WorldWideScience

Sample records for alkaline wet oxidation

  1. Combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis of polyvinylchloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the widespread aversion to burning polyvinylchloride (PVC) together with municipal waste, we have attempted an alternative approach to its decomposition. This paper describes a combined wet oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis yielding water soluble, biodegradable products. Experiments were...... carried out at temperatures from 180-260 degree C and reaction times of 8-24 min. The chloride liberated provides information on the rate constants. Considering the measured Cl- and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) values, we find hydrolysis and oxidation processes to be interdependent. The main products...

  2. Comparison of the chemical properties of wheat straw and beech fibers following alkaline wet oxidation and laccase treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A. S.; Mallon, S.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2002-01-01

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum) and beech (Fagus sylvatica), were used to evaluate the effects of two pre-treatment processes (alkaline wet oxidation and enzyme treatment with laccase) on lignocellulosic materials for applications in particleboards and fiberboards. Wheat straw and beech fibers...... treatment gave a more reactive surface than alkaline wet oxidation for wheat straw, whereas the opposite was observed for beech. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy showed an almost complete loss of the ester carbonyl stretching signal and the corresponding C-C-O stretching in wet...

  3. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reactio...

  4. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  5. catalysed oxidation of atenolol by alkaline permanganate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Kinetics of ruthenium (III) catalyzed oxidation of atenolol by permanganate in alkaline medium at constant ionic strength of 0⋅30 mol dm3 has been studied spectrophotometrically using a rapid kinetic accessory. Reaction between permanganate and atenolol in alkaline medium exhibits 1 : 8 stoichiometry.

  6. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1994-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  9. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of soot over alkaline niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchi, G.; Cabrera, B.; Buljan, A.; Delgado, E.J.; Gordon, A.L.; Jimenez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► No previous reported studies about alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation. ► NaNbO 3 and KNbO 3 perovskite-type oxides show lower activation energy than other lanthanoid perovskite-type oxides. ► The alkaline niobate does not show deactivation by metal loss. - Abstract: The lack of studies in the current literature about the assessment of alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation has motivated this research. In this study, the synthesis, characterization and assessment of alkaline metal niobates as catalysts for soot combustion are reported. The solids MNbO 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb) are synthesized by a citrate method, calcined at 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, 750 °C, and characterized by AAS, N 2 adsorption, XRD, O 2 -TPD, FTIR and SEM. All the alkaline niobates show catalytic activity for soot combustion, and the activity depends basically on the nature of the alkaline metal and the calcination temperature. The highest catalytic activity, expressed as the temperature at which combustion of carbon black occurs at the maximum rate, is shown by KNbO 3 calcined at 650 °C. At this calcination temperature, the catalytic activity follows an order dependent on the atomic number, namely: KNbO 3 > NaNbO 3 > LiNbO 3 . The RbNbO 3 solid do not follow this trend presumably due to the perovskite structure was not reached. The highest catalytic activity shown by of KNbO 3 , despite the lower apparent activation energy of NaNbO 3 , stress the importance of the metal nature and suggests the hypothesis that K + ions are the active sites for soot combustion. It must be pointed out that alkaline niobate subjected to consecutive soot combustion cycles does not show deactivation by metal loss, due to the stabilization of the alkaline metal inside the perovskite structure.

  11. Monitoring of corrosion rates of Fe-Cu alloys under wet/dry condition in weakly alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Je Kyoung; Nishikata, Atsushi; Tsuru, Tooru

    2002-01-01

    When the steel, containing scrap elements like copper, is used as reinforcing steel bars for concrete, the steel is exposed to alkaline environments. in this study, AC impedance technique has been applied to the monitoring of corrosion rates of iron and several Fe-Cu (0.4, 10wt%) alloys in a wet-dry cycle condition. The wet-dry cycle was conducted by exposure to alternate conditions of 1 hour-immersion in a simulated pH10 concrete solution (Ca(OH) 2 ) containing 0.01M NaCl and 3 hour-drying at 298K and 50%RH. The corrosion rate of the iron is greatly accelerated by the wet-dry cycles. Because the active FeOOH species, which are produced by the oxidation of Fe(II, III)oxide in air during drying, act as very strong oxidants to the corrosion in the wet condition. As the drying progresses, iron shows a large increase in the corrosion rate and a small shift of the corrosion potential to the positive values. This can be explained by acceleration of oxygen transport through the thin electrolyte layer In contrast to iron, the Fe-Cu alloys show low corrosion rates and the high corrosion potentials in whole cycles

  12. Degradation of quinoline by wet oxidation - kinetic aspects and reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The high temperature, high pressure wet oxidation reaction of quinoline has been studied as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature. At neutral to acidic pH, it is effective in the oxidation of quinoline at 240 degrees C and above, whereas under alkaline conditions the reaction...... is markedly slowed down. The results indicate that the reaction is an auto-catalysed, free radical chain reaction transforming 99% of quinoline to other substances. Of the quinoline. 30-50% was oxidised to CO2 and H2O depending on the initial concentration. Wet oxidation of deuterium-labelled quinoline...

  13. Comparison between wet oxidation and steam explosion as pretreatment methods for enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, Carlos Martín; Marcet, M.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2008-01-01

    , and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one third. Wet oxidation formed more aliphatic acids and phenolics, and less furan aldehydes in the liquid......Alkaline wet oxidation and steam explosion pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse were compared with regard to biomass fractionation, formation of by-products, and enzymatic convertibility of the pretreated material. Wet oxidation led to the solubilisation of 82% of xylan and 50% of lignin...... fraction than steam explosion did. A better enzymatic convertibility of cellulose was achieved for the wet-oxidised material (57.4 %) than for the steam-exploded material (48.9 %). Cellulose convertibility was lower for the whole slurry than for the washed solids in both pretreatments, but more...

  14. Electrochemical oxidation and detection of sodium urate in alkaline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrochemical behaviour of copper oxides electrode in the presence of sodium urate was investigated. The correlation between the anodic oxidation and the amperometric detection of sodium urate in the alkaline medium on copper oxides electrode was analysed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical ...

  15. Enhanced wet air oxidation : synergistic rate acceleration upon effluent recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Birchmeier; Charles G. Hill; Carl J. Houtman; Rajai H. Atalla; Ira A. Weinstock

    2000-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) reactions of cellobiose, phenol, and syringic acid were carried out under mild conditions (155°C; 0.93MPa 02; soluble catalyst, Na5[PV2Mo10O40]). Initial oxidation rates were rapid but decreased to small values as less reactive oxidation products accumulated. Recalcitrant oxidation products were consumed more rapidly, however, if additional...

