of organic substances. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  16. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Dehydrogenative Carboxylation of Unactivated Alkanes to Allylic Esters via Alkenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation (ODC) of unactivated alkanes with various substituted benzoic acids to produce the corresponding allylic esters. Spectroscopic studies (EPR, UV–vis) revealed that the resting state of the catalyst is [(BPI)Cu(O2CPh)] (1-O2CPh), formed from [(BPI)Cu(PPh3)2], oxidant, and benzoic acid. Catalytic and stoichiometric reactions of 1-O2CPh with alkyl radicals and radical probes imply that C–H bond cleavage occurs by a tert-butoxy radical. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect from reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane in separate vessels showed that the turnover-limiting step for the ODC of cyclohexane is C–H bond cleavage. To understand the origin of the difference in products formed from copper-catalyzed amidation and copper-catalyzed ODC, reactions of an alkyl radical with a series of copper–carboxylate, copper–amidate, and copper–imidate complexes were performed. The results of competition experiments revealed that the relative rate of reaction of alkyl radicals with the copper complexes follows the trend Cu(II)–amidate > Cu(II)–imidate > Cu(II)–benzoate. Consistent with this trend, Cu(II)–amidates and Cu(II)–benzoates containing more electron-rich aryl groups on the benzamidate and benzoate react faster with the alkyl radical than do those with more electron-poor aryl groups on these ligands to produce the corresponding products. These data on the ODC of cyclohexane led to preliminary investigation of copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative amination of cyclohexane to generate a mixture of N-alkyl and N-allylic products. PMID:25389772

  17. Structures of butyl ions formed by electron impact ionization of isomeric butyl halides and alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shold, D.M.; Ausloos, P.

    1978-01-01

    Using a pulsed ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometer, it is demonstrated that at pressures of about 10 -6 Torr and at observation times ranging from 10 -3 to 0.5 s, isobutane, neopentane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, isobutyl halides, and tert-butyl halides form C 4 H 9 + ions having the tertiary structure. In n-alkanes, 2-methylbutane, 3-methylpentane, n-butyl halides, and sec-butyl halides, both sec-C 4 H 9 + and t-C 4 H 9 + ions are observed, the sec-C 4 H 9 + ions surviving without rearrangement for at least 0.1 s. However, in the case of the halides, a collision-induced isomerization of the sec-C 4 H 9 + to the t-C 4 H 9 + ions occurs. The efficiency of this process increases with the basicity of the alkyl halide. Radiolysis experiments carried out at atmospheric pressures indicate, in agreement with ICR and solution experiments, that at times as short as 10 -10 s the majority of the i-C 4 H 9 + ions from isobutyl bromide rearrange to the t-C 4 H 9 + structure. On the other hand, in the radiolysis of both n-hexane and 3-methylpentane, the abundance of t-C 4 H 9 + relative to sec-C 4 H 9 + is substantially smaller than that observed in the ICR experiments, and decreases with decreasing collision interval. It is suggested that about 90% of the i-C 4 H 9 + can rearrange to t-C 4 H 9 + by simple 1,2-hydride shift without involving secondary or protonated methylcyclopropane structures as intermediates. 4 figures, 2 tables

  18. Kinetics and mechanistic study of n-alkane hydroisomerization reaction on Pt-doped γ-alumina catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Dhar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalysts γ-alumina (GA, the reference catalyst and Pt doped γ-alumina (PGA-s were synthesized using a simple sol-gel technique, in which at first preparation of porous base (GA, then impregnation of platinum salt over the base and finally reduction of platinum in the surface of the support were done. These catalysts prepared in different mole ratios of Pt:Al as 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2 are named as PGA-1, PGA-2 and PGA-3 respectively. The isomerization of n-alkanes (n-hexane, n-heptane and n-octane were investigated over the synthesized catalysts. The 2-methyl pentane (2-MP, 2,2-dimethyl pentane (2,2-DMP and 2,3-dimethyl hexane (2,3-DMH are the major products of respective isomerization of n-hexane, n-heptane and n-octane, besides a small amount of other branched isomers are also produced. The product distribution is comparable to that reported for Pt based other catalysts. The optimal mole ratios of Pt:Al is 1:1 (PGA-2 gives quite good catalytic activity for isomerization of n-alkane. Even through in reusability study, PGA-2 gives better performance than others. We have mainly focused on kinetic study, reaction mechanism behind isomerization and calculated the order of reactions and activation energies of the isomerization reactions in the present work. Keywords: Isomerization, n-alkanes, Catalyst, Reaction mechanism, Kinetics study, Activation energy

  19. Transitions from functionalization to fragmentation reactions of laboratory secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew T; Onasch, Timothy B; Croasdale, David R; Wright, Justin P; Martin, Alexander T; Franklin, Jonathan P; Massoli, Paola; Kroll, Jesse H; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Brune, William H; Worsnop, Douglas R; Davidovits, Paul

    2012-05-15

    Functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) reactions governing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors were studied in a flow reactor in the absence of NO(x). SOA precursors were n-decane (n-C10), n-pentadecane (n-C15), n-heptadecane (n-C17), tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]decane (JP-10), and vapors of diesel fuel and Southern Louisiana crude oil. Aerosol mass spectra were measured with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, from which normalized SOA yields, hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios, and C(x)H(y)+, C(x)H(y)O+, and C(x)H(y)O(2)+ ion abundances were extracted as a function of OH exposure. Normalized SOA yield curves exhibited an increase followed by a decrease as a function of OH exposure, with maximum yields at O/C ratios ranging from 0.29 to 0.74. The decrease in SOA yield correlates with an increase in oxygen content and decrease in carbon content, consistent with transitions from functionalization to fragmentation. For a subset of alkane precursors (n-C10, n-C15, and JP-10), maximum SOA yields were estimated to be 0.39, 0.69, and 1.1. In addition, maximum SOA yields correspond with a maximum in the C(x)H(y)O+ relative abundance. Measured correlations between OH exposure, O/C ratio, and H/C ratio may enable identification of alkane precursor contributions to ambient SOA.

  20. The detection and phylogenetic analysis of the alkane 1-monooxygenase gene of members of the genus Rhodococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táncsics, András; Benedek, Tibor; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Veres, Péter G; Farkas, Milán; Máthé, István; Márialigeti, Károly; Kukolya, József; Lányi, Szabolcs; Kriszt, Balázs

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring and anthropogenic petroleum hydrocarbons are potential carbon sources for many bacteria. The AlkB-related alkane hydroxylases, which are integral membrane non-heme iron enzymes, play a key role in the microbial degradation of many of these hydrocarbons. Several members of the genus Rhodococcus are well-known alkane degraders and are known to harbor multiple alkB genes encoding for different alkane 1-monooxygenases. In the present study, 48 Rhodococcus strains, representing 35 species of the genus, were investigated to find out whether there was a dominant type of alkB gene widespread among species of the genus that could be used as a phylogenetic marker. Phylogenetic analysis of rhodococcal alkB gene sequences indicated that a certain type of alkB gene was present in almost every member of the genus Rhodococcus. These alkB genes were common in a unique nucleotide sequence stretch absent from other types of rhodococcal alkB genes that encoded a conserved amino acid motif: WLG(I/V/L)D(G/D)GL. The sequence identity of the targeted alkB gene in Rhodococcus ranged from 78.5 to 99.2% and showed higher nucleotide sequence variation at the inter-species level compared to the 16S rRNA gene (93.9-99.8%). The results indicated that the alkB gene type investigated might be applicable for: (i) differentiating closely related Rhodococcus species, (ii) properly assigning environmental isolates to existing Rhodococcus species, and finally (iii) assessing whether a new Rhodococcus isolate represents a novel species of the genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Tracing natural gas transport into shallow groundwater using dissolved nitrogen and alkane chemistry in Parker County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, T.; Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved methane in shallow groundwater drives public concern about the safety of hydraulic fracturing. We report dissolved alkane and nitrogen gas concentrations and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N, respectively) from 208 water wells in Parker county, Texas. These data are used to differentiate 'stray' natural gas and low temperature microbial methane, and (2) estimate the ratio of stray gas to groundwater. The ratio of (gas-phase) stray natural gas to groundwater is estimated by correlating dissolved methane and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved nitrogen δ15N values. Our hypothesis is groundwater exposed to high volumes of stray natural gas have high dissolved methane concentrations and low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Alternatively, groundwater exposed to low volumes of stray gas-phase natural gas have elevated dissolved methane, but the concentration of dissolved nitrogen and its d15N value is atmospheric. A cluster of samples in Parker county have high concentrations of dissolved methane (>10mg/L) with d13Cmethane and alkane ratios (C1/C2+C3) typical of natural gas from the Barnett Shale and the Strawn Formation. Coupling dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values with these results, we suggest that few of the wells in this cluster preserve large gas to water ratios. Many samples with high dissolved methane concentrations have atmospheric dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values, providing evidence against high flux natural gas transport into shallow groundwater. These results demonstrate that dissolved nitrogen chemistry, in addition to dissolved alkane and noble gas measurements, may be useful to discern sources of dissolved methane and estimate ratios of stray natural gas-water ratios.

  2. [Bis(TrimethylsilylMethyl]Lithium and -Sodium: Solubility in Alkanes and Complexes with O- and N- Donor Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus von Pilgrim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to alkyl compounds of lithium, which play an important role in organometallic chemistry, the corresponding heavier alkali metal compounds are less investigated. These compounds are mostly insoluble in inert solvents or undergo solvolysis in coordinating solvents due to their high reactivity. An exception from this typical behavior is demonstrated by bis(trimethylsilylmethylsodium. This study examines alkane solutions of bis(trimethylsilylmethyllithium and -sodium by NMR spectroscopic and cryoscopic methods. In addition, structural studies by X-ray crystallography of the corresponding compounds coordinated by O- and N- ligands (tetrahydrofuran and tetramethylethylenediamine present possible structural motifs of the uncoordinated compounds in solution.

  3. Re-evaluating the isotopic divide between angiosperms and gymnosperms using n-alkane δ13C values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    Angiosperm δ13C values are typically 1-3‰ more negative than those of co-occurring gymnosperms. This is known for both bulk leaf and compound-specific values from n-alkanes, which are stable, straight-chain hydrocarbons (C23-C35) found in the epicuticular leaf wax of vascular plants. For n-alkanes, there is a second distinction between the δ13C values of angiosperms and gymnosperms—δ13C values generally decrease with increasing chain-length in angiosperms, while in gymnosperms they increase. These two distinctions have been used to support the ‘plant community change hypothesis’ explaining the difference between the terrestrial and marine carbon isotope excursions during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM.) Preserved n-alkanes from terrestrial paleosols in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming reveal a negative carbon isotope excursion during the PETM of 4-5‰, which is 1-2‰ greater than the excursion recorded by marine carbonates. The local plant community, known from macrofossils as well as palynoflora, shifted from a deciduous, mixed angiosperm/gymnosperm flora to a suite of evergreen angiosperm species during the PETM. At the end of the PETM, the community returned to a mixed deciduous flora very similar to the original. This change in the plant community could thus magnify the terrestrial negative carbon isotope excursion to the degree necessary to explain its divergence from the marine record. However, the comparison between modern angiosperms and gymnosperms has been made mostly between broadleaf, deciduous angiosperms and evergreen, coniferous gymnosperms. New data analyzing deciduous, coniferous gymnosperms, including Metasequoia glyptostroboides and Taxodium distichum, suggests that the division previously ascribed to taxonomy may actually be based on leaf habit and physiology, specifically broadleaf, deciduous versus needle-leaf, evergreen plants. If differences in n-alkane δ13C values can be described not as angiosperms versus gymnosperms

  4. Particle size distribution of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in urban and industrial aerosol of Algiers, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladji, R; Yassaa, N; Balducci, C; Cecinato, A

    2014-02-01

    The distribution of ambient air n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated to particles with aerodynamic diameters lesser than 10 μm (PM(10)) into six fractions (five stages and a backup filter) was studied for the first time in Algeria. Investigation took place during September of 2007 at an urban and industrial site of Algiers. Size-resolved samples (<0.49, 0.49-0.95, 0.95-1.5, 1.5-3.0, 3.0-7.2, and 7.2-10 μm) were concurrently collected at the two sampling sites using five-stage high-volume cascade impactors. Most of n-alkanes (~72 %) and PAHs (~90 %) were associated with fine particles ≤ 1.5 μm in both urban and industrial atmosphere. In both cases, the n-alkane contents exhibited bimodal or weakly bimodal distribution peaking at the 0.95-1.5-μm size range within the fine mode and at 7.3-10 μm in the coarse mode. Low molecular weight PAHs displayed bimodal patterns peaking at 0.49-0.95 and 7.3-10 μm, while high molecular weight PAHs exhibited mono-modal distribution with maximum in the <0.49-μm fraction. While the mass mean diameter of total n-alkanes in the urban and industrial sites was 0.70 and 0.84 μm, respectively, it did not exceed 0.49 μm for PAHs. Carbon preference index (~1.1), wax% (10.1-12.8), and the diagnostic ratios for PAHs all revealed that vehicular emission was the major source of these organic compounds in PM(10) during the study periods and that the contribution of epicuticular waxes emitted by terrestrial plants was minor. According to benzo[a]pyrene-equivalent carcinogenic power rates, ca. 90 % of overall PAH toxicity across PM(10) was found in particles ≤ 0.95 μm in diameter which could induce adverse health effects to the population living in these areas.

  5. Collisional energy transfer in polyatomic molecules at high temperatures: Master equation analysis of vibrational relaxation of shock-heated alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Collisional energy transfer plays an important role in unimolecular reaction kinetics. This Letter presents classical trajectory calculations of the energy transfer processes in collisions between selected alkanes (ethane, propane, isobutane, and neopentane) and krypton at high temperature. The primary aim of this study was to elucidate the validity of the predicted energy transfer parameters by performing master equation analyses of their vibrational relaxation times and comparing the predicted values with the available experimental data. The results demonstrate the ability of classical trajectory calculations to accurately predict the parameters for vibrational energy transfer.

  6. Thermodynamic properties of (an ester+an alkane). XVII. Experimental H{sub m}{sup E} and V{sub m}{sup E} values for (an alkyl propanoate+an alkane) at 318.15K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)]. E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Espiau, F. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Toledo, F.J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Dieppa, R. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071-Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2005-09-15

    In this article, we record the experimental values of H{sub m}{sup E} and V{sub m}{sup E}, obtained at a temperature of T=318.15K and atmospheric pressure for a set of 30 binary mixtures comprised of five alkyl propanoates (methyl to pentyl) with six odd alkanes (heptane to heptadecane). The net values obtained for these properties are the result of different effects of the selected compounds on the mixing process. These effects and the variation with temperature are studied. The H{sub m}{sup E} are positive in all cases and increase with the saturated hydrocarbon chain and diminish with the alkanolic portion of the ester. The variation in V{sub m}{sup E} is similar to that occurring in the H{sub m}{sup E}. For the data correlation, a new form of polynomial equation is used in which the variable is the so-called active fraction which, in turn, is a function of the concentration of the mixture, giving acceptable estimations for simultaneous correlations between the values of Gibbs function obtained in the isobaric (liquid+vapour) equilibria and the enthalpies of the mixture, for some of the mixtures studied. The results are explained with the molecular model proposed for (ester+alkane) mixtures. Finally, the application of two versions of the UNIFAC groups contribution method to estimate enthalpies of the mixtures does not give satisfactory results, although the modified UNIFAC gives somewhat better results.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of (an ester+an alkane). XVII. Experimental HmE and VmE values for (an alkyl propanoate+an alkane) at 318.15K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.; Espiau, F.; Toledo, F.J.; Dieppa, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we record the experimental values of H m E and V m E , obtained at a temperature of T=318.15K and atmospheric pressure for a set of 30 binary mixtures comprised of five alkyl propanoates (methyl to pentyl) with six odd alkanes (heptane to heptadecane). The net values obtained for these properties are the result of different effects of the selected compounds on the mixing process. These effects and the variation with temperature are studied. The H m E are positive in all cases and increase with the saturated hydrocarbon chain and diminish with the alkanolic portion of the ester. The variation in V m E is similar to that occurring in the H m E . For the data correlation, a new form of polynomial equation is used in which the variable is the so-called active fraction which, in turn, is a function of the concentration of the mixture, giving acceptable estimations for simultaneous correlations between the values of Gibbs function obtained in the isobaric (liquid+vapour) equilibria and the enthalpies of the mixture, for some of the mixtures studied. The results are explained with the molecular model proposed for (ester+alkane) mixtures. Finally, the application of two versions of the UNIFAC groups contribution method to estimate enthalpies of the mixtures does not give satisfactory results, although the modified UNIFAC gives somewhat better results

  8. Thermodynamic properties of (an ester + an alkane). XVI. Experimental HmE and VmE values and a new correlation method for (an alkyl ethanoate + an n-alkane) at 318.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.; Espiau, F.; Toledo, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    This work presents the measurements of H m E and V m E , obtained at a temperature of T=318.15 K and atmospheric pressure for a set of 30 binary mixtures composed of five alkyl ethanoates (methyl to pentyl) with six odd n-alkanes (C 7 to C 17 ). The results show that the mixing processes are endothermic in all cases, with regular increases in H m E with the molecular weight of the saturated hydrocarbon and diminishing with the alkanolic part of the ester. The change in V m E is also regular and similar to that of H m E . For data correlation, a new form of polynomial equation is used. In this, the so-called active fraction is used as a variable which, in turn, depends on the concentration of the mixture, giving acceptable estimations of the Gibbs function obtained in the isobaric (liquid + vapor) equilibria for some of the mixtures studied. Finally, a molecular model which interprets the behavior of mixtures of alkyl ethanoates + n-alkanes and the results of residual quantities is proposed. To these binary systems some group contribution models are applied. A modified version of the UNIFAC model gives satisfactory results for enthalpies

  9. Thermodynamic properties of (an ester + an alkane). XVIII. Experimental H{sub m}{sup E}andV{sub m}{sup E} values for (an alkyl butanoate + an alkane) at T = 318.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)], E-mail: jortega@dip.ulpgc.es; Navas, A.; Sabater, G.; Ascanio, M.; Placido, J. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica de Fluidos, Parque Cientifico-Tecnologico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35071 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    This work presents the experimental values of H{sub m}{sup E}andV{sub m}{sup E} obtained at a temperature of 318.15 K and atmospheric pressure for a group of 24 binary mixtures comprised of the first four alkyl butanoates (methyl to butyl) with six odd alkanes, from heptane to heptadecane. All the mixtures are endothermic, and present a regular increase in H{sub m}{sup E} with the molecular weight of the saturated hydrocarbon, while, for a same alkane, the enthalpic effects diminish with increasing alcoholic chain of the butanoate. The variation in V{sub m}{sup E} occurs in the same direction. In this paper the structural behaviour of these systems and the influence of temperature on excess properties are analysed. Experimental data are correlated with a suitable polynomial equation which is given as a function of concentration and temperature, that permits a simultaneous correlation to be established with other properties of the mixture, such as (vapour + liquid) equilibria; and acceptable results are obtained. Finally, an estimation of H{sub m}{sup E} is made with two known versions of the UNIFAC model. In the version by Dang and Tassios [J. Dang, D.P. Tassios, Ind. Eng. Chem. Process Des. Dev. 25 (1986) 22-31.], a method is proposed that considers the interaction parameters as a function of the butanoate alkanolic chain. The estimations obtained for H{sub m}{sup E} are good.

  10. The Gas-Phase Heats of Formation of n-Alkanes as a Function of the Electrostatic Potential Extrema on their Molecular Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhr M. Abu-Awwad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid density functional B3LYP is employed to map the molecular electrostatic potentials on the surfaces of twenty normal alkanes, (Cn H2n+2, n = 1-20. It is shown that gas-phase heats of formation of the alkanes can be represented quantitatively in terms of the potential, where a general equation of the heat of formation is introduced as a function of potentials' extrema, VS,min and VS,max with average absolute error of 0.028 kcal/mol and a standard deviation of 0.048 kcal/mol. This should be viewed as a success of the B3LYP functional and the molecular surface electrostatic potential as tools of chemistry. The predicted gas-phase heats of formation of thirty normal alkanes (n = 21-50 are reproduced and compared to their experimental counterparts when available.

  11. Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC12674 becomes alkane-tolerant upon GroEL2 overexpression and survives in the n-octane phase in two phase culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takihara, Hayato; Matsuura, Chiaki; Ogihara, Jun; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sunairi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the overexpression of GroEL2 played an important role in increasing the alkane tolerance of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4. In the present study, we examined the effects of the introduction of groEL2 on the alkane tolerance of other Rhodococcus strains. The introduction of groEL2 into Rhodococcus strains led to increased alkane tolerance. The translocation of R. rhodochrous ATCC12674 cells to and survival in the n-octane (C8) phase in two phase culture were significantly enhanced by the introduction of groEL2 derived from strain PR4, suggesting that engineering cells to overexpress GroEL2 represents an effective strategy for enhancing organic solvent tolerance in Rhodococcus.

  12. Terrestrial environmental changes around the Gulf of Aden over the last 210 kyr deduced from the sediment n-alkane record: Implications for the dispersal of Homo sapiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaji, Yuta; Kawahata, Hodaka; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Murayama, Masafumi; Tamaki, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed long-chain (C25-C36) n-alkanes and pollen grains in sediments from the Gulf of Aden covering the last 212 kyr to reconstruct the surrounding terrestrial environment, a critical region for the dispersal of Homo sapiens. Substantial increases in the flux of n-alkanes during 200-185, 120-95, and 70-50 ka were interpreted to indicate enhanced vegetation biomass in the Arabian Peninsula and the northern part of the Horn of Africa or increase in lithogenic material inputs. Periods of enhanced n-alkane flux occurred during or immediately after pluvial episodes, indicating that the increased precipitation may have induced substantially enhanced vegetation biomass, creating favorable conditions for Homo sapiens. Additionally, vegetation may have increased due to moderate precipitation unrecorded by speleothems or in accordance with the lowering of sea level, indicating that the dispersal might have been possible even after the shift to an arid environment indicated by the speleothems.

  13. Anaerobic Coculture of Microalgae with Thermosipho globiformans and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii at 68°C Enhances Generation of n-Alkane-Rich Biofuels after Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shigeru; Igarashi, Kensuke; Utsumi, Motoo; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    We tested different alga-bacterium-archaeon consortia to investigate the production of oil-like mixtures, expecting that n-alkane-rich biofuels might be synthesized after pyrolysis. Thermosipho globiformans and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii were cocultured at 68°C with microalgae for 9 days under two anaerobic conditions, followed by pyrolysis at 300°C for 4 days. Arthrospira platensis (Cyanobacteria), Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyta), Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta), and Euglena gracilis (Euglenophyta) served as microalgal raw materials. D. tertiolecta, E. huxleyi, and E. gracilis cocultured with the bacterium and archaeon inhibited their growth and CH4 production. E. huxleyi had the strongest inhibitory effect. Biofuel generation was enhanced by reducing impurities containing alkanenitriles during pyrolysis. The composition and amounts of n-alkanes produced by pyrolysis were closely related to the lipid contents and composition of the microalgae. Pyrolysis of A. platensis and D. tertiolecta containing mainly phospholipids and glycolipids generated short-carbon-chain n-alkanes (n-tridecane to n-nonadecane) and considerable amounts of isoprenoids. E. gracilis also produced mainly short n-alkanes. In contrast, E. huxleyi containing long-chain (31 and 33 carbon atoms) alkenes and very long-chain (37 to 39 carbon atoms) alkenones, in addition to phospholipids and glycolipids, generated a high yield of n-alkanes of various lengths (n-tridecane to n-pentatriacontane). The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of these n-alkanes were similar to those of native petroleum crude oils despite containing a considerable amount of n-hentriacontane. The ratio of phytane to n-octadecane was also similar to that of native crude oils. PMID:23183975

  14. Geochemical characteristics of n-alkanes and isoprenoids in coal seams from Zhuji coal mine, Huainan coalfield, China, and their relationship with coal-forming environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Guijian; Liu, Jingjing

    2018-01-26

    Ten coal seams in Upper Shihezi Formation, Lower Shihezi Formation, and Shanxi Formation from the Zhuji mine, Huainan coalfield, China, were analyzed for n-alkanes and isoprenoids (pristine and phytane) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), with an aim of reconstructing the coal-forming plants and depositional environments along with organic carbon isotope analyses. The total n-alkane concentrations ranged from 34.1 to 481 mg/kg. Values of organic carbon isotope (δ 13 C org ) ranged from - 24.6 to - 23.7‰. The calorific value (Q b,d ), maximum vitrinite reflectance (Ro max ), proximate, and ultimate analysis were also determined but showed no correlation with n-alkane concentrations. Carbon Preference Index (CPI) values ranged from 0.945 to 1.30, suggesting no obvious odd/even predominance of n-alkane. The predominance of C 11 and C 17 n-alkanes implied that the coal may be deposited in the fresh and mildly brackish environment. According to the contrary changing trend of pristine/phytane (Pr/Ph) ratio and boron concentrations, Pr/Ph can be used as an indicator to reconstruct the marine transgression-regression in sedimentary environment of coal formation. The influence of marine transgression may lead to the enrichment of pyrite sulfur in the coal seam 4-2. C3 plants (- 32 to - 21‰) and marine algae (- 23 to - 16‰) were probably the main coal-forming plants in the studied coal seams. No correlation of the n-alkane concentration and redox condition of the depositional environment with organic carbon isotope composition were found.

  15. Hydrodeoxygenation of water-insoluble bio-oil to alkanes using a highly dispersed Pd-Mo catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haohong; Dong, Juncai; Gu, Xianrui; Peng, Yung-Kang; Chen, Wenxing; Issariyakul, Titipong; Myers, William K; Li, Meng-Jung; Yi, Ni; Kilpatrick, Alexander F R; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Xusheng; Ji, Shufang; Wang, Qian; Feng, Junting; Chen, Dongliang; Li, Yadong; Buffet, Jean-Charles; Liu, Haichao; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman; O'Hare, Dermot

    2017-09-19

    Bio-oil, produced by the destructive distillation of cheap and renewable lignocellulosic biomass, contains high energy density oligomers in the water-insoluble fraction that can be utilized for diesel and valuable fine chemicals productions. Here, we show an efficient hydrodeoxygenation catalyst that combines highly dispersed palladium and ultrafine molybdenum phosphate nanoparticles on silica. Using phenol as a model substrate this catalyst is 100% effective and 97.5% selective for hydrodeoxygenation to cyclohexane under mild conditions in a batch reaction; this catalyst also demonstrates regeneration ability in long-term continuous flow tests. Detailed investigations into the nature of the catalyst show that it combines hydrogenation activity of Pd and high density of both Brønsted and Lewis acid sites; we believe these are key features for efficient catalytic hydrodeoxygenation behavior. Using a wood and bark-derived feedstock, this catalyst performs hydrodeoxygenation of lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose-derived oligomers into liquid alkanes with high efficiency and yield.Bio-oil is a potential major source of renewable fuels and chemicals. Here, the authors report a palladium-molybdenum mixed catalyst for the selective hydrodeoxygenation of water-insoluble bio-oil to mixtures of alkanes with high carbon yield.

  16. An overview of dehydration, aldol-condensation and hydrogenation processes for production of liquid alkanes from biomass-derived carbohydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chheda, Juben N.; Dumesic, James A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2007-05-30

    We present results for the conversion of carbohydrate feedstocks to liquid alkanes by the combination of dehydration, aldol-condensation/hydrogenation, and dehydration/hydrogenation processing. With respect to the first dehydration step, we demonstrate that HMF can be produced in good selectivity from abundantly available polysaccharides (such as inulin, sucrose) containing fructose monomer units using a biphasic batch reactor system. The reaction system can be optimized to achieve good yields to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from fructose by varying the contents of aqueous-phase modifiers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP). Regarding the aldol-condensation/hydrogenation step, we present the development of stable, solid base catalysts in aqueous environments. We address the effects of various reaction parameters such as the molar ratio of reactants and temperature on overall product yield for sequential aldol-condensation and hydrogenation steps. Overall, our results show that it is technically possible to convert carbohydrate feedstocks to produce liquid alkanes by the combination of dehydration, aldol-condensation/hydrogenation, and dehydration/hydrogenation processing; however, further optimization of these processes is required to decrease the overall number of separate steps (and reactors) required in this conversion. (author)

  17. Anomaly in the Chain Length Dependence of n-Alkane Diffusion in ZIF-4 Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seungtaik; Gopalan, Arun; Hovestadt, Maximilian; Piepenbreier, Frank; Chmelik, Christian; Hartmann, Martin; Snurr, Randall Q; Kärger, Jörg

    2018-03-15

    Molecular diffusion is commonly found to slow down with increasing molecular size. Deviations from this pattern occur in some host materials with pore sizes approaching the diameters of the guest molecules. A variety of theoretical models have been suggested to explain deviations from this pattern, but robust experimental data are scarcely available. Here, we present such data, obtained by monitoring the chain length dependence of the uptake of n- alkanes in the zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-4. A monotonic decrease in diffusivity from ethane to n- butane was observed, followed by an increase for n- pentane, and another decrease for n- hexane. This observation was confirmed by uptake measurements with n- butane/ n -pentane mixtures, which yield faster uptake of n- pentane. Further evidence is provided by the observation of overshooting effects, i.e., by transient n- pentane concentrations exceeding the (eventually attained) equilibrium value. Accompanying grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations reveal, for the larger n- alkanes, significant differences between the adsorbed and gas phase molecular configurations, indicating strong confinement effects within ZIF-4, which, with increasing chain length, may be expected to give rise to configurational shifts facilitating molecular propagation at particular chain lengths.

  18. High pressure phase equilibrium of ternary and multicomponent alkane mixtures in the temperature range from (283–473) K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Liu, Yiqun; Wibowo, Ahmad A.

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric multicomponent alkane mixtures can be used as model systems for reservoir fluids. We have prepared two ternary mixtures, methane/n-butane/n-decane and methane/n-butane/n-dodecane, and two multicomponent mixtures composed of methane/n-butane/n-octane/n-dodecane/n-hexadecane/n-eicosane a......Asymmetric multicomponent alkane mixtures can be used as model systems for reservoir fluids. We have prepared two ternary mixtures, methane/n-butane/n-decane and methane/n-butane/n-dodecane, and two multicomponent mixtures composed of methane......-Redlich-Kwong (SRK), Peng-Robinson (PR), Perturbed Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), and Soave-Benedict-Webb-Rubin (Soave-BWR), have been used to predict phase equilibrium of the measured systems. PR and PC-SAFT give better results than others and Soave-BWR gives poor phase envelope predictions...... the fractions just below the saturation pressures are difficult to predict. Moreover GERG-2008 has also been tested with the measured methane/n-butane/n-decane system. It over predicts the saturation pressures but predicts low pressure liquid fractions quite accurately....

  19. Investigation on the light alkanes aromatization over Zn and Ga modified HZSM-5 catalysts in the presence of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingyin; Zhang, Fengqi; Jarvis, Jack; He, Peng; Yung, Matthew M.; Wang, Aiguo; Zhao, Kai; Song, Hua

    2018-05-01

    The catalytic co-aromatization of methane and paraffin-rich raffinate oil was investigated along with hexane, heptane and octane as its model compounds over zinc and gallium modified ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts. The benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) components derived from light alkane aromatization were highly promoted with the assistance of methane. The co-existence of Zn and Ga metal species has a positive effect on the formation of BTX components, whereas the individual metal loaded catalyst resulted in the production of heavy aromatics, suggesting that zinc and gallium have a synergistic effect on the formation of BTX under the methane environment. When concerned with gaseous analysis, the introduced methane might interact with smaller intermediates and then transform into larger hydrocarbons. From the DRIFT observation, it was witnessed that the interaction between light alkane and methane occurred on the surface of the charged Zn-Ga/ZSM-5 catalyst. According to the comprehensive catalyst characterizations, the excellent catalytic performance may be closely associated with greatly dispersed metal species on the zeolite support, improved microporous characteristic, moderate Bronsted and increased Lewis acidic sites during the paraffin-rich liquid feedstock aromatization under methane environment. This research provides a promising pathway for the highly effective and profitable utilization of petrochemical resources and natural gas.

  20. Methanogenic paraffin degradation proceeds via alkane addition to fumarate by 'Smithella' spp. mediated by a syntrophic coupling with hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrik, Boris; Marks, Christopher R; Davidova, Irene A; McInerney, Michael J; Pruitt, Shane; Duncan, Kathleen E; Suflita, Joseph M; Callaghan, Amy V

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic microbial biodegradation of recalcitrant, water-insoluble substrates, such as paraffins, presents unique metabolic challenges. To elucidate this process, a methanogenic consortium capable of mineralizing long-chain n-paraffins (C28 -C50 ) was enriched from San Diego Bay sediment. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated the dominance of Syntrophobacterales (43%) and Methanomicrobiales (26%). Metagenomic sequencing allowed draft genome assembly of dominant uncultivated community members belonging to the bacterial genus Smithella and the archaeal genera Methanoculleus and Methanosaeta. Five contigs encoding homologs of the catalytic subunit of alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) were detected. Additionally, mRNA transcripts for these genes, including a homolog binned within the 'Smithella' sp. SDB genome scaffold, were detected via RT-PCR, implying that paraffins are activated via 'fumarate addition'. Metabolic reconstruction and comparison with genome scaffolds of uncultivated n-alkane degrading 'Smithella' spp. are consistent with the hypothesis that syntrophically growing 'Smithella' spp. may achieve reverse electron transfer by coupling the reoxidation of ETFred to a membrane-bound FeS oxidoreductase functioning as an ETF:menaquinone oxidoreductase. Subsequent electron transfer could proceed via a periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and/or hydrogenase, allowing energetic coupling to hydrogenotrophic methanogens such as Methanoculleus. Ultimately, these data provide fundamental insight into the energy conservation mechanisms that dictate interspecies interactions salient to methanogenic alkane mineralization. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Modeling of asphaltene precipitation due to steam and n-alkane co-injection in the ES-SAGD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badamchizadeh, A.; Kohse, Bruce F.; Kumar, A. [Computer Modelling Group Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper provides an insight into the SAGD process in general, and the formation of asphaltene participates in the hybrid ES-SAGD process in particular. The objective of this work was to build an EoS model able to calculate the physical and chemical properties of the bitumen and n-alkane mixture, develop a model to quantify asphaltene participates in bitumen due to n-alkane injection, and investigate their effect on the ES-SAGD process. Athabasca bitumen properties identified under various test conditions and from the results of previous efforts, mainly the SimDist experimental data, were illustrated. These data were used to develop the EoS model, which in turn was used to generate the STARS thermal simulator. Overall, the EoS model was successfully developed and hence was able to predict bitumen and n-heptane properties. Moreover, asphaltene deposition in the ES-SAGD process was modeled in the thermal simulator its effect in causing oil blockage and restrictions in the steam chamber over a long run of the process was demonstrated.

