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Sample records for alkaloids chemistry bioactivity

  1. Bioactive acridone alkaloids from Swinglea glutinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weniger, B; Um, B H; Valentin, A; Estrada, A; Lobstein, A; Anton, R; Maillé, M; Sauvain, M

    2001-09-01

    A new prenylated acridone alkaloid, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2,8-bis(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-10-methyl-9-acridone (1), was isolated from the stembark of Swinglea glutinosa, along with three known acridone alkaloids, 5-hydroxynoracronycine (2), 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-2-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-10-methyl-9-acridone (3), and 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-10-methylacridone (4). The isolated alkaloids were assessed in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains and for cytotoxicity using HeLa cells. PMID:11575960

  2. Bioactive alkaloids in vertically transmitted fungal endophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants form mutualistic symbioses with a variety of microorganisms, including endophytic fungi that live inside the plant and cause no symptoms of infection. Some endophytic fungi form defensive mutualisms based on the production of bioactive metabolites that protect the plant from herbivores in exc...

  3. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades. PMID:26821033

  4. Bioactive heterocyclic alkaloids with diterpene structure isolated from traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tengfei; Liu, Shu; Meng, Lulu; Pi, Zifeng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2016-07-15

    The diterpenoid alkaloids as one type of heterocyclic alkaloids have been found in many traditional herbal medicines, such as genus Consolida, Aconitum, and Delphinium (Ranunculaceae). Pharmacological researches have indicated that many diterpenoid alkaloids are the main bioactive components which have analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-tumor, cardiotonic, and anti-arrhythmic activities. Studies focused on the determination, quantitation and pharmacological properties of these alkaloids have dramatically increased during the past few years. Up to now, newly discovered diterpenoid alkaloids with important biological activities have been isolated and synthesized. Considering their significant role and diffusely used in many disease treatments, we summarized the information of their analysis methods, bioactivity, metabolism and biotransformation in vivo as well as the pharmacological mechanisms. Based on above review, the further researches are suggested.

  5. Naphthylisoquinoline Alkaloids : Structural Elucidation, Metabolism and Functional Analysis of their Bioactivities

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Johan Henrik

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with the isolation and structural elucidation of bioactive naphthylisoquinoline alkaloids and related analogs. The mode of action of the antiplasmodial activity exhibited by the naphthylisoquinoline alkaloids was explored and compared to that of the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Furthermore, the phase 1 and 2 metabolism of dioncophyllines A and C and dioncopeltine A were investigated. In detail the following results have been obtained: • From the leaves of the recently disc...

  6. Design and synthesis of de novo cytotoxic alkaloids by mimicking the bioactive conformation of paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Liang; Veith, Jean M.; Pera, Paula; Bernacki, Ralph J.; Ojima, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    Novel paclitaxel-mimicking alkaloids were designed and synthesized based on a bioactive conformation of paclitaxel, i.e., REDOR-Taxol. The alkaloid 2 bearing a 5-7-6 tricyclic scaffold mimics REDOR-Taxol best among the compounds designed and was found to be the most potent compound against several drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human cancer cell lines. MD simulation study on the paclitaxel mimics 1 and 2 as well as REDOR-Taxol bound to the 1JFF tubulin structure was quite informative to ev...

  7. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Alois Plodek; Franz Bracher

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids...

  8. Bioactive 2(1H-Pyrazinones and Diketopiperazine Alkaloids from a Tunicate-Derived Actinomycete Streptomyces sp.

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    Lamiaa A. Shaala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As a part of our ongoing effort to allocate marine microbial bioactive leads, a tunicate-derived actinomycete, Streptomyces sp. Did-27, was investigated. Three new 2(1H-pyrazinones derivatives, (S-6-(sec-butyl-3-isopropylpyrazin-2(1H-one (1, (S-3-(sec-butyl-6-isopropylpyrazin-2(1H-one (2 and (S-6-(sec-butyl-3-isobutylpyrazin-2(1H-one (3, together with the known (1H-pyrazinones analogues deoxymutaaspergillic acid (4, 3,6-diisobutyl-2(1H-pyrazinone (5 and 3,6-di-sec-butyl-2(1H-pyrazinone (6, and the diketopiperazine alkaloids cyclo(6-OH-d-Pro-l-Phe (7, bacillusamide B (8, cyclo(l-Pro-l-Leu and cyclo(l-Pro-l-Ile (10 were isolated from this strain. The structures of the compounds were determined by study of their one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra as well as high-resolution mass spectral determinations. Compound 4 was reported previously as a synthetic product, while compound 6 was reported as 2-hydroxy-3,6-di-sec-butylpyrazine. Herein, we report the complete NMR data for compounds 4 and 6. The compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against three cell lines. Compound 5 showed potent and selective activity against HCT-116 cell line with IC50 of 1.5 μg/mL, while 1–10 showed variable cytotoxic activities against these cancer cell lines. These results provide further understanding about the chemistry and bioactivities of the alkylated 2(1H-pyrazinone derivatives.

  9. CRINUM; AN ENDLESS SOURCE OF BIOACTIVE PRINCIPLES: A REVIEW. PART 1- CRINUM ALKALOIDS: LYCORINE-TYPE ALKALOIDS

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    John Refaat*, Mohamed S. Kamel , Mahmoud A. Ramadan and Ahmed A. Ali

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Crinum is an important Amaryllidaceous plant thanks to the valuable biological and therapeutic activities of its chemical constituents, especially alkaloids. Many Crinum species have been commonly used in traditional medicines worldwide. Long ago, they have been subjected to extensive chemical, cytological and pharmacological investigations. Accordingly, this work comprehensively comprises both the alkaloidal and non-alkaloidal principles of Crinums isolated from 1950 and up to now, together with various biological and toxicological studies conducted on both the total extracts and individual compounds. As being a major common class of Crinum alkaloids, the current part of this review work highlights the lycorine-type alkaloids isolated so far from this plant in addition to their distribution in different Crinum species.

  10. Workers and alate queens of Solenopsis geminata share qualitatively similar but quantitatively different venom alkaloid chemistry

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    Qun-Hui eShi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Solenopsis geminata group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae encompasses ant species commonly called fire ants because of their painful sting. The many physiological effects of the venom are caused by 2-methyl-6-alkyl and/or alkenylpiperidine alkaloids. The variation in piperidine alkaloid structures has useful taxonomic characters. The most well studied Solenopsis species is S. invicta, which was accidentally imported into the USA in the 1930s from South America. It quickly spread throughout the southern USA and is now a major invasive pest ant in the USA and in other parts of the world. Interestingly, the invasive S. invicta has largely displaced a native USA fire ant, S. geminata, from the southern USA. We explore the possibility that differences in venom chemistry could be correlated with this displacement. The cis and trans alkaloids from body extracts of workers and alate queens of S. geminata were separated by silica gel chromatography, identified, and quantitated by GC-MS analysis. Both workers and alate queens produce primarily cis- and trans-2-methyl-6-n-undecyl-piperidines, as well as other minor alkaloid components. Imported fire ant, S. invicta, alate queens produce the same alkaloids as S. geminata alate queens, but in contrast S. invicta workers produce piperidine alkaloids with longer side chains, which are purported to be physiologically more effective. These results are discussed in relation to the evolutionary progression of fire ant venom alkaloids and displacement of S. geminata by S. invicta in the USA.

  11. Bioactive Hydantoin Alkaloids from the Red Sea Marine Sponge Hemimycale arabica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Diaa T A; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Alshali, Khalid Z

    2015-10-28

    In the course of our continuing efforts to identify bioactive secondary metabolites from Red Sea marine invertebrates, we have investigated the sponge Hemimycale arabica. The antimicrobial fraction of an organic extract of the sponge afforded two new hydantoin alkaloids, hemimycalins A and B (2 and 3), together with the previously reported compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (1). The structures of the compounds were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) studies and high-resolution mass spectral determinations. Hemimycalins A (2) and B (3) represent the first examples of the natural N-alkylated hydantoins from the sponge Hemimycale arabica. Compounds 1-3 displayed variable antimicrobial activities against E. coli, S. aureus, and C. albicans. In addition, compound 1 displayed moderate antiproliferative activity against the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell line. These findings provide further insight into the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of this class of compounds.

  12. Bioactive Hydantoin Alkaloids from the Red Sea Marine Sponge Hemimycale arabica

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    Diaa T. A. Youssef

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of our continuing efforts to identify bioactive secondary metabolites from Red Sea marine invertebrates, we have investigated the sponge Hemimycale arabica. The antimicrobial fraction of an organic extract of the sponge afforded two new hydantoin alkaloids, hemimycalins A and B (2 and 3, together with the previously reported compound (Z-5-(4-hydroxybenzylideneimidazolidine-2,4-dione (1. The structures of the compounds were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC and HMBC studies and high-resolution mass spectral determinations. Hemimycalins A (2 and B (3 represent the first examples of the natural N-alkylated hydantoins from the sponge Hemimycale arabica. Compounds 1–3 displayed variable antimicrobial activities against E. coli, S. aureus, and C. albicans. In addition, compound 1 displayed moderate antiproliferative activity against the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa cell line. These findings provide further insight into the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of this class of compounds.

  13. Reviewing colchicaceae alkaloids – perspectives of evolution on medicinal chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Sonny; Rønsted, Nina

    2014-01-01

    . In this review an approach of taking phylogenetic classification into account in evaluating colchicine and related phenethylisoquinoline alkaloids from the family Colchicaceae will be applied. Following on the trends of utilizing evolutionary reasoning in inferring mechanisms in eg. drug resistance in cancer...... and infections, this will exemplify how thinking about evolution can influence selection of plant material in drug lead discovery, and how knowledge about phylogenetic relationships may be used to evaluate predicted biosynthetic pathways...

  14. Reviewing Colchicaceae Alkaloids – Perspectives of Evolution on Medicinal Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Sonny; Rønsted, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The subject of chemosystematics has provided insight to both botanical classification and drug development. However, degrees of subjectivity in botanical classifications and limited understanding of the evolution of chemical characters and their biosynthetic pathways has often hampered such studies. In this review an approach of taking phylogenetic classification into account in evaluating colchicine and related phenethylisoquinoline alkaloids from the family Colchicaceae will be applied. Fol...

  15. Chemistry and Functionality of Bioactive Compounds Present in Persimmon

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    Shazia Yaqub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research has related the consumption of persimmon with the reduced risk of various diseases and particularly highlighted the presence of bioactive phenolic compounds for their therapeutic properties. Major phenolic compounds present in persimmon are ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and gallic acid. β-Cryptoxanthin, lycopene, β-carotene, zeaxanthin, and lutein are important carotenoids having antioxidant potential. They are important to prevent oxidation of low-density lipoproteins, safeguard beta cells of the pancreas, and reduce cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and damage caused by chronic alcohol consumption. In this paper, the chemistry and health benefits of bioactive compounds present in persimmon are reviewed to encourage impending applications and to facilitate further research activities.

  16. Changes in plant defense chemistry (pyrrolizidine alkaloids) revealed through high-resolution spectroscopy

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    Carvalho, Sabrina; Macel, Mirka; Schlerf, Martin; Moghaddam, Fatemeh Eghbali; Mulder, Patrick P. J.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2013-06-01

    Plant toxic biochemicals play an important role in defense against natural enemies and often are toxic to humans and livestock. Hyperspectral reflectance is an established method for primary chemical detection and could be further used to determine plant toxicity in the field. In order to make a first step for pyrrolizidine alkaloids detection (toxic defense compound against mammals and many insects) we studied how such spectral data can estimate plant defense chemistry under controlled conditions. In a greenhouse, we grew three related plant species that defend against generalist herbivores through pyrrolizidine alkaloids: Jacobaea vulgaris, Jacobaea erucifolia and Senecio inaequidens, and analyzed the relation between spectral measurements and chemical concentrations using multivariate statistics. Nutrient addition enhanced tertiary-amine pyrrolizidine alkaloids contents of J. vulgaris and J. erucifolia and decreased N-oxide contents in S. inaequidens and J. vulgaris. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids could be predicted with a moderate accuracy. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid forms tertiary-amines and epoxides were predicted with 63% and 56% of the variation explained, respectively. The most relevant spectral regions selected for prediction were associated with electron transitions and Csbnd H, Osbnd H, and Nsbnd H bonds in the 1530 and 2100 nm regions. Given the relatively low concentration in pyrrolizidine alkaloids concentration (in the order of mg g-1) and resultant predictions, it is promising that pyrrolizidine alkaloids interact with incident light. Further studies should be considered to determine if such a non-destructive method may predict changes in PA concentration in relation to plant natural enemies. Spectroscopy may be used to study plant defenses in intact plant tissues, and may provide managers of toxic plants, food industry and multitrophic-interaction researchers with faster and larger monitoring possibilities.

  17. Seasonal Variation of Bioactive Alkaloid Contents in Macleaya microcarpa (Maxim. Fedde

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    Jana Gregorová

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Macleaya microcarpa (Maxim. Fedde belongs to the genus Macleaya, family Papaveraceae. Together with the better known and more frequently studied species M. cordata (Willd. R. Br. it is a main source of quaternary benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids. Using HPLC we determined the content of eight isoquinoline alkaloids in the aerial and underground parts of 1-, 2-, 12- and 13-year old plants and followed their changes during the vegetative period. The dominant alkaloid of all samples collected in the end of this period was allocryptopine (3.8–13.6 mg/g for aerial parts, 24.2–48.9 mg/g for underground parts. Chelerythrine, sanguinarine and protopine were also present in both parts of the plant. Additionally, measurable concentrations of chelilutine (CL, chelirubine (CR, macarpine (MA and sanguirubine (SR were detected in underground parts. The most important finding was that contents of CR, CL, SR and MA in the 12- and 13-year old plant roots were significantly higher (approximately 3-fold for CR, 6-fold for CL, 5-fold for SR, and at least 14-fold for MA than in 1- or 2-year old plants. The proportion of individual alkaloids in aerial and underground parts thus changed significantly during the vegetative period.

  18. CRINUM; AN ENDLESS SOURCE OF BIOACTIVE PRINCIPLES: A REVIEW. PART IV: NON-ALKALOIDAL CONSTITUENTS

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    John Refaat *, Mohamed S. Kamel , Mahmoud A. Ramadan and Ahmed A. Ali

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Crinum is an important and fascinating genus of the large and equally captivating Amaryllidaceae family. Owing to the valuable biological effects and therapeutic potentials of its chemical constituents, many Crinum species have a worldwide folkloric reputation. Additionally, Crinum species have been subjected to extensive chemical, cytological and pharmacological investigations. The present part of our comprehensive review work on the phytochemical and biological studies conducted on Crinum plants reviews the non-alkaloidal principles isolated up till now in addition to their distribution in different Crinum species.

  19. A new benzophenanthridine alkaloid and other bioactive constituents from the stem bark of Zanthoxylum heitzii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, Helle; Ho, Giang Thanh Thi; Tadesse, Margey; Miles, Christopher O; Moussavi, Nastaran; Mikolo, Bertin; Malterud, Karl Egil

    2016-03-01

    Heitziquinone (7), a new benzophenanthridine alkaloid, together with five known compounds; isoarnottianamide (5), rhoifoline B (6), isobauerenol (8), 6-hydroxypellitorine (9) and sylvamide (10), were isolated as minor compounds from the hexane extract of stem bark from Zanthoxylum heitzii. Four previously reported compounds (1-4) were found, as well. Compounds 5 and 7 were both found to exist as 4:1 mixtures of two atropisomers. The structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. Compounds 5-10 were identified for the first time in this species, and they are all rare natural compounds. Pellitorine (4), one of the main compounds from the hexane bark extract, was found to be responsible for the brine shrimp larvae toxicity (LC50 37 μM, 8 μg/ml) of the crude extract (LC50 24 μg/ml). Low cytotoxicity against a macrophage cell line was observed. PMID:26802607

  20. Alkaloids in the pharmaceutical industry: Structure, isolation and application

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    Nikolić Milan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available By the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century a new era began in medicine, pharmaceutics and chemistry that was strongly connected with alkaloids and alkaloid drugs. Even before that it was known that certain drugs administered in limited doses were medicines, and toxic if taken in larger doses (opium, coke leaves, belladonna roots, monkshood tubers crocus or hemlock seeds. However, the identification, isolation and structural characterization of the active ingredients of the alkaloid drugs was only possible in the mid 20th century by the use of modern extraction equipment and instrumental methods (NMR, X-ray diffraction and others.In spite of continuing use over a long time, there is still great interest in investigating new drugs, potential raw materials for the pharmaceutical industry, as well as the more detailed investigation and definition of bio-active components and the indication of their activity range, and the partial synthesis of new alkaloid molecules based on natural alkaloids. The scope of these investigations, especially in the field of semi-synthesis is to make better use of the bio-active ingredients of alkaloid drugs, i.e. to improve the pharmacological effect (stronger and prolonged effect of the medicine, decreased toxicity and side effects, or to extend or change the applications. A combined classification of alkaloids was used, based on the chemical structure and origin, i.e. the source of their isolation to study alkaloid structure. For practical reasons, the following classification of alkaloids was used: ergot alkaloids, poppy alkaloids, tropanic alkaloids purine derivative alkaloids, carbon-cyclic alkaloids, and other alkaloids. The second part of this report presents a table of general procedures for alkaloid isolation from plant drugs (extraction by water non-miscible solvents, extraction by water-miscible solvents and extraction by diluted acid solutions. Also, methods for obtaining chelidonine and

  1. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and excretion studies of neotuberostemonine, a major bioactive alkaloid of Stemona tuberosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Ou, Liting; Han, Dong; Tong, Yongbin; Zhang, Mian; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Neotuberostemonine is a potent antitussive alkaloid extracted from Stemona tuberosa. However, the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of pure neotuberostemonine have not been reported. The present study was aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic parameters of neotuberostemonine by developing an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Neotuberostemonine and tetrahydropalmatine (internal standard, IS) in bio-samples were extracted by protein precipitation with methanol and successfully separated on a Zorbax Extend C18 column by using a mobile phase of acetonitrile and a mixture of 0.1% formic acid and 5mM ammonium acetate. The detection was performed by using positive ion electrospray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The MS/MS ion transitions were monitored at m/z 376.1→302.0 for neotuberostemonine and 355.8→192.0 for IS. After oral administration of neotuberostemonine in rats, the Cmax and AUC0-∞ were 11.37ng/mL and 17.68ng·h/mL at 20mg/kg and 137.6ng/mL and 167.4ng·h/mL at 40mg/kg, and the t1/2 were 2.28 and 3.04h at 20 and 40mg/kg, respectively. The high neotuberostemonine concentrations were found in intestine, stomach and liver, and there was no long-term accumulation of neotuberostemonine in tissues. Total recoveries of neotuberostemonine were only 0.90% (0.19% in bile, 0.05% in urine and 0.66% in feces), which might be resulted from the intestine and liver first-pass effects, indicating that neotuberostemonine may be mainly excreted as its metabolites. All above results would provide helpful information for the further pharmacological and clinical studies of neotuberostemonine and the crude drug. PMID:27179627

  2. Solvent-free microwave extraction of bioactive compounds provides a tool for green analytical chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ying LI; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Vian, Maryline; Chemat, Farid

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview on solvent-free microwave-extraction techniques of bioactive compounds from natural products. This new technique is based on the concept of green analytical chemistry. It has proved to be an alternative to other techniques with the advantages of reducing extraction times, energy consumption, solvent use and CO2 emissions.

  3. Alkaloids in Marine Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Ekrem Sezik; Aline Percot; Kasım Cemal Güven

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the alkaloids found in green, brown and red marine algae. Algal chemistry has interested many researchers in order to develop new drugs, as algae include compounds with functional groups which are characteristic from this particular source. Among these compounds, alkaloids present special interest because of their pharmacological activities. Alkaloid chemistry has been widely studied in terrestrial plants, but the number of studies in algae is insignificant. In this review...

  4. Bioactive substances

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.

    Chemistry related to certain bioactive molecules, from Indian Ocean Region, developed into drugs or which served as models for the synthesis of more effective bioactive substances or in use in fundamental studies of physiological and biochemical...

  5. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples. PMID:26717817

  6. Influence of strontium and the importance of glass chemistry and structure when designing bioactive glasses for bone regeneration.

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    O'Donnell, M D; Hill, R G

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight some recent in vitro and in vivo studies of bioactive glasses containing strontium and to review selected literature on the in vitro and in vivo behaviour of bioactive glasses to relate this to the structure of the glass. The strontium-glass studies were performed well scientifically, but the results and conclusions could be misleading in terms of the effect of strontium, or more broadly glass chemistry, on the bioactivity and in vivo behaviour of bioactive glasses due to substitutions made on a weight basis. When strontium is substituted by weight for a lighter element such as calcium this will have a significant effect on structure and properties in particular biological response. PMID:20079468

  7. Exploring Natural Product Chemistry and Biology with Multicomponent Reactions. 5. Discovery of a Novel Tubulin-Targeting Scaffold Derived from the Rigidin Family of Marine Alkaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Frolova, Liliya V.; Magedov, Igor V.; Romero, Anntherese E.; Karki, Menuka; Otero, Isaiah; Hayden, Kathryn; Evdokimov, Nikolai M.; Banuls, Laetitia Moreno Y; Rastogi, Shiva K.; Smith, W. Ross; Lu, Shi-Long; Kiss, Robert; Shuster, Charles B.; Hamel, Ernest; Betancourt, Tania

    2013-01-01

    We developed synthetic chemistry to access the marine alkaloid rigidins and over forty synthetic analogues based on the 7-deazaxanthine, 7-deazaadenine, 7-deazapurine and 7-deazahypoxanthine skeletons. Analogues based on the 7-deazahypoxanthine skeleton exhibited nanomolar potencies against cell lines representing cancers with dismal prognoses, tumor metastases and multidrug resistant cells. Studies aimed at elucidating the mode(s) of action of the 7-deazahypoxanthines in cancer cells reveale...

  8. An integrated strategy for the systematic characterization and discovery of new indole alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla by UHPLC/DAD/LTQ-Orbitrap-MS.

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    Pan, Huiqin; Yang, Wenzhi; Zhang, Yibei; Yang, Min; Feng, Ruihong; Wu, Wanying; Guo, Dean

    2015-08-01

    The exploration of new chemical entities from herbal medicines may provide candidates for the in silico screening of drug leads. However, this significant work is hindered by the presence of multiple classes of plant metabolites and many re-discovered structures. This study presents an integrated strategy that uses ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/linear ion-trap quadrupole/Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC/LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) coupled with in-house library data for the systematic characterization and discovery of new potentially bioactive molecules. Exploration of the indole alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) is presented as a model study. Initially, the primary characterization of alkaloids was achieved using mass defect filtering and neutral loss filtering. Subsequently, phytochemical isolation obtained 14 alkaloid compounds as reference standards, including a new one identified as 16,17-dihydro-O-demethylhirsuteine by NMR analyses. The direct-infusion fragmentation behaviors of these isolated alkaloids were studied to provide diagnostic structural information facilitating the rapid differentiation and characterization of four different alkaloid subtypes. Ultimately, after combining the experimental results with a survey of an in-house library containing 129 alkaloids isolated from the Uncaria genus, a total of 92 alkaloids (60 free alkaloids and 32 alkaloid O-glycosides) were identified or tentatively characterized, 56 of which are potential new alkaloids for the Uncaria genus. Hydroxylation on ring A, broad variations in the C-15 side chain, new N-oxides, and numerous O-glycosides, represent the novel features of the newly discovered indole alkaloid structures. These results greatly expand our knowledge of UR chemistry and are useful for the computational screening of potentially bioactive molecules from indole alkaloids. Graphical Abstract A four-step integrated strategy for the systematic characterization and efficient discovery of new indole

  9. Investigation of Aconitine-type Alkaloids from Processed Tuber of Aconitum carmiechaeli by HPLC-ESI-MS/MSn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Hao; PI Zi-feng; ZHAO Yu-feng; SONG Feng-rui; LIU Zhi-qiang; LIU Shu-ying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction Aconitine-type alkaloids isolated from the roots of Aconitum carmiechaeli show a potential toxicity and a broad spectrum of bioactivity[1-4]. On the basis of the C8-substituent of C19-diterpenoid skeleton, aconitinetype alkaloids can be divided into diester-diterpenoid alkaloids( DDAs), monoester-diterpenoid alkaloids(MDAs), and lipo-alkaloids( Fig. 1 ).

  10. A validated HPLC-PDA method for identification and quantification of two bioactive alkaloids, ephedrine and cryptolepine, in different Sida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Arnab; Kumar, Satyanshu; Chattopadhyay, Sunil K

    2013-12-01

    A simple, rapid, accurate and reproducible reverse-phase HPLC method has been developed for the identification and quantification of two alkaloids ephedrine and cryptolepine in different extracts of Sida species using photodiode array detection. Baseline separation of the two alkaloids was achieved on a Waters RP-18 X-terra column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using a solvent system consisting of a mixture of water containing 0.1% Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and acetonitrile in a gradient elution mode with detection at 210 and 280 nm for ephedrine and cryptolepine, respectively. The calibration curves were linear in a concentration range of 10-250 µg/mL for both the alkaloids with correlation coefficient values >0.99. The limits of detection and quantification for ephedrine and cryptolepine were 5 and 10 µg/mL and 2.5 and 5 µg/mL, respectively. Relative standard deviation values for intra-day and inter-day precision were 1.22 and 1.04% for ephedrine and 1.71 and 2.06% for cryptolepine, respectively. Analytical recovery ranged from 92.46 to 103.95%. The developed HPLC method was applied to identify and quantify ephedrine and cryptolepine in different extracts of Sida species.

  11. Screening of medicinal plants from Suriname for 5-HT(1A) ligands: Bioactive isoquinoline alkaloids from the fruit of Annona muricata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasrat, J A; Pieters, L; De Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G; Vlietinck, A J

    1997-06-01

    Plants from Suriname (South-America) and several Annona species, including A. muricata, A. ckerimolia, A. montana and A. glabra were screened for 5-HT(1A) receptor binding activity by ligand-binding-studies (LBS). Crude extracts of all Annona species and from Hibiscus bifurcatus, Irlbarchia purpurascens and Scoparia dulcis showed high activity. The isoquinoline alkaloids asimilobine (1), nornuciferine (2), and annonaine (3) were isolated as the active principles from the fruit of Annona muricata. These results may partially explain the use of Hibiscus bifurcatus and Annona muricata in traditional medicine in Suriname.

  12. Manipulating the Biosynthesis of Bioactive Compound Alkaloids for Next-Generation Metabolic Engineering in Opium Poppy Using CRISPR-Cas 9 Genome Editing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagoz, Yagiz; Gurkok, Tugba; Zhang, Baohong; Unver, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated9 (Cas9) endonuclease system is a powerful RNA-guided genome editing tool. CRISPR/Cas9 has been well studied in model plant species for targeted genome editing. However, few studies have been reported on plant species without whole genome sequence information. Currently, no study has been performed to manipulate metabolic pathways using CRISPR/Cas9. In this study, the type II CRISPR/SpCas9 system was used to knock out, via nonhomologous end-joining genome repair, the 4'OMT2 in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), a gene which regulates the biosythesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). For sgRNA transcription, viral-based TRV and synthetic binary plasmids were designed and delivered into plant cells with a Cas9 encoding-synthetic vector by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. InDels formed by CRISPR/Cas9 were detected by sequence analysis. Our results showed that the biosynthesis of BIAs (e.g. morphine, thebaine) was significantly reduced in the transgenic plants suggesting that 4'OMT2 was efficiently knocked-out by our CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing approach. In addition, a novel uncharacterized alkaloid was observed only in CRISPR/Cas9 edited plants. Thus, the applicabilitiy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system was demonstrated for the first time for medicinal aromatic plants by sgRNAs transcribed from both synthetic and viral vectors to regulate BIA metabolism and biosynthesis. PMID:27483984

  13. Manipulating the Biosynthesis of Bioactive Compound Alkaloids for Next-Generation Metabolic Engineering in Opium Poppy Using CRISPR-Cas 9 Genome Editing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagoz, Yagiz; Gurkok, Tugba; Zhang, Baohong; Unver, Turgay

    2016-08-03

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated9 (Cas9) endonuclease system is a powerful RNA-guided genome editing tool. CRISPR/Cas9 has been well studied in model plant species for targeted genome editing. However, few studies have been reported on plant species without whole genome sequence information. Currently, no study has been performed to manipulate metabolic pathways using CRISPR/Cas9. In this study, the type II CRISPR/SpCas9 system was used to knock out, via nonhomologous end-joining genome repair, the 4'OMT2 in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), a gene which regulates the biosythesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). For sgRNA transcription, viral-based TRV and synthetic binary plasmids were designed and delivered into plant cells with a Cas9 encoding-synthetic vector by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. InDels formed by CRISPR/Cas9 were detected by sequence analysis. Our results showed that the biosynthesis of BIAs (e.g. morphine, thebaine) was significantly reduced in the transgenic plants suggesting that 4'OMT2 was efficiently knocked-out by our CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing approach. In addition, a novel uncharacterized alkaloid was observed only in CRISPR/Cas9 edited plants. Thus, the applicabilitiy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system was demonstrated for the first time for medicinal aromatic plants by sgRNAs transcribed from both synthetic and viral vectors to regulate BIA metabolism and biosynthesis.

  14. Vinca Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vinca alkaloids are a subset of drugs obtained from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. They are naturally extracted from the pink periwinkle plant, Catharanthus roseus G. Don and have a hypoglycemic as well as cytotoxic effects. They have been used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure and have been used as disinfectants. The vinca alkaloids are also important for being cancer fighters. There are four major vinca alkaloids in clinical use: Vinblastine (VBL, vinorelbine (VRL, vincristine (VCR and vindesine (VDS. VCR, VBL and VRL have been approved for use in the United States. Vinflunine is also a new synthetic vinca alkaloid, which has been approved in Europe for the treatment of second-line transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium is being developed for other malignancies. Vinca alkaloids are the second-most-used class of cancer drugs and will stay among the original cancer therapies. Different researches and studies for new vinca alkaloid applications will be carried out in this regard.

  15. Manipulating the Biosynthesis of Bioactive Compound Alkaloids for Next-Generation Metabolic Engineering in Opium Poppy Using CRISPR-Cas 9 Genome Editing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagoz, Yagiz; Gurkok, Tugba; Zhang, Baohong; Unver, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated9 (Cas9) endonuclease system is a powerful RNA-guided genome editing tool. CRISPR/Cas9 has been well studied in model plant species for targeted genome editing. However, few studies have been reported on plant species without whole genome sequence information. Currently, no study has been performed to manipulate metabolic pathways using CRISPR/Cas9. In this study, the type II CRISPR/SpCas9 system was used to knock out, via nonhomologous end-joining genome repair, the 4′OMT2 in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), a gene which regulates the biosythesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). For sgRNA transcription, viral-based TRV and synthetic binary plasmids were designed and delivered into plant cells with a Cas9 encoding-synthetic vector by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. InDels formed by CRISPR/Cas9 were detected by sequence analysis. Our results showed that the biosynthesis of BIAs (e.g. morphine, thebaine) was significantly reduced in the transgenic plants suggesting that 4′OMT2 was efficiently knocked-out by our CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing approach. In addition, a novel uncharacterized alkaloid was observed only in CRISPR/Cas9 edited plants. Thus, the applicabilitiy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system was demonstrated for the first time for medicinal aromatic plants by sgRNAs transcribed from both synthetic and viral vectors to regulate BIA metabolism and biosynthesis. PMID:27483984

  16. Short-term toxicity studies of loline alkaloids in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, S C; Munday, J S; Munday, R; Kerby, J W F

    2016-08-01

    Epichloë endophytes have been used successfully in pastoral systems to reduce the impact of insect pests through the expression of secondary metabolites. The use of endophytes could be extended to other plant species, such as cereal crops, where the production of bioactive secondary metabolites would reduce the reliance on pesticides for insect control. The success of this approach is dependent on the selection of an appropriate secondary metabolite target which must not only be effective against insect pests but also be safe for grazing and monogastric animals. The loline alkaloids have been identified as possible target metabolites as they are associated with potent effects on insects and low toxicity to grazing animals. The purpose of the current study was to generate toxicological data on the loline alkaloids in a monogastric system using mice. Male and female mice were fed 415 mg/kg/day total lolines for a 3-week period. The loline treatment caused no statistically significant effect on gross pathology, histology, haematology, blood chemistry, heart rate, blood pressure or motor coordination. Reduced weight gain and food consumption were noted in the loline groups during the initial stages of the experiment. This experiment raises no food safety concerns for the loline alkaloids. PMID:27276360

  17. Alkaloids from Daphniphyllum macropodum Miq. and their bioactivities%交让木中生物碱成分及其生物活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金海龙; 穆淑珍; 郝小江

    2012-01-01

    Five alkaloids were isolated from the chloroform part of ethanol extracts of Daphniphyllum macropo-dum Miq. Using classic phytochemistry techniques in the present work. They were identified as Daphnilactone (1) , Paxdaphnine B (2) , Methyl homosecodaphniphyllate (3) , Paxdaphnine A (4) and Daphnigraciline (5) by spectroscopic analysis methods including 1H - NMR, 13C - NMR, DEPT, and ESI - MS. The activities against Artemia Salina were evaluated, and compound 2 showed weak effect.%从虎皮楠属植物交让木(Daphniphyllum macropodum)乙醇提取物的氯仿萃取部分分离得到5个生物碱,采用核磁共振( 1H - NMR、13C- NMR、DEPT)和ESI - MS波谱解析技术对其结构进行鉴定,最终分别确定为Daphnilactone(1)、Paxdaphnine B(2)、Methyl homosecodaphniphyllate (3)、Paxdaphnine A(4)和Daphnigraciline (5).并检测了上述生物碱的杀卤虫活性,发现化合物2具有微弱的活性.

  18. Alkaloids from Delphinium pentagynum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Jesús G; Ruiz, Juan García; Herz, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Aerial parts of a collection of Delphinium pentagynum Lam. from Niebla, Southern Spain, furnished one diterpene alkaloid, 2-dehydrodeacetylheterophylloidine, two norditerpene alkaloids, 14-demethyl-14-isobutyrylanhweidelphinine and 14-demethyl-14-acetylanhweidelphinine, the known alkaloids 14-deacetylnudicauline, methyllycaconitine, 14-deacetyl-14-isobutyrylnudicauline, 14-acetylbrowniine, browniine, delcosine, lycoctonine, 18-methoxygadesine, neoline, karakoline and the aporphine alkaloid magnoflorine. Structures of the alkaloids were established by MS, 1D and 2-D NMR techniques.

  19. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Shinji; Sato, Michio; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid), saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid), strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid), ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid). This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details. PMID:27548127

  20. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kishimoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid, saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid, ergotamine (ergot alkaloid and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid. This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details.

  1. Chemistry and multibeneficial bioactivities of carvacrol (4-isopropyl-2-methylphenol), a component of essential oils produced by aromatic plants and spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2014-08-01

    Aromatic plants produce organic compounds that may be involved in the defense of plants against phytopathogenic insects, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. One of these compounds, called carvacrol, which is found in high concentrations in essential oils such as oregano, has been reported to exhibit numerous bioactivities in cells and animals. This integrated overview surveys and interprets our present knowledge of the chemistry and analysis of carvacrol and its beneficial bioactivities. These activities include its antioxidative properties in food (e.g., lard, sunflower oil) and in vivo and the inhibition of foodborne and human antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria, viruses, pathogenic fungi and parasites, and insects in vitro and in human foods (e.g., apple juice, eggs, leafy greens, meat and poultry products, milk, oysters) and food animal feeds and wastes. Also covered are inhibitions of microbial and fungal toxin production and the anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiarthritic, antiallergic, anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, cardioprotective, gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, and neuroprotective properties of carvacrol as well as metabolic, synergistic, and mechanistic aspects. Areas for future research are also suggested. The collated information and suggested research might contribute to a better understanding of agronomical, biosynthetic, chemical, physiological, and cellular mechanisms of the described health-promoting effects of carvacrol, and facilitate and guide further studies needed to optimize the use of carvacrol as a multifunctional food in pure and encapsulated forms, in edible antimicrobial films, and in combination with plant-derived and medical antibiotics to help prevent or treat animal and human diseases. PMID:25058878

  2. Chemistry, Nutrition, and Health-Promoting Properties of Hericium erinaceus (Lion's Mane) Mushroom Fruiting Bodies and Mycelia and Their Bioactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2015-08-19

    The culinary and medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus is widely consumed in Asian countries, but apparently not in the United States, for its nutritional and health benefits. To stimulate broader interest in the reported beneficial properties, this overview surveys and consolidates the widely scattered literature on the chemistry (isolation and structural characterization) of polysaccharides and secondary metabolites such as erinacines, hericerins, hericenones, resorcinols, steroids, mono- and diterpenes, and volatile aroma compounds, nutritional composition, food and industrial uses, and exceptional nutritional and health-promoting aspects of H. erinaceus. The reported health-promoting properties of the mushroom fruit bodies, mycelia, and bioactive pure compounds include antibiotic, anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, antifatigue, antihypertensive, antihyperlipodemic, antisenescence, cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, and neuroprotective properties and improvement of anxiety, cognitive function, and depression. The described anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and immunostimulating properties in cells, animals, and humans seem to be responsible for the multiple health-promoting properties. A wide range of research advances and techniques are described and evaluated. The collated information and suggestion for further research might facilitate and guide further studies to optimize the use of the whole mushrooms and about 70 characterized actual and potential bioactive secondary metabolites to help prevent or treat human chronic, cognitive, and neurological diseases.

  3. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition.

  4. Alkaloids of the Annonaceae: occurrence and a compilation of their biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lúcio, Ana Silvia Suassuna Carneiro; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa Filho, Jos Maria

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the chemistry and pharmacology of the alkaloids found in species of the Annonaceae family. The occurrence of alkaloids from Annonaceae species, as well as their chemical structures and pharmacological activities are summarized in informative and easy-to-understand tables. Within the Annonaceae family, the genera Annona, Duguetia, and Guatteria have led to many important publications. Valuable and comprehensive information about the structure of these alkaloids is provided. The alkaloids of the aporphine type represent the predominant group in this family. Many of the isolated alkaloids exhibit unique structures. In addition to the chemical structures, the pharmacological activities of some alkaloids are also presented in this chapter. Thus, the leishmanicidal, antimicrobial, antitumor, cytotoxic, and antimalarial activities observed for these alkaloids are highlighted. The chapter is presented as a contribution for the scientific community, mainly to enable the search for alkaloids in species belonging to the Annonaceae family.

  5. Revised NMR data for incartine: an alkaloid from Galanthus elwesii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume

    2007-07-12

    Phytochemical studies on Galanthus elwesii resulted in the isolation of five alkaloids: incartine, hordenine, hippeastrine, 8-O-demethylhomolycorine and lycorine. The NMR data given previously for incartine were revised and completed by two-dimensional 1H-1H and 1H-13C chemical shift correlation experiments. In vitro studies on the bioactivity of incartine were carried out.

  6. Revised NMR data for Incartine: an Alkaloid from Galanthus elwesii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Bastida

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical studies on Galanthus elwesii resulted in the isolation of five alkaloids: incartine, hordenine, hippeastrine, 8-O-demethylhomolycorine and lycorine. The NMR data given previously for incartine were revised and completed by two-dimensional 1H-1H and 1H-13C chemical shift correlation experiments. In vitro studies on the bioactivity of incartine were carried out.

  7. Marine bromopyrrole alkaloids: synthesis and diverse medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Rajesh; Sahu, Niteshkumar; Shah, Chetan; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2014-01-01

    Marine organisms have been found to be a very rich source of bioactive molecules. Among marine organisms, sponges have been proven to be excellent producers of secondary metabolites. More than 5,300 compounds have been isolated from sponges with around 200 new molecules reported each year. Bromopyrrole alkaloids constitute a family of exclusively marine alkaloids and represent a fascinating example of the large variety of compounds formed by marine sponges which exhibit different biological activities such as antifeedent, anti-biofilm, anticancer, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antiserotonergic, antiangiogenic, antihistaminic, chitinase inhibitor and actimyosin ATPase activator. More than 140 derivatives with different structures and biological activities, have been isolated from more than 20 different sponges. Most of these alkaloids share a key building block, pyrrole-imidazole with oroidin being their underlying structural motif. In this review detailed account of isolation and medicinal application of marine bromopyrrole alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives are discussed. PMID:24359195

  8. [Alkaloids of Annonaceae. XXIX. Alkaloids of Annona muricata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboeuf, M; Legueut, C; Cavé, A; Desconclois, J F; Forgacs, P; Jacquemin, H

    1981-05-01

    From leaves, root - and stem - barks of Annona muricata L., seven isoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated: reticuline (main alkaloid), coclaurine, coreximine, atherosperminine, stepharine. Anomurine and anomuricine, two minor alkaloids, are new tetrahydrobenzylisoquinolines, with 5, 6, 7 substituted ring A. The phytochemical significance of these alkaloids is discussed.

  9. Alkaloids in the pharmaceutical industry: Structure, isolation and application

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Milan; Đorđević Siniša M.

    2003-01-01

    By the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century a new era began in medicine, pharmaceutics and chemistry that was strongly connected with alkaloids and alkaloid drugs. Even before that it was known that certain drugs administered in limited doses were medicines, and toxic if taken in larger doses (opium, coke leaves, belladonna roots, monkshood tubers crocus or hemlock seeds). However, the identification, isolation and structural characterization of the active ingredients of the ...

  10. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF3 and dissolved UF4, and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC2. Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U4+/U3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  11. Genotoxic effect of alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. P. Henriques

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increase use of alkaloids in general medical practice in recent years, it is of interest to determine genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic response to different groups of alkaloids in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. Reserpine, boldine and chelerythrine did not show genotoxicity response in the SOS-Chromotest whereas skimmianine showed genotixicity in the presence of a metabolic activation mixture. Voacristine isolated fromthe leaves of Ervatamia coronaria shows in vivo cytostatic and mutagenic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae hapioids cells. The Rauwolfia alkaloid (reserpine was not able to induce reverse mutation and recombinational mitotic events (crossing-over and gene conversion in yeast diploid strain XS2316.

  12. Novel Euglenoid Derived Alkaloid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Disclosed herein is a purified toxin isolated from Euglena sanguinea. More specifically the toxin, termed euglenophycin, is an alkaloid having herbicidal and...

  13. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  14. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Netz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed.

  15. Sarpagine and Related Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjoshi, Ojas A; Cook, James M

    2016-01-01

    The sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids share a common biosynthetic origin, and bear important structural similarities, as expected. These indole alkaloids are widely dispersed in 25 plant genera, principally in the family Apocynaceae. Very diverse and interesting biological properties have been reported for this group of natural products. Isolation of new sarpagine-related alkaloids and the asymmetric synthesis of these structurally complex molecules are of paramount importance to the synthetic and medicinal chemists. A total of 115 newly isolated sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids, along with their physicochemical properties have been included in this chapter. A general and efficient strategy for the synthesis of these monomeric alkaloids, as well as bisindoles, has been presented, which involves application of the asymmetric Pictet-Spengler reaction (>98% ee) as a key step because of the ease of scale up of the tetracyclic template. Also included in this chapter are the syntheses of the sarpagine-related alkaloids, published since 2000. PMID:26827883

  16. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF4--H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF2--ThF4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF4 for Te

  17. A new diketopiperazine alkaloid from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Mohamed; El-Metwally, Mohammad Magdy; Nasr, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of bioactive secondary metabolites from terrestrial Aspergillus oryzae sp. MMAO1 using M2 medium afforded a new diketopiperazine alkaloid, 7,9-dihydroxy-3-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-8-methoxy-2,3,11,11a-tetrahydro-6H-pyrazino[1,2-b]isoquinoline-1,4-dione (1a), containing the unusual amino acid L-6,8-dihydroxy-7-methoxyphenylalanine. This was co-isolated with ditryptophenaline (2), cyclo-(Tryp,Tyr) (4), cyclo-(Pro,Val), α-cyclopiazonic acid (3), kojic acid and uridine. Re-cultivation of the fungal strain on Dox medium led to the production of bisdethio(bismethylthio)gliotoxin (5), pseurotin A (6) along with linoleic acid, α-cyclopiazonic acid (3) and kojic acid. The chemical structure of the new diketopiperazine alkaloid including the relative configuration was determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and HR-ESI-MS spectrometry, and by comparison with the related literature. The new alkaloid (1a) showed no antimicrobial activity or cytotoxicity against brine shrimps.

  18. Total synthesis, biosynthesis and biological profiles of clavine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Stephanie R; Wipf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This review highlights noteworthy synthetic and biological aspects of the clavine subfamily of ergot alkaloids. Recent biosynthetic insights have laid the groundwork for a better understanding of the diverse biological pathways leading to these indole derivatives. Ergot alkaloids were among the first fungal-derived natural products identified, inspiring pharmaceutical applications in CNS disorders, migraine, infective diseases, and cancer. Pergolide, for example, is a semi-synthetic clavine alkaloid that has been used to treat Parkinson's disease. Synthetic activities have been particularly valuable to facilitate access to rare members of the Clavine family and empower medicinal chemistry research. Improved molecular target identification tools and a better understanding of signaling pathways can now be deployed to further extend the biological and medical utility of Clavine alkaloids. PMID:27215547

  19. A new spermidine macrocyclic alkaloid isolated from Gymnosporia arenicola leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gustavo; Martinho, Ana; Soengas, Raquel González; Duarte, Ana Paula; Serrano, Rita; Gomes, Elsa Teixeira; Silva, Olga

    2015-10-01

    The isolation and structural elucidation of a macrocyclic alkaloid, characterized by the presence of a 13-membered macrolactam ring containing a spermidine unit N-linked to a benzoyl group is hereby reported. The structure of this previously unknown spermidine alkaloid isolated from Gymnosporia arenicola (Celastraceae) leaves has been elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy (including bidimensional analysis) and further characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry and polarimetry. A route for the biosynthesis of this new bioactive macrocycle is proposed and the cytotoxicity of the compound was evaluated against two ATCC cell lines - one normal-derived (MCF10A) and one cancer-derived cell line (MCF7) - using the MTT assay. The alkaloid revealed to be non-cytotoxic against both cell lines. The IC50 values from the cells were also determined. PMID:26241493

  20. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua Zhu; Mingxuan Wang; Wei Wen; Rongmin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA). Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. rose...