  16. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  17. Comparison of oxidants in alkaline leaching of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivas, T.; Rajan, K.C.; Srinivas, K.; Anand Rao, K.; Manmadha Rao, M.; Venkatakrishnan, R.R.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    The uranium minerals occurring in various ore deposits consists of predominantly uranous ion (U +4 ), necessitating use of an oxidant and other lixiviants for efficient dissolution during leaching. Unlike acid leaching route, where uranium minerals dissolution could be achieved efficiently with cheaper lixiviants, processing of ores by alkaline leaching route involve expensive lixiviants and drastic leaching conditions. Alkaline leaching of uranium ores becomes economical only upon using cheaper and efficient oxidants and conservation of other reagents by their recycle. The present paper gives efficacy of various oxidants - KMnO 4 , NaOCl, Cu - NH 3 , air and oxygen, in the leaching of uranium from a low-grade dolostone hosted uranium ore of India. A comparison based on technical merits and cost of the oxidant chemicals is discussed. (author)

  18. Effects of Mixed Alkaline Earth Oxides in Potash Silicate Glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of mixed alkaline earth oxide in potash silicate glasses with regards to their physical properties. More recently; there has been an increase in the demand for light weight glasses which retains their physical and chemical properties for both domestic and industrial applications.

  19. High solid simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of wet oxidized corn stover to ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, E.; Klinke, H.B.; Reczey, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this study ethanol was produced from corn stover pretreated by alkaline and acidic wet oxidation (WO) (195 degreesC, 15 min, 12 bar oxygen) followed by nonisothermal simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). In the first step of the SSF, small amounts of cellulases were added at 50...... increase of substrate concentration reduced the ethanol yield significant as a result of insufficient mass transfer. It was also shown that the fermentation could be followed with an easy monitoring system based on the weight loss of the produced CO2. (C) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  20. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  1. Evaluation of wet oxidation pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of softwood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palonen, H.; Thomsen, A.B.; Tenkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    The wet oxidation pretreatment (water, oxygen, elevated temperature, and pressure) of softwood (Picea abies) was investigated for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment was preliminarily optimized. Six different combinations of reaction time, temperature, and pH were applied......, and the compositions of solid and liquid fractions were analyzed. The solid fraction after wet oxidation contained 58-64% cellulose, 2-16% hemicellulose, and 24-30% lignin. The pretreatment series gave information about the roles of lignin and hemicellulose in the enzymatic hydrolysis. The temperature...

  2. Oxidative degradation of Boltysh shale by alkaline potassium permanganate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobul, I Ya; Fomina, A S

    1974-01-01

    This reaction proceeded in stages at 47 to 48/sup 0/C with a 3 percent solution of potassium permanganate in a 1 percent alkaline solution. The products were separated into groups and identified by gas-liquid chromatography. Small amounts of monocarboxylic acids were identified, with normal and branched chains, from acetic to lauric acid. Dicarboxylic acids were mainly of normal structure, or methyl substituted, from succinic to hexadecanedicarboxylic acid. No tricarboxylic acids were detected. For products of primary oxidation insoluble in acid media, a high content of C/sub 10/-C/sub 16/ acids was characteristic, and for the final degree of oxidation C/sub 11/-C/sub 18/ acids. The organic portion of shale consists of structural units, differing in mass and in stability to alkaline permanganate.

  3. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerre, A B; Skammelsen Schmidt, A

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates `losses` of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation.

  4. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Skammelsen Schmidt, A.

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates 'losses' of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation

  5. Electro-oxidation of methanol on copper in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heli, H.; Jafarian, M.; Mahjani, M.G.; Gobal, F.

    2004-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol on copper in alkaline solutions has been studied by the methods of cyclic voltammetry, quasi-steady state polarization and chronoamperometry. It has been found that in the course of an anodic potential sweep the electro-oxidation of methanol follows the formation of Cu III and is catalysed by this species through a mediated electron transfer mechanism. The reaction also continues in the early stages of the reversed cycle until it is stopped by the prohibitively negative potentials. The process is diffusion controlled and the current-time responses follow Cottrellian behavior. The rate constants, turnover frequency, anodic transfer coefficient and the apparent activation energy of the electro-oxidation reaction are reported

  6. Kinetics studies of oxidation of niacinamide by alkaline potassium permanganate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipsingh Gour

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of niacinamide in alkaline media is carried out using potassium permanganate as a oxiding agent. The reaction was monitored using UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 525 nm. It was found to be zero order with respect to oxidant,, fractional order with respect to hydrogen ion concentration and first order with respect to substrate. The thermodynamic parameters(were determinied . The average (?G# was found to be 87.60 KJ/mol. The values ?S# was found to be -0.2132 KJ/mole and energy of activation was found to be 23.95 KJ/mole. A suitable mechanism is proposed based on the experimental conditions.

  7. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials

  8. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M. [Delphi Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  9. Metal Oxide Decomposition In Hydrothermal Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.E. Ziemniak

    2003-09-24

    Alkaline hydrothermal solutions of sodium orthophosphate (2.15 < Na/P < 2.75) are shown to decompose transition metal oxides into two families of sodium-metal ion-(hydroxy)phosphate compounds. Equilibria for these reactions are quantified by determining phosphate concentration-temperature thresholds for decomposition of five oxides in the series: Ti(IV), Cr(III), Fe(III, II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). By application of a computational chemistry method General Utility Lattice Program (GULP), it is demonstrated that the unique non-whole-number Na/P molar ratio of sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate is a consequence of its open-cage structure in which the H{sup +} and excess Na{sup +} ions are located.

  10. Wet oxidation pretreatment of rape straw for ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvaniti, Efthalia; Bjerre, Anne Belinda; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Rape straw can be used for production of second generation bioethanol. In this paper we optimized the pretreatment of rape straw for this purpose using Wet oxidation (WO). The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, and oxygen gas pressure was investigated for maximum ethanol yield via Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). To reduce the water use and increase the energy efficiency in WO pretreatment features like recycling liquid (filtrate), presoaking of rape straw in water or recycled filtrate before WO, skip washing pretreated solids (filter cake) after WO, or use of whole slurry (Filter cake + filtrate) in SSF were also tested. Except ethanol yields, pretreatment methods were evaluated based on achieved glucose yields, amount of water used, recovery of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The highest ethanol yield obtained was 67% after fermenting the whole slurry produced by WO at 205 °C for 3 min with 12 bar of oxygen gas pressure and featured with presoaking in water. At these conditions after pre-treatment, cellulose and hemicellulose was recovered quantitatively (100%) together with 86% of the lignin. WO treatments of 2–3 min at 205–210 °C with 12 bar of oxygen gas produced higher ethanol yields and cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin recoveries, than 15 min WO treatment at 195 °C. Also, recycling filtrate and use of higher oxygen gas pressure reduced recovery of materials. The use of filtrate could be inhibitory for the yeast, but also reduced lactic acid formation in SSF. -- Highlights: ► Wet Oxidation pretreatment on rape straw for sugar and ethanol production. ► Variables were reaction time, temperature, and oxygen gas pressure. ► Also, other configurations for increase of water and energy efficiency. ► Short Wet oxidation pretreatment (2–3 min) produced highest ethanol yield. ► After these pretreatment conditions recovery of lignin in solids was 86%.