  2. Third O2 addition reactions promote the low-temperature auto-ignition of n-alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2016-01-20

    Comprehensive low-temperature oxidation mechanisms are needed to accurately predict fuel auto-ignition properties. This paper studies the effects of a previously unconsidered third O2 addition reaction scheme on the simulated auto-ignition of n-alkanes. We demonstrate that this extended low-temperature oxidation scheme has a minor effect on the simulation of n-pentane ignition; however, its addition significantly improves the prediction of n-hexane auto-ignition under low-temperature rapid compression machine conditions. Additional simulations of n-hexane in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine show that engine-operating parameters (e.g., intake temperature and combustion phasing) are significantly altered when the third O2 addition kinetic mechanism is considered. The advanced combustion phasing is initiated by the formation and destruction of additional radical chain-branching intermediates produced in the third O2 addition process, e.g. keto-dihydroperoxides and/or keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ethers. Our results indicate that third O2 addition reactions accelerate low-temperature radical chain branching at conditions of relevance to advance engine technologies, and therefore these chemical pathways should also be considered for n-alkanes with 6 or more carbon atoms. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella sp. MH1: A wide-chain length alkane-degrading actinomycete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiciudean, Iulia; Nie, Yong; Tănase, Ana-Maria; Stoica, Ileana; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2018-02-20

    Tsukamurella sp. strain MH1, capable to use a wide range of n-alkanes as the only carbon source, was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil (Pitești, Romania) and its complete genome was sequenced. The 4,922,396 bp genome contains only one circular chromosome with a G + C content of 71.12%, much higher than the type strains of this genus (68.4%). Based on the 16S rRNA genes sequence similarity, strain MH1 was taxonomically identified as Tsukamurella carboxydivorans. Genome analyses revealed that strain MH1 is harboring only one gene encoding for the alkB-like hydroxylase, arranged in a complete alkane monooxygenase operon. This is the first complete genome of the specie T. carboxydivorans, which will provide insights into the potential of Tsukamurella sp. MH1 and related strains for bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons-contaminated sites and into the environmental role of these bacteria. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Products and Kinetics of the Reactions of an Alkane Monolayer and a Terminal Alkene Monolayer with NO₃ Radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Simone; Bertram, Allan K.

    2009-01-27

    The reactions of an alkanethiol and a terminal alkenethiol self-assembled monolayer with NO₃ radicals (in the presence of NO₂ and O₂) were studied. For the alkane monolayer, infrared (IR) spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) confirmed the formation of organonitrates (RONO₂). The observation of organonitrates is in contrast to the recent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data, which showed very little nitrogen-containing surface species. The identification of organonitrates may help explain why significant volatilization of the organic chain was not observed in recent studies of alkane monolayer oxidation by NO₃ radicals. The reactive uptake coefficient (g) of NO₃ on alkene monolayers determined in our study is higher than the values obtained in a recent study using liquid and solid alkene bulk films. A possible reason for this difference may be the location of the double bond at the interface. Using the g value determined in our studies, we show that under conditions where NO₃ is high the lifetime of an alkene monolayer in the atmosphere may be short (approximately 20 min). XPS, IR, and ToF-SIMS were used to identify surface functional groups after the oxidation of the alkene monolayers by NO₃. The results are consistent with the formation of C-O, aldehyde/ketone, carboxylic groups, and nitrogen containing species.

  5. Anomaly in the Chain Length Dependence of n-Alkane Diffusion in ZIF-4 Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungtaik Hwang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular diffusion is commonly found to slow down with increasing molecular size. Deviations from this pattern occur in some host materials with pore sizes approaching the diameters of the guest molecules. A variety of theoretical models have been suggested to explain deviations from this pattern, but robust experimental data are scarcely available. Here, we present such data, obtained by monitoring the chain length dependence of the uptake of n-alkanes in the zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-4. A monotonic decrease in diffusivity from ethane to n-butane was observed, followed by an increase for n-pentane, and another decrease for n-hexane. This observation was confirmed by uptake measurements with n-butane/n-pentane mixtures, which yield faster uptake of n-pentane. Further evidence is provided by the observation of overshooting effects, i.e., by transient n-pentane concentrations exceeding the (eventually attained equilibrium value. Accompanying grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations reveal, for the larger n-alkanes, significant differences between the adsorbed and gas phase molecular configurations, indicating strong confinement effects within ZIF-4, which, with increasing chain length, may be expected to give rise to configurational shifts facilitating molecular propagation at particular chain lengths.

  6. Heritability of the Structures and 13C Fractionation in Tomato Leaf Wax Alkanes: A Genetic Model System to Inform Paleoenvironmental Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. D. Bender

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf wax n-alkanes are broadly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental information. However, the utility of n-alkanes as a paleoenvironmental proxy may be modulated by the extent to which biological as well as environmental factors influence the structural and isotopic variability of leaf waxes. In paleoclimate applications, there is usually an implicit assumption that most variation of leaf wax traits through a time series can be attributed to environmental change and that biological sources of variability within plant communities are small. For example, changes in hydrology affect the δ2H of waxes via rainwater and the δ13C of leaf waxes by changing plant communities. We measured the degree of genetic control over δ13C variation in leaf waxes within closely related species with an experimental greenhouse growth study. We measured the proportion of variability in structural and isotopic leaf wax traits that is attributable to genetic variation using a set of 76 introgression lines (ILs between two interfertile Solanum (tomato species: S. lycopersicum cv M82 (hereafter cv M82 and S. pennellii. Leaves of S. pennellii, a wild desert tomato relative, produced significantly more iso-alkanes than cv M82, a domesticated tomato cultivar adapted to water-replete conditions. We report a methylation index to summarize the ratio of branched (iso- and anteiso- to total alkanes. Between Solanum pennellii and cv M82, the iso-alkanes were found to be enriched in 13C by 1.2–1.4‰ over n-alkanes. The broad-sense heritability values (H2 of leaf wax traits describe the degree to which genetic variation contributes to variation of these traits. Variation of individual carbon isotopic compositions of alkanes were of low heritability (H2 = 0.13–0.19, suggesting that most variation in δ13C of leaf waxes in this study can be attributed to environmental variance. This supports the interpretation that variation in the δ13C of wax compounds recorded in sediments

  7. Simple addition of silica to an alkane solution of Wilkinson WMe6 or Schrock W alkylidyne complex give active complex for saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Callens, Emmanuel

    2015-08-24

    Addition of PDA silica to a solution of the Wilkinson WMe6 as well as the Schrock W neopentilidyne tris neopentyl complex catalyzes linear or cyclic alkanes to produce respectively a distribution of linear alkanes from methane up to triacontane or a mixture of cyclic and macrocyclic hydrocarbons. This single catalytic system transforms also linear α-olefins into higher and lower homologues via isomerization/metathesis mechanism (ISOMET). This complex is also efficient towards functionalized olefins. Unsaturated fatty acid esters (FAEs) are converted into diesters corresponding to self-metathesis products.

  8. Heritability of the structures and 13C fractionation in tomato leaf wax alkanes: a genetic model system to inform paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Amanda L. D.; Chitwood, Daniel H.; Bradley, Alexander S.

    2017-06-01

    Leaf wax n-alkanes are broadly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental information. However, the utility of n-alkanes as a paleoenvironmental proxy may be modulated by the extent to which biological as well as environmental factors influence the structural and isotopic variability of leaf waxes. In paleoclimate applications, there is usually an implicit assumption that most variation of leaf wax traits through a time series can be attributed to environmental change and that biological sources of variability within plant communities are small. For example, changes in hydrology affect the δ2H of waxes via rainwater and the δ13C of leaf waxes by changing plant communities. We measured the degree of genetic control over δ13C variation in leaf waxes within closely related species with an experimental greenhouse growth study. We measured the proportion of variability in structural and isotopic leaf wax traits that is attributable to genetic variation using a set of 76 introgression lines (ILs) between two interfertile Solanum (tomato) species: S. lycopersicum cv M82 (hereafter cv M82) and S. pennellii. Leaves of S. pennellii, a wild desert tomato relative, produced significantly more iso-alkanes than cv M82, a domesticated tomato cultivar adapted to water-replete conditions. We report a methylation index to summarize the ratio of branched (iso- and anteiso-) to total alkanes. Between S. pennellii and cv M82, the iso-alkanes were found to be enriched in 13C by 1.2-1.4‰ over n-alkanes. The broad-sense heritability values (H2) of leaf wax traits describe the degree to which genetic variation contributes to variation of these traits. Variation of individual carbon isotopic compositions of alkanes were of low heritability (H2 = 0.13-0.19), suggesting that most variation in δ13C of leaf waxes in this study can be attributed to environmental variance. This supports the interpretation that variation in the δ13C of wax compounds recorded in sediments reflects

  9. Validation of a δ2Hn-alkane-δ18Ohemicellulose based paleohygrometer: Implications from a climate chamber experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Johannes; Kathrin Schäfer, Imke; Tuthorn, Mario; Wüthrich, Lorenz; Zech, Jana; Glaser, Bruno; Juchelka, Dieter; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Zech, Roland; Mayr, Christoph; Zech, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Leaf wax-derived biomarkers, e.g. long chain n-alkanes and fatty acids, and their hydrogen isotopic composition are proved to be of a value in paleoclimatology/-hydrology research. However, the alteration of the isotopic signal as a result of the often unknown amount of leaf water enrichment challenges a direct reconstruction of the isotopic composition of paleoprecipitation. The coupling of ^2H/^1H results of leaf wax-derived biomarkers with 18O/16O results of hemicellulose-derived sugars has the potential to overcome this limitation and additionally allows reconstructing relative air humidity (RH) (Zech et al., 2013). This approach was recently validated by Tuthorn et al. (2015) by applying it to topsoil samples along a climate transect in Argentina. Accordingly, the biomarker-derived RH values correlate significantly with modern actual RH values from the respective study sites, showing the potential of the established 'paleohygrometer' approach. However, a climate chamber validation study to answer open questions regarding this approach, e.g. how robust biosynthetic fractionation factors are, is still missing. Here we present coupled δ2Hn-alkane-δ18Ohemicellulose results obtained for leaf material from a climate chamber experiment, in which Eucalyptus globulus, Vicia faba and Brassica oleracea were grown under controlled conditions (Mayr, 2003). First, the 2H and 18O enrichment of leaf water strongly reflects actual RH values of the climate chambers. Second, the biomarker-based reconstructed RH values correlate well with the actual RH values of the respective climate chamber, validating the proposed 'paleohygrometer' approach. And third, the calculated fractionation factors between the investigated leaf biomarkers (n-C29 and n-C31 for alkanes; arabinose and xylose for hemicellulose) and leaf water are close to the expected once reviewed from the literature (+27\\permil for hemicellulose; -155\\permil for n-alkanes). Nevertheless, minor dependencies of these

  10. Changes in the n-alkane composition of avocado pulp oil ( Persea americana, Mill. during fruit ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuffrè, A. M.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The n-alkane composition of Avocado pulp oil (cv. Hass was investigated during fruit ripening. Three samples of fruit were harvested on March 3, 2003, March 18, 2003 and April 2, 2003. Glass gravity column chromatography was employed to separate n-alkanes from other minor components contained in the unsaponifiable fraction. Gas chromatography was used to analyze the eluate. Fourteen compounds were detected ranging from n -C21 to n -C34; mainly n -C24, followed by n -C25 and then by n -C23. Quantities of n -C21, n -C22, n -C23, n -C27 and n -C28 progressively increased during ripening, whereas n -C24, n -C25, n -C26, n -C29, n -C30 and n -C34 decreased from the first harvest date to the third harvest date. While odd-numbered carbon n-alkanes increased (52.38 %, 52.85 % and 53.06 % for the three samples respectively, even-numbered carbon n-alkanes decreased as the fruit ripened (47.62 %, 47.15 % and 46.94 %. The total n-alkane content decreased during ripening, from 25.20 mg/Kg (first harvest date to 16.77 mg/Kg (third harvest date. In order to minimize.Se ha analizado la composición en hidrocarburos lineales saturados del aceite de la pulpa de aguacate (variedad Hass. Tres muestras fueron recolectadas: el 3 de marzo 2003, el 18 de marzo 2003 y el 2 de abril 2003. La separación de los hidrocarburos lineales saturados se realizó mediante fraccionamiento del insaponificable por cromatografía gravimétrica de adsorción en columna y la determinación de los mismos hidrocarburos por cromatografía gaseosa. 14 compuestos fueron detectados del n- C21 al n- C34. El n- C24 fue el mayoritario, seguido del n- C25 y el n- C23. El porcentaje de n- C21, n- C22, n- C23, n- C27 y n- C28, aumentó durante la maduración, mientras que el porcentaje de n- C24, n- C25, n- C26, n- C29, n- C30 y C34 disminuyó desde el 3 de marzo 2003 hasta el 2 de abril 2003. Los hidrocarburos lineales saturados con número impar de átomos de carbono aumentaron (52.38 %, 52

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 FAMILY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The P450alk gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. Structural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures ...

  12. Heat capacity and Joule-Thomson coefficient of selected n-alkanes at 0.1 and 10 MPa in broad temperature ranges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Varzandeh, Farhad; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2017-01-01

    Isobaric heat capacity of six n-alkanes, i.e. n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane, was determined with a Calvet type differential heat-flux calorimeter at 0.1 and 10 MPa in a broad temperature range. The measured isobaric heat capacity data were combined...

  13. Modelling the phase equilibria of multicomponent mixtures containing CO2, alkanes, water, and/or alcohols using the quadrupolar CPA equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Martin Gamel; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a quadrupolar cubic plus association (qCPA) equation of state is evaluated for its ability to predict the phase equilibria of multicomponent mixtures containing CO2 and alkanes, alcohols, and/or water. A single binary interaction parameter is employed in qCPA for all binary...

  14. Distribution and origins of n-alkanes, hopanes, and steranes in rivers and marine sediments from Southwest Caspian coast, Iran: implications for identifying petroleum hydrocarbon inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirneshan, Golshan; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Memariani, Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of n-alkanes and biomarkers (hopane and sterane) in surface sediments from Southwestern coasts of Caspian Sea and 28 rivers arriving to this lake, determined with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method, was used to assess the impacts of anthropogenic activities in the studied area. The concentrations of total n-alkanes (Σ21 n-alkane) in costal and riverine sediments varied from 249.2 to 3899.5 and 56 to 1622.4 μg g(-1), respectively. An evaluation of the source diagnostic indices indicated that petroleum related sources (petrogenic) were mainly contributed to n-alkanes in costal and most riverine sediments. Only the hydrocarbons in sediment of 3 rivers were found to be mainly of biogenic origin. Principal component analysis using hopane diagnostic ratios in costal and riverine sediments, and Anzali, Turkmenistan, and Azerbaijan oils were used to identify the sources of hydrocarbons in sediments. It was indicated that the anthropogenic contributions in most of the costal sediment samples are dominated with inputs of oil spills from Turkmenistan and Azerbaijan countries.

  15. Mechanism of Alkene, Alkane, and Alcohol Oxidation with H2O2 by an in Situ Prepared Mn-II/Pyridine-2-carboxylic Acid Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saisaha, Pattama; Dong, Jia Jia; Meinds, Tim G.; de Boer, Johannes W.; Hage, Ronald; Mecozzi, Francesco; Kasper, Johann B.; Browne, Wesley R.

    The oxidation of alkenes, alkanes, and alcohols with H2O2 is catalyzed efficiently using an in situ prepared catalyst comprised of a MnII salt and pyridine-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) together with a ketone in a wide range of solvents. The mechanism by which these reactions proceed is elucidated, with a

  16. Characterization of polychlorinated n-alkanes using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korytar, P.; Parera, J.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Santos, F.J.; Boer, de J.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with electron-capture negative ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC¿ECNI-TOF-MS) is used to study the composition and characteristics of short-, medium- and long-chain polychlorinated n-alkane (PCA) mixtures. Distinct ordered

  17. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes bound to PM1 collected near the Venice highway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valotto, Gabrio; Rampazzo, Giancarlo; Gonella, Francesco; Formenton, Gianni; Ficotto, Silvia; Giraldo, Giorgia

    2017-04-01

    n-Alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) bound to atmospheric particulate matter (PM 1 ) were investigated in a traffic site located in an urban area of Venice Province (Eastern Po Valley, Italy) during the cold season. Considering the critical situation affecting the Veneto Region concerning the atmospheric pollution and the general lack of information on PM 1 composition and emission in this area, this experimental study aims at determining the source profile, their relative contributions and the dispersion of finer particles. Four sources were identified and quantified using the Positive Matrix Factorization receptor model: (1) mixed combustions related to the residential activities, (2) agricultural biomass burning in addition to the resuspension of anthropogenic and natural debris carried by the wind, (3) gasoline and (4) diesel traffic-related combustions. The role of local atmospheric circulation was also investigated to identify the pollutant sources. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Elevation-dependent changes in n-alkane δD and soil GDGTs across the South Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Rohrmann, Alexander; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Sachse, Dirk; Tofelde, Stefanie; Niedermeyer, Eva M.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Mulch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Surface uplift of large plateaus may significantly influence regional climate and more specifically precipitation patterns and temperature, sometimes complicating paleoaltimetry interpretations. Thus, understanding the topographic evolution of tectonically active mountain belts benefits from continued development of reliable proxies to reduce uncertainties in paleoaltimetry reconstructions. Lipid biomarker-based proxies provide a novel approach to stable isotope paleoaltimetry and complement authigenic or pedogenic mineral proxy materials, in particular outside semi-arid climate zones where soil carbonates are not abundant but (soil) organic matter has a high preservation potential. Here we present δD values of soil-derived n-alkanes and mean annual air temperature (MAT) estimates based on branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) distributions to assess their potential for paleoelevation reconstructions in the southern central Andes. We analyzed soil samples across two environmental and hydrological gradients that include a hillslope (26-28°S) and a valley (22-24°S) transect on the windward flanks of Central Andean Eastern Cordillera in NW Argentina. Our results show that present-day n-alkane δD values and brGDGT-based MAT estimates are both linearly related with elevation and in good agreement with present-day climate conditions. Soil n-alkanes show a δD lapse rate (Δ (δD)) of - 1.64 ‰ / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p Colombia and Bolivia and the Equatorial and Peruvian Andes. BrGDGT-derived soil temperatures are similar to monitored winter temperatures in the region and show a lapse rate of ΔT = - 0.51 °C / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.01), comparable with lapse rates from in situ soil temperature measurements, satellite-derived land-surface temperatures at this transect, and weather stations from the Eastern Cordillera at similar latitude. As a result of an increasing leeward sampling position along the valley transect lapse rates are biased towards

  19. Stable Hydrogen Isotopes of Terrestrial n-alkanes record the Mid Younger Dryas Event in European Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muegler, I.; Gleixner, G.; Sachse, D.; Grafenstein, U. V.

    2007-12-01

    Compound-specific hydrogen isotope measurements (expressed as δD values) on lacustrine long- chained n-alkanes are a potentially promising means of reconstructing variations in the isotopic composition of continental precipitation in the geological past. Long-chain n-alkanes are produced in the leaf waxes of terrestrial higher plants and have been shown to preserve the hydrogen isotope composition of precipitation being influenced by atmospheric moisture source, evaporation as well as plant physiology. Since δD values are determined directly on carbon-bound hydrogen, which is non-exchangeable even at higher temperatures biological and environmental source conditions can be preserved over geological timescales. Here, we present a record of n-alkane δD values, \\( nC27 - nC31 \\), from the Ammersee, southern Germany and Lac d'Annecy, French Alps spanning the time period from the Oldest Dryas to Preboreal (14 ka to 11 ka BP). We compare biomarker hydrogen isotopic signatures to oxygen-isotope ratios of precipitation inferred from deep-lake ostracods from the Ammersee as well to GRIP \\(δ18\\)O values. The remarkable climate shift at the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) (12.9 to 11.6 ka BP) is recorded in the \\(δ18\\)O values as well as the hydrogen isotope signal with a pronounced drop of approx. - 40‰ in D at the Ammersee and a minor negative excursion of - (20‰) in D at Lac d'Annecy. This depletion is consistent with a colder and dryer climate and the expansion of grasslands in the lake catchments as recorded in a significant increase of grass-derived \\( nC31 \\). A sudden remarkable deuterium enrichment of about 100‰ in D is apparent in both lakes and marks the mid-Younger Dryas event (MYDE), which is also reflected in the GRIP and Ammersee \\(δ18\\)O values. δD values during this event reach or even exceed the following Holocene level. The simultaneous appearance of this event in different locations suggests a climate driven by mechanisms like the

  20. Efficient Hydrogenolysis of Alkanes at Low Temperature and Pressure Using Tantalum Hydride on MCM-41, and a Quantum Chemical Study

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogenolysis of hydrocarbons is of considerable technological importance for applications such as the hydroprocessing of petrochemical feedstocks to generate high-value and useful chemicals and fuels. We studied the catalytic activity of tantalum hydride supported on MCM-41 for the hydrogenolysis of alkanes at low temperature and low atmospheric pressure in a dynamic reactor. The reactions proceed with good turnover numbers, and the catalyst could be reused for several times, which makes the overall catalytic process sustainable. We derived the plausible mechanism by using DFT calculations and identified the preferred pathways by the analysis of potential energy surface. Our results and the proposed reaction mechanism demonstrate the viability of the "catalyst-by-design" approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes-proof-of-concept stage -- Phase 6. Final report, February 1--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement, the authors uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of light alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of light hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane > propane > ethane > methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of-concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase 5). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases 4, 6), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases 7 through 9). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phase 5 and 6 so that further work is not anticipated. 72 refs.

  2. Antioxidant, electrochemical, thermal, antimicrobial and alkane oxidation properties of tridentate Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Gökhan; Çelik, Cumali; Uruş, Serhan; Demirtaş, İbrahim; Elmastaş, Mahfuz; Tümer, Mehmet

    2011-10-01

    In this study, two Schiff base ligands (HL 1 and HL 2) and their Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Pd(II) and Ru(III) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by the analytical and spectroscopic methods. Alkane oxidation activities of the metal complexes were studied on cyclohexane as substrate. The ligands and their metal complexes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Corynebacterium xerosis, Bacillus brevis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Enterococcus faecalis (as Gram-positive bacteria) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Klebsiella fragilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans (as Gram-negative bacteria). The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH rad ) free radical scavenging and reducing power activity of superoxide anion radical generated non-enzymatic systems. Electrochemical and thermal properties of the compounds were investigated.

  3. Oh Magadi! Interpreting isoGDGTs and n-alkanes in a saline tropical lake: Lake Magadi, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, T. M.; Werne, J. P.; Castañeda, I. S.; Cohen, A. S.; Lowenstein, T. K.; Deocampo, D.; Renaut, R.; Bernhart, O. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) seeks to understand the paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental context of hominin adaptation and evolution by analysis of paleolacustrine cores taken near key hominin fossil and artifact localities in Kenya and Ethiopia. We present biomarker and compound specific isotope data from a 200 m drill core from Lake Magadi, Kenya. Located 20 km from the Koora Plain in the southern Kenya Rift, and adjacent to the Olorgesailie basin, Lake Magadi is in one of the richest Early-Late Pleistocene archaeological localities in Africa, a region that has been key in debates about the relationship between climate and evolution. Present-day Lake Magadi is a saline pan, a descendant of a series of paleolakes that have occupied its drainage basin and progressively dried for approximately one million years. Nearly 70% of samples analyzed for n-alkanes recorded a robust terrestrial signal. The majority of samples did not contain the complete suite of branched GDGTs necessary to reconstruct temperature from the Methylation of Branched Tetraethers and Cyclisation of Branched Tetraethers (MBT/CBT; Weijers et al., 2007) proxy. The TetraEther indeX with 86 carbon atoms (TEX86; Schouten et al., 2002) temperature proxy was established for 90% of samples analyzed for isoGDGTs, however the Methane and Ring Indices (Zhang et al., 2011; Zhang et al., 2016) suggest that the TEX86 is not applicable to temperature reconstruction at Magadi. Despite this, the Magadi TEX86 temperature reconstruction appears to agree with not only the trends in our n-alkane data but with other regional and global records, including the GRIP-2 δ18O record. We compare our temperature data to other records in the region, and investigate influences on our TEX86 data including microbial community turnover and lake drying.

  4. Carbon Isotopes of Alkanes in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperatures and Pressures: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques [1-4]. With more evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history [5-7], abiotic formation by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis during serpentization reactions may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars [8, 9]. While the experimental studies performed to date leave little doubt that chemical reactions exist for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds by mineral surface-catalyzed reactions [10-12], little is known about the reaction pathways by which CO2 and/or CO are reduced under hydrothermal conditions. Carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements of alkanes have been used as an effective tool to constrain the origin and reaction pathways of hydrocarbon formation. Alkanes generated by thermal breakdown of high molecular weight organic compounds have carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures completely distinct from those formed abiotically [13-15]. Recent experimental studies, however, showed that different abiogenic hydrocarbon formation processes (e.g., polymerization vs. depolymerization) may have different carbon and hydrogen isotopic patterns [16]. Results from previous experiments studying decomposition of higher molecular weight organic compounds (lignite) also suggested that pressure could be a crucial factor affecting fractionation of carbon isotopes [17]. Under high pressure conditions, no experimental data are available describing fractionation of carbon isotope during mineral catalyzed FTT synthesis. Thus, hydrothermal experiments present an excellent opportunity to provide the requisite carbon isotope data. Such data can also be used to identify reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis under experimental conditions.

  5. Predictions of homogeneous nucleation rates for n-alkanes accounting for the diffuse phase interface and capillary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planková, Barbora; Vinš, Václav; Hrubý, Jan

    2017-10-28

    Homogeneous droplet nucleation has been studied for almost a century but has not yet been fully understood. In this work, we used the density gradient theory (DGT) and considered the influence of capillary waves (CWs) on the predicted size-dependent surface tensions and nucleation rates for selected n-alkanes. The DGT model was completed by an equation of state (EoS) based on the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory and compared to the classical nucleation theory and the Peng-Robinson EoS. It was found that the critical clusters are practically free of CWs because they are so small that even the smallest wavelengths of CWs do not fit into their finite dimensions. The CWs contribute to the entropy of the system and thus decrease the surface tension. A correction for the effect of CWs on the surface tension is presented. The effect of the different EoSs is relatively small because by a fortuitous coincidence their predictions are similar in the relevant range of critical cluster sizes. The difference of the DGT predictions to the classical nucleation theory computations is important but not decisive. Of the effects investigated, the most pronounced is the suppression of CWs which causes a sizable decrease of the predicted nucleation rates. The major difference between experimental nucleation rate data and theoretical predictions remains in the temperature dependence. For normal alkanes, this discrepancy is much stronger than observed, e.g., for water. Theoretical corrections developed here have a minor influence on the temperature dependency. We provide empirical equations correcting the predicted nucleation rates to values comparable with experiments.

  6. Diversity of crude oil-degrading bacteria and alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Haozhi; Wang, Yilin; Chang, Sijing; Liu, Guangxiu; Chen, Tuo; Huo, Guanghua; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Xiukun; Tai, Xisheng; Sun, Likun; Zhang, Baogui

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the response of the microbial community to crude oil and the diversity of alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes in soil samples from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP). The enrichment cultures and clone libraries were used. Finally, 53 isolates and 94 alkB sequences were obtained from 10 pristine soil samples after enrichment at 10 °C with crude oil as sole carbon source. The isolates fell into the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, with the dominance of Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. The composition of degraders was different from polar habitats where Acinetobacter sp. is not a predominant responder of alkane degradative microbial communities. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the alkB genes from isolates and enrichment communities formed eight clusters and mainly related with alkB genes of Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Acinetobacter. The alkB gene diversity in the QTP was lower than marine environments and polar soil samples. In particular, a total of 10 isolates exhibiting vigorous growth with crude oil could detect no crude oil degradation-related gene sequences, such as alkB, P450, almA, ndoB, and xylE genes. The Shannon-Wiener index of the alkB clone libraries from the QTP ranged from 1.00 to 2.24 which is similar with polar pristine soil samples but lower than that of contaminated soils. These results indicated that the Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Rhodococcus genera are the candidate for in situ bioremediation, and the environment of QTP may be still relatively uncontaminated by crude oil.

  7. Hydrogen isotopes of n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids as tracers of precipitation in a temperate forest and implications for paleorecords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Erika J.; Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Lowell, Thomas V.

    2017-06-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf waxes (δDwax) primarily reflects that of plant source water. Therefore, sedimentary δDwax records are increasingly used to reconstruct the δD of past precipitation (δDp) and to investigate paleohydrologic changes. Such reconstructions rely on estimates of apparent fractionation (εapp) between δDp and the resulting δDwax. However, εapp values are modified by numerous environmental and biological factors during leaf wax production. As a result, εapp can vary widely among plant species and growth forms. This complicates estimation of accurate εapp values and presents a central challenge to quantitative leaf wax paleohydrology. During the 2014 growing season, we examined εapp in the five deciduous angiosperm tree species (Prunus serotina, Acer saccharinum, Quercus rubra, Quercus alba, and Ulmus americana) that dominate the temperate forest at Brown's Lake Bog, Ohio, USA. We sampled individuals of each species at weekly to monthly intervals from March to October and report δD values of n-C29 alkanes (δDn-C29 alkane) and n-C28 alkanoic acids (δDn-C28 acid), as well as xylem (δDxw) and leaf water (δDlw). n-Alkane synthesis was most intense 2-3 weeks after leaf emergence and ceased thereafter, whereas n-alkanoic acid synthesis continued throughout the entire growing season. During bud swell and leaf emergence, δDlw was a primary control on δDn-C29 alkane and δDn-C28 acid values, which stabilized once leaves became fully expanded. Metabolic shifts between young and mature leaves may be an important secondary driver of δDwax changes during leaf development. In mature autumn leaves of all species, the mean εapp for n-C29 alkane (-107‰) was offset by approximately -19‰ from the mean εapp for n-C28 alkanoic acid (-88‰). These results indicate that in temperate settings n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids from deciduous trees are distinct with respect to their abundance, timing of synthesis, and εapp values.

  8. Predominance of even carbon-numbered n-alkanes from lacustrine sediments in Linxia Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau: Implications for climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yongli [Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources Research, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Tibetan and Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Fang Xiaomin, E-mail: fangxm@itpcas.ac.cn [Institute of Tibetan and Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Western Resources and Environment of Education Ministry, College at Earth and Environment Sciences, University of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Tongwei [Key Laboratory of Western Resources and Environment of Education Ministry, College at Earth and Environment Sciences, University of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li Yuanmao; Wu Yingqin; He Daxiang; Wang Youxiao [Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources Research, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} This study reports the first observation of predominant even carbon-numbered n-alkanes of sediments in the continuous lacustrine-sedimentary section (Maogou) from the Late Miocene to the Early Pliocene (13-4.4 Ma) in the Linxia Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau. {yields} Certain types of special autochthonous bacteria are a possible source for the special distribution of even carbon-numbered n-alkanes in lacustrine sediments. {yields} These bacteria may have a high production rate in weak oxic-anoxic and arid depositional environments, in which a variety of geochemical parameters have recorded palaeoclimate change. {yields} A close correspondence among the low ratio of n-C{sub 27}/n-C{sub 31}, the heavy {delta}{sup 13}C values of TOC and a strong even carbon-number predominance (low OEP{sub 16-20} values) from approximately 6.5 to 4.4 Ma and at approximately 8 Ma in the studied section suggests that n-alkanes with a high predominance of even carbon-numbers may be treated as geochemical proxies for arid climate. - Abstract: This study reports the first observation of predominant even C-numbered n-alkanes from sediments in the continuous lacustrine-sedimentary section (Maogou) from the Late Miocene to the Early Pliocene (13-4.4 Ma) in the Linxia Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau. The n-alkanes showed a bimodal distribution that is characterised by a centre at n-C{sub 16}-n-C{sub 20} with maximum values at n-C{sub 18} and n-C{sub 27}-n-C{sub 31} as well as at n-C{sub 29}. The first mode shows a strong even C-number predominance (OEP{sub 16-20} 0.34-0.66). In contrast, the second mode has a strong odd C-number predominance (OEP{sub 27-31} 1.20-2.45). Certain types of special autochthonous bacteria are a possible source for this distribution of even C-numbered n-alkanes in lacustrine sediments. These bacteria may have a high production rate in weak oxic-anoxic and arid depositional environments, in which a variety of geochemical parameters have recorded

  9. Predominance of even carbon-numbered n-alkanes from lacustrine sediments in Linxia Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau: Implications for climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongli; Fang Xiaomin; Zhang Tongwei; Li Yuanmao; Wu Yingqin; He Daxiang; Wang Youxiao

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study reports the first observation of predominant even carbon-numbered n-alkanes of sediments in the continuous lacustrine-sedimentary section (Maogou) from the Late Miocene to the Early Pliocene (13-4.4 Ma) in the Linxia Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau. → Certain types of special autochthonous bacteria are a possible source for the special distribution of even carbon-numbered n-alkanes in lacustrine sediments. → These bacteria may have a high production rate in weak oxic-anoxic and arid depositional environments, in which a variety of geochemical parameters have recorded palaeoclimate change. → A close correspondence among the low ratio of n-C 27 /n-C 31 , the heavy δ 13 C values of TOC and a strong even carbon-number predominance (low OEP 16-20 values) from approximately 6.5 to 4.4 Ma and at approximately 8 Ma in the studied section suggests that n-alkanes with a high predominance of even carbon-numbers may be treated as geochemical proxies for arid climate. - Abstract: This study reports the first observation of predominant even C-numbered n-alkanes from sediments in the continuous lacustrine-sedimentary section (Maogou) from the Late Miocene to the Early Pliocene (13-4.4 Ma) in the Linxia Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau. The n-alkanes showed a bimodal distribution that is characterised by a centre at n-C 16 -n-C 20 with maximum values at n-C 18 and n-C 27 -n-C 31 as well as at n-C 29 . The first mode shows a strong even C-number predominance (OEP 16-20 0.34-0.66). In contrast, the second mode has a strong odd C-number predominance (OEP 27-31 1.20-2.45). Certain types of special autochthonous bacteria are a possible source for this distribution of even C-numbered n-alkanes in lacustrine sediments. These bacteria may have a high production rate in weak oxic-anoxic and arid depositional environments, in which a variety of geochemical parameters have recorded palaeoclimate change.

  10. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Plant Wax n-Alkanes: A Tool for Characterizing Soil Provenance in Forensic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Wagner, T.; Jones, M.