  1. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Crews

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD. Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes.

  2. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na3CrF6 and Na5Cr3F14, were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li2BeF4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe2+ and Cr3+ and the determination of the U3+/U4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF4--NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF4--NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  3. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  4. Identification of Plant-derived Alkaloids with Therapeutic Potential for Myotonic Dystrophy Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrendorff, Ruben; Faleschini, Maria Teresa; Stiefvater, Adeline; Erne, Beat; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Kern, Frances; Hamburger, Matthias; Potterat, Olivier; Kinter, Jochen; Sinnreich, Michael

    2016-08-12

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) is a disabling neuromuscular disease with no causal treatment available. This disease is caused by expanded CTG trinucleotide repeats in the 3' UTR of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase gene. On the RNA level, expanded (CUG)n repeats form hairpin structures that sequester splicing factors such as muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1). Lack of available MBNL1 leads to misregulated alternative splicing of many target pre-mRNAs, leading to the multisystemic symptoms in DM1. Many studies aiming to identify small molecules that target the (CUG)n-MBNL1 complex focused on synthetic molecules. In an effort to identify new small molecules that liberate sequestered MBNL1 from (CUG)n RNA, we focused specifically on small molecules of natural origin. Natural products remain an important source for drugs and play a significant role in providing novel leads and pharmacophores for medicinal chemistry. In a new DM1 mechanism-based biochemical assay, we screened a collection of isolated natural compounds and a library of over 2100 extracts from plants and fungal strains. HPLC-based activity profiling in combination with spectroscopic methods were used to identify the active principles in the extracts. The bioactivity of the identified compounds was investigated in a human cell model and in a mouse model of DM1. We identified several alkaloids, including the β-carboline harmine and the isoquinoline berberine, that ameliorated certain aspects of the DM1 pathology in these models. Alkaloids as a compound class may have potential for drug discovery in other RNA-mediated diseases. PMID:27298317

  5. An Overview on the Progress of Chemical Constituents and Bioactivities of Plants in Urticaceae during 2000-2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; YANG Hong-xing; TENG Yong-zhen; YUAN Pei; TIAN Rui; LIAO Chun-bi

    2011-01-01

    Utticaceae includes about 1300 species in 47 genera which largely spread in wet tropical regions,and 341 species in 25 genera are in China.Some species are used in Chinese folk medicine.So far,studies on chemistry and pharmacology of Urticaceous plants are mainly focused on nettle of Urtica L.In this review,the chemical researches on 35 new compounds and related pharmacological effects of the plants in Urticaceae reported during2000-2010 are described.The 35 new compounds belong to the classes of lignan,secolignan,norlignan,flavonoid,alkaloid,sesquiterpenoid,triterpenoid,sterol,and sphingolipid.The main bioactivities include cytotoxic,antitumor,antimicrobial,antifungal,anti-BPH,anti-HIV,antidiabetic,hypolipidemic,5α-reductase inhibitory,hair regrowth promotion,and anti-oxidative activities.

  6. Alkaloid profiling and anticholinesterase activity of South American Lycopodiaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Ortega, María Gabriela; de Loreto Bordignon, Sérgio; Apel, Miriam Anders; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha; Cabrera, José Luis

    2013-02-01

    The alkaloid extracts of four Huperzia and one Lycopodiella species, from Brazilian habitats, were tested for their in vitro anticholinesterase activities. IC(50) values showed a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibition for H. reflexa (0.11 ± 0.05 μg/mL), followed by H. quadrifariata (2.0 ± 0.3 μg/mL), H. acerosa (5.5 ± 0.9 μg/mL), H. heterocarpon (25.6 ± 2.7 μg/mL) and L. cernua (42.6 ± 1.5 μg/mL). A lower inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase was observed for all species with the exception of H. heterocarpon (8.3 ± 0.9 μg/mL), whose alkaloid extract presented a selectivity for pseudocholinesterase. Moreover, the chemical study of the bioactive extracts performed by GC-MS, revealed the presence of a number of Lycopodium alkaloids belonging to the lycopodane, flabellidane and cernuane groups. Surprisingly, the potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors huperzines A and B were not detected in the extracts, suggesting that other alkaloids may be responsible for such an effect. PMID:22117191

  7. Alkaloids from Galanthus nivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume

    2007-07-01

    Phytochemical studies on Galanthus nivalis of Bulgarian origin resulted in the isolation of five compounds: 11-O-(3'-hydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3,11-O-(3',3''-dihydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3-O-(2''-butenoyl)-11-O-(3'-hydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3,11,3''-O-(3',3'',3'''-trihydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, and 2-O-(3'-acetoxybutanoyl)lycorine, together with five known alkaloids: ungeremine, lycorine, tazettine, hamayne, and ismine. Their structures were determined by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H and (1)H-(13)C chemical shift correlation experiments.

  8. Bis(indolyl)methane alkaloids: Isolation, bioactivity, and syntheses

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Praveen, P.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Majik, M.S.

    the related compound, streptindole is obtained from Streptococcus faecium IB 37, found in human feces. In recent years, these molecules, which display a wide range of biological properties (antibacterial, antiviral, anti-oxidant, neurotoxic activity etc...

  9. Bioactive phytoconstituents and plant extracts from genus Heliotropium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Goyal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliotropium is a genus of herbs and rarely shrubs of family Boraginaceae. Heliotropium species have been used in folk medicine for the treatment of gout, rheumatism and as antiseptic, febrifuge, cholagogue, anti-inflammatory and healing agents. The alkaloids mainly pyrrolizidine alkaloids are the main constituents of Heliotropium species, which are responsible for several biological activities viz. anti-tumoural, anti-microbial, and anti-viral effects. Phenolic compounds, terpenoids, and quinones have also been reported in this genus. The present review summarizes the various biological studies done on the extracts and bioactive phytoconstituents from the plants of the genus Heliotropium over the past few decades.

  10. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Mingxuan; Wen, Wei; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA). Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. roseus TIA biosynthesis and its regulating enzymes are described. In addition, the culture condition, hormones, signaling molecules, precursor feeding on the accumulation of TIA, and gene expression are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:26009689

  11. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA. Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. roseus TIA biosynthesis and its regulating enzymes are described. In addition, the culture condition, hormones, signaling molecules, precursor feeding on the accumulation of TIA, and gene expression are also evaluated and discussed.

  12. Biosynthesis of tylophora alkaloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using labelled precursors, biosynthesis of the tylophora alkaloids, tylophorine, tylophorinidine and tylophorinide has been investigated in Tylophora asthmatica plants. The radioactive precursors, phenylalanine-2-14C, benzoic acid-1-14C, benzoic acid-ring 14C, acetate-2-14C, ornithine-5-14C, acetate-2-14C, ornithine-5-14C and cinnamic acid-2-14C were administered to the plants individually by wick technique. Tylophorine was isolated in each case and assayed for its radioactivity to find out the incorporation of the label into it. The results indicate that: (1) phenylalanine via cinnamic acid is an important precursor in the biosynthesis of tylophorine (2) orinithine participates in tylophorine biosynthesis via pyrroline and (3) tylophorinidine may be a direct precursor of tylophorine. (M.G.B.)

  13. Design, synthesis and bioactivity of novel ALS enzyme inhibitors (II)——Molecular mechanics, quantum chemistry and structure-activity relationship studies on the herbicidal heterocyclic sulfonamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆荣健; 杨华铮; 尚贞锋; 汪惟为; 潘荫明; 赵学庄

    1996-01-01

    In view of quantum pharmacology, the structure-activity relationships of different kinds of fused heterocydic sulfonamides with the same mode of action were first investigated using molecular mechanics, quantum chemistry and discriminatory analysis. It has been found that the process of the interaction of the fused heterocydic sulfonamide with ALS enzyme involves the electropositive region of the sulfonyl bridge chain and the electronegative region of the heterocydic moiety. The herbicidal activity is related to the potency of electric charge translocation of the related regions.

  14. Total Synthesis of Securinega Alkaloids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Honda

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Naturally occurring Securinega alkaloids (1-4) (Fig. 1)[1], with their wide range of structural and stereochemical features, continue to provide challenging synthetic targets, since these alkaloids exhibit attractive biological activities. Securinine (1), isolated from Securinega suffruticosa [2], was structurally determined to contain an indolizidine skeleton with an azabicyclo[3.2.1 ]octane system together with an α, β-unsaturated γ-lactone ring. This alkaloid has been clinically used in Russia as a CNS stimulating drug[3], and has been shown to act as a stereospecific antagonist at the GABA binding site of the GABAA-receptor complex[4].Viroallosecurinine (2), a diastereoisomeric alkaloid of securinine, was also isolated from the leaves of Securinega virosa[5] as a cytotoxic alkaloid exhibiting a MIC of 0.48 μg/mL for Ps. aeruginosa and Staph.aureus[6]. This alkaloid is recognized to be bactericidal since the yields of MIC/MBC were less than 1[7].

  15. Chemical constituents and bioactivity of Formosan lauraceous plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsun-Shuo Chang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan is rich in lauraceous plants. A review of 197 references based on the chemical analysis and bioactivity of indigenous lauraceous plants carried out by native scientists from 1963 to 2014 has been compiled. About 303 new compounds and thousands of known compounds comprising alkaloids and non-alkaloids with diverse structures have been isolated or identified from indigenous plants belonging to the 11 lauraceous genera. The volatile components, however, have been excluded from this review. This review provides an overview of the past efforts of Taiwan scientists working on secondary metabolites and their bioactivity in native lauraceous plants. The potential of lauraceous plants worthy of further study is also noted. The contents will be helpful for the chemotaxonomy of Lauraceae and be of value for the development of native Formosan lauraceous plants.

  16. Copper catalysed synthesis of indolylquinazolinone alkaloid bouchardatine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mayavan Viji; Rajagopal Nagarajan

    2014-07-01

    We describe the total synthesis of indolylquinazolinone alkaloid bouchardatine and some of the quinazolinone derivatives. The aerobic oxidation induced by copper(I) bromide, followed by Vilsmeier-Haack formylation gives the natural product bouchardatine alkaloid in good yield.

  17. Enrichment and purification of six Aconitum alkaloids from Aconiti kusnezoffii radix by macroporous resins and quantification by HPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Li, Qing; Liu, Ran; Yin, Yidi; Chen, Xiaohui; Bi, Kaishun

    2014-06-01

    Aconitine, mesaconitine, hypaconitine, benzoylaconine, benzoylmesaconine and benzoylhypaconine are six main Aconitum alkaloids from traditional Chinese medicine, Aconiti kusnezoffii radix, which possess highly bioactive as well as highly toxic character for medicinal use. In the present study, for the purpose of better utilizing the toxic herbal material, the performance characteristics of NKA-II, D101, X-5, AB-8, S-8, HPD722 and HPD750 macroporous resins for the enrichment and purification of these six Aconitum alkaloids were critically evaluated. Results showed that NKA-II offered the best adsorption and desorption capacities for six Aconitum alkaloids among the seven macroporous resins tested, which were affected significantly by the pH value. Subsequently, dynamic adsorption and desorption experiments had been carried out with the column packed by NKA-II resin to optimize the separation process of six Aconitum alkaloids. After one run treatment with NKA-II resin, the content of total six Aconitum alkaloids were increased from 5.87% to 60.3%, the recovery was 75.8%. Meanwhile, a validated HPLC-MS method had been developed to qualitative and quantitative these six Aconitum alkaloids. This method would provide scientific references to the large-scale production of six Aconitum alkaloids from Aconiti kusnezoffii radix or other plants and might also expand the secure application of these highly toxic components for pharmacy. PMID:24814003

  18. Pyridinoacridine alkaloids of marine origin: NMR and MS spectral data, synthesis, biosynthesis and biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis P. Sandjo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on pyridoacridine-related metabolites as one biologically interesting group of alkaloids identified from marine sources. They are produced by marine sponges, ascidians and tunicates, and they are structurally comprised of four to eight fused rings including heterocycles. Acridine, acridone, dihydroacridine, and quinolone cores are features regularly found in these alkaloid skeletons. The lack of hydrogen atoms next to quaternary carbon atoms for two or three rings makes the chemical shift assignment a difficult task. In this regard, one of the aims of this review is the compilation of previously reported, pyridoacridine 13C NMR data. Observations have been made on the delocalization of electrons and the presence of some functional groups that lead to changes in the chemical shift of some carbon resonances. The lack of mass spectra information for these alkaloids due to the compactness of their structures is further discussed. Moreover, the biosynthetic pathways of some of these metabolites have been shown since they could inspire biomimetic synthesis. The synthesis routes used to prepare members of these marine alkaloids (as well as their analogues, which are synthesized for biological purposes are also discussed. Pyridoacridines were found to have a large spectrum of bioactivity and this review highlights and compares the pharmacophores that are responsible for the observed bioactivity.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, A; Mares, M; Rios, J L; Canton, E; Gobernado, M

    1987-04-01

    The antimicrobial in vitro activity of 14 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids was investigated by agar diffusion and agar dilution methods against several genera of microorganisms that included Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lysteria, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Shigella, Mycobacterium and Candida. Anolobine was the most active compound against grampositive bacteria with MIC90 between 12 and 50 mg/l; less active were anonaine, lysicamine and liriodenine. All the alkaloids of the noraporphine and oxoaporphine groups, with the exception of isopiline, showed activity against Mycobacterium phlei (MIC 6-25 mg/l). Candida albicans ATCC26555 was inhibited by anonaine, nornantenine and xylopine (MIC 3-12 mg/l). None of the alkaloids tested had a significant activity against gramnegative rods. The action against susceptible microorganisms was bactericidal. PMID:3615557

  20. Alkaloids from Stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang LIANG; Xin Gen LUO; Hai Sheng CHEN; Xiao Dong ZHANG; Mao HUANG; Wen Yong LIU

    2006-01-01

    Six indole alkaloids were isolated from the stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis. Among them, 10-hydroxy-19, 20-dihydroisositsirikine (Ⅰ) is new. The other five are known alkaloids,namely: matrine (Ⅱ), 19, 20-dihydroisositsuikine (Ⅲ), 19-s-voacangarine (Ⅳ), 11'-methoxyl- 19s-heyneanine (Ⅴ), conodurine (Ⅵ). The structural elucidation of the alkaloids was based on spectral means.

  1. Alkaloids from stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Gen Luo; Hai Sheng Chen; Shuang Liang; Mao Huang; Wei Dong Xuan; Li Jin

    2007-01-01

    Six indole alkaloids were isolated from the stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis.Among them, yunnanensine (Ⅰ) is new.The other five are known alkaloids, namely: 19,20-E-vallesamine (Ⅱ), 19s-heyneanine (Ⅲ), ibogaine (Ⅳ), ibogamine (Ⅴ), coronaridine (Ⅵ).The structural elucidation of the alkaloids was based on spectral means.

  2. FIVE NEW NORDITERPENOID ALKALOIDS FROM ACONITUM SINOMONTANUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG-PENG WANG; CHONG-SHENG PENG; XI-XIAN JIAN; DONG-LIN CHEN

    2001-01-01

    From the roots of A conitum sinomontanum, five new norditerpenoid alkaloids, sinomontanitines A (1) and B (2), sinomontanines A (3), B (4) and C (5), were isolated together with the known alkaloids lappaconitine (6) and ranaconitine (7), The structures of the new alkaloids were determined by spectral analysis.

  3. I. Cyclopeptide alkaloids; II. Phycocyanobilipeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagarias, J.C.

    1979-09-01

    Several examples of the 14-membered, para-bridged ring system of the cyclopeptide alkaloids have been synthesized via an active ester cyclization. The yield of monomeric cyclopeptide varied from 1 to 33% and was affected by the amino acid substitution pattern and amide conformation of the linear peptide precursors. Both the synthetic models and a naturally cyclopeptide alkaloid, ceanothine B, bind monovalent (Li/sup +/) and divalent (Ca/sup + +/, Mg/sup + +/) cations. Seven cyclopeptide alkaloids, phencyclopeptines 1-7, have been found distributed among three forms of the shrub Ceanothus integerrimus. Chemical degradation, mass spectroscopy, and /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy have established structures for these seven compounds, three of which have been previously reported. The utility of cyclopeptide alkaloid structure and the distribution for chemotaxonomic assignments is discussed. Field desorption mass spectroscopy has identified five phencyclopeptines in the crude alkaloidal extracts of Ceanothus sanguineus. A new paired-ion HPLC system for the separation of these alkaloids is discussed. Amino acid analysis, electron impact mass spectroscopy, and /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy have established the structures of six phencyclopeptines including two isomeric compounds 5 and 6. The structure of 2 has not been previously reported. The smallest cyanogen bromide fragment derived from the ..beta..-subunit of Synechococcus sp 6301 C-phycocyanin, the blue heptapeptide 2, has been investigated by 360 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. The peptide portion, heptapeptide 3, was synthesized independently and used in comparative spectroscopic analysis.These studies have led to complete assignment of the structure of the peptide-linked phycocyanobilin and elucidation of the nature of the thioether chromophore-peptide linkage.

  4. Citrus Limonoids: Analysis, Bioactivity, and Biomedical Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    This publication is a review of the chemistry, biochemistry and bioactivity of limonoids occurring in citrus. The review chronologically relates the evolution of research in citrus limonoids beginning with their association with bitterness development in citrus juices. The chemical and biochemical...

  5. The alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sulphureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel; Lee, Stephen T; Gardner, Dale R; Pfister, James A; Welch, Kevin D; Green, Benedict T; Davis, T Zane; Panter, Kip E

    2009-02-25

    Lupines are common plants on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Specimens of L. sulphureus from field collections and herbaria were evaluated taxonomically and by chemical means. A total of seven distinct alkaloid profiles and the individual alkaloids associated with each profile were identified. Each alkaloid profile was unique in its geographical distribution and its potential risk to livestock. In conclusion, taxonomic classification is not sufficient to determine risk, as chemical characterization of the alkaloids must also be performed.

  6. Seasonal Change of Loline Alkaloids in Endophyte-lnfected Meadow Fescue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG De-wen; WANG Jin-yi; Brain Patchett; Ravi Gooneratne

    2006-01-01

    Lolines are a group of saturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids that possess broad bioactivity against a wide array of herbivorous insects. However, they do not exhibit toxicity to ruminants such as cattle and sheep. In order to study the direct and potential physiological effects on ruminants and the mechanism of insecticide/insectifuge, the distribution of loline alkaloids in endophyte-infected meadow fescue and the seasonal change of the distribution were analyzed. The crowns,roots and leaves of endophyte-infected meadow fescue at its four different growth periods, i.e., spring, summer, early autumn and late autumn, in New Zealand were colleted. After powdering, organic solvent extraction and purification by column chromatography, all loline alkaloid samples were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography with 4-phenylmorpholine (PM) as an internal standard. The analytic results showed that the loline contents in the roots, crowns and leaves of endophyte-infected meadow fescue vary with seasons. Even within the same season, the distribution of lolines in endophyte-infected meadow fescue varies. During summer, lolines mainly existed in the leaves and roots, but in early autumn, they are produced in the crowns. It was concluded that, lolines were mainly produced in the leaves and roots of endophyte-infected meadow fescue. In gas chromatographic analysis, N-formylloline, the major component of loline alkaloid in the plant, was employed to assay the alkaloids.

  7. Alcalóides alquilpiridínicos de esponjas marinhas Alkylpyridine alkaloids from marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaíla M. P. Almeida

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry of alkylpyridine alkaloids originating from marine sponges is comprehensively reviewed, with emphasis on their natural occurrence, methods for their isolation, spectroscopic characterization, biological activities e chemical synthesis. A likely chemotaxonomic role is suggested, as markers for sponges of the Order Haplosclerida (Demospongiae.

  8. Lycopodium alkaloids from Palhinhaea cernua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fu-Wei [Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luo, Ji-Feng; Wang, Yue-Hu, E-mail: wangyuehu@mail.kib.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Economic Plants and Biotechnology, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sun, Qian-Yun; Yang, Fu-Mei [Key Laboratory of Chemistry for Natural Products, Guizhou Province and Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Liu, Fang [College of Landscape and Horticulture, Yunnan Agricultural University (China); Long, Chun-Lin, E-mail: long@mail.kib.ac.cn [College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Minzu University of China, Beijing, (China)

    2012-07-01

    Two new Lycopodium alkaloids, acetyllycoposerramine M and palcernine A were isolated from whole plant extracts of Palhinhaea cernua L. together with ten previously identified compounds. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses using the Flack parameter. (author)

  9. Quaternary alkaloids of tinospora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, N G; Nwaiwu, J

    1983-08-01

    The occurrence of quaternary alkaloids in TINOSPORA (and PARABAENA) species (Menispermaceae) has been studied. The main components were generally the protoberberine bases berberine and palmatine, with jatrorrhizine an occasional minor constituent, and the aporphine base magnoflorine. Choline was also often present. Only magnoflorine was detected in the PARABAENA material examined. PMID:17404996

  10. The indole alkaloid meleagrin, from the olive tree endophytic fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, as a novel lead for the control of c-Met-dependent breast cancer proliferation, migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Mohamed S; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M; Ebrahim, Hassan Y; Elsayed, Heba E; Houssen, Wael E; Haggag, Eman G; Soliman, Randa F; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2016-01-15

    Fungi of the genus Penicillium produce unique and chemically diverse biologically active secondary metabolites, including indole alkaloids. The role of dysregulated hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, c-Met, in the development and progression of breast carcinoma is documented. The goal of this work is to explore the chemistry and bioactivity of the secondary metabolites of the endophytic Penicillium chrysogenum cultured from the leaf of the olive tree Olea europea, collected in its natural habitat in Egypt. This fungal extract showed good inhibitory activities against the proliferation and migration of several human breast cancer lines. The CH2Cl2 extract of P. chrysogenum mycelia was subjected to bioguided chromatographic separation to afford three known indole alkaloids; meleagrin (1), roquefortine C (2) and DHTD (3). Meleagrin inhibited the growth of the human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-468, BT-474, SK BR-3, MCF7 and MCF7-dox, while similar treatment doses were found to have no effect on the growth and viability of the non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells MCF10A. Meleagrin also showed excellent ATP competitive c-Met inhibitory activity in Z-Lyte assay, which was further confirmed via molecular docking studies and Western blot analysis. In addition, meleagrin treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of HGF-induced cell migration, and invasion of breast cancer cell lines. Meleagrin treatment potently suppressed the invasive triple negative breast tumor cell growth in an orthotopic athymic nude mice model, promoting this unique natural product from hit to a lead rank. The indole alkaloid meleagrin is a novel lead c-Met inhibitory entity useful for the control of c-Met-dependent metastatic and invasive breast malignancies. PMID:26692349

  11. A concise synthesis of (R)-Bgugaine, a pyrrolidine alkaloid from Arisarum vulgare

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majik, M.S.; Parameswaran, P.S; Tilve, S.G.

    concise synthesis of (R)-Bgugaine, a pyrrolidine alkaloid from arisarum vulgare Mahesh S. Majik a , P.S. Parameswaran b and Santosh G. Tilve a * a Department of Chemistry, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Goa 403 206, India b National Institute... and effective chiral catalysts. 2-4 There are a large number of studies concerning the development of new syntheses of these molecules. 5-7 (R)-Bgugaine (1) is a natural 2-alkyl pyrrolidine alkaloid, first isolated 8 in 1993 from the tubers...

  12. Secondary metabolites of seagrasses (Alismatales and Potamogetonales; Alismatidae): Chemical diversity, bioactivity, and ecological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidorn, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Seagrasses are the only higher plants living in fully marine environments; they play a significant role in coastal ecosystems. Seagrasses inhabit the coastal shelves of all continents except Antarctica and can grow in depths of up to 90 m. Because of their eminent ecological importance, innumerous studies have been dedicated to seagrasses and their ecology. However, the phytochemistry has not been equally well investigated yet and many of the existing studies in chemical ecology are only investigating the chemistry at the level of compound classes, e.g. phenolics, and not at the level of chemically defined metabolites. In the present review, the existing literature on secondary metabolites of seagrasses, their known source seagrasses, their bioactivity, and ecological function are compiled and critically assessed. Moreover, research gaps are highlighted and avenues for future research are discussed. Currently, a total of 154 chemically defined natural products have been reported from the about 70 seagrass species known worldwide. Compounds reported include simple phenols derivatives (four compounds), phenylmethane derivatives (14 compounds), phenylethane derivatives (four compounds), phenylpropane derivatives including their esters and dimers (20 compounds), chalkones (four compounds), flavonoids including catechins (57 compounds), phenylheptanoids (four compounds), one monoterpene derivative, one sesquiterpene, diterpenoids (13 compounds), steroids (31 compounds), and one alkaloid. Most of the existing bioactivity studies of seagrass metabolites and extracts have been directed to potential cytotoxic, antimicrobial, or antimacrofouling activity. Antimicrobial studies have been performed towards panels of both human pathogens and ecologically relevant pathogens. In the antimacrofouling studies, investigations of the potential of zosteric acid from the genus Zostera are the most numerous and have yielded so far the most interesting results. Studies on the chemical

  13. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  14. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids of senecio sp from Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Ruiz Vásquez and Matías Reina Artiles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs (two saturated macrocyclic, three unsaturated macrocyclic and one unsaturated seco-macrocyclic were isolated from native Peruvian Senecio species. The structures of these alkaloids were established by a complete NMR spectroscopic analysis, chemical transformations and comparison of their NMR data with those published for similar alkaloids. Three PAs were then tested for antifungal activity against Fusarium moniliforme, F. (Sheldon, F. oxysporum fs. lycopersici (Scheldt and F. solani (Mart, no significant activity being observed.

  15. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Senecio sp from Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) (two saturated macrocyclic, three unsaturated macrocyclic and one unsaturated seco-macrocyclic) were isolated from native Peruvian Senecio species. The structures of these alkaloids were established by a complete NMR spectroscopic analysis, chemical transformations and comparison of their NMR data with those published for similar alkaloids. Three PAs were then tested for antifungal activity against Fusarium moniliforme, F. (Sheldon), F. oxysporum fs. lycopersici (Scheldt) and F. solani (Mart), no significant activity being observed. (author)

  16. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Senecio sp from Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Vasquez, Liliana; Reina Artiles, Matias [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, CSIC, Tenerife (Spain); Gonzalez Coloma, Azucena [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (ICA), CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera Perez, Raimundo [Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Tenerife (Spain). Unidad de Fitopatologia, Facultad de Biologia; Ruiz Mesia, Lastenia [Universidad Nacional de la Amazonia Peruana (LIPNAA-UNAP), AA.HH. Nuevo San Lorenzo, San Juan, Iquitos (Peru). Lab. de Investigacion en Productos Naturales Antiparasitarios de la Amazonia

    2011-07-01

    Six pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) (two saturated macrocyclic, three unsaturated macrocyclic and one unsaturated seco-macrocyclic) were isolated from native Peruvian Senecio species. The structures of these alkaloids were established by a complete NMR spectroscopic analysis, chemical transformations and comparison of their NMR data with those published for similar alkaloids. Three PAs were then tested for antifungal activity against Fusarium moniliforme, F. (Sheldon), F. oxysporum fs. lycopersici (Scheldt) and F. solani (Mart), no significant activity being observed. (author)

  17. Indole alkaloids and terpenoids from Tabernaemontana markgrafiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Hazell, A.; Hazell, R.;

    1994-01-01

    The bark of Tabernaemontana markgrafiana yielded five acetylated pentacyclic triterpenes and 24 monoterpene indole alkaloids. The major triterpene was baurenyl acetate, which constituted ca 6% of the crude petrol extract. An X-ray study of iso-ursenyl acetate was carried out for the first time....... The indole alkaloids were primarily of the iboga-type and constituted ca 3% of the dried bark and 20% of the total extracts. The major alkaloids were coronaridine, (19S)-heyneanine, voacangine and ibogamine. Among the minor components, four new alkaloids were identified: 5,6-dehydro-coronaridine, 3R...

  18. Total synthesis of the indolizidine alkaloid tashiromine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McElhinney Alison D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tashiromine 1 is a naturally occurring indolizidine alkaloid. It has been the subject of thirteen successful total syntheses to date. Our own approach centres on the stereoselective construction of the indolizidine core by capture of an electrophilic acyliminium species by a pendant allylsilane. The key cyclisation precursor is constructed using olefin cross-metathesis chemistry, which has the potential to facilitate both racemic and asymmetric approaches, depending upon the choice of the allylsilane metathesis partner. Results The use of the allyltrimethylsilane cross-metathesis approach enables the rapid construction of the key cyclisation precursor 3 (3 steps from commercial materials, which undergoes acid-induced cyclisation to give the desired bicyclic indolizidine skeleton as a 96:4 mixture of diastereomers. Simple functional group interconversions allowed the completion of the total synthesis of racemic tashiromine in six steps (19% overall yield. Three chiral α-alkoxyallylsilanes (12,14 and 15 were prepared in enantioenriched form and their cross-metathesis reactions studied as part of a putative asymmetric approach to tashiromine. In the event, α-hydroxysilane 12 underwent isomerisation under the reaction conditions to acylsilane 17, while silanes 14 and 15 were unreactive towards metathesis. Conclusion A concise, stereoselective total synthesis of racemic tashiromine has been developed. Attempts to translate this into an asymmetric synthesis have thus far been unsuccessful.

  19. Separation and enrichment of major quinolizidine type alkaloids from Sophora alopecuroides using macroporous resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Zhang, Liyan; Zhu, Guihua; Li, Li

    2014-01-15

    Matrine (MT), oxymatrine (OM) and sophoridine (SP) are three bioactive alkaloids in Sophora alopecuroides. In the present study, the chromatographic characteristics of six widely used macroporous resins, namely NKA, NKA-9, HPD-100, HPD-722, HPD-750, and AB-8, respectively, towards the separation and enrichment of the three alkaloids from the aqueous extract of S. alopecuroides are critically evaluated. The results indicated that AB-8 resin offered the best absorption and desorption capacity and its adsorption data fitted best to the Freundlich isotherm. Dynamic adsorption and desorption experiments on packed columns of AB-8 resin have been investigated for optimization of chromatographic parameters. The adsorption of the alkaloids on the resin was best achieved by 5 bed volume (BV) of sample solution of pH 10 with a flow rate of 2BV/h. The desorption of the compounds from the resin was effectively completed by using 5BV of 80% ethanol in water at a flow rate of 2BV/h. After one run of adsorption and desorption, the contents of MT, OM, and SP were increased from 9.30, 8.39 and 9.84% to 22.22, 21.44 and 28.02%, the recovery were 69.4, 78.3 and 72.6%, respectively. This method would provide useful information to the industrial production of the alkaloids from S. alopecuroides. PMID:24321756

  20. Prehistoric peyote use: alkaloid analysis and radiocarbon dating of archaeological specimens of Lophophora from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seedi, Hesham R; De Smet, Peter A G M; Beck, Olof; Possnert, Göran; Bruhn, Jan G

    2005-10-01

    Two archaeological specimens of peyote buttons, i.e. dried tops of the cactus Lophophora williamsii (Lem.) Coulter, from the collection of the Witte Museum in San Antonio, was subjected to radiocarbon dating and alkaloid analysis. The samples were presumably found in Shumla Cave No. 5 on the Rio Grande, Texas. Radiocarbon dating shows that the calibrated 14C age of the weighted mean of the two individual dated samples corresponds to the calendric time interval 3780-3660 BC (one sigma significance). Alkaloid extraction yielded approximately 2% of alkaloids. Analysis with thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) led to the identification of mescaline in both samples. No other peyote alkaloids could be identified. The two peyote samples appear to be the oldest plant drug ever to yield a major bioactive compound upon chemical analysis. The identification of mescaline strengthens the evidence that native North Americans recognized the psychotropic properties of peyote as long as 5700 years ago.

  1. Intraspecific variability in the alkaloid metabolism of Galanthus elwesii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Sidjimova, Borjana; Evstatieva, Luba; Popov, Simeon

    2004-03-01

    Alkaloid pattern of individuals from 16 Bulgarian Galanthus elwesii populations was investigated by GC/MS and TLC. Twenty-one Amaryllidaceae alkaloids were detected and 14 of them were identified. Crinane type alkaloids, haemanthamine or crinine, dominated alkaloid metabolism in most of the populations. With exception of one population, where the separate individuals showed variable alkaloid profiles (dominated by crinine or haemanthamine) the individuals of the rest of populations have identical and characteristic alkaloid profiles. Some populations showed remarkable differences in respect to their alkaloid pattern-type of biosynthesis, main alkaloids and number of alkaloids. Populations dominated by galanthamine type alkaloids were found as well. These data demonstrate that like the morphological features, the alkaloid metabolism of G. elwesii is also variable.

  2. Influence of Surface Treatments on the Bioactivity of Ti

    OpenAIRE

    Lindahl, Carl; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Several techniques have been described to modify the surface of titanium to make it more bioactive. Heat treatment (HT) and sodium hydroxide treatment (NaOH) have been used and can change the crystallinity and surface chemistry of titanium implants. However, no studies have systemically focused on comparing these different methods and their effect on the bioactivity of Ti. Therefore, in this study, Ti substrates were systematically treated using HT, NaOH, and a combination of HT and NaOH. The...

  3. Bioactive glass-polymer composite for experimental bone reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, A.J.; Tirri, T.; Strandberg, N.; Jaakkola, T.; Naerhi, T.; Kukkonen, J. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Biomaterials Project of Turku; Seppaelae, J.; Rich, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Thermoplastic composite of bioactive glass (S53P4) and copolymer of lactones (Glepron) can be used as liquid, injectable or paste like form, as solid plugs or thin membranes for filling bone defects. This bone substitute is bioactive, osteoconductive and biocompatible resulting in bone bonding contacts between glass granules and bone in defects on the distal femur and ulna of experimental animals. Properties of the material can be adjusted by polymer chemistry. (orig.)

  4. Tropane alkaloids in food: poisoning incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamse, P.; Egmond, van H.P.; Noordam, M.Y.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Nijs, de W.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of wild and cultured plants produce secondary metabolites that can be toxic to humans and animals. The present study aims to provide insight into the routes of (un)intentional poisonings of humans by tropane alkaloids. Poisonings of humans by tropane alkaloids occur as unintended inge

  5. Alkaloids from the Roots of Saccopetalum prolificum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new alkaloid, named prolifine (1), was isolated along with four known alkaloids, liriodenine (2), 6-hydroxyonychine (3), isooncodine (4) and discretamine (5) from the roots of Saccopetalum prolificum. The structure of 1 was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  6. Alkaloids of some Asian Sedum species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, JH; THart, H; Stevens, JF

    1996-01-01

    The leafy parts of 16 Asian species belonging to the three sections of Sedum were investigated for the presence of alkaloids. Only in seven species of Sedum sect. Sedum were alkaloids found. Sedum bulbiferum, S. japonicum, S. lepidopodium, S. morrisomensis, S. oryzifolium, S. polytrichoides and S. s

  7. Natural Products Chemistry Research 2009's Progress in China%2009年我国天然药物化学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶阳; 李希强; 唐春萍

    2011-01-01

    本文综述了2009年我国科学家在天然药物化学领域内的研究成果.选择其中具有新颖性或者显著生物活性的化合物.按其结构分类分别介绍.主要包括萜类、生物碱、木脂体、香豆素、黄酮、甾体、内酯、酚类、芪类、酰胺、环酮等.%This article reviews the progresses made by Chinese scientists in the field of natural products chemistry in 2009. Selected compounds with unique structural features and/or promising bioactivities were described herein on the basis of structural types. The main types included: terpenes, alkaloids, lignans, coumarins, flavones, steroids, lactones, phenols, stilbenes, acidamides, cyclic ketones, etc.

  8. Indole Alkaloids of the Stigonematales (Cyanophyta: Chemical Diversity, Biosynthesis and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Walton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The cyanobacteria are well recognized as producers of a wide array of bioactive metabolites including toxins, and potential drug candidates. However, a limited number of taxa are generally considered with respect to both of these aspects. That said, the order Stigonematales, although largely overlooked in this regard, has become increasingly recognized as a source of bioactive metabolites relevant to both human and environmental health. In particular, the hapalindoles and related indole alkaloids (i.e., ambiguines, fischerindoles, welwitindolinones from the order, represent a diverse, and phylogenetically characteristic, class of secondary metabolites with biological activity suggestive of potential as both environmental toxins, and promising drug discovery leads. The present review gives an overview of the chemical diversity of biologically active metabolites from the Stigonematales—and particularly the so-called hapalindole-type alkaloids—including their biosynthetic origins, and their pharmacologically and toxicologically relevant bioactivities. Taken together, the current evidence suggests that these alkaloids, and the associated cyanobacterial taxa from the order, warrant future consideration as both potentially harmful (i.e., “toxic” algae, and as promising leads for drug discovery.

  9. The comparative toxicity of a reduced, crude comfrey (Symphytum officinale) alkaloid extract and the pure, comfrey-derived pyrrolizidine alkaloids, lycopsamine and intermedine in chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ammon W; Stegelmeier, Bryan L; Colegate, Steven M; Gardner, Dale R; Panter, Kip E; Knoppel, Edward L; Hall, Jeffery O

    2016-05-01

    Comfrey (Symphytum officinale), a commonly used herb, contains dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids that, as a group of bioactive metabolites, are potentially hepatotoxic, pneumotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic. Consequently, regulatory agencies and international health organizations have recommended comfrey be used for external use only. However, in many locations comfrey continues to be ingested as a tisane or as a leafy vegetable. The objective of this work was to compare the toxicity of a crude, reduced comfrey alkaloid extract to purified lycopsamine and intermedine that are major constituents of S. officinale. Male, California White chicks were orally exposed to daily doses of 0.04, 0.13, 0.26, 0.52 and 1.04 mmol lycopsamine, intermedine or reduced comfrey extract per kg bodyweight (BW) for 10 days. After another 7 days chicks were euthanized. Based on clinical signs of poisoning, serum biochemistry, and histopathological analysis the reduced comfrey extract was more toxic than lycopsamine and intermedine. This work suggests a greater than additive effect of the individual alkaloids and/or a more potent toxicity of the acetylated derivatives in the reduced comfrey extract. It also suggests that safety recommendations based on purified compounds may underestimate the potential toxicity of comfrey. PMID:26177929

  10. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo SUN; Fen ZHANG; Guo-jun ZHOU; Guo-hai CHU; Fang-fang HUANG; Qiao-mei WANG; Li-feng JIN; Fu-cheng LIN; Jun YANG

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from al six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were ob-served both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R2=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  11. Norditerpenoid Alkaloids from Aconitum spicatum Stapf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To search for pharmacologically and structurally interesting substances from traditional Chinese medicines,we investigated the chemical compounds of Aconitum spicatum Stapf. Two new norditerpenoid alkaloids,namely spicatine A (compound 1) and spicatine B (compound 2), as well as 11 known norditerpenoid alkaloids were isolated from the CHCl3 portion of the 90% ethanol extract of the roots of A. spicatum. The structures of the alkaloids were characterized on the basis of their spectral data, One of the isolated compounds showed significant cytotoxic activities (IC50 values < 200 μmol/L) against the HL-60 cell line.

  12. Synthesis of the isoquinoline alkaloid, crispine C

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, A.; Stevenson, L; Sutherland, A

    2012-01-01

    The first total synthesis of the isoquinoline alkaloid, crispine C is described in seven steps using a Henry reaction and the Pictet–Gams variant of the Bischler–Napieralski reaction to effect the key transformations.

  13. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect.

  14. Polycyclic alkaloids via transannular Mannich reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vital, Paulo; Hosseini, Masood; Shanmugham, M. S.;

    2009-01-01

    The tricyclic compound 13, representing the framework of the cylindricine 4 and lepadiformine 5 alkaloids, was prepared in a single operation via the first example of a transannular Mannich reaction involving a macrocyclic diketoamine 12.......The tricyclic compound 13, representing the framework of the cylindricine 4 and lepadiformine 5 alkaloids, was prepared in a single operation via the first example of a transannular Mannich reaction involving a macrocyclic diketoamine 12....

  15. Alkaloids from Fissistigma latifolium (Dunal) Merr.

    OpenAIRE

    Asmah Alias; Hazrina Hazni; Faridahanim Mohd Jaafar; Khalijah Awang; Nor Hadiani Ismail

    2010-01-01

    A phytochemical study of the bark of Fissistigma latifolium (Annonaceae) yielded a new aporphine alkaloid, (-)-N-methylguattescidine (1), and eight known alkaloids: liriodenine (2), oxoxylopine (3), (-)-asimilobine (4), dimethyltryptamine (5), (-)-remerine (6), (-)-anonaine (7), columbamine (8) and lysicamine (9). The compounds were isolated using various chromatographic methods and structural elucidation was accomplished by means of spectroscopic methods, notably 1D-NMR (1H, 13C, DEPT), 2D-N...

  16. Alkaloids from Fissistigma latifolium (Dunal Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmah Alias

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A phytochemical study of the bark of Fissistigma latifolium (Annonaceae yielded a new aporphine alkaloid, (--N-methylguattescidine (1, and eight known alkaloids: liriodenine (2, oxoxylopine (3, (--asimilobine (4, dimethyltryptamine (5, (--remerine (6, (--anonaine (7, columbamine (8 and lysicamine (9. The compounds were isolated using various chromatographic methods and structural elucidation was accomplished by means of spectroscopic methods, notably 1D-NMR (1H, 13C, DEPT, 2D-NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, UV, IR and MS.

  17. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L

    2013-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes...

  18. Two new diterpene alkaloids from Delphinium chrysotrichum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qing He; Xiao Mei Wei; Yi Li Han; Li Ming Gao

    2007-01-01

    Chemical investigation on the ethanol extract from the whole plants of Delphinium chrysotrichum resulted in the isolation of two new diterpene alkaloids named delphatisine A (1) and delphatisine B (2), respectively. The structures of the new compounds were deduced on the basis of their spectral data (IR, HREIMS, EIMS, 1D, 2D-NMR). This is the first report on the isolation of diterpenoid alkaloids from the D. Chrysotrichum.

  19. The chemistry and biology of zoanthamine alkaloids and Illicium sesquiterpenes

    OpenAIRE

    Trzoss, Lynnie L.

    2012-01-01

    Natural products, or secondary metabolites, have proven significant to the existence of life. They have been used for countless reasons throughout history, including nonessential purposes such as dyes for textiles and paints. Less trivial uses, such as those related to health better demonstrate the importance of natural products. Toxic natural products had been used to bolster hunting efficiency and insect pheromones. Therapeutic natural products have long been used as dietary supplements and...

  20. A new tropane alkaloid from the leaves of Erythroxylum subsessile isolated by pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Rodrigo Alves Soares; Almeida, Henrique; Fernandes, Caio Pinho; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; Rocha, Leandro; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães

    2016-04-01

    Tropane alkaloids are bioactive metabolites with great importance in the pharmaceutical industry and the most important class of natural products found in the Erythroxylum genus. However, these compounds are usually separated by traditional chromatographic techniques, in which the sample is progressively purified in multiple chromatographic steps, resulting in a time- and solvent-consuming procedure. In this work we present the isolation of a novel alkaloid, 6β,7β-dibenzoyloxytropan-3α-ol, together with the two known 3α-benzoyloxynortropan-6β-ol and 3α,6β-dibenzoyloxytropane alkaloids, directly from the crude alkaloid fraction from the leaves of Erythroxylum subsessile, by using a single run pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography method. The ethyl acetate/water (1:1, v/v) biphasic solvent system with triethylamine and HCl as retention and eluter agents, respectively, was used to isolate tropane alkaloids for the first time. The structures of the isolated alkaloids were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. PMID:26888377

  1. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses: Glass design, structure, bioactivity, cellular interactions, and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Furqan A

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive glasses (BGs) are known to bond to both hard and soft tissues. Upon exposure to an aqueous environment, BG undergoes ion exchange, hydrolysis, selective dissolution and precipitation of an apatite layer on their surface, which elicits an interfacial biological response resulting in bioactive fixation, inhibiting further dissolution of the glass, and preventing complete resorption of the material. Fluorine is considered one of the most effective in-vivo bone anabolic factors. In low concentrations, fluoride ions (F(-)) increase bone mass and mineral density, improve the resistance of the apatite structure to acid attack, and have well documented antibacterial properties. F(-) ions may be incorporated into the glass in the form of calcium fluoride (CaF2) either by part-substitution of network modifier oxides, or by maintaining the ratios of the other constituents relatively constant. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses (FBGs) enhance and control osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralisation. And with their ability to release fluoride locally, FBGs make interesting candidates for various clinical applications, dentinal tubule occlusion in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. This paper reviews the chemistry of FBGs and the influence of F(-) incorporation on the thermal properties, bioactivity, and cytotoxicity; and novel glass compositions for improved mechanical properties, processing, and bioactive potential.

  2. Visual identification of alkaloids in some medicinal plants: common alkaloid reagents versus bromocresol green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsa F, Esfahani HR, Gamooshi RA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Background: Alkaloids are a group of nitrogenous compounds with potential effects on the physiological behavior of human and animals. Some of these compounds are considered important drugs in modern medicine, such as atropine and morphine. Plants are considered the most important source of alkaloids. Therefore, investigating the presence of alkaloids in different plants is very important. Usually, alkaloids in plants are identified by methods such as those of Dragendorf, Wagner and Meyer, among others, which require milligrams of alkaloids for identification. In the present study, a fast and sensitive procedure for detecting of alkaloids in plants is presented.   "n"nMethods: Twelve dried plants samples were investigated for the presence alkaloids. After extracting the total alkaloid into methanol using a Soxhlet extractor, a few milligrams of the extract was transferred to a separatory funnel, buffered to pH 4.7, the bromocresol green (BCG solution (10-4 M was added, mixed and extracted with CHCl3 until a yellow color was observed in the CHCl3 layer, indicating the presence of the alkaloid. The crude extracts were also investigated by the standard methods of Dragendorf, Wagner and Meyer for the presence of alkaloids.   "n"nResults: Investigation of the 12 plant samples for the presence of alkaloids by the standard reagents of Dragendorf, Wagner, and Meyer showed that only Camelia sinensis (flowers, Echium amoenum Fisch & Mey (flowers, and Stachys (aerial parts are devoid

  3. Greener and Expeditious Synthesis of Bioactive Heterocycles using Microwave Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The utilization of green chemistry techniques is dramatically reducing chemical waste and reaction times as has recently been proven in several organic syntheses and chemical transformations. To illustrate these advantages in the synthesis of bio-active heterocycles, we have stud...