  11. Bimetallic catalysts for continuous catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, A; Bengoa, C; Font, J; Fabregat, A

    1999-01-29

    Catalytic wet oxidation has proved to be effective at eliminating hazardous organic compounds, such as phenol, from waste waters. However, the lack of active long-life oxidation catalysts which can perform in aqueous phase is its main drawback. This study explores the ability of bimetallic supported catalysts to oxidize aqueous phenol solutions using air as oxidant. Combinations of 2% of CoO, Fe2O3, MnO or ZnO with 10% CuO were supported on gamma-alumina by pore filling, calcined and later tested. The oxidation was carried out in a packed bed reactor operating in trickle flow regime at 140 degrees C and 900 kPa of oxygen partial pressure. Lifetime tests were conducted for 8 days. The pH of the feed solution was also varied. The results show that all the catalysts tested undergo severe deactivation during the first 2 days of operation. Later, the catalysts present steady activity until the end of the test. The highest residual phenol conversion was obtained for the ZnO-CuO, which was significantly higher than that obtained with the 10% CuO catalyst used as reference. The catalyst deactivation is related to the dissolution of the metal oxides from the catalyst surface due to the acidic reaction conditions. Generally, the performance of the catalysts was better when the pH of the feed solution was increased.

  12. Determination of 129I in large soil samples after alkaline wet disintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunzl, K.; Kracke, W.

    1992-01-01

    Large soil samples (up to 500 g) can conveniently be disintegrated by hydrogen peroxide in an utility tank under alkaline conditions to determine subsequently 129 I by neutron activation analysis. Interfering elements such as Br are removed already before neutron irradiation to reduce the radiation exposure of the personnel. The precision of the method is 129 I also by the combustion method. (orig.)

  13. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests

  14. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/l sodium carbonate, and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degreesC) was used for pre-treating wheat straw (60 g/l), resulting in a hemicellulose-rich hydrolysate and a cellulose-rich solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (9 g....../l), aliphatic carboxylic acids (6 g/l), phenols (0.27 g/l or 1.7 mM), and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/l). The wet-oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol yield by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present...

  15. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Olsson, Lisbeth; Thomsen, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/L sodium carbonate and 12 bar oxygen at 195degreesC) was used as pretreatment method for wheat straw (60 g/L), resulting in a hydrolysate and a cellulosic solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (8 g/L), low......-molecular-weight carboxylic acids (3.9 g/L), phenols (0.27 g/L = 1.7 mM) and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/L). The wet oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present in the hydrolysate, were each tested...

  16. Microhardness of anodic aluminum oxide formed in an alkaline electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanygina, O. N.; Filyak, M. M.

    2017-04-01

    The microhardness of anodic aluminum oxide formed by anodizing of aluminum sheet in electrolyte on the basis of sodium hydroxide has been determined experimentally. The microhardness of the hard film/soft substrate system has been estimated by three approaches: indentation geometry (length of diagonals) in film surfaces, the sum of the hardnesses of the film and the surface with allowance for the indentation surface area and geometry, and with allowance for the indentation depth. It is demonstrated that the approach accounting for the indentation depth makes it possible to eliminate the influence of the substrate. It is established that the microhardness of the films formed in alkaline electrolytes is comparable with that formed in acid electrolytes.

  17. Evaporation and wet oxidation of steam generator cleaning solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, P.N. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) is used in metal-cleaning formulations. Usually the form of the EDTA used is the tetra ammonium salt. When these powerful cleaning solutions are used in steam generators, they attract the key metals of interest--iron and copper. A reduction in the volume of these cleaners and EDTA destruction is required to meet waste management and disposal standards. One method of volume reduction is described: concentration by evaporation. Once volume is reduced, the liquid waste can then be further volume reduced and treated for EDTA content through the use of wet oxidation. The effect of this process on the total organic carbon (TOC) in the form of EDTA contained in the copper as well as the iron spent cleaning solutions is reviewed, including regression analysis of selected benchmark and production data. A regressive analysis is made of the relationship between the EDTA and the TOC analyzed in the wet-oxidation batch residuals as well as the summary effects of hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, and reaction time on the percentage of TOC destroyed

  18. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of tellurium (IV) by periodate in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, K.; Vani, P.; Dikshitulu, L.S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed kinetic study of the oxidation of tellurium (IV) by periodate in alkaline medium has been carried out to compare the mechanisms of oxidation in the acid and alkaline media. It is interesting to note that the rate step involves a two-electron transfer from tellurium (IV) to periodate in alkaline medium although the kinetic pattern is somewhat different from that in the acid medium. 7 refs., 1 tab

  20. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning; Descorme, Claude; Besson, Michele

    2007-01-01

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO 2 . 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO 2 is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393 K) and lower total pressure (3 MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect

  1. Wet oxidation pretreatment of rape straw for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Efthalia; Bjerre, Anne Belinda; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Rape straw can be used for production of second generation bioethanol. In this paper we optimized the pretreatment of rape straw for this purpose using Wet oxidation (WO). The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, and oxygen gas pressure was investigated for maximum ethanol yield via...... Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). To reduce the water use and increase the energy efficiency in WO pretreatment features like recycling liquid (filtrate), presoaking of rape straw in water or recycled filtrate before WO, skip washing pretreated solids (filter cake) after WO, or use of whole...... gas produced higher ethanol yields and cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin recoveries, than 15 min WO treatment at 195 °C. Also, recycling filtrate and use of higher oxygen gas pressure reduced recovery of materials. The use of filtrate could be inhibitory for the yeast, but also reduced lactic acid...

  2. Preliminary comparison of three processes of AlN oxidation: dry, wet and mixed ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbutowicz R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three methods of AlN layers oxidation: dry, wet and mixed (wet with oxygen were compared. Some physical parameters of oxidized thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN layers grown on silicon Si(1 1 1 were investigated by means Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE. Three series of the thermal oxidations processes were carried out at 1012 °C in pure nitrogen as carrying gas and various gas ambients: (a dry oxidation with oxygen, (b wet oxidation with water steam and (c mixed atmosphere with various process times. All the research methods have shown that along with the rising of the oxidation time, AlN layer across the aluminum oxide nitride transforms to aluminum oxide. The mixed oxidation was a faster method than the dry or wet ones.