    2009-04-01

    Forensic science is an integrative discipline that requires material evidence from diverse sources. Geochemical evidence derived from inorganic and organic substances is becoming increasingly popular among law enforcement agencies in industrialized countries. Previous investigations indicate that the relative distributions of individual plant-derived biomarkers found in soils are linked to the biomarker patterns found in the overlying vegetation. However, identification of soil provenance based on the distribution of plant-derived biomarkers for forensic purposes is inhibited by the fact that a significant number of terrestrial plant species have overlapping biomarker distributions. In order to enhance the resolving power of plant-derived biomarker signal, we propose to enhance the molecular approach by adding a stable isotope component, i.e. the delta13C/deltaD values of individual biomarkers. The first objective of this project is to determine the delta13C/deltaD signatures of n-alkanes derived from various higher plant types commonly growing in the UK. The second objective is to investigate whether the same species/plant types differ isotopically between two locations affected by different weather patterns in the UK: a relatively warmer and drier Norwich, Norfolk and a cooler and wetter Newcastle-upon-Tyne in NE England. The n-C29 alkane data from 14 tree species sampled during July 2007 and August 2008 in Newcastle show a clear negative trend between delta13C and deltaD values. When these data are plotted against each other, the six deciduous angiosperms (delta13C: c. -39 to -35 per mil; deltaD: c. -155 to -130 per mil) are completely separated from four evergreen angiosperms (delta13C: c. -33 to -28 per mil; deltaD: c. -195 to -165 per mil). The four gymnosperm species data plot between those of the deciduous and evergreen angiosperms. Because all 14 species in Newcastle experience the same environmental conditions, we suggest that the observed isotopic

  11. An arsenate-reducing and alkane-metabolizing novel bacterium, Rhizobium arsenicireducens sp. nov., isolated from arsenic-rich groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Balaram; Sarkar, Angana; Joshi, Swati; Chatterjee, Atrayee; Kazy, Sufia Khannam; Maiti, Mrinal Kumar; Satyanarayana, Tulasi; Sar, Pinaki

    2017-03-01

    A novel arsenic (As)-resistant, arsenate-respiring, alkane-metabolizing bacterium KAs 5-22 T , isolated from As-rich groundwater of West Bengal was characterized by physiological and genomic properties. Cells of strain KAs 5-22 T were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile, and facultative anaerobic. Growth occurred at optimum of pH 6.0-7.0, temperature 30 °C. 16S rRNA gene affiliated the strain KAs 5-22 T to the genus Rhizobium showing maximum similarity (98.4 %) with the type strain of Rhizobium naphthalenivorans TSY03b T followed by (98.0 % similarity) Rhizobium selenitireducens B1 T . The genomic G + C content was 59.4 mol%, and DNA-DNA relatedness with its closest phylogenetic neighbors was 50.2 %. Chemotaxonomy indicated UQ-10 as the major quinone; phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol as major polar lipids; C 16:0 , C 17:0 , 2-OH C 10:0 , 3-OH C 16:0 , and unresolved C 18:1 ɷ7C/ɷ9C as predominant fatty acids. The cells were found to reduce O 2 , As 5+ , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- and Fe 3+ as alternate electron acceptors. The strain's ability to metabolize dodecane or other alkanes as sole carbon source using As 5+ as terminal electron acceptor was supported by the presence of genes encoding benzyl succinate synthase (bssA like) and molybdopterin-binding site (mopB) of As 5+ respiratory reductase (arrA). Differential phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic as well as physiological properties revealed that the strain KAs 5-22 T is separated from its nearest recognized Rhizobium species. On the basis of the data presented, strain KAs 5-22 T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium arsenicireducens sp. nov. is proposed as type strain (=LMG 28795 T =MTCC 12115 T ).

  12. H-Abstraction by OH from Large Branched Alkanes: Overall Rate Measurements and Site-Specific Tertiary Rate Calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dapeng

    2017-01-10

    Reaction rate coefficients for the reaction of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with nine large branched alkanes (i.e., 2-methyl-3-ethyl-pentane, 2,3-dimethyl-pentane, 2,2,3-trimethylbutane, 2,2,3-trimethyl-pentane, 2,3,4-trimethyl-pentane, 3-ethyl-pentane, 2,2,3,4-tetramethyl-pentane, 2,2-dimethyl-3-ethyl-pentane, and 2,4-dimethyl-3-ethyl-pentane) are measured at high temperatures (900-1300 K) using a shock tube and narrow-line-width OH absorption diagnostic in the UV region. In addition, room-temperature measurements of six out of these nine rate coefficients are performed in a photolysis cell using high repetition laser-induced fluorescence of OH radicals. Our experimental results are combined with previous literature measurements to obtain three-parameter Arrhenius expressions valid over a wide temperature range (300-1300 K). The rate coefficients are analyzed using the next-nearest-neighbor (N-N-N) methodology to derive nine tertiary (T003, T012, T013, T022, T023, T111, T112, T113, and T122) site-specific rate coefficients for the abstraction of H atoms by OH radicals from branched alkanes. Derived Arrhenius expressions, valid over 950-1300 K, are given as (the subscripts denote the number of carbon atoms connected to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon): T003 = 1.80 × 10-10 exp(-2971 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T012 = 9.36 × 10-11 exp(-3024 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T013 = 4.40 × 10-10 exp(-4162 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T022 = 1.47 × 10-10 exp(-3587 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T023 = 6.06 × 10-11 exp(-3010 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T111 = 3.98 × 10-11 exp(-1617 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T112 = 9.08 × 10-12 exp(-3661 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T113 = 6.74 × 10-9 exp(-7547 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1; T122 = 3.47 × 10-11 exp(-1802 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  13. Literature study and experimental investigations into the production of organic iodine compounds from alkane-vapour/air mixtures with radioiodine in the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskopf, W.; Holl, S.; Bleier, K.

    1992-01-01

    It was assumed in these investigations that these compounds originated in the gas phase by irradiation induced reactions with radioiodine. Alkane(methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) vapour/air mixtures were radiolysed with iodine in a Co-60 gamma source. The parameter varied were the concentrations of iodine (6.85 E-09 mol/ml - 3.43 E-06 mol/ml) and of the alkanes (1.81 E-05 mol/ml - 3.72 E-10 mol/ml) as well as the irradiation doses (4.45 E + 02 Gy - 1.17 E + 05 Gy). The gaseous reaction mixtures were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively by an ECD- and a MSD-detector for iodine compounds difficult to separate. (orig.) [de

  14. Calculation for liquid-liquid equilibria of quaternary alkane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water systems used in counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zhao, Mengqiang; Yu, Yanmei; Li, Zongcheng

    2007-06-01

    The calculation of liquid-liquid equilibrium compositions of solvent systems is very important for the work on counter-current chromatography (CCC), especially the phase composition and volume ratio obtained from liquid-liquid equilibrium calculation. In this work, liquid-liquid equilibria of quaternary Arizona solvent systems, alkane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water, and related ternary systems are correlated and predicted using the non-random two-liquid model (NRTL). Hexane, heptane and isooctane are the used alkanes. The parameters in the model are regressed only with the special systems considered. Detailed comparison with experimental data shows that liquid-liquid equilibria of these systems can be predicted with greatly improved accuracy as compared to the group contribution method (UNIFAC).

  15. An efficient nitration of light alkanes and the alkyl side-chain of aromatic compounds with nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid catalyzed by N-hydroxyphthalimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Yoshiki; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Yasutaka

    2002-08-09

    Nitration of light alkanes and the alkyl side-chain of aromatic compounds with NO(2) and HNO(3) was successfully achieved by the use of N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) as a catalyst under relatively mild conditions. For example, the nitration of propane with NO(2) catalyzed by NHPI at 100 degrees C for 14 h gave 2-nitropropane in good yield without formation of 1-nitropropane and cleaved products such as nitroethane and nitromethane. Various aliphatic nitroalkanes, which are difficult to prepare by conventional methods, could be selectively obtained by means of the present methodology by using NHPI as the key catalyst. In addition, the side-chain nitration of alkylbenzenes such as toluene was selectively carried out to lead to alpha-nitrotoluene without the ring nitration. The present reaction provides an efficient selective method for the nitration of light alkanes and alkylbenzenes, which has been very difficult to carry out so far.

  16. Rationalization and Prediction of the Equivalent Alkane Carbon Number (EACN) of Polar Hydrocarbon Oils with COSMO-RS σ-Moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowicz, Thomas; Benazzouz, Adrien; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2015-10-20

    The equivalent alkane carbon numbers (EACNs) of 20 polar hydrocarbon oils are determined by the fishtail method. These values supplemented by 43 already reported EACNs of other hydrocarbons are rationalized by using the COSMO-RS σ-moments as descriptors for a QSPR analysis. A reliable model, with only two meaningful physicochemical parameters, namely the surface area (M0(X)) and the overall polarity (M2(X)) of the oil X, is able to predict the EACN values of a large variety of oils including (cyclo)alkanes, (cyclo)alkenes, terpenes, aromatics, alkynes, and chloroalkanes and to rationalize structural effects on EACNs. Furthermore, the dependence of the EACN of homologous oils on the chain length provides some molecular insight into how the different oils penetrate into the interfacial film of surfactants.

  17. Reconstruction of palaeoenvironmental change in a late Miocene peatland, as deduced from distribution patterns of lipid biomarkers and the carbon isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnny Briggs; David Large [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-07-01

    In order to comprehend the processes of peatland evolution, and to make projections concerning the long-term response of the peatland carbon reservoir to environmental change, we consider thick lignite deposits formed over periods of 1 my. To explore the long-term response of peatland to changing climate, we have investigated the reaction of peatland plant communities to changes in the exogenic carbon cycle on timescales exceeding 100 ky. This was achieved by examining variations in bulk {delta}{sup 13}C, biomarker distributions, and compound specific {delta}{sup 13}C compositions of plant derived n-alkanes, from orbitally tuned early Miocene lignite. 21 samples were analysed from the Morwell 1B lignite, Gippsland Basin, Australia. These samples encompassed 27.8 m of lignite, thought to correspond to the time interval of 22.29 - 22.68 Ma. Prior to analysis by GC-IR-MS, the n-alkanes were purified using urea adduction. Analysis of the relative distributions of n-alkanes and aliphatic Terpenoid biomarkers was undertaken by GC-MS. The distributions of Terpenoid biomarkers indicated that no correlation exists between bulk {delta}{sup 13}C and the relative contribution of angiosperm to gymnosperm type vegetation. The n-alkane distributions demonstrated a link between bulk {delta}{sup 13}C and aquatic macrophytes, (greatest contributor to the C{sub 29} homologue in peat forming vegetation is terrestrial plants, whereas the C{sub 25} homologue is a proxy for aquatic macrophytes). This suggests that after accounting for atmospheric {delta}{sup 13}C, bulk carbon isotopes carry a signature for the hydrological conditions of plant growth. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Fusing catalase to an alkane-producing enzyme maintains enzymatic activity by converting the inhibitory byproduct H2O2 to the cosubstrate O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Carl; Kim, Sung Won; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Shanklin, John

    2013-02-19

    Biologically produced alkanes represent potential renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived chemicals. A cyanobacterial pathway consisting of acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein reductase and an aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase (ADO) converts acyl-Acyl Carrier Proteins into corresponding n-1 alkanes via aldehyde intermediates in an oxygen-dependent manner (K(m) for O(2), 84 ± 9 µM). In vitro, ADO turned over only three times, but addition of more ADO to exhausted assays resulted in additional product formation. While evaluating the peroxide shunt to drive ADO catalysis, we discovered that ADO is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) with an apparent K(i) of 16 ± 6 µM and that H(2)O(2) inhibition is of mixed-type with respect to O(2). Supplementing exhausted assays with catalase (CAT) restored ADO activity, demonstrating that inhibition was reversible and dependent on H(2)O(2), which originated from poor coupling of reductant consumption with alkane formation. Kinetic analysis showed that long-chain (C14-C18) substrates follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, whereas short and medium chains (C8-C12) exhibit substrate inhibition. A bifunctional protein comprising an N-terminal CAT coupled to a C-terminal ADO (CAT-ADO) prevents H(2)O(2) inhibition by converting it to the cosubstrate O(2). Indeed, alkane production by the fusion protein is observed upon addition of H(2)O(2) to an anaerobic reaction mix. In assays, CAT-ADO turns over 225 times versus three times for the native ADO, and its expression in Escherichia coli increases catalytic turnovers per active site by fivefold relative to the expression of native ADO. We propose the term "protection via inhibitor metabolism" for fusion proteins designed to metabolize inhibitors into noninhibitory compounds.

  19. Preferential activation of primary C–H bonds in the reactions of small alkanes with the diatomic MgO+. cation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, J.; Alikhani, E.; Kwapien, K.; Sauer, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 13 (2010), s. 4110-4119 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400550704; GA ČR GA203/08/1487 Grant - others: ERC (XE) HORIZOMS AdG226373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : alkanes * C-H activation * density functional calculations * magnesium oxide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.476, year: 2010

  20. Degradation of Hydrocarbons by Members of the Genus Candida II. Oxidation of n-Alkanes and 1-Alkenes by Candida lipolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, M. J.; Markovetz, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    Candida lipolytica ATCC 8661 was grown in a mineral-salts hydrocarbon medium. n-Alkanes and 1-alkenes with 14 through 18 carbon atoms were used as substrates. Ether extracts of culture fluids and cells obtained from cultures grown on the various substrates were analyzed by thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatography. Analyses of fluids from cultures grown on n-alkanes indicated a predominance of fatty acids and alcohols of the same chain length as the substrate. In addition, numerous other fatty acids and alcohols were present. Analyses of saponifiable and nonsaponifiable material obtained from the cells revealed essentially the same products. The presence of primary and secondary alcohols, as well as fatty acids, of the same chain length as the n-alkane substrate suggested that attack on both the methyl and α-methylene group was occurring. The significance of these two mechanisms in the degradation of n-alkanes by this organism was not evident from the data presented. Analyses of fluids from cultures grown on 1-alkenes indicated the presence of 1,2-diols, as well as ω-unsaturated fatty acids, of the same chain length as the substrate. Alcohols present were all unsaturated. Saponifiable and nonsaponifiable material obtained from cells contained essentially the same products. The presence of 1,2-diols and ω-unsaturated fatty acids of the same chain length as the substrate from cultures grown on 1-alkenes indicated that both the terminal methyl group and the terminal double bond were being attacked. PMID:6025303

  1. Using Odd-Alkanes as a Carbon Source to Increase the Content of Nutritionally Important Fatty Acids in Candida krusei, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Yarrowia lipolytica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matátková, O.; Gharwalová, L.; Zimola, M.; Řezanka, Tomáš; Masák, J.; Kolouchová, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, October (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 8195329. ISSN 1687-8760 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-00027S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : HYDROCARBON-UTILIZING MICROORGANISMS * CHAIN N-ALKANES * POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.901, year: 2016

  2. Normal alkanes and the unresolved complex mixture as diagnostic indicators of hydrocarbon source contributions to marine sediments of the Northern Gulf of Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, J.W.; Heintz, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Coal beds, hydrocarbon source rocks, and natural oil seeps represent potentially significant sources of hydrocarbons contamination of marine sediments in the northern Gulf of Alaska. Intensive studies of several supposedly diagnostic polycyclic aromatic (PAH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds have been conducted to solve the controversy of whether the hydrocarbons come from natural or anthropogenic sources. These hydrocarbons could be associated with a refractory matrix not biologically available, as strongly suggested by the n-alkane profile characteristic of the marine sediments. There are similarities between the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) profile of the marine sediments and those of eroding coals and source rocks. However, there were differences with the UCM of seep oils entering the Gulf of Alaska. The seep-oils possess low concentrations of n-alkanes due to biodegradation before entering the Gulf of Alaska, and have large UCM and PAH concentrations. Additional strong constraints are placed on hydrocarbon contributions from natural sources to the marine sediments of the northern portion of the Gulf of Alaska as a result of inclusion of n-alkane and UCM results into hydrocarbon source allocation models. The authors indicated that seep-oils are unlikely to be significant contributors. 19 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  3. Whole-cell bio-oxidation of n-dodecane using the alkane hydroxylase system of P. putida GPo1 expressed in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Chris; Woodley, John; Baganz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    , successful n-dodecane oxidation for the production of 1-dodecanol or dodecanoic acid has proven elusive in the past when using alkB-expressing recombinants. This article demonstrates, for the first time in vivo, by using the Escherichia coli GEC137 pGEc47ΔJ strain, that n-dodecane oxidation using this enzyme......The alkane-1-monoxygenase (alkB) complex of Pseudomonas putida GPo1 has been extensively studied in the past and shown to be capable of oxidising aliphatic C5–C12 alkanes to primary alcohols both in the wild-type organism by growth on C5–C12 alkanes as sole carbon source and in vitro. Despite this...... aqueous phase and 200mL of n-dodecane as a second phase. The maximum volumetric rate of combined alcohol and acid production achieved was 1.9g/Lorganic/h (0.35g/Ltotal/h). The maximum specific activity of combined alcohol and acid production was 7-fold lower on n-dodecane (3.5μmol/min/gdcw) than on n...

  4. Threshold Ionization Spectroscopy of La(CH_{3}CN) and La(C_{4}H_{9}CN) Radicals Formed by la Reactions with Alkane Nitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ahamed; Kim, Jong Hyun; Cao, Wenjin; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2017-06-01

    La atom reactions with acetonitrile (CH_{3}CN) and pentanenitrile (C_{4}H_{9}CN) are carried out in a laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beam source. Metal-containing species are observed using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In this talk, we report the mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopic characterization of two metal-containing radicals, La(CH_{3}CN) and La(C_{4}H_{9}CN), formed by La associations with acetonitrile and pentanenitrile, respectively. Adiabatic ionization energies of the two La-alkane nitrile species and their vibrational frequencies are measured from the MATI spectra. Metal-ligand binding modes and molecular structures are investigated by comparing the spectroscopic measurements with density functional theory calculations and spectral simulations. For both alkane nitriles, the preferred La binding site is identified to be the nitrile group with a π-bind mode, the resultant metal complexes are three-membered metallacycles. While a single isomer is observed for La(CH_{3}CN), two rotational conformers are identified for La(C_{4}H_{9}CN). The binding and structures of these metal-alkane nitrile radicals are different from those formed by metal ion reactions, where metal ions were reported to favor σ binding with the nitrogen atom. K. Eller, W. Zummack, H. Schwarz, L. M. Roth, B. S. Freiser, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1991, 113, 833-839

  5. Organometallic model complexes elucidate the active gallium species in alkane dehydrogenation catalysts based on ligand effects in Ga K-edge XANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getsoian, Andrew “Bean”; Das, Ujjal; Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Hu, Bo; Cheah, Singfoong; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Krause, Theodore R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-modified zeolites are known catalysts for the dehydrogenation of alkanes, reactivity that finds industrial application in the aromatization of light alkanes by Ga-ZSM5. While the role of gallium cations in alkane activation is well known, the oxidation state and coordination environment of gallium under reaction conditions has been the subject of debate. Edge shifts in Ga K-edge XANES spectra acquired under reaction conditions have long been interpreted as evidence for reduction of Ga(III) to Ga(I). However, a change in oxidation state is not the only factor that can give rise to a change in the XANES spectrum. In order to better understand the XANES spectra of working catalysts, we have synthesized a series of molecular model compounds and grafted surface organometallic Ga species and compared their XANES spectra to those of gallium-based catalysts acquired under reducing conditions. We demonstrate that changes in the identity and number of gallium nearest neighbors can give rise to changes in XANES spectra similar to those attributed in literature to changes in oxidation state. Specifically, spectral features previously attributed to Ga(I) may be equally well interpreted as evidence for low-coordinate Ga(III) alkyl or hydride species. These findings apply both to gallium-impregnated zeolite catalysts and to silica-supported single site gallium catalysts, the latter of which is found to be active and selective for dehydrogenation of propane and hydrogenation of propylene.

  6. Plant Wax n-Alkane and n-Alkanoic Acid Signatures Overprinted by Microbial Contributions and Old Carbon in Meromictic Lake Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makou, Matthew; Eglinton, Timothy; McIntyre, Cameron; Montluçon, Daniel; Antheaume, Ingrid; Grossi, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    Specific n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids are commonly used as biomarkers in paleoenvironmental reconstruction, yet any individual homologue may originate from multiple biological sources. Here we improve source and age controls for these compounds in meromictic systems by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) ages of specific homologues preserved in twentieth century Lake Pavin (France) sediments. In contrast to many studies, 14C ages generally decreased with increasing carbon chain length, from 7.3 to 2.6 ka for the C14-C30 n-alkanoic acids and from 9.2 to 0.3 ka for the C21-C33 n-alkanes. Given a known hard water effect, these values suggest that aquatic microbial sources predominate and contributed to most of the homologues measured. Only the longest chain n-alkanes exclusively represent inputs of higher plant waxes, which were previously sequestered in soils over centennial to millennial timescales prior to transport and deposition. These findings suggest that biomarker source and age should be carefully established for lacustrine settings.

  7. Analysis of rotator phase transitions in the linear alkanes hexacosane to triacontane by adiabatic scanning calorimetry and by photopyroelectric calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, S.; Mercuri, F.; Zammit, U.; Leys, J.; Glorieux, C.; Thoen, J.

    2018-03-01

    The study of the nature of various phase transitions between rotator phases in several linear alkanes was performed by analyzing the hysteretic behavior of the specific heat between heating and cooling measurements. The investigations have been carried out by both adiabatic scanning calorimetry and photopyroelectric calorimetry techniques, whose combined use has provided complementary information concerning the changes occurring in the samples' structure during their temperature change. The study enabled to establish that, unlike what previously reported, the Riii-Riv and the Rii-Riv transitions are of first order, despite them not showing any sharp peak profile in the temperature dependence of the specific heat. The first order of the Rv-Rii transition was confirmed also in the present study and, finally the Rv-Riii transition could be observed by calorimetric detection for the first time and shown to be of second order. The obtained results were discussed in terms of order parameters power terms in the Landau free energy expansion.

  8. Directed assembly of optoelectronically active alkyl-π-conjugated molecules by adding n-alkanes or π-conjugated species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollamby, Martin J.; Karny, Maciej; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Sommerdjik, Nico A. J. M.; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Grillo, Isabelle; Pauw, Brian R.; Brown, Paul; Eastoe, Julian; Möhwald, Helmuth; Nakanishi, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Supramolecular assembly can yield ordered structures by taking advantage of the cumulative effect of multiple non-covalent interactions between adjacent molecules. The thermodynamic origin of many self-assembled structures in water is the balance between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments of the molecule. Here, we show that this approach can be generalized to use solvophobic and solvophilic segments of fully hydrophobic alkylated fullerene molecules. Addition of n-alkanes results in their assembly—due to the antipathy of C60 towards n-alkanes—into micelles and hexagonally packed gel-fibres containing insulated C60 nanowires. The addition of pristine C60 instead directs the assembly into lamellar mesophases by increasing the proportion of π-conjugated material in the mixture. The assembled structures contain a large fraction of optoelectronically active material and exhibit comparably high photoconductivities. This method is shown to be applicable to several alkyl-π-conjugated molecules, and can be used to construct organized functional materials with π-conjugated sections.

  9. Role of Sn in the Regeneration of Pt/γ-Al2O3 Light Alkane Dehydrogenation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hien N; Sattler, Jesper J H B; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Datye, Abhaya K

    2016-04-01

    Alumina-supported Pt is one of the major industrial catalysts for light alkane dehydrogenation. This catalyst loses activity during reaction, with coke formation often considered as the reason for deactivation. As we show in this study, the amount and nature of carbon deposits do not directly correlate with the loss of activity. Rather, it is the transformation of subnanometer Pt species into larger Pt nanoparticles that appears to be responsible for the loss of catalytic activity. Surprisingly, a portion of the Sn remains atomically dispersed on the alumina surface in the spent catalyst and helps in the redispersion of the Pt. In the absence of Sn on the alumina support, the larger Pt nanoparticles formed during reaction are not redispersed during oxidative regeneration. It is known that Sn is added as a promoter in the industrial catalyst to help in achieving high propene selectivity and to minimize coke formation. This work shows that an important role of Sn is to help in the regeneration of Pt, by providing nucleation sites on the alumina surface. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy helps to provide unique insights into the operating characteristics of an industrially important catalyst by demonstrating the role of promoter elements, such as Sn, in the oxidative regeneration of Pt on γ-Al 2 O 3 .

  10. Microwave-assisted extraction versus Soxhlet extraction for the analysis of short-chain chlorinated alkanes in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parera, J; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2004-08-13

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) was evaluated as a possible alternative to Soxhlet extraction for analysing short-chain chlorinated alkanes (commonly called short-chain chlorinated paraffins, SCCPs) in river sediment samples, using gas chromatography coupled to negative chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. For MAE optimisation, several extraction parameters such as solvent extraction mixture, extraction time and extraction temperature were studied. Maximum extraction efficiencies for SCCPs (90%) and for 12 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (91-95%) were achieved using 5 g of sediment sample, 30 ml of n-hexane-acetone (1:1, v/v) as solvent extraction, and 15 min and 115 degrees C of extraction time and temperature, respectively. Activated Florisil was used to clean-up the extracts, allowing highly selective separation of SCCPs from other organic contaminants such as PCBs. MAE was compared with a conventional extraction technique such as Soxhlet and good agreement in the results was obtained. Quality parameters of the optimised MAE method such as run-to-run (R.S.D. 7%) and day-to-day precision (R.S.D. 9%) were determined using spiked river sediment samples, with LODs of 1.5 ng g(-1). This method was successfully applied to the analysis of SCCPs in river sediment samples at concentrations below the ng g(-1) level. O 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical properties of {anisole + n-alkanes} at temperatures between (293.15 and 303.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jimaz, Adel S.; Al-Kandary, Jasem A.; Abdul-latif, Abdul-Haq M.; Al-Zanki, Adnan M.

    2005-01-01

    Density ρ, viscosity η, and refractive index n D , values of {anisole + hexane, or heptane, or octane, or nonane, or decane, or dodecane} binary mixtures over the entire range of mole fraction at temperatures (293.15, 298.15, and 303.15) K, have been investigated at atmospheric pressure. The excess molar volume V E , has been calculated from the experimental measurements. These results were fitted to Redlich and Kister polynomial equation to estimate the binary interaction parameters. The viscosity data were correlated with equations of Grunberg and Nissan, and McAllister. The refractive indices data were used to calculate the specific refractivity R 12 , and also correlated with Lorentz-Lorenz equation. While the excess molar volumes of {anisole + hexane} are negative, and {anisole + heptane} are sigmoidal S-shaped, the remaining binary mixtures are positive. The effects of n-alkanes chain length as well as the temperature on the excess molar volume have been studied. The calculated values have been qualitatively used to explain the intermolecular interaction between the mixing components

  12. Viscosity and surface tension of binary systems of N,N-dimethylformamide with alkan-1-ols at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, Abubaker A.; Alkhaldi, Khaled H.A.E.; AlTuwaim, Mohammad S.; Al-Jimaz, Adel S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Physical properties of binary mixtures of DMF+1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, or 1-heptanol. ► Viscosity and surface tension were measured. ►Δη, Δσ σ and G ∗E were calculated using the experimental data. ► H σ and S σ were determined using the surface tension data. ► Semi-empirical relations were used to estimate the viscosity of liquid mixtures. - Abstract: Viscosity η and surface tension σ were measured for binary mixtures of N,N-dimethylformamide DMF with pentan-1-ol, hexan-1-ol, and heptan-1-ol at T = (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K and atmospheric pressure over the entire mole fraction range. Deviations in viscosity Δη and surface tension Δσ were calculated using experimental results. Moreover, the values of the excess Gibbs free energy of activation G ∗E , surface enthalpy H σ and surface entropy S σ of these mixtures were determined. Viscosity measurements of the binary systems were correlated with Grunberg and Nissan, the three-body and four-body McAllister expressions. Viscosity deviation, surface tension deviation and excess Gibbs energy of activation functions were fitted to the method of Redlich–Kister (R–K) polynomial to estimate the coefficients and standard deviations. The effects of chain length of alkan-1-ols and temperature on the thermodynamic properties of binary systems were studied.

  13. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant-producing Alcanivorax strains: hydrocarbon accession strategies and alkane hydroxylase gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Nelda L; Nievas, Marina L; Lozada, Mariana; Del Prado, Guillermo; Dionisi, Hebe M; Siñeriz, Faustino

    2009-01-01

    Biosurfactant-producing bacteria belonging to the genera Alcanivorax, Cobetia and Halomonas were isolated from marine sediments with a history of hydrocarbon exposure (Aristizábal and Gravina Peninsulas, Argentina). Two Alcanivorax isolates were found to form naturally occurring consortia with strains closely related to Pseudomonas putida and Microbacterium esteraromaticum. Alkane hydroxylase gene analysis in these two Alcanivorax strains resulted in the identification of two novel alkB genes, showing 86% and 60% deduced amino acid sequence identity with those of Alcanivorax sp. A-11-3 and Alcanivorax dieselolei P40, respectively. In addition, a gene homologous to alkB2 from Alcanivorax borkumensis was present in one of the strains. The consortium formed by this strain, Alcanivorax sp. PA2 (98.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with A. borkumensis SK2(T)) and P. putida PA1 was characterized in detail. These strains form cell aggregates when growing as mixed culture, though only PA2 was responsible for biosurfactant activity. During exponential growth phase of PA2, cells showed high hydrophobicity and adherence to hydrocarbon droplets. Biosurfactant production was only detectable at late growth and stationary phases, suggesting that it is not involved in initiating oil degradation and that direct interfacial adhesion is the main hydrocarbon accession mode of PA2. This strain could be useful for biotechnological applications due to its biosurfactant production, catabolic and aggregation properties.

  14. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes-proof-of-concept stage - Phase IV. Topical report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This report details the research performed on Phase IV of the extended Cooperative Agreement. This Phase, entitled C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} Research, provides the research support which accompanies the C{sub 4} Proof-of-Concept Phase (Phase V) as the two major activities of the Cooperative Agreement during calendar 1993. It is the objective of this phase to understand the nature of the catalysts and catalytic activity of perhaloporphyrin complexes uncovered during Phases I-III in order that superior catalytic materials can be made and tested which meet commercial criteria for the oxidation of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} light alkane gases found in natural gas and other available hydrocarbon streams. During Phase IV, we have examined the physical and electronic structures of the very active perhaloporphyrin catalysts which we have developed, and have gained an understanding of the properties which make them active. This has led us to design and synthesize materials which are cheaper, more active, more robust and, in general superior for carrying out practical catalysis. Our early generation perhaloporphyrin catalysts, while exhibiting unprecedented catalytic activity, were far too expensive for use in converting natural gas or its C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} components.

  15. High Amounts of n-Alkanes in the Composition of Asphodelus aestivus Brot. Flower Essential Oil from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polatoğlu, Kaan; Demirci, Betül; Can Başer, Kemal Hüsnü

    2016-10-01

    There is only a couple of reports indicating essential oil composition of Asphodelus species in the literature. However, from the members of this genus many non-volatile secondary metabolites were isolated. In Cyprus, Asphodelus aestivus Brot. can be found abundantly in all regions of the island. This plant has various ethnobotanical uses in Cyprus. There is no report on the volatiles nor the essential oil composition of A. aestivus. The smell of A. aestivus flowers resembles that of a cat pee which caught our attention. Therefore, we have carried out GC, GC/MS analysis of the essential oil (yield: 0.01 v/w) obtained from Asphodelus aestivus flowers. Seventeen compounds were identified in the essential oil comprising 96.2% of the oil. The major components of the essential oil were hexadecanoic acid 35.6%, pentacosane 17.4%, tricosane 13.4% and heptacosane 8.4%. In our results, we expected to see sulfur containing cat pee odorants due to the odor of the flower whereas high amounts of n-alkanes, saturated fatty acids and minor amounts of acyclic diterpenes were observed.

  16. Transport behavior of n-alkane penetrants into castor oil based polyurethane-polyester nonwoven fabric composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satheesh Kumar, M.N.; Manjula, K.S.; Siddaramaiah

    2007-01-01

    Castor oil based polyurethane (PU)-polyester nonwoven fabric composites were fabricated by impregnating the polyester nonwoven fabric in a composition containing castor oil and diisocyanate. Composites were fabricated with two different isocyanates such as toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI). Transport behavior of n-alkane penetrants (pentane, hexane and heptane) into both PUs and PU-polyester nonwoven fabric composites were studied. Sorption studies were carried out at different temperatures. From the sorption results, the diffusion (D) and permeation (P) coefficients of penetrants have been calculated. Significant increase in the diffusion and permeation coefficients was observed with increase in the temperature of sorption experiments. Drastical reduction in diffusion and permeation coefficients was noticed in the composites compared to neat PUs. Attempts were made to estimate the empirical parameters like n, which suggests the mode of transport and K is a constant depends on the structural characteristics of the composite in addition to its interaction with penetrants. The temperature dependence of the transport coefficients has been used to estimate the activation energy parameter for diffusion (E D ) and permeation (E P ) processes from Arrhenius plots. Furthermore, the sorption results have been interpreted in terms of the thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS)

  17. Identification of In-Chain-Functionalized Compounds and Methyl-Branched Alkanes in Cuticular Waxes of Triticum aestivum cv. Bethlehem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu C Racovita

    Full Text Available In this work, cuticular waxes from flag leaf blades and peduncles of Triticum aestivum cv. Bethlehem were investigated in search for novel wax compounds. Seven wax compound classes were detected that had previously not been reported, and their structures were elucidated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of various derivatives. Six of the classes were identified as series of homologs differing by two methylene units, while the seventh was a homologous series with homologs with single methylene unit differences. In the waxes of flag leaf blades, secondary alcohols (predominantly C27 and C33, primary/secondary diols (predominantly C28 and esters of primary/secondary diols (predominantly C50, combining C28 diol with C22 acid were found, all sharing similar secondary hydroxyl group positions at and around C-12 or ω-12. 7- and 8-hydroxy-2-alkanol esters (predominantly C35, 7- and 8-oxo-2-alkanol esters (predominantly C35, and 4-alkylbutan-4-olides (predominantly C28 were found both in flag leaf and peduncle wax mixtures. Finally, a series of even- and odd-numbered alkane homologs was identified in both leaf and peduncle waxes, with an internal methyl branch preferentially on C-11 and C-13 of homologs with even total carbon number and on C-12 of odd-numbered homologs. Biosynthetic pathways are suggested for all compounds, based on common structural features and matching chain length profiles with other wheat wax compound classes.

  18. Fabrication, thermal properties and thermal stabilities of microencapsulated n-alkane with poly(lauryl methacrylate) as shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Xiaolin, E-mail: shirleyqiu2009@gmail.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Food Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Lu, Lixin; Wang, Ju [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Food Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Tang, Guoyi [Advanced Materials Institute and Clearer Production Key Laboratory, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Song, Guolin [Advanced Materials Institute and Clearer Production Key Laboratory, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2015-11-20

    Highlights: • Microencapsulation of octadecane and paraffin by crosslinked poly(lauryl methacrylate). • Octadecane microcapsules have a melting enthalpy of about 118 J g{sup −1}. • Weight loss temperatures of the microcapsules were increased by 67 °C and 28 °C. • Phase change enthalpies decreased by around 10 wt% after 500 thermal cycles. • Foams with microcapsules can be applied for passive temperature control. - Abstract: Microencapsulation of n-octadecane or paraffin with poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA) shell was performed by a suspension-like polymerization. The polymer shell was crosslinked by pentaerythritol tetraacrylate (PETRA). The surface morphologies of microcapsules were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Phase change properties, thermal reliabilities and thermal stabilities of microcapsules were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The n-octadecane microcapsule exhibits higher melting enthalpy (118.0 J g{sup −1}) and crystallization enthalpy (108.3 J g{sup −1}) compared with the paraffin microcapsule. The thermal resistant temperatures were enhanced by more than 25 °C when n-alkanes were microencapsulated by PLMA. The PCM contents of microcapsules decreased by less than 4 wt% and 6 wt% after 500 and 1000 thermal cycles, respectively. Heat-up experiments indicated that microcapsule-treated foams exhibited upgraded thermal regulation capacities. Consequently, microencapsulated n-octadecane or paraffin with PLMA as shell possesses good potentials for heat storage and thermal regulation.

  19. Fabrication, thermal properties and thermal stabilities of microencapsulated n-alkane with poly(lauryl methacrylate) as shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Xiaolin; Lu, Lixin; Wang, Ju; Tang, Guoyi; Song, Guolin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microencapsulation of octadecane and paraffin by crosslinked poly(lauryl methacrylate). • Octadecane microcapsules have a melting enthalpy of about 118 J g −1 . • Weight loss temperatures of the microcapsules were increased by 67 °C and 28 °C. • Phase change enthalpies decreased by around 10 wt% after 500 thermal cycles. • Foams with microcapsules can be applied for passive temperature control. - Abstract: Microencapsulation of n-octadecane or paraffin with poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA) shell was performed by a suspension-like polymerization. The polymer shell was crosslinked by pentaerythritol tetraacrylate (PETRA). The surface morphologies of microcapsules were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Phase change properties, thermal reliabilities and thermal stabilities of microcapsules were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The n-octadecane microcapsule exhibits higher melting enthalpy (118.0 J g −1 ) and crystallization enthalpy (108.3 J g −1 ) compared with the paraffin microcapsule. The thermal resistant temperatures were enhanced by more than 25 °C when n-alkanes were microencapsulated by PLMA. The PCM contents of microcapsules decreased by less than 4 wt% and 6 wt% after 500 and 1000 thermal cycles, respectively. Heat-up experiments indicated that microcapsule-treated foams exhibited upgraded thermal regulation capacities. Consequently, microencapsulated n-octadecane or paraffin with PLMA as shell possesses good potentials for heat storage and thermal regulation.