  4. Comparative Analysis of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids from Three Lycoris Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Tian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The major active constituents from Amaryllidaceae family were reported to be Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs, which exhibited a wide spectrum of biological activities, such as anti-tumor, anti-viral, and acetyl-cholinesterase-inhibitory activities. In order to better understand their potential as a source of bioactive AAs and the phytochemical variations among three different species of Lycoris herbs, the HPLC fingerprint profiles of Lycoris aurea (L. aurea, L. radiata, and L. guangxiensis were firstly determined and compared using LC-UV and LC-MS/MS. As a result, 39 peaks were resolved and identified as AAs, of which nine peaks were found in common for all these three species, while the other 30 peaks could be revealed as characteristic AAs for L. aurea, L. radiata and L. guangxiensis, respectively. Thus, these AAs can be used as chemical markers for the identification and quality control of these plant species. To further reveal correlations between chemical components and their pharmaceutical activities of these species at the molecular level, the bioactivities of the total AAs from the three plant species were also tested against HepG2 cells with the inhibitory rate at 78.02%, 84.91% and 66.81% for L. aurea, L. radiata and L. guangxiensis, respectively. This study firstly revealed that the three species under investigation were different not only in the types of AAs, but also in their contents, and both contributed to their pharmacological distinctions. To the best of our knowledge, the current research provides the most detailed phytochemical profiles of AAs in these species, and offers valuable information for future valuation and exploitation of these medicinal plants.

  5. Synthesis and bioactivity of secondary metabolites from marine sponges containing dibrominated indolic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Adriano; Locatelli, Marcello; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Pinnen, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum.) produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharmaceutical fields, especially related to the new drug development process. Researchers have focused their attention principally on secondary metabolites with anti-cancer and cytotoxic activities. A common target for these molecules is the cytoskeleton, which has a central role in cellular proliferation, motility, and profusion involved in the metastatic process associate with tumors. In particular, many substances containing brominated indolic rings such as 5,6-dibromotryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptophan (dibromoabrine), 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine isolated from different marine sources, have shown anti-cancer activity, as well as antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Considering the structural correlation between endogenous monoamine serotonin with marine indolic alkaloids 5,6-dibromoabrine and 5,6-dibromotryptamine, a potential use of some dibrominated indolic metabolites in the treatment of depression-related pathologies has also been hypothesized. Due to the potential applications in the treatment of various diseases and the increasing demand of these compounds for biological assays and the difficult of their isolation from marine sources, we report in this review a series of recent syntheses of marine dibrominated indole-containing products. PMID:22614862

  6. Synthesis and Bioactivity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Sponges Containing Dibrominated Indolic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Stefanucci

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum. produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharmaceutical fields, especially related to the new drug development process. Researchers have focused their attention principally on secondary metabolites with anti-cancer and cytotoxic activities. A common target for these molecules is the cytoskeleton, which has a central role in cellular proliferation, motility, and profusion involved in the metastatic process associate with tumors. In particular, many substances containing brominated indolic rings such as 5,6-dibromotryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptophan (dibromoabrine, 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine isolated from different marine sources, have shown anti-cancer activity, as well as antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Considering the structural correlation between endogenous monoamine serotonin with marine indolic alkaloids 5,6-dibromoabrine and 5,6-dibromotryptamine, a potential use of some dibrominated indolic metabolites in the treatment of depression-related pathologies has also been hypothesized. Due to the potential applications in the treatment of various diseases and the increasing demand of these compounds for biological assays and the difficult of their isolation from marine sources, we report in this review a series of recent syntheses of marine dibrominated indole-containing products.

  7. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy. PMID:24671624

  8. Hemlock alkaloids from Socrates to poison aloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Hemlock (Conium maculatum L. Umbelliferae) has long been known as a poisonous plant. Toxicity is due to a group of piperidine alkaloids of which the representative members are coniine and gamma-coniceine. The latter is the more toxic and is the first formed biosynthetically. Its levels in relation to coniine vary widely according to environmental conditions and to provenance of the plants. Surprisingly, these piperidine alkaloids have turned up in quite unrelated species in the monocotyledons as well as the dicotyledons. Aloes, for instance, important medicinal plants, are not regarded as poisonous although some species are very bitter. Nevertheless a small number of mostly local species contain the alkaloids, especially gamma-coniceine and there have been records of human poisoning. The compounds are recognized by their characteristic mousy smell. Both acute and chronic symptoms have been described. The compounds are neurotoxins and death results from respiratory failure, recalling the effects of curare. Chronic non-lethal ingestion by pregnant livestock leads to foetal malformation. Both acute and chronic toxicity are seen with stock in damp meadows and have been recorded as problems especially in North America. The alkaloids derive biosynthetically from acetate units via the polyketide pathway in contrast to other piperidine alkaloids which derive from lysine.

  9. Two New C19-Diterpenoid Alkaloids from Delphinium davidii Franch.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xia LIANG; Dong Lin CHEN; Feng Peng WANG

    2006-01-01

    Two new C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, davidisines A (1) and B (2) along with thirteen known alkaloids were isolated from the whole herb of Delphinium davidii Franch. Their structures were established by spectral methods, especially 2D NMR techniques.

  10. Biosynthesis of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid Ajmaline Catalyzed by Novel Reductases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction One of the major root alkaloids of the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpenlina Benth. Ex Kurz is named ajmaline. The enzymatic biosynthesisof this alkaloid has been studied for a long time by our group[1].

  11. Biological activity of alkaloids from Solanum dulcamara L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Padma; Sharma, Bindu; Bakshi, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids are well known for their antimicrobial activity. Though all natural alkaloids come from plants, not all plants produce alkaloids. Plants of the Solanaceae family are known for their high alkaloid content. Alkaloids are found in all plant parts like roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. In the present study, those plant parts of Solanum dulcamara were selected which have been reported to produce a high content of a specific alkaloid: solanine (from unripe fruits), solasodine (from flowers) and beta-solamarine (from roots). These alkaloids were extracted from various parts of S. dulcamara by well-established methods and were screened for their antibacterial activity. Human pathogenic bacteria, viz., Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, were selected for the study. All three alkaloids inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. However, no significant activity was observed against E. aerogenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were also evaluated.

  12. Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus Cultivated in Yunnan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Liu, Lu; Chen, Ying-ying; Li, Qiong; Li, Dan; Liu, Va-ping; Luo, Xiao-dong

    2015-12-01

    A new monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, 15,20-dehydro-3α-(2-oxopropyl) coronaridine (1), along with sixteen analogues (2-17) were isolated from the leaves of Catharanthus roseus cultivated in Yunnan. The new alkaloid was elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, and the known alkaloids were identified by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. Among them, alkaloid 16 was isolated from Catharanthus for the first time. PMID:26882670

  13. An efficient synthesis of loline alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Mesut; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    Loline (1) is a small alkaloid that, in spite of its simple-looking structure, has posed surprising challenges to synthetic chemists. It has been known for more than a century and has been the subject of extensive biological investigations, but only two total syntheses have been achieved to date. Here, we report an asymmetric total synthesis of loline that, with less then ten steps, is remarkably short. Our synthesis incorporates a Sharpless epoxidation, a Grubbs olefin metathesis and an unprecedented transannular aminobromination, which converts an eight-membered cyclic carbamate into a bromopyrrolizidine. The synthesis is marked by a high degree of chemo- and stereoselectivity and gives access to several members of the loline alkaloid family. It delivers sufficient material to support a programme aimed at studying the complex interactions between plants, fungi, insects and bacteria brokered by loline alkaloids.

  14. Two New Alkaloids from Narcissus serotinus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Viladomat

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Amaryllidaceae family is well known for the presence of an exclusive group of alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities. Narcissus serotinus L. is a plant belonging to this family and its geographical distribution is mainly located along the Mediterranean coast. In the present work, specimens collected near Casablanca (Morocco were used to study the alkaloid content of this species. Starting with 350 g of the whole plant we used standard extraction and purification procedures to obtain fractions and compounds for GC-MS and NMR analysis. As well as five known alkaloids, we isolated two new compounds: 1-O-(3´-acetoxybutanoyllycorine and narseronine. The latter has been previously published, but with an erroneous structure.

  15. Aporphine alkaloids from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabon, Ludy Cristina; Cuca, Luis Enrique, E-mail: lcpabonb@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional de Bogota (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias. Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Four aporphine alkaloids from the wood of Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae) were isolated and characterized as (S)-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (1), (S)-N-ethoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (2), (S)-N-formyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (3) and (S)-N-methoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (4); alkaloids 2-4 are being report for the first time. The structure the isolated compounds were determined based on their spectral data and by comparison of their spectral data with values described in literature. The alkaloid fraction and compound 1 showed antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and also compound 1 showed antimicrobial activity towards Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis as well. (author)

  16. Aporphine alkaloids from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludy Cristina Pabon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four aporphine alkaloids from the wood of Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae were isolated and characterized as (S-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (1, (S-N-ethoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (2, (S-N-formyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (3 and (S-N-methoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (4; alkaloids 2-4 are being report for the first time. The structure the isolated compounds were determined based on their spectral data and by comparison of their spectral data with values described in literature. The alkaloid fraction and compound 1 showed antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and also compound 1 showed antimicrobial activity towards Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis as well.

  17. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of liriodenine and related oxoaporphine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, C D; Sharma, A S; Oguntimein, B O

    1980-10-01

    Liriodenine was evaluated for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against several microorganisms. Other related oxoaporphine alkaloids also were evaluated. Attempts to prepare oxoaporphine alkaloids from N-acetylnoraporphines were unsuccessful, but an unexpected phenanthrene alkaloid was obtained. A novel N-demethylation reaction was noted when oxogaucine methiodide and liriodenine methiodide were treated with alumina. PMID:7420287

  18. Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles: From Synthesis to Materials Design for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Vichery

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their high biocompatibility and bioactivity, bioactive glasses are very promising materials for soft and hard tissue repair and engineering. Because bioactivity and specific surface area intrinsically linked, the last decade has seen a focus on the development of highly porous and/or nano-sized materials. This review emphasizes the synthesis of bioactive glass nanoparticles and materials design strategies. The first part comprehensively covers mainly soft chemistry processes, which aim to obtain dispersible and monodispersed nanoparticles. The second part discusses the use of bioactive glass nanoparticles for medical applications, highlighting the design of materials. Mesoporous nanoparticles for drug delivery, injectable systems and scaffolds consisting of bioactive glass nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer, implant coatings and particle dispersions will be presented.

  19. Antimicrobial hasubanalactam alkaloid from Stephania glabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Rawat, Usha

    2009-03-01

    A novel hasubanalactam alkaloid, named glabradine, has been isolated from the tubers of Stephania glabra, together with three known quaternary protoberberine alkaloids, palmatine, dehydrocorydalmine and stepharanine. The structure of glabradine was assigned as 7-O-demethyl-N,O-dimethyloxostephinine, by means of rigorous spectroscopic analysis including 2 D NMR measurements. It was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. mutans, Microsporum gypseum, M. canis and Trichophyton rubrum and displayed potent antimicrobial activity superior to those of novobiocin and erythromycin used as positive controls. PMID:19148860

  20. Antiprotozoal alkaloids from Psychotria prunifolia (Kunth) Steyerm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Lucilia; Oliveira, Cecilia M.A. de; Faria, Emiret O.; Ribeiro, Laryssa C.; Carvalho, Brenda G., E-mail: lucilia@quimica.ufg.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus II, Samambaia, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Silva, Cleuza C. da; Santin, Silvana M.O. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR (Brazil); Schuque, Ivania T.A.; Nakamura, Celso V.; Britta, Elisandra A.; Miranda, Nathielle [Departamento de Farmacia e Farmacologia, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, PR (Brazil); Iglesias, Amadeu H. [Waters Technologies do Brasil LTDA, Barueri, SP (Brazil); Delprete, Piero G. [VHerbier de Guyane, Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD), UMR AMAP, French Guiana (France)

    2012-07-01

    The continuity of the phyto chemical study of crude extracts of P. prunifolia's roots and branches led to the isolation of five indole-{beta}-carboline alkaloids. Among them, the 10-hydroxy-iso-deppeaninol and N-oxide-10-hydroxy-antirhine derivatives are described here for the first time. The structures were achieved through 1D and 2D NMR, IR and HRMS analyses. The branches and roots crude extracts and the alkaloids 14-oxoprunifoleine and strictosamide showed selective activity against L. amazonensis, with IC{sub 50} values of 16.0 and 40.7 {mu}g per mL, respectively. (author)

  1. Total Synthesis of the Zoanthamine Alkaloid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Miyashita

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The zoanthamine alkaloids, a type of heptacyclic marine alkaloid isolated from colonial zoanthids of the genus Zoanthus sp., have attracted much attention from a wide area of science, because of their distinctive biological and pharmacological properties as well as their chemical structures with stereochemical complexity.Namely, norzoanthamine (1)[1] can suppress the loss of bone weight and strength in ovariectomized mice and has been considered a promising candidate for an antiosteoporotic drug[1], whereas zoanthamine (2)[2] has exhibited potent inhibitory activity toward phorbol myristate-induced inflammation in addition to powerful analgesic effects[2]. See Fig. 1.

  2. Analysis of E. rutaecarpa Alkaloids Constituents In Vitro and In Vivo by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS Combined with Diagnostic Fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shenshen; Tian, Meng; Yuan, Lei; Deng, Haoyue; Wang, Lei; Li, Aizhu; Hou, Zhiguo; Li, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Rutaceae) dried ripe fruit is used for dispelling colds, soothing liver, and analgesia. Pharmacological research has proved that alkaloids are the main active ingredients of E. rutaecarpa. This study aimed to rapidly classify and identify the alkaloids constituents of E. rutaecarpa by using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS coupled with diagnostic fragments. Furthermore, the effects of the material base of E. rutaecarpa bioactive ingredients in vivo were examined such that the transitional components in the blood of rats intragastrically given E. rutaecarpa were analyzed and identified. In this study, the type of alcohol extraction of E. rutaecarpa and the corresponding blood sample were used for the analysis by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS in positive ion mode. After reviewing much of the literature and collected information on the fragments, we obtained some diagnostic fragments of the alkaloids. Combining the diagnostic fragments with the technology of UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, we identified the compounds of E. rutaecarpa and blood samples and compared the ion fragment information with that of the alkaloids in E. rutaecarpa. A total of 17 alkaloids components and 6 blood components were identified. The proposed method was rapid, accurate, and sensitive. Therefore, this technique can reliably and practically analyze the chemical constituents in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). PMID:27446630

  3. Nocardiopsis species: a potential source of bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennur, T; Ravi Kumar, A; Zinjarde, S S; Javdekar, V

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Nocardiopsis are an ecologically versatile and biotechnologically important group of Actinomycetes. Most of the isolates are halotolerant or halophilic and they prevail in soils, marine environments or hypersaline locations. To aid their survival under these conditions, they mainly produce extremozymes, compatible solutes, surfactants and bioactive compounds. The current review details the bioactive compounds obtained for this genus. Important antimicrobial agents obtained from this genus include polyketides, phenzines, quinoline alkaloids, terphenyls, proteins, thiopeptides and amines. Polyketides and peptides displaying potent anticancer activities are also significant. Tumour promoting agents, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitors, immunomodulators and protein kinase inhibitors are other relevant products obtained from Nocardiopsis species. Structurally, polyketides (synthesized by polyketide synthases) and peptides (made by nonribosomal peptide synthetases or cyclodipeptide synthases) are important compounds. Considered here are also toxins, anti photoaging and adipogenic agents produced by this genus. The gene clusters mediating the synthesis of bioactive compounds have been described. Commercially available products (Apoptolidins and K-252a) derived from this genus have also been described. This review highlights the significance of a single genus in producing an assortment of compounds with varied biological activities. On account of these features, the members of this genus have established a place for themselves and are of considerable value in producing compounds with profound bio-medical applications. PMID:26369300

  4. Hierarchical Fabrication of Engineered Vascularized Bone Biphasic Constructs via Dual 3D Bioprinting: Integrating Regional Bioactive Factors into Architectural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Zhou, Xuan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-01

    A biphasic artificial vascularized bone construct with regional bioactive factors is presented using dual 3D bioprinting platform technique, thereby forming a large functional bone grafts with organized vascular networks. Biocompatible mussel-inspired chemistry and "thiol-ene" click reaction are used to regionally immobilize bioactive factors during construct fabrication for modulating or improving cellular events.

  5. Alkaloid diversity in Galanthus elwesii and Galanthus nivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Bastida, Jaume; Sidjimova, Borjana; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Seventy alkaloids of galanthamine, lycorine, homolycorine, tazettine, haemanthamine, narciclasine, and tyramine types were detected by GC/MS in 25 Galanthus elwesii and seven Galanthus nivalis populations, collected from different locations in Bulgaria. Intraspecies diversity in the alkaloid profiles regarding the main alkaloid types (chemotypes) was observed. Tyramine-type protoalkaloids (namely, hordenine and its derivatives) were dominant in 19 populations of G. elwesii. In other populations of G. elwesii, the plants accumulated mainly homolycorine-, lycorine-, and galanthamine-type alkaloids. The alkaloid profiles of G. nivalis were dominated by narciclasine-, galanthamine-, lycorine-, haemanthamine-, or tazettine-type compounds. Geographical distribution of chemotypes indicated a relationship between populations, since adjacent populations often displayed similar alkaloid profiles. The results from year-to-year sampling and transplantation experiments imply genetic determination of alkaloid synthesis in the two studied species of Galanthus.

  6. A New Quinolizidine Alkaloid from Boehmeria siamensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new quinolizidine alkaloid, 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-3, 4-dehydroquinolizidine (1), was isolated from the ethanol extract of the whole plants of Boehmeria siamensis Craib. Its structure was elucidated on the analysis of 1D NMR and 2D NMR spectrum.

  7. Two New Oxoaporphine Alkaloids from Thalictrum elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志远; 杨小生; 汪冶; 郝小江

    2005-01-01

    Two new oxoaporphine alkaloids, 1,2,3,10-tetramethoxy-9-(2-hydroxy-4,5-dimethoxybenzyloxy)oxoaporphine (1) and 1,2,3,10-tetramethoxy-9-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-formylphenoxy)oxoaporphine (2), were isolated from Thalictrum elegans. Their structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic analysis including 1D, 2D NMR, IR and MS.

  8. Saponins and alkaloids from Abuta grandifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Sayagh, C.; Long, C; Moretti, Christian; Lavaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Five new bidesmosidic saponins (1-5), along with six known triterpenoid saponins, were isolated from the methanolic extracts of the leaves and twigs of Abuta grandifolia. The ethyl acetate extracts allowed the isolation of three tropoloisoquinolines and of one isoquinoline; all were known alkaloids. The structures of all compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic data analysis.

  9. A New Alkaloid from Sinomenium acutum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ming CHENG; Feng QIU; Li Jun WU; Xin Sheng YAO

    2005-01-01

    Sinomenium acutum is widely used in East and South Asia for the treatment of many diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The chemical research on Sinomenium acutum led to the isolation of a new alkaloid compound (1). On the basis of chemical evidences and spectral analysis, 1 was identified as N-(1, 7-dimethoxylphenanthren-2-yl)acetamide.

  10. Histrionicotoxin alkaloids finally detected in an ant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Tappey H.; Adams, Rachelle Martha Marie; Spande, Thomas F.;

    2012-01-01

    Workers of the ant Carebarella bicolor collected in Panama were found to have two major poison-frog alkaloids, cis- and trans-fused decahydroquinolines (DHQs) of the 269AB type, four minor 269AB isomers, two minor 269B isomers, and three isomers of DHQ 271D. For the first time in an ant, however......, the DHQs were accompanied by six histrionicotoxins (HTXs), viz., 283A, 285A, 285B, 285C, 287A, and 287D. This co-occurrence of the HTX and DHQ alkaloids is the usual pattern seen in dendrobatid frogs. This finding contrasts with our earlier study, where workers of a Brazilian ant, Solenopsis (Diplorhoptrum......) sp., were found to have a very similar DHQ complex but failed to show HTXs. Several new DHQ alkaloids of MW 271 (named in the frog as 271G) are reported from the above ants that have both m/z 202 and 204 as major fragment ions, unlike the spectrum seen for the poison-frog alkaloid 271D, which has...

  11. Acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting Alkaloids from Zephyranthes concolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Arseneau

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The bulbs and aerial parts of Zephyranthes concolor (Lindl. Benth. & Hook. f. (Amaryllidaceae, an endemic species to Mexico, were found to contain the alkaloids chlidanthine, galanthamine, galanthamine N-oxide, lycorine, galwesine, and epinorgalanthamine. Since currently only partial and low resolution 1H-NMR data for chlidanthine acetate are available, and none for chlidanthine, its 1D and 2D high resolution 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra were recorded. Unambiguous assignations were achieved with HMBC, and HSQC experiments, and its structure was corroborated by X-ray diffraction. Minimum energy conformation for structures of chlidanthine, and its positional isomer galanthamine, were calculated by molecular modelling. Galanthamine is a well known acetylcholinesterase inhibitor; therefore, the isolated alkaloids were tested for this activity. Chlidanthine and galanthamine N-oxide inhibited electric eel acetylcholinesterase (2.4 and 2.6 × 10−5 M, respectively, indicating they are about five times less potent than galanthamine, while galwesine was inactive at 10−3 M. Inhibitory activity of HIV-1 replication, and cytotoxicity of the isolated alkaloids were evaluated in human MT-4 cells; however, the alkaloids showed poor activity as compared with standard anti-HIV drugs, but most of them were not cytotoxic.

  12. Recombinagenic activity of integerrimine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid from Senecio brasiliensis, in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campesato, V R; Graf, U; Reguly, M L; de Andrade, H H

    1997-01-01

    Integerrimine (ITR), a pyrrolizidine alkaloid from Senecio brasiliensis, was tested for genotoxicity using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. The compound was administered by chronic feeding (48 hours) of 3-day-old larvae. Two different crosses involving the markers flare (flr) and multiple wing hairs (mwh) were used, that is, the standard (ST) cross and the high bioactivation (HB) cross, which has a high cytochrome P450-dependent bioactivation capacity. In both crosses, the wings of two types of progeny were analyzed, that is, inversion-free marker heterozygotes and balancer heterozygotes carrying multiple inversions. ITR was found to be equally potent in inducing spots in a dose-related manner in the marker heterozygotes of both crosses. This indicates that the bioactivation capacity present in larvae of the ST cross is sufficient to reveal the genotoxic activity of ITR. In the balancer heterozygotes of both crosses, where all recombinational events are eliminated due to the inversions, the frequencies of induced spots were considerably reduced which documents the recombinagenic activity of ITR. Linear regression analysis of the dose response relationships for both genotypes shows that 85% to 90% of the wing spots are due to mitotic recombination. PMID:9020312

  13. Gastroprotective activity of alkaloid extract and 2-phenylquinoline obtained from the bark of Galipea longiflora Krause (Rutaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Francielle; Gandolfi, Renan Becker; Lemos, Marivane; Ticona, Juan Carlos; Gimenez, Alberto; Clasen, Bruna Kurz; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni

    2009-07-15

    As part of our continuing search for bioactive natural products from plants, the present study was carried out in order to evaluate the gastroprotective properties of alkaloid extract and 2-phenylquinoline obtained from the bark of Galipea longiflora (Rutaceae). Anti-ulcer assays were performed using the following protocols in mice: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/bethanecol-induced ulcer, ethanol/HCl-induced ulcer, and stress-induced ulcer. The effects of the extract on gastric content volume, pH and total acidity were also evaluated, using the pylorus ligated model. Treatment using doses of 50, 125 and 250 mg/kg of G. longiflora alkaloid extract and positive controls (omeprazol or cimetidine) significantly diminished the lesion index, total lesion area, and percentage of lesion, in comparison with the negative control groups in all the models evaluated. Regarding the model of gastric secretion, a reduction in volume of gastric juice and total acidity was observed, as well as an increase in gastric pH. The main alkaloid of the plant, 2-phenylquinoline, was also evaluated in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. The results showed that at a dose of 50 mg/kg, it significantly inhibited ulcerative lesions. However, this effect was less than that of the alkaloid extract. All these results taken together show that G. longiflora displays gastroprotective activity, as evidenced by its significant inhibition of the formation of ulcers induced by different models. There are indications that mechanisms involved in anti-ulcer activity are related to a decrease in gastric secretion and an increase in gastric mucus content. Also, there is evidence of involvement of NO in the gastroprotector mechanisms. These effects may be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of some alkaloids, particularly 2-phenylquinoline. PMID:19497430

  14. Applied bioactive polymeric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Carraher, Charles; Foster, Van

    1988-01-01

    The biological and biomedical applications of polymeric materials have increased greatly in the past few years. This book will detail some, but not all, of these recent developments. There would not be enough space in this book to cover, even lightly, all of the major advances that have occurred. Some earlier books and summaries are available by two of this book's Editors (Gebelein & Carraher) and these should be consul ted for additional information. The books are: "Bioactive Polymeric Systems" (Plenum, 1985); "Polymeric Materials In Medication" (Plenum, 1985); "Biological Acti vi ties of Polymers" (American Chemical Society, 1982). Of these three, "Bioacti ve Polymeric Systems" should be the most useful to a person who is new to this field because it only contains review articles written at an introductory level. The present book primarily consists of recent research results and applications, with only a few review or summary articles. Bioactive polymeric materials have existed from the creation of life...

  15. Bioactive phytochemicals in flaxseed

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, Pernilla

    2009-01-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) is rich in health-promoting bioactive compounds. Among plant foods, flaxseed has the highest content of lignans, mainly in the form of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). Flaxseed oil also has a very high concentration of the essential omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). This thesis presents studies on both SDG and ALA. An HPLC method for quantification of SDG in hydrolysed flaxseed extracts was developed and used to compare the SDG content in ...

  16. Studies on the Chemistry of Paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Haiqing Jr.

    1998-01-01

    STUDIES ON THE CHEMISTRY OF PACLITAXEL HAIQING YUAN (ABSTRACT) Paclitaxel is a natural occurring diterpene alkaloid originally isolated from the bark of Taxus brevifolia. It is now one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents for clinical treatment of ovarian and breast cancers. Recent clinical trials have also shown paclitaxel's potential for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer, head and neck cancer, and other types of cancers. While tremendous chemica...

  17. Bioactive molecules: current trends in discovery, synthesis, delivery and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew Beng Kang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Important bioactive molecules are moleculesthat are pharmacologically active derived from naturalsources and through chemical synthesis. Over the yearsmany of such molecules have been discovered throughbioprospective endeavours. The discovery of taxol fromthe pacific yew tree bark that has the ability in stabilisingcellular microtubules represents one of the hallmarks ofsuccess of such endeavours. In recent years, the discoveryprocess has been aided by the rapid developmentof techniques and technologies in chemistry andbiotechnology. The progress in advanced genetics andcomputational biology has also transformed the wayhypotheses are formulated as well as the strategies for drugdiscovery. Of equal importance is the use of advanceddrug delivery vehicles in enhancing the efficacy andbioavailability of bioactive molecules. The availability ofsuitable animal models for testing and validation is yetanother major determinant in increasing the prospect forclinical trials of bioactive molecules.

  18. Biological Impact of Bioactive Glasses and Their Dissolution Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Alexander; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-01-01

    For many years, bioactive glasses (BGs) have been widely considered for bone tissue engineering applications due to their ability to bond to hard as well as soft tissue (a property termed bioactivity) and for their stimulating effects on bone formation. Ionic dissolution products released during the degradation of the BG matrix induce osteogenic gene expression leading to enhanced bone regeneration. Recently, adding bioactive metallic ions (e.g. boron, copper, cobalt, silver, zinc and strontium) to silicate (or phosphate and borate) glasses has emerged as a promising route for developing novel BG formulations with specific therapeutic functionalities, including antibacterial, angiogenic and osteogenic properties. The degradation behaviour of BGs can be tailored by adjusting the glass chemistry making these glass matrices potential carrier systems for controlled therapeutic ion release. This book chapter summarises the fundamental aspects of the effect of ionic dissolution products from BGs on osteogenesis and angiogenesis, whilst discussing novel BG compositions with controlled therapeutic ion release. PMID:26201273

  19. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  20. Phytochemical genomics of the Madagascar periwinkle: Unravelling the last twists of the alkaloid engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Clastre, Marc; Besseau, Sébastien; Oudin, Audrey; Burlat, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Lanoue, Arnaud; Papon, Nicolas; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Courdavault, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle produces a large palette of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids (MIAs), a class of complex alkaloids including some of the most valuable plant natural products with precious therapeutical values. Evolutionary pressure on one of the hotspots of biodiversity has obviously turned this endemic Malagasy plant into an innovative alkaloid engine. Catharanthus is a unique taxon producing vinblastine and vincristine, heterodimeric MIAs with complex stereochemistry, and also manufactures more than 100 different MIAs, some shared with the Apocynaceae, Loganiaceae and Rubiaceae members. For over 60 years, the quest for these powerful anticancer drugs has inspired biologists, chemists, and pharmacists to unravel the chemistry, biochemistry, therapeutic activity, cell and molecular biology of Catharanthus roseus. Recently, the "omics" technologies have fuelled rapid progress in deciphering the last secret of strictosidine biosynthesis, the central precursor opening biosynthetic routes to several thousand MIA compounds. Dedicated C. roseus transcriptome, proteome and metabolome databases, comprising organ-, tissue- and cell-specific libraries, and other phytogenomic resources, were developed for instance by PhytoMetaSyn, Medicinal Plant Genomic Resources and SmartCell consortium. Tissue specific library screening, orthology comparison in species with or without MIA-biochemical engines, clustering of gene expression profiles together with various functional validation strategies, largely contributed to enrich the toolbox for plant synthetic biology and metabolic engineering of MIA biosynthesis. PMID:25146650

  1. Endophytes: A Treasure House of Bioactive Compounds of Medicinal Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Sushanto; Das, Gitishree; Sen, Sandeep K.; Shin, Han-Seung; Patra, Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Endophytes are an endosymbiotic group of microorganisms that colonize in plants and microbes that can be readily isolated from any microbial or plant growth medium. They act as reservoirs of novel bioactive secondary metabolites, such as alkaloids, phenolic acids, quinones, steroids, saponins, tannins, and terpenoids that serve as a potential candidate for antimicrobial, anti-insect, anticancer and many more properties. While plant sources are being extensively explored for new chemical entities for therapeutic purposes, endophytic microbes also constitute an important source for drug discovery. This review aims to comprehend the contribution and uses of endophytes as an impending source of drugs against various forms of diseases and other possible medicinal use. PMID:27746767

  2. Synthesis of the Marine Pyrroloiminoquinone Alkaloids, Discorhabdins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasufumi Wada

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Manynatural products with biologically interesting structures have been isolated from marine animals and plants such as sponges, corals, worms, etc. Some of them are discorhabdin alkaloids. The discorhabdin alkaloids (discorhabdin A-X, isolated from marine sponges, have a unique structure with azacarbocyclic spirocyclohexanone and pyrroloiminoquinone units. Due to their prominent potent antitumor activity, discorhabdins have attracted considerable attention. Many studies have been reported toward the synthesis of discorhabdins. We have accomplished the first total synthesis of discorhabdin A (1, having the strongest activity in vitro among discorhabdins in 2003. In 2009, we have also accomplished the first total synthesis of prianosin B (2, having the 16,17-dehydropyrroloiminoquinone moiety, by a novel dehydrogenation reaction with a catalytic amount of NaN3. These synthetic studies, as well as syntheses of the discorhabdins by various chemists to-date, are reviewed here.

  3. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jian Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made.

  4. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2015-12-11

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  5. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo J. Diaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  6. Antimicrobial alkaloids from Zanthoxylum tetraspermum and caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanka, A P; Karunaratne, V; Bandara, B M; Kumar, V; Nakanishi, T; Nishi, M; Inada, A; Tillekeratne, L M; Wijesundara, D S; Gunatilaka, A A

    2001-04-01

    Two benzophenanthrene alkaloids, 8-acetonyldihydronitidine and 8-acetonyldihydroavicine were isolated from Zanthoxylum tetraspermum stem bark along with liriodenine, sesamin, lichexanthone and (+)-piperitol-gamma,gamma-dimethylallylether. The species endemic to Sri Lanka, Z. caudatum, contained sesamin, savinin, liriodenine, decarine and 8-O-desmethyl-N-nornitidine. 8-Acetonyldihydronitidine and 8-acetonyldihydroavicine showed significant antibacterial activity while the former along with liriodenine was strongly antifungal. Savinin exhibited potent spermicidal activity. Both savinin and sesamin exhibited significant insecticidal activity. PMID:11324918

  7. Synthesis studies on the Melodinus alkaloid meloscine

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Ken S.; Antoline, Joshua F.

    2013-01-01

    The pentacyclic Melodinus alkaloid (±)-meloscine was synthesized in 19 chemical steps from 2-bromobenzaldehyde through a route featuring an allenyl azide cyclization cascade to deliver the core azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane substructure. Peripheral functionalization of this core included a Tollens-type aldol condensation to set the quaternary center at C(20) and a diastereoselective ring closing metathesis to forge the tetrahydropyridine ring.

  8. A new alkaloid from Solanum cathayanum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Cheng; Xiang Li; Jun Zhi Wang

    2008-01-01

    A new alkaloid compound I was obtained from Solanum cathayanum, a folk medicine of Hubei Province, together with a knownalkaloid, orotic acid ethyl ester. On the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical methods, I was identified as 8-hydroxy-3-methoxy-5H-pyrido[2,1-c]pyrazin-5-one. Compound 1 can inhibit the production of NO in peritoneal macrophage of mice induced with LPS.The content of NO was determined by enzyme methods.

  9. Potential antimalarial activity of indole alkaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Frederich, Michel; Tits, Monique; Angenot, Luc

    2008-01-01

    New antimalarial treatments are now urgently required, following the emergence of resistance to the most used drugs. Natural products contribute greatly to the therapeutic arsenal in this area, including artemisinin and quinine (and atovaquone, semi-synthetic). Among the natural products, indole alkaloids represent an interesting class of compounds. Screening carried out to date has revealed several substances active in vitro under the micromolar range and with a good selectivity index. This ...

  10. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids and diterpenes from Villasenoria orcuttii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arciniegas, Amira; Perez-Castorena, Ana L.; Gonzalez, Karina; Vivar, Alfonso Romo de, E-mail: alperezc@unam.mx [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan, DF (Mexico); Reyes-Lezama, Marisol [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico-Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UAEM-UNAM), Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Villasenor, Jose Luis [Instituto de Biologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan, DF, (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    The chemical study of Villasenoria orcuttii, the only species of the genus Villasenoria, afforded three acyclic diterpenes, two of them described for the first time. Two pyrrolizidine alkaloids, florosenine and floridanine, among other known compounds were also isolated. The absolute configuration of floridanine was determined by X-ray analysis using anomalous dispersion with Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation, and its {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data were corrected. (author)

  11. A Recent Perspective on Discovery and Development of Diverse Therapeutic Agents Inspired from Isatin Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Rajesh A; Karunanidhi, Sivanandhan; Jain, Kavita; Shaikh, Mahamadhanif; Hampannavar, Girish; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2016-01-01

    Isatin as an alkaloidal framework have consistently attracted attention of medicinal chemist towards development of wide range of novel therapeutic agents. This review report has discussed significant isatin lead molecules and their derivatives which have shown promising biological potential in recent times. The substituted isatins showing a potent pharmacological activities such as antimicrobial, antitubercular, anticancer, antioxidant, anti-histaminic, anti-HIV, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-Parkinson's and antidiabetic have been described in this review. The mechanism of action leading to therapeutic activity of the respective isatin derivation has also been recorded. This review reveals that the systematic and rational modifications on isatin motif exhibited significant bio-activities which can be exploited for the development of potent novel therapeutic agents in the future studies. Hence the quest to investigate more structural alterations on isatin scaffold should be continued. PMID:26369813

  12. Lipoperoxidation and cyclooxygenase enzyme inhibitory piperidine alkaloids from Cassia spectabilis green fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Cláudio; Silva, Dulce H S; Pivatto, Marcos; de Rezende, Amanda; Castro-Gambôa, Ian; Bolzani, Vanderlan S; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2007-12-01

    Phytochemical work in the search for bioactive metabolites from the methanolic extract of Senna spectabilis green fruits led to the isolation of a new piperidine alkaloid, (+)-3- O-feruloylcassine ( 1), in addition to the known (-)-spectaline ( 2) and (-)-3- O-acetylspectaline ( 3). The isolates were submitted to in vitro evaluation of lipoperoxidation (LPO) and cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and -2) inhibitory properties and showed moderate antioxidant activities (40-70%) at 100 ppm when compared to commercial standards BHT and vitamin E and moderate inhibition of COX-1 (ca . 40%) and marginal inhibition of COX-2 enzymes (<10%) at 100 ppm when compared to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) aspirin, rofecoxib, and celecoxib, respectively.

  13. Two New Alkaloids from Roots of Stemona tuberosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligen Lin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The roots of Stemona tuberosa ha ve been used as an antitussive and insecticide remedy for thousands of years. On the chemical investigation of the roots of S . tuberosa , two new tuberostemonine-type alkaloids, epoxy-tuberostemonol (1, and neotuberostemoenone (2, together with a known alkaloid, n eotuberostemonine, were isolated and identified. The structures of new alkaloids were established on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR and other spectroscopic analyses.

  14. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Bremner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on structural elucidation of some of the alkaloids is reported briefly.

  15. A new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid from Hamelia patens micropropagated plantlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua-Vega, David; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2012-11-01

    Chemical studies on Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) micropropagated plantlets allowed production of a new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid, named (-)-hameline (7), together with eight known alkaloids, tetrahydroalstonine (1), aricine (2), pteropodine (3), isopteropodine (4), uncarine F (5), speciophylline (6), palmirine (8), and rumberine (9). The structure of the new alkaloid was assigned on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling.

  16. Tobacco NUP1 transports both tobacco alkaloids and vitamin B6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Keita; Shitan, Nobukazu; Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The purine permeases (PUPs) constitute a large plasma membrane-localized transporter family in plants that mediates the proton-coupled uptake of nucleotide bases and their derivatives, such as adenine, cytokinins, and caffeine. A Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) PUP-family transporter, nicotine uptake permease 1 (NtNUP1), was previously shown to transport tobacco alkaloids and to affect both nicotine biosynthesis and root growth in tobacco plants. Since Arabidopsis PUP1, which belongs to the same subclade as NtNUP1, was recently reported to transport pyridoxine and its derivatives (vitamin B6), it was of interest to examine whether NtNUP1 could also transport these substrates. Direct uptake measurements in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that NtNUP1 efficiently promoted the uptake of pyridoxamine, pyridoxine, anatabine, and nicotine. The naturally occurring (S)-isomer of nicotine was preferentially transported over the (R)-isomer. Transport studies using tobacco BY-2 cell lines overexpressing NtNUP1 or PUP1 showed that NtNUP1, similar to PUP1, transported various compounds containing a pyridine ring, but that the two transporters had distinct substrate preferences. Therefore, the previously reported effects of NtNUP1 on tobacco physiology might involve bioactive metabolites other than tobacco alkaloids. PMID:24947336

  17. Binding Parameters of Alkaloids Berberine and Sanguinarine with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Gumenyuk, V G; Kutovyy, S Yu; Yashchuk, V M; Zaika, L A

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of berberine and sanguinarine (plant alkaloids) with DNA in aqueous solutions, by using optical spectroscopy methods (absorption and fluorescence). The dependencies of alkaloid spectral characteristics on the concentration ratio N/c between the DNA base pairs and alkaloid molecules in the solutions are considered, and the manifestations of the alkaloid-DNA binding are revealed. The character of binding is found to depend on N/c. The parameters of the binding of berberine and sanguinarine with DNA are determined, by using the modified Scatchard and McGhee-von Hippel equations

  18. Characterization of chemical constituents and rats metabolites of an alkaloidal extract of Alstonia scholaris leaves by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Shen, Hong-Mei; Wang, Qi; Qian, Yi; Guo, Hong-Cheng; Li, Kai; Qiao, Xue; Guo, De-An; Luo, Xiao-Dong; Ye, Min

    2016-07-15

    Alstonia scholaris has been used in "Dai" ethnic medicine to treat chronic respiratory diseases for a long history, and the major bioactive constituents are alkaloids. An alkaloidal extract of A. scholaris leaves (AAS) has been developed into an investigational new drug, and has been approved for phase I/II clinical trials by China Food and Drug Administration. However, little is known on the chemical composition and in vivo metabolism of AAS, thus far. In this study, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC/qTOF-MS) method was established to characterize the chemical constituents of AAS. Samples were separated on an ACQUITY UPLC CSH column (2.1×100mm, 1.7μm) with acetonitrile and water containing 0.3% formic acid as the mobile phase. On the basis of high-accuracy mass spectral analysis, a total of 35 alkaloids were characterized from AAS, including 11 scholaricine-type, 9 vallesamine-type, 12 picrinine-type, and 3 tubotaiwine-type alkaloids. Furthermore, the metabolic pathways of 4 representative alkaloids in rats were studied. They mainly undertook hydroxylation and glucuronidation reactions. Based on the above metabolic pathways, the metabolism of AAS (10mg/kg) in rats after oral administration was studied by LC/MS. A total of 33 compounds in plasma, 40 compounds in urine, and 38 compounds in feces were characterized. The results indicated that scholaricine-type alkaloids could get into circulation more readily than the other types. This is the first systematic study on chemical profiling and metabolites identification of AAS. PMID:26275898

  19. Quantitative determination of isoquinoline alkaloids and chlorogenic acid in Berberis species using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Kumar, Sunil; Arya, Kamal Ram; Sharma, Kulwant Rai; Kumar, Brijesh

    2015-06-01

    Berberis species are well known and used extensively as medicinal plants in traditional medicine. They have many medicinal values attributable to the presence of alkaloids having different pharmacological activities. In this study, a method was developed and validated as per international conference on harmonization guidelines using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry operated in the multiple reaction monitoring mode for nine bioactive compounds, including protoberberine alkaloids, aporphine alkaloids and chlorogenic acid. This method was applied in different plant parts of eight Berberis species to determine variations in content of nine bioactive compounds. The separation was achieved on an ACQUITY UPLC CSH™ C18 column using a gradient mobile phase at flow rate 0.3 mL/min. Calibration curves for all the nine analytes provided optimum linear detector response (with R(2) ≥0.9989) over the concentration range of 0.5-1000 ng/mL. The precision and accuracy were within RSDs ≤2.4 and ≤2.3%, respectively. The results indicated significant variation in the total contents of the nine compounds in Berberis species. PMID:25847792

  20. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  1. Potential Pharmacological Resources: Natural Bioactive Compounds from Marine-Derived Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liming; Quan, Chunshan; Hou, Xiyan; Fan, Shengdi

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a considerable number of structurally unique metabolites with biological and pharmacological activities have been isolated from the marine-derived fungi, such as polyketides, alkaloids, peptides, lactones, terpenoids and steroids. Some of these compounds have anticancer, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibiotic and cytotoxic properties. This review partially summarizes the new bioactive compounds from marine-derived fungi with classification according to the sources of fungi and their biological activities. Those fungi found from 2014 to the present are discussed.

  2. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (KA) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level

  3. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Bulgarian species of the genus Senecio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADEZHDA KOSTOVA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine Bulgarian species from the genus Senecio were studied phytochemically and/or by GC-MS analysis. Senecivernine-N-oxide was isolated and identified by spectral data for the first time. Different types of pyrrolizidine alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity on murine lymphocytes. At a concentration of 100 µg/ml, the alkaloid retroisosenine showed immunosuppressive effect.

  4. Galanthindole: a new indole alkaloid from Galanthus plicatus ssp. byzantinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Nehir; Kaya, G Irem; Werner, Christa; Verpoorte, Robert; Gözler, Belkis

    2003-09-01

    A new indole alkaloid, galanthindole, was isolated from Galanthus plicatus ssp. byzantinus (Amaryllidaceae), a plant native to northwestern Turkey. Incorporating a non-fused indole ring, galanthindole may represent the prototype of a new subgroup of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids. Two other bases, (+)-11-hydroxyvittatine and hordenine, are also reported from the same plant.

  5. Two New Norditerpenoid Alkaloids from Aconitum spicatum Stapf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ming GAO; Xiao Mei WEI; Li YANG

    2005-01-01

    Two new norditerpenoid alkaloids, spicatine A (1) and spicatine B (2) were isolated from the root of Aconitum spicatum. The new compounds were deduced on the basis of their spectral data (IR, HREIMS, EIMS, 1D, 2D-NMR). This is the first whole report on the isolation of diterpenoid alkaloids from the A. spicatum Stapf.

  6. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yantao [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Peng, Tingting [College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Baicheng Normal University, Baicheng, 130032 (China); Zhao, Lei [Siping Institute for Food and Drug Control, Siping 136000 (China); Jiang, Dayu [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Cui, Yuncheng, E-mail: 1979yanzi@163.com [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China)

    2014-12-15

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (K{sub A}) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level.

  7. ALKALOIDS OF SOME EUROPEAN AND MACARONESIAN SEDOIDEAE AND SEMPERVIVOIDEAE (CRASSULACEAE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEVENS, JF; THART, H; HENDRIKS, H; MALINGRE, TM

    1992-01-01

    Some 22 pyrrolidine and piperdine alkaloids were detected in the leafy parts of Sedum acre, S. aetnense, S. anglicum, S. brissemoreti, S. farinosum, S. fusiforme, S. lancerottense, S. melanantherum, and S. nudum. In addition to the alkaloids known from S. acre, 1-(2-pyrrolidyl)-propan-2-one and 2-mo

  8. Extraction of alkaloids for NMR-based profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Nyberg, Nils; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W.