  3. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U. J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A. M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  4. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption – Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada-Peñate, I.; Julcour-Lebigue, C.; Jáuregui-Haza, U.J.; Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. ► Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. ► Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. ► Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. ► Convenient hybrid adsorption–regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  5. Solid state oxidation of phenols to quinones with sodium perborate on wet montmorillonite K10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Mohammed M.; Eftekhari-Sis, Bagher; Khalili, Behzad; Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry]. E-mail: mhashemi@sharif.edu

    2005-09-15

    Phenols were oxidized to quinones using sodium perborate (SPB) on wet montmorillonite as oxidant. The reaction was carried out at ambient temperature on the solid phase under solvent free conditions. (author)

  6. Solid state oxidation of phenols to quinones with sodium perborate on wet montmorillonite K10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Mohammed M.; Eftekhari-Sis, Bagher; Khalili, Behzad; Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed

    2005-01-01

    Phenols were oxidized to quinones using sodium perborate (SPB) on wet montmorillonite as oxidant. The reaction was carried out at ambient temperature on the solid phase under solvent free conditions. (author)

  7. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Desorption of acetone from alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolite after propane selective oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Mojet, Barbara; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2004-01-01

    The desorption of products from a series of alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolites after room-temperature propane selective oxidation was investigated by in situ infrared and mass spectroscopy. The intermediate product, isopropylhydroperoxide (IHP), did not desorb during

  9. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    DETOX SM is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit

  10. Indium tin oxide films prepared via wet chemical route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legnani, C.; Lima, S.A.M.; Oliveira, H.H.S.; Quirino, W.G.; Machado, R.; Santos, R.M.B.; Davolos, M.R.; Achete, C.A.; Cremona, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, indium tin oxide (ITO) films were prepared using a wet chemical route, the Pechini method. This consists of a polyesterification reaction between an α-hydroxicarboxylate complex (indium citrate and tin citrate) with a polyalcohol (ethylene glycol) followed by a post annealing at 500 deg. C. A 10 at.% of doping of Sn 4+ ions into an In 2 O 3 matrix was successfully achieved through this method. In order to characterize the structure, the morphology as well as the optical and electrical properties of the produced ITO films, they were analyzed using different experimental techniques. The obtained films are highly transparent, exhibiting transmittance of about 85% at 550 nm. They are crystalline with a preferred orientation of [222]. Microscopy discloses that the films are composed of grains of 30 nm average size and 0.63 nm RMS roughness. The films' measured resistivity, mobility and charge carrier concentration were 5.8 x 10 -3 Ω cm, 2.9 cm 2 /V s and - 3.5 x 10 20 /cm 3 , respectively. While the low mobility value can be related to the small grain size, the charge carrier concentration value can be explained in terms of the high oxygen concentration level resulting from the thermal treatment process performed in air. The experimental conditions are being refined to improve the electrical characteristics of the films while good optical, chemical, structural and morphological qualities already achieved are maintained

  11. Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation process for chromium oxidation at graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yudong; Zheng, Shili; Sun, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation processes for chromium oxidation and Cr-contaminated waste disposal were reported in this study. The highly graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes g-MWCNTs modified electrode was prepared for the in-situ electrochemical generation of HO 2 - . RRDE test results illustrated that g-MWCNTs exhibited much higher two-electron oxygen reduction activity than other nanocarbon materials with peak current density of 1.24 mA cm -2 , %HO 2 - of 77.0% and onset potential of -0.15 V (vs. Hg/HgO). It was originated from the highly graphitized structure and good electrical conductivity as illustrated from the Raman, XRD and EIS characterizations, respectively. Large amount of reactive oxygen species (HO 2 - and ·OH) were in-situ electro-generated from the two-electron oxygen reduction and chromium-induced alkaline electro-Fenton-like reaction. The oxidation of Cr(III) was efficiently achieved within 90 min and the conversion ratio maintained more than 95% of the original value after stability test, offering an efficient and green approach for the utilization of Cr-containing wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel advanced oxidation process——wet electrocatalytic oxidation for high concentrated organic wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI QiZhou; ZHOU MingHua; LEI LeCheng; ZHANG Xing Wang

    2007-01-01

    A novel advanced oxidation process-wet electrocatalytic oxidation(WEO)was studied with p-nitrophenol as model pollutant and β-PbO2 electrode as the anode.Compared with the effect of the individual wet air oxidation(WAO)and electrochemical oxidation(EO),the effect of WEO showed synergistic effect on COD removal under the conditions of temperature 160℃,C=1000mg·L-1,PN2=0.50MPa,Po2=0.9 MPa,current density=3 mA·cm-2,Na2SO4 3 g·L-1.And the synergistic factor got the best value of 0.98 within 120 min after 180 min treatment.The synergistic factor was studied after 120 min treatment at 100℃,120℃,140℃and 160℃,and the effect of 120℃was the best with the value of 1.26.Possible mechanism for the synergistic effect was discussed based on the analysis of free-radical generation and intermediates detected by HPLC and GC/MS.

  13. An oxidant, detergent and salt stable alkaline protease from Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel soil bacterium, Bacillus cereus SIU1 was earlier isolated from non-saline, slightly alkaline soil of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. The isolate B. cereus SIU1 was grown in modified glucose yeast extract (modified GYE) medium at pH 9.0 and 45°C. It produced maximum protease at 20 h incubation. The enzyme was ...

  14. THE BIOENERGETICS OF AMMONIA AND HYDROXYLAMINE OXIDATION IN NITROSOMONAS-EUROPAEA AT ACID AND ALKALINE PH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRIJLINK, MJ; ABEE, T; LAANBROEK, HJ; DEBOER, W; KONINGS, WN

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizers depend on alkaline or neutral conditions for optimal activity. Below pH 7 growth and metabolic activity decrease dramatically. Actively oxidizing cells of Nitrosomonas europaea do not maintain a constant internal pH when the external pH is varied from 5 to 8. Studies of

  15. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetic study of the alkaline metals oxidation by dry oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzain, Ph.

    1967-06-01

    The oxidation of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and sodium-potassium alloys by dry oxygen is studied at several temperatures and in the oxygen pressure range 40 to 400 mmHg. One distinguishes three different oxidation behaviours (inflammation, ignition and slow combustion) whose zones are precised in function of the temperature. The slow oxidation kinetic laws, the composition of oxides and the motive of oxides colorations are determined. At least, the experimental data are construed theoretically. (author) [fr

  17. Oxidation of propionic acid-3-14C with alkaline permanganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of oxidation of propionic acid with permanganate in alkaline medium was reinvestigated using methyl- 14 C labelled propionate. The preferential rupture of the αC-βC bond in propionate in highly concentrated alkaline solutions of NaOH (and KOH) was confirmed and the appearance of 14 C-labelled oxalate explained by the formation of the symmetrical intermediate which decomposes in two different modes. (author)

  18. Oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The invention involves an improvement to the reductive stripping process for recovering uranium values from wet-process phosphoric acid solution, where uranium in the solution is oxidized to uranium (VI) oxidation state and then extracted from the solution by contact with a water immiscible organic solvent, by adding sufficient oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, to obtain greater than 90 percent conversion of the uranium to the uranium (VI) oxidation state to the phosphoric acid solution and simultaneously extracting the uranium (VI)

  19. Measurement of the oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention relates to processes for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid and more particularly to the oxidation-extraction steps in the DEPA-TOPO process for such recovery. A more efficient use of oxidant is obtained by monitoring the redox potential during the extraction step

  20. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by ¤Thermoanaerobacter mathranii¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, B.K.