  20. Diastereomeric and isotopic scrambling in (hydrido)alkyliridium complexes. Evidence for the presence of a common `alkane complex` intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobley, T.A.; Schade, C.; Bergman, R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-07-26

    An alternative explanation for the scrambling of isotopic labels in the alkylmetal hydride complexes is the direct dyotropic rearrangement over the transition state. In an attempt to clarify the mechanism involved in these deuterium-scrambling reactions we have carried out kinetic investigations of the interconversion of diastereomeric (hydrido)(dimethylcyclopropyl)iridium complexes 1a and 1b and the deuterium scrambling of their {alpha}-deuterio analogs. A dramatic difference in behavior of the Rh and Ir systems yields significant conclusions regarding the reaction coordinate for alkane oxidative addition reactions to metal centers. Comparison of the results from the iridium system discussed here and the analogous rhodium system studied earlier yields the following interesting conclusion: with iridium, the barrier for interconversion of 4a and 4b is comparable to the barrier for C-H insertion to re-form 1a,b whereas the corresponding barrier for interconversion of the rhodium analogs of 4a and 4b is high compared to the barrier for C-H insertion. This difference may be caused by the different temperatures at which the two reactions are run; another possibility, however, is that deuterium scrambling in the rhodium system occurs by a dyotropic rearrangement. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The ORF slr0091 of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 encodes a high-light induced aldehyde dehydrogenase converting apocarotenals and alkanals

    KAUST Repository

    Trautmann, Danika

    2013-07-05

    Oxidative cleavage of carotenoids and peroxidation of lipids lead to apocarotenals and aliphatic aldehydes called alkanals, which react with vitally important compounds, promoting cytotoxicity. Although many enzymes have been reported to deactivate alkanals by converting them into fatty acids, little is known about the mechanisms used to detoxify apocarotenals or the enzymes acting on them. Cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic organisms must cope with both classes of aldehydes. Here we report that the Synechocystis enzyme SynAlh1, encoded by the ORF slr0091, is an aldehyde dehydrogenase that mediates oxidation of both apocarotenals and alkanals into the corresponding acids. Using a crude lysate of SynAlh1-expressing Escherichia coli cells, we show that SynAlh1 converts a wide range of apocarotenals and alkanals, with a preference for apocarotenals with defined chain lengths. As suggested by in vitro incubations and using engineered retinal-forming E. coli cells, we found that retinal is not a substrate for SynAlh1, making involvement in Synechocystis retinoid metabolism unlikely. The transcript level of SynAlh1 is induced by high light and cold treatment, indicating a role in the stress response, and the corresponding gene is a constituent of a stress-related operon. The assumptions regarding the function of SynAlh are further supported by the surprisingly high homology to human and plant aldehyde dehydrogenase that have been assigned to aldehyde detoxification. SynAlh1 is the first aldehyde dehydrogenase that has been shown to form both apocarotenoic and fatty acids. This dual function suggests that its eukaryotic homologs may also be involved in apocarotenal metabolism, a function that has not been considered so far. Aldehyde dehydrogenases play an important role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes. Here, we report on a cyanbacterial enzyme capable in converting two classes of lipid-derived aldehydes, apocaotenals and alkanals. The corresponding gene is a

  2. Size-distributions of n-alkanes, PAHs and hopanes and their sources in the urban, mountain and marine atmospheres over East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Size-segregated (9 stages n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and hopanes in the urban (Baoji city in inland China, mountain (Mt. Tai in east coastal China and marine (Okinawa Island, Japan atmospheres over East Asia were studied using a GC/MS technique. Ambient concentrations of n-alkanes (1698±568 ng m−3 in winter and 487±145 ng m−3 in spring, PAHs (536±80 and 161±39 ng m−3, and hopanes (65±24 and 20±2.4 ng m−3 in the urban air are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than those in the mountain aerosols and 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than those in the marine samples. Mass ratios of n-alkanes, PAHs and hopanes clearly demonstrate coal-burning emissions as their major source. Size distributions of fossil fuel derived n-alkane, PAHs and hopanes were found to be unimodal in most cases, peaking at 0.7–1.1 μm size. In contrast, plant wax derived n-alkanes presented a bimodal distribution with two peaks at the sizes of 0.7–1.1 μm and >4.7 μm in the summer mountain and spring marine samples. Among the three types of samples, geometric mean diameter (GMD of the organics in fine mode (<2.1 μm was found to be smallest (av. 0.63 μm in spring for the urban samples and largest (1.01 μm for the marine samples, whereas the GMD in coarse mode (≥2.1 μm was found to be smallest (3.48 μm for the marine aerosols and largest (4.04 μm for the urban aerosols. The fine mode GMDs of the urban and mountain samples were larger in winter than in spring and summer. Moreover, GMDs of 3- and 4-ring PAHs were larger than those of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in the three types of atmospheres. Such differences in GMDs can be interpreted by the repartitioning of organic compounds and the coagulation and hygroscopic growth of particles during a long-range transport from the inland continent to the marine area, as well as the difference in their sources among the three regions.

  3. Variation in the carbon isotopic composition of alkanes during shale gas desorption process and its geological significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Meng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking Chang 7 shale of the Yanchang Formation in the southeastern area of the Yishan slope of the Ordos Basin as our research subject, desorption experiments were performed on more than 30 shale samples that helped this study focus on the variation of carbon isotopic composition of alkanes during the desorption process of shale gas, the possible causes of this phenomenon and its geological significance will also be discussed as follows. It was found that carbon isotopic composition became higher by 9.2‰ (from −50.1‰ to −40.9‰ for methane desorbed gas (δ13C1, and it also became higher by 2.8‰ (from −35.5‰ to −32.7‰ for ethane (δ13C2, but there's barely any differences for propane during the desorption process. At room temperature or constant temperature, carbon isotopic composition for both methane and ethane (δ13C1 & δ13C2 increased continuously. The values of δ13C1 and δ13C2 were low at first and then it gradually became high whilst the desorption process of shale gas that was optimized with the aid of the increasing temperature. The reason for this phenomenon is most likely due to the main adsorption/desorption of shale gas and diffusion migration fractionation of isotope. Additionally, these variation characteristics of methane and ethane carbon isotope composition of shale gas may be a vital reason for the relatively low carbon isotopic composition of methane compared to δ13C calculated by means of the vitrinite reflectance (RO, and this may be applied to evaluate the remaining amount of shale gas resources.

  4. Orientation in metal-catalyzed hydrogen exchange between alkanes, naphthalene, or biphenyl and deuterium or deuterium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, M.A.; Moyes, R.B.; Wells, P.B.; Garnett, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange between deuterium gas and protium in hexane, pentane, 2-methyl-butane, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, and 2,4-dimethylpentane has been catalyzed by clean platinum films (70--100 0 C). A selection of these reactions has been catalyzed by films of rhodium and iridium (typically -13 to -35 0 C). In all cases, multiple exchange occurred. Product analysis by mass and proton NMR spectroscopy showed that exchange in methylene and methine groups was more rapid than that in methyl groups. A similar orientation effect was observed in reactions over platinum powder but not over platinum-alumina. For exchange between deuterium oxide and hexane catalyzed by platinum films at 200 0 C, the rate of exchange in methyl groups exceeded that in methylene groups. It is proposed that preferential exchange in methylene and methine groups is normal behavior during alkane exchange with molecular deuterium over these platinum metals when their surfaces (i) are initially clean or (ii) contain several adjacent sites which are unperturbed by the presence of any electronegative adsorbed species. Preferential exchange in the methyl groups of hexane results from contamination of the surface by adsorbed D 2 O, OD, or O; this may be a geometric effect or an electronic effect, depending on the magnitude of the surface coverage of water, which is unknown. Orientation in the exchange between deuterium gas and naphthalene or biphenyl catalyzed by films of platinum and iridium does not differ from that observed in exchanges where the isotope source is deuterium oxide or deuterated solvent, but the M value calculated for exchange in naphthalene is higher than that previously reported

  5. Preparation and surface active properties of oxypropylated α-hydroxyacids, α-hydroxyesters and α-, β-alkane diols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker, N. O.

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of a-hydroxyacids RCH(OHCO2H, α-hydroxyesters RCH(OHCO2CH3 and α, β-alkane diols was synthetized and condensed with 5-20 moles propylene oxide to obtain nonionic surfactants. Some of the physicochemical properties and the biodegradability of these products were examined. The results showed that the best wetting properties were obtained by the addition of 15 oxypropylene groups to methyl α-hydroxymyristate. The α-hydroxymyristic acid with 20 moles of propylene oxide gave the highest foam. Biodegradation studies indicated that increasing both the chain length of the hydrophobic alkyl chain or the number of oxypropylene groups in the adduct decreased biodegradation.

    Una serie de α-hidroxiácidos RCH(OHCO2H, α-hidroxiésteres RCH(OHCO2CH3 y α, β-alcanodioles se sintetizaron y condensaron con 5-20 moles de óxido de propileno para obtener tensioactivos no iónicos. Se examinaron algunas propiedades fisicoquímicas y de biodegradabilidad de estos productos. Los resultados mostraron que las mejores propiedades humectantes se obtuvieron por adición de 15 grupos oxipropilenos a α-hidroximiristato de metilo.
    El ácido α-hidroximirístico con 20 moles de óxido de propileno dio la espuma más poderosa. Estudios de biodegradación indicaron que tanto el aumento de la longitud de cadena de los grupos alquilo hidrofóbicos como el número de grupos oxipropilenos en el aducto disminuyeron la biodegradación.

  6. Leaf cuticular n-alkanes as markers in the chemotaxonomy of the eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliński, L P; Szafranek, J; Stepnowski, P

    2011-11-01

    The complex of species formed by eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) and its wild and weedy relatives (mainly S. incanum L. and S. insanum L.) is characterised by an extreme morphological divergence that is not always associated with genetic variation. The taxonomy of so-called 'spiny Solanum' species (subgenus Leptostemonum) is therefore extremely unclear. Cultivated eggplant lacks resistance to pests that frequently occur among the wild forms and species. As these wild plants are a potential gene pool for improvement of eggplant cultivars, knowledge of the characteristics of taxonomic relations between plants of different origin is crucial. We suggest using the leaf cuticular n-alkane chain length distribution pattern as an alternative taxonomic marker for eggplant and related species. The results are in good agreement with current knowledge of the systematics of these plants; at the same time, the method developed here is useful for verifying plant identification based on morphological traits. Analysis of 13 eggplant cultivars, five accessions of S. incanum and two lines of S. macrocarpon enabled the intraspecific variation within eggplant to be assessed as low. There was wide variability among S. incanum accessions, probably because plants described as S. incanum are members of a number of different species. Some Asian accessions (sometimes described as S. insanum) were found to be almost identical to S. melongena, while a truly wild African S. incanum plant showed extensive similarity. The usefulness of the chemotaxonomic approach in dealing with the S. melongena-S. incanum complex is discussed. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. Flash kinetics in liquefied noble gases: Studies of alkane activation and ligand dynamics at rhodium carbonyl centers, and a search for xenon-carbene adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeston, Jake Simon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    A general introduction is given to place the subsequent chapters in context for the nonspecialist. Results are presented from a low temperature infrared (IR) flash kinetic study of C-H bond activation via photoinduced reaction of Cp*Rh(CO)2 (1) with linear and cyclic alkanes in liquid krypton and liquid xenon solution. No reaction was observed with methane; for all other hydrocarbons studied, the rate law supports fragmentation of the overall reaction into an alkane binding step followed by an oxidative addition step. For the binding step, larger alkanes within each series (linear and cyclic) interact more strongly than smaller alkanes with the Rh center. The second step, oxidative addition of the C-H bond across Rh, exhibits very little variance in the series of linear alkanes, while in the cyclic series the rate decreases with increasing alkane size. Results are presented from an IR flash kinetic study of the photoinduced chemistry of Tp*Rh(CO)2 (5; Tp* = hydridotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borato) in liquid xenon solution at –50 °C. IR spectra of the solution taken 2 μs after 308 nm photolysis exhibit two transient bands at 1972-1980 cm-1 and 1992-2000 cm-1, respectively. These bands were assigned to (η3-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe and (η2-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe solvates on the basis of companion studies using Bp*Rh(CO)2 (9; Bp* = dihydridobis(3,5-dimethyl pyrazolyl)borato). Preliminary kinetic data for reaction of 5 with cyclohexane in xenon solution indicate that both transient bands still appear and that their rates of decay correlate with formation of the product Tp*Rh(CO)(C6H11)(H). The preparation and reactivity of the new complex Bp*Rh(CO)(pyridine) (11) are described. The complex reacts with CH3I to yield the novel Rh carbene hydride complex HB(Me2pz)2Rh(H)(I)(C5H5N)(C(O)Me) (12), resulting from formal addition of CH

  8. Liquid–liquid extraction of toluene from alkane with pyridinium based ionic liquid ([BPy][NO3] and [HPy][NO3]) at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enayati, Mobin; Mokhtarani, Babak; Sharifi, Ali; Anvari, Sanam; Mirzaei, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Extraction of toluene from alkane with pyridinium based ionic liquid was studied. • The ionic liquids [BPy][NO 3 ] and [HPy][NO 3 ] were used. • The effect of alkane chain length on selectivity of toluene was evaluated. • The effect of alkyl chain length of ionic liquids on toluene selectivity was investigated. • The experimental data were correlated with the NRTL model. - Abstract: The focus of this paper is to study the liquid−liquid extraction process for the separation of toluene from alkane employing the ionic liquids N-butylpyridinium nitrate, [BPy][NO 3 ], and N-hexylpyridinium nitrate, [HPy][NO 3 ], as a new solvents. New experimental data for the ternary systems of {[BPy][NO 3 ] (1) + heptane, or octane, or decane (2) + toluene (3)} and {[HPy][NO 3 ] (1) + heptane, or octane, or decane (2) + toluene (3)} at T = 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure are reported. The Othmer-Tobias and Hand correlation are examined to check the reliability of the experimental LLE data. The toluene distribution ratios and selectivity were calculated form the experimental data. The selectivity values are higher than unity which indicates the ILs, [BPy][NO 3 ] and [HPy][NO 3 ], used in this work are potential solvents to separate toluene from alkane. Besides, the effect of the alkane chain length in the selectivity values was evaluated. In addition, the result of the NRTL thermodynamic modeling shows, the experimental data were satisfactorily correlated.

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance evidence for the occurrence of hydrogen and/or proton transfer between C7, C8 and C11 n-alkanes and their cations in irradiated CCl3F matrices at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyckx, G.; Ceulemans, J.

    1991-01-01

    After γ-irradiation of heptane and octane at low concentration in CCI 3 F at 77 K, only the EPR spectrum of the corresponding radical cations is observed. At higher concentrations, the spectrum of alkyl radicals also appears. Clear alkyl radical features are also observed after irradiation of 1 mol% undecane in CCI 3 F. In contrast, alkane radical cations but no alkyl radicals are observed after irradiation of heptane, octane and undecane in CCI 3 CF 3 and other saturated chlorofluorocarbon matrices at concentrations where alkyl radicals are already very prominent in CCI 3 F. Different mechanisms for the formation of these alkyl radicals are considered, viz. direct radiolysis of the alkane solutes, formation as a result of electronic excitation energy transfer and formation via the corresponding alkane radical cations that are formed by hole transfer from matrix cations. In the latter case, unimolecular deprotonation, charge neutralization by electron tunnelling and hydrogen/proton transfer with alkane molecules are taken into consideration. It is concluded that the hydrogen/proton transfer reaction (RH dot+ + RH→R dot + RH + 2 ) mainly accounts for the observed alkyl radicals. The results further indicate that in CCI 3 F at 77 K alkanes are present as small aggregates, to which hole transfer from matrix cations still occurs efficiently. (author)

  10. Comment on "Changes in atmospheric CO2 levels recorded by the isotopic signature of n-alkanes from plants" from K.S. Machado and S. Froehner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Peter; Nehrbass-Ahles, Christoph; Schmitt, Jochen; Stocker, Thomas F.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2017-09-01

    The recently published invited research article by Machado and Froehner (2017) is presenting δ13C values from sedimentary organic matter (n-alkane), measured on samples collected in the Barigui watershed (Brazil) covering the last 400 years. The derived δ13C time series based on C27n-alkane, beginning approximately in the calendar year 1600 (or 1600 CE; with CE for Common Era) until recent times is subsequently - in their Fig. 3 - compared with a record, which is believed to be a representative reconstruction of atmospheric CO2 concentrations covering approximately the last 650 years (with respect to the year 2005 CE). The final conclusion of this article, as reflected in its title, is that changes in atmospheric CO2 levels are recorded in isotopic signatures on n-alkane from plants. We argue, that this conclusion can not be drawn from the study of Machado and Froehner (2017), since what is shown in their Fig. 3 is not a time series of atmospheric CO2 concentration of the last 650 years. The authors show reconstructions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations based on Antarctic ice cores over the past 650,000 years and use them for the past 650 years by ignoring the fact that the time scale in IPCC (2007), from which, according to the caption of their Fig. 3, they took this CO2 time series, is in kyr (1 kyr = 1 kilo year = 1000 years). This is wrong and any conclusion based on this comparison is incorrect. Instead they should have used for a correct CO2 time series for the comparison with their measurements.

  11. Degradation of n-alkanes and PAHs from the heavy crude oil using salt-tolerant bacterial consortia and analysis of their catabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Ranjit; Lyu, Honghong; Ma, Jianli; Tang, Jingchun; Liu, Qinglong; Zhang, Hairong

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, salt-tolerant strains, Dietzia sp. HRJ2, Corynebacterium variabile HRJ4, Dietzia cinnamea HRJ5 and Bacillus tequilensis HRJ6 were isolated from the Dagang oil field, China. These strains degraded n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) aerobically from heavy crude oil (HCO) in an experiment at 37 °C and 140 rpm. The GC/MS investigation for degradation of different chain lengths of n-alkanes (C8-C40) by individual strains showed the highest degradation of C8-C19 (HRJ5), C20-C30 (HRJ4) and C31-C40 (HRJ5), respectively. Moreover, degradation of 16 PAHs with individual strains demonstrated that the bicyclic and pentacyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) were mostly degraded by HRJ5, tricyclic and tetracyclic AHs by HRJ6 and hexacyclic AHs by HRJ2. However, the highest degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), total saturated hydrocarbons (TSH), total aromatic hydrocarbons (TAH), n-alkanes (C8-C40) and 16 PAHs was achieved by a four-membered consortium (HRJ2 + 4 + 5 + 6) within 12 days, with the predominance of HRJ4 and HRJ6 strains which was confirmed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The abundance of alkB and nah genes responsible for catabolism of n-alkanes and PAHs was quantified using the qPCR. Maximum copy numbers of genes were observed in HRJ2 + 4 + 5 + 6 consortium (gene copies l -1 ) 2.53 × 10 4 (alkB) and 3.47 × 10 3 (nah) at 12 days, which corresponded to higher degradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) (total SOD (T-SOD), Cu 2+ Zn 2+ -SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities in Allium sativum and Triticum aestivum were lower in the HRJ2 + 4 + 5 + 6-treated HCO as compared to the plantlets exposed directly to HCO. The present results revealed the effective degradation of HCO-contaminated saline medium using the microbial consortium having greater metabolic diversity.

  12. [Altered expressions of alkane monooxygenase and hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression in lung tissue of rat hypoxic pulmonary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua-jun; Yuan, Ya-dong

    2013-10-29

    To explore the altered expressions of alkane monooxygenase (AlkB) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Twenty Wistar rats were divided randomly into normal control and hypoxia groups after 1-week adaptive feeding. Hypoxia group was raised in a homemade organic glass tank with a 24-h continuous supply of air and nitrogen atmospheric mixed gas. And the oxygen concentration of (10.0 ± 0.5)% was controlled by oxygen monitoring control system. The control group was maintained in room air. Both groups stayed in the same room with the same diet. After 8 weeks, the level of mean pulmonary pressure (mPAP) was measured by right-heart catheterization, right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI) calculated by the ratio of right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum and hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling (HPSR) observed under microscope. And the levels of AlkB and HIF-1α mRNA and protein in lungs were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. At 8 weeks post-hypoxia, compared with the control group [11.0 ± 0.7 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa), 0.210 ± 0.035], the levels of mPAP and RVHI in hypoxia group (33.3 ± 1.3 mm Hg, 0.448 ± 0.013) increased significantly (both P < 0.05), the expressions of AlkB mRNA and protein in pulmonary tissue decreased significantly (0.338 ± 0.085 vs 0.688 ± 0.020, P < 0.01) (0.483 ± 0.052 vs 0.204 ± 0.010, P < 0.01), and the expressions of HIF-1α mRNA and protein increased significantly (0.790 ± 0.161 vs 0.422 ± 0.096, P < 0.01) (0.893 ± 0.080 vs 0.346 ± 0.008, P < 0.01). The down-regulation of AlkB in lung tissue may increase the activity of HIF-1 to participate in the occurrence and development of pulmonary hypertension.

  13. Premarital Sexual Practice among Unmarried First Year Undergraduate Students in Alkan University College in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalew Gemechu Sendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Premarital sexual practice among unmarried College students has markedly increased recently in Ethiopia. College students are recognized as one of the age groups most affected by sexually transmitted infections including HIV. However, little has been explored about the magnitude of premarital sexual activity and predisposing factors in the circumstance of private higher education institutions in Ethiopia. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the magnitude of premarital sexual practice and predisposing factors among unmarried undergraduate first year students in Alkan University College in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of college students was conducted in April-May 2013. Study participants were selected by stratified random sampling. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 207 unmarried first year undergraduate students, and was analyzed using SPSS V.16.0. Multi-variate logistic regression was used to see association between variables. Results were summarized in frequencies and percentages and presented in tables. RESULTS: A total of 207 students took part in the survey. The mean age of respondents was 21.8 ±2.0 years. More than half of survey respondents (60.9% reported that they have had premarital sex. Multi-variate logistic regression analysis showed that male respondents were more than seven times to ever have sexual intercourse as compared to female respondents (AOR= 7.6; 95%CI: 4.51, 34.87. However, age less than 18 years was found to be protective against premarital sexual practice (AOR=0.42.; 95%CI: 0.27-0.73. Compared to respondents who do not use alcohol, those who are alcohol users after joining college were 3.8 times (AOR 3.05, 95% CI: 1.51-4.32 as likely to begin premarital sex. Similarly, ever chewing khat after joining college was found to be positively associated with premarital sex in this study. (AOR=2.60.; 95%CI: 0.62-1.43. CONCLUSION: A significant number of students had started

  14. Premarital Sexual Practice among Unmarried First Year Undergraduate Students in Alkan University College in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalew Gemechu Sendo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Premarital sexual practice among unmarried College students has markedly increased recently in Ethiopia. College students are recognized as one of the age groups most affected by sexually transmitted infections including HIV. However, little has been explored about the magnitude of premarital sexual activity and predisposing factors in the circumstance of private higher education institutions in Ethiopia. OBJECTIVE To investigate the magnitude of premarital sexual practice and predisposing factors among unmarried undergraduate first year students in Alkan University College in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. METHODS A cross-sectional survey of college students was conducted in April-May 2013. Study participants were selected by stratified random sampling. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 207 unmarried first year undergraduate students, and was analyzed using SPSS V.16.0. Multi-variate logistic regression was used to see association between variables. Results were summarized in frequencies and percentages and presented in tables. RESULTS A total of 207 students took part in the survey. The mean age of respondents was 21.8 ±2.0 years. More than half of survey respondents (60.9% reported that they have had premarital sex. Multi-variate logistic regression analysis showed that male respondents were more than seven times to ever have sexual intercourse as compared to female respondents (AOR= 7.6; 95%CI: 4.51, 34.87. However, age less than 18 years was found to be protective against premarital sexual practice (AOR=0.42.; 95%CI: 0.27- 0.73. Compared to respondents who do not use alcohol, those who are alcohol users after joining college were 3.8 times (AOR 3.05, 95% CI: 1.51- 4.32 as likely to begin premarital sex. Similarly, ever chewing khat after joining college was found to be positively associated with premarital sex in this study. (AOR=2.60.; 95%CI: 0.62-1.43. CONCLUSION A significant number of students had started pre

  15. The C32 alkane-1,15-diol as a proxy of late Quaternary riverine input in coastal margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattaud, Julie; Dorhout, Denise; Schulz, Hartmut; Castañeda, Isla S.; Schefuß, Enno; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    The study of past sedimentary records from coastal margins allows us to reconstruct variations in terrestrial input into the marine realm and to gain insight into continental climatic variability. There are numerous organic proxies for tracing terrestrial input into marine environments but none that strictly reflect the input of river-produced organic matter. Here, we test the fractional abundance of the C32 alkane 1,15-diol relative to all 1,13- and 1,15-long-chain diols (FC32 1, 15) as a tracer of input of river-produced organic matter in the marine realm in surface and Quaternary (0-45 ka) sediments on the shelf off the Zambezi and nearby smaller rivers in the Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean). A Quaternary (0-22 ka) sediment record off the Nile River mouth in the eastern Mediterranean was also studied for long-chain diols. For the Mozambique Channel, surface sediments of sites most proximal to Mozambique rivers showed the highest F1, 15 - C32 (up to 10 %). The sedimentary record shows high (15-35 %) pre-Holocene F1, 15 - C32 and low (soil and river-produced organic matter in the marine environment, which declines from 0.25 to 0.60 for the pre-Holocene to sea level, which caused the Zambezi River mouth to become more distal to our study site, thereby decreasing riverine input at the core location. Some small discrepancies are observed between the records of the BIT index and FC32 1, 15 for Heinrich Event 1 (H1) and the Younger Dryas (YD), which may be explained by a change in soil sources in the catchment area rather than a change in river influx. Like for the Mozambique Channel, a significant correlation between FC32 1, 15 and the BIT index (r2 = 0.38, p sea level rise. In general, the differences between the BIT index and FC32 1, 15 eastern Mediterranean Nile records can be explained by the fact that the BIT index is not only affected by riverine runoff but also by vegetation cover with increasing cover leading to lower soil erosion. Our results

  16. One-of-A-Kind: A Microporous Metal-Organic Framework Capable of Adsorptive Separation of Linear, Mono- and Di-branched Alkane Isomers via Temperature- and Adsorbate-Dependent Molecular Sieving

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2018-03-29

    Separation of alkane isomers represents a crucial process in the petrochemical industry in order to achieve high octane rating of gasoline. Herein, we report the first example of complete separation of linear, monobranched and dibranched alkane isomers by a single adsorbent. A calcium-based robust microporous metal-organic framework, Ca(H2tcpb) (tcpb = 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-benzene) exhibits unique molecular exclusion behavior which enables full separation of binary or ternary mixtures of alkane isomers into pure form of each isomerate. The successful separation of monobranched and dibranched hexane isomers will not only lead to the production of higher quality gasoline with maximum possible octane numbers but also fill the gap in the current separation technology. Exploration of separation mechanism indicates that structural flexibility and adsorbate-dependent structure change of the porous framework plays a vital role for the observed temperature-dependent molecular sieving property of the adsorbent.

  17. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana-Pillai, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons with a metal complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/H/sub 2/ in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form a hydridoalkyl complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/RH; (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform CHX/sub 3/ at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) CpRhPMe/sub 3/RX; and (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex with halogen -60 to 25/sup 0/C to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  18. Crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes (C26–C32 via single-crystal and powder diffraction and DFT-D optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Brooks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes have been determined from single-crystal or high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Mono-methyl alkanes can be found on the cuticles of insects and are believed to act as recognition pheromones in some social species, e.g. ants, wasps etc. The molecules were synthesized as pure S enantiomers and are (S-9-methylpentacosane, C26H54; (S-9-methylheptacosane and (S-11-methylheptacosane, C28H58; (S-7-methylnonacosane, (S-9-methylnonacosane, (S-11-methylnonacosane and (S-13-methylnonacosane, C30H62; and (S-9-methylhentriacontane, C32H66. All crystallize in space group P21. Depending on the position of the methyl group on the carbon chain, two packing schemes are observed, in which the molecules pack together hexagonally as linear rods with terminal and side methyl groups clustering to form distinct motifs. Carbon-chain torsion angles deviate by less than 10° from the fully extended conformation, but with one packing form showing greater curvature than the other near the position of the methyl side group. The crystal structures are optimized by dispersion-corrected DFT calculations, because of the difficulties in refining accurate structural parameters from powder diffraction data from relatively poorly crystalline materials.

  19. Extraction of toluene from aliphatic compounds using an ionic liquid as solvent: Influence of the alkane on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Emilio J.; Calvar, Noelia; Dominguez, Irene; Dominguez, Angeles

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → An ionic liquid was analyzed as solvent for extraction of toluene from alkanes. → Liquid-liquid equilibrium data were measured at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. → Selectivity and solute distribution ratio were obtained and compared with literature. → The Othmer-Tobias equation was used to ascertain the experimental LLE data. → Experimental data were correlated using NRTL and UNIQUAC models. - Abstract: In this paper, the feasibility of using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ionic liquid, [EMim][ESO 4 ], as solvent for the extraction of toluene from aliphatic compounds (hexane, heptane, octane, or nonane) was analyzed. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary systems {alkane (1) + toluene (2) + [EMim][ESO 4 ] (3)} were measured at T = 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Selectivity and solute distribution ratio were calculated from the experimental LLE data, and the obtained values were compared to those previously reported using other ionic liquids and sulfolane. The degree of consistency of the experimental LLE data was ascertained using the Othmer-Tobias equation. Finally, the experimental LLE data were satisfactorily correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models.

  20. Excess molar volumes of the ternary system {methylcyclohexane (1)+cyclohexane (2)+n-alkanes (3)} at T=298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iloukhani, Hossein; Rezaei-Sameti, Mahdi

    2005-01-01

    Densities were experimentally determined in the whole range of composition at T=298.15 K for the ternary system {methylcyclohexane (1)+cyclohexane (2)+n-alkanes (3)} and for the seven corresponding binary systems. The n-alkanes include n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane. Excess molar volumes, V E , were calculated for the binaries and ternaries systems. The V 123 E data are positive over the entire range of composition for the systems {methylcyclohexane (1)+cyclohexane (2)+n-heptane (3) or n-octane (3)} at three fixed compositions (f m =X 1 /X 2 ). For the system {methylcyclohexane (1)+cyclohexane (2)+n-hexane (3)}, the V E values showed positive for f m =0.3 and negative for f m =3. The V E data exhibit, an inversion in sign in the mixture containing f m =1 for later ternary system. Several empirical expressions are used to predict and correlate the ternary excess molar volumes from experimental results on the constituted binaries and analyzed to gain insight about liquid mixture interactions

  1. Comparing the accuracy of high-dimensional neural network potentials and the systematic molecular fragmentation method: A benchmark study for all-trans alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastegger, Michael; Kauffmann, Clemens; Marquetand, Philipp; Behler, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches, which have been developed to express the potential energy of large systems, exploit the locality of the atomic interactions. A prominent example is the fragmentation methods in which the quantum chemical calculations are carried out for overlapping small fragments of a given molecule that are then combined in a second step to yield the system’s total energy. Here we compare the accuracy of the systematic molecular fragmentation approach with the performance of high-dimensional neural network (HDNN) potentials introduced by Behler and Parrinello. HDNN potentials are similar in spirit to the fragmentation approach in that the total energy is constructed as a sum of environment-dependent atomic energies, which are derived indirectly from electronic structure calculations. As a benchmark set, we use all-trans alkanes containing up to eleven carbon atoms at the coupled cluster level of theory. These molecules have been chosen because they allow to extrapolate reliable reference energies for very long chains, enabling an assessment of the energies obtained by both methods for alkanes including up to 10 000 carbon atoms. We find that both methods predict high-quality energies with the HDNN potentials yielding smaller errors with respect to the coupled cluster reference.

  2. Cucumber ECERIFERUM1 (CsCER1), which influences the cuticle properties and drought tolerance of cucumber, plays a key role in VLC alkanes biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjiao; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Chong; Ren, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xiaofeng; Black, Kezia; Gai, Xinshuang; Wang, Qian; Ren, Huazhong

    2015-02-01

    Most land plants have a wax layer which covers their aerial parts to protect them from environmental stresses, such as drought, UV radiation, and pathogenic invasion. The wax biosynthesis has been well studied previously in Arabidopsis, but it still remains elusive in cucumber. Here, we isolated a CER1 homolog CsCER1 in cucumber, and we found that the expression of CsCER1 in the cucumber line 3401 which shows waxy fruit phenotype is much higher than that in the cucumber line 3413 which displays glossy fruit phenotype. Spatial and temporal expression analyses revealed that CsCER1 is specifically expressed in the epidermis where waxes are synthesized, and sub-cellular location showed that CsCER1 protein is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. The expression of CsCER1 can be induced by low temperature, drought, salt stress and abscisic acid. In addition, abnormal expressions of CsCER1 in transgenic cucumber plants have dramatic effects on very-long-chain (VLC) alkanes biosynthesis, cuticle permeability, and drought resistance. Our data suggested that CsCER1 plays an important role in VLC alkanes biosynthesis in cucumber.

  3. Extraction of toluene from aliphatic compounds using an ionic liquid as solvent: Influence of the alkane on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Emilio J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica de la Universidad de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Calvar, Noelia, E-mail: noecs@uvigo.e [Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Facultade de Engenharia, Universidade de Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Dominguez, Irene; Dominguez, Angeles [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica de la Universidad de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: An ionic liquid was analyzed as solvent for extraction of toluene from alkanes. Liquid-liquid equilibrium data were measured at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Selectivity and solute distribution ratio were obtained and compared with literature. The Othmer-Tobias equation was used to ascertain the experimental LLE data. Experimental data were correlated using NRTL and UNIQUAC models. - Abstract: In this paper, the feasibility of using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ionic liquid, [EMim][ESO{sub 4}], as solvent for the extraction of toluene from aliphatic compounds (hexane, heptane, octane, or nonane) was analyzed. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary systems {l_brace}alkane (1) + toluene (2) + [EMim][ESO{sub 4}] (3){r_brace} were measured at T = 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Selectivity and solute distribution ratio were calculated from the experimental LLE data, and the obtained values were compared to those previously reported using other ionic liquids and sulfolane. The degree of consistency of the experimental LLE data was ascertained using the Othmer-Tobias equation. Finally, the experimental LLE data were satisfactorily correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models.