    2012-01-01

    of the well-known cinchona alkaloids quinine, cinchonine and cinchonidine without any apparent clustering. Signals from analogues were detected but not in substantial amounts. The main variation was related to the absolute amounts of extracted alkaloids, which was attributed to the evolution of the Cinchona...

  9. New monoterpenoid alkaloids from the aerial parts of Uncaria hirsuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Sheng-Yuan; Tian, Hai-Yan; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of medicinal plant Uncaria hirsuta, three new monoterpenoid alkaloids, named hirsutanines A-C (1-3), were isolated. Their structures with absolute configurations were elucidated by means of NMR, X-ray diffraction and CD analysis. Compound 3 was the first dimeric monoterpenoid alkaloid obtained from genus Uncaria. PMID:24684175

  10. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  11. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  12. Colour Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  13. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  14. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  15. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troco K. Mihali

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin (STX and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs. PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes, which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified in several cyanobacterial genera including Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, Aphanizomenon Planktothrix and Lyngbya. STX and its analogs can be structurally classified into several classes such as non-sulfated, mono-sulfated, di-sulfated, decarbamoylated and the recently discovered hydrophobic analogs—each with varying levels of toxicity. Biotransformation of the PSTs into other PST analogs has been identified within marine invertebrates, humans and bacteria. An improved understanding of PST transformation into less toxic analogs and degradation, both chemically or enzymatically, will be important for the development of methods for the detoxification of contaminated water supplies and of shellfish destined for consumption. Some PSTs also have demonstrated pharmaceutical potential as a long-term anesthetic in the treatment of anal fissures and for chronic tension-type headache. The recent elucidation of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in cyanobacteria and the identification of new PST analogs will present opportunities to further explore the pharmaceutical potential of these intriguing alkaloids.

  16. Bioactive glasses: Frontiers and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry L. Hench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980’s it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are: a discovery; b clinical application; c tissue regeneration; and d innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs.

  17. Bioactive proteins from pipefishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. Rethna Priya; S. Ravichandran; R. Ezhilmathi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To screen antimicrobial potence of some pipefish species collected from Tuticorin coastal environment.Methods:Antimicrobial activity of pipefishes in methanol extract was investigated against 10 bacterial and 10 fungal human pathogenic strains.Results:Among the tested strains, in Centriscus scutatus, pipefish showed maximum zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholerae (8 mm) and minimum in the sample of Hippichthys cyanospilos against Klebseilla pneumoniae (2 mm). In positive control, maximum zone of inhibition was recorded in Vibrio cholerae (9 mm) and minimum in Klebseilla pneumoniae, and Salmonella paratyphi (5 mm). Chemical investigation indicated the presence of peptides as evidenced by ninhydrin positive spots on thin layer chromatography and presence of peptide. In SDS PAGE, in Centriscus scutatus, four bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 25.8-75 kDa. In Hippichthys cyanospilos, five bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 20.5-78 kDa. The result of FT-IR spectrum revealed that the pipe fishes extracts compriseed to have peptide derivatives as their predominant chemical groups.Conclusions:It can be conclude that this present investigation suggests the tested pipe fishes will be a potential source of natural bioactive compounds.

  18. Bioactive metabolite profiles and antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts from Muntingia calabura L. leaves and stems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Patrick Cruiz Buhian; Raquel Orejudos Rubio; Demetrio Lim Valle Jr; Juliana Janet Martin-Puzon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the bioactive phytochemicals and antimicrobial activity of leaf and stem ethanolic extracts from Muntingia calabura L. (M. calabura). Methods: Dried leaves and stems of M. calabura were extracted with 95%ethanol. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the extracts were examined using the disc diffusion assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each extract showing antimicrobial activity was determined. The dried extracts were subjected to phyto-chemical screening to determine the presence of bioactive components. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method and the aluminum chloride method, respectively. Results: Varying degrees of antimicrobial activity were exhibited by the leaf and stem extracts against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Bacillus subtilis, and Candida albicans (C. albicans), with minimal activity against Escherichia coli. Based on the MIC, the extracts showed the highest activity against C. albicans, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of sterols, flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins, glycosides and tannins in the leaf extract; however, no triterpenes were detected. In the stem extract, triterpenes were detected along with relative amounts of flavonoids, saponins, glycosides and tannins. Alkaloids and sterols were absent in the stem extract. Conclusions: M. calabura leaf and stem ethanol extracts are potential sources of anti-bacterial agents against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. This study reports for the first time the high degree of antifungal activity of M. calabura ethanolic extract, especially against C. albicans.

  19. Indolopyridoquinazoline alkaloids from Esenbeckia grandiflora mart. (Rutaceae); Alkaloides {beta}-indolopiridoquinazolinicos de Esenbeckia grandiflora mart. (Rutaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Januario, Ana Helena; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Silva, Maria Fatima das Gracas Fernandes da; Fernandes, Joao Batista [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCAR), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica], e-mail: anahjanuario@unifran.br; Silva, Jorge Jose de Brito; Conserva, Lucia Maria [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica e Biotecnologia

    2009-07-01

    The chemical composition of two specimens of Esenbeckia grandiflora, collected in the south and northeast regions of Brazil, was investigated. In this study, three b-indolopyridoquinazoline alkaloids from the leaves (rutaecarpine, 1-hydroxyrutaecarpine) and roots (euxylophoricine D) were isolated for the first time in this genus. In addition, the triterpenes {alpha}-amyrin, {beta}-amyrin, {alpha}-amyrenonol, {beta}-amyrenonol, 3{alpha}-hydroxy-ursan-12-one, and 3{alpha}-hydroxy-12,13-epoxy-oleanane, the coumarins auraptene, umbelliferone, pimpinelin, and xanthotoxin, the furoquinoline alkaloids delbine and kokusaginine, and the phytosteroids sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol and 3{beta}-O-{beta}-D-glucopyranosylsitosterol were also isolated from the leaves, twigs, roots and stems of this species. Structures of these compounds were established by spectral analysis. (author)

  20. Microwave-assisted synthesis of bio-active heterocycles in aqueous media

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of bio-active heterocycles and fine chemicals in aqueous media are one of the best solutions for the development of green and sustainable protocols. To illustrate the advantages of aqueous MW chemistry in heterocycle synthesis, in this chapter, various synthetic pathways developed in recent years in aqueous reaction media using microwave irradiation are described.

  1. The distribution of inole alkaloids in different organs of Catharanthus roseus G. Don. (Vinca rosea L)

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Ebrahimzadeh; Azra Ataei -Azimi4 Mohammad-Reza Noori-Dafoi

    1996-01-01

    The study of alkaloid extract of the leaf of Vinca rosea by TLC showed the existence of 13 bands, 7 bands of them were: Serpentine, Vincristine, Vinblastine, Ajmaline, Catharantine, Vindoline and Ajmalicine. The existence of these 7 alkaloids was confirmed in the young leaves, old leaves and the roots of the plant by HPLC. Furthermore, two alkaloids with the short retention times and one alkaloid with the medium retention time in the young leaf, three alkaloids with the short retention time a...

  2. Genotoxic and tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in Chinese herbal plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.P. Fu; Q. Xia; M.W. Chou; G. Lin

    2005-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are a class of hepatotoxic and tumorigenic compounds detected in Chinese herbal plants,contaminated foods, and dietary supplements. In this review, the sources, toxicity, genotoxicity, tumorigenicity, and the metabolic pathways,particular the activation pathways leading to hepatotoxicity and tumorigenicity, of pyrrolizidine alkaloids are briefly discussed, with a focus on the most recent important findings concerning the genotoxic mechanism by which riddelliine liver tumors. This mechanism involves the formation of 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts and may be general to most carcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

  3. Prenylindole alkaloids from Raputia praetermissa (Rutaceae) and their chemosystematic significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas, Lisandra V.; Veiga, Thiago Andre M.; Fernandes, Joao B.; Vieira, Paulo C.; Silva, M. Fatima das G.F. da, E-mail: dmfs@power.ufscar.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DQ/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    The dichloromethane extract from the stems of Raputia praetermissa afforded four new compounds, 4-deoxyraputindole C (1), raputimonoindole A-B (2, 3), and hexadecanyl 2-hydroxy- 4-methoxy-cinnamate (5), besides the alkaloids 5-(4-methoxymethylfuran-2-yl)-1H-indole (raputimonoindole C), furoquinolines maculosidine, robustine, evolitrine and dictamnine. The hexane extract yielded N-methyl-4-methoxyquinoline-2(1H)-one, skimmianine, cycloartenone, sitosterol, stigmasterol and sitostenone. The anthranilate alkaloid content indicates that the genus is strongly related to those included in Cusparieae tribe, but differs from Neoraputia by the absence of prenylindole alkaloids in the late, whose species have previously been placed in Raputia. (author)

  4. Antifouling Alkaloids from Crinum augustum (Amaryllidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Refaat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation and purification of the ethanolic extract of the bulbs of Crinum augustum Rox. (Amaryllidaceae cultivated in Egypt yielded five alkaloids 6-methoxy-crinamine (1 , crinamine (2 , buphanisine (3 , ungeremine (4 , and hippadine (5 ; two fatty acid derivatives: myristic acid ethyl ester (6 and palmitic acid ethyl ester (7 ; four terpenoidal and steroidal compounds: ursolic acid (8 , β-sitosterol-O- β glucopyranoside (9 and mixture of β--sitosterol (10 and stigmasterol (11 . The structures of all compounds were determined by interpretation of their spectroscopic data; 1D ( 1 H and 13 C, 2D (HSQC, COSY, DQF, NOE and HMBC NMR; MS and UV analyses. The compounds (1 -4 and (6-8 were tested towards biofouling activity using larvae of barnacle Balance amphitrie. Significant activities of 1, 2 and 3 with EC 50 1.8, 1.2 and 0.75 μg/mL respectively, were observed.

  5. Pyrrolidonyl and pyridyl alkaloids in Lymantria dispar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deml, Reinhold

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence and metabolism of nicotine and related N-containing compounds in body fluids of the gipsy moth were addressed. Thin layer chromatographic studies clearly showed the simultaneous presence of GABA and 2-pyrrolidone but not of GABamide in the larval haemolymph and osmeterial secretion of Lymantria dispar as well as in the corresponding body fluids of the saturniids, Saturnia pavonia and Attacus atlas. Furthermore, feeding and injection experiments using alkylated precursors and combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence of the transformation of 2-pyrrolidone to nicotine and of nicotinic acid to nicotinamide in caterpillars of L. dispar. Based on these results, on the earlier described variation of the secondary-compound patterns of L. dispar during its development, and on literature data, metabolic pathways for the hitherto detected pyridyl and pyrrolidonyl alkaloids in Lymantriidae (and possibly Saturniidae) are proposed.

  6. Bioactive benzofuran derivatives: moracins A-Z in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ravi; Harmalkar, Dipesh S; Xu, Xuezhen; Jang, Kyusic; Lee, Kyeong

    2015-01-27

    Benzofuran heterocycles are fundamental structural units in a variety of biologically active natural products as well as synthetic materials. Over the time, benzofuran derivatives have attracted many researchers due to the broad scope of their biological activity, which include anticancer, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Egonol, homoegonol and moracin families are biologically active natural products containing benzofuran heterocycle as basic structural units. This paper focuses on the moracin family (moracin A to Z). Morus, a genus of flowering plants in the family Moraceae, comprises 10-16 species of deciduous trees commonly known as mulberries. The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Morus alba, M. lhou, Morus macroura are the main sources for arylbenzofuran derivatives including the moracins. A large volume of research has been carried out on moracins and their derivatives, which has shown the pharmacological importance of this benzofuran heterocyclic nucleus. In this mini-review, we attempt to highlight the importance of moracins, as they have been a major source for drug development. Herein, we also summarize the current state of the art concerning the synthesis and medicinal use of moracins A-Z.

  7. The future of bioactive ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hench, Larry L

    2015-02-01

    Two important worldwide needs must be satisfied in the future; (1) treatment of the deteriorating health of an aging population and, (2) decreasing healthcare costs to meet the needs of an increased population. The ethical and economic dilemma is how to achieve equality in quality of care while at the same time decreasing cost of care for an ever-expanding number of people. The limited lifetime of prosthetic devices made from first-generation nearly inert biomaterials requires new approaches to meet these two large needs. This paper advises an expanded emphasis on: (1) regeneration of tissues and (2) prevention of tissue deterioration to meet this growing need. Innovative use of bioactive ceramics with genetic control of in situ tissue responses offers the potential to achieve both tissue regeneration and prevention. Clinical success of use of bioactive glass for bone regeneration is evidence that this concept works. Likewise the use of micron sized bioactive glass powders in a dentifrice for re-mineralization of teeth provides evidence that prevention of tissue deterioration is also possible. This opinion paper outlines clinical needs that could be met by innovative use of bioactive glasses and ceramics in the near future; including: regeneration of skeletal tissues that is patient specific and genetic based, load-bearing bioactive glass-ceramics for skeletal and ligament and tendon repair, repair and regeneration of soft tissues, and rapid low-cost analysis of human cell-biomaterial interactions leading to patient specific diagnoses and treatments using molecularly tailored bioceramics.

  8. Synthesis and in vitro bioactivity of mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, C.J., E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.T. [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Huang, L.F. [School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lu, P.S.; Chang, H.F. [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, I.L., E-mail: 84004@cch.org.tw [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chang-Hua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China)

    2010-06-15

    The main objective of the present study was to determine the effect of thermal treatment procedures (calcination temperature, heating rate and duration time) on the synthesis of SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds. This is accomplished by thermogravimetric analyses, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by analysis of nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. In vitro bioactivity can also be assessed by the cytotoxic effect of the glasses on the NIH-3T3 cell line, and by characterization of MC-3T3-E1 cell attachment.

  9. Synthesis and in vitro bioactivity of mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the present study was to determine the effect of thermal treatment procedures (calcination temperature, heating rate and duration time) on the synthesis of SiO2-CaO-P2O5 mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds. This is accomplished by thermogravimetric analyses, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by analysis of nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. In vitro bioactivity can also be assessed by the cytotoxic effect of the glasses on the NIH-3T3 cell line, and by characterization of MC-3T3-E1 cell attachment.

  10. Study on bioactivity of NiTinol after surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Chrzanowski

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the work was to assess bioactive properties and corrosion resistance of nickel titanium alloyafter alkali treatment and spark oxidation in Hank’s Balance Salt Solution.Design/methodology/approach: Surfaces of samples were prepared by chemical treatment in NaOHfollowed by heat treatment, and spark oxidation. Corrosion resistance was investigated using potentiodynamicmethod. Chemical composition of the samples surface was measured using SEM EDX. Surface roughness andtopography was analyzed using AFM. Bioactive properties were analyses on the basis of the chemical compositionof the samples immersed in HBSS for 14 days.Findings: The chemical composition analysis of the samples showed that alkali treatment increased significantlynickel content in top layer and also increase in roughness was observed. Spark oxidation results also in roughnessincrease. Corrosion test showed insignificant increase of the corrosion resistance after oxidation while alkalitreatment caused drop of the resistance. Bioactivity study revealed that both applied treatments did not improvebioactive properties of the NiTinol when compared with simply ground samples.Research limitations/implications: Two types of the treatment applied for nickel titanium and intended toimprove bioactive properties were investigated. There was no improvement in bioactivity observed after surfacetreatment. However, alternation in chemical composition, corrosion resistance, and topography were observed.Further analysis of biocompatibility and mechanical properties are required.Practical implications: Both chemical and electrochemical treatment, as presented in the paper, gave promisingresults in terms of wetting ability, topography and apatite film formation, however further study are required toconfirm suitability of the treatments for medical applications.Originality/value: The obtained results revealed unsuitability of the alkali treatment intended to improvebioactivity of the

  11. Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bertini, Ivano; Gray, Harry B.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    1994-01-01

    This book covers material that could be included in a one-quarter or one-semester course in bioinorganic chemistry for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in chemistry or biochemistry. We believe that such a course should provide students with the background required to follow the research literature in the field. The topics were chosen to represent those areas of bioinorganic chemistry that are mature enough for textbook presentation. Although each chapter presents material...

  12. Organic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-15

    This book with sixteen chapter explains organic chemistry on linkage isomerism such as alkane, cycloalkane, alkene, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic halogen compound, alcohol, ether, aldehyde and ketone, carboxylic acid, dicarboxylic acid, fat and detergent, amino, carbohydrate, amino acid and protein, nucleotide and nucleic acid and spectroscopy, a polymer and medical chemistry. Each chapter has introduction structure and characteristic and using of organic chemistry.

  13. Social Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtfouse, Eric; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Robert, Didier

    2012-01-01

    International audience This article is both an essay to propose social chemistry as a new scientific discipline, and a preface of the book Environmental Chemistry for a Sustainable World. Environmental chemistry is a fast emerging discipline aiming at the understanding the fate of pollutants in ecosystems and at designing novel processes that are safe for ecosystems. Past pollution should be cleaned, future pollution should be predicted and avoided (Lichtfouse et al., 2005a). Such advices ...

  14. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlar, Donald G.; McKoy, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  15. A New Binary Carbazole Alkaloid from Murraya koenigii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new binary carbazole alkaloid, 8, 8"-biskoenigine (1), along with its monomer,kocnigine, was isolated from the dried leaves of Murraya koenigii collected in Xishuangbanna,Yunnan province. The structure of 1 was established by spectroscopic methods.

  16. Activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against biofilm formation and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotalaria genus belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae comprising about 600 species spread throughout tropical, neotropical and subtropical regions. In this study, seeds of Crolatalaria pallida were used to the isolation of usaramine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid. Thus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stap...

  17. New bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Laureliopsis philippiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Dan; Thi, Loi Pham; Rasmussen, Hasse Bonde;

    2009-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Laureliopsis philippiana resulted in isolation of a new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid (1) named laureliopsine A. The structure was established by spectroscopic methods, including 2D homo- and heteronuclear NMR experiments. This finding of a bisbenzylisoquinoline al...

  18. A new pyrrole alkaloid from seeds of Castanea sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiermann, Alois; Kedwani, Samir; Schramm, Hans Wolfgang; Seger, Christoph

    2002-02-01

    A new pyrrole alkaloid, methyl-(5-formyl-1H-pyrrole-2-yl)-4-hydroxybutyrate (1), was isolated from sweet chestnut seeds and its structure elucidated on the basis of data from NMR spectroscopy and by comparison with synthetic analogues.

  19. NEW NORDITERPENOID ALKALOIDS FROM THE ROOTS OF ACONITUM GENICULATUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG-BANG LI; LIANG XU; XI-XIAN JIAN; FENG-PENG WANG

    2001-01-01

    Four new norditerpenoid alkaloids, geniculatines A (1), B (4), C (7) and D (8), were isolated from the roots of Aconitum geniculatum Fletcher, and their structures were elucidated by spectral methods.

  20. Two bromotyrosine alkaloids from the sponge Psammaplysilla purpurea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tilvi, S.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Naik, C.G.

    The sponge Psammaplysilla purpurea (Order: Verongidae, Family: Aplysinellidae) is a well known source for several bromotyrosine alkaloids of unique structural features and exhibiting promising biological activities such as cytotoxicity...

  1. Simultaneous separation of ergot alkaloids by capillary electrophoresis after cloud point extraction from cereal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Emiliano; Wang, Chien C; Fernández, Liliana P; Gomez, María R

    2015-01-01

    A new and sensitive analytical methodology for ergot alkaloids (EA) determination from cereal samples based on cloud point extraction (CPE) prior to CE-UV absorbance was developed. The methodology involves extraction under acid conditions and subsequent preconcentration by applying a simple, rapid and environmentally friendly low volume surfactant extraction procedure. After extraction, CE analysis was carried out by performing dilutions on preconcentrated surfactant rich phase, achieving a single peak or simultaneous alkaloids determination. A real preconcentration factor of 22 of total EA was obtained, demonstrating the efficiency of this methodology. The limits of detection were 2.6 and 2.2 μg/kg for ergotamine and ergonovine, respectively. Validation procedure revealed suitable linearity, accuracy and precision. The average extraction and clean-up recoveries were compared with the theoretical values and were better than 92%. This method was successfully applied to the determination of EA in different varieties of commercial flour samples, two grain samples and one of the leading brands cereal-based product for infant feeding. The high sensitivity achieved for EA determinations in real samples suggests CPE procedure as an interesting approach to improve CE-UV visible detection limits. Moreover, the whole process could be considered as a contribution to green chemistry because nonorganic solvents were involved, demonstrating its great potential over conventional techniques.

  2. 3-Methoxysampangine, a novel antifungal copyrine alkaloid from Cleistopholis patens.

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Liu; Oguntimein, B; Hufford, C D; Clark, A M

    1990-01-01

    Further examination of the active ethanolic extract of the root bark of Cleistopholis patens by using bioassay-directed fractionation resulted in the isolation of a new alkaloid, 3-methoxysampangine (compound I), together with three known alkaloids, eupolauridine (compound II), liriodenine (compound III), and eupolauridine N-oxide (compound IV). The proposed structure of compound I was based on its physicochemical properties and spectral data. 3-Methoxysampangine exhibited significant antifun...

  3. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    John B. Bremner; Surya Hadi

    2001-01-01

    Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on ...

  4. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of sheep in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, J T

    1987-06-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of sheep in New South Wales was reviewed, based on the records of the New South Wales Department of Agriculture's Regional Veterinary Laboratories. The plant species causing significant mortalities were Echium plantagineum and Heliotropium europaeum. The syndrome of hepatogenous chronic copper poisoning was more frequently diagnosed than primary pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning, particularly when grazing E. plantagineum. The data indicated that adult crossbred ewes were the most commonly affected class of sheep. PMID:3632498

  5. Bioactive saponins from Dioscorea futschauensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H W; Hu, K; Zhao, Q C; Cui, C B; Kobayashi, H; Yao, X S

    2002-08-01

    A new anti-neoplastic spirostanol saponin, (25S)-spirost-5-en-3 beta, 27-diol-3O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->3)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside and three known compounds viz. prosapogenin A of dioscin, dioscin and gracilin were isolated from Dioscorea futschauensis by bioactivity-guided fractionation. Their structures were elucidated mainly by means of spectroscopic analysis. Their bioactivity against Pyricularia oryzae and cytotoxic activity on ts-FT210 cell line was evaluated. PMID:12227201

  6. Anticholinesterase inhibitory activity of quaternary alkaloids from Tinospora crispa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Mashitah; Hamid, Hazrulrizawati; Houghton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary alkaloids are the major alkaloids isolated from Tinospora species. A previous study pointed to the necessary presence of quaternary nitrogens for strong acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in such alkaloids. Repeated column chromatography of the vine of Tinospora crispa extract led to the isolation of one new protoberberine alkaloid, 4,13-dihydroxy-2,8,9-trimethoxydibenzo[a,g]quinolizinium (1), along with six known alkaloids-dihydrodiscretamine (2), columbamine (3), magnoflorine (4), N-formylannonaine (5), N-formylnornuciferine (6), and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7). The seven compounds were isolated and structurally elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Two known alkaloids, namely, dihydrodiscretamine and columbamine are reported for the first time for this plant. The compounds were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's method. In the AChE inhibition assay, only columbamine (3) showed strong activity with IC50 48.1 µM. The structure-activity relationships derived from these results suggest that the quaternary nitrogen in the skeleton has some effect, but that a high degree of methoxylation is more important for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. PMID:24448061

  7. Preparation and bioactivity of sol-gel macroporous bioactive glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihua Zhou; Jianming Ruan; Jianpeng Zou; Zhongcheng Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Bioactive glass is well known for its ability of bone regeneration, and sol-gel bioactive glass has many advantages com-pared with melt-derived bioactive glass. 3-D scaffold prepared by the sol-gel method is a promising substrate material for bone tissue engineering and large-scale bone repair. Porous sol-gel glass in the CaO-SiO2-P2O5 system with macropores larger than 100 μm was prepared by the addition of stearic acid as a pore former. The diameter of the pore created by the pore former varied from 100 to 300μm. The formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the glass was analyzed by studying the surface of the porous glass by scanning elec-tron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectra after they had been immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for some time, and the porous glass shows good bioactivity.

  8. Good chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The subject matter in chemistry courses reflects almost nothing of the issues that chemists are interested in. It is important to formulate a set of topics - and a Medical College Admissions Test reflecting them - that would leave chemistry departments no choice but to change their teaching.

  9. Alkaloid decomposition by DC pin-hole discharge in water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Edita J.; Krcma, Frantisek; Jonisova, Lenka

    2016-08-01

    DC diaphragm discharge generated in a batch reactor was used to decompose two selected model alkaloids, caffeine and quinine in concentrations ranging from 10 to 50 ppm or 5 to 15 ppm, respectively. UV-vis spectrometry was utilized in evaluation of H2O2 production during the process as well as degradation of caffeine. Fluorescence spectrometry was used for quantification of quinine. High rates of decomposition were reached in both cases in the anode part of the reactor. On the other hand, up to four times lower decomposition was observed in the cathode part. Total removal efficiency gained up to 300 mg/kWh for caffeine and 210 mg/kWh for quinine. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  10. An antimicrobial alkaloid and other metabolites produced by Penicillium sp. An endophytic fungus isolated from Mauritia flexuosa L.f

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koolen, Hector Henrique Ferreira; Soares, Elzalina Ribeiro; Silva, Felipe Moura Araujo da; Almeida, Richardson Alves de; Souza, Afonso Duarte Leao de, E-mail: hectorkoolen@gmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus - AM (Brazil); Medeiros, Livia Soman de; Rodrigues Filho, Edson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos - SP (Brazil); Souza, Antonia Queiroz Lima de [Escola Superior de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus - AM (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The alkaloid glandicoline B (1) and six other compounds: ergosterol (2), brassicasterol (3), ergosterol peroxide (4), cerevisterol (5), mannitol (6) and 1-O-{alpha}-D-glucopyranoside (7) were isolated from Penicillium sp. strain PBR.2.2.2, a fungus from Mauritia flexuosa roots. The structures of the isolated metabolites were established by spectral analysis. MeOH extract of the fungal mycelium at 500 {mu}g mL{sup -1} exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and the compound 1 at 100 {mu}g mL{sup -1} was active against S. aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli. The relationship between the bioactive properties of the fungus PBR.2.2.2 and those achieved for glandicoline B, as well the potential of this substance as bacteriide is discussed. (author)

  11. Piperine: bioactivities and structural modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Huan; Lv, Min; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Piperine is a simple alkaloid isolated from the seeds of Piper nigrum. Piperine and its derivatives exhibited a wide range of biological properties such as antitumor activity, antioxidant activity, antiinflammatory activity, antimycobacterial activity, insecticidal activity, etc. Although five excellent reviews have recently been described by Srinivasan in 2007, Mao in 2011, Butt in 2013, and Meghwal in 2013, respectively, their topics were mainly focused on the biological effects. Therefore, in the present review, the progress in the structural modifications on the aliphatic chain and the amide moiety of piperine was reported. Meanwhile, the biological activities and structure-activity relationship of piperine and its derivatives were also described. PMID:25553428

  12. Astonishing diversity of natural surfactants: 6. Biologically active marine and terrestrial alkaloid glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembitsky, Valery M

    2005-11-01

    This review article presents 209 alkaloid glycosides isolated and identified from plants, microorganisms, and marine invertebrates that demonstrate different biological activities. They are of great interest, especially for the medicinal and/or pharmaceutical industries. These biologically active glycosides have good potential for future chemical preparation of compounds useful as antioxidants, anticancer, antimicrobial, and antibacterial agents. These glycosidic compounds have been subdivided into several groups, including: acridone; aporphine; benzoxazinoid; ergot; indole; enediyne alkaloidal antibiotics; glycosidic lupine alkaloids; piperidine, pyridine, pyrrolidine, and pyrrolizidine alkaloid glycosides; glycosidic quinoline and isoquinoline alkaloids; steroidal glycoalkaloids; and miscellaneous alkaloid glycosides. PMID:16459921

  13. Analysis of Norditerpenoid Alkaloids Extracted from Aconitum sinomantanum Nakai by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry(ESI-MS) was applied simultaneously in determining norditerpenoid alkaloids from the roots of Aconitum sinomantanum Nakai (RAS) based on molecular mass information. The tandem mass spectra(ESI-MSn) provided the alkaloidal structural information, through which the existence of these alkaloids was further confirmed. Accordingly, six known norditerpenoid alkaloids were simultaneously determined on the basis of their ESI-MSn spectra. Furthermore, based on the diagnostic fragmentation pathways of alkaloidal MSn, a rapid method for direct detection and characterization of alkaloids from an ethanolic extract of RAS was described.

  14. Bioactivity of Minor Milk Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh

    of infant formula. Thereafter, bioactive milk components which were preserved in gently-processed infant formula were selected for further investigation of their immunomodulatory activity in cell and preterm pig models. We hope this project will contribute to the research on the development of new...

  15. Study on the Metabolic Characteristics of Aconite Alkaloids in the Extract of Radix aconiti under Intestinal Bacteria of Rat by UPLC/MSn Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛杨; 皮子凤; 宋凤瑞; 刘志强; 刘淑莹

    2012-01-01

    The extract of Radix aconiti was incubated with rat intestinal bacteria in vitro. Further, aconitine and hypaconitine standard were incubated at the same condition as the extract of Radix aconiti, respectively. Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/Multi-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC/MSn) was used for detecting and identifying all the aco- nite alkaloids. Results showed that there were four metabolites which were identified as 8-butyryl-14-benzoylmesa- conine (m/z 660), 8-propionyl-14-benzoylaconine (m/z 660), 8-butyryl-14-benzoylaconine (m/z 674) and 8-valeryl-14-benzoylmesaconine (m/z 674) in the metabolized sample of the extract of Radix aconiti. The relative area ratio of them presented increasing trend during 6 d. On the basis of all results, we could concluded that substi- tution at N atom mainly influenced the metabolizing rate of diester-diterpenoid alkaloids (DDAs), C-8 substitute was active metabolized site, intestinal bacterial metabolites of the aconite alkaloids in the extract of Radix aconiti were mainly the substitute with propionyl group, butyl group or valeryl group at C-8. This paper illustrated holistic metabolizing profile of the extract of Radix aconiti in vitro and possible metabolizing reaction type of main DDAs, which could provide reference for finding out potential bioactive components in the extract and the prescription of Chinese Medicine.

  16. Mass spectrometry for determination of bioactive compounds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tilvi, S.; Majik, M.S.; Singh, K.S.

    are naturally occurring nitrogen containing biologically active heterocyclic compounds. Over the last few years, a large number of biologically important alkaloids with antiviral, antibacterial, anti- inflammatory, antimalarial, antioxidant and anticancer...

  17. Alkaloids and athlete immune function: caffeine, theophylline, gingerol, ephedrine, and their congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Kohut, Marian L; Nguyen, Norah A; Perera, M Ann d N

    2014-01-01

    Plant alkaloids are found in foods, beverages, and supplements consumed by athletes for daily nutrition, performance enhancement, and immune function improvement. This paper examined possible immunomodulatory roles of alkaloids in exercise contexts, with a focus on human studies. Four representative groups were scrutinized: (a) caffeine (guaranine, mateine); (b) theophylline and its isomers, theobromine and paraxanthine; (c) ginger alkaloids including gingerols and shogaol; and (d) ephedra alkaloids such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Emerging or prospective alkaloid sources (Goji berry, Noni berry, and bloodroot) were also considered. Human in vitro and in vivo studies on alkaloids and immune function were often conflicting. Caffeine may be immunomodulatory in vivo depending on subject characteristics, exercise characteristics, and immune parameters measured. Caffeine may exhibit antioxidant capacities. Ginger may exert in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in certain populations, but it is unclear whether these effects are due to alkaloids or other biochemicals. Evidence for an immunomodulatory role of alkaloids in energy drinks, cocoa, or ephedra products in vivo is weak to nonexistent. For alkaloid sources derived from plants, variability in the reviewed studies may be due to the presence of unrecognized alkaloids or non-alkaloid compounds (which may themselves be immunomodulatory), and pre-experimental factors such as agricultural or manufacturing differences. Athletes should not look to alkaloids or alkaloid-rich sources as a means of improving immune function given their inconsistent activities, safety concerns, and lack of commercial regulation. PMID:24974722

  18. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  19. Chemical Components and Bioactive of Gorgonian Sea Plumes (Genus Rumphella and Hicksonella from Raijua Islands-East Nusa Tenggara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunialdi Happynes Teffu,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea plumes is mostly used by people as jewellery and arthritis drug. The aim of this research was to characterize the chemicals and the bioactive compounds of the sea plumes for pharmaceutical ingredients. Characterization of sea plumes was carried out schlerit form identification, proximate analysis, heavy metal analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectrofotometer, radium content using gamma spectrometer, extraction by maceration method for 24 hour and phytochemicals quality testing based on color appearance. The sea plumes was identified as Rumphella and Hicksonella contains the highest protein components. Heavy metal Pb exceed the standar set to National Standar of Indonesia (SNI and Medicines and Foods Security Agency. Akar bahar containing radium 0.65-0.79 Becquerel/kilogram, highest yield using methanol and containing secondary metabolite which targeted as bioactive compounds alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols hydroquinone, steroids, triterpenoids and saponins.

  20. Green algae Chlorococcum humicola- a new source of bioactive compounds with antimicrobial activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bhagavathy S; Sumathi P; Jancy Sherene Bell I

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the existence of bioactive phytochemicals and their antimicrobial role of green algae Chlorococcum humicola (C. humicola). Methods: The various organic solvents such as acetone, benzene, chloroform, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate, ethanol, hexane and methanol were used for the preparation of the algal extracts then subjected to chemical analysis and further used for the screening of antimicrobial assay. The purified carotenoid pigments and chlorophylls were used for the antimicrobial studies against the harmful pathogens Escherichia coli, Pseudomonasaeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Vibreo cholerae, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. Results: The chemical analysis showed the existence of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, alkaloids, favanoids, fattyacids, saponins, aminoacids and carbohydrates. In vitro screening of organic solvent extracts of green algae C. humicola shows activity in inhibiting the growth of virulent strains of bacteria and fungi pathogenic to human. Eight different extracts showed effective inhibitory action against the selected pathogens. Depends upon their existence of the bioactive compounds the different organic algal extracts shows difference in their inhibitory zone against the microbes. Out of all the organic extracts benzene and ethyl acetate extracts showed excellent effect nearly 80% microbial growth inhibition. The separated carotenoid and chlorophyll fractions of C. humicola, also results in the microbial growth inhibition. Conclusions: The present study concludes that green algae C. humicola are a rich and varied source of pharmacologically active natural products and nutraceuticals. While nutraceutical and pharmaceutical content in the baseline algae strain is very small, they showed excellent effect against the microbial pathogens.

  1. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  2. Introductory Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Stevens, Gary; Gray, Nathan; Atherton, Thomas; Winn, Joss

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and Learning resources for the 1st Year Introductory Chemistry course (Forensic Science). 30 credits. These are Open Educational Resources (OER), made available for re-use under a Creative Commons license.

  3. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  4. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  5. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  6. Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Senecio and Crotalaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birecka, Helena; Birecki, Mieczyslaw; Cohen, Eric J.; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    When tested for ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Senecio riddellii, S. longilobus (Compositae), and Crotalaria retusa (Leguminosae) plants exhibited only ornithine decarboxylase activity. This contrasts with previous studies of four species of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) in which arginine decarboxylase activity was very high relative to that of ornithine decarboxylase. Unlike Heliotropium angiospermum and Heliotropium indicum, in which endogenous arginine was the only detectable precursor of putrescine channeled into pyrrolizidines, in the species studied here—using difluoromethylornithine and difluoromethylarginine as the enzyme inhibitors—endogenous ornithine was the main if not the only precursor of putrescine converted into the alkaloid aminoalcohol moiety. In S. riddellii and C. retusa at flowering, ornithine decarboxylase activity was present mainly in leaves, especially the young ones. However, other very young organs such as inflorescence and growing roots exhibited much lower or very low activities; the enzyme activity in stems was negligible. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and polyamine or alkaloid content in either species. In both species only free polyamines were detected except for C. retusa roots and inflorescence—with relatively very high levels of these compounds—in which conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were also found; agmatine was not identified by HPLC in any plant organ except for C. retusa roots with rhizobial nodules. Organ- or age-dependent differences in the polyamine levels were small or insignificant. The highest alkaloid contents were found in young leaves and inflorescence. PMID:16665870

  7. Anticholinesterase Inhibitory Activity of Quaternary Alkaloids from Tinospora crispa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashitah Yusoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quaternary alkaloids are the major alkaloids isolated from Tinospora species. A previous study pointed to the necessary presence of quaternary nitrogens for strong acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitory activity in such alkaloids. Repeated column chromatography of the vine of Tinospora crispa extract led to the isolation of one new protoberberine alkaloid, 4,13-dihydroxy-2,8,9-trimethoxydibenzo[a,g]quinolizinium (1, along with six known alkaloids—dihydrodiscretamine (2, columbamine (3, magnoflorine (4, N-formylannonaine (5, N-formylnornuciferine (6, and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7. The seven compounds were isolated and structurally elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Two known alkaloids, namely, dihydrodiscretamine and columbamine are reported for the first time for this plant. The compounds were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman’s method. In the AChE inhibition assay, only columbamine (3 showed strong activity with IC50 48.1 µM. The structure–activity relationships derived from these results suggest that the quaternary nitrogen in the skeleton has some effect, but that a high degree of methoxylation is more important for acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

  8. Antiparasitic activities of acridone alkaloids from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven acridone alkaloids isolated from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr. were examined for in vitro activity against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB900 and Leishmania donovani L82. An assay with KB cells was developed in order to compare in vitro toxicity of alkaloids with the selective action on the parasites. Nine of the compounds had IC50 values ranging from 0.3 to 11.6 μM against P. falciparum. In contrast, a small number of compounds showed significant activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and none had activity against L. donovani. Among the alkaloids three had IC50 50 < 10 μM. The characterization of the acridone alkaloids, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-10-methyl-2,8-bis(3-methylbut-2-enyl)acridin-9 (10H)-one (1), 2,3-dihydro-4,9-dihydroxy-2-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-11-methoxy-10-methylfuro [3,2-b] acridin-5(10H)-one (2) and 3,4-dihydro-3,5,8-trihydroxy-6-methoxy-2,2,7-trimethyl-2Hpyrano[ 2,3-a]acridin-12(7H)-one (3), is discussed, as well as the structure-activity relationship of all compounds assayed. Isolation and spectral data of alkaloids 1-3 are described for the first time although their cytotoxicities to cancer cells have been described before. (author)

  9. 6,7-diepicastanospermine, a tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid inhibitor of amyloglucosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molyneux, R.J.; Benson, M. (Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA (United States)); Pan, Y.T.; Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Elbein, A.D. (Univ. of Texas, San Antonio (United States))

    1991-10-15

    A tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid, 6,7-diepicastanospermine, was isolated from the seeds of Castanospermum australe by extraction with methanol and purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange, preparative thin-layer, and radial chromatography. A very low yield of a pyrrolidine alkaloid, N-(hydroxyethyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine, was also obtained by analogous methods. The purity of both alkaloids was established by gas chromatography of their trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives as better than 99%. The molecular weight of each alkaloid was established as 189 and 161, respectively, by mass spectrometry, and the structure of each was deduced from their {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. The structure of the pyrrolidine alkaloids which co-occur in C. australe. 6,7-Diepicastanospermine was found to be a moderately good inhibitor of the fungal {alpha}-glucosidase, amyloglucosidase and a relatively weak inhibitor of {beta}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}-L-fucosidase. Comparison of its inhibitory activity toward amyloglucosidase with those of its isomers, castanospermine and 6-epicastanospermine, demonstrated that epimerization of a single hydroxyl group can produce significant alteration of such inhibitory properties.

  10. Unbiased Evaluation of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites in Complex Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Taichi; Wang, Yuehong; Pro, Samuel M.; Franzblau, Scott G.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of bioactive principles in a complex matrix such as natural products and botanical medicines are secondary rather than primary metabolites. In addition to being chemically diverse, the bioactivity of an ethnobotanical can comprise from one to several bioactive compounds, present in a complex mixture. Conventional discovery efforts utilize bioassay-guided fractionation (BGF) to isolate individual active compounds. When applied to complex natural products, BGF is often challenged by an apparent loss of activity during fractionation, resulting in weakly active isolated compounds. Metabolomic analysis can potentially complement existing the BGF paradigm by capturing the chemical complexity of the metabolites. The proposed biochemometric approach establishes a link between the chemistry of a secondary metabolome and a deserved health impact, using a high-throughput, high-resolution capable biological endpoint. The proof of principle is demonstrated for the anti-tuberculosis (TB) activity of the Alaskan ethnobotanical, Oplopanax horridus. Biochemometric analysis identified the 100 most active constituents from thousands of metabolites in the active extract by means of 2D orthogonal chromatography using countercurrent and GC-MS methods. Previously isolated O. horridus phytoconstituents were used as reference markers of known structure and bio(in)activity. Positive correlations allowed distinction of anti-TB actives from inactive compounds. A total of 29 bioactives from 3 main structural classes were assigned based on MS data. Biochemometric analysis is a new tool for the standardization of herbal medicines and ethnobotanicals, as well as for drug discovery from nature. The method can assign multiple active compounds in complex mixtures without their prior isolation or structure elucidation, while still providing an interface to structural information. PMID:22766306

  11. Solid substrate mediated changes in ergot alkaloid spectra in solid state fermentation system

    OpenAIRE

    Trejo Hernandez, M.R.; Lonsane, B.K.; Raimbault, Maurice; Roussos, Sevastianos

    1993-01-01

    Use of different solid substrates resulted in minor alterations in total alkaloid production by #Claviceps purpurea$ 1029c in solid state fermentation system but the changes in the spectra of ergot alkaloids were of significantly higher magnitudes. Ergonovine accounted for 93% of the total alkaloid production in wheat grain medium while lysergic acid derivatives and ergonovine comprised of 66% and 32% of total alkaloids in rye grain medium. In contrast, ergonovine, ergotamine, and lysergic ac...

  12. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    microgravitation of an HFB do not need to maintain the same surface forces as in normal Earth gravitation, they can divert more energy sources to growth and differentiation and, perhaps, to biosynthesis of greater quantities of desired medicinal compounds. Because one can adjust the HFB to vary effective gravitation, one can also test the effects of intermediate levels of gravitation on biosynthesis of various products. The potential utility of this methodology for producing drugs was demonstrated in experiments in which sandalwood and Madagascar periwinkle cells were grown in an HFB. The conditions in the HFB were chosen to induce the cells to form into aggregate cultures that produced anti-cancer indole alkaloids in amounts greater than do comparable numbers of cells of the same species cultured according to previously known methodologies. The observations made in these experiments were interpreted as suggesting that the aggregation of the cells might be responsible for the enhancement of production of alkaloids.

  13. THE ALKALOID CYTISINE IN THE CELL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazaliev A.M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids are vegetative establishments of complex and original structure with nitrous heterocycles in the basis. For a long time they drew researchers’ attention because of their unique and specific physiological effect on alive organisms. Not all the representatives of the globe’s flora contain these unique substances. Alkaloid cytisine is to be found mainly in the plants of the fabaceous family - Fabaceae. For the cytisine production the seeds of Thermopsis lanceolata R.Br (T. lanceolata R.Br and Cytisus laburnum (C. laburnum are used as a raw material. The object of the research is T. lanceolata cell culture. Sterile sprouts are used at the first stage of the experiment. Callus genesis is accompanied with dedifferentiation. It leads to the cellular organization simplification. Based on an important property of a plant cell, such as totipotency, there appears the formation of the “de novo” biosynthetic device. The cultivation algorithm consists of two basic stages: (i the cultivation conditions optimization of callus with a high level of the primary metabolites biosynthesis (Aspartat – lysine; (ii the research of cultivation chemical and physical factors influence on the secondary metabolite (cytisine biosynthesis and accumulation. During the cultivation the Murashige and Skoog classical recipe of nutrient medium will be used. Optimization of the cultivation conditions will concern the phytohormones, macro- and micronutrients content, as the purpose of optimization is the production of the determined high-level competence embriogenical callus. The main problem is genetic heterogeneity of a cellular population and instability of morpho-physiological processes. The correct management of higher plants cells population is possible at the synchronization of a cellular cycle phases. The references analysis has shown that it is almost impossible to synchronize cellular cycles in the culture of plant tissue. The application of chemical

  14. 2-Oxoglutarate: linking TCA cycle function with amino acid, glucosinolate, flavonoid, alkaloid and gibberellin biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner L. Araújo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG is used as an obligatory substrate in a range of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are widespread in nature being involved in several important biochemical processes. We have recently demonstrated that tomato plants in which the TCA cycle enzyme 2-OG dehydrogenase (2-ODD was antisense inhibited were characterized by early senescence and modified fruit ripening associated with differences in the levels of bioactive gibberellin (GA. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence that the TCA cycle plays an important role in modulating the rate of flux from 2-OG to amino acid metabolism. Here we discuss recent advances in the biochemistry and molecular biology of 2-OG metabolism occurring in different biological systems indicating the importance of 2-OG and 2-OG dependent dioxygenases not only in glucosinolate, flavonoid and alkaloid metabolism but also in GA and amino acid metabolism. We additionally summarize recent findings regarding the impact of modification of 2-OG metabolism on biosynthetic pathways involving 2-ODDs.

  15. Chelating Tendencies of Bioactive Aminophosphonates

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss, Tamas; Lázár, István; Kafarski, Pawel

    1994-01-01

    The metal-binding abilities of a wide variety of bioactive aminophosphonates, from the simple aminoethanephosphonic acids to the rather large macrocyclic polyaza derivatives, are discussed with special emphasis on a comparison of the analogous carboxylic acid and phosphonic acid systems. Examples are given of the biological importance of metal ion – aminophosphonate interactions in living systems, and also of their actual and potential applicability in medicine.

  16. Bioactivity of Rumex obtusifolius (Polygonaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Harshaw Diane; Nahar Lutfun; Vadla Brahmachari; Saif-E-Naser Gadria M.; Sarker Satyajit D.