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/l sodium carbonate, and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degreesC) was used for pre-treating wheat straw (60 g/l), resulting in a hemicellulose-rich hydrolysate and a cellulose-rich solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (9 g....../l), aliphatic carboxylic acids (6 g/l), phenols (0.27 g/l or 1.7 mM), and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/l). The wet-oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol yield by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present...

  1. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  2. Oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy as SOFC interconnect in dry/wet air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Fu-Shen; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A special thermodynamic description corresponding to the kinetics was applied. •We reported the relationships of degradation time with temperature and moisture. •”Turning time” in the Fe–16Cr alloy oxidation kinetic model was given. •The oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy in the wet air was discussed. -- Abstract: Experimental study on the oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was carried out at 800–1100 °C under dry/wet air conditions. Faster oxidation rate was observed at higher temperature and water vapor content. The degradation time t d between two stages in oxidation process showed an exponential relationship with elevating corrosion temperature in dry air, and a linear relationship with the water content in the case of water vapor introduced to the system. The mechanism of oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was suggested by the Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. It was found that the break-away oxidation in stage II was controlled by diffusion at initial both in dry and wet air, then became linear with the exposure time, which implied that the oxidation rate was then controlled by chemical reaction of the interface between the metal and the oxidized scale. Moreover, the effect of water in the oxidation process is not only to supply more oxygen into system, but also to modify the structures of oxide scale due to the existence of hydrogen atom, which results in the accelerated corrosions

  3. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  4. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Chang-Mao, E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h{sup -1}.

  5. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h -1 .

  6. Ultrasmall PdmMn1-mOx binary alloyed nanoparticles on graphene catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; Park, Dongchul; Jeon, Seungwon

    2016-03-01

    A rare combination of graphene (G)-supported palladium and manganese in mixed-oxides binary alloyed catalysts (BACs) have been synthesized with the addition of Pd and Mn metals in various ratios (G/PdmMn1-mOx) through a facile wet-chemical method and employed as an efficient anode catalyst for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in alkaline fuel cells. The as prepared G/PdmMn1-mOx BACs have been characterized by several instrumental techniques; the transmission electron microscopy images show that the ultrafine alloyed nanoparticles (NPs) are excellently monodispersed onto the G. The Pd and Mn in G/PdmMn1-mOx BACs have been alloyed homogeneously, and Mn presents in mixed-oxidized form that resulted by X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical performances, kinetics and stability of these catalysts toward EOR have been evaluated using cyclic voltammetry in 1 M KOH electrolyte. Among all G/PdmMn1-mOx BACs, the G/Pd0.5Mn0.5Ox catalyst has shown much superior mass activity and incredible stability than that of pure Pd catalysts (G/Pd1Mn0Ox, Pd/C and Pt/C). The well dispersion, ultrafine size of NPs and higher degree of alloying are the key factor for enhanced and stable EOR electrocatalysis on G/Pd0.5Mn0.5Ox.

  7. Oxidant and solvent stable alkaline protease from Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increase in agricultural practices has necessitated the judicious use of agricultural wastes into value added products. In this study, an extracellular, organic solvent and oxidant stable, serine protease was produced by Aspergillus flavus MTCC 9952 under solid state fermentation. Maximum protease yield was obtained ...

  8. Synthesis of complex plutonium oxides with alkaline-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasufumi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Yamawaki, Michio.

    1995-03-01

    Complex plutonium(IV) oxides with strontium and barium, SuPuO 3 and BaPuO 3 , were synthesized and their crystal structure was analyzed. Compacted mixture of plutonium dioxide powder and the carbonate of strontium or barium was heated in a stream of argon gas using a cell with a small orifice. The products obtained were found to be composed of a nearly single phase showing the structure of orthorhombic slightly distorted from cubic. (author)

  9. Catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline with nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, R; Milman, M; Landau, M V; Brenner, A; Herskowitz, M

    2008-07-15

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of aqueous solution containing 1000 ppm aniline was conducted in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a novel nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst (surface area of 300 m2/g) prepared using SBA-15 silica as a hard template. A range of liquid hourly space velocities (5-20 h(-1)) and temperatures (110-140 degrees C) at 10 bar of oxygen were tested. The experiments were conducted to provide the intrinsic performance of the catalysts. Complete aniline conversion, 90% TOC conversion, and 80% nitrogen mineralization were achieved at 140 degrees C and 5 h(-1). Blank experiments yielded relatively low homogeneous aniline (<35%) and negligible TOC conversions. Fast deactivation of the catalysts was experienced due to leaching caused by complexation with aniline. Acidification of the solution with HCI (molar HCI to aniline ratio of 1.2) was necessary to avoid colloidization and leaching of the nanoparticulate catalyst components. The catalyst displayed stable performance for over 200 h on stream.

  10. Nickel as a catalyst for the electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Rahim, M. A.; Abdel Hameed, R. M.; Khalil, M. W.

    The use of Ni as a catalyst for the electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline medium was studied by cyclic voltammetry. It was found that only Ni dispersed on graphite shows a catalytic activity towards methanol oxidation but massive Ni does not. Ni was dispersed on graphite by the electro-deposition from acidic NiSO 4 solution using potentiostatic and galvanostatic techniques. The catalytic activity of the C/Ni electrodes towards methanol oxidation was found to vary with the amount of electro-deposited Ni. The dependence of the oxidation current on methanol concentration and scan rate was discussed. It was concluded from the electro-chemical measurements and SEM analysis that methanol oxidation starts as Ni-oxide is formed on the electrode surface.

  11. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu ++ , Co ++ , Fe +++ , Ni ++ , Cr +++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  12. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. There is a need for non-combustion processes with a wide application range to treat the large majority of these waste forms. The non-combustion process should also be safe, effective, cost-competitive, permit-able, and preferrably mobile. This paper describes the DETOX process of organic waste oxidation

  13. Testing of wet scrap recovery equipment for mixed oxide scrap reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demiter, J.A.; Klem, M.J.; Owen, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    The Wet Scrap Recovery (WSR) program was initiated at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) by Westinghouse Hanford Company in Richland, Washington to demonstrate fuel fabrication scrap recovery and reconversion to fuel grade oxide powder using the continuous coprecipitation-calcination (COPRECAL) conversion process. Advancements in process control equipment and instrumentation were also developed and demonstrated

  14. Wet Oxidation of Maleic Acid by a Pumice Supported Copper (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pumice supported Cu (II) Schiff base catalysts were prepared by surface chemical modification followed by complexation with Cu (II) acetate. The resulting materials were characterised by Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to confirm the modification. The materials were tested in a wet oxidation ...