  4. Technical note: Evaluation of markers for estimating duodenal digesta flow and ruminal digestibility: Acid detergent fiber, sulfuric acid detergent lignin, and n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozloski, G V; Stefanello, C M; Mesquita, F R; Alves, T P; Ribeiro Filho, H M N; Almeida, J G R; Moraes Genro, T C

    2014-03-01

    The amount of digesta flowing to the duodenum is a relevant measurement for the evaluation of nutrient supply to ruminants, which is usually estimated in animals fitted with a duodenal T-type cannula using internal or external markers. This study evaluated acid detergent fiber (ADF) compared with external (C32n-alkane) and internal [sulfuric acid lignin (ADL) and n-alkanes C31 and C33] markers for estimating duodenal flow and(or) ruminal digestibility of dry matter (DM) in cattle and sheep. In the first assay, 4 duodenally cannulated Holstein steers housed in metabolism cages, dosed with C32n-alkane, and fed Avena strigosa plus concentrate and increasing levels of tannin extract to reduce ruminal digestibility, were used in a Latin square design. The mobile-bag technique was used to measure the intestinal disappearance of ADL and ADF from forage (Avena strigosa, Pennisetum purpureum, Cynodon dactylon, and Medicago sativa) and concentrate (corn grain, soybean meal, and sunflower meal) samples that were previously incubated in the rumen of additional fistulated steer for 12, 24, 36, or 48 h. The ADF concentration in residues recovered in the feces was strongly related to the ADF concentration in residues at the duodenum (R(2)=0.93, standard deviation=30.0, n=901). This relationship showed a lower precision for ADL fraction (R(2)=0.88, standard deviation=12.6, n=590). In a second assay, duodenal flow and ruminal DM digestibility were calculated from the duodenal and fecal concentration of either marker. We observed a significant effect of marker type on ruminal DM digestibility values, and the effect of tannin treatments was observed only when ADF or ADL was used as the marker. The lowest residual error was obtained for ADF. Ruminal DM digestibility was, on average, higher for C31 and C(33)n-alkanes, and the use of dosed C(32)n-alkane resulted in a negative value. In the third assay, a data set of 235 individual observations was compiled from digestibility trials to

  5. Thermal, Mutual and Self-Diffusivities in Binary Liquid Mixtures Consisting of n-Alkanes with Dissolved Gases at Infinite Dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudet, Cédric; Klein, Tobias; Zhao, Guanjia; Rausch, Michael Heinrich; Koller, Thomas M; Fröba, Andreas Paul

    2018-02-27

    In the present study, dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for the investigation of the molecular diffusion in binary mixtures of liquids with dissolved gases at macroscopic thermodynamic equilibrium. Model systems based on the n-alkanes n-hexane or n-decane with dissolved hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, or carbon monoxide were studied at temperatures between 303 and 423 K and at gas mole fractions below 0.06. With DLS, the relaxation behavior of microscopic equilibrium fluctuations in concentration and temperature is analyzed to determine simultaneously mutual and thermal diffusivity in an absolute way. The present measurements document that even for mole gas fractions of 0.007 and Lewis numbers close to 1, reliable mutual diffusivities with an average expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 13% can be obtained. Using suitable molecular models for the mixture components, the self-diffusion coefficient of the gases was determined by MD simulations with an averaged expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 7%. The DLS experiments showed that the thermal diffusivity of the studied systems is not affected by the dissolved gas and agrees with the reference data for the pure n-alkanes. In agreement with theory, mutual diffusivities and self-diffusivities were found to be equal mostly within combined uncertainties at conditions approaching infinite dilution of the gas. Our DLS and MD results, representing the first available data for the present systems, reveal distinctly larger mass diffusivities for mixtures containing hydrogen or helium compared to mixtures containing nitrogen or carbon monoxide. Based on the broad range of mass diffusivities of the studied gas-liquid systems covering about two orders of magnitude from about 10 -9 to 10 -7 m 2 ·s -1 , effects of the solvent and solute properties on the temperature-dependent mass diffusivities are discussed. This contributed to the development of a simple semi-empirical correlation

  6. Theoretical investigation of the structure and nature of the interaction in metal-alkane σ-complexes of the type [M(CO)5(C2H6)] (M = Cr, Mo, and W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, Julio C.S.; De Almeida, Wagner B.; Rocha, Willian R.

    2009-01-01

    Density Functional Theory calculations were carried out to study the structure, energetics of the interactions and nature of the bonds in the metal-alkane σ-complexes of the type M(CO) 5 (C 2 H 6 ) M = Cr, Mo, and W. Only the η 1 coordination mode through hydrogen is obtained. The vibrational frequencies showed that upon coordination the ν(C-H) asym mode has an important red shift of 273 cm -1 and thus may be an important mode to characterize and follow the alkane coordination to the metallic fragment. TD-DFT calculations of the electronic transitions show that the coordination of the alkane affects drastically the metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band of the metallic fragment, showing a blue shift of 163 nm. The computed AIM local properties (ρ(r), ∇ 2 (ρ), G(r), V(r) and H(r)) in conjunction with the Morokuma energy decomposition analysis (EDA) and also comparisons with the water dimer, suggest that this metal-alkane interaction may also be viewed as an unconventional hydrogen bond, with significant charge transfer and polarization contribution.

  7. Theoretical investigation of the structure and nature of the interaction in metal-alkane {sigma}-complexes of the type [M(CO){sub 5}(C{sub 2}H{sub 6})] (M = Cr, Mo, and W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, Julio C.S.; De Almeida, Wagner B. [LQC-MM: Laboratorio de Quimica Computacional e Modelagem Molecular, Departamento de Quimica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Campus Universitario Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rocha, Willian R., E-mail: wrocha@ufmg.br [LQC-MM: Laboratorio de Quimica Computacional e Modelagem Molecular, Departamento de Quimica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Campus Universitario Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-11-18

    Density Functional Theory calculations were carried out to study the structure, energetics of the interactions and nature of the bonds in the metal-alkane {sigma}-complexes of the type M(CO){sub 5}(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) M = Cr, Mo, and W. Only the {eta}{sup 1} coordination mode through hydrogen is obtained. The vibrational frequencies showed that upon coordination the {nu}(C-H){sub asym} mode has an important red shift of 273 cm{sup -1} and thus may be an important mode to characterize and follow the alkane coordination to the metallic fragment. TD-DFT calculations of the electronic transitions show that the coordination of the alkane affects drastically the metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band of the metallic fragment, showing a blue shift of 163 nm. The computed AIM local properties ({rho}(r), {nabla}{sup 2}({rho}), G(r), V(r) and H(r)) in conjunction with the Morokuma energy decomposition analysis (EDA) and also comparisons with the water dimer, suggest that this metal-alkane interaction may also be viewed as an unconventional hydrogen bond, with significant charge transfer and polarization contribution.

  8. Expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes by plant-associated bacteria in the rhizosphere and endosphere of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) grown in diesel contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andria, Verania [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Unit of Environmental Resources and Technologies, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Sessitsch, Angela, E-mail: angela.sessitsch@ait.ac.a [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2009-12-15

    For phytoremediation of organic contaminants, plants have to host an efficiently degrading microflora. To assess the role of endophytes in alkane degradation, Italian ryegrass was grown in sterile soil with 0, 1 or 2% diesel and inoculated either with an alkane degrading bacterial strain originally derived from the rhizosphere of Italian ryegrass or with an endophyte. We studied plant colonization of these strains as well as the abundance and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes in the rhizosphere, shoot and root interior. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior. - Bacterial alkane degradation genes are expressed in the rhizosphere and in the plant interior.

  9. Determination of n-alkanes in C. annuum (bell pepper) fruit and seed using GC-MS: comparison of extraction methods and application to samples of different geographical origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rijke, E.; Fellner, C.; Westerveld, J.; Lopatka, M.; Cerli, C.; Kalbitz, K.; de Koster, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    An efficient extraction and analysis method was developed for the isolation and quantification of n-alkanes from bell peppers of different geographical locations. Five extraction techniques, i.e., accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), ball mill extraction, ultrasonication, rinsing, and shaking, were

  10. Equation of state modeling of the phase equilibria of asymmetric CO2+n-alkane binary systems using mixing rules cubic with respect to mole fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cismondi, Martin; Mollerup, Jørgen M.; Zabaloy, Marcelo S.

    2010-01-01

    Both the equation of state (EOS) and the quadratic mixing rules proposed by van der Waals towards the end of the XIX century were enormous contributions to the understanding and modeling of fluids phase behavior. They set the basis for a consistent and useful representation of phase equilibria...... interaction parameters) in modern equations of state.In particular, the phase equilibria of binary mixtures containing CO2 and heavy n-alkanes have been studied by an important number of authors and using different types of models, achieving only partially accurate results and realizing the difficulties...... that these systems showing type III phase behavior (from C14 on) present for predicting or even correlating their phase equilibrium data in wide ranges of temperature and pressure.Cubic mixing rules (CMRs), implemented as a natural extension of the classical quadratic mixing rules, constitute the simplest...

  11. Assessing of organic content in surface sediments of Suez Gulf, Egypt depending on normal alkanes, terpanes and steranes biological markers indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedel Aziz Elfadly

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Semi-enclosed Suez Gulf records various signals of high anthropic pressures from surrounding regions and the industrialized Suez countries. The sedimentary hydrocarbons have been studied in 6 coastal stations located in the Gulf of Suez. Non-aromatic hydrocarbons were analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS to assess organic content in surface sediments of Suez Gulf, Egypt depending on alkanes, terpanes and steranes biological markers indicators. The results showed that the hydrocarbons are originated from multiple terrestrial inputs, biogenic, pyrolytic. Several ratios of hydrocarbons indicated the predominance of petrogenic in combination with biogenic hydrocarbons. Al-Attaqa harbor, Suez oil processing company, Al-Nasr Oil Company, AL-Kabanon and EL-Sukhna of Loloha Beach are the main sources of petroleum contamination.

  12. Paleoclimatic changes at the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition recorded by δD of n-alkanes and δ15Norg in a continental section of central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramoy, Romain; Schnyder, Johann; Thui Nguyen Tu, Thanh; Yans, Johan; Jeremy, Jacob; Sebilo, Mathieu; Derenne, Sylvie; Baudin, François

    2015-04-01

    Major paleoenvironmental changes have been recognized at the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition. Cooler conditions are suggested during the Late Pliensbachian before a drastic increase of temperatures in the Early Toarcian. Most studies were realized on European marine sediments, with little information on the environmental conditions that prevailed in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we present results on a continental section from Taskomirsai (Kazakhstan, Central Asia) showing a succession of sedimentary cycles made of lignites, clayey layers and silty-sandstones most probably deposited in a fluvial/lacustrine environment with nearby swampy areas. Rock-Eval pyrolysis indicates a type-III organic matter, i.e. mainly derived from terrestrial plants. A multi-isotope approach based on bulk organic nitrogen isotopes (δ15Norg) and hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of n-alkanes was developed to document paleoclimatic changes in the area. In the literature, δ15Norg measured on modern or Quaternary plants has been positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with precipitations. According to these observations, δ15Norg measured on lignites and clayey layers has been recently used to support humid/dry cycles around the Paleocene-Eocene transition. In Taskomirsai, δ15Norg values ranged from 0.5o to 4.5o with low values in lignite beds interpreted as humid periods and high values in clayey layers interpreted as drier periods. The δD values of n-alkanes (C17 to C35) ranged from -248o to -151o. Two groups of n-alkanes could be distinguished: an aquatic group (C17 to C23) and a terrestrial group (C25 to C35). In the aquatic group, low δD values in lignites (-219±17; n=10) suggest wetter and/or cooler climate during their deposition, whereas high values in clayey layers (-179±13; n=6) suggest a drier and/or warmer climate. Low δD values recorded in the aquatic pool prior to the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition suggest a relatively cooler and wetter

  13. Highly efficient exciplex formation via radical ion pair recombination in X-irradiated alkane solutions for luminophores with short fluorescence lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Anatoly R; Kalneus, Evgeny V; Korolev, Valeri V; Dranov, Igor G; Kruppa, Alexander I; Stass, Dmitri V

    2014-08-01

    X-irradiation of alkane solutions of N,N-dimethylaniline with various organic luminophores produces characteristic emission bands ascribed to the corresponding exciplexes. In contrast to optical generation, which requires diffusion-controlled quenching of excited states, an additional channel of exciplex formation via irreversible recombination of radical ion pairs is operative here, which produces exciplexes in solution with high efficiency even for p-terphenyl and diphenylacetylene having fluorescence decay times of 0.95 ns and 8 ps, respectively. The exciplex emission band is sensitive to an external magnetic field and exerts a very large observed magnetic field effect of up to 20%, the maximum possible value under the conditions of the described experiment.

  14. Hydrogen isotope ratios of terrestrial leaf wax n-alkanes from the Tibetan Plateau: Controls on apparent enrichment factors, effect of vapor sources and implication for altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Xu, Baiqing; Günther, Franziska; Mügler, Ines; Lange, Markus; Zhao, Huabiao; Li, Jiule; Gleixner, Gerd

    2017-08-01

    Empirical evidence suggested that the altitudinal dependence of hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes (δDwax) can be used to estimate paleoaltitudinal changes. However, the application of δDwax-based paleoaltimetry remains difficult, as the impacts of evaporative, transpirative and biosynthetic processes on hydrogen isotope fractionations in changing environments and the influence of likely changing water vapor sources are not well explored. For this study, we sampled stream waters, soils and plant leaves along two transects spanning large gradients of altitude, precipitation amount, vapor source, temperature and vegetation type on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). δD values of stream water (as an approximation for δDp), soil water (δDsw) and plant leaf water (δDlw) as well as leaf wax n-alkanes were measured in order to quantify isotopic fractionations in the formation of leaf waxes. Most interestingly, we found a strong negative correlation between the evapotranspirative enrichment of leaf water against precipitation (εlw-p), which combines the effects of soil evaporation and leaf transpiration, and the biosynthetic hydrogen isotope fractionation (εwax-lw), which describes isotopic enrichment between leaf wax and leaf water. The relationship yields a steady apparent isotopic enrichment factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax and precipitation, which is independent from climatic parameters and has an average value of -107 ± 26‰ for grasses (monocotyledons) and -77 ± 22‰ for trees (dicotyledons). Since the terrestrial n-alkanes, especially n-C27 and n-C29, in sediments are derived from trees and grasses, the likely change of the vegetation type in the uplift of mountains can change the isotopic estimates by about ±30‰, which corresponds to an altitudinal change of ∼1600 m. We, therefore, suggest that hydrogen isotope ratio of sedimentary n-C31 alkane, which is mainly derived from grasses might be better proxies to reconstruct paleoaltitudes. Our large

  15. Study of gas-liquid partitioning of alkane solutes in several organic solvents by using principal component analysis and linear solvation energy relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castells, Cecilia B.; Reta, Mario R

    2003-07-17

    Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to extract the number of factors which can describe the 737 gas-liquid partition coefficients of five linear, four branched, and two cyclic alkanes in 67 common solvents. Based on the reconstruction of partition coefficient data matrix, we concluded that the experimental dataset could readily be reduced to two relevant factors. Using only these two factors, there were no errors larger than 3%, 7 cases had errors larger than 2%, and in 34 cases, errors were between 1 and 2%. n-Hexane and ethylcyclohexane were chosen as the test factors, and all other partition coefficients were expressed in terms of these two test factors. Prediction of the logarithmic partition coefficient of these alkanes in seven chemically different solvents, which were originally excluded from the data matrix, was excellent: the root mean square error was 0.064, only in 11 cases the errors were larger than 1%, and only 3 had errors larger than 4%. Linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) using both theoretical and empirical solvent parameters were used to explain the molecular interactions responsible for partition. Several combinations of parameters were tried but the standard deviations were not less than 0.31. This could be attributed to the model itself, imprecisions in the data matrix or in some of the LSER parameters. Solvent cohesive parameters and surface tension in combination with polarity-polarizability or dispersion parameters perform the best. Finally, the two principal component factors were rotated onto the most relevant physicochemical parameters that control the gas-liquid partitioning phenomena.

  16. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. La

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas–wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas–wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  17. 1,4-hydroxycarbonyl products of the OH radical initiated reactions of C5-C8 n-alkanes in the presence of NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisen, Fabienne; Aschmann, Sara M; Atkinson, Roger; Arey, Janet

    2005-06-15

    Alkanes account for approximately 50% of nonmethane organic compounds present in urban atmospheres. Previous studies have shown that hydroxycarbonyls are important products ofthe OH radical initiated reactions of > or = C5 n-alkanes, but isomer-specific identifications and quantifications of these products have not been carried out. In this work, we have used solid-phase microextraction fibers precoated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine for on-fiber derivatization of carbonyl-containing compounds with subsequent analyses by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). GC-MS analyses showed the presence of the oximes of 5-hydroxy-2-pentanone and 4-hydroxypentanal from the n-pentane reaction; 5-hydroxy-2-hexanone, 6-hydroxy-3-hexanone, and 4-hydroxyhexanal from the n-hexane reaction; 5-hydroxy-2-heptanone, 6-hydroxy-3-heptanone, 1-hydroxy-4-heptanone, and 4-hydroxyheptanal from the n-heptane reaction; and 5-hydroxy-2-octanone, 6-hydroxy-3-octanone, 7-hydroxy-4-octanone, and 4-hydroxyoctanal from the n-octane reaction. The formation yields of these 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls were determined from GC-FID analyses. By use of the yields of 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls formed from n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane at 50% relative humidity (and those from n-pentane at both 5 and 50% relative humidity), then formation of 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls accounts for 54% of the reaction products from n-pentane, 57% from n-hexane, 51% from n-heptane, and 53% from n-octane. Combined with previously measured yields of carbonyls, alkyl nitrates, and hydroxyalkyl nitrates, we can now accountfor approximately 74-118% of the products formed from the n-pentane through n-octane reactions.

  18. Revisiting the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of the Low-Temperature Oxidation Pathways of Alkanes: A Case Study of the Three Pentane Isomers

    KAUST Repository

    Bugler, John

    2015-07-16

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. This paper describes our developing understanding of low-temperature oxidation kinetics. We have investigated the ignition of the three pentane isomers in a rapid compression machine over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, including conditions of negative temperature coefficient behavior. The pentane isomers are small alkanes, yet have structures that are complex enough to allow for the application of their kinetic and thermochemical rules to larger molecules. Updates to the thermochemistry of the species important in the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons have been made based on a thorough literature review. An evaluation of recent quantum-chemically derived rate coefficients from the literature pertinent to important low-temperature oxidation reaction classes has been performed, and new rate rules are recommended for these classes. Several reaction classes have also been included to determine their importance with regard to simulation results, and we have found that they should be included when developing future chemical kinetic mechanisms. A comparison of the model simulations with pressure-time histories from experiments in a rapid compression machine shows very good agreement for both ignition delay time and pressure rise for both the first- and second-stage ignition events. We show that revisions to both the thermochemistry and the kinetics are required in order to replicate experiments well. A broader validation of the models with ignition delay times from shock tubes and a rapid compression machine is presented in an accompanying paper. The results of this study enhance our understanding of the combustion of straight- and branched-chained alkanes.

  19. Nutrients can enhance the abundance and expression of alkane hydroxylase CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass planted in hydrocarbon-polluted soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arslan

    Full Text Available Plant-bacteria partnership is a promising strategy for the remediation of soil and water polluted with hydrocarbons. However, the limitation of major nutrients (N, P and K in soil affects the survival and metabolic activity of plant associated bacteria. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of nutrients on survival and metabolic activity of an alkane degrading rhizo-bacterium. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum was grown in diesel-contaminated soil and inoculated with an alkane degrading bacterium, Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79, in greenhouse experiments. Two levels of nutrients were applied and plant growth, hydrocarbon removal, and gene abundance and expression were determined after 100 days of sowing of ryegrass. Results obtained from these experiments showed that the bacterial inoculation improved plant growth and hydrocarbon degradation and these were further enhanced by nutrients application. Maximum plant biomass production and hydrocarbon mineralization was observed by the combined use of inoculum and higher level of nutrients. The presence of nutrients in soil enhanced the colonization and metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterium in the rhizosphere. The abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass was found to be directly associated with the level of applied nutrients. Enhanced hydrocarbon degradation was associated with the population of the inoculum bacterium, the abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass. It is thus concluded that the combination between vegetation, inoculation with pollutant-degrading bacteria and nutrients amendment was an efficient approach to reduce hydrocarbon contamination.

  20. Long-chain alkanes and fatty acids from Ludwigia octovalvis weed leaf surface waxes as short-range attractant and ovipositional stimulant to Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S; Sarkar, N; Barik, A

    2017-06-01

    The importance of leaf surface wax compounds from the rice-field weed Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) Raven (Onagraceae) was determined in the flea beetle Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Extraction, thin layer chromatography and GC-MS and GC-FID analyses of surface waxes of young, mature and senescent leaves revealed 20, 19 and 19 n-alkanes between n-C15 and n-C35, respectively; whereas 14, 14 and 12 free fatty acids between C12:0 and C22:0 fatty acids were identified in young, mature and senescent leaves, respectively. Tricosane was predominant n-alkane in young and mature leaves, whilst eicosane predominated in senescent leaves. Heneicosanoic acid, palmitic acid and docosanoic acid were the most abundant free fatty acids in young, mature and senescent leaves, respectively. A. cyanea females showed attraction to 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes compared with young or senescent leaves in a short glass Y-tube olfactometer bioassay. The insects were attracted to a synthetic blend of 0.90, 1.86, 1.83, 1.95, 0.50 and 0.18 µg ml-1 petroleum ether of hexadecane, octadecane, eicosane, tricosane, palmitic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively, comparable with the proportions as present in 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes. A. cyanea also laid eggs on a filter paper moistened with 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes or a synthetic blend of 0.90, 1.86, 1.83, 1.95, 0.50 and 0.18 µg ml-1 petroleum ether of hexadecane, octadecane, eicosane, tricosane, palmitic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively. This finding could provide a basis for monitoring of the potential biocontrol agent in the field.

  1. Characterization of alkanes, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tar-balls collected from the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandru, Kuhan; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Anita, Sofia; Shahbazi, Azadeh; Sakari, Mahyar; Bahry, Pourya Shahpoury; Mohamed, Che Abd Rahim

    2008-05-01

    The East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia faces the South China Sea and is vulnerable to oil pollution because of intense petroleum production activities in the area. The South China Sea is also a favored route for supertankers carrying crude oil to the Far East. Consequently, oil spills can occur, causing pollution and contamination in the surrounding areas. Residual oil spills stranded on coastal beaches usually end up as tar-balls. Elucidating the sources of tar-balls using a molecular marker approach is essential in assessing environmental impacts and perhaps settling legal liabilities for affected parties. This study utilizes a multimodal molecular marker approach through the use of diagnostic ratios of alkanes, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to determine the source, distribution and weathering of tar-balls. Hopane ratios (e.g., C29/C30, and summation C31-C35/C30 ratios) were used to identify the sources of tar-balls. The weathering effects were distinguished by using alkanes, namely the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) and low molecular weight/high molecular weight (L/H) ratios. Similarly, PAHs were also used for the determination of weathering processes undergone by the tar-balls. This multimodal molecular marker gave a very strong indication of the sources of tar-balls in this study. For example, 16 out of 17 samples originated from South East Asian Crude Oil (SEACO) with one sample from Merang, Terengganu originating from North Sea Oil (Troll). The TRME-2 sample may have come from a supertanker's ballast water discharge. The second possibility is that the tar-ball may have been transported via oceanographic currents. All 'weathered' sample characterizations were based on the presence of UCM and other ratios. The multimodal molecular marker approach applied in this study has enabled us to partially understand the transport behavior of tar-balls in the marine environment and has revealed insights into the weathering process of tar-balls.

  2. Solvation molar enthalpies and heat capacities of n-alkanes and n-alkylbenzenes on stationary phases of wide-ranging polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrón-Aguilar, Rosa; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo; Santiuste, José María

    2010-12-03

    A comparison of the most usual gas chromatographic methods for the calculation of partial molar enthalpies of solvation (Δ(sol)H(o)) has been carried out. Those methods based on the fitting of lnV(g) or ln(k/T) vs. 1/T and ln(k/T) vs. (1/T and the temperature arrangement, T(a)) are the most adequate ones for obtaining Δ(sol)H(o) values. However, the latter is the only reliable option for Δ(sol)H(o) estimation when commercial WCOT capillary columns are used, since in this case the estimation of some variables involved in the V(g) determination is less accurate or even impossible. Consequently, in this paper, Δ(sol)H(o) obtained from ln(k/T) vs. (1/T+T(a)) fitting at 373.15 and 298.15K for n-alkanes and n-alkylbenzenes on 12 commercial capillary columns coated with stationary phases covering the 203-3608 McReynolds polarity range are reported. Moreover, molar heat capacities of solvation at constant pressure (Δ(sol)C(p)(o)) have also been calculated using this method. A clear influence on Δ(sol)H(o) of the type and content of the substitution group in the stationary phase was observed. In addition, a linear relationship of Δ(sol)C(p)(o) with the van der Waals volume of the n-alkanes and the temperature gradient of density of the stationary phase was found. The effect of the size of the hydrocarbon on both thermodynamic variables was also investigated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Digestibilidade determinada pelo método indireto usando o n-alcano C35 Digestibility determinate by indirect method using C35 n-alkane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Estrásulas de Oliveira

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi feito um trabalho de extração e análise de n-alcanos com o objetivo de investigar o uso do n-alcano (C35 presente nas forragens como um indicador interno para determinação de digestibilidade. Foram utilizadas amostras de experimentos de digestibilidade convencional realizados previamente entre os anos de 1978 e 1982. O C35 subestimou as digestibilidades da matéria seca e orgânica, apresentando diferença média, em relação ao método in vivo, de 4,68 (± 0,69 e 4,43 (± 0,85 unidades percentuais, respectivamente. O coeficiente de regressão não diferiu da unidade, indicando que os métodos foram equivalentes, havendo, porém, a necessidade de um fator de correção. Os coeficientes de correlação para a matéria seca e orgânica, observados entre os dois métodos, foram 0,87 e 0,85, respectivamente. O C35 apresentou recuperação fecal média de 91,76% (± 7,94, que contribuiu para o vício da técnica.An experiment was conducted, on extraction and analysis of n-alkanes, to investigate the use of n-alkane (C35 present in forages as an internal marker for the digestibility determination. Samples of forages and feces were taken from conventional digestibility trials, which were previous conducted from 1978 to 1982. The C35 underestimated the dry matter and organic matter digestibilities, presenting an average difference in relation to in vivo of 4.68 (± 0.69 and 4,43 (± 0.85 perceptual units, respectively. The coefficient of regression did not differ from the unit, indicating that both methods were equivalent, having, however, the necessity of a correction factor. The coefficients of correlation observed for the dry and organic matter between the two methods were 0.87 and 0.85, respectively. The average fecal recovery of C35 was 91.76% (± 7.94, and this contributed to the bias of the method.

  4. Alkane metathesis with the tantalum methylidene [(≡SiO)Ta(=CH2)Me2]/[(≡SiO)2Ta(=CH2)Me] generated from well-defined surface organometallic complex [(≡SiO)TaVMe4

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2015-01-21

    By grafting TaMe5 on Aerosil700, a stable, well-defined, silica-supported tetramethyl tantalum(V) complex, [(≡SiO)TaMe4], is obtained on the silica surface. After thermal treatment at 150 °C, the complex is transformed into two surface tantalum methylidenes, [(≡SiO)2Ta(=CH2)Me] and [(≡SiO)Ta(=CH2)Me2], which are active in alkane metathesis and comparable to the previously reported [(≡SiO)2TaHx]. Here we present the first experimental study to isolate and identify a surface tantalum carbene as the intermediate in alkane metathesis. A systematic experimental study reveals a new reasonable pathway for this reaction.

  5. Contribution of unburned lubricating oil and gasoline-derived n-alkanes to particulate emission from non-catalyst and catalyst-equipped two-stroke mopeds operated with synthetic lubricating oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzano, Pasquale; Picini, Paolo; Cataldi, Dario

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the contribution of unburned lubricating oil and gasoline-derived n-alkanes to particulate emission from non-catalyst and catalyst-equipped two-stroke (2-S) mopeds operated with ester-based, fully synthetic lubricating oil. Exhaust particulate matter (PM) from ten 2-S, 50 cm3 mopeds belonging to three different levels of emission legislation (EURO-0, EURO-1 and EURO-2) was collected during the sampling phase of the ECE 47 driving cycle through which each mopeds was driven on a dynamometer bench. Filters containing PM were extracted with an accelerated solvent extractor and analysed by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry. The contribution of unburned lubricating oil to the PM was ascertained and quantified by exploiting characteristic ions in its mass spectrum. The experimental results show that unburned lubricating oil accounted for a significant fraction (4.7-38.7%) of the PM emitted from 2-S mopeds. Emission rates of particulate unburned lubricating oil and n-alkanes from non-catalyst EURO-0 mopeds were 15.4-56.2 mg km(-1) and 1-2 mg km(-1), respectively. These emission rates were reduced of 75% and 88%, respectively, for catalyst-equipped EURO-1 mopeds. The results of the tests carried out on two EURO-2 mopeds of different technology were contrasting. A EURO-2 moped with carburettor and secondary air injection exhibited a clear reduction of 95% and 88% for unburned lubricating oil and n-alkanes emission rates with respect to the average values observed for EURO-1 mopeds. On the other hand, the second EURO-2 moped, equipped with catalyst and direct injection, had unburned lubricating oil emission rates roughly in the range of EURO-0 mopeds while particulate n-alkanes were emitted at rates comparable with typical values observed for catalyst EURO-1 mopeds.

  6. I2-SDS-H2O System: A highly Efficient Dual Catalytic Green System for Deprotection of Imines and in Situ Preparation of Bis(indolyl)alkanes from Indoles in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Parasa; Pahari, Pallab; Borah, Manash Jyoti; Konwar, Dilip

    2012-01-01

    A novel catalytic system consisting of I2-SDS-H2O has been developed which cleaves 2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene, 1-aza-1,3-butadienes, oximes and in presence of indoles in the medium uses the corresponding aldehyde products to produce bis(indolyl)alkanes in situ. This one pot simple and mild dual catalytic system works in water at room temperature under neutral conditions.

  7. Biocatalytic Production of Perillyl Alcohol from Limonene by Using a Novel Mycobacterium sp. Cytochrome P450 Alkane Hydroxylase Expressed in Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beilen, Jan B.; Holtackers, René; Lüscher, Daniel; Bauer, Ulrich; Witholt, Bernard; Duetz, Wouter A.

    2005-01-01

    A number of oxygenated monoterpenes present at low concentrations in plant oils have anticarcinogenic properties. One of the most promising compounds in this respect is (−)-perillyl alcohol. Since this natural product is present only at low levels in a few plant oils, an alternative, synthetic source is desirable. Screening of 1,800 bacterial strains showed that many alkane degraders were able to specifically hydroxylate l-limonene in the 7 position to produce enantiopure (−)-perillyl alcohol. The oxygenase responsible for this was purified from the best-performing wild-type strain, Mycobacterium sp. strain HXN-1500. By using N-terminal sequence information, a 6.2-kb ApaI fragment was cloned, which encoded a cytochrome P450, a ferredoxin, and a ferredoxin reductase. The three genes were successfully coexpressed in Pseudomonas putida by using the broad-host-range vector pCom8, and the recombinant converted limonene to perillyl alcohol with a specific activity of 3 U/g (dry weight) of cells. The construct was subsequently used in a 2-liter bioreactor to produce perillyl alcohol on a scale of several grams. PMID:15811996

  8. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium at T = 298.15 K for ternary mixtures of alkane + aromatic compounds + imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domínguez, Irene; Requejo, Patricia F.; Canosa, José; Domínguez, Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The LLE ternary phase diagrams with 2 imidazolium-based ionic liquids were measured. • The LLE data were experimental determined at T = 298.15 K and p = 1 atm. • Mixtures of (octane or nonane) and (benzene or toluene or ethylbenzene) were studied. • LLE experimental data were correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC thermodynamic models. - Abstract: Ionic liquids, with their unique and tunable properties, can be an advantageous alternative as extractive solvents in separation processes involving systems containing aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. In this work, (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary systems {nonane (1) + benzene (2) + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [BMim][NTf 2 ] (3)}, {octane (1) + benzene (2) + 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [PMim][NTf 2 ] (3)}, and {nonane (1) + aromatic compound (benzene or toluene or ethylbenzene) (2) + [PMim][NTf 2 ] (3)} were determined at T = 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Selectivity and solute distribution ratio, derived from the equilibrium data, were used to determine if this ionic liquid can be considered as a potential solvent for the separation of aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene) from alkanes (octane and nonane). The experimental data were satisfactorily correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models

  9. Estimativa da ingestão e digestibilidade de erva e bolota em porcos alentejanos pela técnica dos n-alcanos Estimation of intake and digestibility of pasture and acorns by alentejano pigs using n-alkanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mendes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objectivo de estimar, em porcos Alentejanos, a ingestão e a digestibilidade de erva e bolota, foi realizado um ensaio utilizando n-alcanos de cadeia longa como marcadores fecais. Oito animais, alojados em caixas metabólicas, distribuídos aleatoriamente em 2 grupos de 4 animais cada, foram sujeitos a dois tratamentos. Cada animal do grupo 1 recebeu um bolinho por dia, contendo 100 mg de C32 e 150 mg de C36 e do grupo 2, dois bolinhos por dia contendo 50 mg de C32 e 75 mg de C36. Os animais foram alimentados com erva e bolota ao longo de todo o ensaio. A ingestão e a digestibilidade da dieta foram determinadas individualmente, através da medição das quantidades de alimento ingeridas e de fezes produzidas durante 5 dias e estimadas através da utilização da técnica dos n-alcanos. As estimativas da digestibilidade feitas através da utilização dos n-alcanos naturais C25 e C27 permitiram a obtenção de resultados muito próximos das medições in vivo. Os C29 e C31, em combinação com os nalcanos artificiais (C32 e C36, forneceram as estimativas da digestibilidade mais próximas da determinada, sendo os pares C29:C32 e C29:C36 os que forneceram as melhores estimativas para a ingestão. A administração dos C32 e C36 uma ou duas vezes por dia não demonstrou ter qualquer influência nas estimativas realizadas. A composição da dieta (bolota e erva, estimada pelos n-alcanos, apresentou valores próximos dos medidos in vivo, sendo as melhores estimativas dadas pelas combinações dos n-alcanos C29 e C31.The aim of this experiment was to estimate intake and digestibility of grass and acorns in Alentejano pigs, using long chain n-alkanes as fecal markers. Eight male Alentejano pigs, housed in metabolic cages were randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 received one small cake per animal per day containing 100 mg of C32 and 150 mg of C36 and group 2 received two small cakes per animal per day containing 50 mg of C32 and 75 mg of C

  10. In vitro bactericidal activity of 4- and 5-chloro-2-hydroxy-N-[1-oxo-1-(phenylamino)alkan-2-yl]benzamides against MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadrazilova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Pauk, Karel; Imramovsky, Ales; Vinsova, Jarmila; Cizek, Alois; Jampilek, Josef

    2015-01-01

    A series of nine substituted 2-hydroxy-N-[1-oxo-1-(phenylamino)alkan-2-yl]benzamides was assessed as prospective bactericidal agents against three clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and S. aureus ATCC 29213 as the reference and quality control strain. The minimum bactericidal concentration was determined by subculturing aliquots from MIC determination onto substance-free agar plates. The bactericidal kinetics of compounds 5-chloro-2-hydroxy-N-[(2S)-3-methyl-1-oxo-1-{[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino}butan-2-yl]benzamide (1f), N-{(2S)-1-[(4-bromophenyl)amino]-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl}-4-chloro-2-hydroxybenzamide (1g), and 4-chloro-N-{(2S)-1-[(3,4-dichlorophenyl)amino]-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl}-2-hydroxybenzamide (1h) was established by time-kill assay with a final concentration of the compound equal to 1x, 2x, and 4x MIC; aliquots were removed at 0, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h time points. The most potent bactericidal agent was compound 1f exhibiting remarkable rapid concentration-dependent bactericidal effect even at 2x MIC at 4, 6, and 8 h (with a reduction in bacterial count ranging from 3.08 to 3.75 log10 CFU/mL) and at 4x MIC at 4, 6, 8, and 24 h (5.30 log10 CFU/mL reduction in bacterial count) after incubation against MRSA 63718. Reliable bactericidal effect against other strains was maintained at 4x MIC at 24 h.