    2010-01-01

    Rumex obtusifolius L. (Polygonaceae), commonly known as 'broad-leaf dock', is one of the most common Irish wayside weeds, and it also occurs in silage fields, on river banks, in ditches and on waste grounds. The ethnobotanical uses of this species include its use as an antidote to nettle, depurative, astringent, laxative, and tonic, and in the treatment of sores, blisters, burns, cancer and tumors. The bioactivities of n-hexane, dichloromethane (DCM) and methanol (MeOH) extracts of the leaves...

  17. Synthesis of bicyclic alkaloids from the iridoid antirrhinoside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Signe Maria

    The present thesis describes the isolation of the iridoid glucoside antirrhinoside from Antirrhinum majus, and the approaches made towards its transformation into analogues of biologically active compounds, with special interest in syntheses of bicyclic alkaloids.A synthetic piperidine monoterpene...... alkaloid was prepared from antirrhinoside by means of an enzymatic cleavage to afford the aglucone, followed by a double reductive amination with benzylamine hydrochloride and sodium cyanoborohydride. The resulting piperidine was modified by opening of the epoxide on the cyclopropane ring by azide...... strategy was therefore abandoned.A one-pot reaction involving ozonolysis and subsequent reduction of the 5,6-O-isopropylidene-2',3',4',6'-tetra-O-acetyl antirrhinoside yielded a diol, which was considered a potential intermediate in the preparation of enantiopure 3-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane alkaloids...

  18. Terpenoid Indole Alkaloids Biosynthesis and Metabolic Engineering in Catharanthus roseus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus L. (Madagascar periwinkle) biosynthesizes a diverse array of secondary metabolites including anticancer dimeric alkaloids (vinblastine and vincristine) and antihypertensive alkaloids (ajmalicine and serpentine). The multi-step terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthetic pathway in C. roseus is complex and is under strict molecular regulation. Many enzymes and genes involved in the TIAs biosynthesis have been studied in recent decades. Moreover,some regulatory proteins were found recently to control the production of TIAs in C. roseus. Based on mastering the rough scheme of the pathway and cloning the related genes, metabolic engineering of TIAs biosynthesis has been studied in C.roseus aiming at increasing the desired secondary metabolites in the past few years. The present article summarizes recent advances in isolation and characterization of TIAs biosynthesis genes and transcriptional regulators involved in the second metabolic control in C. roseus. Metabolic engineering applications in TIAs pathway via overexpression of these genes and regulators in C. roseus are also discussed.

  19. A look inside an alkaloid multisite plant: the Catharanthus logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas; Clastre, Marc; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Burlat, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Environmental pressures forced plants to diversify specialized metabolisms to accumulate noxious molecules such as alkaloids constituting one of the largest classes of defense metabolites. Catharanthus roseus produces monoterpene indole alkaloids via a highly elaborated biosynthetic pathway whose characterization greatly progressed with the recent expansion of transcriptomic resources. The complex architecture of this pathway, sequentially distributed in at least four cell types and further compartmentalized into several organelles, involves partially identified inter-cellular and intra-cellular translocation events acting as potential key-regulators of metabolic fluxes. The description of this spatial organization and the inherent secretion and sequestration of metabolites not only provide new insight into alkaloid cell biology and its involvement in plant defense processes but also present new biotechnological challenges for synthetic biology. PMID:24727073

  20. Bioactive peptides in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata Marletta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are specific protein fragments that have a positive impact on body functions and conditions and may ultimately influence health. Most of the biological activities are encrypted within the primary sequence of the native protein and can be released by enzymatic hydrolysis and proteolysis or by food processing. Milk is a rich source of bioactive peptides which may contribute to regulate the nervous, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems as well as the immune system, confirming the added value of dairy products that, in certain cases, can be considered functional foods. The main biological activities of these peptides and their bioavailability in dairy products are reviewed. The natural concentration of these biomolecules is quite low and, to date one of the main goals has been to realize products enriched with bioactive peptides that have beneficial effects on human health and proven safety. Even though several health-enhancing products have already been launched and their integration in the diet could help in the prevention of chronic diseases such as hypertension, cancer and osteoporosis, more clinical trials are required in order to develop a deeper understanding of the activity of biopeptides on the human physiological mechanisms and also to assess the efficacy of their effects in a long term view. New scientific data are also needed to support their commercialisation in compliance with current regulations.

  1. Alkaloids in the human food chain - Natural occurrence and possible adverse effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, I.; Beek, van T.A.; Soffers, A.E.M.F.; Dusemund, B.; Rietjens, I.

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants are an intrinsic part of the regular Western diet. The present paper summarizes the occurrence of alkaloids in the food chain, their mode of action and possible adverse effects including a safety assessment. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are a reason for concern because of their

  2. Two new C19-diterpenoid alkaloids from roots Aconitum hemsleyanium var. atropurpureum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Tang; Dong Lin Chen; Xi Xian Jian; Feng Peng Wang

    2007-01-01

    A new franchetine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloid 3-hydroxyfranchetine 1 and a new aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloid atropurpursine 2 have been isolated from the roots of Aconitum hemsleyanium var.atropurpureum.The structures of these new alkaloids were established on the basis of spectral data.

  3. Three new C20-diterpenoid alkaloids from Delphinium anthriscifolium var. savatieri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yu Liu; Qiao Hong Chen; Feng Peng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Three new C20-diterpenoid alkaloids, designated as anthriscifolmines A-C (1-3), together with two known alkaloids denudatine and delgramine, were isolated from the whole herb of Delphinium anthriscifolium var. savatieri. The structures of these new alkaloids were elucidated on the basis of spectral data.

  4. Steroidal glyco alkaloids and molluscicidal activity of Solanum asperum Rich. fruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tania M.S. [Instituto Multidisciplinar em Saude, Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil). Campus Avancado Anisio Teixeira]. E-mail: sarmento@pesquisador.cnpq.br; Camara, Celso A. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Freire, Kristerson R.L.; Silva, Thiago G. da; Agra, Maria de F.; Bhattacharyya, Jnanabrata [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica

    2008-07-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the alkaloidal extract of the green fruits of Solanum asperum afforded a new compound, solanandaine along with solasonine and solamargine. The total crude alkaloids as well as the isolated pure alkaloids exhibited significant molluscicidal activity. (author)

  5. Bioguided discovery and pharmacophore modeling of the mycotoxic indole diterpene alkaloids penitrems as breast cancer proliferation, migration, and invasion inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Asmaa A.; Houssen, Wael E.; Gissendanner, Chris R.; Orabi, Khaled Y.; Foudah, Ahmed I.; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2013-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi have proven to be important sources of bioactive natural organohalides. The genus Penicillium is recognized as a rich source of chemically diverse bioactive secondary metabolites. This study reports the fermentation, isolation and identification of a marine-derived Penicillium species. Bioassay-guided fractionation afforded the indole diterpene alkaloids penitrems A, B, D, E and F as well as paspaline and emnidole SB (1–7). Supplementing the fermentation broth of the growing fungus with KBr afforded the new 6-bromopenitrem B (8) and the known 6-bromopenitrem E (9). These compounds showed good antiproliferative, antimigratory and anti-invasive properties against human breast cancer cells. Penitrem B also showed a good activity profile in the NCI-60 DTP human tumor cell line screen. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was used to assess the BK channel inhibitory activity and toxicity of select compounds. A pharmacophore model was generated to explain the structural relationships of 1–9 with respect to their antiproliferative activity against the breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The structurally less complex biosynthetic precursors, paspaline (6) and emindole SB (7), were identified as potential hits suitable for future studies. PMID:24273638

  6. Genome mining reveals unlocked bioactive potential of marine Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Sonnenschein, Eva; Melchiorsen, Jette;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance in bacteria spreads quickly, overtaking the pace at which new compounds are discovered and this emphasizes the immediate need to discover new compounds for control of infectious diseases. Terrestrial bacteria have for decades been investigated as a source......- and Gammaproteobacteria collected during the Galathea 3 expedition were sequenced and mined for natural product encoding gene clusters. Results: Independently of genome size, bacteria of all tested genera carried a large number of clusters encoding different potential bioactivities, especially within the Vibrionaceae...... of bioactive compounds leading to successful applications in pharmaceutical and biotech industries. Marine bacteria have so far not been exploited to the same extent; however, they are believed to harbor a multitude of novel bioactive chemistry. To explore this potential, genomes of 21 marine Alpha...

  7. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  8. 3-Methoxysampangine, a novel antifungal copyrine alkaloid from Cleistopholis patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S C; Oguntimein, B; Hufford, C D; Clark, A M

    1990-04-01

    Further examination of the active ethanolic extract of the root bark of Cleistopholis patens by using bioassay-directed fractionation resulted in the isolation of a new alkaloid, 3-methoxysampangine (compound I), together with three known alkaloids, eupolauridine (compound II), liriodenine (compound III), and eupolauridine N-oxide (compound IV). The proposed structure of compound I was based on its physicochemical properties and spectral data. 3-Methoxysampangine exhibited significant antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the first report of the isolation of liriodenine (compound III) from the root bark of C. patens. PMID:2188584

  9. Quinolizidines alkaloids: Petrosin and xestospongins from the sponge Oceanapia sp.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keisham Sarjit Singh; Babulal Das; Chandrakant G Naik

    2011-09-01

    A bisquinolizidine alkaloid, petrosin (1) and a series of bis-1-oxaquinolizidine, xestospongins (2-9), were obtained from the ethyl acetate extract of the sponge Oceanapia sp. Petrosin was obtained along with xestospongin- C, D, E, F, G, H, I and J having di-hetroatom rings, from the ethyl acetate extract of the sponge. The compounds exhibited moderate to high activities against some microorganisms and clinical isolates. The structures of the alkaloids were elucidated by NMR and ESIMS spectroscopic data. The structure of petrosin was confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study.

  10. Taichunamides: Prenylated Indole Alkaloids from Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagiyama, Ippei; Kato, Hikaru; Nehira, Tatsuo;

    2016-01-01

    Seven new prenylated indole alkaloids, taichunamides A–G, were isolated from the fungus Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404). Taichunamides A and B contained an azetidine and 4‐pyridone units, respectively, and are likely biosynthesized from notoamide S via (+)‐6‐epi‐stephacidin A. Taichunamides C...... and D contain endoperoxide and methylsulfonyl units, respectively. This fungus produced indole alkaloids containing an anti‐bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core, whereas A. protuberus and A. amoenus produced congeners with a syn‐bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core. Plausible biosynthetic pathways to access...

  11. Hierarchical Structures and Shaped Particles of Bioactive Glass and Its In Vitro Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Boonyang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bioactive glass particles with controllable structure and porosity were prepared using dual-templating methods. Block copolymers used as one template component produced mesopores in the calcined samples. Polymer colloidal crystals as the other template component yielded either three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM products or shaped bioactive glass nanoparticles. The in vitro bioactivity of these bioactive glasses was studied by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF at body temperature (37°C for varying lengths of time and monitoring the formation of bone-like apatite on the surface of the bioactive glass. A considerable bioactivity was found that all of bioactive glass samples have the ability to induce the formation of an apatite layer on its surface when in contact with SBF. The development of bone-like apatite is faster for 3DOM bioactive glasses than for nanoparticles.

  12. The Chemistry and Pharmacology of Anatoxin-a and Related Homotropanes with respect to Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Gallagher

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This chapter covers the chemistry and nicotinic pharmacology of naturally occurring homotropane alkaloids, with an emphasis of anatoxin-a. In addition to anatoxin-a, homoanatoxin and pinnamine, as well as the major classes of synthetic derivatives of anatoxin-a including UB-165, are discussed.

  13. Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  14. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    2006-01-01

    Lowe's new edition assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry. It can serve as a primary text in quantum chemistry courses, and enables students and researchers to comprehend the current literature. This third edition has been thoroughly updated and includes numerous new exercises to facilitate self-study and solutions to selected exercises.* Assumes little initial mathematical or physical sophistication, developing insights and abilities in the context of actual problems* Provides thorough treatment

  15. Assessment of bioactivities of ethanolic extract of Melia azedarach (Meliaceae) leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Asadujjaman; Abu Saed; Md Aslam Hossain; Utpal Kumar Karmakar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess ethanolic extract of the leaves of Melia azedarach L. (Family-Meliaceae) for its possible antioxidant, analgesic and antibacterial activities in association with performing phytochemical evaluation.Methods:A number of phytochemical tests of this extract were utilized to distinguish the existence of different sorts of compounds. Qualitative and quantitative antioxidant activities were assessed by TLC and DPPH scavenging assay respectively. Acetic acid induced writhing test in mice and disk diffusion assay of the leaves extract were carried out to demonstrate the analgesic and antibacterial activities respectively.Results:The phytochemical assessment revealed the existence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, saponins and tannins like compounds. Ethanolic extract of the leaves demonstrated antioxidant, analgesic and antibacterial activities in vitro.Conclusion:Considering the study, this could justify the leaves extract’s bioactivities but, to substantiate the activity of individual compound further investigation is necessary.

  16. Bioactive glasses materials, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ylänen, Heimo

    2011-01-01

    Due to their biocompatibility and bioactivity, bioactive glasses are used as highly effective implant materials throughout the human body to replace or repair damaged tissue. As a result, they have been in continuous use since shortly after their invention in the late 1960s and are the subject of extensive research worldwide.Bioactive glasses provides readers with a detailed review of the current status of this unique material, its properties, technologies and applications. Chapters in part one deal with the materials and mechanical properties of bioactive glass, examining topics such

  17. Functionalized Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between the molecular structure and physical properties of functionalized naturally occurred Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists is presented. The molecular modeling of the ergoline-skeleton is based on the comprehensive theoretical study of the binding affinity of the isolated chemicals towards the active sites of the D3 sub-type receptor (D3R) loops. The studied proton accepting ability under physiological conditions allows classifying four types of monocationics, characterizing with the different binding modes to D3R involving selected amino acid residues to the active sites. These results marked the pharmaceutical potential and clinical usage of the reported compounds as antipsychotic drugs for Schizophrenia treatment, since they allowed evaluating the highlights of the different hypothesizes of the biochemical causes the illness. The applied complex approach for theoretical and experimental elucidation, including quantum chemistry method, electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) methods, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational IR and Raman spectroscopy on the isolated fifteen novel derivatives (1)-(15) and their different protonated forms (1a)-(15a) evidenced a strong dependence of molecular conformation, physical properties and binding affinity. Thus, the semi-synthetic functionalization of the naturally occurred products (NPs), provided significant possibilities to further molecular drugs-design and development of novel derivatives with wanted biological function, using the established profile of selected classes/families of NPs. The work described chiefly the non-linear (NL) approach for the interpretation of the mass chromatograms on the performed hybrid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem MS/MS and MS/MS/MS experiments, discussing the merits and great diversity of instrumentation flexibility, thus achieving fundamental

  18. Green alga Ulva pertusa--a new source of bioactive compounds with antialgal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying-ying, Sun; Hui, Wang; Gan-lin, Guo; Yin-fang, Pu; Bin-lun, Yan; Chang-hai, Wang

    2015-07-01

    We tested the effects of solvent fractions (FA, FB, FC, and FD), which partitioned by liquid-liquid extraction from the methanol extract of Ulva pertusa, on the growth of red tide microalgae (Karenia mikimitoi, Skeletonema costatum, Alexandrium tamarense, Heterosigma akashiwo, Prorocentrum donghaiense), and FA, FB, and FC exhibited significantly antialgal activity. The chemical constituent analysis showed the existence of bioactive compounds such as phenols and alkaloids. Further, four solvent fractions were applied to silica gel column and repeated preparative TLC to produce 13 samples and their purity qualified as thin-layer chromatographic grade. Among these purified samples, FA111, FB411, FC411, FD111, and FD211 exhibited stronger antialgal activity. Furthermore, their functional groups were analyzed by colorimetric methods and UV spectra data. FD111 and FD211 were temptatively identified as alkaloids; the others were initially identified as phenolic acids. This is a preliminary study and the structure identification of these purified samples requires further investigation. While concentration of these purified samples in this algae was very small, they showed excellent effects against red tide microalgae. PMID:25724801

  19. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the mycotoxin research group are discussed. This includes the isolation and structure determination of mycotoxins, plant products, the biosyntheris of mycotoxins, the synthesis and characteristics of steroids, the synthesis and mechanistic aspects of heterocyclic chemistry and the functionality of steroids over long distances. Nmr spectra and mass spectroscopy are some of the techniques used

  20. Reinventing Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesides, George McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is in a period of change, from an era focused on molecules and reactions, to one in which manipulations of systems of molecules and reactions will be essential parts of controlling larger systems. This Essay traces paths from the past to possible futures.

  1. Comparison of 454-ESTs from Huperzia serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus reveals putative genes involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis and developmental regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmetz André

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants of the Huperziaceae family, which comprise the two genera Huperzia and Phlegmariurus, produce various types of lycopodium alkaloids that are used to treat a number of human ailments, such as contusions, swellings and strains. Huperzine A, which belongs to the lycodine type of lycopodium alkaloids, has been used as an anti-Alzheimer's disease drug candidate. Despite their medical importance, little genomic or transcriptomic data are available for the members of this family. We used massive parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset for Huperzia serrata (H. serrata and Phlegmariurus carinatus (P. carinatus as representative members of the Huperzia and Phlegmariurus genera, respectively. H. serrata and P. carinatus are important plants for research on the biosynthesis of lycopodium alkaloids. We focused on gene discovery in the areas of bioactive compound biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation as well as genetic marker detection in these species. Results For H. serrata, 36,763 unique putative transcripts were generated from 140,930 reads totaling over 57,028,559 base pairs; for P. carinatus, 31,812 unique putative transcripts were generated from 79,920 reads totaling over 30,498,684 base pairs. Using BLASTX searches of public databases, 16,274 (44.3% unique putative transcripts from H. serrata and 14,070 (44.2% from P. carinatus were assigned to at least one protein. Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG orthology annotations revealed that the functions of the unique putative transcripts from these two species cover a similarly broad set of molecular functions, biological processes and biochemical pathways. In particular, a total of 20 H. serrata candidate cytochrome P450 genes, which are more abundant in leaves than in roots and might be involved in lycopodium alkaloid biosynthesis, were found based on the comparison of H

  2. Pressurised Fluid Extraction of Bioactive Species in Tree Barks : Analysis using Hyphenated Electrochemical Mass Spectrometric Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Co, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Analytical chemistry has developed throughout time to meet current needs. At present, the interest in biorefinery is growing, due to environmental awareness and the depletion of fossil resources. Biomass from agricultural and forestry industries has proven to be excellent raw material for different processes. Biorefinering valuable species such as bioactive species from biomass, without compromising the primary process of the biomass is highly desirable. Pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) usi...

  3. Synthesis and Bioactivity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Sponges Containing Dibrominated Indolic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Azzurra Stefanucci; Francesco Pinnen; Adriano Mollica; Marcello Locatelli

    2012-01-01

    Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum.) produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharm...

  4. Histochemical Investigation and Kinds of Alkaloids in Leaves of Different Developmental Stages in Thymus quinquecostatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiting Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymus quinquecostatus, with more medical value, is a kind of wild plants. In order to exploit and utilize this plant, we studied the species and locations of alkaloids in its leaves. In this paper, histochemical study of leaves at different developing stages was taken to localize the alkaloids. Meanwhile, the kinds and content of alkaloids in leaves were identified using GC-MS technique. It was found that there were two kinds of glandular trichomes, namely, peltate trichomes and capitate trichomes, on the surface of leaves, and their secretory cells could secrete alkaloids. Results showed that trichomes could secrete alkaloids as soon as the first pair of leaves formed, and there were altogether 18 kinds of alkaloids identified by GC-MS. Nearly all of these alkaloids of leaves at different developing stages were distinct from each other, except one, 3-methoxy-a-methyl-benzeneethanamine, persists at different developing stages with high concentration.

  5. Dasycarine, a New Quinoline Alkaloid from Dictamnus dasycarpus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Dasycarine, a new quinoline alkaloid along with five known compounds, dictamine, dihydroobacunone, obacunone, fraxinellone and b -sitosterol, were isolated from Dictamnus dasycarpus. The structure of dasycarine was identified as 4, 5, 8- trimethoxyl -3- (3- methyl -2- butenyl)- 2- quinone by 1D and 2D NMR techniques.

  6. Metabolic Engineering of Tropane Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei ZHANG; Guo-Yin KAI; Bei-Bei LU; Han-Ming ZHANG; Ke-Xuan TANG; Ji-Hong JIANG; Wan-Sheng CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, the evolving commercial importance of so-called plant secondary metabolites has resulted in a great interest in secondary metabolism and, particularly, in the possibilities to enhance the yield of fine metabolites by means of genetic engineering. Plant alkaloids, which constitute one of the largest groups of natural products, provide many pharmacologically active compounds. Several genes in the tropane alkaloids biosynthesis pathways have been cloned, making the metabolic engineering of these alkaloids possible. The content of the target chemical scopolamine could be significantly increased by various approaches, such as introducing genes encoding the key biosynthetic enzymes or genes encoding regulatory proteins to overcome the specific rate-limiting steps. In addition, antisense genes have been used to block competitive pathways. These investigations have opened up new, promising perspectives for increased production in plants or plant cell culture. Recent achievements have been made in the metabolic engineering of plant tropane alkaloids and some new powerful strategies are reviewed in the present paper.

  7. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. 119.1 Section 119.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS THAT PRESENT A SIGNIFICANT...

  8. ALKALOIDS OF THE SEDUM ACRE-GROUP (CRASSULACEAE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEVENS, JF; THART, H; HENDRIKS, H; MALINGRE, TM

    1993-01-01

    The 16 species of the Sedum acre-group were investigated for the presence of alkaloids. They are S. acre of S. ser. Acria, S. alpestre, S. annuum, S. apoleipon, S. borissovae, S. euxinum, S. grisebachii, S. laconicum, S. multiceps, S. sexangulare, S. tuberiferum, S. tuberosum, S. ursi, and S. urvill

  9. The alkaloid profiles of Sophora nuttalliana and Sophora stenophylla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophora is a diverse genus in the family Fabaceae, comprised of herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Species of Sophora are known to contain quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. Two perennial herbaceous spec...

  10. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity in livestock: A paradigm for human poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livestock poisoning, primarily liver damage, caused by consumption of plants containing 1,2-dehydropyrro-lizidine ester alkaloids (dehydroPAs), and the corresponding N-oxides, is a relatively common occurrence worldwide. Because of the economic impact, extensive investigations...

  11. New Diterpenoid Alkaloids from Spiraea japonica var. ovalifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Five new diterpenoid alkaloids, 19-O-deethylspiramine N (1), deacetylspiramine S (2), spiramidine A (3), spiramidine B (4) and deacetylspiramine F (5) were isolated from the aerial parts of Spireae japonica L. f. var. ovalifolia. Their structures were charaterized mainly based on spectral analysis.

  12. Repellence and attraction of Apis mellifera foragers by nectar alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hroncová Z.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary metabolites present naturally in nectar, such as alkaloids, may change the behavioural responses of floral visitors and affect pollination. Some studies have shown that nectar containing low concentrations of these secondary metabolites is preferred by honey bee foragers over pure nectar. However, it remains unclear whether this is caused by dependence or addictive behaviour, a simple taste preference, or by other conditions such as self-medication. In our choice experiment, free-flying bees were presented with artificial flowers holding 20% sucrose containing 0.5−50 μg ml−1 of one of the naturally occurring nectar alkaloids - caffeine, nicotine, senecionine, and gelsemine. Nectar uptake was determined by weighing each flower and comparing the weight to that of the control flower. Our experimental design minimized memorizing and marking; despite this, caffeine was significantly preferred at concentrations 0.5−2 μg ml−1 over control nectar; this preference was not observed for other alkaloids. All of the compounds tested were repellent at concentrations above 5 μg ml−1. We confirmed previous reports that bees exhibit a preference for caffeine, and hypothesize that this is not due only to addictive behaviour but is at least partially mediated by taste preference. We observed no significant preference for nicotine or any other alkaloid.

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity of various dehydropyrrolizidine ester alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPAs) are plant-derived hepato-, pneumo- and geno-toxins that are carcinogenic in several species. Because of the difficulty in isolating sufficient DHPA for toxicological studies, there are few direct comparisons of toxicity. The objectives of this study was to de...

  14. Effect of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Foregut Vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergot alkaloids induce vasoconstriction of bovine foregut vasculature. Ergovaline induced the greatest response in ruminal artery while ergovaline and ergotamine induced the greatest response in ruminal vein. Lysergic acid did not stimulate a contractile response in either the ruminal artery or vein...

  15. Scientific Opinion on Ergot alkaloids in food and feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuerle, T.; Benford, D.; Brimer, L.; Cottrill, B.; Doerge, D.; Dusemund, B.; Farmer, P.; Fürst, P.; Humpf, H.; Mulder, P.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) was asked by the European Commission to deliver a scientific opinion on ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food and feed. EAs are produced by several members within the fungal orders of Hypocreales and Eurotiales. In Europe, Claviceps purpurea is the most widespread C

  16. Scientific Opinion on Tropane alkaloids in food and feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuerle, T.; Benford, D.; Brimer, L.; Cottrill, B.; Doerge, D.; Dusemund, B.; Farmer, P.; Fürst, P.; Humpf, H.; Mulder, P.P.J.

    2013-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) was asked by the European Commission to deliver a scientific opinion on ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food and feed. EAs are produced by several members within the fungal orders of Hypocreales and Eurotiales. In Europe, Claviceps purpurea is the most widespread C

  17. Scientific Opinion on Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in food and feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuerle, T.; Benford, D.; Brimer, L.; Cottrill, B.; Doerge, D.; Dusemund, B.; Farmer, P.; Fürst, P.; Humpf, H.; Mulder, P.P.J.

    2013-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) was asked by the European Commission to deliver a scientific opinion on ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food and feed. EAs are produced by several members within the fungal orders of Hypocreales and Eurotiales. In Europe, Claviceps purpurea is the most widespread C

  18. Antiparasitic activities of acridone alkaloids from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Djalma A.P. dos; Vieira, Paulo C.; Silva, M. Fatima das G.F. da; Fernandes, Joao B. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Rattray, Lauren; Croft, Simon L. [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Infectious and Tropical Diseases

    2009-07-01

    Eleven acridone alkaloids isolated from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr. were examined for in vitro activity against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB900 and Leishmania donovani L82. An assay with KB cells was developed in order to compare in vitro toxicity of alkaloids with the selective action on the parasites. Nine of the compounds had IC{sub 50} values ranging from 0.3 to 11.6 {mu}M against P. falciparum. In contrast, a small number of compounds showed significant activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and none had activity against L. donovani. Among the alkaloids three had IC{sub 50} < 1.0 {mu}M against P. falciparum, whereas against T. b. rhodesiense five had IC{sub 50} < 10 {mu}M. The characterization of the acridone alkaloids, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-10-methyl-2,8-bis(3-methylbut-2-enyl)acridin-9 (10H)-one (1), 2,3-dihydro-4,9-dihydroxy-2-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-11-methoxy-10-methylfuro [3,2-b] acridin-5(10H)-one (2) and 3,4-dihydro-3,5,8-trihydroxy-6-methoxy-2,2,7-trimethyl-2Hpyrano[ 2,3-a]acridin-12(7H)-one (3), is discussed, as well as the structure-activity relationship of all compounds assayed. Isolation and spectral data of alkaloids 1-3 are described for the first time although their cytotoxicities to cancer cells have been described before. (author)

  19. Bioactivity of plasma implanted biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification of biomedical materials is described. NiTi alloys have unique super-elastic and shape memory properties and are suitable for orthopedic implants but the leaching of toxic Ni may pose health hazards in humans. We have recently investigated the use of acetylene, oxygen and nitrogen PIII&D to prevent out-diffusion of nickel and good results have been obtained. Silicon is the most important material in the microelectronics industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PIII into silicon to improve the surface bioactivity and observed biomimetic growth of apatite on the surface in simulated body fluids. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness and by incorporation of elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the surface blood compatibility can be improved. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results are discussed in this article.

  20. Bioactive components in fish venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegman, Rebekah; Alewood, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Animal venoms are widely recognized excellent resources for the discovery of novel drug leads and physiological tools. Most are comprised of a large number of components, of which the enzymes, small peptides, and proteins are studied for their important bioactivities. However, in spite of there being over 2000 venomous fish species, piscine venoms have been relatively underrepresented in the literature thus far. Most studies have explored whole or partially fractioned venom, revealing broad pharmacology, which includes cardiovascular, neuromuscular, cytotoxic, inflammatory, and nociceptive activities. Several large proteinaceous toxins, such as stonustoxin, verrucotoxin, and Sp-CTx, have been isolated from scorpaenoid fish. These form pores in cell membranes, resulting in cell death and creating a cascade of reactions that result in many, but not all, of the physiological symptoms observed from envenomation. Additionally, Natterins, a novel family of toxins possessing kininogenase activity have been found in toadfish venom. A variety of smaller protein toxins, as well as a small number of peptides, enzymes, and non-proteinaceous molecules have also been isolated from a range of fish venoms, but most remain poorly characterized. Many other bioactive fish venom components remain to be discovered and investigated. These represent an untapped treasure of potentially useful molecules. PMID:25941767

  1. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Andersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk.

  2. Organometallic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bashkin, James K.; M.L.H. Green; Dr. M. L. H. Green

    1982-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic chemistry is a rapidly expanding field, which has an important relationship to industrial problems of petrochemical catalysis. This thesis describes studies of fundamental organometallic reaction processes, such as C-H and C-C bond formation and cleavage, and investigations of the structure and bonding of organometallic compounds. A number of techniques were used to pursue these studies, including synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and semi-em...

  3. Disk Chemistry*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    The chemical species in protoplanetary disks react with each other. The chemical species control part of the thermal balance in those disks. How the chemistry proceeds in the varied conditions encountered in disks relies on detailed microscopic understanding of the reactions through experiments or theoretical studies. This chapter strives to summarize and explain in simple terms the different types of chemical reactions that can lead to complex species. The first part of the chapter deals wit...

  4. Interstellar chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species o...

  5. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  6. Solid-phase extraction and LC-MS analysis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in honeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Kerrie A; Betteridge, Keith; Colegate, Steven M; Edgar, John A

    2004-10-20

    Strong-cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction of pyrrolizidine alkaloids and their N-oxides from honey samples was followed by reduction of the N-oxides and subsequent analysis of total pyrrolizidine alkaloids using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. A limited survey of 63 preprocessing samples of honey, purposefully biased toward honeys attributed to floral sources known to produce pyrrolizidine alkaloids, demonstrated levels of pyrrolizidine alkaloids up to approximately 2000 parts per billion (ppb) in a sample attributed to Echium plantagineum. Up to 800 ppb pyrrolizidine alkaloids was detected in some honeys not attributed by the collector to any pyrrolizidine alkaloid-producing floral source. No pyrrolizidine alkaloids were detected in approximately 30% of the samples in this limited study, while some honeys showed the copresence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from multiple floral sources such as E. plantagineum and Heliotropium europaeum. In addition, retail samples of blended honeys (with no labeling to suggest that pyrrolizidine alkaloid-producing floral sources were used in the blends) have been shown to contain up to approximately 250 ppb pyrrolizidine alkaloids. PMID:15479038

  7. GC-MS analysis of bioactive compounds in the methanol extract of Clerodendrum viscosum leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritipadma Panda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clerodendrum viscosum is commonly found in India and Bangladesh. Previously, various parts of this plant were reported for treatment of different types of diseases and there was no report on GC-Ms analysis. Objective: To analyze and characterize the phytochemical compounds of methanol extract of Clerodendrum viscosum using GC-MS. Materials and Methods: The preliminary phytochemical screening of methanol extract was carried out according to standard procedures described in WHO guidelines. Various bioactive compounds of the extract were determined by GC-MS technique. Results: The presence of steroids, triterpenoids, alkaloids, saponins, flavonoids, tannins and carbohydrate was found on phytochemical screening of methanol extract of the leaves. The GC-MS analysis showed 16 peaks of different phytoconstituents namely acetamide,N,N-carbonylbis-, 4-Pyranone,2,3-dihydro-, alpha-D-Galactofuranoside, methyl 2,3,5,6-tetra-O-methyl-, Glycerin, Xylitol, N,N-Dimethylglycine, 4H-Pyran-4-one,2,3-dihydro-3, 5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-, Benzofuran,2,3-dihydro-, 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural, 2(1HPyrimidinone,1-methyl-, 2,4-Dihydroxy-5,6-dimethylpyrimidine, 3-Deoxy-d-mannoic lactone, 1,3-Methylene-d-arabitol, Orcinol, n-Hexadecanoic acid and Phenol,4,4′-(1-methyl ethylidene bis etc. Conclusion: The bioactive compounds present in the methanol extract of Clerodendrum viscosum suggest the application of this extract for the treatment of various diseases by the aborigine tribes.

  8. Bioactive furanonaphthoquinones from Crescentia cujete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, C E; Gunatilaka, A A; Glass, T E; Kingston, D G; Hoffmann, G; Johnson, R K

    1993-09-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of the MeCOEt extract of Crescentia cujete (Bignonaceae) resulted in the isolation of (2S,3S)-3-hydroxy-5,6-dimethoxydehydroiso-alpha-lapachone [1], (2R)-5,6-dimethoxydehydroiso-alpha-lapachone [2], (2R)-5-methoxydehydroiso-alpha-lapachone [3], 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)naphtho[2,3-b]furan-4,9-dione [4], 5-hydroxy-2-(1-hydroxyethyl)naphtho[2,3-b]furan-4,9-dione [5], 2-isopropenylnaphtho[2,3-b]furan-4,9-dione [6], and 5-hydroxydehydroiso-alpha-lapachone [7]. Compounds 1-3 are new, and all compounds are bioactive, showing selective activity towards DNA-repair-deficient yeast mutants. The isolation, structure elucidation, and biological activities of these compounds are reported. PMID:8254347

  9. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  10. A bioactive elastin-like recombinamer reduces unspecific protein adsorption and enhances cell response on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvagni, Emiliano; Berguig, Geoffrey; Engel, Elisabeth; Rodriguez-Cabello, J Carlos; Coullerez, Geraldine; Textor, Marcus; Planell, Josep A; Gil, F Javier; Aparicio, Conrado

    2014-02-01

    We present the immobilization on synthetic substrates of elastin-like recombinamers (ELR) that combine a bioactive motif for cell adhesion with protein antifouling properties. Physical adsorption of the recombinamers and covalent-grafting through organosilane chemistry were investigated. The biochemically-modified surfaces were thoroughly characterized and tested for protein absorption in serum by fluorescence-labelling, XPS, Ellipsometry, and OWLS. The ELR were successfully grafted and stable, even upon mechanical stresses; being the covalent bonding favourable over physical adsorption. The coated metal surfaces exhibited excellent reduction of serum protein adsorption (9 ng/cm(2)) compared to the bare metal surface (310 ng/cm(2)). Non-specific protein adsorption may mask the introduced bioactive motifs; therefore, the bioactivated surfaces should display serum-protein antifouling properties. Finally, improved hMSCs response was assessed on the bioactivated substrates. In summary, the coatings simultaneously displayed anti-fouling and bioactive properties. These studies investigated key factors to enhance tissue material interactions fundamental for the design of bioactive devices and future biomedical applications.

  11. Rapid screening and distribution of bioactive compounds in different parts of Berberis petiolaris using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Awantika Singh; Vikas Bajpai; Mukesh Srivastava; Kamal Ram Arya; Brijesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Berberis petiolaris Wall. ex G. Don, an unexplored medicinal plant belonging to the family Berberidaceae, is a large deciduous shrub found in Western Himalaya between 1800-3000 m. Chemical profiling of fruit, leaf, root and stem was done by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry followed by multivariate analysis for discrimination among the plant parts. The bioactive compounds, including magnoflorine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, thalifendine/berberrubine, demethyleneberberine, reticuline, 8-oxoberberine, N-methyltetrahydroberberine, tetrahydropalmatine, tetrahydroberberine and palmatine, were identified by their exact mass measurement and the corresponding molecular formula of each compound. A comparative study of distribution pattern for all these bioactive alkaloids showed qualitative and quantitative variations in different parts of B. petiolaris. Principal component analysis clearly dis-criminated each part of B. petiolaris plant.

  12. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  13. Planctomycetes as novel source of bioactive molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patrícia Graça

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments are a fruitful source of bioactive compounds some of which are the newest leading drugs in medicinal therapeutics. Of particular importance are organisms like sponges and macroalgae and their associated microbiome. Planctomycetes, abundant in macroalgae biofilms, are promising producers of bioactive compounds since they share characteristics, like large genomes and complex life cycles, with the most bioactive bacteria, the Actinobacteria. Furthermore, genome mining revealed the presence of secondary metabolite pathway genes or clusters in 13 analyzed Planctomycetes genomes.In order to assess the antimicrobial production of a large and diverse collection of Planctomycetes isolated from macroalgae from the Portuguese coast, molecular and bioactivity assays were performed in 40 bacteria from several taxa. Two genes commonly associated with the production of bioactive compounds, nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS and polyketide synthases (PKS genes were screened. Molecular analysis revealed that 95 % of the planctomycetes potentially have one or both secondary bioactive genes; 85 % amplified with PKS-I primers and 55 % with NRPS primers. Some of the amplified genes were confirmed to be involved in secondary metabolite pathways. Using bioinformatic tools their biosynthetic pathways were predicted. The secondary metabolite genomic potential of strains LF1, UC8 and FC18 was assessed using in silico analysis of their genomes. Aqueous and organic extracts of the Planctomycetes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against an environmental Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and a clinical isolate of Candida albicans. The screening assays showed a high number of planctomycetes with bioactive extracts revealing antifungal (43 % and antibacterial (54 % activity against C. albicans and B. subtilis, respectively

  14. Planctomycetes as Novel Source of Bioactive Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Ana P; Calisto, Rita; Lage, Olga M

    2016-01-01

    Marine environments are a fruitful source of bioactive compounds some of which are the newest leading drugs in medicinal therapeutics. Of particular importance are organisms like sponges and macroalgae and their associated microbiome. Planctomycetes, abundant in macroalgae biofilms, are promising producers of bioactive compounds since they share characteristics, like large genomes and complex life cycles, with the most bioactive bacteria, the Actinobacteria. Furthermore, genome mining revealed the presence of secondary metabolite pathway genes or clusters in 13 analyzed Planctomycetes genomes. In order to assess the antimicrobial production of a large and diverse collection of Planctomycetes isolated from macroalgae from the Portuguese coast, molecular, and bioactivity assays were performed in 40 bacteria from several taxa. Two genes commonly associated with the production of bioactive compounds, nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), and polyketide synthases (PKS) genes were screened. Molecular analysis revealed that 95% of the planctomycetes potentially have one or both secondary bioactive genes; 85% amplified with PKS-I primers and 55% with NRPS primers. Some of the amplified genes were confirmed to be involved in secondary metabolite pathways. Using bioinformatic tools their biosynthetic pathways were predicted. The secondary metabolite genomic potential of strains LF1, UC8, and FC18 was assessed using in silico analysis of their genomes. Aqueous and organic extracts of the Planctomycetes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against an environmental Escherichia coli, E. coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, and a clinical isolate of Candida albicans. The screening assays showed a high number of planctomycetes with bioactive extracts revealing antifungal (43%) and antibacterial (54%) activity against C. albicans and B. subtilis, respectively. Bioactivity was observed in

  15. Planctomycetes as Novel Source of Bioactive Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Ana P.; Calisto, Rita; Lage, Olga M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine environments are a fruitful source of bioactive compounds some of which are the newest leading drugs in medicinal therapeutics. Of particular importance are organisms like sponges and macroalgae and their associated microbiome. Planctomycetes, abundant in macroalgae biofilms, are promising producers of bioactive compounds since they share characteristics, like large genomes and complex life cycles, with the most bioactive bacteria, the Actinobacteria. Furthermore, genome mining revealed the presence of secondary metabolite pathway genes or clusters in 13 analyzed Planctomycetes genomes. In order to assess the antimicrobial production of a large and diverse collection of Planctomycetes isolated from macroalgae from the Portuguese coast, molecular, and bioactivity assays were performed in 40 bacteria from several taxa. Two genes commonly associated with the production of bioactive compounds, nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), and polyketide synthases (PKS) genes were screened. Molecular analysis revealed that 95% of the planctomycetes potentially have one or both secondary bioactive genes; 85% amplified with PKS-I primers and 55% with NRPS primers. Some of the amplified genes were confirmed to be involved in secondary metabolite pathways. Using bioinformatic tools their biosynthetic pathways were predicted. The secondary metabolite genomic potential of strains LF1, UC8, and FC18 was assessed using in silico analysis of their genomes. Aqueous and organic extracts of the Planctomycetes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against an environmental Escherichia coli, E. coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, and a clinical isolate of Candida albicans. The screening assays showed a high number of planctomycetes with bioactive extracts revealing antifungal (43%) and antibacterial (54%) activity against C. albicans and B. subtilis, respectively. Bioactivity was observed in

  16. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Characterization of Half-Calycanthaceous Alkaloid Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shaojun; Zhou, Xinping; Xu, Shixun; Zhu, Rui; Bai, Hongjin; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    A total of 29 novel tetrahydropyrroloindol-based calycanthaceous alkaloid derivatives were synthesized from indole-3-acetonitrile in good yields. The synthesized compounds were evaluated against nine strains of bacteria and a wide range of plant pathogen fungi. Bioassay results revealed that majority of the compounds displayed similar or higher in vitro antimicrobial activities than the positive control. The biological activities also indicated that substituents at R₄ and R₅ significantly affect the activities. Notably, compound c4 was found to be most active among the tested calycanthaceous analogues and might be a novel potential leading compound for further development as an antifungal agent. The results could pave the way for further design and structural modification of calycanthaceous alkaloids as antimicrobial agents. PMID:27618003

  17. Biogenetically inspired synthesis and skeletal diversification of indole alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Haruki; Oikawa, Hideaki; Oguri, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    To access architecturally complex natural products, chemists usually devise a customized synthetic strategy for constructing a single target skeleton. In contrast, biosynthetic assembly lines often employ divergent intramolecular cyclizations of a polyunsaturated common intermediate to produce diverse arrays of scaffolds. With the aim of integrating such biogenetic strategies, we show the development of an artificial divergent assembly line generating unprecedented numbers of scaffold variations of terpenoid indole alkaloids. This approach not only allows practical access to multipotent intermediates, but also enables systematic diversification of skeletal, stereochemical and functional group properties without structural simplification of naturally occurring alkaloids. Three distinct modes of [4+2] cyclizations and two types of redox-mediated annulations provided divergent access to five skeletally distinct scaffolds involving iboga-, aspidosperma-, andranginine- and ngouniensine-type skeletons and a non-natural variant within six to nine steps from tryptamine. The efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by successful total syntheses of (±)-vincadifformine, (±)-andranginine and (-)-catharanthine.

  18. A Submarine Journey: The Pyrrole-Imidazole Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Scolaro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In his most celebrated tale “The Picture of Dorian Gray”, Oscar Wilde stated that “those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril”. This sentence could be a prophetical warning for the practitioner who voluntarily challenges himself with trying to synthesize marine sponge-deriving pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids. This now nearly triple-digit membered community has been growing exponentially in the last 20 years, both in terms of new representatives and topological complexity − from simple, achiral oroidin to the breathtaking 12-ring stylissadines A and B, each possessing 16 stereocenters. While the biosynthesis and the role in the sponge economy of most of these alkaloids still lies in the realm of speculations, significant biological activities for some of them have clearly emerged. This review will account for the progress in achieving the total synthesis of the more biologically enticing members of this class of natural products.

  19. A submarine journey: the pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Barbara; Malgesini, Beatrice; Piutti, Claudia; Quartieri, Francesca; Scolaro, Alessandra; Papeo, Gianluca

    2009-11-27

    In his most celebrated tale "The Picture of Dorian Gray", Oscar Wilde stated that "those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril". This sentence could be a prophetical warning for the practitioner who voluntarily challenges himself with trying to synthesize marine sponge-deriving pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids. This now nearly triple-digit membered community has been growing exponentially in the last 20 years, both in terms of new representatives and topological complexity--from simple, achiral oroidin to the breathtaking 12-ring stylissadines A and B, each possessing 16 stereocenters. While the biosynthesis and the role in the sponge economy of most of these alkaloids still lies in the realm of speculations, significant biological activities for some of them have clearly emerged. This review will account for the progress in achieving the total synthesis of the more biologically enticing members of this class of natural products.

  20. A Submarine Journey: The Pyrrole-Imidazole Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Barbara; Malgesini, Beatrice; Piutti, Claudia; Quartieri, Francesca; Scolaro, Alessandra; Papeo, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    In his most celebrated tale “The Picture of Dorian Gray”, Oscar Wilde stated that “those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril”. This sentence could be a prophetical warning for the practitioner who voluntarily challenges himself with trying to synthesize marine sponge-deriving pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids. This now nearly triple-digit membered community has been growing exponentially in the last 20 years, both in terms of new representatives and topological complexity – from simple, achiral oroidin to the breathtaking 12-ring stylissadines A and B, each possessing 16 stereocenters. While the biosynthesis and the role in the sponge economy of most of these alkaloids still lies in the realm of speculations, significant biological activities for some of them have clearly emerged. This review will account for the progress in achieving the total synthesis of the more biologically enticing members of this class of natural products. PMID:20098608

  1. Potent Antiplasmodial Alkaloids and Flavonoids from Dasymaschalon acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchanaporn Chokchaisiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new aporphine alkaloid, 7-epi-duguetine (1 together with one known alkaloid, dicentrinone (2, and four known flavonoids, quercetin 3,7-dimethyl ether 3′ -O- α -L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 g 2-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, galangin 5-methyl ether (4, 5,7-dimethoxy-3-hydroxyflavone (5, and 3,5,7-trimethoxyflavone (6, were isolated from the leaves of Dasymaschalon acuminatum , a new plant species which has not been investigated phytochemically before. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated through extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis. All isolates were evaluated for antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum strain K1 and 7- epi -duguetine was found to exhibit potent activity with an IC 50 of 0.385 m g/ml .