  15. Hysteresis losses in iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by glass crystallization or wet chemical precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Robert; Dutz, Silvio; Hergt, Rudolf; Schmidt, Christopher; Steinmetz, Hanna; Zeisberger, Matthias; Gawalek, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Ferrofluids were prepared from glass crystallized as well as wet precipitated iron oxide particles. Comparing hysteresis losses versus applied field amplitude from particles in immobilized state (powder) and in fluid state (ferrofluid) shows in some cases anomalous large losses at low magnetic fields. The influence of texture on the losses was investigated

  16. Subcritical wet air oxidation of organic solvents and chelating agents of the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachir, Souley

    1999-01-01

    This document deals with the environment control, more specially organic solvents and chelating agents destruction, employed in the nuclear industry. This work details the subcritical wet air oxidation process. Another part of the document deals with the possible coupling between this process and the biodegradation technic in the framework of the sewage sludges treatment. (A.L.B.)

  17. Wet Oxidation Pretreatment of Tobacco Stalks and Orange Waste for Bioethanol Production. Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Carlos; Fernandez, Teresa; Garcia, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) was used as a pretreatment method prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of tobacco stalks and orange waste. The pretreatment, performed at 195 degrees C and an oxygen pressure of 1.2 MPa, for 15 min, in the presence of Na2CO3, increased the cellulose content of the materials and gave c...

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Some Alkaline-Earth-Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jitendra Pal; Lim, Weon Cheol; Won, Sung Ok; Song, Jonghan; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2018-04-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of MgO and CaO nanoparticles by using the sol-gel autocombustion method. The annealing of the precursor at 1200 °C was observed to lead the formation of MgO nanoparticles having average crystallite size of 31 nm. Annealing the precursor at same temperature produced materials having a CaO phase with a minor impure phase of calcium carbonate ( 3%). The crystallite size corresponding to the CaO phase was 38 nm. A change of thermal history in the precursor was observed not to result in an improvement of the CaO phase. The change of thermal history in the precursor gave rise to mixed phases of CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 rather than the phase of CaO. Further, annealing at 1200 °C for 12 h resulted in the formation of the CaO phase along with almost 1 - 5% of calcium hydroxide as an impurity phase. X-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements carried out on these materials revealed that the local electronic/atomic structure of these oxides was not only affected by the impurity phases but also influenced by the carbaneous impurities attached to the crystallites.

  19. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Qiang, E-mail: dong@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro [Department of Research Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Miyamae cho-7, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  20. Oxidative dissolution of chromium from Hanford tank sludges under alkaline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapko, B.M.; Delegard, C.H.; Wagner, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    Alkaline oxidative leaching has been performed on caustic leached sludges from the three following Hanford waste tanks: BY-110, S-107, and SX-108. These samples were chosen because they represent types of waste where significant amounts of Cr are located and show relatively poor dissolution of Cr during standard caustic leaching. The experiments involved tests with three chemical oxidants, permanganate, ozone and oxygen, and a blank, argon. The effects of varying the hydroxide concentration of the leachate (from 0.1 M to 3 M) and of time and temperature (from room temperature to 80 degrees C) were also examined

  1. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  2. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, C.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H 2 PtCl 6 , Pd(NO 3 ) 3 and Rh(NO 3 ) 3 . Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h -1 in the wet catalytic processes

  3. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, C.-M. [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, Pd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Rh(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h{sup -1} in the wet catalytic processes.

  4. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes.

  5. Characterization of degradation products from alkaline wet oxidation of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Ahring, B.K.; Schmidt, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    to their chemical structure, e.g. diacids (oxalic and succinic acids), furan aldehydes, phenol aldehydes, phenol ketones and phenol acids. Aromatic aldehyde formation was correlated to severe conditions with high temperatures and low pH. Apart from CO2 and water, carboxylic acids were the main degradation products...... degreesC with addition of 12 bar oxygen and 6.5 g l(-1) Na2CO3. At these conditions the hemicellulose fraction from 100 g straw consisted of soluble hemicellulose (16 g), low molecular weight carboxylic acids (11 g), monomeric phenols (0.48 g) and 2-furoic acid (0.01 g). Formic acid and acetic acid...... constituted the majority of degradation products (8.5 g). The main phenol monomers were 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone), vanillic acid and syringic acid, occurring in 0.04-0.12 g per 100 g straw concentrations. High lignin removal from...

  6. Ultra‐high performance supercritical fluid chromatography of lignin‐derived phenols from alkaline cupric oxide oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhe; Lidén, Gunnar; Sandahl, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Traditional chromatographic methods for the analysis of lignin‐derived phenolic compounds in environmental samples are generally time consuming. In this work, an ultra‐high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method with a diode array detector for the analysis of major lignin‐derived phenolic compounds produced by alkaline cupric oxide oxidation was developed. In an analysis of a collection of 11 representative monomeric lignin phenolic compounds, all compounds were clearly separated within 6 min with excellent peak shapes, with a limit of detection of 0.5–2.5 μM, a limit of quantification of 2.5–5.0 μM, and a dynamic range of 5.0–2.0 mM (R 2 > 0.997). The new ultra‐high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method was also applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of lignin‐derived phenolic compounds obtained upon alkaline cupric oxide oxidation of a commercial humic acid. Ten out of the previous eleven model compounds could be quantified in the oxidized humic acid sample. The high separation power and short analysis time obtained demonstrate for the first time that supercritical fluid chromatography is a fast and reliable technique for the analysis of lignin‐derived phenols in complex environmental samples. PMID:27452148

  7. Ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography of lignin-derived phenols from alkaline cupric oxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhe; Lidén, Gunnar; Sandahl, Margareta; Turner, Charlotta

    2016-08-01

    Traditional chromatographic methods for the analysis of lignin-derived phenolic compounds in environmental samples are generally time consuming. In this work, an ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method with a diode array detector for the analysis of major lignin-derived phenolic compounds produced by alkaline cupric oxide oxidation was developed. In an analysis of a collection of 11 representative monomeric lignin phenolic compounds, all compounds were clearly separated within 6 min with excellent peak shapes, with a limit of detection of 0.5-2.5 μM, a limit of quantification of 2.5-5.0 μM, and a dynamic range of 5.0-2.0 mM (R(2) > 0.997). The new ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method was also applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of lignin-derived phenolic compounds obtained upon alkaline cupric oxide oxidation of a commercial humic acid. Ten out of the previous eleven model compounds could be quantified in the oxidized humic acid sample. The high separation power and short analysis time obtained demonstrate for the first time that supercritical fluid chromatography is a fast and reliable technique for the analysis of lignin-derived phenols in complex environmental samples. © 2016 The Authors, Journal of Separation Science Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. [Kinetics of catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol in trickle bed reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-ming; Zhao, Jian-fu; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Xiu-hua; Zhou, Yang-yuan

    2004-05-01

    By using a trickle bed reactor which was designed by the authors, the catalytic wet air oxidation reaction of phenol on CuO/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was studied. The results showed that in mild operation conditions (at temperature of 180 degrees C, pressure of 3 MPa, liquid feed rate of 1.668 L x h(-1) and oxygen feed rate of 160 L x h(-1)), the removal of phenol can be over 90%. The curve of phenol conversion is similar to "S" like autocatalytic reaction, and is accordance with chain reaction of free radical. The kinetic model of pseudo homogenous reactor fits the catalytic wet air oxidation reaction of phenol. The effects of initial concentration of phenol, liquid feed rate and temperature for reaction also were investigated.