  11. Ecological response to climate change and human activities indicated by n-alkane proxy during the mid- to late Holocene: a case study from an alpine lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Zhao, C.

    2017-12-01

    Paleolimonological records provide long-term dynamics information of past climate, environment, human activities and ecological variations and give evolutionary perspectives to understand responses process of ecological shift to internal or external trigger. In this study, a powerful biomarkers, n-alkanes, was used to reconstruct the past 5000 years organic matter sources and ecological evolution history of Beilianchi Lake in the southwestern of Loess Plateau after preliminary investigation of modern samples. Climate-environment change and human activities were also traced by total organic matter (TOC), magnetic susceptibility (MS) and relevant proxies. The results showed that the ecosystem related to organic matter composition in Beilianchi Lake might be mainly controlled by climate change before 1400 cal B.P., whereas after that, it was significantly influenced by soil erosion induced by increasing population and enhanced human activities. Lake ecosystem experienced periodical change from relatively stable stage with combination of allochthonous-autochthonous organic sources prior to 1400 cal B.P. to extremely instability and final return to steady state with allochthonous-dominant organic source since 300 cal B.P.. During the period of instability, organic matter composition during 1400-800 cal B.P. indicated a obvious bimodal distribution based on probability density distribution analysis, which reflected the lake ecosystem might stay at bistable state and switched repeatedly from more-macrophytes state (regime A with low ACL) towards less-macrophytes state (regime B with high ACL) controlled by disturbance of soil erosion. The flickering during this period could serve as the early warning signal of transition towards more-macrophytes state or less-macrophytes state in lake ecosystems.

  12. Development of a sampling method for the simultaneous monitoring of straight-chain alkanes, straight-chain saturated carbonyl compounds and monoterpenes in remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detournay, Anaïs; Sauvage, Stéphane; Locoge, Nadine; Gaudion, Vincent; Leonardis, Thierry; Fronval, Isabelle; Kaluzny, Pascal; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2011-04-01

    Studies have shown that biogenic compounds, long chain secondary compounds and long lifetime anthropogenic compounds are involved in the formation of organic aerosols in both polluted areas and remote places. This work aims at developing an active sampling method to monitor these compounds (i.e. 6 straight-chain saturated aldehydes from C6 to C11; 8 straight-chain alkanes from C9 to C16; 6 monoterpenes: α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, limonene, α-terpinene, & γ-terpinene; and 5 aromatic compounds: toluene, ethylbenzene, meta-, para- and ortho-xylenes) in remote areas. Samples are collected onto multi-bed sorbent cartridges at 200 mL min(-1) flow rate, using the automatic sampler SyPAC (TERA-Environnement, Crolles, France). No breakthrough was observed for sampling volumes up to 120 L (standard mixture at ambient temperature, with a relative humidity of 75%). As ozone has been shown to alter the samples (losses of 90% of aldehydes and up to 95% of terpenes were observed), the addition of a conditioned manganese dioxide (MnO(2)) scrubber to the system has been validated (full recovery of the affected compounds for a standard mixture at 50% relative humidity--RH). Samples are first thermodesorbed and then analysed by GC/FID/MS. This method allows suitable detection limits (from 2 ppt for camphene to 13 ppt for octanal--36 L sampled), and reproducibility (from 1% for toluene to 22% for heptanal). It has been successfully used to determine the diurnal variation of the target compounds (six 3 h samples a day) during winter and summer measurement campaigns at a remote site in the south of France.

  13. GC×GC measurements of C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane hydrocarbons on Crete, in air from Eastern Europe during the MINOS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS campaign in August 2001 gas-phase organic compounds were measured using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC at the Finokalia ground station, Crete. In this paper, C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane measurements are presented and interpreted. The mean mixing ratios of the hydrocarbons varied from 1±1 pptv (i-propylbenzene to 43±36 pptv (toluene. The observed mixing ratios showed strong day-to-day variations and generally higher levels during the first half of the campaign. Mean diel profiles showed maxima at local midnight and late morning, and minima in the early morning and evening. Results from analysis using a simplified box model suggest that both the chemical sink (i.e. reaction with OH and the variability of source strengths were the causes of the observed variations in hydrocarbon mixing ratios. The logarithms of hydrocarbon concentrations were negatively correlated with the OH concentrations integral over a day prior to the hydrocarbon measurements. Slopes of the regression lines derived from these correlations for different compounds are compared with literature rate constants for their reactions with OH. The slopes for most compounds agree reasonably well with the literature rate constants. A sequential reaction model has been applied to the interpretation of the relationship between ethylbenzene and two of its potential products, i.e. acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde. The model can explain the good correlation observed between [acetophenone]/[ethylbenzene] and [benzeneacetaldehyde]/[ethylbenzene]. The model results and field measurements suggest that the reactivity of benzeneacetaldehyde may lie between those of acetophenone and ethylbenzene and that the ratio between yields of acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde may be up to 28:1. Photochemical ages of trace gases sampled at Finokalia during the campaign are estimated using the sequential reaction model and

  14. Integrated Use of n-Alkanes and PAH to Evaluate the Anthropogenic Hydrocarbon Sources and the Toxicity Assessment of Surface Sediments from the Southwestern Coasts of the Caspian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golshan Shirneshan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH compounds and normal alkanes form a large group of undegradable environmental contaminats. This study aims to determine the sources and distribution of oil pollution (PAH compounds and normal alkanes in the sediments of the southwestern coastal areas of the Caspian Sea and to compare their levels with the relevant standards. For this purpose, 18 surface sediment samples were collected from depths of 10, 20, and 50 meters along two transects in the vertical direction located in the coastal areas of Sangachin and Hashtpar (Gilan Province. The samples were then examined using mass-spectrometric gas chromatography. The origins of n-alkanes were identified using CPI index (0.76-0.95, U/R (3.30‒6.57, and Pristane/Phytane (0.21‒0.42. The sources of PAHs were determined using the index ratios of LMW/HMW (1.93‒13.37, Phenanthrene/Anthracene (11.44‒ 16.7, Chrysene/Benzo (a anthracene (4.69‒10/33, Fluoranthene/Pyrene (0.53‒0.69, and MP/P (0.05‒0.08. Results confirmed the dominant petrogenic source of the hydrocarbons found in the region. The total concentrations of 30 aliphatic hydrocarbons and PAHs in the sediments ranged from 823.8 to 3899.5 µg/g and from 626.95 to 3842.5362 ng/g, respectively. Comparison of the measured PAH concentrations with US sediment quality guidelines revealed that the levels of naphthalene, fluorine, Acenaphthylene, and Acenaphthene exceeded the ERLs at stations with depths of 50m in Sangachin and Hashtpar while comparisons with Canadian standards indicated that they were higher than PELs at all the stations sampled. A major point of great concern is the high concentration of naphthalene as the most toxic PAH compound, which naturally warrants due attention to adopt appropriate management programs.

  15. Circulating mitochondrial DNA as biomarker linking environmental chemical exposure to early preclinical lesions elevation of mtDNA in human serum after exposure to carcinogenic halo-alkane-based pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia T Budnik

    Full Text Available There is a need for a panel of suitable biomarkers for detection of environmental chemical exposure leading to the initiation or progression of degenerative diseases or potentially, to cancer. As the peripheral blood may contain increased levels of circulating cell-free DNA in diseased individuals, we aimed to evaluate this DNA as effect biomarker recognizing vulnerability after exposure to environmental chemicals. We recruited 164 individuals presumably exposed to halo-alkane-based pesticides. Exposure evaluation was based on human biomonitoring analysis; as biomarker of exposure parent halo-methanes, -ethanes and their metabolites, as well as the hemoglobin-adducts methyl valine and hydroxyl ethyl valine in blood were used, complemented by expert evaluation of exposure and clinical intoxication symptoms as well as a questionnaire. Assessment showed exposures to halo alkanes in the concentration range being higher than non-cancer reference doses (RfD but (mostly lower than the occupational exposure limits. We quantified circulating DNA in serum from 86 individuals with confirmed exposure to off-gassing halo-alkane pesticides (in storage facilities or in home environment and 30 non-exposed controls, and found that exposure was significantly associated with elevated serum levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (in size of 79 bp, mtDNA-79, p = 0.0001. The decreased integrity of mtDNA (mtDNA-230/mtDNA-79 in exposed individuals implicates apoptotic processes (p = 0.015. The relative amounts of mtDNA-79 in serum were positively associated with the lag-time after intoxication to these chemicals (r = 0.99, p<0.0001. Several months of post-exposure the specificity of this biomarker increased from 30% to 97% in patients with intoxication symptoms. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial DNA has a potential to serve as a biomarker recognizing vulnerable risk groups after exposure to toxic/carcinogenic chemicals.

  16. Toxicity of C{sub 10}-, C{sub 11}-, C{sub 12}-, and C{sub 14}-polychlorinated alkanes to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, A.T.; Tomy, G.T.; Muir, D.C.G.

    1999-12-01

    Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) eggs were exposed to aqueous concentrations of six polychlorinated n-alkane (PCA) standards (C{sub 10}H{sub 15.5}Cl{sub 6.5}, C{sub 10}H{sub 15.3}Cl{sub 6.7}, C{sub 11}H{sub 18.4}Cl{sub 5.6}, C{sub 12}H{sub 19.5}Cl{sub 6.5}, C{sub 14}H{sub 24.9}Cl{sub 5.1}, and C{sub 14}H{sub 23.3}Cl{sub 6.7}) of known carbon chain length and chlorine content to assess their toxicity. Eggs were also exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to act as a positive control. Chlorinated paraffins are complex industrial products for which there is a lack of toxicological data on individual congeners. High aqueous concentrations of C{sub 10}H{sub 15.5}Cl{sub 6.5} and C{sub 10}H{sub 15.3}Cl{sub 6.7} caused 100% mortality in eggs, but no other significant mortalities or lesions were observed at lower concentrations or in any eggs exposed to the other PCAs. Larvae from eggs exposed to high concentrations of the C{sub 10}-, C{sup 11}- and C{sub 12}-PCAs were extremely lethargic or did not move, although a heart beat was present. The concentrations in these exposures and the tissue concentrations of the larvae were at levels that should elicit narcosis. Concentrations of the C{sub 14}-PCAs in larvae did not reach narcotic levels, and larvae in these exposures appeared normal with no signs of narcosis. The TCDD was found to be extremely embryotoxic, consistent with past work using Japanese medaka eggs. The ratio of LC50 to TCDD to the LC50 of the PCAs, based on acute toxicity and TCDD results, were all <0.0001, and most were <0.000001. These results suggest that the acute mechanism of toxicity of lower chlorinated, short (C{sub 10--13}) and medium (C{sub 14--18}) carbon chain PCAs is narcosis and that chlorine substitution on the terminal carbons of PCAs does not significantly increase nor decrease the toxicity of C{sub 10} and C{sub 14}-PCAs. However, additional work is needed to assess a greater range of PCAs as well as their sublethal effects and

  17. Effects of metal nanoparticles on the secondary ion yields of a model alkane molecule upon atomic and polyatomic projectiles in secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Nimer; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bertrand, Patrick; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2008-08-15

    A model alkane molecule, triacontane, is used to assess the effects of condensed gold and silver nanoparticles on the molecular ion yields upon atomic (Ga(+) and In(+)) and polyatomic (C60(+) and Bi3(+)) ion bombardment in metal-assisted secondary ion mass spectrometry (MetA-SIMS). Molecular films spin-coated on silicon were metallized using a sputter-coater system, in order to deposit controlled quantities of gold and silver on the surface (from 0 to 15 nm equivalent thickness). The effects of gold and silver islets condensed on triacontane are also compared to the situation of thin triacontane overlayers on metallic substrates (gold and silver). The results focus primarily on the measured yields of quasi-molecular ions, such as (M - H)(+) and (2M - 2H)(+), and metal-cationized molecules, such as (M + Au)(+) and (M + Ag)(+), as a function of the quantity of metal on the surface. They confirm the absence of a simple rule to explain the secondary ion yield improvement in MetA-SIMS. The behavior is strongly dependent on the specific projectile/metal couple used for the experiment. Under atomic bombardment (Ga(+), In(+)), the characteristic ion yields an increase with the gold dose up to approximately 6 nm equivalent thickness. The yield enhancement factor between gold-metallized and pristine samples can be as large as approximately 70 (for (M - H)(+) under Ga(+) bombardment; 10 nm of Au). In contrast, with cluster projectiles such as Bi3(+) and C60(+), the presence of gold and silver leads to a dramatic molecular ion yield decrease. Cluster projectiles prove to be beneficial for triacontane overlayers spin-coated on silicon or metal substrates (Au, Ag) but not in the situation of MetA-SIMS. The fundamental difference of behavior between atomic and cluster primary ions is tentatively explained by arguments involving the different energy deposition mechanisms of these projectiles. Our results also show that Au and Ag nanoparticles do not induce the same behavior in Met

  18. Quantification of the selective activation of C--H bonds in short chain alkanes: The reactivity of ethane, propane, isobutane, n-butane, and neopentane on Ir(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.F.; Weinberg, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    The initial probabilities of precursor-mediated, dissociative chemisorption of the saturated hydrocarbons 13 C-labeled ethane, propane, isobutane, n-butane, and neopentane on the close-packed Ir(111) surface have been measured. The selective activation of primary (1 degree), secondary (2 degree), and tertiary (3 degree) C--H bonds has been quantified by examining the reactivities of the selectively deuterated isotopomers of propane, C 3 H 8 , CH 3 CD 2 CH 3 , and C 3 D 8 , and of isobutane, (CH 3 ) 3 CH, (CH 3 ) 3 CD, and (CD 3 ) 3 CH. With respect to the bottom of the physically adsorbed well for each hydrocarbon, the apparent C--H bond activation energies have been found to be 10.4±0.3 kcal/mol (ethane), 11.4±0.3 kcal/mol (propane), 11.5±0.3 kcal/mol (n-butane), 11.3±0.3 kcal/mol (i-butane), and 11.3±0.3 kcal/mol (neopentane). For all the alkanes examined, the ratios of the preexponential factors of the rate coefficients of reaction and desorption are 1x10 -2 . The C--D bond activation energies are higher than the corresponding C--H bond activation energies by 480 cal/mol (ethane), 630 cal/mol (propane), and 660 cal/mol (i-butane). By analyzing the primary kinetic isotope effects for the selectively deuterated isotopomers of propane and isobutane, the 2 degree C--H bond activation energy is found to be 310±160 cal/mol less than the 1 degree C--H bond activation energy on this surface, and similarly, 3 degree C--H bond cleavage is less by 80±70 cal/mol. The quantification of the branching ratios within the C--H bond activation channel for propane and isobutane on this surface shows that the formation of 1 degree-alkyl intermediates is, in general, favored over the formation of either 2 degree- or 3 degree-alkyl intermediates. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Isomerization of alkane molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.L.; Burgers, P.C.; Mollah, M.Y.A.; Wolkoff, P.

    1982-01-01

    The appearance energies of daughter ions for the major low-energy losses of C 2 H 6 , CH 4 , and CH 3 ., of pentane and methylbutane radical cations were measured. The behaviors of a variety of 13 C- and 2 H-labeled compounds were examined. For methylbutane, loss of C 2 H 6 and CH 3 . yielded ionized propene and 2-butyl cations, at their calculated thermochemical thresholds. Loss of CH 4 proceeded at an energy greater than that calculated for the production of ionized but-2-ene, methylpropene, but-1-ene, or methylcyclopropane. Ethane elimination is preceded partially (ca. 20 to 25%) by a 1 to 2 methyl shift and a concomitant 2 to 1 H shift; isotope effects associated with this reaction are discussed. For pentane, losses of CH 3 . and CH 4 take place at the same energy, corresponding to the calculated threshold for production of the secondary cations; 13 C labelling experiments showed that the penultimate C atoms are not lost but that C-3 is lost (46%) in these reactions, with an ease similar to terminal C atom losses (54%). 2 H labelling permitted the separation of the metastable peak for methane loss into components having different kinetic energy releases attributable to the production of different [C 4 H 8 ] + . daughter ions. Although C 2 H 6 loss was observed to take place at energies down to the calculated thermochemical threshold for generation of ionized propene, the appearance energy of the metastable peak was the same as that for CH 3 . and CH 4 losses. Labelling experiments showed that the central C atom is not lost in this reaction. Detailed analysis of the observations leads to the conclusion that the CH 3 ., CH 4 , and C 2 H 6 eliminations from pentane radical cations are preceded by an isomerization to energy-rich ionized methylbutane. 2 figures, 3 tables

  20. Alkane Soluble Transition Metal Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    If. B.; leys , P+ N.; Shaw, B. L.). Ch.. Soc., aldhe "r,,+. 1!178.257. 10. Spencer, J. L lor. Synth. 1979, 19, 213. 11. Baflar. IC. In "In anic...Rh(P-I)(CO)(PPh 3))]2 V0 1130cm1 III 1980c. 1 vPO 1130cmkD, 2 Me , -2PPh 3 +2) leI , kf k -,-2NdI k +2MeI~ -F+Ph32PPh3 D +2P\\Ph +2Ndh %c +200 H 3 CCO...I I 1 3 MeC ’I .Ij I /PPh 3 N I I Ph 3P\\Ix .Rh Rh R 3 Ph 3P N I.- I CH 3 Ce’I R h I CO PPh 3 3 4 -11 X9 1705cml VII~ Vc 2048km .’ CO ~ -- CO

  1. Synthesis of selectively deuterated alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Nobuaki; Kido, Kenichi; Ichikawa, Takahisa

    1991-01-01

    Position-specifically deuterated three n-hexanes and three n-octanes were synthesized and their percent deuterations were measured by mass spectrometry. n-Hexane-1,1,1,6,6,6-d 6 ; n-hexane-2,2,5,5-d 4 and n-octane-1,1,1,8,8,8-d 8 were synthesized by lithium aluminium deuteride as key-step reactions and their percent deuterations were over 99%. The percent deuteration of n-octane-2,2,7,7-d 4 of which deuterium atoms were inserted into its carbon skeleton by deuterium exchange with base catalyst was 95%. n-Hexane-3,3,4,4-d 4 and n-octane-4,4,5,5-d 4 were obtained by deuterium addition with Wilkinson catalyst to triple bonds of 3-hexyne and 4-octyne, respectively, and their percent deuteration were no more than 80%. The causes for their relatively low deuteration were examined from reaction mechanisms. (author)

  2. Automatic construction and validation of models of combustion of alkanes and ethers; Construction automatique et validation de modeles cinetiques de combustion d'alcanes et d'ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaude, P.A.

    1999-07-01

    The reformulation of fuels for the abatement of pollutants emission requires the construction of detailed chemical models of the combustion of hydrocarbons. The manual writing of these chemical mechanisms is complex. Thus, an automatic generator of alkanes and ethers combustion models has been developed. The models include a base of the small species reactions, a detailed and exhaustive primary mechanism of the reagents consumption and a simplified secondary mechanism. The necessary kinetic and thermodynamic data are supplied. Beside this computer code development, the kinetic schemes and the velocity constants used have been defined. The validations of this system were performed with the simulation of the combustion of n-butane, n-heptane and iso-octane, pure and in mixtures, of n-octane and n-decane for the alkanes. MTBE, ETBE and their mixtures with n-heptane were studied in the case of ethers. The analysis of the models allows to show the expert-system characteristic of the generator by proposing a-priori simplification rules for the mechanisms. The reaction ways of the different species are studied, together with the formation of the products. The most sensible parameters of the models and the reactions that determine the global behaviour of the chemical systems are examined. Finally, some explanations are proposed to explain the differences in the behaviour of molecules, in particular with respect to self-ignition. (J.S.)

  3. Bimolecular encounters and re-encounters (cage effect) of a spin-labeled analogue of cholestane in a series of n-alkanes: effect of anisotropic exchange integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Andrew D; Bales, Barney L; Salikhov, K M; Peric, Miroslav

    2012-12-27

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the nitroxide spin probe 3β-doxyl-5α-cholestane (CSL) are studied as functions of the molar concentration, c, and the temperature, T, in a series of n-alkanes. The results are compared with a similar study of a much smaller spin probe, perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (pDT). The Heisenberg spin exchange (HSE) rate constants, K(ex), of CSL are similar in hexane, octane, and decane and are about one-half of those for pDT in the same solvents. They are also about one-half of the Stokes-Einstein-Perrin prediction. This reduction in HSE efficiency is attributed to an effective steric factor, f(eff), which was evaluated by comparing the results with the Stokes-Einstein-Perrin prediction or with pDT, and it is equal to 0.49 ± 0.03, independent of temperature. The unpaired spin density in CSL is localized near one end of the long molecule, so the exchange integral, J, leading to HSE, is expected to be large in some collisions and small in others; thus, J is modeled by an ideal distribution of values of J = J(0) with probability f and J = 0 with probability (1 - f). Because of rotational and translation diffusion during contact and between re-encounters of the probe, the effective steric factor is predicted to be f(eff) = f(1/2). Estimating the fraction of the surface of CSL with rich spin density yields a theoretical estimate of f(eff) = 0.59 ± 0.08, in satisfactory agreement with experiment. HSE is well described by simple hydrodynamic theory, with only a small dependence on solvent-probe relative sizes at the same value of T/η, where η is the viscosity of the solvent. This result is probably due to a fortuitous interplay between long- and short-range effects that describe diffusion processes over relatively large distances. In contrast, dipole-dipole interactions (DD) as measured by the line broadening, B(dip), and the mean time between re-encounters within the cage, τ(RE), vary significantly

  4. Potencial discriminatório dos N-alcanos em plantas forrageiras tropicais por análises multivariadas Discriminatory potential of the N-alkanes in tropical forages by multivariate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Côrtes

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available O potencial dos n-alcanos em discriminar frações ou espécies de gramíneas (Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu, Cynodon dactylon Pers. cv. Coast-cross 1 e Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzânia 1 e leguminosas tropicais (Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory. cv. Amarillo e Glycine wightii Verdc. Soja Perene foi avaliado neste estudo. As forrageiras foram amostradas na primavera, no verão e inverno, com quatro repetições por espécie. Utilizaram-se nas análises os n-alcanos C24 a C35, sendo o C32 e C34 padrões internos. As concentrações dos n-alcanos nas diferentes espécies e respectivas frações (lâminas foliares, haste porções superior e inferior e matéria morta, para gramíneas; folhas, caule porções superior e inferior e matéria morta para leguminosas foram avaliadas mediante análises multivariadas. O potencial discriminatório dos n-alcanos foi determinado pela análise de variáveis canônicas. As espécies e frações foram divididas em grupos por meio da análise de agrupamento. Os alcanos com menor potencial discriminatório foram: C26, C29, C25, C27 e C28 (primavera, C26, C28, C27, C30 e C29 (verão e C28, C26, C25, C29 e C27 (inverno. Nos períodos de primavera e inverno, a técnica de n-alcanos permitiu distinguir a lâmina foliar do coastcross das hastes superior e inferior, bem como das gramíneas e leguminosas. Em pastagens exclusivas de Brachiaria brizantha, no período de verão, seria possível discriminar as frações de importância nutricional, lâmina foliar e haste superior, pela determinação dos n-alcanos. As análises multivariadas, as variáveis canônicas e a análise de agrupamento representam boas alternativas de cálculo para melhorar a aplicabilidade da técnica dos n-alcanos na discriminação das dietas de herbívoros.The discriminatory potential of n-alkanes in tropical grasses (Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu, Cynodon dactylon Pers. cv. Coast-cross 1 and Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanz

  5. Long n-alkanes isomerization by medium pore zeolites with pore mouth and key lock mechanisms; Isomerisation des paraffines longues par des zeolithes a pores moyens selon les mecanismes ouverture de pore et cle serrure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claude, M.

    1999-10-01

    Skeletal isomerization of long n-alkanes is practiced to improve cold flow properties of diesel and lubricant fractions. In this work, model long n-alkanes (n-C{sub 10} - n-C{sub 24}) were hydro-isomerized in a fixed bed down flow vapour phase reactor loaded with bifunctional Pt/H-ZSM-22 zeolite catalyst. The skeletal isomers were analysed and identified with GC/MS. High isomer yields were obtained. The distribution of positional mono-methyl-branched isomers obtained from n-C{sub 12} to n-C{sub 24} are typically bimodal. This is explained by adsorption and reaction of the alkanes in pore mouths and locks on the external surface of the zeolite crystals. The pore mouth mode favours branching at C{sub 2} and C{sub 3}. The 'key lock' type proceeds by penetration of the two ends of the hydrocarbon chain into a different pore opening and favours more central mono-branching of the chain. The contribution of the key lock mode increases with increasing chain length and with the reaction temperature. The preferentially formed dimethyl-branched isomers have a separation between branchings of three up to fourteen carbon atoms. The formation of the second methyl-branching occurs preferentially from a centrally branched mono-methyl-branched isomer, so that the second branching is generated always more toward the end of the chain. Owing to the differences in adsorption entropy among the locks, at higher temperatures the largest lock is preferred and the distance between the two branching along the carbon chain in the preferred isomers is biggest. Thus the work resulted in the formulation of structure-selectivity relationships. n-C{sub 18} was hydro-isomerized on other zeolites. The nature and distribution of the isomers obtained suggest that the tubular 10-ring zeolites ZSM-23, ZSM-35 and SAPO-11 also operate according to pore mouth and key lock concepts. Zeolites with 12-rings show typical product patterns for catalysis in absence of steric hindrance. (author)

  6. Comparing plastic syringes and disposable columns to extract n-alkanes in forage and concentrate feeds Comparação de seringas plásticas e colunas descartáveis para extração de n-alcanos em forragens e concentrados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Estrasulas de Oliveira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons (n-alkanes were extracted from feed, orts, and bovine fecal samples using disposable, plastic 5mL-syringes as an alternative material to disposable columns, which are normally used in the liquid-solid extraction phase of n-alkanes. For both methods, the n-alkane extracts (carbon chain length between 31 and 36 atoms were identified using gas chromatography. The linear regression between methods were: 1 feces: column Alkane=2.63+0.92×syringeAlkane [r²=0.94, square root of the mean square error (RMSE=13.7mg kg-1, n=30] from which the intercept and the slope did not simultaneously differ from zero and unity (P>0.05, respectively; 2 feeds: column Alkane=0.36+1.12×syringeAlkane (r²=0.85, RMSE=1.9mg kg-1, n=21 from which the intercept and the slope did not simultaneously differ from zero and unity (P>0.05, respectively; 3 orts: column Alkane=0.49+0.92×syringeAlkane (r²=0.98, RMSE=1.2mg kg-1, n=15 from which the intercept and the slope did not simultaneously differ from zero and unity (P>0.05, respectively. Materials with low concentration of n-alkanes may affect the values obtained in both methods. These results suggested that disposable plastic syringes might be a viable alternative to columns thus, reducing analytical costs.N-alcanos foram extraídos de alimentos, sobras e fezes de bovinos com a utilização de seringas plásticas descartáveis de 5mL como um material alternativo às colunas descartáveis que são normalmente utilizadas para a fase de extração líquido-sólido. Para ambos os métodos, os n-alcanos (cadeias de carbono entre 31 e 36 átomos foram identificados usando cromatografia gasosa. As regressões lineares entre métodos foram: 1 fezes: coluna Alcano=2,63+0,92×seringa Alcano [r²=0,94, raiz do quadrado médio do erro (RMSE=13,7mg kg-1, n=30], em que o intercepto e o coeficiente angular não diferiram simultaneamente de zero e um (P>0,05, respectivamente; 2 alimentos: coluna Alcano=0

  7. Low temperature hydrogenolysis of waxes to diesel range gasoline and light alkanes: Comparison of catalytic properties of group 4, 5 and 6 metal hydrides supported on silica-alumina

    KAUST Repository

    Norsic, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    A series of metal hydrides (M = Zr, Hf, Ta, W) supported on silica-alumina were studied for the first time in hydrogenolysis of light alkanes in a continuous flow reactor. It was found that there is a difference in the reaction mechanism between d 0 metal hydrides of group 4 and d 0 ↔ d 2 metal hydrides of group 5 and group 6. Furthermore, the potential application of these catalysts has been demonstrated by the transformation of Fischer-Tropsch wax in a reactive distillation set-up into typical gasoline and diesel molecules in high selectivity (up to 86 wt%). Current results show that the group 4 metal hydrides have a promising yield toward liquid fuels.

  8. Perfil de n-alcanos em cinco espécies de plantas forrageiras tropicais - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v27i3.1207 Profile of n-alkanes in five species of plants tropical forages - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v27i3.1207

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Ferriani Branco

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do experimento foi estudar o perfil de n-alcanos em espécies de gramíneas (Brachiaria brizantha, Cynodon dactylon e Panicum maximum e leguminosas (Arachis pintoi e Glycine wightii. Foram identificados e quantificados por meio de cromatografia gasosa, os n-alcanos C24 a C35, sendo C32 e C34 padrões internos. As concentrações dos n-alcanos nas diferentes espécies e respectivas frações (lâminas foliares, colmos porções superior e inferior e matéria morta para gramíneas; folhas, caule porção superior e inferior e matéria morta para leguminosas foram submetidas à análise de variância e teste de média (Tukey. Nos períodos de primavera e inverno, para a maioria das espécies e frações, há predomínio dos n-alcanos de cadeia ímpar. Houve maior concentração de C29, C31 e C33 na primavera, C27, C28, C29, C30 e C31, no verão e C27, C29, C31 e C33 no invernoThis experiment aimed to study the profile of n-alkanes in tropical grasses species (Brachiaria brizantha, Cynodon dactylon and Panicum maximum and legumes (Arachis pintoi and Glycine wightii. They were identified and quantified, through gas cromatography, the n-alkanes C24 to C35, being the alkanes C32 and C34 internal indices. The n-alkanes concentrations in the different species and respective fractions (leaf blade, stem higher and lower portion and dead matter for grasses; leaves, stem higher portion, stem lower portion and dead matter for legumes were submitted to variance analysis and mean test (Tukey. For most of the species and fractions, there is prevalence of odd chain n-alkanes during springtime and winter. There was larger concentration of the alkanes C29, C31 and C33 in springtime, C27, C28, C29, C30 and C31 in summer and C27, C29, C31 and C33 in winter

  9. Uso de N-alcanos na estimativa da composição botânica em amostras com diferentes proporções de Brachiaria brizantha e Arachis pintoi Use of N-alkanes for estimations of botanical composition in samples with different proportions of Brachiaria brizantha and Arachis pintoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Côrtes

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido para se determinar a composição de n-alcanos (C24 a C36 em diferentes proporções de dietas hipotéticas de Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu e Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory. cv. Amarillo (0; 15; 30; 45; 60 e 100% de Arachis pintoi e identificar a combinação de alcanos que permite calcular a composição botânica de dietas com o menor valor residual (real menos o estimado. As forragens foram amostradas no verão e os n-alcanos extraídos pelo método de saponificação direta, sendo identificados e quantificados por meio de análise de cromatografia gasosa. O alcano C34 foi utilizado como padrão interno. As proporções de A. pintoi nas dietas foram estimadas pela minimização do z (soma dos quadrados dos desvios entre a proporção real dos alcanos analisados e as proporções pré-estabelecidas (tratamentos, utilizando-se a equação de Duncan et al. (1999. Observou-se que houve predomínio das cadeias carbônicas ímpares e que a concentração total de n-alcanos decresceu à medida que se aumentou a proporção de A. pintoi nos tratamentos. Estimativas acuradas da composição botânica de misturas de A. pintoi com B. brizantha foram obtidas utilizando-se os alcanos C29, C31, C33 e C35. O alcano C35 foi fundamental para a qualidade das estimativas. Os resultados indicaram o grande potencial da técnica para estudos com animais em pastejo.This trial was carried out to determine the composition of n-alkanes (C24 to C36 in hypothetical diets comprising of pure Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu and Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory. cv. Amarillo and mixtures of these two spececies with 15%, 30%, 45%, or 60% of Arachis pintoi; it also intended to identify the combination of alkanes that allows to calculate the botanical composition of diets with the smallest residual value (real less estimated values. The forages were sampled in the summer. The n-alkanes were extracted for the direct saponification

  10. Sublethal Toxic Effects and Induction of gGutathione S-transferase by Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins (SCCPs and C-12 alkane (dodecane in Xenopus laevis Frog Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Burýšková

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs are important industrial chemicals with high persistence in the environment but poorly characterized ecotoxicological effects. We studied embryotoxic effects of commercial mixture of SCCP (carbon length C-12, 56% of chlorine; CP56-12 and non-chlorinated n-alkane (dodecane, C-12 in the 96h Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay - Xenopus (FETAX. Only weak lethal effects were observed for both substances (the highest tested concentration 500 mg/L of both chemicals caused up to 11% mortality. On the other hand, we observed developmental malformations and reduced embryo growth at 5 mg/l and higher concentrations. However, the effects were not related to chlorination pattern as both SCCPs and dodecane induced qualitatively similar effects. SCCPs also significantly induced phase II detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST in Xenopus laevis embryos even at 0.5 mg/L, and this biomarker might be used as another early warning of chronic toxic effects. Our results newly indicate significant developmental toxicity of both SCCPs and n-dodecane to aquatic organisms along with inductions of specific biochemical toxicity mechanisms.

  11. Effective rate constants and uptake coefficients for the reactions of organic molecular markers (n-alkanes, hopanes, and steranes) in motor oil and diesel primary organic aerosols with hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Andrew T; Miracolo, Marissa A; Hennigan, Christopher J; Robinson, Allen L; Donahue, Neil M

    2009-12-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) uptake by organic aerosols, followed by heterogeneous oxidation, happens nearly at the collision frequency. Oxidation complicates the use of organic molecular markers such as hopanes for source apportionment, since receptor models assume markers are stable during transport. We report the oxidation kinetics of organic molecular markers (C(25)-C(32) n-alkanes, hopanes and steranes) in motor oil and primary organic aerosol emitted from a diesel engine at atmospherically relevant conditions inside a smog chamber. A thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (TAG) and Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure the changes in molecular comosition and bulk primary organic aerosol. From the measured changes in molecular composition, we calculated effective OH rate constants, effective relative rate constants, and effective uptake coefficients for molecular markers. Oxidation rates varied with marker volatility, with more volatile markers being oxidized at rates much faster than could be explained from heterogeneous oxidation. This rapid oxidation can be explained by significant gas-phase OH oxidation that dominates heterogeneous oxidation, resulting in overall oxidation lifetimes of 1 day or less. Based on our results, neglecting oxidation of molecular markers used for source apportionment could introduce significant error, since many common markers such as norhopane appear to be semivolatile under atmospheric conditions.