  2. Anti-leishmanial activity of alkaloidal extract from Aspidosperma ramiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabel Cristina Piloto Ferreira

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections due to protozoa of the genus Leishmania are a major worldwide health problem, with high endemicity in developing countries. The drugs of choice for the treatment of leishmaniasis are the pentavalent antimonials (SbV, which present renal and cardiac toxicity. Besides, the precise chemical structure and mechanism of action of these drugs are unknown up to date. In order to find new drugs against leishmaniasis, we have been studying extracts of Brazilian trees. In the present study, we have evaluated the effectiveness of an alkaloid extract of Aspidosperma ramiflorum Muell. Arg. (Apocynaceae, against the extracellular forms promastigotes of L. (L. amazonensis and L. (V. braziliensis. The alkaloid extract of A. ramiflorum was much more effective against L. (L. amazonensis (LD50 < 47 µg/ml than L. (V. braziliensis. Based on these in vitro results against L. (L. amazonensis new studies should be made to find the compounds with anti-leishmanial activity.

  3. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from seven wild-growing Senecio species in Serbia and Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORIS M. MANDIC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Senecio (family Asteraceae is one of the largest in the world. It comprises about 1100 species which are the rich source of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Plants containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids are among the most important sources of human and animal exposure to plant toxins and carcinogens. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids of seven Senecio species (S. erucifolius, S. othonnae, S. wagneri, S. subalpinus, S. carpathicus, S. paludosus and S. rupestris were studied. Fourteen alkaloids were isolated and their structures determined from spectroscopic data (1H- and 13C-NMR, IR and MS. Five of them were identified in S. erucifolius, four in S. othonnae, two in S. wagneri, four in S. subalpinus, two in S. carpathicus, three in S. paludosus and three in S. rupestris. Seven pyrrolizidine alkaloids were found for the first time in particular species. The results have chemotaxonomic importance. The cytotoxic activity and antimicrobial activity of some alkaloids were also studied.

  4. Antiplasmodial activities of furoquinoline alkaloids from Teclea afzelii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansi, Jean Duplex; Hussain, Hidayat; Tcho, Alain Tadjong; Kouam, Simeon F; Specht, Sabine; Sarite, Salem Ramadan; Hoerauf, Achim; Krohn, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    The study of the chemical constituents of the stem bark of Teclea afzelii (Rutaceae) has resulted in the isolation and characterization of four furoquinoline alkaloids, namely kokusaginine (1), tecleaverdoornine (2), maculine (3) and montrifoline (4) together with lupeol (5) and beta-sitosterol glucopyranoside (6). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated based on spectroscopic studies. The antimalarial activity of compounds 1-4 against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro shows partial suppression of parasitic growth. PMID:19496062

  5. Alkaloid and other chemical constituents from Psychotria stachyoides Benth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Antonia T.A.; Uchoa, Daniel E.A.; Silveira, Edilberto R.; Lima, Mary Anne S. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Braz-Filho, Raimundo, E-mail: mary@dqoi.ufc.br [Centro de Ciencias, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense and Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    The organic extracts of leaves and roots of Psychotria stachyoides provided the new glucoside monoterpenoid indole alkaloid N-demethylcorreantoside, besides bizantionoside B, a-amyrin, alizarine methyl-ether, rubiadine, scopoletin, barbinevic acid and a mixture of b-sitosterol and stigmasterol glucosides. The structural characterization of the isolates was established based on infrared spectroscopy (IR), mass spectrometry (MS) and, particularly, 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). (author)

  6. Anxiolytic-like effects of erythrinian alkaloids from Erythrina suberosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Maria Amelia R.; Batista, Andrea N. de L.; Bolzani, Vanderlan da S.; Santos, Luciana de A. [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Nogueira, Paulo J. de C.; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo L. [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Latif, Abdul; Arfan, Mohammad [University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan). Inst. of Chemical Sciences

    2011-07-01

    Two alkaloids, erysodine (1) and erysothrine (2) were isolated from the flowers of a Pakistani medicinal plant, Erythrina suberosa. These compounds were investigated for anxiolytic properties, and the results showed significant effect, in an acute oral treatment with 1-2, which were suspended in saline (NaCl 0.9%) plus DMSO 1%, and evaluated in 122 Swiss male mice exposed to two tests of anxiety - the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and the light/dark transition model (LDTM). (author)

  7. Antitumor effects of the benzophenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine: Evidence and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Gaziano, Roberta; Moroni, Gabriella; Buè, Cristina; Miele, Martino Tony; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Pica, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Historically, natural products have represented a significant source of anticancer agents, with plant-derived drugs becoming increasingly explored. In particular, sanguinarine is a benzophenanthridine alkaloid obtained from the root of Sanguinaria canadensis, and from other poppy Fumaria species, with recognized anti-microbial, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, increasing evidence that sanguinarine exibits anticancer potential through its capability of inducing apoptosi...

  8. Alkaloids of in vitro cultures of Rhazya stricta

    OpenAIRE

    Akhgari, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Rhazya stricta Decne. (Apocynaceae) is a traditional medicinal plant in the Middle East and South Asia. It produces a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids(TIAs), some of which possess important pharmacological properties. This study focused on the establishment of biotechnological production tools of R. stricta, namely undifferentiated cell cultures, and an Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation method to obtain hairy roots expressing heterologous genes from the early TIA path...

  9. Antimalarial diterpene alkaloids from the seeds of Caesalpinia minax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guoxu; Sun, Zhaocui; Sun, Zhonghao; Yuan, Jingquan; Wei, Hua; Yang, Junshan; Wu, Haifeng; Xu, Xudong

    2014-06-01

    Two new diterpene alkaloids, caesalminines A (1) and B (2), possessing a tetracyclic cassane-type furanoditerpenoid skeleton with γ-lactam ring, were isolated from the seeds of Caesalpinia minax. Their structures were determined by different spectroscopic methods and ECD calculation. The plausible biosynthetic pathway of caesalminines A and B was proposed. The anti-malarial activity of compounds 1 and 2 is presented with IC50 values of 0.42 and 0.79 μM, respectively.

  10. Enantioselective Nazarov Cyclization Catalyzed by a Cinchona Alkaloid Derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Wen; Frontier, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophilic catalysts for a 1,6 addition/Nazarov cyclization/elimination sequence were evaluated for their ability to induce enantioselectivity in the electrocyclization step. Of the tertiary amines examined, it was found that a cinchona alkaloid derivative was able to generate substituted 5-hydroxy γ-methylene cyclopentenones with excellent enantioselectivity. The study results suggest that successful cyclization depends upon the ability of the dienyl diketone substrate to readily adopt an s-cis conformation. PMID:26085696

  11. Bioactivities and Health Benefits of Wild Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wild fruits are exotic or underutilized. Wild fruits contain many bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins and flavonoids. Many studies have shown that wild fruits possess various bioactivities and health benefits, such as free radical scavenging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity. Therefore, wild fruits have the potential to be developed into functional foods or pharmaceuticals to prevent and treat several chronic diseases. In the present article, we review current knowledge about the bioactivities and health benefits of wild fruits, which is valuable for the exploitation and utilization of wild fruits.

  12. Bioactivities and Health Benefits of Wild Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Xu, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Yue; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-08-04

    Wild fruits are exotic or underutilized. Wild fruits contain many bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins and flavonoids. Many studies have shown that wild fruits possess various bioactivities and health benefits, such as free radical scavenging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity. Therefore, wild fruits have the potential to be developed into functional foods or pharmaceuticals to prevent and treat several chronic diseases. In the present article, we review current knowledge about the bioactivities and health benefits of wild fruits, which is valuable for the exploitation and utilization of wild fruits.

  13. Bioactivities and Health Benefits of Wild Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Xu, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Yue; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Wild fruits are exotic or underutilized. Wild fruits contain many bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins and flavonoids. Many studies have shown that wild fruits possess various bioactivities and health benefits, such as free radical scavenging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity. Therefore, wild fruits have the potential to be developed into functional foods or pharmaceuticals to prevent and treat several chronic diseases. In the present article, we review current knowledge about the bioactivities and health benefits of wild fruits, which is valuable for the exploitation and utilization of wild fruits. PMID:27527154

  14. Anti-anaphylactic and anti-inflammatory activities of a bioactive alkaloid from the root bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Vijayalakshmi; V Ravichandiran; Malarkodi Velraj; S Hemalatha; G Sudharani; S Jayakumari

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-anaphylactic, anti-inflammatory and membrane stabilizing properties of plumerianine (compound 1) isolated from the root bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir. Methods: The anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 (10, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was studied by using models such as passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, passive paw anaphylaxis and its anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenin induced paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma in albino rats was also investigated using ketotifen and indomethacin as reference drugs. Results: A dose-dependent beneficial effect was observed on leakage of evans blue dye in skin challenged with antigen and on paw anaphylaxis induced by antiserum. The compound 1 also exhibited significant (P<0.01) inhibition of rat paw edema and granuloma tissue formation, including significant protection of RBC against the haemolytic effect of hypotonic solution, an indication of membrane-stabilizing activity. Conclusions: Anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 may be possibly due to inhibition of the release of various inflammatory mediators. Anti-inflammatory activity of compound may be related to the inhibition of the early phase and late phase of inflammatory events.

  15. Cactus alkaloids. XXXVI. Mescaline and related compounds from Trichocereus peruvianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, J H; McLaughlin, J L; Kondrat, R W; Cooks, R G

    1977-01-01

    Agurell has previously detected (tlc, glc-ms) tyramine, 3-methoxytyramine, and two unknown alkaloids in the Peruvian cactus, Trichocereus peruvianus Br. and R. The presence of mescaline in other similar Trichocereus species prompted us to reinvestigate this species, which is commercially available in the United States. The nonphenolic alkaloid extracts yielded an abundance of crystalline mescaline hydrochloride (0.82% yield) and a trace of 3,4-dimethoxyphenethylamine (tlc-ms). Crystalline tyramine hydrochloride, 3-methoxytyramine hydrochloride, and 3,5 dimethoxy-4-hydroxphenethylamine hydrochloride were isolated from the phenolic alkaloid extracts; the last compound has not been previously crystallized from nature, although it is the immediate biosynthetic precursor of mescaline. Crystalline 2-chloromescaline hydrochloride was isolated drom the nonphenolic extracts; but, as determined by mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy spectrometry, this new compound is an extraction artifact. Both 2-chloromescaline and 2.6-dichloromescaline hydrochlorides were prepared synthetically from mescaline. This cactus species has a mescaline content equal or superior to peyote and should be legally controlled as an item of drug abuse.

  16. Metabolic engineering for the production of plant isoquinoline alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Andrew; Desgagné-Penix, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Several plant isoquinoline alkaloids (PIAs) possess powerful pharmaceutical and biotechnological properties. Thus, PIA metabolism and its fascinating molecules, including morphine, colchicine and galanthamine, have attracted the attention of both the industry and researchers involved in plant science, biochemistry, chemical bioengineering and medicine. Currently, access and availability of high-value PIAs [commercialized (e.g. galanthamine) or not (e.g. narciclasine)] is limited by low concentration in nature, lack of cultivation or geographic access, seasonal production and risk of overharvesting wild plant species. Nevertheless, most commercial PIAs are still extracted from plant sources. Efforts to improve the production of PIA have largely been impaired by the lack of knowledge on PIA metabolism. With the development and integration of next-generation sequencing technologies, high-throughput proteomics and metabolomics analyses and bioinformatics, systems biology was used to unravel metabolic pathways allowing the use of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches to increase production of valuable PIAs. Metabolic engineering provides opportunity to overcome issues related to restricted availability, diversification and productivity of plant alkaloids. Engineered plant, plant cells and microbial cell cultures can act as biofactories by offering their metabolic machinery for the purpose of optimizing the conditions and increasing the productivity of a specific alkaloid. In this article, is presented an update on the production of PIA in engineered plant, plant cell cultures and heterologous micro-organisms. PMID:26503307

  17. Alkaloids and acetogenins in Annonaceae development: biological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Rosa González-Esquinca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical studies of the plant family Annonaceae have intensified in the last several decades due to the discovery of annonaceous molecules with medicinal potential (e.g., benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and acetogenins. Approximately 500 alkaloids have been identified in 138 Annonaceae species in 43 genera. In addition, until 2004, 593 annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs had been identified, from 51 species in 13 genera.This suggests that plants from this family allocate important resources to the biosynthesis of these compounds. Despite the diversity of these molecules, their biological roles, including their physiological and/or ecological functions, are not well understood. In this study, it was provided new data describing the variety and distribution of certain alkaloids and ACGs in annonaceous plants in distinct stages of development. The potential relationships among some of these compounds and the seasonally climatic changes occurring in the plant habitat are also discussed. These data will improve our understanding of the secondary metabolism of these pharmacologically important molecules and their expression patterns during development, which will help to determine the optimal growth conditions and harvest times for their production.

  18. Bioactivity of bioresorbable composite based on bioactive glass and poly-L-lactide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-hua; RUAN Jian-ming; ZOU Jian-peng; ZHOU Zhong-cheng; SHEN Xiong-jun

    2007-01-01

    Bioactive and bioresorbable composite was fabricated by a solvent evaporation technique using poly-L-lactide(PLLA) and bioactive glass (average particle size: 6.8 μm). Bioactive glass granules are homogeneously distributed in the composite with microcrack structure. The formation of hydroxyapatite(HA) on the composite in simulated body fluid(SBF) was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS), X-ray diffraction(XRD), and Raman spectra. Rod-like HA crystals deposit on the surface of PLLA/bioactive glass composite after soaking for 3 d. Both rod-like crystals and HA layer form on the surface for 14 d in SBF. The high bioactivity of PLLA/bioactive glass composite indicates the potential of materials for integration with bone.

  19. Penentuan Sifat Kimia Fisika Senyawa Alkaloid Hasil Isolasi Dari Daun Bandotan (Ageratum Conyzoides Linn.)

    OpenAIRE

    Hasibuan, Poppy Anjelisa Z.; Nainggolan, Marline

    2010-01-01

    Extraction, isolation and identification of alkaloid from bandotan’s leaf (Ageratum conyzoides Linn.) has been carried out. Extraction was done by maceration method by using methanol. Isolation has been carried out by adding acid base to give crude alkaloid. The isolation followed by column chromatography by using chloroform-methanol-amonia as mobile phase (85-15-1) and silica gel 60 (mesh 70-230 ASTM) as statis phase. The result of column chromatography has get one white crystal alkaloid...

  20. Radiation Processed Carrageenan Improves Plant Growth, Physiological Activities, and Alkaloids Production in Catharanthus roseus L.

    OpenAIRE

    Naeem, M.; Mohd Idrees; Tariq Aftab; M. Masidur Alam; Khan, M. Masroor A.; Moin Uddin; Lalit Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Apocynaceae) is a medicinal plant that produces indole alkaloids used in cancer chemotherapy. Commercially important antineoplastic alkaloids, namely, vinblastine and vincristine, are mainly present in the leaves of C. roseus. Gamma-rays irradiated carrageenan (ICR) has been proven as plant growth promoting substance for a number of medicinal and agricultural plants. Considering the importance of ICR as a promoter of plant growth and alkaloids production in C....

  1. MEXICAN WILD LUPINES AS A SOURCE OF QUINOLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS OF ECONOMIC POTENTIAL

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Ruiz-López; P.M. García-López; R. Rodríguez-Macías; J.F. Zamora Natera; M.L. Isaac-Virgen; M. Múzquiz

    2010-01-01

    Quinolizidine alkaloids such as lupanine, 13-hydroxylupanine, multifl orine, angustifoline and sparteine, which are present in the species of the genus Lupinus, have been reported to have biopesticide and pharmacological activities. The aim of this study was to quantify the content and variation of the individual alkaloids in seeds of L. mexicanus, L. exaltatus, L. montanus and L. stipulatus collected in different states of Mexico. Lupanine was the major (5.05 ± 0.37 mg/g) alkaloid found in L...

  2. Radiolytically degraded sodium alginate enhances plant growth, physiological activities and alkaloids production in Catharanthus roseus L.

    OpenAIRE

    Naeem, M.; Tariq Aftab; Abid A. Ansari; Mohd Idrees; Akbar Ali; Khan, M. Masroor A.; Moin Uddin; Lalit Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Family Apocynaceae) is a medicinal plant that produces indole alkaloids used in cancer chemotherapy. The anticancerous alkaloids, viz. vinblastine and vincristine, are mainly present in the leaves of C. roseus. High demand and low yield of these alkaloids in the plant has led to explore the alternative means for their production. Gamma irradiated sodium alginate (ISA) has proved as a plant growth promoting substance for various medicinal and agricultural crops...

  3. Binary stress induces an increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Wei ZHU; Yang, Bingxian; Komatsu, Setsuko; Lu, Xiaoping; Li, Ximin; Tian, Jingkui

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abund...

  4. Binary Stress Induces an Increase in Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Wei eZhu; Bingxian eYang; Setsuko eKomatsu; Xiaoping eLu; Ximin eLi; Jingkui eTian

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abund...

  5. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the ...

  6. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei)

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Wink; Vera Rosenkranz

    2008-01-01

    The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD) in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S) was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, c...

  7. Main Alkaloids of Peganum harmala L. and Their Different Effects on Dicot and Monocot Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Chi Zhang; Yuanming Zhang; Hua Shao; Xiaoli Huang

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids with allelopathic activity are not as well-known as other allelochemicals. Our study revealed that total alkaloids from seeds of the medicinal plant Peganum harmala L. possessed significant growth inhibitory effect on four treated plants, with dicot plants (lettuce and amaranth) being more sensitive than the tested monocot plants (wheat and ryegrass). Further investigation led to the isolation of harmaline and harmine as the main active ingredients in the total alkaloids of P. harma...

  8. Studies in benzimidazo [2,1-a] isoquinoline chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Donaghy, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Studies in Benzimidazo[2,1-a]isoquinoline Chemistry by Michael John Donaghy B. Sc. (Hons.) Ellipticine, a member of the pyrido[4,3-b]carbazole alkaloid family first isolated in 1959 from the leaves of the plant Ochrosia Elliptica has been shown to possess anti-cancer activity against various tumours. Ellipticine is thought to undergo biological oxidation to give the more active 9-hydroxyellipticine that is subsequently converted to a highly reactive quinone-imine intermediate. The quinone-imi...

  9. Changes in plant defense chemistry (pyrrolizidine alkaloids) revealed through high-resolution spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, S.; Macel, M.; Schlerf, M.; Eghbali Moghaddam, F.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Skidmore, A.K.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2013-01-01

    Plant toxic biochemicals play an important role in defense against natural enemies and often are toxic to humans and livestock. Hyperspectral reflectance is an established method for primary chemical detection and could be further used to determine plant toxicity in the field. In order to make a fir

  10. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these.

  11. Rumen microbial abundance and fermentation profile during severe subacute ruminal acidosis and its modulation by plant derived alkaloids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickdam, Elsayed; Khiaosa-Ard, Ratchaneewan; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Chizzola, Remigius; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-06-01

    Rumen microbiota have important metabolic functions for the host animal. This study aimed at characterizing changes in rumen microbial abundances and fermentation profiles using a severe subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in vitro model, and to evaluate a potential modulatory role of plant derived alkaloids (PDA), containing quaternary benzophenanthridine and protopine alkaloids, of which sanguinarine and chelerythrine were the major bioactive compounds. Induction of severe SARA strongly affected the rumen microbial composition and fermentation variables without suppressing the abundance of total bacteria. Protozoa and fungi were more sensitive to the low ruminal pH condition than bacteria. Induction of severe SARA clearly depressed degradation of fiber (P methanogenic 16S rRNA gene abundance was not affected. According to principal component analysis, Methanobrevibacter spp. correlated to methane concentration. Addition of PDA modulated ruminal fermentation under normal conditions such as enhanced (P < 0.05) concentration of total SCFA, propionate and valerate, and increased (P < 0.05) degradation of crude protein compared with the unsupplemented control diet. Our results indicate strong shifts in the microbial community during severe SARA compared to normal conditions. Supplementation of PDA positively modulates ruminal fermentation under normal ruminal pH conditions. PMID:26868619

  12. Elemental step thermodynamics of various analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtaining hydride in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Nan-Ping; Fu, Yan-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-12-21

    A series of analogues of indazolium alkaloids were designed and synthesized. The thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 elemental steps for the analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtain hydride in acetonitrile were determined using an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and electrochemical methods, respectively. The effects of molecular structure and substituents on the thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 steps were examined. Meanwhile, the oxidation mechanism of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids was examined using the chemical mimic method. The result shows that the oxidation of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids in vivo takes place by one-step concerted hydride transfer mechanism.

  13. Integration of Transcriptome and Proteome Reveals the Alkaloids Biosynthesis in Macleaya cordata and Macleaya microcarpa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yisong Liu; Wei Liu; Xiubing Liu; Peng Huang; Pengcheng Zhu; Pi Cheng; Jing Zeng

    2012-01-01

    The Macleaya spp.,including Macleaya cordata and Macleaya microcarpa,are traditional anti-virus,inflammation eliminating,and insecticide herb medicines for their isoquinoline alkaloids.The studies of their alkaloids biosyntheses are urgent for better application.To further characterize their alkaloids biosyntheses,we elaborately designed the transcriptome,proteome and metabolism profiling for 10 samples of both species to explore their alkaloids biosyntheses.From the transcriptome data,we obtained 69367 and 78255 unigenes for M.cordata and M.microcarpa,which two thirds of them were similar to sequences in public databases.By metabolism profiling,we observed reverse patterns in different organs of two species for alkaloids sanguinarine,chelerythrine,protopine,and allocryptopine.Thus,the expression of enzymes in alkaloid biosynthesis pathways and the differential gene expression for multiple interesting comparisons were analyzed.We identified more than 1000 proteins and hundreds of differentially expressed proteins from iTRAQ proteome data.Furthermore,the ultrastructure of laticifers by SEM proved the alkaloids accumulation in the mature roots.This study suggests strongly that root maybe the organ for major alkaloids biosynthesis.Except for biosynthesis,the alkaloids storage and transport were also important for their accumulation.This work provided the first genome scale analysis for Macleaya spp.and shed light on researches for non-model plants by integrating different high-throughput technologies.

  14. Reaction of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids with valine and hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuewei; Wang, Shuguang; Xia, Qingsu; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Doerge, Daniel R; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2014-10-20

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids exert toxicity through metabolism to dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids that bind to cellular protein and DNA, leading to hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. To date, it is not clear how dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids bind to cellular constituents, including amino acids and proteins, resulting in toxicity. Metabolism of carcinogenic monocrotaline, riddelliine, and heliotrine produces dehydromonocrotaline, dehyroriddelliine, and dehydroheliotrine, respectively, as primary reactive metabolites. In this study, we report that reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with valine generated four highly unstable 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived valine (DHP-valine) adducts. For structural elucidation, DHP-valine adducts were derivatized with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) to DHP-valine-PITC products. After HPLC separation, their structures were characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, (1)H NMR, and (1)H-(1)H COSY NMR spectral analysis. Two DHP-valine-PITC adducts, designated as DHP-valine-PITC-1 and DHP-valine-PITC-3, had the amino group of valine linked to the C7 position of the necine base, and the other two DHP-valine-PITC products, DHP-valine-PITC-2 and DHP-valine-PITC-4, linked to the C9 position of the necine base. DHP-valine-PITC-1 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-3, and DHP-valine-PITC-2 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-4. Reaction of dehydroriddelliine and dehydroheliotrine with valine provided similar results. However, reaction of valine and dehydroretronecine (DHR) under similar experimental conditions did not produce DHP-valine adducts. Reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with rat hemoglobin followed by derivatization with PITC also generated the same four DHP-valine-PITC adducts. This represents the first full structural elucidation of

  15. Going viral: designing bioactive surfaces with bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Olsson, Adam L J; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriophage-functionalized bioactive surfaces are functional materials that can be used as antimicrobial surfaces in medical applications (e.g., indwelling medical devices or wound dressings) or as biosensors for bacterial capture and detection. Despite offering immense potential, designing efficient phage-functionalized bioactive surfaces is hampered by a number of challenges. This review offers an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field and presents a critical perspective of the technological promises and challenges.

  16. Release of bioactive active iodine in kelp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiang-wu; WENG Huan-xin; QIN Ya-chao

    2005-01-01

    The release process and influencing factors of bioactive iodine of kelp are systemically studied by leaching experiment. The results showed that the bioactive iodine of kelp can be released rapidly and the principal form of iodine in lixivium is I- . There is a dynamic process between the release and absorption of iodine. With the increase of leaching water, the gross amounts of released iodine rise.There also exists a transforming process among I- , IO3- and organic iodine in lixivium.

  17. Microencapsulation of bioactives for food applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Maria Inês; Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira; Barreiro, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Health issues are an emerging concern to the world population, and therefore the food industry is searching for novel food products containing health-promoting bioactive compounds, with little or no synthetic ingredients. However, there are some challenges in the development of functional foods, particularly in which the direct use of some bioactives is involved. They can show problems of instability, react with other food matrix ingredients or present strong odour and/or flavours. In this co...

  18. Cyclodextrin chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of cyclodextrins was studied. This study included synthesising some cyclodextrin derivatives, preparing selected inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin and investigating the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and certain linear oligosaccharides. This report presents a brief review of the structure and properties of cyclodextrins, the synthesis of cyclodextrin derivatives, their complexation and applications. This is followed by a description of the synthesis of some cyclodextrin derivatives and the preparation of inclusion complexes of cyclodextrin with some organic compounds. Finally, the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins, some of their derivatives and certain structurally related carbohydrates are discussed. The gamma irradiation studies were carried out for two reasons: to study the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and their derivatives; and to investigate selectivity during the gamma irradiation of cyclodextrin derivatives

  19. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  20. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses: Surface reactivity in simulated body fluids solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioactive glasses are used in medical field as bone regenerative materials. They promote the growth of bone tissue surface, and establish interconnections in order to form a continuum with the tissue. The bioactivity of this class of materials, immersed in a real or simulated biological medium, is monitored by the ability to form at its surface a layer of Ca-phosphate, which ought to crystallize in the form of either hydroxy-apatite (H A) or hydroxy-carbonate-apatite (H C A). The present contribution deals with the activity/reactivity of some oxidic materials (to be possibly used as bio-active glasses) that: 1) have been produced through the conventional melt-quench-grin method; 2) belong to the family of Hench's Bio glass (H-glass); 3) have been modified, in respect of H-glass composition by the introduction of variable amounts of Ca-fluoride. In assessing the bioactivity of two families of F-modified glasses, it is herewith shown that the use of some physico-chemical methods, typical of surface chemistry (e.g., surface area determination, IR and Raman vibrational spectroscopic analysis), gives indeed access to what happens at the interface between a complex oxidic material and the surrounding biological medium.

  1. Biodegradable mesoporous bioactive glass nanospheres for drug delivery and bone tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojian; Li, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Bioactive inorganic materials are attractive for hard tissue regeneration, and they are used as delivery vehicles for pharmaceutical molecules, scaffolds and components for bio-composites. We demonstrated mesoporous bioactive glass (BG) nanospheres that exhibited the capacity to deliver pharmaceutical molecules. Mesoporous BG nanospheres with variable Ca to Si ratios were synthesized using sol-gel chemistry. By controlling the hydrolysis and condensation conditions, the diameter of the mesoporous BG nanospheres was changed from 300 nm to 1500 nm. The porous structure and surface area of the BG nanospheres were shown to be dependent on their composition. The surface area of the BG nanospheres decreased from 400 ± 2 m2 g-1 to 56 ± 0.1 m2 g-1 when the Ca/Si ratio increased from 5 to 50 at.%. When the mesoporous BG nanospheres were loaded with ibuprofen (IBU), they exhibited a sustained release profile in simulated body fluid (SBF). In the meantime, the IBU-loaded BG nanospheres degraded in SBF, and induced apatite layer formation on the surface as a result of their good bioactivity. When the BG nanospheres were used as a composite filler to poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), they were shown to be effective at improving the in vitro bioactivity of PCL microspheres.

  2. Probing the bioactivity-relevant chemical space of robust reactions and common molecular building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenfeller, Markus; Eberle, Martin; Meier, Peter; Nieto-Oberhuber, Cristina; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Gisbert; Jacoby, Edgar; Renner, Steffen

    2012-05-25

    In the search for new bioactive compounds, there is a trend toward increasingly complex compound libraries aiming to target the demanding targets of the future. In contrast, medicinal chemistry and traditional library design rely mainly on a small set of highly established and robust reactions. Here, we probe a set of 58 such reactions for their ability to sample the chemical space of known bioactive molecules, and the potential to create new scaffolds. Combined with ~26,000 common available building blocks, the reactions retrieve around 9% of a scaffold-diverse set of compounds active on human target proteins covering all major pharmaceutical target classes. Almost 80% of generated scaffolds from virtual one-step synthesis products are not present in a large set of known bioactive molecules for human targets, indicating potential for new discoveries. The results suggest that established synthesis resources are well suited to cover the known bioactivity-relevant chemical space and that there are plenty of unexplored regions accessible by these reactions, possibly providing valuable "low-hanging fruit" for hit discovery. PMID:22512717

  3. Public perception of chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Stražar, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the perception of chemistry among the public, which reflects the stereotypes that people have about chemistry. It presents the existing classification of stereotypes about chemistry and their upgrade. An analysis of movies that reflect the existing perception of chemistry in the public is written. Literature on selected aspects of the application of chemistry in movies is collected and analyzed. A qualification of perception of chemistry in the movies is presented based ...

  4. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  5. Activity cliff networks for medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    Network representations are widely used in bioinformatics but have only been little explored in chemistry. Thus far, only a few attempts have been made to generate and analyze compound networks. Among these are the first activity cliff networks. In medicinal chemistry, activity cliffs are focal points of structure-activity relationships (SAR) analysis. Activity cliffs have generally been defined as pairs of structurally similar or analogous active compounds that have a large difference in potency against their target. However, most activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple highly and weakly potent compounds. Recently, a comprehensive activity cliff network has been generated for current public domain bioactive compounds, hence providing a first global view of activity cliff formation. The design of activity cliff networks is discussed herein. From the global activity cliff network, local networks can be extracted for individual compound activity classes that provide graphical access to high-level SAR information for compound optimization efforts.

  6. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids in two Cryptantha species: Including two new open chain diesters one of which is amphoteric

    Science.gov (United States)

    A livestock poisoning outbreak near Kingman, Arizona, USA, potentially linked to dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids, prompted an evaluation of some local plants for the presence of these hepatotoxic alkaloids. Two species of Cryptantha, a Boraginaceous genus previously shown to produce potentially toxic...

  7. Aporphine alkaloid contents increase with moderate nitrogen supply in Annona diversifolia Saff. (Annonaceae) seedlings during diurnal periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Castillo, José Agustín; Cruz-Ortega, Rocío; Martinez-Vázquez, Mariano; González-Esquinca, Alma Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Aporphine alkaloids are secondary metabolites that are obtained in low levels from species of the Annonaceae family. Nitrogen addition may increase the alkaloid content in plants. However, previous studies published did not consider that nitrogen could change the alkaloid content throughout the day. We conducted this short-term study to determine the effects of nitrogen applied throughout the diurnal period on the aporphine alkaloids via measurements conducted on the roots, stems and leaves of Annona diversifolia seedlings. The 60-day-old seedlings were cultured with the addition of three levels of nitrogen (0, 30 and 60 mM), and alkaloid extracts were analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography. The highest total alkaloid content was measured in the treatment with moderate nitrogen supply. Further, the levels of aporphine alkaloids changed significantly in the first few hours of the diurnal period. We conclude that aporphine alkaloid content increased with moderate nitrogen supply and exhibited diurnal variation.

  8. Atropurpuran – Missing Biosynthetic Link Leading to the Hetidine and Arcutine C20-Diterpenoid Alkaloids or an Oxidative Degradation Product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Manuel; Owens, Kyle; Sarpong, Richmond

    2015-01-01

    A possible biosynthetic link between atropurpuran, the hetidine diterpenoid alkaloids and the alkaloid arcutine and congeners is proposed. The feasibility of aspects of this biosynthesis, especially key 1,2-rearrangements, have been examined computationally. PMID:26028789

  9. Bioactive Constituents of Zanthoxylum rhetsa Bark and Its Cytotoxic Potential against B16-F10 Melanoma Cancer and Normal Human Dermal Fibroblast (HDF) Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Ramesh Kumar; Ahmad, Syahida; Abas, Faridah; Safinar Ismail, Intan; Rukayadi, Yaya; Tayyab Akhtar, Muhammad; Shaari, Khozirah

    2016-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhetsa is an aromatic tree, known vernacularly as "Indian Prickly Ash". It has been predominantly used by Indian tribes for the treatment of many infirmities like diabetes, inflammation, rheumatism, toothache and diarrhea. In this study, we identified major volatile constituents present in different solvent fractions of Z. rhetsa bark using GC-MS analysis and isolated two tetrahydrofuran lignans (yangambin and kobusin), a berberine alkaloid (columbamine) and a triterpenoid (lupeol) from the bioactive chloroform fraction. The solvent fractions and purified compounds were tested for their cytotoxic potential against human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and mouse melanoma (B16-F10) cells, using the MTT assay. All the solvent fractions and purified compounds were found to be non-cytotoxic to HDF cells. However, the chloroform fraction and kobusin exhibited cytotoxic effect against B16-F10 melanoma cells. The presence of bioactive lignans and alkaloids were suggested to be responsible for the cytotoxic property of Z. rhetsa bark against B16-F10 cells. PMID:27231889

  10. Bioactive Constituents of Zanthoxylum rhetsa Bark and Its Cytotoxic Potential against B16-F10 Melanoma Cancer and Normal Human Dermal Fibroblast (HDF Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar Santhanam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zanthoxylum rhetsa is an aromatic tree, known vernacularly as “Indian Prickly Ash”. It has been predominantly used by Indian tribes for the treatment of many infirmities like diabetes, inflammation, rheumatism, toothache and diarrhea. In this study, we identified major volatile constituents present in different solvent fractions of Z. rhetsa bark using GC-MS analysis and isolated two tetrahydrofuran lignans (yangambin and kobusin, a berberine alkaloid (columbamine and a triterpenoid (lupeol from the bioactive chloroform fraction. The solvent fractions and purified compounds were tested for their cytotoxic potential against human dermal fibroblasts (HDF and mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cells, using the MTT assay. All the solvent fractions and purified compounds were found to be non-cytotoxic to HDF cells. However, the chloroform fraction and kobusin exhibited cytotoxic effect against B16-F10 melanoma cells. The presence of bioactive lignans and alkaloids were suggested to be responsible for the cytotoxic property of Z. rhetsa bark against B16-F10 cells.

  11. Chemistry and pharmacology of saponins: special focus on cytotoxic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur M.; Melzig MF; Fuchs H.; Weng A

    2011-01-01

    Mayank Thakur1, Matthias F Melzig2, Hendrik Fuchs1, Alexander Weng1 1Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin; 2Institute of Pharmacy, Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Saponins are bioactive compounds produced mainly by plants but also by some marine organisms and insects. In the recent past, there has been unforeseen interest in the clinical utilization of saponins as chemot...

  12. Chemistry and pharmacology of saponins: special focus on cytotoxic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Mayank Thakur1, Matthias F Melzig2, Hendrik Fuchs1, Alexander Weng1 1Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin; 2Institute of Pharmacy, Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Saponins are bioactive compounds produced mainly by plants but also by some marine organisms and insects. In the recent past, there has been unforeseen interest in the clinical utilization of saponi...

  13. Analysis of Alkaloids from Physalis peruviana by Capillary GC, Capillary GC-MS, and GC-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubwabo, C; Rollmann, B; Tilquin, B

    1993-04-01

    The alkaloid composition of the aerial parts and roots of PHYSALIS PERUVIANA was analysed by capillary GC (GC (2)), GC (2)-MS and GC (2)-FTIR. Eight alkaloids were identified, three of those alkaloids are 3beta-acetoxytropane and two N-methylpyrrolidinylhygrine isomers, which were not previously found in the genus PHYSALIS. A reproduction of the identification of alkaloids detected in the plant by the use of retention indices has been proposed. PMID:17230349

  14. Neocryptolepine: A Promising Indoloisoquinoline Alkaloid with Interesting Biological Activity. Evaluation of the Drug and its Most Relevant Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larghi, Enrique L; Bracca, Andrea B J; Arroyo Aguilar, Abel A; Heredia, Daniel A; Pergomet, Jorgelina L; Simonetti, Sebastian O; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2015-01-01

    Plants are one of the most important resources for the discovery of new drugs. The potential of natural compounds as new drug leads is clearly illustrated by the discovery and development of many modern medicines. This is an encouraging factor that drives natural products research in the vegetable kingdom. Neocryptolepine is a tetracyclic nitrogen heterocycle isolated from the African climber Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, which is widely used in traditional African medicine in many countries of Central and West Africa. The natural product is one of the representative examples of the small family of indolo[2,3-b]quinoline alkaloids, being endowed of multiple biological activities, including DNA-binding and inhibition of the enzyme topoisomerase II. It is also cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal and molluscicidal, also displaying antiprotozoal activity, particularly as antitrypanosomal, antileishmanial, antischistosomal and antiplasmodial. Some of these activities have been related to the product's ability to bind to DNA and to inhibit topoisomerase II; however, the exact mechanisms behind all of the observed bioactivities have not been comprehensively clarified. Major research activities regarding neocryptolepine have been focused into two seemingly opposite fields, related to its cytotoxic and antimalarial properties. Optimization of the natural product as a cytotoxic agent implied improvements in its bioavailability and activity, while the need of non-cytotoxic compounds guided the design and optimization of antimalarial agents. Therefore, the aim of the present article is to systematically review the current knowledge about the diversity of the biological activities related to neocryptolepine, its analogs and derivatives. PMID:25915612

  15. Bioactive molecules from sea hares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, H; Sakai, R; Jimbo, M

    2006-01-01

    Sea hares, belonging to the order Opisthobranchia, subclass Gastropoda, are mollusks that have attracted many researchers who are interested in the chemical defense mechanisms of these soft and "shell-less" snails. Numbers of small molecules of dietary origin have been isolated from sea hares and some have ecologically relevant activities, such as fish deterrent activity or toxicity. Recently, however, greater attention has been paid to biomedically interesting sea hare isolates such as dolastatins, a series of antitumor peptide/macrolides isolated from Dolabella auricularia. Another series of bioactive peptide/macrolides, as represented by aplyronines, have been isolated from sea hares in Japanese waters. Although earlier studies indicated the potent antitumor activity of aplyronines, their clinical development has never been conducted because of the minute amount of compound available from the natural source. Recent synthetic studies, however, have made it possible to prepare these compounds and analogs for a structure-activity relationship study, and started to uncover their unique action mechanism towards their putative targets, microfilaments. Here, recent findings of small antitumor molecules isolated from Japanese sea hares are reviewed. Sea hares are also known to produce cytotoxic and antimicrobial proteins. In contrast to the small molecules of dietary origin, proteins are the genetic products of sea hares and they are likely to have some primary physiological functions in addition to ecological roles in the sea hare. Based on the biochemical properties and phylogenetic analysis of these proteins, we propose that they belong to one family of molecule, the "Aplysianin A family," although their molecular weights are apparently divided into two groups. Interestingly, the active principles in Aplysia species and Dolabella auricularia were shown to be L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a flavin enzyme that oxidizes an alpha-amino group of the substrate with

  16. Bioactivity of Rumex obtusifolius (Polygonaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshaw Diane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumex obtusifolius L. (Polygonaceae, commonly known as 'broad-leaf dock', is one of the most common Irish wayside weeds, and it also occurs in silage fields, on river banks, in ditches and on waste grounds. The ethnobotanical uses of this species include its use as an antidote to nettle, depurative, astringent, laxative, and tonic, and in the treatment of sores, blisters, burns, cancer and tumors. The bioactivities of n-hexane, dichloromethane (DCM and methanol (MeOH extracts of the leaves of R. obtusifolius were assessed using the 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, the newly developed micro-titer-based antimicrobial assay incorporating resazurin as an indicator of cell growth, and the brine shrimp lethality assay. The most potent free radical scavenging activity was displayed by the MeOH extract with a RC50 value of 7.80 x 10-2 mg/mL. Among the fractions obtained from solid-phase extraction (SPE of the MeOH extract, the 50% aqueous methanolic SPE fraction exhibited the highest levels of free radical scavenging property (RC50 = 1.05 x 10-2 mg/mL. While the n-hexane extract did not show any antibacterial activity at test concentrations, the DCM extract was active only against Escherichia coli. However, the MeOH extract as well as the 50% and 80% SPE fractions of the MeOH extract showed significant antibacterial property against all bacterial strains tested. None of the extracts or fractions exhibited any significant toxicity towards brine shrimps.

  17. Trace Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  18. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional KD concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  19. Renieramycins H and I, two novel alkaloids from the sponge Haliclona cribricutis Dendy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parameswaran, P.S; Naik, C.G.; Kamat, S.Y.; Pramanik, B.N.

    The known alkaloid, mimosamycin 1, along with its moon- and di hydroxy derivaties, 4-hydroxy mimosamycin 2 and 1, 4-dihydroxymimosamycin 3 and two new dimeric alkaloids: namely renieramycins H and I 4 and 5 have been isolated from the MeOH extract...

  20. The toxicity of Poison Dart Frog alkaloids against the Fire Ant (Solenopsis invicta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundreds of alkaloids, representing over 20 structural classes, have been identified from the skin of neotropical poison frogs (Dendrobatidae). These alkaloids are derived from arthropod prey of the frogs, and are generally are believed to deter vertebrate predators. We developed a method to put ind...

  1. Antimicrobial activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Annona salzmanii D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, M de Q; Barbosa-Filho, J M; Lima, E O; Maia, R F; Barbosa, R de C; Kaplan, M A

    1992-02-01

    Bark of Annona salzmanii D.C. (Annonaceae), used in Brazilian folk medicine, was found to contain four benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, namely reticuline, anonaine, laurelliptine and isoboldine. Only anonaine possesses some antibacterial property while all four alkaloids show some antifungal activity. PMID:1501491

  2. Livestock Poisoning with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Containing Plants (Senecio, Crotalaria, Cynoglossum, Amsinckia, Heliotropium and Echium spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are potent liver toxins that have been identified in over 6,000 plants throughout the world. Alkaloids are nitrogen-based compounds with potent biological activity. About half of the identified PAs are toxic and several cause cancer (carcinogenic). PA-containing plants...

  3. A convenient microwave-assisted synthesis of cinchona alkaloid-derived ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of cinchona alkaloid-derived ligands based on solvent-free microwave-assisted reaction was described. The coupling of 1,4-dichlorophthalazine or 3,6-dichloropyridazine with quinine, cinchonine or cinchonidine provide bis- or mono-cinchona alkaloid-derived ligands in moderate to good yields (52-89%) within 15 rain under optimum microwave conditions.

  4. CHINESE BITTERSWEET ALKALOID Ⅲ,A NEW COMPOUND FROM CELASTR US ANGULATUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-PING YIN; TIAN-ZENG ZHAO; JING-GUO FU

    2001-01-01

    A novel skeleton alkaloid named Chinese Bittersweet Alkaloid Ⅲ from the leaves of C. angulatus was reported. The structure and its stereochemistry were established by IR, 1Dand 2DNMR (1H-1HCOSY, HMQC, HMBC, NOESY), MS and elemental analysis.

  5. Heterozygous P53 knockout mouse model for dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids are a large, structurally diverse group of plant-derived protoxins that are potentially carcinogenic. With worldwide significance, these alkaloids can contaminate or be naturally present in the human food supply. To develop a small animal model that may be used to com...

  6. Isolation of a minor nitro-alkaloid from the aerial parts of Duguetia furfuracea--Annonaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; de Siqueira, Joao Maximo

    2009-01-01

    The refractionation of an alkaloidal extract of the leaves and twigs of Duguetia furfuracea has provided a minor aporphinoid alkaloid, named (+)-8-nitrous-isocorydine or (+)-1,2,3-trymethoxy-11-hydroxy-8-nitrous- aporphine. The structure of the new compound was elucidated by spectroscopic methods, notably 2D NMR and HRESIMS.

  7. New C19-Diterpenoid Alkaloids from the Roots of Delphinium Giraldii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周先礼; 陈巧鸿; 陈东林; 王锋鹏

    2003-01-01

    Three new C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, giraldines A (1), B (3) and C (4), were isolated from the roots of Delphinium giraldii Diels, together with three known C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, dihydrogadesine (5), tatsiensine (6) and siwanine A (7), as well as their structures were elucidated by chemical evidence and spectral analyses, including IR, MS, 1D NMR and 2D NMR.

  8. Conformational, IR spectroscopic and electronic properties of conium alkaloids and their adducts with C60 fullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotnyi, M. A.; Prylutskyy, Yu I.; Poluyan, N. A.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Dovbeshko, G. I.

    2016-08-01

    Conformational, IR spectroscopic and electronic properties of the components of Conium alkaloids (Conium maculatum) in aqueous environment were determined by model calculations and experiment. With the help of FT-IR spectroscopy the possibility of formation of an adduct between γ-coniceine alkaloid and C60 fullerene was demonstrated, which is important for further application of conium analogues in biomedical purposes.

  9. Soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type affect pyrrolizidine alkaloids in Jacobaea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Veen, van J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Secondary metabolites like pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) play a crucial part in plant defense. We studied the effects of soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type on pyrrolizidine alkaloids in roots and shoots of Jacobaea vulgaris. We used clones of two genotypes from a dune area (Meijendel), propagat

  10. Determining important parameters related to cyanobacterial alkaloid toxin exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, A H

    2005-09-16

    Science-based decision making required robust and high-fidelity mechanistic data about the system dynamics and impacts of system changes. Alkaloid cyanotoxins have the characteristics to warrant consideration for their potential threat. Since insufficient information is available to construct a systems model for the alkaloid cyanotoxins, saxitoxins, anatoxins, and anatoxin-a(S), an accurate assessments of these toxins as a potential threat for use for intentional contamination is not possible. Alkaloid cyanotoxin research that contributed to such a model has numerous areas of overlap for natural and intentional health effects issues that generates dual improvements to the state of the science. The use of sensitivity analyses of systems models can identify parameters that, when determined, result in the greatest impact to the overall system and may help to direct the most efficient use of research funding. This type of modeling-assisted experimentation may allow rapid progress for overall system understanding compared to observational or disciplinary research agendas. Assessment and management of risk from intentional contamination can be performed with greater confidence when mechanisms are known and the relationships between different components are validated. This level of understanding allows high-fidelity assessments that do not hamper legitimate possession of these toxins for research purposes, while preventing intentional contamination that would affect public health. It also allows for appropriate response to an intentional contamination event, even if the specific contamination had not been previous considered. Development of science-based decision making tools will only improve our ability to address the new requirements addressing potential threats to our nation.