  9. Pretreatment of Reed by Wet Oxidation and Subsequent Utilization of the Pretreated Fibers for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szijarto, Nora; Kádár, Zsófia; Varga, Eniko

    2009-01-01

    lignocelluloses usually do. In the present study, wet oxidation was investigated as the pretreatment method to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of reed cellulose to soluble sugars and thus improve the convertibility of reed to ethanol. The most effective treatment increased the digestibility of reed cellulose...... of cellulose to glucose was 82.4%. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated solids resulted in a final ethanol concentration as high as 8.7 g/L, yielding 73% of the theoretical....

  10. On the degradability of printing and dyeing wastewater by wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Lei, L; Chen, G; Yue, P L

    2001-06-01

    A modified first-order kinetics model was used to study the wet air oxidation of printing and dyeing wastewater. The model simulations are in good agreement with experimental data. The results indicate that a certain fraction of organic pollutants in the printing and dyeing wastewater could not be removed even at elevated temperature and prolonged reaction time. The ratio of degradable organic matter is found independent of temperature and can be improved by using a catalyst.

  11. Ag supported on carbon fiber cloth as the catalyst for hydrazine oxidation in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ran; Ye, Ke; Gao, Yinyi; Zhang, Wenping; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CFC supported microspherical Ag is obtained by square-wave potential method. • Ag/CFC electrode has high catalytic activity toward hydrazine oxidation. • Hydrazine oxidation on the electrode proceeds by a near 4-electron pathway. - Abstract: Silver particles with microspheric structure are directly electrodeposited on carbon fiber cloth (CFC) substrate by square-wave potential electrodeposition method. The electrocatalytic behaviors of the Ag/CFC electrode toward hydrazine oxidation in alkaline solution are examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. An onset oxidation potential of -0.5 V and a peak current density of 30 mA cm −2 are achieved in the solution containing 1.0 mol L −1 KOH and 20.0 mmol L −1 hydrazine. The microspheric structure of the Ag/CFC electrode provides large electroactive surface area, hence, abundant active sites are vacant for hydrazine oxidation. The calculated apparent activation energies at different potentials show that hydrazine electro-oxidation at higher potential has faster kinetics than that at lower potential. In addition, the transfer electron number of hydrazine oxidation reaction on the Ag/CFC electrode is close to four, suggesting hydrazine is almost completely electrooxidized on the electrode and the full use of hydrazine fuel is basically achieved.

  12. Wet oxidative destruction of spent ion-exchange resins using hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, C.; Ramaswamy, M.; Theyyunni, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Spent organic ion exchange resins are generated in large quantities during the operation of nuclear facilities. Wet oxidation as a mode of treatment of these gel-type ion exchange resins was investigated using H 2 O 2 as oxidant in the presence of CuSO 4 as catalyst. Experiments using commercial samples were conducted at 95-100 deg C under reflux conditions at atmospheric pressure. It was found that the reaction of cation resin with H 2 O 2 was instantaneous whereas with anion resin, there was a lag time. For efficient utilization of the oxidant, low rate of addition of H 2 O 2 , 0.01M concentration of CuSO 4 and neutral pH in mixed resin reactions, were found to be useful. Foaming was noted during reactions involving anion resins. This could be controlled by silicone-based agents. The residual solution left after resin oxidation is aqueous in nature and is expected to contain all the radioactivity originally present in the resin. Preliminary experiments showed that it could be efficiently trapped using available inorganic sorbents. Wet oxidation system offers a simple method of converting organic waste into environmentally acceptable inorganic products. (author). 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Selective Oxidation and Reactive Wetting during Galvanizing of a CMnAl TRIP-Assisted Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellhouse, E. M.; McDermid, J. R.

    2011-09-01

    A transformation induced plasticity (TRIP)-assisted steel with 0.2 pct C, 1.5 pct Mn, and 1.5 pct Al was successfully galvanized using a thermal cycle previously shown to produce an excellent combination of strength and ductility. The steel surface chemistry and oxide morphology were determined as a function of process atmosphere oxygen partial pressure. For the 220 K (-53 °C) dew point (dp) + 20 pct H2 atmosphere, the oxide morphology was a mixture of films and nodules. For the 243 K (-30 °C) dp + 5 pct H2 atmosphere, nodules of MnO were found primarily at grain boundaries. For the 278 K (+5 °C) dp + 5 pct H2 atmosphere, nodules of metallic Fe were found on the surface as a result of alloy element internal oxidation. The steel surface chemistry and oxide morphology were then related to the reactive wetting behavior during continuous hot dip galvanizing. Good wetting was obtained using the two lower oxygen partial pressure process atmospheres [220 K dp and 243 K dp (-53 °C dp and -30 °C dp)]. An increase in the number of bare spots was observed when using the higher oxygen partial pressure process atmosphere (+5 °C dp) due to the increased thickness of localized oxide films.

  14. Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1996-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

  15. Treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewater by wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Luan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation (WAO is one of the most economical and environmentally-friendly advanced oxidation processes. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. In wet air oxidation aqueous waste is oxidized in the liquid phase at high temperatures (125–320 °C and pressures (0.5–20 MPa in the presence of an oxygen-containing gas (usually air. The advantages of the process include low operating costs and minimal air pollution discharges. The present review is concerned about the literature published in the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters, such as dyes. Phenolics were taken as model pollutants in most cases. Reports on effect of treatment for the WAO of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters are reviewed, such as emulsified wastewater, TNT red water, etc. Discussions are also made on the mechanism and kinetics of WAO and main technical parameters influencing WAO. Finally, development direction of WAO is summed up.