  12. Excess molar volumes and dynamic viscosities for binary mixtures of toluene + n-alkanes (C5-C10) at T = 298.15 K - Comparison with Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iloukhani, Hossein; Rezaei-Sameti, Mahdi; Basiri-Parsa, Jalal

    2006-01-01

    Densities ρ, dynamic viscosities η, for binary mixtures of toluene with some n-alkanes, namely, n-pentane, n-hexane, n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, and n-decane have been measured over the complete composition range. Excess molar volumes V E , viscosity deviations Δη, and excess Gibbs free energy of activation ΔG * E , were calculated there from and were correlated by Redlich-Kister type function in terms of mole fractions. For mixtures of toluene with n-pentane and n-hexane the V E is negative and for the remaining systems is positive. The Δη values are negative for all the studied mixtures. The ΔG * E values shows the positive values for the binary mixtures with n-decane, whereas the negative values have been observed for all the remaining binary mixtures. From the results, the excess thermal expansivities at constant pressure α E , is also estimated. The Prigogine-Flory-Patterson (PFP) theory and its applicability in predicting V E is tested. The results obtained for viscosity of binary mixtures were used to test the semi-empirical relations of Grunberg and Nissan, Tamura and Kurata, Hind et al., Katti and Chaudhri, McAllister, Heric, Kendall, and Monroe. The experimental on the constituted binaries are analyzed to discus the nature and strength of intermolecular interactions in these mixtures

  13. New organic reference materials for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements: caffeines, n-alkanes, fatty acid methyl esters, glycines, L-valines, polyethylenes, and oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Fong, Jon; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F.; Toman, Blaza; Ackermann, Annika; Assonov, Sergey; Aerts-Bijma, Anita; Brejcha, Ramona; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Darwish, Tamim; Elsner, Martin; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Gröning, Manfred; Hélie, Jean-François; Herrero-Martín, Sara; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Sauer, Peter E.; Sessions, Alex L.; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    An international project developed, quality-tested, and determined isotope−δ values of 19 new organic reference materials (RMs) for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements, in addition to analyzing pre-existing RMs NBS 22 (oil), IAEA-CH-7 (polyethylene foil), and IAEA-600 (caffeine). These new RMs enable users to normalize measurements of samples to isotope−δ scales. The RMs span a range of δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values from −210.8 to +397.0 mUr or ‰, for δ13CVPDB-LSVEC from −40.81 to +0.49 mUr and for δ15NAir from −5.21 to +61.53 mUr. Many of the new RMs are amenable to gas and liquid chromatography. The RMs include triads of isotopically contrasting caffeines, C16 n-alkanes, n-C20-fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), glycines, and l-valines, together with polyethylene powder and string, one n-C17-FAME, a vacuum oil (NBS 22a) to replace NBS 22 oil, and a 2H-enriched vacuum oil. A total of 11 laboratories from 7 countries used multiple analytical approaches and instrumentation for 2-point isotopic normalization against international primary measurement standards. The use of reference waters in silver tubes allowed direct normalization of δ2H values of organic materials against isotopic reference waters following the principle of identical treatment. Bayesian statistical analysis yielded the mean values reported here. New RMs are numbered from USGS61 through USGS78, in addition to NBS 22a. Because of exchangeable hydrogen, amino acid RMs currently are recommended only for carbon- and nitrogen-isotope measurements. Some amino acids contain 13C and carbon-bound organic 2H-enrichments at different molecular sites to provide RMs for potential site-specific isotopic analysis in future studies.

  14. Alkanes as markers in nutritional studies with wild ruminant and non-ruminant animals Alcanos como indicadores em estudos nutricionais com ruminantes selvagens e animais não-ruminantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Estrasulas de Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of information relative to the digestibility, intake and botanical and morphological composition of the diet is important in nutritional studies, since it provides the basis for understanding aspects related to the ingestive behavior and selectivity of animals. N-alkanes have been used successfully as markers in studies with many species of animals, particularly domesticated ruminants, most of the times as replacements for conventional markers as chromium oxide for example. However, for wild ruminants and non-ruminant animals information on this technique is still scarce and, as a consequence, its potential for use unknown. This review reports the use of this technique in studies of feed digestibility, intake and diet composition with wild ruminants and non-ruminant animals, summarizing results and inferring on the feasibility and applicability of the technique.O conhecimento de informações relativas à digestibilidade, consumo, composição botânica e morfológica da dieta é importante em estudos de nutrição, pois fornece a base para a compreensão de aspectos relativos ao comportamento ingestivo e a seletividade dos animais. N-alcanos têm sido usados com sucesso como indicadores em estudos com várias espécies de animais, particularmente ruminantes domésticos, muitas vezes como substitutos a marcadores convencionais como o cromo por exemplo. No entanto, no caso de ruminantes selvagens e animais não-ruminantes as informações sobre essa técnica são ainda escassas e, consequentemente, seu potencial de uso desconhecido. Esta revisão borda o uso dessa metodologia em estudos de digestibilidade, consumo e estimativa da composição da dieta em ruminantes selvagens e animais não-ruminantes, sumarizando resultados e inferindo sobre a viabilidade e aplicabilidade da técnica.

  15. Uso de n-alcanos na estimativa da composição botânica da dieta em ovinos alimentados com diferentes proporções de Brachiaria decumbens Stapf e Arachis pintoi Koprov e Gregory Use of n-alkanes to estimate the dietary botanical composition in sheep fed different proportions of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf and Arachis pintoi Koprov and Gregory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Massaru Fukumoto

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste experimento objetivou-se avaliar o poder discriminatório dos n-alcanos para estimar com acurácia e precisão a composição botânica da dieta em ovinos alimentados com diferentes proporções de Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory cv. Amarillo (0, 15, 30, 45 e 60% e Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. Foram utilizados 20 ovinos em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com período experimental de dez dias de adaptação à dieta e cinco dias de coleta de fezes. Nas amostras (compostas de fezes do período e nos fenos, foi analisada a concentração de n-alcanos. Para o cálculo da composição botânica, utilizou-se minimização da soma dos quadrados dos desvios, considerando as concentrações dos alcanos nos componentes da dieta e nas fezes. Para a escolha dos alcanos mais discriminatórios, foram utilizadas as análises multivariadas e as variáveis canônicas. As estimativas calculadas foram submetidas à análise de variância. As médias foram comparadas pelo teste t e as correções dos valores estimados em relação aos valores reais foram ajustadas em regressão linear. As variáveis canônicas indicaram que os alcanos C35, C33, C30, C31, C27, C29 e C36 são os de maior potencial discriminatório. O uso desses alcanos nos cálculos foi mais acurado e preciso para estimar a proporção de A. pintoi na dieta que o uso de apenas dois ou três alcanos com poder discriminatório. O melhor ajuste da regressão também foi encontrado para esses alcanos. O teste t para o intercepto da equação (a e o coeficiente de regressão (b indicaram que a = 0 e b = 1, comprovando que os valores estimados são equivalentes aos valores reais. As análises multivariadas mostraram-se ferramentas de grande importância na escolha dos n-alcanos nos cálculos nas estimativas.The objective of this experiment was to use n-alkane to estimate accurately and precisely the botanical composition of dietary forage in sheep fed different proportions of Arachis pintoi

  16. Plant and soil intake by organic broilers reared in tree- or grass-covered plots as determined by means of n-alkanes and of acid-insoluble ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurjanz, S; Germain, K; Juin, H; Jondreville, C

    2015-05-01

    Free-range birds such as organic broilers may ingest soil and plants during exploration. The estimation of such intakes is of great interest to quantify possible nutritional supplies and also to evaluate the risk of exposure to parasites or to environmental contaminants. Marker-based techniques are now available and would allow to quantify plant and, especially, soil intake in free-range birds, and this quantification was the aim of this study. Methodologically, the proportion of plants in diet intake was determined first using a method based on n-alkanes. Subsequently, the fraction of soil in the total intake was estimated with a second marker, acid-insoluble ash. This approach was carried out to estimate ingested amounts of plants and soil for five successive flocks of organic broilers, exploring grass-covered yards or those under trees, at two time points for each yard: 51 and 64 days of age. Each factor combination (yard type×period=flock number×age) was repeated on two different yards of 750 broilers each. The birds' plant intake varied widely, especially on grass-covered yards. The proportion of plant intake was significantly higher on grass-covered plots than under trees and was also affected, but to a lesser extent, by age or flock number. The ingestion of plants would generally not exceed 11 g of DM daily, except two extreme outliers of nearly 30 g. The daily plant intake under trees tended to be lower and never exceeded 7 g of DM. The amount of ingested plants increased significantly for spring flocks. It increased slightly but significantly with age. The proportion of ingested soil was significantly higher under trees than on grass-covered yards. Dry soil intake was generally low with not more than 3 g per day. Only in adverse conditions - that is, older birds exploring yards under trees in winter - soil intake reached the extreme value of nearly 5 g. Broilers on yards under trees ingested significantly more soil than on grass-covered yards with least

  17. Gas-phase reactions of the bare Th2+ and U2+ ions with small alkanes, CH4, C2H6, and C3H8: experimental and theoretical study of elementary organoactinide chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Emanuela; Santos, Marta; Michelini, Maria C; Marçalo, Joaquim; Russo, Nino; Gibson, John K

    2011-02-16

    The gas-phase reactions of two dipositive actinide ions, Th(2+) and U(2+), with CH(4), C(2)H(6), and C(3)H(8) were studied by both experiment and theory. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the bimolecular ion-molecule reactions; the potential energy profiles (PEPs) for the reactions, both observed and nonobserved, were computed by density functional theory (DFT). The experiments revealed that Th(2+) reacts with all three alkanes, including CH(4) to produce ThCH(2)(2+), whereas U(2+) reacts with C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8), with different product distributions than for Th(2+). The comparative reactivities of Th(2+) and U(2+) toward CH(4) are well explained by the computed PEPs. The PEPs for the reactions with C(2)H(6) effectively rationalize the observed reaction products, ThC(2)H(2)(2+) and UC(2)H(4)(2+). For C(3)H(8) several reaction products were experimentally observed; these and additional potential reaction pathways were computed. The DFT results for the reactions with C(3)H(8) are consistent with the observed reactions and the different products observed for Th(2+) and U(2+); however, several exothermic products which emerge from energetically favorable PEPs were not experimentally observed. The comparison between experiment and theory reveals that DFT can effectively exclude unfavorable reaction pathways, due to energetic barriers and/or endothermic products, and can predict energetic differences in similar reaction pathways for different ions. However, and not surprisingly, a simple evaluation of the PEP features is insufficient to reliably exclude energetically favorable pathways. The computed PEPs, which all proceed by insertion, were used to evaluate the relationship between the energetics of the bare Th(2+) and U(2+) ions and the energies for C-H and C-C activation. It was found that the computed energetics for insertion are entirely consistent with the empirical model which relates insertion efficiency to the

  18. Detailed structural characterization of the grafting of [Ta(=CHtBu)(CH2tBu)3] and [Cp*TaMe4] on silica partially dehydroxylated at 700 C and the activity of the grafted complexes toward alkane metathesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Erwan; Chabanas, Mathieu; Baudouin, Anne; de Mallmann, Aimery; Coperet, Christophe; Quadrelli, E. Allesandra; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Basset, Jean-Marie; Lukens, Wayne; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Sunley, Glenn J.

    2004-08-30

    The reaction of [Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 3}] or [Cp*Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}] with a silica partially dehydroxylated at 700 C gives the corresponding monosiloxy surface complexes [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}] and [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*] by eliminating a {sigma}-bonded ligand as the corresponding alkane (H-CH{sub 2}tBu or H-CH{sub 3}). EXAFS data show that an adjacent siloxane bridge of the surface plays the role of an extra surface ligand, which most likely stabilizes these complexes as in [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (1a') and [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (2a'). In the case of [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})], the structure is further stabilized by an additional interaction: a C-H agostic bond as evidenced by the small J coupling constant for the carbenic C-H (H{sub C-H} = 80 Hz), which was measured by J-resolved 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The product selectivity in propane metathesis in the presence of [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)-(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (1a') as a catalyst precursor and the inactivity of the surface complex [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta-(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (2a') show that the active site is required to be highly electrophilic and probably involves a metallacyclobutane intermediate.

  19. THERMODYNAMICS OF LIGHT ALKANE CARBOXYLATION. (R827124)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. The Electrophysiologic Mechanisms of Halogenated Alkane Arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    signal was also recorded. The tissue was carefully removed from the bath, placed in 1.0 ml of cold 5% trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and homogenized using...and Daly, J.W.: Forskolin: unique diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase in membranes and in intact cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 76:3363

  1. Low temperature alkane activation over zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, J.A.Z.

    2000-01-01

    The use of a catalyst, a material that selectively accelerates a chemical reaction by providing a new reaction path way (without being consumed itself), is of major importance in chemical industry. In a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction, at least one of the reactants must be adsorbed on the solid

  2. N-alkanes to estimate voluntary forage intake of cattle using controlled-release capsules N-alcanos para estimar o consumo voluntário de forragem em bovinos usando cápsulas de liberação controlada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Estrasulas de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available N-alkanes have been used as internal markers in digestibility trials with ruminants and non-ruminants for more than 20 years. In this study, two trials were conducted under different feeding regimes to (i evaluate the release rate of n-alkanes of controlled-release capsules in the rumen of rumen-cannulated steers either grazing or restrained in metabolic stalls and (ii estimate voluntary forage intake of the same steers in metabolic stalls. Six rumen-cannulated Nelore steers were allocated to individual metabolic stalls and were fed diets with varying forage to concentrate ratios (80:20, 60:40, and 40:60; respectively. Corn silage was the only forage source. In the grazing trial, the same steers were evaluated under three feeding managements (Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu unsupplemented or supplemented with either 0.3% or 0.6% of live weight of a concentrate. The release rate of the n-alkanes (mg d-1 was measured by multiplying the distance (mm d-1 the capsule plunger travelled after 3, 7, 10, 13, and 17 d of rumen infusion to the n-alkanes concentration of capsule tablets (mg mm-1. There was an effect of day of measurement (P 0.05 of feeding management or feeding management x day of measurement interaction was observed. Values averaged 6.9 and 14.8%, lower than proposed by the manufacturer for the C32, when animals were restrained in metabolic stalls and at grazing, respectively. Similarly, the values of C36 were 15.9 and 23.1% lower for those animals in metabolic stalls and grazing, respectively. The average release rate of C32 into the rumen was 372 and 341 mg d-1 for animals restrained in metabolic stalls and grazing, respectively. There was no difference in the release rate between feeding regimes (P > 0.05. The regression of the pooled data indicated an average release rate of 345 mg d-1. Estimated values of voluntary forage intake using the pair of C33:C32 n-alkanes using the animals restrained in metabolic stalls was not different

  3. Utilização dos componentes da cera das plantas, em especial os n-alcanos, em estudos de nutrição de ruminantes The utilization of plant wax components, especially n-alkanes, in ruminants nutrition studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Estrásulas de Oliveira

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de métodos indiretos para estimar o consumo e a digestibilidade dos alimentos por ruminantes é bastante importante, porque pode representar uma economia de tempo, dinheiro e trabalho em relação aos experimentos convencionais e, também, por permitir tais estimativas sob condições extensivas de pastejo. Dentre esses métodos, sobressai-se o dos indicadores fecais. Várias substâncias têm sido utilizadas para esse fim. Este artigo é uma revisão de alguns aspectos sobre o uso de n-alcanos como indicadores em estudos de nutrição de ruminantes.The indirect methods used to estimate the intake and digestibility of feedstuffs by ruminants are very important because these methods represent an economy of time, money and work, in relation to conventional trials. Also, they permit estimates in grazing conditions. Among these methods, the faecal markers stand out and lots of substances have been used. This paper is a review about the use of n-alkanes as markers in ruminant nutrition studies.

  4. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from Cienfuegos bay, Cuba; Mar. Pollut. Bull. 58. 1624–1634. UNEP 1995 Determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in selected marine organisms; Reference method for Marine pollution studies No. 72; UNEP/IOC/IAEA/FAO. Volkman J K 1986 A review of sterol markers for marine and terrigenous OM; Org. Geochem.

  5. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption of volatile n-alkane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    chromatography, before and after treatment of the root biomass with mineral acid and organic solvent. The free energy ... Mineral acid and organic solvent treatment leads to greater adsorption bond strength, with ∆Ga and ∆Ha values of -36.08 ..... polysaccharides, lignins, printing ink pigments, and ink fillers by inverse gas ...

  6. Combustion and noise phenomena in turbulent alkane flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, B.

    2007-01-01

    A gas turbine engine is an advanced apparatus for propulsion and power generation that has been developed over the last 60 years. The energy for this production of propulsion and power in a gas turbine is generated by combustion. It is feasible and relatively easy to solve the governing equations in

  7. Catalytic oxidative conversion of alkanes to olefines and oxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerns, M. [Institut fuer Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    All of the direct reaction schemes described and the corresponding process schemes are still in an exploratory state. Ethylene by oxidative coupling of methane could become competitive if process schemes are developed with significantly less expenditures for separation of the product from unconverted feed. No encouragement for formaldehyde from methane can be presently derived from the existing knowledge. Liquid-phase oxidation of methane to methanol appears to be attractive but no final judgement is possible at present. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylene and propane look promising although further catalyst improvement is required. Acetic acid from ethane and acrylonitrile from propane have a certain potential as an alternative to present technology. The outlook for acrolein and acrylic acid from propane is less favourable; new concepts for catalyst design are necessary. (orig.)

  8. Use of limonene in countercurrent chromatography: a green alkane substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Karine; Bouju, Elodie; Suchet, Pauline; Berthod, Alain

    2013-05-07

    Counter-current chromatography (CCC) is a preparative separation technique working with the two liquid phases of a biphasic liquid system. One phase is used as the mobile phase when the other, the stationary phase, is held in place by centrifugal fields. Limonene is a biorenewable cycloterpene solvent coming from orange peel waste. It was evaluated as a possible substitute for heptane in CCC separations. The limonene/methanol/water and heptane/methanol/water phase diagrams are very similar at room temperature. The double bonds of the limonene molecule allows for possible π-π interactions with solutes rendering limonene slightly more polar than heptane giving small differences in solute partition coefficients in the two systems. The 24% higher limonene density is a difference with heptane that has major consequences in CCC. The polar and apolar phases of the limonene/methanol/water 10/9/1 v/v have -0.025 g/cm(3) density difference (lower limonene phase) compared to +0.132 g/cm(3) with heptane (upper heptane phase). This precludes the use of this limonene system with hydrodynamic CCC columns that need significant density difference to retain a liquid stationary phase. It is an advantage with hydrostatic CCC columns because density difference is related to the working pressure drop: limonene allows one to work with high centrifugal fields and moderate pressure drop. Limonene has the capability to be a "green" alternative to petroleum-based solvents in CCC applications.

  9. Light alkane (mixed feed) selective dehydrogenation using bi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increase in time-on-stream (TOS) remarkably improves propene selectivity at the expense of lower conversion. The performances of bimetallic zeolite based catalyst largely affected by coke deposition. The presence of butane and ethane adversely affected propane conversion. Optimum propene selectivity is about 48 % ...

  10. Adsorption of light alkanes on coconut nanoporous activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results for adsorption equilibrium of methane, ethane, and butane on nanoporous activated carbon obtained from coconut shells. The adsorption data were obtained gravimetrically at temperatures between 260 and 300K and pressures up to 1 bar. The Toth isotherm was used to correlate the data, showing good agreement with measured values. Low-coverage equilibrium constants were estimated using virial plots. Heats of adsorption at different loadings were also estimated from the equilibrium data. Adsorption properties for this material are compared to the same properties for BPL activated carbon and BAX activated carbon.

  11. Quantum chemical study of hydroxylation of alkanes by hypofluorous acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ončák, Milan; Srnec, Martin; Zahradník, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2008), s. 649-659 ISSN 0137-5083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electronic structure * nonheme iron * basis-set Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.518, year: 2008

  12. Alkanes in Firn Air Samples, Antarctica and Greenland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains ethane, propane, and n-butane measurements in firn air from the South Pole and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide in Antarctica, and...

  13. Electron-stimulated desorption from condensed branched alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, J.A.; Knotek, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Desorption of H + , CH 3+ , H 2+ , and D + have been measured as a function of electron excitation energy for solid neopentane, tetramethylsilane and two deuterated isomers of isobutane. The evidence shows that C-C (or Si-C) and C-H bonds are broken by electronic excitations localized on methyl groups, in contrast to CH 3+ production in gas-phase neopentane, and that these excitations are the final states of decay processes initiated by creation of a hole in the C2s level, or, in tetramethylsilane, the C2s/Si3s level. This is in accord with other evidence which shows that localized multi-valence hole states result in C-H, C-C, Si-C and Si-H dissociation, and that such states may be excited either directly or by shakeup, by decay from a C2s hole, or by decay for a C1s core hole. It is apparent then, that dissociation and desorption of ions from covalent materials is a multi (electron) hole mechanism, and that the means of localizing the excitation energy in such systems involves multi-hole correlation

  14. Maximal oil recovery by simultaneous condensation of alkane and steam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, J.; Marchesin, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of steam to enhance the recovery from petroleum reservoirs. We formulate a mathematical and numerical model that simulates coinjection of volatile oil with steam into a porous rock in a one-dimensional setting. We utilize the mathematical theory of conservation

  15. Avaliação do possível efeito tóxico de um alcano semifluorinado de uso oftalmológico sobre cultura de células Vero Assessment of the possible toxic effect of a semifluorinated alkane on Vero cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Estacia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Perfluorocarbonos líquidos (PFCLs são usados em cirurgias oftalmológicas de vítreo-retina. Os PFCLs podem causar reações inflamatórias, danos celulares e destruição da arquitetura normal da retina. Na tentativa de se evitar estes efeitos, foram desenvolvidos os alcanos semifluorinados (ASF. Este trabalho avaliou o uso potencial de um ASF, o perfluorohexiloctano (F6H8, como substituto do vítreo de longo prazo em condições controladas por meio de cultura celular. MÉTODOS: Foi feita análise da citotoxicidade indireta, na qual as células entram em contato apenas com elementos solúveis que pudessem ser eliminados pelo perfluorohexiloctano. Avaliou-se então a toxicidade direta, ou seja, a toxicidade mediada pelo contato, do perfluorohexiloctano por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura e a imunocitoquímica para a actina. Utilizou-se como controle, células em meio de cultura livre de qualquer tratamento, um controle positivo para toxicidade, que apresenta comprovado efeito tóxico às células, e um controle de peso que exercesse compressão mecânica similar à quantidade de perfluorohexiloctano utilizada no experimento. RESULTADO: Observou-se que o referido produto não apresenta toxicidade indireta. Os ensaios de toxicidade direta mostraram que as alterações celulares promovidas pelo perfluorohexiloctano eram similares àquelas exercidas pelo controle de peso e distintas do controle de toxicidade. CONCLUSÕES: O perfluorohexiloctano não apresenta toxicidade indireta e tem efeito mais compressivo do que tóxico sobre as células em cultura.PURPOSE: Perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCLs are used in vitreoretinal surgery. PFCLs may cause inflammatory reactions, cellular injury and destruction of the normal retinal architecture. In order to avoid these effects, semifluorinated alkanes (SFA were developed. We assessed the potential use of an SFA known as perfluorohexiloctano (F6H8 as long-term vitreous replacement under

  16. A molecular simulation-based method for the estimation of activity coefficients for alkane solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Epaminondas, Voutsas; Dimitrios, Tassios

    1996-01-01

    in the solvent (gamma(2)(infinity)) were calculated at infinite dilution conditions. The MS data cover a broad range of system asymmetry with respect to size in the area of oligomer-solvent mixtures (up to segment ratio 60/1 which corresponds to e.g. a system of n-heptane with nC(460)). The MS results were...

  17. Production of Low-Freezing-Point Highly Branched Alkanes through Michael Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yaxuan; Xia, Qineng; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Yanqin

    2017-12-22

    A new approach for the production of low-freezing-point, high-quality fuels from lignocellulose-derived molecules was developed with Michael addition as the key step. Among the investigated catalysts, CoCl 2 ⋅6 H 2 O was found most active for the Michael addition of 2,4-pentanedione with FA (single aldol adduct of furfural and acetone, 4-(2-furanyl)-3-butene-2-one). Over CoCl 2 ⋅6 H 2 O, a high carbon yield of C 13 oxygenates (about 75 %) can be achieved under mild conditions (353 K, 20 h). After hydrodeoxygenation, low-freezing-point (freezing-point (freezing point from renewable biomass. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Solid-Liquid equilibrium of n-alkanes using the Chain Delta Lattice Parameter model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    degrees of success.An attempt to describe the equilibrium between the high temperature form of a paraffinic solid solution, commonly known as rotator phase, and the liquid phase is performed. The Chain Delta Lattice Parameter model (CDLP) is developed allowing a successful description of the solid...... mixtures, is related with the values of the melting temperatures by a function common to the entire homologous series. When applied to systems with a symmetric behavior, this yields a correct description of both the enthalpic and entropic parts of the excess Gibbs free energy with the CDLP model......The formation of a solid phase in liquid mixtures with large paraffinic molecules is a phenomenon of interest in the petroleum, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological industries among onters. Efforts to model the solid-liquid equilibrium in these systems have been mainly empirical and with different...

  19. Selective oxidation of alkanes and/or alkenes to valuable oxygenates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Manhua [Maple Glen, PA; Pillai, Krishnan S [North Brunwick, NJ

    2011-02-15

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing at least one of methacrolein and methacrylic acid, for example, by subjecting isobutane or isobutylene or a mixture thereof to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen. In the case where isobutane alone is subjected to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, the product is at least one of isobutylene, methacrolein and methacrylic acid. The catalyst comprises a compound having the formula A.sub.aB.sub.bX.sub.xY.sub.yZ.sub.zO.sub.o wherein A is one or more elements selected from the group of Mo, W and Zr, B is one or more elements selected from the group of Bi, Sb, Se, and Te, X is one or more elements selected from the group of Al, Bi, Ca, Ce, Co, Fe, Ga, Mg, Ni, Nb, Sn, W and Zn, Y is one or more elements selected from the group of Ag, Au, B, Cr, Cs, Cu, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Re, Ru, Sn, Te, Ti, V and Zr, and Z is one or more element from the X or Y groups or from the following: As, Ba, Pd, Pt, Sr, or mixtures thereof, and wherein a=1, 0.05oxidation state of the other elements.

  20. Langmuir-Blodgett films of alkane chalcogenice (S, Se, Te) stabilized gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brust, M.; Stuhr-Hansen, N.; Norgaard, K.

    2001-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles stabilized by alkanethiolates, alkaneselenides, and alkanetellurides have been prepared by analogous methods. Chloroform solutions of thiolate and selenide stabilized particles were spread and evaporated on the water/air interface where the particles formed well-defined Langmuir...

  1. Oxidation of gem-chloronitroso- and vic-chloronitroso-alkanes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chlorine mixture with olefins, especially in the gas phase, which leads to a mixture of several nitration products ... Silica gel (Qualigens) used for column chromatography. (60–120 mesh size) was activated by heating to 110. ◦. C ..... A K and Vernay H F 1976 J. Chem. Soc. Perkin. Trans. 1 1113; (f) Bozzi E G, Shiue Ch. Y and ...

  2. Excess properties and vapour pressure of (3-diethylaminopropylamine + n-alkanes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khimeche, Kamel [Ecole Militaire Polytechnique EMP, BP 17 Bordj-El-Bahri (Algeria); Laboratoire de Thermodynamique et Modelisation Moleculaire, Faculte de Chimie, USTHB, BP. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar (Algeria); Dahmani, Abdallah [Laboratoire de Thermodynamique et Modelisation Moleculaire, Faculte de Chimie, USTHB, BP. 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar (Algeria)], E-mail: abdahmani@yahoo.fr; Jose, Jacques [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique I, Universite Claude Bernard (Lyon I), 43, bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2008-05-15

    The vapour pressures of liquid (3-diethylaminopropylamine (3-DEPA) + n-heptane) mixtures were measured by a static method between T = (303.15 and 343.15) K at 10 K intervals. The molar excess enthalpies H{sup E} at T = 303.15 K were measured for the systems {l_brace}3-DEPA + C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2} (n = 6, 7, 12){r_brace}. The molar excess Gibbs free energies G{sup E} were obtained with Barker's method and fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. The Wilson equation was also used. Deviations between experimental and predicted G{sup E} and H{sup E}, by using group contribution UNIFAC (Gmehling version) model, were evaluated.

  3. Kinematic Viscosities for Ether + Alkane Mixtures: Experimental Results and UNIFAC-VISCO Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrés, I.; Lahuerta, C.; Villares, A.; Martín, S.; Lafuente, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    Kinematic viscosities for the binary mixtures of diisopropylether, dibutylether or methyl ter-butyl ether with 3-methylpentane, hexane or heptane have been measured at 283.15 K, 298.15 K, and 313.15 K. The experimental values have been correlated by the McAllister equation. Using these results, new UNIFAC-VISCO parameters, Oether-CH2 and Oether-CH3, have been calculated.

  4. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. II. Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Diama, A.

    2007-01-01

    on very different time scales: 1-40 ps (DCS) and 0.1-4 ns (HFBS). The MD simulations were done on corresponding time scales and were used to interpret the neutron spectra. The authors found that the dynamics of the two monolayers are qualitatively similar on the respective time scales...

  5. Spectroscopic Characterization of Intermediates in the Iron Catalyzed Activation of Alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward M. Eyring

    2007-05-28

    The present report begins with a brief survey of recent hypervalent iron chemistry and mentions two previously reported ferrate papers funded by the DOE/BES grant. The focus is then shifted to the seven publications acknowledging support of the grant that have not been reported since the last Progress Report, DOE/ER/14340-9, was prepared. These papers deal with: (a) the successful use of an ATR element in a stopped-flow infrared spectrometer, (b) the rationalization of a depolarization of a LiClO4 solution in polyethylene oxide high polymer, (c) an analysis of several coupled ultrasonic relaxations observed in solutions of pentoses undergoing isomerization, (d) the combination of ultrasonic absorption and Raman scattering measurements to elucidate zinc thiocyanate solutions in water, (e) the use of NMR to determine stability constants when LiClO4:12-crown-4 is dissolved in acetonitrile and in methanol, (f) the possible existence of triple ions in low permittivity solutions, and (g) the properties of a high surface area ceria aerogel. Collectively, these papers illustrate advantages of bringing several modern experimental techniques to bear on complex chemical systems.

  6. Elimination of alkanes from off-gases using biotrickling filters containing two liquid phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestijn, J.W. van; Lake, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Biological techniques are highly cost-effective for the treatment of off-gases containing low concentrations of pollutants (<5 g/m3). They may also be attractive for the elimination of higher concentrations of explosive hydrocarbons (when compared to incineration). Conventional techniques such as

  7. Rate Constants for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radical with Several Alkanes, Cycloalkanes, and Dimethyl Ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMore, W.; Bayes, K.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiements were used to measure rate constants and temperature denpendencies of the reactions of OH with propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and dimethyl ether.

  8. Tools for characterizing the whole‐cell bio‐oxidation of alkanes at microscale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Chris; da Silva Damas Pinto, Ana Catarina; Lui, Hai‐Po

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the first reported microwell whole‐cell bioconversion using a water immiscible substrate that matches the specific activity and yield achieved in a 1.2 L stirred tank bioreactor. Maximum yields of 0.6 g/Ltotal 1‐dodecanol achieved in 24 h compare favorably to 0.28 g/Ltotal ...

  9. (III) Porphyrins for the selective oxidation of alkanes/alkenes by t ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Two iron(III) tetraphenyl porphyrin catalytic units are connected by an azo-link to form the dimeric .... and was decanted and was evaporated to dryness under reduced pressure. The crude solid was purified by silica gel column chromatography and the desired .... matography equipped with flame ionization detector.

  10. Fact Sheet: Alkanes, C12-13, chloro (CAS No. 71011-12-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  11. A thermal stability study of alkane and aromatic thiolate self-assembled monolayers on copper surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, L.; Whelan, C. M.; Kinsella, M.; Maex, K.

    2004-07-01

    The thermal stability of 1-decanethiol (C10) and benzenethiol (BT) Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) on metallic and oxidized copper surfaces has been investigated by thermal desorption spectrometry. High quality C10 and BT SAMs exhibit low thermal stabilities on clean copper surfaces with a maximum in decomposition occurring between 100 and 150 ∘C. The decomposition of SAMs follows different mechanisms. For the alkanethiol, a direct interaction between the alkyl group of the thiolate and the metallic copper surface is the dominant pathway for the C-S bond scission. The head group desorbs as oxidized sulfur and this is followed by the desorption of the alkyl fragments of the chain adsorbed on the clean copper surface. In the case of benzenethiol, a simultaneous desorption of the head group as oxidized sulfur and the benzene group occurs. SAM formation on the oxidized copper surface results in complete removal and/or reduction of the CuO layer. Higher SAM surface coverages on the resulting Cu/Cu 2O surface result from the enhanced surface roughness of the substrate. The decomposition mechanisms and thermal stabilities of the C10 and BT SAMs are dependent on the oxidation state of the underlying substrate and the chemical nature of the chain.

  12. Oxidation of Alkane Rich Gasoline Fuels and their Surrogates in a Motored Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Shankar, Vijai S B

    2015-03-30

    The validation of surrogates formulated using a computational framework by Ahmed et al.[1]for two purely paraffinic gasoline fuels labelled FACE A and FACE C was undertaken in this study. The ability of these surrogate mixtures to be used in modelling LTC engines was accessed by comparison of their low temperature oxidation chemistry with that of the respective parent fuel as well as a PRF based on RON. This was done by testing the surrogate mixtures in a modified Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) engine running in Controlled Autoignition Mode (CAI) mode. The engine was run at a constant speed of 600 rpm at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 with the intake temperature at 150 °C and a pressure of 98 kPa. The low temperature reactivity of the fuels were studied by varying the compression ratio of the engine from the point were very only small low temperature heat release was observed to a point beyond which auto-ignition of the fuel/air mixture occurred. The apparent heat release rates of different fuels was calculated from the pressure histories using first law analysis and the CA 50 times of the low temperature heat release (LTHR) were compared. The surrogates reproduced the cool flame behavior of the parent fuels better than the PRF across all compression ratios.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of the rheological and dynamical properties of a model alkane fluid under confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D.

    1999-01-01

    We study the effect of wall endash fluid interactions on the state conditions and the effective properties of a model dodecane fluid confined between parallel solid walls. A significant increase in the effective density of the confined fluid is observed with increasing strength of the wall endash fluid interaction. The effect of the wall endash fluid interaction on the rotational relaxation and diffusional relaxation of the fluid is seen in the significant slowing down of the relaxation with increasing wall endash fluid interaction strength. The difference between the confined fluid and the three-dimensional bulk fluid is demonstrated by the strong anisotropy of the dynamical properties, the molecular rotation, and self-diffusion. The viscosity of the confined fluid shows a large difference between weak and strong wall endash fluid interactions, and a significant difference from bulk fluid at low shear rate. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering study on the polytypism of even-numbered n-alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Hideki; Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya

    2005-02-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the two polytypes of n-hexatriacontane ( n- C36H74), single-layered structure Mon and double-layered structure Orth II, have been studied with incoherent inelastic neutron scattering and solubility measurements. The solubility measurements show that Orth II is more stable than Mon, because of its larger entropy. The neutron scattering measurements reveal that the vibrational modes of Orth II shift to the lower frequencies compared with those of Mon in the frequency region below 120 cm-1. The vibrational modes in this region make a dominant contribution to the vibrational entropy of a system, and the advantage of Orth II in vibrational entropy due to the low-frequency shifts is estimated to be 7.8 J K-1 mol-1 at 288 K under the harmonic approximation, which is in good agreement with the entropy difference between Mon and Orth II determined by solubility measurements. These results suggest that the relative stability of polytypic structures of long-chain compounds is mainly determined by the vibrational entropy of the low-frequency modes.