  11. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowell eBush

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because synthetically produced ergovaline is difficult to obtain, we developed a seed extraction and partial purification protocol for ergovaline/ergovalinine that provided a biologically active product. Tall fescue seed was ground and packed into several different sized columns for liquid extraction. Smaller particle size and increased extraction time increased efficiency of extraction. Our largest column was a 114 × 52 × 61 cm (W×L×D stainless steel tub. Approximately 150 kg of seed could be extracted in this tub. The extraction was done with 80% ethanol. When the solvent front migrated to bottom of the column, flow was stopped and seed was allowed to steep for at least 48 h. Light was excluded from the solvent from the beginning of this step to the end of the purification process. Following elution, ethanol was removed from the eluate by evaporation at room temperature. Resulting syrup was freeze-dried. About 80% recovery of alkaloids was achieved with 18-fold increase in concentration of ergovaline. Initial purification of the dried product was accomplished by extracting with hexane/water (6:1, v/v and the hexane fraction was discarded. The aqueous fraction was extracted with chloroform, the aqueous layer discarded, after which the chloroform was removed with a resulting 20-fold increase of ergovaline. About 65% of the ergovaline was recovered from the chloroform residue for an overall recovery of 50%. The resultant partially purified ergovaline had biological activities in in vivo and in vitro bovine bioassays that approximate that of synthetic ergovaline.

  12. Bromopyrrole Alkaloids as Lead Compounds against Protozoan Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Tasdemir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study,13 bromopyrrole alkaloids, including the oroidin analogs hymenidin (2, dispacamide B (3 and dispacamide D (4, stevensine (5 and spongiacidin B (6, their derivatives lacking the imidazole ring bromoaldisin (7, longamide B (8 and longamide A (9, the dimeric oroidin derivatives sceptrin (10 and dibromopalau’amine (11, and the non-oroidin bromopyrrolohomoarginin (12, manzacidin A (13, and agelongine (14, obtained from marine sponges belonging to Axinella and Agelas generahave been screened in vitro against four parasitic protozoa, i.e., two Trypanosoma species (T. brucei rhodesiense and T. cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum (K1 strain, a chloroquine resistant strain, responsible of human diseases with high morbidity and, in the case of malaria, high mortality. Our results indicate longamide B (8 and dibromopalau’amine (11 to be promising trypanocidal and antileishmanial agents, while dispacamide B (3 and spongiacidin B (6 emerge as antimalarial lead compounds.In addition,evaluation of the activity of the test alkaloids (2–14 against three different enzymes (PfFabI, PfFabG, PfFabZ involved in the de novo fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of P. falciparum (PfFAS-II identified bromopyrrolohomoarginin (12 as a potent inhibitor of PfFabZ. The structural similarity within the series of tested molecules allowed us to draw some preliminary structure-activity relationships. Tests against the mammalian L6 cells revealed important clues on therapeutic index of the metabolites. This is the first detailed study on the antiprotozoal potential of marine bromopyrrole alkaloids.

  13. Pyridine alkaloids from Senna multijuga as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Welington; Pivatto, Marcos; Danuello, Amanda; Regasini, Luis O; Baccini, Luciene R; Young, Maria C M; Lopes, Norberto P; Lopes, João L C; Bolzani, Vanderlan S

    2012-03-23

    As part of an ongoing research project on Senna and Cassia species, five new pyridine alkaloids, namely, 12'-hydroxy-7'-multijuguinol (1), 12'-hydroxy-8'-multijuguinol (2), methyl multijuguinate (3), 7'-multijuguinol (4), and 8'-multijuguinol (5), were isolated from the leaves of Senna multijuga (syn. Cassiamultijuga). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis. Mass spectrometry was used for confirmation of the positions of the hydroxy groups in the side-chains of 1, 2, 4, and 5. All compounds exhibited weak in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity as compared with the standard compound physostigmine.

  14. Ampullosine, a new isoquinoline alkaloid from Sepedonium ampullosporum (Ascomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Dang Ngoc; Schmidt, Jürgen; Porzel, Andrea; Wessjohann, Ludger; Haid, Mark; Arnold, Norbert

    2010-06-01

    A new isoquinoline alkaloid, ampullosine (3-methyl-isoquinoline-6-carboxylic acid, 1), was isolated from Sepedonium ampullosporum and characterized by spectroscopic analysis and chemical reactions. This compound is responsible for the deep yellow color of the culture fluid of this species. Moreover, the known compounds sepedonin (2) and anhydrosepedonin (3) were detected. Twelve strains belonging to eight species of Sepedonium have been screened for these three metabolites by LC/ESI-SRM (selected reaction monitoring). Ampullosine (1) could be detected in almost all species in Sepedonium, but not in the phylogenetically more distant species S. brunneum and S. tulasneanum. Anhydrosepedonin (3) showed antifungal activity against the phytopathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum. PMID:20614812

  15. Antifungal alkaloids and limonoid derivatives from Dictamnus dasycarpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W; Wolfender, J L; Hostettmann, K; Xu, R; Qin, G

    1998-01-01

    From the root bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus (Rutaceae), four limonoid derivatives, two furoquinoline alkaloids, five limonoids, two sesquiterpenes and three steroids were isolated and their structures elucidated on the basis of various spectroscopic methods. Among the identified compounds, one was determined to be a new natural product, 6 beta-hydroxyfraxinellone, while six compounds were found to be active against the plant pathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum. The relationship between the structures of limonoid derivatives and their inhibitory activity against fungal growth was investigated. PMID:9429316

  16. Bromopyrrole alkaloids from the Caribbean sponge Agelas cerebrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regalado, Erik L.; Laguna, Abilio, E-mail: erikluis18@gmail.co [Center of Marine Bioproducts, Havana (Cuba). Dept. of Chemistry; Mendiola, Judith [Institute of Tropical Medicine Pedro Kouri (IPK), Havana (Cuba). Dept. of Parasitology; Thomas, Olivier P. [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis (France). Lab. de Chimie des Molecules Bioactives et des Aromes; Nogueiras, Clara [University of Havana, San Lazaro y L, Havana (Cuba). Faculty of Chemistry. Center of Natural Products

    2011-07-01

    Bioguided fractionation of Agelas cerebrum crude extract resulted in isolation of four bromopyrrole and four bromopyrrole aminoimidazole alkaloids, identified as 5-bromopyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (1), 4-bromopyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (2), 3,4-bromopyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (3), 4,5-bromopyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (4), oroidin (5), bromoageliferin (6), dibromoageliferin (7) and dibromosceptrin (8) on the basis of spectroscopic data analyses (UV, IR, HRMS, 1D and 2D NMR) and comparison with literature data. This is the first report of compounds 2 and 3 in a marine sponge belonging to the Agelas genus and the first evidence of the presence of 1 from a natural source. (author)

  17. An azafluorenone alkaloid and a megastigmane from Unonopsis lindmanii (Annonaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Nidia C., E-mail: nidiayoshida@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Siqueira, Joao M. de [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao Del Rei, Divinpolis, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Farmacia; Rodrigues, Ricardo P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Correia, Rodolfo P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Garcez, Walmir S., E-mail: walmir.garcez@ufms.br [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2013-04-15

    The azafluorenone alkaloid 5,8-dimethoxy-7-hydroxy-1-methyl-4-azafluoren-9-one and the megastigman (-)-(5R*, 6S*)-megastigman-3-one-10,7-olide were isolated from aerial parts of Unonopsis lindmanii (Annonaceae), along with the known compounds (3S*,5S*,8R*)-3,5-dihydroxymegastigma-6,7-dien-9-one (grasshopper ketone), N-trans-feruloyltyramine, (-)-anonaine, (-)-asimilobine, liriodenine and (-)-syringaresinol. This is the first description of the presence of megastigmanes in Annonaceae. The structures of the compounds were elucidated based on spectroscopic data. (author)

  18. A New Prenylated Indole Diketopiperazine Alkaloid from Eurotium cristatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwei Zou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid, cristatumin F (1, and four known metabolites, echinulin (2, dehydroechinulin (3, neoechinulin A (4 and variecolorin O (5, were isolated from the crude extract of the fungus Eurotium cristatum. The structure of 1 was elucidated primarily by NMR and MS methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was assigned using Marfey’s method applied to its acid hydrolyzate. Cristatumin F (1 showed modest radical scavenging activity against DPPH radicals, and exhibited marginal attenuation of 3T3L1 pre-adipocytes.

  19. A new prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid from Eurotium cristatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xianwei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiaona; Li, Qian; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yun; Tang, Tao; Zheng, Saijing; Wang, Weimiao; Tang, Jintian

    2014-11-03

    A new prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid, cristatumin F (1), and four known metabolites, echinulin (2), dehydroechinulin (3), neoechinulin A (4) and variecolorin O (5), were isolated from the crude extract of the fungus Eurotium cristatum. The structure of 1 was elucidated primarily by NMR and MS methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was assigned using Marfey's method applied to its acid hydrolyzate. Cristatumin F (1) showed modest radical scavenging activity against DPPH radicals, and exhibited marginal attenuation of 3T3L1 pre-adipocytes.

  20. Scientific Opinion on Ergot alkaloids in food and feed

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM)

    2012-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) was asked by the European Commission to deliver a scientific opinion on ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food and feed. EAs are produced by several members within the fungal orders of Hypocreales and Eurotiales. In Europe, Claviceps purpurea is the most widespread Claviceps species within the Hypocreales. A total of 20 558 analytical results for EAs in 1 716 food, 496 feed and 67 unprocessed grain samples wer...

  1. A Short Synthetic Route to the Calystegine Alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaanderup, Philip Robert; Madsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    An efficient strategy is described for the synthesis of enantiopure calystegine alkaloids. The key step employs a zinc-mediated fragmentation of benzyl-protected methyl 6-iodo-glycosides followed by in situ formation of the benzyl imine and Barbier-type allylation with zinc, magnesium, or indium ...... to afford the desired calystegines. Hereby, calystegine B2, B3, and B4 are prepared from D-glucose, D-galactose, and D-mannose, respectively. This route constitutes the shortest synthesis of calystegine B2 and gives rise to the first total syntheses of calystegine B3 and B4....

  2. Bioactive compounds, RP-HPLC analysis of phenolics, and antioxidant activity of some Portuguese shrub species extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, Angelo; Domingues, Fernanda; Duarte, Ana Paula

    2011-12-01

    In the ecosystem of Serra Da Estrela, some plant species have the potential to be used as raw material for extraction of bioactive products. The goal of this work was to determine the phenolic, flavonoid, tannin and alkaloid contents of the methanolic extracts of some shrubs (Echinospartum ibericum, Pterospartum tridentatum, Juniperus communis, Ruscus aculeatus, Rubus ulmifolius, Hakea sericea, Cytisus multiflorus, Crataegus monogyna, Erica arborea and Ipomoea acuminata), and then to correlate the phenolic compounds and flavonoids with the antioxidant activity of each extract. The Folin-Ciocalteu's method was used for the determination of total phenols, and tannins were then precipitated with polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP); a colorimetric method with aluminum chloride was used for the determination of flavonoids, and a Dragendorff's reagent method was used for total alkaloid estimation. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and beta-carotene bleaching tests were used to assess the antioxidant activity of extracts. The identification of phenolic compounds present in extracts was performed using RP-HPLC. A positive linear correlation between antioxidant activity index and total phenolic content of methanolic extracts was observed. The RP-HPLC procedure showed that the most common compounds were ferulic and ellagic acids and quercetin. Most of the studied shrubs have significant antioxidant properties that are probably due to the existence of phenolic compounds in the extracts. It is noteworthy to emphasize that for Echinospartum ibericum, Hakea sericea and Ipomoea acuminata, to the best of our knowledge, no phytochemical studies have been undertaken nor their use in traditional medicine been described.

  3. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF THE ALKALOIDS FROM Radix Caulophylli ON THE PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To find an angiogenetic inhibitor from Radix Caulophylli (RC). Methods The extract of Radix Caulophylli was obtained by using 95% alcohol in water as solvent. Then, the total alkaloids of Radix Caulophylli was isolated from the extract by using a positive ion exchange resin column. An active part was found by a screening model of cell membrane chromatography (CMC) and further tested by the MTT method with emodin as a control. Results The total alkaloids of Radix Caulophylli was the active part by CMC and could significantly inhibit proliferation of ECV304 cells in MTT test. The inhibitory rate was 56.06% while the concentration of the total alkaloids of Radix Caulophylli was 19.63μg/mL. Conclusion The total alkaloids from Radix Caulophylli may be a new angiogenetic inhibitor, and mechanism of the total alkaloids on inhibitory angiogenesis still need to be further investigated.

  4. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  5. Differential alkaloid profile in Uncaria tomentosa micropropagated plantlets and root cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Palencia, Gabriela R; Huerta-Heredia, Ariana A; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2013-05-01

    The alkaloids of Uncaria tomentosa micropropagated plantlets and root cultures were isolated and identified by NMR and mass spectrometry. Plantlets yielded pteropodine (1), isopteropodine (2), mitraphylline (3), isomitraphylline (4), uncarine F (5), speciophylline (6), rhynchophylline (7) and isorhynchophylline (8). In plantlets growing under continuous light, tetracyclic alkaloids 7 and 8 decreased from 20 ± 1.8 at 2 months to 2.2 ± 0.33 mg/g dry wt at 6 months, while the pentacyclic alkaloids 1-4 increased from 7.7 ± 1.4 to 15 ± 0.05 mg/g dry wt, supporting their biogenetic conversion. Micropropagated plantlets produced four times more alkaloids (27.6 ± 3.1 mg/g dry wt) than greenhouse plants. Plantlet roots yielded 3, 4, 8 and the glucoindole alkaloids 3α-dihydrocadambine (9) and dolichantoside (10), the last one not previously found in Uncaria.

  6. A bioactive elastin-like recombinamer reduces unspecific protein adsorption and enhances cell response on titanium surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Salvagni, Emiliano; Berguig, Geoffrey; Engel, Elisabeth; Rodriguez-Cabello, J. Carlos; Coullerez, Geraldine; Textor, Marcus; Planell, Josep A; Gil, F. Javier; Aparicio, Conrado

    2014-01-01

    We present the immobilization on synthetic substrates of elastin-like recombinamers (ELR) that combine a bioactive motif for cell adhesion with protein antifouling properties. Physical adsorption of the recombinamers and covalent-grafting through organosilane chemistry were investigated. The biochemically-modified surfaces were thoroughly characterized and tested for protein absorption in serum by fluorescence-labelling, XPS, Ellipsometry, and OWLS. The ELR were successfully grafted and stabl...

  7. Hypolipidemic Effects of Alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis in Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Kou, Shuming; Zou, Zongyao; Hu, Yinran; Feng, Min; Han, Bing; Li, Xuegang; Ye, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic activity of five major alkaloids in Rhizoma Coptidis using high-fat- and high-cholesterol-induced hyperlipidemic hamsters. Hyperlipidemic hamsters were treated with coptisine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, epiberberine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids with a dose of 46.7 mg/kg × day for 140 days. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids were examined after alkaloid treatment. The results showed that all therapy agents prevented body weight gain, reduced the serum total cholesterol, and increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol of hamsters. Berberine, jatrorrhizine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids decreased the triglyceride level in hyperlipidemic hamsters, while coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids significantly suppressed the elevation of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. The fecal excretion of bile acids was significantly elevated by berberine, coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids, and orlistat. Notably, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids possess a much stronger lipid-lowering effect than the pure Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids could retard the synthesis of cholesterol by downregulating the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and accelerate the clearance of lipids by upregulating the low-density lipoprotein receptor, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and uncoupling protein-2 expression. These findings highlight the critical role of Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids in hyperlipidemia treatment. Thus, they need to be considered in future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26848702

  8. Pressurization of bioactive bone cement in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Iida, H; Kawanabe, K; Okada, Y; Oka, M; Masuda, T; Kitamura, Y; Nakamura, T

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a bioactive bone cement consisting of MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramic powder (AW glass-ceramic powder), silica glass powder as an inorganic filler, and bisphenol-a-glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) based resin as an organic matrix. The efficacy of this bioactive bone cement was investigated by evaluating its pressurization in a 5-mm hole and small pores using a simulated acetabular cavity. Two types of acetabular components were used (flanged and unflanged sockets) and a commercially available polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement (CMW 1 Radiopaque Bone Cement) was selected as a comparative control. Bioactive bone cement exerted greater intrusion volume in 5-mm holes than PMMA bone cement in both the flanged and unflanged sockets 10 minutes after pressurization (p anchor holes than PMMA bone cement.

  9. Acridone alkaloids as potent inhibitors of cathepsin V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Richele P; Guido, Rafael V C; Marques, Emerson F; Brömme, Dieter; da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Fernandes, João B; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Vieira, Paulo C

    2011-02-15

    Cathepsin V is a lysosomal cysteine peptidase highly expressed in thymus, testis and corneal epithelium. Eleven acridone alkaloids were isolated from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr. (Rutaceae), with eight of them being identified as potent and reversible inhibitors of cathepsin V (IC(50) values ranging from 1.2 to 3.9 μM). Detailed mechanistic characterization of the effects of these compounds on the cathepsin V-catalyzed reaction showed clear competitive inhibition with respect to substrate, with dissociation constants (K(i)) in the low micromolar range (2, K(i)=1.2 μM; 6, K(i)=1.0 μM; 7, K(i)=0.2 μM; and 11, K(i)=1.7 μM). Molecular modeling studies provided important insight into the structural basis for binding affinity and enzyme inhibition. Experimental and computational approaches, including biological evaluation, mode of action assessment and modeling studies were successfully employed in the discovery of a small series of acridone alkaloid derivatives as competitive inhibitors of catV. The most potent inhibitor (7) has a K(i) value of 200 nM. PMID:21277783

  10. Modulatory Effects of Eschscholzia californica Alkaloids on Recombinant GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Fedurco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The California poppy (Eschscholzia californica Cham. contains a variety of natural compounds including several alkaloids found exclusively in this plant. Because of the sedative, anxiolytic, and analgesic effects, this herb is currently sold in pharmacies in many countries. However, our understanding of these biological effects at the molecular level is still lacking. Alkaloids detected in E. californica could be hypothesized to act at GABAA receptors, which are widely expressed in the brain mainly at the inhibitory interneurons. Electrophysiological studies on a recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor showed no effect of N-methyllaurotetanine at concentrations lower than 30 μM. However, (S-reticuline behaved as positive allosteric modulator at the α3, α5, and α6 isoforms of GABAA receptors. The depressant properties of aerial parts of E. californica are assigned to chloride-current modulation by (S-reticuline at the α3β2γ2 and α5β2γ2 GABAA receptors. Interestingly, α1, α3, and α5 were not significantly affected by (R-reticuline, 1,2-tetrahydroreticuline, codeine, and morphine—suspected (S-reticuline metabolites in the rodent brain.

  11. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in food and feed on the Belgian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Bart; Callebaut, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are widely distributed plant toxins with species dependent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic and pneumotoxic risks. In a recent European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) opinion, only two data sets from one European country were received for honey, while one feed data set was included. No data are available for food or feed samples from the Belgian market. We developed an LC-MS/MS method, which allowed the detection and quantification of 16 PAs in a broad range of matrices in the sub ng g(-1) range. The method was validated in milk, honey and hay and applied to honey, tea (Camellia sinensis), scented tea, herbal tea, milk and feed samples bought on the Belgian market. The results confirmed that tea, scented tea, herbal tea and honey are important food sources of pyrrolizidine alkaloid contamination in Belgium. Furthermore, we detected PAs in 4 of 63 commercial milk samples. A high incidence rate of PAs in lucerne (alfalfa)-based horse feed and in rabbit feed was detected, while bird feed samples were less contaminated. We report for the first time the presence of monocrotaline, intermedine, lycopsamine, heliotrine and echimidine in cat food. PMID:26373269

  12. Plant-like biosynthesis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccile, Joshua A; Spraker, Joseph E; Le, Henry H; Brandenburger, Eileen; Gomez, Christian; Bok, Jin Woo; Macheleidt, Juliane; Brakhage, Axel A; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Keller, Nancy P; Schroeder, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    Natural product discovery efforts have focused primarily on microbial biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) containing large multimodular polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases; however, sequencing of fungal genomes has revealed a vast number of BGCs containing smaller NRPS-like genes of unknown biosynthetic function. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that a BGC in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus named fsq, which contains an NRPS-like gene lacking a condensation domain, produces several new isoquinoline alkaloids known as the fumisoquins. These compounds derive from carbon-carbon bond formation between two amino acid-derived moieties followed by a sequence that is directly analogous to isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in plants. Fumisoquin biosynthesis requires the N-methyltransferase FsqC and the FAD-dependent oxidase FsqB, which represent functional analogs of coclaurine N-methyltransferase and berberine bridge enzyme in plants. Our results show that BGCs containing incomplete NRPS modules may reveal new biosynthetic paradigms and suggest that plant-like isoquinoline biosynthesis occurs in diverse fungi. PMID:27065235

  13. Excretion of alkaloids by malpighian tubules of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddrell, S H; Gardiner, B O

    1976-04-01

    Nicotine is transported at high rates by Malpighian tubules of larvae of Manduca sexta, Pieris brassicae and Rhodnius prolixus and the transport persists in the absence of alkaloid from the diet. In the fluid-secreting portion of Rhodnius tubules this transport is not coupled to ion transport, nor is it dependent on the physiological state of the animal. The transport, which can occur against a steep electrochemical gradient, shows saturation kinetics with a maximal rate of 700 pmol. min-1 per tubule and is half saturated at 2-3 mM. Nicotine transport independent of ion movements also occurs in the lower resorptive parts of Rhodnius tubules. Both portions of Rhodnius tubules can transport morphine and atropine. These alkaloids and nicotine compete with one naother and are presumed to be carried by the smae transport system. Nicotine transport in Rhodnius was unaffected by organic anions, such as amaranth and benzyl penicillin, or by the organic anion transport inhibitor, probenecid. Fluid secretion in 5-HT-stimulated tubules was reduced by atropine and nicotine, probably by blocking the 5-HT receptors. The Malpighian tubules of adult Calliphora erythrocephala and Musca domestica remove nicotine from bathing solutions, an unknown metabolic accumulating in the tubules. Adult P. brassicae and M. sexta do not exhibit transport of nicotine by their Malpighian tubules.

  14. Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don - plant regeneration and alkaloids content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Furmanowa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a regeneration of plantlets of Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don from shoot tips and axillary buds. Shoot tips were excised from 7-day-old seedlings and were incubated in solid Nitsch and Nitsch (NN medium supplemented with kinetin, benzyladenine (BA, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and β-indolylacetic acid (IAA in various combinations. After two months in culture, regenerated rooted plantlets were cut and transferred to a new medium; the explants contained shoot tips or axillary buds. Four passages were done. We obtained about 200 rooting plantlets from one seedling. Then the plantlets were transferred to the soil and they grew under a foil tent. After five months of vegetation they were collected, dried and weighed. Chemical investigations of leaves of these plants were done. The vindoline and catharanthine were dominant alkaloids in the juvenile stage of plants (before blooming. Total amount of alkaloids, equal 2.95%, was gravimetrically determined in leaves of plants, after 4th passage, regenerated in vitro on NN medium supplemented with kinetin and IBA.

  15. Biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxuan; Zeng, Xinyi; Sun, Chao; Chen, Shilin

    2014-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most extensively investigated medicinal plants, which can produce more than 130 alkaloids, including the powerful antitumor drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here we review the recent advances in the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in C. roseus, and the identification and characterization of the corresponding enzymes involved in this pathway. Strictosidine is the central intermediate in the biosynthesis of different TIAs, which is formed by the condensation of secologanin and tryptamine. Secologanin is derived from terpenoid (isoprenoid) biosynthetic pathway, while tryptamine is derived from indole biosynthetic pathway. Then various specific end products are produced by different routes during downstream process. Although many genes and corresponding enzymes have been characterized in this pathway, our knowledge on the whole TIA biosynthetic pathway still remains largely unknown up to date. Full elucidation of TIA biosynthetic pathway is an important prerequisite to understand the regulation of the TIA biosynthesis in the medicinal plant and to produce valuable TIAs by synthetic biological technology. PMID:25159992

  16. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M.; Backheet, Enaam Y.; Bayoumi, Soad A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4–8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 µM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 µM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine. PMID:26969788

  17. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M; Backheet, Enaam Y; Bayoumi, Soad A; Ross, Samir A

    2016-04-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4-8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 μM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 μM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine. PMID:26969788

  18. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  19. The distribution of inole alkaloids in different organs of Catharanthus roseus G. Don. (Vinca rosea L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ebrahimzadeh

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of alkaloid extract of the leaf of Vinca rosea by TLC showed the existence of 13 bands, 7 bands of them were: Serpentine, Vincristine, Vinblastine, Ajmaline, Catharantine, Vindoline and Ajmalicine. The existence of these 7 alkaloids was confirmed in the young leaves, old leaves and the roots of the plant by HPLC. Furthermore, two alkaloids with the short retention times and one alkaloid with the medium retention time in the young leaf, three alkaloids with the short retention time and one alkaloid with long retention time in the old leaf, and one alkaioid with the short retention time and two other alkaloids with the long retention times in the root, were observed."nThe study of absorption spectrum of alkaloid extract and its comparison with absorption spectrum of ajmalicine showed that the latter can be used for drawing a standard curve and detecting the amount of total alkaloids. The total alkaloids in fresh root, old leaf and young leaf were 2.1 mg , 1.3 mg and 0.9 mg/g respectively, Vindoline and Catharantine were major alkaloids in all of them. However, their amount were more in the root (1.2 mg/ g of fresh material, 0.85 in the old leaf and 0.38 in the young leaf. Vinblastine existed in all three samples but its amount was more in the root {0.22 mg per gramme of the fresh material in the root, 0.26 in the young leaf and 0.003 in the old leaf."nAjmalicine was detected only in the leaf and its amount was more in young leaf than the old leaf (0.141 mg/g of the fresh material in the young leaf and 0.013 in the old leaf. Serpentine was seen in all of the studied organs but its amount was more in the young leaf than other organs (0.192 mg/ g of the fresh material in the young leaf, 0.11 in the root and 0.07 in the old leaf. Ajmaline existed in all of the organs in minute amount but in the old leaf was more (0 .07 mg/g of the fresh material in the old !eaf,0.044 in the young leaf and 0.04 in the root . The percentage of unknown

  20. Synthesis of isoxazolidines by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and their bioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Chunsheng; Li Zhinian; Shu Jinyan; Li Tao; Zhang Baoyan

    2006-01-01

    A series of new isoxazolidines was prepared by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of different mono-substituted styrenes with 1,3-dipolar compounds that were prepared by the reaction of N-methylhydroxylamine sulfate with aromatic carbonyl substances.This synthetic pathway for the preparation of isoxazolidines was an ideal process of green chemistry.The synthetic products were 5-substituted isoxazolidines and their structures were characterized by mass and NMR (1H-,13C-,COSY,HSQC,and DEPT) spectrometry,and their bioactivity was investigated indicating that some new compounds inhibited Botrytis cinerea effectively.

  1. Hierarchically Nanoporous Bioactive Glasses for High Efficiency Immobilization of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, W.; Min, D.D.; Zhang, X.D.;

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glasses with hierarchical nanoporosity and structures have been heavily involved in immobilization of enzymes. Because of meticulous design and ingenious hierarchical nanostructuration of porosities from yeast cell biotemplates, hierarchically nanostructured porous bioactive glasses can...

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of novel bioactive composite starch/bioactive glass microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, G. A.; Costa, F. J.; Coutinho, O. P.; Radin, S.; Ducheyne, P.; Reis, R. L.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the development of composite materials is to combine the most desired properties of two or more materials. In this work, the biodegradable character, good controlled-release properties, and natural origin of starch-based biomaterials are combined with the bioactive and bone-bonding properties of bioactive glass (BG). Novel, bioactive composite starch-BG microparticles were synthesized starting from a blend of starch and polylactic acid (50%/50% wt) with BG 45S5 powder using a simpl...

  3. From Matter to Life:Chemistry?Chemistry!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marie; LEHN

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Animate as well as inanimate matter,living organisms as well as materials,are formed of molecules and of the organized entities resulting from the interaction of molecules with each other.Chemistry provides the bridge between the molecules of inanimate matter and the highly complex molecular architectures and systems which make up living organisms. Synthetic chemistry has developed a very powerful set of methods for constructing ever more complex molecules.Supramolecular chemistry seeks to con...

  4. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Talaviya; Falguni Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceut...

  5. Methods of Manufacturing Bioactive Gels from Extracellular Matrix Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentner, Kimberly A. (Inventor); Stuart, Katherine A. (Inventor); Janis, Abram D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of manufacturing bioactive gels from ECM material, i.e., gels which retain bioactivity, and can serve as scaffolds for preclinical and clinical tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to tissue reconstruction. The manufacturing methods take advantage of a new recognition that bioactive gels from ECM material can be created by digesting particularized ECM material in an alkaline environment and neutralizing to provide bioactive gels.

  6. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  7. Alkaloids: an overview of their antibacterial, antibiotic-enhancing and antivirulence activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Cushnie, Benjamart; Lamb, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    With reports of pandrug-resistant bacteria causing untreatable infections, the need for new antibacterial therapies is more pressing than ever. Alkaloids are a large and structurally diverse group of compounds that have served as scaffolds for important antibacterial drugs such as metronidazole and the quinolones. In this review, we highlight other alkaloids with development potential. Natural, semisynthetic and synthetic alkaloids of all classes are considered, looking first at those with direct antibacterial activity and those with antibiotic-enhancing activity. Potent examples include CJ-13,136, a novel actinomycete-derived quinolone alkaloid with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.1 ng/mL against Helicobacter pylori, and squalamine, a polyamine alkaloid from the dogfish shark that renders Gram-negative pathogens 16- to >32-fold more susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Where available, information on toxicity, structure-activity relationships, mechanisms of action and in vivo activity is presented. The effects of alkaloids on virulence gene regulatory systems such as quorum sensing and virulence factors such as sortases, adhesins and secretion systems are also described. The synthetic isoquinoline alkaloid virstatin, for example, inhibits the transcriptional regulator ToxT in Vibrio cholerae, preventing expression of cholera toxin and fimbriae and conferring in vivo protection against intestinal colonisation. The review concludes with implications and limitations of the described research and directions for future research. PMID:25130096

  8. Relationship between alkaloid contents and growth environment of Yimu Cao (Herba Leonuri)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO Zhi; YAN Gang

    2001-01-01

    To study the relationship between alkaloids contents in Chinese traditional drug Yimu Cao (the dried aerial parts ofLeonurus artemisia) and its growing environment. Methods: Samples of the drug and the soil at the growing site collected from 5 selected regions. Reference materials were checked and on-the-spot observations were carried out to investigate the growth environment. RP-HPLC was performed to determine the alkaloid contents in the drug. Results: Different regions had different environmental conditions, including climate, soil, vegetation, and so on.No matter barren or fertile the soil at the growing site was, the herb ofL. Artemisia could grow well, but the contents of alkaloid in the drug varied greatly. The drugs produced in 2 northern regions, where the soil is alkaline, had higher content of alkaloid (about 0.4%) than that produced in southern regions (0.1%-0.2%), where the soil is acid. Conclusion:The contents of organic matters, effective phosphorus, quick-acting potassium, and the pH value of the growing site soil were the factors correlating with alkaloid contents in the drug, among which the pH value of soil was an important positively correlating factor. The alkaline soils in North benefit the accumulation of alkaloids more than the acid soils in South. The other probable elements affecting the alkaloid contents in Yimu Cao were climate and genetic factors.

  9. Isolation, biosynthesis and biological activity of alkaloids of Tylophora asthmatica, a versatile medicinal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylophorine and related new alkaloids have been isolated from Tylophora asthmatics, Pergularia pallida and Ficus hispida plants. Biosynthesis of this group of alkaloids has been carried out using various labelled precursors for the first time and from the systematic degradation of the isolated radiolabelled tylophorine, it has been concluded that these alkaloids arise from one molecule each of tyrosine, phenylalanine and ornithine. The interactions of Tylophora alkaloids particularly tylophorinidine with biomolecules such as lysozyme and bovine serum albumin have also been studied and binding characteristics determined. It was found that Tylophora alkaloid extract possesses antianaphylactic activity as observed in passive peritoneal anaphylaxis in rats. The drug also possessed mild antihistaminic and anticholinergic activities. Studies of the extract on the bronchial smooth muscle both in vivo and in vitro did not reveal bronchiodilator potential of the drug. In addition, the distribution and metabolism of the drug was studied in vivo using 14C radiolabelled alkaloids prepared by biosynthetic method. This study further revealed its usefulness since the drug is absorbed by vital organs and also it is not metabolised into fragments which could cause some other damage. Tylophora alkaloids have also been found to be anti-mutagenic. 10 tables, 5 figures, 24 refs. (author)

  10. Effect of polyamine biosynthetic inhibitors on alkaloids and organogenesis in tobacco callus cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburcio, A F; Kaur-Sawhney, R; Galston, A W

    1987-01-01

    We studied the effects of inhibitors of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and spermidine synthase (Spd synthase) on organogenesis and the titers of polyamines (PA) and alkaloids in tobacco calli. DL-alpha-diffluromethylarginine (DFMA) and D-arginine (D-Arg), both inhibitors of ADC activity, were more effective than DL-alpha-difluromethylorinithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ODC, in reducing titers of PA and the putrescine (Put)-derived alkaloids (nornicotine and nicotine). Dicyclohexylammonium sulfate (DCHA), an inhibitor of Spd synthase, was also more efficient than DFMO in reducing PA and alkaloid levels. Root organogenesis is inversely related to the titers of Put and alkaloids. Thus, DFMA and D-Arg, which strongly inhibit Put and alkaloid biosynthesis, markedly promote root organogenesis, while control callus with high Put and alkaloid content showed poor root organization. These results suggest that morphological differentiation is not required for activation of secondary metabolic pathways and support the view that ADC has a major role in the generation of Put going to the pyrrolidine ring of tobacco alkaloids.

  11. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS of Imidazole Alkaloids in Pilocarpus microphyllus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Mazzafera

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine, an important imidazole alkaloid, is extracted from the leaves of Pilocarpus microphyllus (Rutaceae, known in Brazil as jaborandi and used mainly for the treatment of glaucoma. Jaborandi leaves also contain other imidazole alkaloids, whose pharmacological and physiological properties are unknown, and whose biosynthetic pathways are under investigation. In the present study, a HPLC method coupled with ESI-MSn was developed for their qualitative and quantitative analysis. This method permits the chromatographic separation of the imidazole alkaloids found in extracts of jaborandi, as well as the MS/MS analysis of the individual compounds. Thus two samples: leaves of P. microphyllus and a paste that is left over after the industrial extraction of pilocarpine; were compared. The paste was found to contain significant amounts of pilocarpine and other imidazole alkaloids, but had a slightly different alkaloid profile than the leaf extract. The method is suitable for the routine analysis of samples containing these alkaloids, as well as for the separation and identification of known and novel alkaloids from this family, and may be applied to further studies of the biosynthetic pathway of pilocarpine in P. microphyllus.

  12. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS of imidazole alkaloids in Pilocarpus microphyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; Abreu, Ilka Nacif; Andreazza, Nathalia Luiza; Eberlin, Marcos N; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    Pilocarpine, an important imidazole alkaloid, is extracted from the leaves of Pilocarpus microphyllus (Rutaceae), known in Brazil as jaborandi and used mainly for the treatment of glaucoma. Jaborandi leaves also contain other imidazole alkaloids, whose pharmacological and physiological properties are unknown, and whose biosynthetic pathways are under investigation. In the present study, a HPLC method coupled with ESI-MS(n) was developed for their qualitative and quantitative analysis. This method permits the chromatographic separation of the imidazole alkaloids found in extracts of jaborandi, as well as the MS/MS analysis of the individual compounds. Thus two samples: leaves of P. microphyllus and a paste that is left over after the industrial extraction of pilocarpine; were compared. The paste was found to contain significant amounts of pilocarpine and other imidazole alkaloids, but had a slightly different alkaloid profile than the leaf extract. The method is suitable for the routine analysis of samples containing these alkaloids, as well as for the separation and identification of known and novel alkaloids from this family, and may be applied to further studies of the biosynthetic pathway of pilocarpine in P. microphyllus. PMID:18719522

  13. Encapsulation for preservation of functionality and targeted delivery of bioactive food components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Paul; Faas, Marijke M.; Spasojevic, Milica; Sikkema, Jan

    2010-01-01

    There has been a tremendous increase in the number of food products containing bioactive components with a health promoting or disease preventing effect. Bioactive food components can be divided into bioactive molecules and bioactive living cells (probiotics). Both bioactive molecules and bioactive

  14. Asexual endophytes in a native grass: tradeoffs in mortality, growth, reproduction, and alkaloid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, Stanley H; Hayes, Cinnamon J; Gardner, Dale R

    2010-10-01

    Neotyphodium endophytes are asexual, seed-borne fungal symbionts that are thought to interact mutualistically with their grass hosts. Benefits include increased growth, reproduction, and resistance to herbivores via endophytic alkaloids. Although these benefits are well established in infected introduced, agronomic grasses, little is known about the cost and benefits of endophyte infection in native grass populations. These populations exist as mosaics of uninfected and infected plants, with the latter often comprised of plants that vary widely in alkaloid content. We tested the costs and benefits of endophyte infections with varying alkaloids in the native grass Achnatherum robustum (sleepygrass). We conducted a 4-year field experiment, where herbivory and water availability were controlled and survival, growth, and reproduction of three maternal plant genotypes [uninfected plants (E-), infected plants with high levels of ergot alkaloids (E+A+), and infected plants with no alkaloids (E+A-)] were monitored over three growing seasons. Generally, E+A+ plants had reduced growth over the three growing seasons and lower seed production than E- or E+A- plants, suggesting a cost of alkaloid production. The reduction in vegetative biomass in E+A+ plants was most pronounced under supplemented water, contrary to the prediction that additional resources would offset the cost of alkaloid production. Also, E+A+ plants showed no advantage in growth, seed production, or reproductive effort under full herbivory relative to E- or E+A- grasses, contrary to the predictions of the defensive mutualism hypothesis. However, E+A+ plants had higher overwintering survival than E+A- plants in early plant ontogeny, suggesting that alkaloids associated with infection may protect against below ground herbivory or harsh winter conditions. Our results suggest that the mosaic of E-, E+A+, and E+A- plants observed in nature may result from varying biotic and abiotic selective factors that maintain

  15. Preparation of bioactive glasses with controllable degradation behavior and their bioactive characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO AiHua; WANG DePing; FU Qiang; HUANG WenHai; Mohamed N. RAHAMAN

    2007-01-01

    Bioactive glasses and ceramics have been widely investigated for bone repair because of their excellent bioactive characteristics. However, these biomaterials undergo incomplete conversion into a bone-like material, which severely limits their biomedical application. In this paper, borosilicate bioactive glasses were prepared by traditional melting process. The results showed that borosilicate glasses possessed high biocompatibility and bioactivity. In addition, when immersed in a 0.02 mol/L K2HPO4 solution, particles of a borate glass were fully converted to HA. The desirable conversion rate to HA may be achieved through the adjustment of the B2O3/SiO2 ratio. The results of XRD and FTIR analysis indicated that the degradation product was carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite, which was similar to the inorganic component of bone.

  16. Bioactive Terpenes from Marine-Derived Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Elissawy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived fungi continue to be a prolific source of secondary metabolites showing diverse bioactivities. Terpenoids from marine-derived fungi exhibit wide structural diversity including numerous compounds with pronounced biological activities. In this review, we survey the last five years’ reports on terpenoidal metabolites from marine-derived fungi with particular attention on those showing marked biological activities.

  17. Glutathione conjugation as a bioactivation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bladeren, P.J. van

    2000-01-01

    In general, glutathione conjugation is regarded as a detoxication reaction. However, depending on the properties of the substrate, bioactivation is also possible. Four types of activation reaction have been recognized: direct-acting compounds, conjugates that are activated through cysteine conjugate

  18. Marine Bioactives and Potential Application in Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An enriched diet with antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic compounds, has always been suggested to improve oxidative stress, preventing related diseases. In this respect, marine natural product (MNP, such as COX inhibitors, marine steroids, molecules interfering with factors involved in the modulation of gene expression (such as NF-κB, macrolides, many antioxidant agents, thermogenic substances and even substances that could help the immune system and that result in the protection of cartilage, have been recently gaining attention. The marine world represents a reserve of bioactive ingredients, with considerable potential as functional food. Substances, such as chitin, chitosan, n-3 oils, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals and bioactive peptides, can provide several health benefits, such as the reduction of cardiovascular diseases, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities. In addition, new marine bioactive substances with potential anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and thermogenic capacity may provide health benefits and performance improvement, especially in those who practice physical activity, because of their increased free radical and Reacting Oxygen Species (ROS production during exercise, and, particularly, in athletes. The aim of this review is to examine the potential pharmacological properties and application of many marine bioactive substances in sports.

  19. Marine bioactives and potential application in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Gemello, Eugenio; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2014-04-30

    An enriched diet with antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic compounds, has always been suggested to improve oxidative stress, preventing related diseases. In this respect, marine natural product (MNP), such as COX inhibitors, marine steroids, molecules interfering with factors involved in the modulation of gene expression (such as NF-κB), macrolides, many antioxidant agents, thermogenic substances and even substances that could help the immune system and that result in the protection of cartilage, have been recently gaining attention. The marine world represents a reserve of bioactive ingredients, with considerable potential as functional food. Substances, such as chitin, chitosan, n-3 oils, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals and bioactive peptides, can provide several health benefits, such as the reduction of cardiovascular diseases, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities. In addition, new marine bioactive substances with potential anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and thermogenic capacity may provide health benefits and performance improvement, especially in those who practice physical activity, because of their increased free radical and Reacting Oxygen Species (ROS) production during exercise, and, particularly, in athletes. The aim of this review is to examine the potential pharmacological properties and application of many marine bioactive substances in sports.

  20. Bioactive compounds in whole grain wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateo Anson, N.

    2010-01-01

    Bread can be healthier! Consuming whole-grain foods can prevent cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This is due to bioactive compounds in whole grain, such as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds. We found that the different fractions of a wheat grain vary much i

  1. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  2. Genotoxicity of the boldine aporphine alkaloid in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, P R; Vargas, V M; Andrade, H H; Henriques, A T; Henriques, J A

    1991-06-01

    The aporphine alkaloid boldine, present in Peumus boldus (boldo-do-Chile) widely used all over the world, was tested for the presence of genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic activities in microorganisms. This alkaloid did not show genotoxic activity with or without metabolic activation in the SOS chromotest and Ames tester strains TA100, TA98 and TA102. It was not able to induce point and frameshift mutations in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. However, mitotic recombinational events such as crossing-over and gene conversion were weakly induced in diploid yeast cells by this alkaloid. Also, boldine was able to induce weakly cytoplasmic 'petite' mutation in haploid yeast cells. PMID:2046695

  3. [HPTLC separation and fluorodensitometric determination of isoquinoline alkaloids in Chelidonine majus L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, C Q; He, L Y

    1992-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Chelidonine majus L. was investigated and a HPTLC method has been established. Using this method, we separated and determined eight isoquinoline alkaloids, i.e. chelidonine, protopine, berberine, coptisine, tetrahydrocoptisine, 6-methoxydihydrochelerythrine, 6-methoxydihydrosanguinarine and dihydrosanguinarine. The HPTLC method developed used one developing system on high performance silica gel plate (10 x 10 cm). After separation of these eight alkaloids, fluorescence derivatization was carried out in situ. The content was determined by fluorescence scanning. TLC fluorescence derivatization, fluorescence enhancement and fluorescence stability have been studied. Experiments showed that this method is simple, fast, highly sensitive and highly selective. PMID:1529718

  4. Neonaucline, a New Indole Alkaloid from the Leaves of Ochreinauclea maingayii (Hook. f. Ridsd. (Rubiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Litaudon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new indole alkaloid; neonaucline (1, along with six known compounds–Cadamine (2, naucledine (3, harmane, benzamide, cinnamide and blumenol A–were isolated from the leaves of Ochreinauclea maingayii (Rubiaceae. In addition to that of compound 1, 13C-NMR data of cadamine (2 and naucledine (3 were also reported. Structural elucidations of these alkaloids were performed using spectroscopic methods especially 1D- and 2D-NMR, IR, UV and LCMS-IT-TOF. The excellent vasorelaxant activity on isolated rat aorta was observed for the alkaloids 1–3 after injection of each sample at 1 × 10−5 M.

  5. GC-MS investigation of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in Galanthus xvalentinei nothosubsp. subplicatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Buket Bozkurt; Berkov, Strahil; Bastida, Jaume; Kaya, Gulen Irem; Onur, Mustafa Ali; Somer, Nehir Unver

    2013-03-01

    A GC-MS analysis of alkaloids in the aerial parts and bulbs of Galanthus xvalentinei nothosubsp. subplicatus was performed for the first time. Totally, twenty-six alkaloids were identified, of which tazettine and galanthindole were the major ones. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the alkaloidal extracts was determined using modified in vitro Ellman's method. Significant anticholinesterase activity was observed in the tested samples (bulbs: IC50 = 21.3 microg/mL, aerial parts: IC50 = 16.3 microg/mL).

  6. Weak C–H…O hydrogen bonds in alkaloids: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajnikant; Dinesh; Kamni

    2005-06-01

    An overview of general classification scheme, medicinal importance and crystal structure analysis with emphasis on the role of hydrogen bonding in some alkaloids is presented in this paper. The article is based on a general kind of survey while crystallographic analysis and role of hydrogen bonding are limited to only those alkaloids whose three-dimensional structure has been reported by us. The C–H…O hydrogen bonding in the solid state in alkaloids has been found to be predominant and this observation makes the role of hydrogen bonding in organic molecular assemblies very important.