  15. Application of the N-Alkane molecular alloys to thermally protected containers for catering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjona, F.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermally controlled transport device was designed and tested. As hot food needs to be transported at temperatures between 60 and 70ºC in order to avoid contamination by microorganisms, the use of Molecular Alloy Phase Change Materials (MAPCM can lead to improvements in this field of application. A heat transfer numerical simulation of the box used for transporting the food was conducted. Despite obvious simplifications, a good agreement between numerical simulation and experimental results was obtained. Furthermore, we compared our experimental results with those from other experiments related to the transport of hot food. Here, pizza is taken as the example, and it is shown that delivering time can be increased three-fold.

    Para evitar la proliferación de microorganismos, los alimentos cocinados deben ser transportados a temperaturas entre 60 y 70ºC. Los Materiales con Cambio de Fase a base de Aleaciones Moleculares (MAPCM representan una solución en este tipo de aplicaciones. Para ello hemos diseñado y probado un contenedor que permite el transporte a temperatura controlada. Se ha realizado la experimentación y simulación numérica de la transferencia de calor en el dispositivo con el objetivo de determinar su rendimiento. A pesar de las necesarias simplificaciones, hemos obtenido un buen acuerdo entre resultados experimentales y de simulación. En este trabajo hemos tomado el transporte de pizzas como ejemplo, mostrando que el tiempo de protección térmica puede ser incrementado utilizando aleaciones moleculares.

  16. Dehydrogenation of light alkanes over rhenium catalysts on conventional and mesoporous MFI supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovik, Anne Krogh; Hagen, Anke; Schmidt, I.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, Re/HZSM-5 (Si/Al = 15) was shown to be an efficient catalyst for ethane dehydrogenation and aromatization at 823 K and atmospheric pressure. In this reaction, the major initial products were benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX), but increasing amounts of ethene were produced with time...

  17. Catalytic behavior of Pt nanoparticles dealuminated Y-zeolite for some n-alkane hydroisomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dealuminated zeolite Y-supported platinum was prepared adopting two dealumination methods, viz. fast (1, 3 and 6 h and slow method (18 h. The content of Pt was constant at 0.5 wt% in all investigated catalysts. The prepared samples were characterized using TGA/DSC, XRD, FTIR techniques, nitrogen adsorption at −196 °C and TEM-connected with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Surface acidity was investigated via pyridine adsorption using FT-IR spectroscopy. The parent and dealuminated Y-zeolite samples were characterized by their microporous system. By increasing the dealumination time to 6 h, the increased specific surface area and total pore volume indicated a sort of pore opening taking place with an increase in the accessibility of nitrogen molecules. DSC confirmed the thermal stability of the dealuminated zeolite samples up to 800 °C. The prepared catalysts were tested through hydroisomerization reactions of n-hexane and n-heptane using a micro-catalytic pulse technique. Different catalytic behaviors could be distinguished for the dealuminated samples based on competitive reactions; hydro-isomerization, hydrocracking and cyclization. Slow dealumination leads to the most selective catalysts for hydroisomerization. n-Heptane was converted to higher extent than n-hexane; cracking process was more evident when the former was fed to the reactor.

  18. The phase behavior of a hard sphere chain model of a binary n-alkane mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanoski, A. P.; Monson, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Monte Carlo computer simulations have been used to study the solid and fluid phase properties as well as phase equilibrium in a flexible, united atom, hard sphere chain model of n-heptane/n-octane mixtures. We describe a methodology for calculating the chemical potentials for the components in the mixture based on a technique used previously for atomic mixtures. The mixture was found to conform accurately to ideal solution behavior in the fluid phase. However, much greater nonidealities were seen in the solid phase. Phase equilibrium calculations indicate a phase diagram with solid-fluid phase equilibrium and a eutectic point. The components are only miscible in the solid phase for dilute solutions of the shorter chains in the longer chains. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  19. Dynamic behaviour of tantalum hydride supported on silica or MCM-41 in the metathesis of alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Soignier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The metathesis of ethane and propane catalysed by tantalum hydride supported on silica or MCM-41 was studied under static and dynamic conditions. During the reaction, the rate decreased over time, indicating deactivation of the catalyst. The evolution of the catalytic system and surface species over time was monitored by various physico-chemical methods: FTIR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and chemical reactivity. A carbonaceous deposit composed of unsaturated hydrocarbyl species was observed by 13C NMR. This deposit was responsible for poisoning of the catalyst. The deactivation of the catalyst proved more severe at higher temperatures and under static rather than dynamic conditions. A partial regeneration of the catalyst could be achieved during a series of repeated runs. Mechanistically, the deconvolution of the products\\' distribution over time indicated the occurrence of hydrogenolysis in the early stages of the reaction, while pure metathesis dominated later on. The hydrogen was supplied by the dehydrogenation of hydrocarbyl surface species involved in the deactivation process. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. XH···C hydrogen bonds in n-alkane-HX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hada M, Ehara K, Toyota K, Fukuda R, Hasegawa J,. Ishida M, Nakajima T, Honda Y, Kitao O, Nakai H,. Klene M, Li X, Knox J E, Hratchian H P, Cross J B,. Adamo C, Jaramillo J, Gomperts R, Stratmann R E,. Yazyev O, Austin A J, Cammi R, Pomelli C, Ochterski. J W, Ayala P Y, Morokuma K, Voth G A, Salvador P,.

  1. Adhesion of alkane as a functional group on muscovite and quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Klaus; Pedersen, Christian Schack; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between mineral surfaces and organic molecules in water control many processes in nature and in the production of modern materials. To improve the understanding of fluid-surface interactions, we investigated the interface behavior of quartz and muscovite, a model for clay minerals...... experiments and DLVO calculations, we were able to determine the surface charge density. We observed increased adhesion between the mineral surface and the hydrophobic tips as the contact time increased from 7 ms to ?2 s. The di ffusion of dissolved ions takes time, and density functional theory (DFT...

  2. Intramolecular and Lattice Melting in n-Alkane Monolayers: An Analog of Melting in Lipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Herwig, K.W.; Matthies, B.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and neutron diffraction experiments have been performed on n-dotriacontane (n-C32D66) monolayers adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. The diffraction experiments show little change in the crystalline monolayer structure up to a temperature of similar...

  3. REMOVAL OF CHLORINATED AND BROMINATED ALKANES FROM DRINKING WATER USING REVERSE OSMOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrane use in water treatment has historically focused on desalination. With the development of new membrane materials, attention began to focus on reverse osmosis and pervaporation as alternatives to traditional water treatment processes. This paper addresses the use of reve...

  4. Langmuir-Blodgett films of alkane chalcogenice (S, Se, Te) stabilized gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brust, M.; Stuhr-Hansen, N.; Norgaard, K.

    2001-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles stabilized by alkanethiolates, alkaneselenides, and alkanetellurides have been prepared by analogous methods. Chloroform solutions of thiolate and selenide stabilized particles were spread and evaporated on the water/air interface where the particles formed well-defined Langmuir...... films. The films were transferred to solid supports of freshly cleaved mica and were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The particles were found to have an average core diameter of 2 nm. The stability of the particles under ambient conditions increased in the order Te

  5. Insertion of singlet chlorocarbenes across C–H bonds in alkanes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    months are slowly phasing out the refrigerants chloro- fluorocarbons (CFCs) and halogens which are potent stratospheric ozone destroyers.1 The advantages of. HCFCs and HFCs are their susceptibility to quick oxidation by OH radicals in the troposphere and their photodissociation to halocarbenes. In addition to their.

  6. Formation of the N-Iodopyridinium Cation in an Alkane Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that pyridine (py) and iodine (I2) form a 1:1 molecular complex, py-I2. Within the framework of a student project at Roskilde University [1], we have recently investigated the formation and mid-infrared linear dichroism of the complex in a stretched polyethylene (PE) matrix......-iodopyridinium cation (pyI+). This assignment is consistent with the observed polarization data. Ionic side reactions (py-I2 = pyI+ + I–, py-I2 + I2 = pyI+ + I3–, etc.) are easily observed in binary pyridine-iodine mictures and in polar solvents, but not so easily in non-polar media. We are thus surprised to see...... the apparent efficiency with which the pyI+ cation is formed in an apolar and aprotic medium like PE. With excess iodine, the peaks assigned to pyI+ dominate the observed mid-infrared spectrum. We suspect that a driving force for the ionic reaction is the formation of polyiodide anions in the channels...

  7. Advenella alkanexedens sp. nov., an alkane-degrading bacterium isolated from biogas slurry samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huimin; Zhou, Shan; Wang, Yanwei; Kong, Delong; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Jie; Dong, Weiwei; Ruan, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A novel aerobic bacterium, designated strain LAM0050 T , was isolated from a biogas slurry sample, which had been enriched with diesel oil for 30 days. Cells of strain LAM0050 T were gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming and coccoid-shaped. The optimal temperature and pH for growth were 30-35 °C and 8.5, respectively. The strain did not require NaCl for growth, but tolerated up to 5.3 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain LAM0050 T was a member of the genus Advenella , and was most closely related to Advenella faeciporci KCTC 23732 T , Advenella incenata CCUG 45225 T , Advenella kashmirensis DSM 17095 T and Advenella mimigardefordensis DSM 17166 T , with 98.1, 96.6, 96.6 and 96.3 % sequence similarity, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness between strain LAM0050 T and A. faeciporci KCTC 23732 T was 41.7 ± 2.4 %. The genomic DNA G+C content was 51.2 mol%, as determined by the T m method. The major fatty acids of strain LAM0050 T were C 16 : 0 , C 17 : 0 cyclo, summed feature 3 (C 16 : 1 ω7 c and/or C 16 : 1 ω6 c ) and summed feature 8 (C 18 : 1 ω7 c and/or C 18 : 1 ω6 c ). The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8. The main polar lipids were diphosphatidyglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine and four unidentified phospholipids. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain LAM0050 T is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Advenella , for which the name Advenella alkanexedens sp. nov., is proposed, the type strain is LAM0050 T ( = ACCC 06485 T  = JCM 30465 T ).

  8. Product energy deposition of CN + alkane H abstraction reactions in gas and solution phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we report the first theoretical studies of post-transition state dynamics for reaction of CN with polyatomic organic species. Using electronic structure theory, a newly developed analytic reactive PES, a recently implemented rare-event acceleration algorithm, and a normal mode projection scheme, we carried out and analyzed quasi-classical and classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the reactions CN + propane (R1) and CN + cyclohexane (R2). For (R2), we carried out simulations in both the gas phase and in a CH2Cl2 solvent. Analysis of the results suggests that the solvent perturbations to the (R2) reactive free energy surface are small, leading to product energy partitioning in the solvent that is similar to the gas phase. The distribution of molecular geometries at the respective gas and solution phase variational association transition states is very similar, leading to nascent HCN which is vibrationally excited in both its CH stretching and HCN bending coordinates. This study highlights the fact that significant non-equilibrium energy distributions may follow in the wake of solution phase bimolecular reactions, and may persist for hundreds of picoseconds despite frictional damping. Consideration of non-thermal distributions is often neglected in descriptions of condensed-phase reactivity; the extent to which the present intriguing observations are widespread remains an interesting question.

  9. Measuring and predicting sooting tendencies of oxygenates, alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics on a unified scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Dhrubajyoti D.; St. John, Peter C.; McEnally, Charles S.; Kim, Seonah; Pfefferle, Lisa D.

    2018-04-01

    Databases of sooting indices, based on measuring some aspect of sooting behavior in a standardized combustion environment, are useful in providing information on the comparative sooting tendencies of different fuels or pure compounds. However, newer biofuels have varied chemical structures including both aromatic and oxygenated functional groups, which expands the chemical space of relevant compounds. In this work, we propose a unified sooting tendency database for pure compounds, including both regular and oxygenated hydrocarbons, which is based on combining two disparate databases of yield-based sooting tendency measurements in the literature. Unification of the different databases was made possible by leveraging the greater dynamic range of the color ratio pyrometry soot diagnostic. This unified database contains a substantial number of pure compounds (greater than or equal to 400 total) from multiple categories of hydrocarbons important in modern fuels and establishes the sooting tendencies of aromatic and oxygenated hydrocarbons on the same numeric scale for the first time. Using this unified sooting tendency database, we have developed a predictive model for sooting behavior applicable to a broad range of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons. The model decomposes each compound into single-carbon fragments and assigns a sooting tendency contribution to each fragment based on regression against the unified database. The model's predictive accuracy (as demonstrated by leave-one-out cross-validation) is comparable to a previously developed, more detailed predictive model. The fitted model provides insight into the effects of chemical structure on soot formation, and cases where its predictions fail reveal the presence of more complicated kinetic sooting mechanisms. This work will therefore enable the rational design of low-sooting fuel blends from a wide range of feedstocks and chemical functionalities.

  10. Insertion of singlet chlorocarbenes across C–H bonds in alkanes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    stry3 and in gas phase combustion.4,5 Regarding the stability the large σ – pπ separation6–8 and inductive/ mesomeric effects make the halocarbenes more stable .... to the enthalpy due to internal energy. All the reaction enthalpies show the exothermicity of the insertion reactions indicating that all the tran-. Table 2. Heat of ...

  11. Oxidation of gem-chloronitroso-and vic-chloronitroso-alkanes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chloronitro derivatives are formed in moderate yields, because of the propensity of the vic-chloronitroso group to tautomerize to -chlorooxime. The present method is simple and practical, particularly for the preparation of vic-chloronitro compounds, ...

  12. Alkanes and terpenes in wood and leaves of Pinus jeffreyi and P. sabiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Adams; Jessica W. Wright

    2012-01-01

    The wood oils of Pinus jeffreyi and P. sabiniana contain considerable amounts of heptane (76.6%, 92%), on a monoterpene basis. However, when entire wood extractables is considered, the amounts drop considerably (3.4%, 36.8%) with the major portion of the wood oils being diterpene acids. The leaf oil of P. jeffreyi...

  13. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Punyu, V.R.; Harji, R.R.; Bhosle, N.B.; Sawant, S.S.; Venkat, K.

    Origin and alteration of oils and oil seeps from the Sinu-San Jacinto Basin, Colombia; Org. Geochem. 37 1831–1845. Shi H, Zhang L, Yue L and Zheng G 2008 Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in surface sediments of Beiluohe Basins, China; Bull. Environ...

  14. Transition between scanning tunneling microscopy images of alkane derivatives on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibino, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAMs of dialkyl sulfides form at the liquid–graphite interface. • STM contrast of molecules change reversibly between zigzag and aligned bright spot patterns. • The free energy for contrast change is smaller than the thermal energy (RT). • STM contrast change is caused by electronic effects and registry of the alkyl chains. - Abstract: Self-assembled monolayers of alkylated sulfides containing two alkyl chains and a sulfur atom positioned at the center of the molecules were studied on a graphite surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). STM images of the closed-packed alkyl chains that extend linearly from the sulfur atoms change reversibly between a zigzag pattern and an aligned bright spot pattern on a time scale of minutes. The observation times of the zigzag and aligned bright spot patterns indicate that the difference between the free energies of these two stable molecular configurations with respect to the graphite surface is smaller than their thermal energies in the presence of a solvent, and 10 times smaller than the theoretical free energy between parallel and perpendicular configurations of the alkyl chains on graphite under vacuum. The change in the contrast of the STM images occurred owing to the electronic effects that depend on the registry of the alkyl chains on the graphite surface, and not by the classical observation of transfer between parallel and perpendicular orientations of alkyl chains on the surface.

  15. Aromatization of alkanes over Pt promoted conventional and mesoporous gallosilicates of MEL zeolite

    KAUST Repository

    Akhtar, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    Aromatization of hexane and propane was investigated over Pt promoted mesoporous gallium-containing HZSM-11 with controlled mesoporosity generated by desilication. Prepared catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared of chemisorbed pyridine, and NH 3 temperature programmed desorption confirming the development of intracrystalline mesoporosity of Ga-containing HZSM-11. The catalytic activities, which were compared in the aromatization of n-hexane and propane, increased upon desilication. The aromatization of n-hexane decreased in the following order, Pt/mesoporous GaZSM-11 Pt/conventional GaZSM-11 mesoporous GaZSM-11 > conventional GaZSM-11. Hexane conversion reached 70.1% over mesoporous Pt/GaZSM-11 with Si/Ga of 61, as compared with 29.6 and 24.9% for corresponding mesoporous and conventional GaZSM-11 (Si/Ga = 94), respectively, for experiments at liquid hour space velocity of 3.6 h -1, and 540 °C. Comparison of BTX (benzene-toluene-xylene) selectivity at the conversion level of ∼21.0% revealed that Pt/mesoporous GaZSM-11 is more selective than corresponding mesoporous and conventional GaZSM-11. The BTX selectivity over Pt/mesoporous GaZSM-11 (Si/Ga = 94), which showed strong dependence on the conversion, reached 28.2%, whereas over corresponding mesoporous and conventional GaZSM-11catalysts reached 19.1% and 5.5%, respectively. A higher conversion and better selectivity can be attributed to the improved accessibility to the active extra-framework Ga species owing to the generation of mesopores inside the zeolite particles and shortening the contact time. It is worth mentioning that the prepared catalysts exhibited quite low activity in propane aromatization but exhibiting similar trends as for hexane aromatization. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. QSAR models for predicting in vivo aquatic toxicity of chlorinated alkanes to fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvinavashe, E.; Berg, H. van den; Soffers, A.E.M.F.; Vervoort, J.; Freidig, A.; Murk, A.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are expected to play a crucial role in reducing the number of animals to be used for toxicity testing resulting from the adoption of the new European Union chemical control system called Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of

  17. Effects of methyl substitution on the auto-ignition of C16 alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Lapuerta, Magín

    2015-12-18

    The auto-ignition quality of diesel fuels, quantified by their cetane number or derived cetane number (DCN), is a critical design property to consider when producing and upgrading synthetic paraffinic fuels. It is well known that auto-ignition characteristics of paraffinic fuels depend on their degree of methyl substitution. However, there remains a need to study the governing chemical functionalities contributing to such ignition characteristics, especially in the case of methyl substitutions, which have not been studied in detail. In this work, the auto-ignition of 2,6,10-trimethyltridecane has been compared with the reference hydrocarbons used for cetane number determination, i.e. n-hexadecane and heptamethylnonane, all of them being C16 isomers. Results from a constant-volume combustion chamber under different pressure and temperature initial conditions showed that the ignition delay time for both cool flame and main combustion events increased less from n-hexadecane to trimethyltridecane than from trimethyltridecane to heptamethylnonane. Additional experimental results from blends of these hydrocarbons, together with kinetic modelling, showed that auto-ignition times and combustion rates were correlated to the concentration of the functional groups indicative of methyl substitution, although not in a linear manner. When the concentration of these functional groups decreased, the first stage OH radical concentration increased and ignition delay times decreased, whereas when their concentration increased, H2O2 production was slower and ignition was retarded. Contrary to the ignition delay times, DCN was correlated linearly with functional groups, thus homogenizing the range of values and clarifying the differences between fuels.

  18. Selective alkane activation with single-site atoms on amorphous support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Adam S.; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hu, Bo

    2015-11-24

    The present invention relates generally to catalysts and methods for use in olefin production. More particularly, the present invention relates to novel amorphously supported single-center, Lewis acid metal ions and use of the same as catalysts.

  19. Oxidative conversion of light alkanes to olefins over alkali promoted oxide catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leveles, L.; Fuchs, S.; Fuchs, Stefan; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lercher, J.A.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2002-01-01

    Alkali promoted mixed oxides were studied as catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) and cracking of butane and propane. Olefin yields as high as 50% were obtained with Li/MgO-based catalysts. Magnesia-based catalysts showed higher activity for olefin production than catalysts based on

  20. Production of medium-chain, a, omega-bifunctional monomers from fatty acids and n-alkanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuland, Youri M.

    2017-01-01

    In chapter 1, we give an introduction to bifunctional monomers that play an important role in the chemical industry. Briefly, the conventional production processes of α,ω-dicarboxylic acids and α,ω-diols are discussed. Strategies for more sustainable

  1. Anaerobic microbial transformation of chlorinated alkanes in cultures derived from Besòs River estuary sediments /

    OpenAIRE

    Mortan, Siti Hatijah,

    2017-01-01

    Els compostos orgànics halogenats (organohalogenats) són recalcitrants i presenten efectes tòxics per la salut humana i l'ecosistema. A partir d'uns sediments de la desembocadura del riu Besòs (Barcelona, Espanya) es va establir un cultiu anaerobi estable i no metanogènic que exclusivament dehalogenava cloro- i bromoalcans que tenen els àtoms d'halògens en carbonis adjacents via dihaloeliminació. L'aplicació de cebadors específics derivats a partir del gen 16rRNA de diferents bacteris dehalor...

  2. A Low Concentration of Tacrolimus/Semifluorinated Alkane (SFA) Eyedrop Suppresses Intraocular Inflammation in Experimental Models of Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Majumdar, S; Subinya, M; Korward, J; Pettigrew, A; Scherer, D; Xu, H

    2017-01-01

    Corticosteroids remain the mainstay therapy for uveitis, a major cause of blindness in the working age population. However, a substantial number of patients cannot benefit from the therapy due to steroids resistance or intolerance. Tacrolimus has been used to treat refractory uveitis through systemic administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of 0.03% tacrolimus eyedrop in mouse models of uveitis. 0.03% tacrolimus in perfluorobutylpentane (F4H5) (0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA) was formulated using a previously published protocol. Tacrolimus suspended in PBS (0.03% Tacrolimus/PBS) was used as a control. In addition, 0.1% dexamethasone (0.1% DXM) was used as a standard therapy control. Endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) and experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) were induced in adult C57BL/6 mice using protocols described previously. Mice were treated with eyedrops three times/day immediately after EIU induction for 48 h or from day 14 to day 25 post-immunization (for EAU). Clinical and histological examinations were conducted at the end of the experiment. Pharmacokinetics study was conducted in mice with and without EIU. At different times after eyedrop treatment, ocular tissues were collected for tacrolimus measurement. The 0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA eyedrop treatment reduced the clinical scores and histological scores of intraocular inflammation in both EIU and EAU to the levels similar to 0.1% DXM eyedrop treatment. The 0.03% Tacrolimus/PBS did not show any suppressive effect in EIU and EAU. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that 15 min after topical administration of 0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA, low levels of tacrolimus were detected in the retina (48 ng/g tissue) and vitreous (2.5 ng/ml) in normal mouse eyes, and the levels were significantly higher in EIU eyes (102 ng/g tissue in the retina and 24 ng/ml in the vitreous). Tacrolimus remained detectable in intraocular tissues of EIU eyes 6 h after topical administration (68 ng/g retinal tissue, 10 ng/ml vitreous). Only background levels of tacrolimus were detected in the retina (2-8 ng/g tissue) after 0.03% Tacrolimus/PBS eyedrop administration. 0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA eyedrop can penetrate ocular barrier and reach intraocular tissue at therapeutic levels in mouse eyes, particularly under inflammatory conditions. 0.03% Tacrolimus/SFA eyedrop may have therapeutic potentials for inflammatory eye diseases including uveitis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Poisoning Experiments Aimed at Discriminating Active and Less-Active Sites of Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydride for Alkane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Saggio, Guillaume

    2010-10-04

    Only 50% of the silica-supported tantalum hydride sites are active in the metathesis of propane. Indeed, more than 45% of the tantalum hydride can be eliminated by a selective oxygen poisoning of inactive sites with no significant decrease in the global turnover. Conversely, cyclopentane induces no such selective poisoning. Hence, the active tantalum hydride sites that show greater resistance to oxygen poisoning correspond to the νTa-H bands of higher wavenumbers, particularly that at 1860cm-1. These active tantalum hydride sites should correspond to tris- or monohydride species relatively far from silica surface oxygen atoms. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The C32 alkane-1,15-diol as a tracer for riverine input in coastal seas

    OpenAIRE

    Lattaud, J.; Kim, J.-H; de Jonge, C.; Zell, C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2017-01-01

    Long chain alkyl diols are lipids that occur ubiquitously in marine sediments and are used as a proxy for sea surface temperature (SST), using the Long chain Diol Index (LDI), and for upwelling intensity/high nutrient conditions. The distribution of 1,13- and 1,15-diols has been documented in open marine and lacustrine sediments and suspended particulate matter, but rarely in coastal seas receiving a significant riverine, and thus continental organic matter, input. Here we studied the distrib...

  5. Towards quantitative accuracy in first-principles transport calculations: The GW method applied to alkane/gold junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of the electronic conductance of nanoscale junctions from first principles is a long-standing problem in the field of charge transport. Here we demonstrate excellent agreement with experiments for the transport properties of the gold/alkanediamine benchmark system when electron......-electron interactions are described by th=e many-body GW approximation. The conductance follows an exponential length dependence: Gn = Gc exp(-βn). The main difference from standard density functional theory (DFT) calculations is a significant reduction of the contact conductance, Gc, due to an improved alignment...

  6. Experimental determination and prediction of (solid+liquid) phase equilibria for binary mixtures of heavy alkanes and fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziane, Mokhtar; Khimeche, Kamel; Dahmani, Abdellah; Nezar, Sawsen; Trache, Djalal

    2012-06-01

    Solid-liquid equilibria for three binary mixtures, n-Eicosane (1) + Lauric acid (2), n-Tetracosane (1) + Stearic acid (2), and n-Octacosane (1) + Palmitic acid (2), were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter. Simple eutectic behaviour was observed for these systems. The experimental results were correlated by means of the modified UNIFAC (Larsen and Gmehling versions), UNIQUAC and ideal models. The root-mean-square deviations of the solubility temperatures for all measured data vary from 0.26 to 3.15 K and depend on the particular model used. The best solubility correlation was obtained with the UNIQUAC model.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M., E-mail: chris.macdermaid@temple.edu; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.fiorin@temple.edu [Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Temple University, 1925 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122-1801 (United States); Kashyap, Hemant K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); DeVane, Russell H. [Modeling and Simulation, Corporate Research and Development, The Procter and Gamble Company, West Chester, Ohio 45069 (United States); Shinoda, Wataru [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Klauda, Jeffery B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  8. Alcanivorax dieselolei, an alkane-degrading bacterium associated with the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum (Cnidaria, Anthozoa)

    OpenAIRE

    Campos,FF.; Garcia,JE.; Luna-Finkler,CL.; Davolos,CC.; Lemos,MVF.; Pérez,CD.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of 16S rDNA genes were used to identify the microbiota isolated from the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum at Porto de Galinhas on the coast of Pernambuco State, Brazil. This study is important as the first report of this association, because of the potential biotechnological applications of the bacterium Alcanivorax dieselolei, and as evidence for the presence of a hydrocarbon degrading bacterium in a reef ecosystem such as Porto de Galinhas.

  9. Alcanivorax dieselolei, an alkane-degrading bacterium associated with the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum (Cnidaria, Anthozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F F; Garcia, J E; Luna-Finkler, C L; Davolos, C C; Lemos, M V F; Pérez, C D

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of 16S rDNA genes were used to identify the microbiota isolated from the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum at Porto de Galinhas on the coast of Pernambuco State, Brazil. This study is important as the first report of this association, because of the potential biotechnological applications of the bacterium Alcanivorax dieselolei, and as evidence for the presence of a hydrocarbon degrading bacterium in a reef ecosystem such as Porto de Galinhas.

  10. Influence of Pt nanoparticles modified by La and Ce oxides on catalytic dehydrocyclization of n-alkanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Samia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic reforming accounts for a large share of the world’s gasoline production, it is the most important source of aromatics for the petrochemical industry. In addition, reforming of hydrocarbon on the dual-function catalysts has been found to form fundamentally different products in hydrogen diluents. Typical catalysts employed for this reforming process are Pt/Al2O3 and Pt-M/Al2O3, M being the promoter. These solids are characterized by both acid and metal functions which catalyze dehydrocyclization, dehydrogenation, isomerization and cracking processes. In this regard, information about cerium and lanthanum, as promoters, is hardly revealed. The present work aims to study the performance of Pt/Al2O3 catalysts modified by lanthanum or cerium during the conversion of cyclohexane, n-hexane and n-heptane. Catalytic activities of the prepared catalysts were tested using a micro catalytic pulse technique. Physicochemical characterization of the solid catalysts such as, surface area (SBET, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, hydrogen-temperature programed reduction (H2-TPR, hydrogen-temperature-programed desorption (H2-TPD, CO2-TPD, NH3-TPD, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD were depicted. Results indicated clearly that Pt/Al2O3 catalyst is selective toward dehydrogenation to benzene which could be explained as due to the decrease in the active acid sites and the comparative segregation of the alumina support especially at 3% load of CeO. The presence of La2O3 in the Pt/Al2O3 catalyst promotes aromatization of n-hexane and n-heptane, also the dehydrocyclization of n-hexane is more difficult than that of n-heptane. Thus, modification of the Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by La, resulted in a more active and selective reforming catalyst.

  11. Effects of Oriented Surface Dipole on Photoconversion Efficiency in an Alkane/Lipid-Hybrid-Bilayer-Based Photovoltaic Model System

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lixia

    2013-06-21

    When a phospholipid monolayer containing a zinc-coordinated porphyrin species formed atop a self-assembled monolayer of heptadecafluoro-1-decanethiol (CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2SH) is subjected to photoelectrochemical current generation, a significant modulation effect is observed. Compared with devices that contain similar photoactive lipid monolayers but formed on 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, these fluorinated hybrid bilayers produce a >60 % increase in cathodic currents and a similar decrease in anodic currents. Photovoltages recorded from these hybrid bilayers are found to vary in the same fashion. The modulation of photovoltaic responses in these hybrid-bilayer-based devices is explained by the opposite surface dipoles associated with the thiols employed in this study, which in one case (fluorothiol) increase and in another (alkanethiol) decrease the work function of the underlying gold substrates. A similar trend of photovoltage/photocurrent modulation is also observed if fullerene is used as the photoagent in these devices. Our results reveal the intricacy of orientated surface dipole in influencing the photovoltaic processes, and its subtle interplay with other factors related to the photoagents, such as their location and orientation within the organic matrix. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes in the gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions and neutralization mechanisms of hydrocarbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the fate of unreactive hydrocarbon ions in various selected gaseous systems. It is shown that experiments performed with the high radiation dose rates obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments have several advantages over conventional low dose rate experiments for the elucidation of the mechanism of homogeneous neutralization of unreactive hydrocarbon ions. This is so because the charged species has a much shorter lifetime with respect to neutralization under high dose rate (pulse radiolysis) conditions, so that the reaction of the ions with minor impurities or accumulated products is much less probable than in low dose rate experiments. It is further shown through a few examples, that quantitative information about the rate contants of neutralization events and ion-molecule reactions can be obtained when the dose rate is high enough for neutralization and chemical reaction to be in competition. Once reliable rate constants for neutralization and ion-molecule reactions are derived, one can obtain a quantitative evaluation of the products which will by formed in the pulse radiolysis of a hydrocarbon gas mixture from a computer calculation. (author)

  13. Hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain alkanes and polyolefins over metal-promoted anion-modified transition metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, Koppampatti R.; Hu, Jianli; Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving

    1996-12-01

    A method is described for cracking a feedstock by contacting the feedstock with a metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst in the presence of hydrogen gas. The metal oxide of the catalyst is one or more of ZrO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2}, and the feedstock is principally chains of at least 20 carbon atoms. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of Pt, Ni, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, (Mn and Fe) or mixtures of them present between about 0.2% to about 15% by weight of the catalyst. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of SO{sub 4}, WO{sub 3}, or mixtures of them present between about 0.5% to about 20% by weight of the catalyst.

  14. Alcanivorax dieselolei, an alkane-degrading bacterium associated with the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum (Cnidaria, Anthozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FF. Campos

    Full Text Available Analyses of 16S rDNA genes were used to identify the microbiota isolated from the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum at Porto de Galinhas on the coast of Pernambuco State, Brazil. This study is important as the first report of this association, because of the potential biotechnological applications of the bacterium Alcanivorax dieselolei, and as evidence for the presence of a hydrocarbon degrading bacterium in a reef ecosystem such as Porto de Galinhas.

  15. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictions of homogeneous nucleation rates for n-alkanes accounting for the diffuse phase interface and capillary waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Planková, Barbora; Vinš, Václav; Hrubý, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 16 (2017), č. článku 164702. ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14466; GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-07129Y Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : nucleation * classical nucleation theory * density gradient theory Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics OBOR OECD: Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2016

  17. Isolation, characterization and antifungal activity of very long chain alkane derivatives from Cinnamomum obtusifolium, Elaeocarpus lanceifolius and Baccaurea sapida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Manobjyoti; Saikia, Surovi; Bordoloi, Prasanta K.; Kolita, Bhaskor; Dutta, Partha P.; Bhuyan, Purnajyoti D.; Dutta, Subhas C.; Rao, Paruchuri G.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize bioactive secondary metabolites from the flora of the Indo-Burma biodiversity belt for controlling leaf blight disease of Solanum khasianum Clarke (Solanaceae) caused by Alternaria tenuissima and Alternaria alternata during commercial cultivation, the berries of which contains 1.80-3.45% solasodine, a major raw material for steroid drug industries. Three new and two white powdered compounds were extracted from Cinnamomum obtusifolium (Roxb.) Nees (Lauraceae), Elaeocarpus lanceifolius (Roxb.) (Elaeocarpaceae) and Baccaurea sapida (Roxb.) Mull. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae). New compounds were characterized as Triacontanoic acid (1), octatriacontan-1-ol (2) and dotriacontane (3) isolated from C. obtusfolium and E. lanceofolius by 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopy respectively. Other two known compounds were palmitic acid (4) and oleic acid (5) and from B. sapida. Complete inhibition of pathogenic fungi A.tenuissima and A. alternata were observed for compound 2 and 3. Further, in-silico molecular binding analysis of these compounds towards endopolygalacturonase, β-isopropyl dehydrogenase, plasma membrane ATPase, calmodulin, ACR-toxin biosynthesis hydroxylase and synthatase peptide (transcription regulator of Amt-gene) of A. tenuissima and A.alternata revealed that they are effective in inhibiting multiple targets. The antifungal potential of three new isolated compounds from C. obtusifolium and E. lanceifolius is reported for the first time. The results indicate the possible use of triacontanoic acid, octatriacontan-1-ol and dotriacontane as potential antifungal agents.

  18. Flame chemistry of alkane-rich gasoline fuels and a surrogate using photoionization mass spectrometry: I. Primary reference fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Selim, H.

    2015-03-30

    Improving the gasoline engines performance requires thorough understanding of their fundamental chemistry of combustion. Since the actual gasoline fuels are difficult to examine, due to the lack of knowledge about their exact composition as well as their numerous fuel components, the approach of using simpler gasoline fuels with limited number of components or using surrogate fuels has become more common. In this study, the combustion chemistry of laminar premixed flame of different gasoline fuels/surrogate has been examined. In this particular paper, the primary reference fuel, PRF84, has been examined at equivalence ratio of 1 and pressure of 20 Torr. The gas analysis was conducted using vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry.

  19. Sieving di-branched from mono-branched and linear alkanes using ZIF-8: experimental proof and theoretical explanation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, A.F.P.; Mittelmeijer-Hazeleger, M.C.; Granato, M.A.; Duarte Martins, V.F.; Rodrigues, A.E.; Rothenberg, G.

    2013-01-01

    We study the adsorption equilibrium isotherms and differential heats of adsorption of hexane isomers on the zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-8. The studies are carried out at 373 K using a manometric set-up combined with a micro-calorimeter. We see that the Langmuir model describes well the

  20. Gas-phase models for catalysis: Alkane activation and olefin epoxidation by the triatomic cation Ag2O+

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, Jana; Schröder, Detlef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 129, č. 49 (2007), s. 15311-15318 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400550704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : C-H activation * density functional theory * epoxidation * hydrogen abstraction * oxide clusters Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.885, year: 2007