  7. Alkaloids from Marine Invertebrates as Important Leads for Anticancer Drugs Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Imperatore

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes research on novel natural antitumor alkaloids isolated from marine invertebrates. The structure, origin, and confirmed cytotoxic activity of more than 130 novel alkaloids belonging to several structural families (indoles, pyrroles, pyrazines, quinolines, and pyridoacridines, together with some of their synthetic analogs, are illustrated. Recent discoveries concerning the current state of the potential and/or development of some of them as new drugs, as well as the current knowledge regarding their modes of action, are also summarized. A special emphasis is given to the role of marine invertebrate alkaloids as an important source of leads for anticancer drug discovery.

  8. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids from the Leaves of Madhuca pasquieri (Dubard).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Le Son; Tran, Manh Hung; Lee, Joo Sang; To, Dao Cuong; Nguyen, Van Thu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Jeong Hyung; Woo, Mi Hee; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-01-01

    A novel pyrrolizidine alkaloids, madhumidine A (1), and two known alkaloids, lindelofidine benzoic acid ester (2) and minalobine B (3) were isolated from the leaves of Madhuca pasquieri (Dubard) H. J. LAM. The chemical structures of these alkaloids were established mainly by NMR techniques and mass spectrometry. Their anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated against lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in macrophage RAW264.7 cell. In addition, the cytotoxic activity of all isolated compounds was tested against a panel of cancer cell lines. PMID:26027474

  9. Alkaloids from Duguetia flagellaris Huber (Annonaceae); Alcaloides de Duguetia flagellaris Huber (Annonaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, V.R.; Sette, I.M.F.; Da-Cunha, E.V.L.; Silva, M.S.; Barbosa Filho, J.M. [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica; Maia, J.G.S. [Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Belem, PA (Brazil). Dept. de Botanica

    2001-04-01

    Ten aporphine alkaloids were isolated from ethanol extract of leaves, thin branches and stem bark of Duguetia flagellaris Huber (Annonceae); they were identified by {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C NMR spectroscopic techniques; five were aporphine strictu sensu: nornuciferine (1), isopiline (2), O-methylisopiline (3), calycinine (3), duguevanine (5), and five 7-hydroxyaporphines: pachypodanthine (6), oliveroline {beta}-N-oxide (8), oliveridine (9), and duguetine (10). Alkaloids 2, 6, 7 and 8 are being cited for the first time in Duguetia genus. This study also includes a literature review of the chemical constituents of the genus Duguetia, predominantly aporphine alkaloids, all isolated from plants that occur in South America. (author)

  10. Influence of Some Heavy Metals on Growth, Alkaloid Content and Composition in Catharanthus roseus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, N. K.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    Shoot biomass production, alkaloid content and composition as influence by cadmium, manganese, nickel and lead at uniform dose of 5 mM were investigated in Catharanthus roseus plants grown in sand culture. Treatment with Mn, Ni, and Pb significantly enhanced total root alkaloid accumulation. Cd and Ni treatment resulted in two-fold where as Pb treatment resulted in three fold increase in serpentine content of roots. The non-significant affect on biomass suggests that plants can withstand metal stress at the level tested with positive affect on root alkaloid content. PMID:21969751

  11. Hainanerectamines A–C, Alkaloids from the Hainan Sponge Hyrtios erecta

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Fei He; Duo-Qing Xue; Li-Gong Yao; Jing-Ya Li; Jia Li; Yue-Wei Guo

    2014-01-01

    Two new indole alkaloids, hainanerectamines A (1) and B (2), and one new β-carboline alkaloids, hainanerectamines C (4), along with five known related alkaloids (3, 5–8), have been isolated from the Hainan marine sponge Hyrtios erecta. The structures of new compounds 1, 2 and 4 were determined by detailed analysis of their 1D and 2D NMR spectra and by comparison of their spectroscopic data with those of related model compounds. Compounds 2–4 exhibited moderate inhibitory activity against Aur...

  12. Preparation and bioactive properties of nano bioactive glass and segmented polyurethane composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Pérez, Fernando J; Vargas-Coronado, Rossana F; Cervantes-Uc, Jose M; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V; Covarrubias, Cristian; Pedram-Yazdani, Merhdad

    2016-04-01

    Composites of glutamine-based segmented polyurethanes with 5 to 25 wt.% bioactive glass nanoparticles were prepared, characterized, and their mineralization potential was evaluated in simulated body fluid. Biocompatibility with dental pulp stem cells was assessed by MTS to an extended range of compositions (1 to 25 wt.% of bioactive glass nanoparticles). Physicochemical characterization showed that composites retained many of the matrix properties, i.e. those corresponding to semicrystalline elastomeric polymers as they exhibited a glass transition temperature (Tg) between -41 and -36℃ and a melting temperature (Tm) between 46 and 49℃ in agreement with X-ray reflections at 23.6° and 21.3°. However, with bioactive glass nanoparticles addition, tensile strength and strain were reduced from 22.2 to 12.2 MPa and 667.2 to 457.8%, respectively with 25 wt.% of bioactive glass nanoparticles. Although Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy did not show evidence of mineralization after conditioning of these composites in simulated body fluid, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed the formation of an apatite layer on the surface which increased with higher bioactive glass concentrations and longer conditioning time. Dental pulp stem cells proliferation at day 5 was improved in bioactive glass nanoparticles composites containing lower amounts of the filler (1-2.5 wt.%) but it was compromised at day 9 in composites containing high contents of nBG (5, 15, 25 wt.%). However, Runx2 gene expression was particularly upregulated for the dental pulp stem cells cultured with composites loaded with 15 and 25 wt.% of bioactive glass nanoparticles. In conclusion, low content bioactive glass nanoparticles and segmented polyurethanes composites deserve further investigation for applications such as guided bone regeneration membranes, where osteoconductivity is desirable but not a demanding mechanical performance.

  13. Recent advances in design, synthesis and bioactivity of paclitaxel-mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guan; Qu, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Dan; Chen, Xing-Xiu; Tian, Xin-Chuan; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Xian-Li

    2016-04-01

    Taxane-type anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel and its semi-synthetic derivatives docetaxel and cabazitaxel, are widely applied to chemotherapy of malignancy like breast cancer, ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and prostate cancer. However, their clinical applications are generally limited by scarce natural resources, various side effects and multidrug resistance. Therefore, it is significant to develop paclitaxel-mimics with simplified structure, fewer side effects and improved pharmaceutical properties. Based on our investigation on chemistry of paclitaxel, the current review summarized the most recent advances in the design, synthesis and biological activities of paclitaxel-mimics, which could be appealing to researchers in the field of medicinal chemistry and oncology. Meanwhile, smart design, interesting synthesis and potential bioactivities of these novel compounds may also provide valuable reference for the wider scientific communities. PMID:26906104

  14. Antimicrobial and selected in vitro enzyme inhibitory effects of leaf extracts, flavonols and indole alkaloids isolated from Croton menyharthii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderogba, Mutalib A; Ndhlala, Ashwell R; Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Croton species are used in folk medicine in the management of infections, inflammation and oxidative stress-related diseases. In order to isolate, characterize and evaluate the bioactive constituents of Croton menyharthii Pax leaf extracts, repeated column fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction from a 20% aqueous methanol crude extract afforded three flavonols identified by NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopic methods as myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (myricetrin, 1), quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (2) and quercetin (3) along with an indole alkaloid, (E)-N-(4-hydroxycinnamoyl)-5-hydroxytryptamine, [trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin, 4]. All the compounds are reported from the leaf extract of this plant for the first time. The crude extracts, four solvent fractions (hexane, DCM, ethyl acetate and butanol) and isolated compounds obtained from the leaves were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on selected bacteria, a fungus (Candida albicans), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), α-glucosidase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Amongst the compounds, quercetin (3) was the most active against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans while myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin (4) were the most active compounds against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) against COX-2 was insignificant while that of the other three compounds 2-4 was low. The AChE inhibitory activity of the alkaloid, trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin was high, with a percentage inhibitory activity of 72.6% and an IC50 value of 15.0 µg/mL. The rest of the compounds only had moderate activity. Croton menyharthii leaf extracts and isolated compounds inhibit α-glucosidase at very low IC50 values compared to the synthetic drug acarbose. Structure activity relationship of the isolated flavonols 1-3 is briefly outlined. Compounds 1-4 and the leaf extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of activities. This validates the

  15. Antimicrobial and Selected In Vitro Enzyme Inhibitory Effects of Leaf Extracts, Flavonols and Indole Alkaloids Isolated from Croton menyharthii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Croton species are used in folk medicine in the management of infections, inflammation and oxidative stress-related diseases. In order to isolate, characterize and evaluate the bioactive constituents of Croton menyharthii Pax leaf extracts, repeated column fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction from a 20% aqueous methanol crude extract afforded three flavonols identified by NMR (1D and 2D spectroscopic methods as myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (myricetrin, 1, quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (2 and quercetin (3 along with an indole alkaloid, (E-N-(4-hydroxycinnamoyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, [trans-N-(p-coumaroyl serotonin, 4]. All the compounds are reported from the leaf extract of this plant for the first time. The crude extracts, four solvent fractions (hexane, DCM, ethyl acetate and butanol and isolated compounds obtained from the leaves were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on selected bacteria, a fungus (Candida albicans, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, α-glucosidase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Amongst the compounds, quercetin (3 was the most active against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans while myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1 and trans-N-(p-coumaroyl serotonin (4 were the most active compounds against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1 against COX-2 was insignificant while that of the other three compounds 2–4 was low. The AChE inhibitory activity of the alkaloid, trans-N-(p-coumaroyl serotonin was high, with a percentage inhibitory activity of 72.6% and an IC50 value of 15.0 µg/mL. The rest of the compounds only had moderate activity. Croton menyharthii leaf extracts and isolated compounds inhibit α-glucosidase at very low IC50 values compared to the synthetic drug acarbose. Structure activity relationship of the isolated flavonols 1–3 is briefly outlined. Compounds 1–4 and the leaf extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of activities. This validates the

  16. Antimicrobial and selected in vitro enzyme inhibitory effects of leaf extracts, flavonols and indole alkaloids isolated from Croton menyharthii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderogba, Mutalib A; Ndhlala, Ashwell R; Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Croton species are used in folk medicine in the management of infections, inflammation and oxidative stress-related diseases. In order to isolate, characterize and evaluate the bioactive constituents of Croton menyharthii Pax leaf extracts, repeated column fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction from a 20% aqueous methanol crude extract afforded three flavonols identified by NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopic methods as myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (myricetrin, 1), quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (2) and quercetin (3) along with an indole alkaloid, (E)-N-(4-hydroxycinnamoyl)-5-hydroxytryptamine, [trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin, 4]. All the compounds are reported from the leaf extract of this plant for the first time. The crude extracts, four solvent fractions (hexane, DCM, ethyl acetate and butanol) and isolated compounds obtained from the leaves were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on selected bacteria, a fungus (Candida albicans), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), α-glucosidase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Amongst the compounds, quercetin (3) was the most active against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans while myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin (4) were the most active compounds against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) against COX-2 was insignificant while that of the other three compounds 2-4 was low. The AChE inhibitory activity of the alkaloid, trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin was high, with a percentage inhibitory activity of 72.6% and an IC50 value of 15.0 µg/mL. The rest of the compounds only had moderate activity. Croton menyharthii leaf extracts and isolated compounds inhibit α-glucosidase at very low IC50 values compared to the synthetic drug acarbose. Structure activity relationship of the isolated flavonols 1-3 is briefly outlined. Compounds 1-4 and the leaf extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of activities. This validates the

  17. Bioactive macroporous titanium implants highly interconnected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparrós, Cristina; Ortiz-Hernandez, Mónica; Molmeneu, Meritxell; Punset, Miguel; Calero, José Antonio; Aparicio, Conrado; Fernández-Fairén, Mariano; Perez, Román; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Intervertebral implants should be designed with low load requirements, high friction coefficient and low elastic modulus in order to avoid the stress shielding effect on bone. Furthermore, the presence of a highly interconnected porous structure allows stimulating bone in-growth and enhancing implant-bone fixation. The aim of this study was to obtain bioactive porous titanium implants with highly interconnected pores with a total porosity of approximately 57 %. Porous Titanium implants were produced by powder sintering route using the space holder technique with a binder phase and were then evaluated in an in vivo study. The size of the interconnection diameter between the macropores was about 210 μm in order to guarantee bone in-growth through osteblastic cell penetration. Surface roughness and mechanical properties were analyzed. Stiffness was reduced as a result of the powder sintering technique which allowed the formation of a porous network. Compression and fatigue tests exhibited suitable properties in order to guarantee a proper compromise between mechanical properties and pore interconnectivity. Bioactivity treatment effect in novel sintered porous titanium materials was studied by thermo-chemical treatments and were compared with the same material that had undergone different bioactive treatments. Bioactive thermo-chemical treatment was confirmed by the presence of sodium titanates on the surface of the implants as well as inside the porous network. Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the identified titanate structures would enhance in vivo apatite formation by promoting ion exchange for the apatite formation process. In vivo results demonstrated that the bioactive titanium achieved over 75 % tissue colonization compared to the 40 % value for the untreated titanium. PMID:27582071

  18. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Talaviya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceuticals is to utilize eco-friendly, non-hazardous, reproducible and efficient solvents and catalysts in synthesis of drug molecules, drug intermediates and in researches involving synthetic chemistry. Microwave synthesis is also an important tool of green chemistry by being an energy efficient process.

  19. Engineering biosynthesis of the anticancer alkaloid noscapine in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanran; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine is a potential anticancer drug isolated from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum, and genes encoding enzymes responsible for the synthesis of noscapine have been recently discovered to be clustered on the genome of P. somniferum. Here, we reconstitute the noscapine gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to achieve the microbial production of noscapine and related pathway intermediates, complementing and extending previous in planta and in vitro investigations. Our work provides structural validation of the secoberberine intermediates and the description of the narcotoline-4′-O-methyltransferase, suggesting this activity is catalysed by a unique heterodimer. We also reconstitute a 14-step biosynthetic pathway of noscapine from the simple alkaloid norlaudanosoline by engineering a yeast strain expressing 16 heterologous plant enzymes, achieving reconstitution of a complex plant pathway in a microbial host. Other engineered yeasts produce previously inaccessible pathway intermediates and a novel derivative, thereby advancing protoberberine and noscapine related drug discovery. PMID:27378283

  20. New Alkaloid De-Oxypalmitine from Coscinium fenestratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Talat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Present study is aimed at to investigate phytochemically the stem bark of Coscinium fenestratum (family Menispermaceae a plant popularly and commonly known as “tree turmeric” used globally in traditional medicine to treat variety of ailments, using a standard procedure. Fractionation of its methanol extract by ethyl acetate and chloroform and subsequent column chromatography over silica gel G (60-120 mesh size led to the isolation of Berberine, Palmitine and Jatrorrhizine. The structure of palmitine was elucidated using 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FABMS and DEPT analysis and was confirmed. In addition, alkaloid Deoxypalmitine (1 was isolated from the methanol extract of the defatted stem of the Coscinium fenestratum. The structure of the new compound 1 was determined by means of spectral data analysis and also comparing that of reference sample of palmitine.

  1. Alkaloids from Pandanus amaryllifolius: Isolation and Their Plausible Biosynthetic Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Chi; Yu, Meng-Lun; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Beerhues, Ludger; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Lei-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Chen, Hui-Fen; Chung, Yu-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2015-10-23

    Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb. (Pandanaceae) is used as a flavor and in folk medicine in Southeast Asia. The ethanolic crude extract of the aerial parts of P. amaryllifolius exhibited antioxidant, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory activities in previous studies. In the current investigation, the purification of the ethanolic extract yielded nine new compounds, including N-acetylnorpandamarilactonines A (1) and B (2); pandalizines A (3) and B (4); pandanmenyamine (5); pandamarilactones 2 (6) and 3 (7), and 5(E)-pandamarilactonine-32 (8); and pandalactonine (9). The isolated alkaloids, with either a γ-alkylidene-α,β-unsaturated-γ-lactone or γ-alkylidene-α,β-unsaturated-γ-lactam system, can be classified into five skeletons including norpandamarilactonine, indolizinone, pandanamine, pandamarilactone, and pandamarilactonine. A plausible biosynthetic route toward 1-5, 7, and 9 is proposed.

  2. Alkaloids from an algicolous strain of Talaromyces sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibin; Li, Fang; Ji, Naiyun

    2016-03-01

    Compounds isolated and identified in a culture of the alga-endophytic fungus Talaromyces sp. cf-16 included two naturally occurring alkaloids, 2-[( S)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1a) and 2-[( R)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1b), that were identified for the first time. In addition, seven known compounds ( 2- 8) were obtained from the culture. Following chiral column chromatography, compounds 1a and 1b were identified as enantiomers by spectroscopic analyses and quantum chemical calculations. Bioassay results showed that 5 was more toxic to brine shrimp than the other compounds, and that 3- 6 could inhibit Staphylococcus aureus.

  3. Indolosesquiterpene alkaloids from the Cameroonian medicinal plant Polyalthia oliveri (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouam, Simeon Fogue; Ngouonpe, Alain Wembe; Lamshöft, Marc; Talontsi, Ferdinand Mouafo; Bauer, Jonathan O; Strohmann, Carsten; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu; Laatsch, Hartmut; Spiteller, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The stem bark of Polyalthia oliveri was screened for its chemical constituents using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry resulting in the isolation of three indolosesquiterpene alkaloids named 8α-polyveolinone (1), N-acetyl-8α-polyveolinone (2) and N-acetyl-polyveoline (3), together with three known compounds, dehydro-O-methylisopiline (4), N-methylurabaine (5) and polycarpol (6). The structures of the compounds were elucidated by means of high resolution mass spectrometry and different NMR techniques and chemical transformations. Their absolute configurations were assigned by ab-initio calculation of CD and ORD data (for 2 and 3) and X-ray diffraction analysis (for 2). Compounds 2 and 3 exhibited moderate antiplasmodial activity against erythrocytic stages of chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum NF54 strain and low cytotoxicity on rat skeletal myoblast (L6) cell line.

  4. Indole alkaloid and other constituents from Ocotea minarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcez, Walmir S.; Garcez, Fernanda R.; Silva, Lillian May G.E. da; Shimabukuro, Angela A. [Mato Grosso do Sul Univ., Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: wgarcez@nin.ufms.br

    2005-11-15

    From the fruits of Ocotea minarum a new ie alkaloid, tryptophol-5-O-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, was isolated in addition to the coumarin scopoletin and the flavonoids taxifolin, quercetin-7-O-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, eriodictyol-3'-O-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside and naringenin-7-O-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside. A new alkyl phenol, 3-(1,4-dihydroxypentyl)-5-methoxyphenol, was obtained from the heartwood in addition to 5-propylresorcinol, trans-asarone, lyonyresinol, 3-O-{beta}-D-glucopyranosyl stigmasterol and stigmasta-4,22-dien-3-one, whereas from the trunk bark the sesquiterpene lanceolic acid (as its methyl ester derivative after methylation procedures) and {beta}-sitosterol were isolated. 5-propylresorcinol and lanceolic acid are reported for the first time as natural products. (author)

  5. New vobasinyl-ibogan type bisindole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana corymbosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Guo, Lingli; Yang, Guangmei; Guo, Feng; Di, Yingtong; Li, Shunlin; Chen, Duozhi; Hao, Xiaojiang

    2015-01-01

    Ten vobasinyl-ibogan type bisindole alkaloids, including three new ones, tabercorines A-C (1-3), and a new natural product, 17-acetyl-tabernaecorymbosine A (4), were isolated from the twigs and leaves of Tabernaemontana corymbosa. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, and the NMR data of 17-acetyl-tabernaecorymbosine A (4) was assigned and reported for the first time. The absolute configurations of 1-4 were determined by CD exciton chirality method. All new compounds were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against various human cancer cell lines. Compounds 1 and 4 showed significant inhibitory effects with IC50 values comparable to those of cisplatin. PMID:25449423

  6. Cytochrome P450 as dimerization catalyst in diketopiperazine alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Takayoshi; Yagishita, Fumitoshi; Mino, Takashi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2014-03-21

    As dimeric natural products frequently exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding their mechanisms of dimerization is of great interest. One such compound is (−)-ditryptophenaline, isolated from Aspergillus flavus, which inhibits substance P receptor for potential analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. Through targeted gene knockout in A. flavus and heterologous yeast gene expression, we determined for the first time the gene cluster and pathway for the biosynthesis of a dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid. We also determined that a single cytochrome P450, DtpC, is responsible not only for pyrroloindole ring formation but also for concurrent dimerization of N-methylphenylalanyltryptophanyl diketopiperazine monomers into a homodimeric product. Furthermore, DtpC exhibits relaxed substrate specificity, allowing the formation of two new dimeric compounds from a non-native monomeric precursor, brevianamide F. A radical-mediated mechanism of dimerization is proposed.

  7. Synthesis of some /sup 11/C-labelled alkaloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laangstroem, B.; Antoni, G.; Halldin, H.; Svaerd, H.; Bergson, G. (Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden) Inst. of Chemistry)

    1982-01-01

    Using (/sup 11/C)-methyl iodide in N-alkylation reactions in dimethylformamide (DMF), the alkaloids N-(/sup 11/C-methyl)-morphine, N-(/sup 11/C-methyl)-codeine, 6-N(methyl)-9, 10-dihydroergotamine, 6-N-(/sup 11/C-methyl)-bromocriptine and N-(/sup 11/C-methyl)-nicotine have been synthesized in radiochemical yields of 50-95%, within 5-10 min of introducing (/sup 11/C)-methyl iodide into the reaction vial. (/sup 11/C)-Methyl iodide was obtained within 4-7 min from (/sup 11/C)-carbon dioxide prepared by the /sup 14/N(p,..cap alpha..)/sup 11/C reaction.

  8. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  9. CHINESE JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Chinese Journal of Chemistry is an international journal published in English by the Chinese Chemical Society with its editorial office hosted by Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Organic chemistry experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Seok Sik

    2005-02-15

    This book deals with organic chemistry experiments, it is divided five chapters, which have introduction, the way to write the experiment report and safety in the laboratory, basic experiment technic like recrystallization and extraction, a lot of organic chemistry experiments such as fischer esterification, ester hydrolysis, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldol reaction, benzoin condensation, wittig reaction grignard reaction, epoxidation reaction and selective reduction. The last chapter introduces chemistry site on the internet and way to find out reference on chemistry.

  11. Frontiers in Gold Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Basic chemistry of gold tells us that it can bond to sulfur, phosphorous, nitrogen, and oxygen donor ligands. The Frontiers in Gold Chemistry Special Issue covers gold complexes bonded to the different donors and their fascinating applications. This issue covers both basic chemistry studies of gold complexes and their contemporary applications in medicine, materials chemistry, and optical sensors. There is a strong belief that aurophilicity plays a major role in the unending applications of g...

  12. The Artemisia L. Genus: A Review of Bioactive Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Bermejo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous members of the Anthemideae tribe are important as cut flowers and ornamental crops, as well as being medicinal and aromatic plants, many of which produce essential oils used in folk and modern medicine and in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry. Essential oils generally have a broad spectrum of bioactivity, owing to the presence of several active ingredients that work through various modes of action. Due to their mode of extraction, mostly by distillation from aromatic plants, they contain a variety of volatile molecules such as terpenes, phenol-derived aromatic and aliphatic components. The large genus Artemisia L., from the tribe Anthemideae, comprises important medicinal plants which are currently the subject of phytochemical attention due to their biological and chemical diversity. Artemisia species, widespread throughout the world, are one of the most popular plants in Chinese traditional preparations and are frequently used for the treatment of diseases such as malaria, hepatitis, cancer, inflammation and infections by fungi, bacteria and viruses. Extensive studies of the chemical components of Artemisia have led to the identification of many compounds as well as essentials oils. This review summarizes some of the main reports on the chemistry and anti-infective activities of Artemisia. Li. essential oils from the data in the recent literature (2000–2011.

  13. Hyaluronic Acid Bioconjugates for the Delivery of Bioactive Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA has currently several therapeutic applications: in ophthalmology, osteoarthritis, wound healing, tissue regeneration, postoperative anti-adhesion and anesthetic medicine. In the last ten years, it has also been successfully investigated in the field of drug delivery, in the form of conjugates or hydrogel depot systems. HAylation, the covalent conjugation of HA to bioactive molecules, allows the overcoming of disadvantages associated with some pharmaceuticals, such as insolubility, instability and fast kidney clearance. These issues can be addressed also by covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEGylation, but HA has the relevant advantages of biodegradability, high loading and specific targeting. In this review, the novel HA derivatives and the latest advances in HA-based drug delivery with a particular focus on the chemistry of conjugation will be discussed. Although, so far, there are no HA-drug conjugates on the market, several derivatives are presently under clinical investigation, and the promising results encourage further investigations and the exploitation of this versatile polysaccharide.

  14. Green Chemistry and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  15. Independent recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for safe accumulation of sequestered pyrrolizidine alkaloids in grasshoppers and moths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linzhu Wang

    Full Text Available Several insect lineages have developed diverse strategies to sequester toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from food-plants for their own defense. Here, we show that in two highly divergent insect taxa, the hemimetabolous grasshoppers and the holometabolous butterflies, an almost identical strategy evolved independently for safe accumulation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This strategy involves a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase that transfers the pyrrolizidine alkaloids to their respective N-oxide, enabling the insects to avoid high concentrations of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the hemolymph. We have identified a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase, which is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase, of the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus. After heterologous expression in E. coli, this enzyme shows high specificity for pyrrolizidine alkaloids of various structural types and for the tropane alkaloid atropine as substrates, a property that has been described previously for a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Grammia geneura. Phylogenetic analyses of insect flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences suggest that independent gene duplication events preceded the establishment of this specific enzyme in the lineages of the grasshoppers and of arctiid moths. Two further flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences have been identified from Z. variegatus sharing amino acid identities of approximately 78% to the pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase. After heterologous expression, both enzymes are also able to catalyze the N-oxygenation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, albeit with a 400-fold lower specific activity. With respect to the high sequence identity between the three Z. variegatus sequences this ability to N-oxygenize pyrrolizidine alkaloids is interpreted as a relict of a former bifunctional ancestor gene of which one of the gene copies optimized this activity for the specific adaptation to pyrrolizidine alkaloid containing food plants.

  16. Studies of Genetic Variation of Essential Oil and Alkaloid Content in Boldo (Peumus boldus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H; Razmilic, I; Muñoz, M; Doll, U; Martin, J S

    1999-02-01

    Boldo is a tree or shrub with medicinal properties native to Chile. The leaves contain alkaloids and essential oils. Variation of total alkaloid concentration, of the alkaloid boldine, and essential oil components were studied in different populations from northern, central, and southern parts of its geographic range and in their progenies (half-sib families). Total alkaloid concentration showed genetic variation between progenies of the central population but not between populations. Boldine content found in concentrations of 0.007 to 0.009% did not differ significantly between populations. Principal components of the essential oil were determined genetically, with highest values for ascaridole in the population of the north and for P-cymene in the south. Between half-sib families genetic variation was found in the central and northern populations for these components. The high heritability coefficients found indicate considerable potential for successful selection of individuals for these characters. PMID:17260243

  17. Safety concerns of herbal products and traditional Chinese herbal medicines: Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and aristolochic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many countries, including the United States, herbal supplements, tisanes and vegetable products, including traditional Chinese medicines, are largely unregulated and their content is not registered, monitored or verified. Consequently, potent plant toxins including dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids ...

  18. Studies on the Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloid: Preparation of the Key Allylic Silyl Ether Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Lei SONG; Yong Qiang TU; Shuan Hu GAO; Yi Jun JIANG; Shu Yu ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A convergent strategy to the key allylic silyl ether precursor 4 in our synthetic efforts toward morphinan alkaloid is presented. The vital step is the selective 1,2-addition of the organocerium agent of 6 to ketene 5.

  19. Survey of Iranian Plants For Saponins Alkaloids Flavonoids And Tannins. IV

    OpenAIRE

    M.H. Salehi Surmaghi; Y. Aynehchi GH. Amin; Z. Mahmoodi

    1992-01-01

    A total of 149 plant extracts representing 49 different families has been screened for saponins, flavonoids, tannins and alkalodids. positive tests obtained were 145 (97) for saponins 74 (50%) for alkaloids 16 (51%) for fiavonoisds and 60 (40%) for tannins.

  20. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine, benzophenanthridine and aristolochia alkaloids to various RNA structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinatha Suresh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an area of remarkable current interest. For this purpose, a basic understanding of the molecular aspects of the interaction of small molecules with various RNA structures is essential. Alkaloids are a group of natural products with potential therapeutic utility, and very recently, their interaction with many RNA structures have been reported. Especially noteworthy are the protoberberines and aristolochia alkaloids distributed widely in many botanical families. Many of the alkaloids of these group exhibit excellent binding affinity to many RNA structures that may be exploited to develop RNA targeted therapeutics. This review attempts to present the current status on the understanding of the interaction of these alkaloids with various RNA structures, mainly highlighting the biophysical aspects.

  1. Apparent effects of glyphosate on alkaloid production in coca plants grown in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, John; Lydon, John

    2007-05-01

    During the routine analysis of coca leaf material from South America, alkaloids in Erythroxylum coca var. ipadu (ECVI) leaf samples from fields suspected of being treated with glyphosate were compared with those from non-treated E. coca var. ipadu and Erythroxylum novogranatense var. novogranatense (ENVN) plants. Cocaine levels in leaf tissue from non-treated ECVI and ENVN were 0.53+/-0.08% and 0.64+/-0.08% (w/w), respectively, whereas leaves from treated plants were nearly devoid of cocaine. Further analysis demonstrated the presence of several previously undescribed N-nortropane alkaloids, several of which were tentatively identified. The results suggest that applications of glyphosate to coca plants can have dramatic effects on the quantity and quality of alkaloids produced by surviving or subsequent leaves. The analytical data presented will be of value to forensic chemists who encounter illicit cocaine preparations containing alkaloids produced from coca plants treated with glyphosate.

  2. New records of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-feeding insects. Hemiptera and Coleoptera on Senecio brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke; Trigo

    2000-04-01

    New records are reported for a Hemipteran (Largus rufipennis) and a Coleopteran (Chauliognathus fallax) feeding on Senecio brasiliensis (Asteraceae) and sequestering pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). Both insects are warningly colored and rejected by predators. PMID:10725590

  3. Induction of micronuclei by alkaloids extracted from Senecio brasiliensis and stored for 23 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Mello, R; Deimlimg, L I; Lauer Júnior, C M; Almeida, A

    2002-04-26

    In the present study, we report the results of an investigation on pyrrolizidine alkaloids extracted from Senecio brasiliensis (Sprengel) Less., which were stored for more than 23 years under variable conditions of temperature and humidity and exposed to light. Both the crude alkaloid (integerrimine+retrorsine+impurities) and pure integerrimine conserved the ability to induce acute toxicity in mice, leading to the death of the animals in less than 24h. The alkaloids also conserved the potential to induce significant increases in micronucleus frequencies in polychromatic erythrocytes of mouse bone marrow compared to the negative control. The administration of alkaloids to lymphocyte cultures blocked with cytochalasin-B showed no significant increase in micronucleus frequency in binucleated cells, probably due to the lack of a metabolic activation mechanism. However, an antimitotic effect was observed. PMID:11943607

  4. Effect of purine alkaloids on the proliferation of lettuce cells derived from protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Hamako; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the ecological role of caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and paraxanthine, which are released from purine alkaloid forming plants, the effects of these purine alkaloids on the division and colony formation of lettuce cells were assessed at concentrations up to 1 mM. Five days after treatment with 500 μM caffeine, theophylline and paraxanthine, division of isolated protoplasts was significantly inhibited. Thirteen days treatment with > 250 μM caffeine had a marked inhibitory effect on the colony formation of cells derived from the protoplasts. Other purine alkaloids also acted as inhibitors. The order of the inhibition was caffeine > theophylline > paraxanthine > theobromine. These observations suggest that a relatively low concentration of caffeine is toxic for proliferation of plant cells. In contrast, theobromine is a weak inhibitor of proliferation. Possible allelopathic roles of purine alkaloids in natural ecosystems are discussed.

  5. Thesinine-4'-O-beta-D-glucoside the first glycosylated plant pyrrolizidine alkaloid from Borago officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Martina; Joppe, Holger; Schmaus, Gerhard

    2002-06-01

    The glycosylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid, thesinine-4'-O-beta-D-glucoside, has been isolated from the aqueous methanol extract of dried, defatted seeds of Borago officinalis (Boraginaceae). The structure was established by means of spectroscopic and chemical analysis. PMID:12031432

  6. A Journey Under the Sea: The Quest for Marine Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Darwiche

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The alarming increase in the global cancer death toll has fueled the quest for new effective anti-tumor drugs thorough biological screening of both terrestrial and marine organisms. Several plant-derived alkaloids are leading drugs in the treatment of different types of cancer and many are now being tested in various phases of clinical trials. Recently, marine-derived alkaloids, isolated from aquatic fungi, cyanobacteria, sponges, algae, and tunicates, have been found to also exhibit various anti-cancer activities including anti-angiogenic, anti-proliferative, inhibition of topoisomerase activities and tubulin polymerization, and induction of apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Two tunicate-derived alkaloids, aplidin and trabectedin, offer promising drug profiles, and are currently in phase II clinical trials against several solid and hematologic tumors. This review sheds light on the rich array of anti-cancer alkaloids in the marine ecosystem and introduces the most investigated compounds and their mechanisms of action.

  7. A journey under the sea: the quest for marine anti-cancer alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Rita; Darwiche, Nadine; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala

    2011-01-01

    The alarming increase in the global cancer death toll has fueled the quest for new effective anti-tumor drugs thorough biological screening of both terrestrial and marine organisms. Several plant-derived alkaloids are leading drugs in the treatment of different types of cancer and many are now being tested in various phases of clinical trials. Recently, marine-derived alkaloids, isolated from aquatic fungi, cyanobacteria, sponges, algae, and tunicates, have been found to also exhibit various anti-cancer activities including anti-angiogenic, anti-proliferative, inhibition of topoisomerase activities and tubulin polymerization, and induction of apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Two tunicate-derived alkaloids, aplidin and trabectedin, offer promising drug profiles, and are currently in phase II clinical trials against several solid and hematologic tumors. This review sheds light on the rich array of anti-cancer alkaloids in the marine ecosystem and introduces the most investigated compounds and their mechanisms of action. PMID:22113577

  8. Significant differences in alkaloid content of Coptis chinensis (Huanglian, from its related American species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skeels Matthew

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing popularity of Chinese herbal medicine in the United States has prompted large-scale import of raw herbs from Asia. Many of the Asian herbs have phylogenetically related North American species. We compared three phylogenetically related species, namely Coptis chinensis (Huanglian, Hydrastis canadensis and Coptis trifolia to show whether they can be substituted by one another in terms of alkaloid content. Methods We used microwave assisted extraction to obtain alkaloids berberine, coptisine, palmatine and hydrastine. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to quantify each alkaloid. Results Hydrastis canadensis has the most berberine, whereas Coptis trifolia has the most coptisine. Hydrastine and palmatine were unique to Hydrastis canadensis and Coptis chinensis respectively. Conclusion Neither Hydrastis canadensis nor Coptis trifolia contains all the alkaloids found in Coptis chinensis used in Chinese medicine. Substitutes of this Chinese species by its American relatives are not recommended.

  9. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of lycopodane-type alkaloids from the Icelandic Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldórsdóttir, Elsa Steinunn; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate structures and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of lycopodane-type alkaloids isolated from an Icelandic collection of Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre. Ten alkaloids were isolated, including annotinine, annotine, lycodoline, lycoposerramine M......, anhydrolycodoline, gnidioidine, lycofoline, lannotinidine D, and acrifoline, as well as a previously unknown N-oxide of annotine. (1)H and (13)C NMR data of several of the alkaloids were provided for the first time. Solvent-dependent equilibrium constants between ketone and hemiketal form of acrifoline were...... determined. Conformation of acrifoline was characterized using NOESY spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The isolated alkaloids were evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Ligand docking studies based on mutated 3D structure of Torpedo...

  10. Using Natural Cinchona Alkaloids to Promote the Enantioselective Addition of Dialkylzinc to N-Diphenylphosphinylimines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海乐; 方春梅; 李昕; 龚流柱; 宓爱巧; 崔欣; 蒋耀忠

    2003-01-01

    Cinchona alkaloids are utilized as chiral ligands to promote the enantioselective addition of dialkylzinc to N-diphenyiphosphinylirnlnes affording enantiomerically enriched N-diphenyiphosphinylamines in up to 91% ee.

  11. Alternative extraction of alkaloid anticarcinogens from Brazilian "vinca rosea" using Ion exchange chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Freire de Carvalhaes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts in ethanol and ethanol-ammonia of dried leaves from Catharanthus roseus, gathered at Rio de Janeiro state, were adsorbed in a strongly acidic cation exchange resin with sulfonic acid group, using the finite bath method, resulting in an alkaloid retained fraction and an acidic and neutral unretained fraction. High Performance Liquid Chromatography showed the isolation of the alkaloid fraction to be highly selective and with good performance, with an absence of alkaloids in the unretained fraction, while the retained fraction presented 1,54-6,35 mg/g of vindoline and 0,12-0,91 mg/g of vinblastine, common for an alkaloid-rich concentrate, usually obtained by classic extraction with several steps using solvents.

  12. Poor alkaloid sequestration by arrow poison frogs of the genus Phyllobates from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebs, Dietrich; Alvarez, Joseph Vargas; Pogoda, Werner; Toennes, Stefan W; Köhler, Gunther

    2014-03-01

    Frogs of the genus Phyllobates from Colombia are known to contain the highly toxic alkaloid batrachotoxin, but species from Central America exhibit only very low levels or are entirely free of this toxin. In the present study alcohol extracts from 101 specimens of Phyllobates lugubris and Phyllobates vittatus and 21 of three sympatric species (Dendrobates pumilio, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates granuliferus) from Costa Rica were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Whereas the extracts of the Dendrobates species exhibited typical profiles of toxic alkaloids, those of the two Phyllobates species contained low levels of few alkaloids only, batrachotoxin was not detected. Although the feeding pattern of the Dendrobates and Phyllobates species are similar as revealed by examination of their stomach content (mainly ants and mites), the Phyllobates species are poorly sequestering alkaloids from their food source in contrast to the Dendrobates frogs. PMID:24467995

  13. ISOLATION AND PURIFICATION OF ALKALOIDS FROM PLUMULA NELUMBINIS BY DOUBLE-COLUMN ADSORPTION CHROMOTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jixiang; GUO Jinsheng; OU Lailiang

    2007-01-01

    The performance of adsorption and separation for liensinine, isoliensinine and neferine was studied by double-column adsorption chromatography using macroporous adsorption and cation exchange resins. The alkaloid extract with 49.2% total contents by mass representing 10.6% liensinine, 10.6% isoliensinine and 28.0% neferine respectively was prepared by D72 cation exchange resins, in which most of the impurities were water-soluble alkaloids. Furthermore, the alkaloid extract with 82.6% total contents by mass containing 33.1%, 15.0% and 34.5% of the three adsorbates respectively was prepared by double-column adsorption chromatography using AKS-W macroporous adsorption and D72 cation exchange resins. As a result, the content of single and total alkaloids has been greatly increased by the double-column adsorption chromatography.

  14. ISOLATION AND PURIFICATION OF ALKALOIDS FROM PLUMULA NELUMBINIS BY DOUBLE-COLUMN ADSORPTION CHROMOTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The performance of adsorption and separation for liensinine, isoliensinine and neferine was studied by double-column adsorption chromatography using macroporous adsorption and cation exchange resins. The alkaloid extract with 49.2% total contents by mass representing 10.6% liensinine, 10.6% isoliensinine and 28.0% neferine respectively was prepared by D72 cation exchange resins, in which most of the impurities were water-soluble alkaloids. Furthermore,the alkaloid extract with 82.6% total contents by mass containing 33.1%, 15.0% and 34.5% of the three adsorbates respectively was prepared by double-column adsorption chromatography using AKS-W macroporous adsorption and D72 cation exchange resins. As a result, the content of single and total alkaloids has been greatly increased by the double-column adsorption chromatography.

  15. Analysis of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids from Zephyranthes grandiflora by GC/MS and their cholinesterase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Cahlíková

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Amaryllidaceae are known as ornamental plants, furthermore some species of this family contain galanthamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and other alkaloids with interesting pharmacological activity. The chemical composition of alkaloids from Zephyranthes grandiflora Lindl. was analyzed by GC/MS. Seven known compounds, belonging to five structural types of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids, were identified. The alkaloid extract from the bulbs showed promising cholinesterase inhibitory activities against human blood acetylcholinesterase (HuAChE; IC50 39.2±3.0 µg/mL and human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (HuBuChE; IC50 356±9.3 µg/mL.

  16. Lucidimine A-D, four new alkaloids from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen-Zhu; Chen, He-Ping; Feng, Tao; Li, Zheng-Hui; Dong, Ze-Jun; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Four new polycylic alkaloids, lucidimine A-D, were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum. Their chemical structures were established based on 1D and 2D NMR data as well as HREIMS/HRESIMS analyses. PMID:26666338

  17. Three new C19-diterpenoid alkaloids from Delphinium laxicymosum var. Pilostachyum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Tang; Dong Lin Chen; Qiao Hong Chen; Xi Xian Jian; Feng Peng Wang

    2007-01-01

    Three new lycoctonine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, laxicymine 1, laxicymisine 2, and laxicyminine 3 have been isolated from the whole herb of Delphinium laxicymosum var.pilostachyum W.T.Wang.Their structures were established by spectra data.

  18. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Bioactive Thiazinoquinone Marine Natural Products Thiaplidiaquinones A and B

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    Jacquie L. Harper

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to more accurately define the mechanism of cell death and to establish structure-activity relationship requirements for the marine meroterpenoid alkaloids thiaplidiaquinones A and B, we have evaluated not only the natural products but also dioxothiazine regioisomers and two precursor quinones in a range of bioassays. While the natural products were found to be weak inducers of ROS in Jurkat cells, the dioxothiazine regioisomer of thiaplidiaquinone A and a synthetic precursor to thiaplidiaquinone B were found to be moderately potent inducers. Intriguingly, and in contrast to previous reports, the mechanism of Jurkat cell death (necrosis vs. apoptosis was found to be dependent upon the positioning of one of the geranyl sidechains in the compounds with thiaplidiaquinone A and its dioxothiazine regioisomer causing death dominantly by necrosis, while thiaplidiaquinone B and its dioxothiazine isomer caused cell death via apoptosis. The dioxothiazine regioisomer of thiaplidiaquinone A exhibited more potent in vitro antiproliferative activity against human tumor cells, with NCI sub-panel selectivity towards melanoma cell lines. The non-natural dioxothiazine regioisomers were also more active in antiplasmodial and anti-farnesyltransferase assays than their natural product counterparts. The results highlight the important role that natural product total synthesis can play in not only helping understand the structural basis of biological activity of natural products, but also the discovery of new bioactive scaffolds.

  19. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from the Red Sea Marine Verongid Sponge Suberea Species

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    Lamiaa A. Shaala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In a continuation of our efforts to identify bioactive compounds from Red Sea Verongid sponges, the organic extract of the sponge Suberea species afforded seven compounds including two new dibrominated alkaloids, subereamollines C and D (1 and 2, together with the known compounds aerothionin (3, homoaerothionin (4, aeroplysinin-1 (5, aeroplysinin-2 (6 and a revised subereaphenol C (7 as ethyl 2-(2,4-dibromo-3,6-dihydroxyphenylacetate. The structures of the isolated compounds were assigned by different spectral data including optical rotations, 1D (1H and 13C and 2D (COSY, multiplicity-edited HSQC, and HMBC NMR and high-resolution mass spectroscopy. Aerothionin (3 and subereaphenol C (7 displayed potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa cell line with IC50 values of 29 and 13.3 µM, respectively. In addition, aeroplysinin-2 (6 showed potent antimigratory activity against the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with IC50 of 18 µM. Subereamollines C and D are new congeners of the previously reported compounds subereamollines A and B with methyl ester functionalities on the side chain. These findings provide further insight into the biosynthetic capabilities of members of the genus Suberea and the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of these compounds.

  20. Bioactivity guided isolation of the antifungal components in sawdust extracts of Piptadeniatrum africanum, and Terminalia ivorensis

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    Olajuyigbe A.O

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The antifungal activities of extracts from fresh sawdust of Piptadeniatrum africanum,and Terminalia ivorensis was determined using the agar well diffusion method. Aqueous, methanol, chloroform,and n-hexane extracts obtained from the sawdust samples were tested against fungi isolated from some decayed wood samples.Methodology and Results: Fungal isolates included: Aspergillus. niger, Aspergillus. flavus, Aspergillus. fumigates, Aspergillus. wentii, Aspergillus. tamari, and Penicillium. chrysogenum (please write the microorganisms’ name in full when first time introducing them. Results of inhibitory activities showed that the chloroform extracts showed the highest inhibitory abilities with zones of inhibition ranging from 14 mm-24 mm for P. africanum, and 11 mm-15 mm for T. ivorensis. However, the aqueous extracts exhibited the least antifungal activity with zones of inhibition ranging between 10 mm-13 mm and 8 mm-11 mm respectively.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The major secondary plant metabolites identified are alkaloids, anthraquinones, anthraglycosides, arbutin, glycosides, flavonoids, phenolics, saponins, coumarins and valepotriates. The antifungal components in P. africanum were identified to be 3, 7, 8, 3'–Tetramethoxy-6–C-methyl-5, 4'–dihydroxyflavone and 3–methoxy–6–C–methyl–3',4',5,7,8–pentahydroxyflavone while Terminalia ivorensis contained 5,7,8-Trihydroxy-2′5′-methoxy-3′,4′-methylenedioxyisoflavanone as the bioactive component.