  16. A gravimetric method for the determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides by addition of alkaline earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Takeo; Tagawa, Hiroaki; Adachi, Takeo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    A simple gravimetric determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides is described. In alkaline earth uranates which are formed by heating in air at 800-1100 0 C, uranium is in the hexavalent state over certain continuous ranges of alkaline earth-to-uranium ratios. Thus, if an alkaline earth uranate or a compound containing an alkaline earth element, e.g. MgO, is mixed with the oxide sample and heated in air under suitable conditions, oxygen can be determined from the weight change before and after the reaction. The standard deviation of the O:U ratio for a UOsub(2+x) test sample is +-0.0008-0.001, if a correction is applied for atmospheric moisture absorbed during mixing. (Auth.)

  17. A catalytic wet oxidation process for mixed waste volume reduction/recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Mixed wastes have presented a challenge to treatment and destruction technologies. A recently developed catalytic wet oxidation method has promising characteristics for volume reduction and recycling of mixed wastes. The process utilizes iron (III) as an oxidant in the presence of homogeneous cocatalysts which increase organics' oxidation rates and the rate of oxidation of iron (II) by oxygen. The reaction is conducted in an aqueous mineral acid solution at temperatures of 373 - 573 deg K. The mineral acid should solvate a number of heavy metals, including U and Pu. Studies of reaction rates show that the process can oxidize a wide range of organic compounds including aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Rate constants in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -4 sec -1 , depending on the cocatalyst, acidity, type of anions, type of organic, temperature, and time. Activation energies ranged from 25. to 32. KJ/mole. Preliminary measurements of the extent of oxidation which could be obtained ranged from 80% for trichloroethylene to 99.8% for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene; evidence was obtained that absorption by the fluorocarbon liners of the reaction bombs allowed some of the organics to escape exposure to the catalyst solution. The results indicate that complete oxidation of the organics used here, and presumably many others, can be achieved. (author)

  18. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Leticia Poras Reis de; Amico, Sandro Campos; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga, E-mail: leticiamoraes@usp.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil); Matos, Bruno R.; Santiago, Elisabete Inacio; Fonseca, Fabio Coral [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Direct ethanol fuel cells require adequate electrocatalysts to promote the carbon carbon cleavage of ethanol molecule. Typical electrocatalysts are based on platinum, which have shown improved activity in acidic media. However, Pt-based catalysts have high cost and are easily deactivated by CO poisoning. Therefore, novel catalysts have been developed, and among then, palladium-based materials have shown promising results for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. The present study reports on the performance of alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) by using carbon-supported Pd, PdSn, PdNi, and PdNiSn produced by impregnation-reduction of the metallic precursors. The effect of chemical functionalization by acid treatment of the carbon support (Vulcan) was investigated. The electrocatalysts were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-rays diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and ADEFC tests. TGA measurements of functionalized Vulcan evidenced the characteristic weight losses attributed to the presence of surface functional groups due to the acid treatment. A high degree of alloying between Pd and Sn was inferred from XRD data, whereas in both PdNi and PdNiSn, Ni occurs mostly segregated in the oxide form. TEM analyses indicated agglomeration of Pd and PdSn particles, whereas a more uniform particle distribution was observed for PdNi and PdNiSn samples. CV curves showed that the peak potential for the oxidation of ethanol shifts towards negative values for all samples supported on functionalized Vulcan indicating that ethanol oxidation is facilitated. Microstructural and electrochemical features were confirmed by ADEFC tests, which revealed that the highest open circuit voltage and maximum power density were achieved for PdNiSn electrocatalysts supported on functionalized Vulcan with uniform particle distribution and improved triple phase boundaries. (author)

  19. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Leticia Poras Reis de; Amico, Sandro Campos; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga; Matos, Bruno R.; Santiago, Elisabete Inacio; Fonseca, Fabio Coral

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Direct ethanol fuel cells require adequate electrocatalysts to promote the carbon carbon cleavage of ethanol molecule. Typical electrocatalysts are based on platinum, which have shown improved activity in acidic media. However, Pt-based catalysts have high cost and are easily deactivated by CO poisoning. Therefore, novel catalysts have been developed, and among then, palladium-based materials have shown promising results for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. The present study reports on the performance of alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) by using carbon-supported Pd, PdSn, PdNi, and PdNiSn produced by impregnation-reduction of the metallic precursors. The effect of chemical functionalization by acid treatment of the carbon support (Vulcan) was investigated. The electrocatalysts were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-rays diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and ADEFC tests. TGA measurements of functionalized Vulcan evidenced the characteristic weight losses attributed to the presence of surface functional groups due to the acid treatment. A high degree of alloying between Pd and Sn was inferred from XRD data, whereas in both PdNi and PdNiSn, Ni occurs mostly segregated in the oxide form. TEM analyses indicated agglomeration of Pd and PdSn particles, whereas a more uniform particle distribution was observed for PdNi and PdNiSn samples. CV curves showed that the peak potential for the oxidation of ethanol shifts towards negative values for all samples supported on functionalized Vulcan indicating that ethanol oxidation is facilitated. Microstructural and electrochemical features were confirmed by ADEFC tests, which revealed that the highest open circuit voltage and maximum power density were achieved for PdNiSn electrocatalysts supported on functionalized Vulcan with uniform particle distribution and improved triple phase boundaries. (author)

  20. Manganese mediated oxidation of progesterone in alkaline medium: Mechanism study and quantitative determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Pashabadi, Afshin; Taherpour, Avat; Bahrami, Kiumars; Sharghi, Hashem

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • This is first report on oxidation of progesterone in alkaline medium using a new manganese (III) Schiff base complex. • Utilizing QM and MM, we modelled and interpreted the observed electrochemical behavior of complex on carbon and gold materials as platform. • The long term stability of proposed sensor is improved relative to previously reported immunosensors for P4. • A detailed mechanism was developed for the oxidation of P4. • The proposed sensor was applied to quantify P4 in cow’s milk. - Abstract: We report here a non-immunosensing approach for the electrocatalytic oxidation of progesterone (P4) in alkaline medium using a salen-type manganese Schiff base complex (Mn(III)-SB) as a suitable electrocatalyst. We explored the role of carbon surface at glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and gold surface at glassy carbon/gold nanoparticles modified electrode (GCE/AuNPs) on immobilization of the Mn(III)-SB complex using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The GCE/Mn(III)-SB displayed a pair of small redox peaks attributed to Mn(II) ⇄ Mn(III) with a small peak-to-peak separation (ΔE p ), while GCE/AuNP/Mn(III)-SB displayed redox peaks with larger densities, but with a wider ΔE p . A combined molecular mechanics (MM) and quantum mechanics (QM) study were carried out to investigate the variation of surface configuration and energy barrier, when the Mn(III)-SB immobilization was modeled on GCE and GCE/Au surface. Cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic amperometry were used for the quantitative determination of P4. A limit of detection (LOD) of 11.4 nM was obtained using amperometry. The sensor retained 91% of its original response after 3 months, which is improved compared to previously reported P4 immunosensors. For the first time, a detailed mechanism for oxidation of P4 in alkaline medium was suggested. The proposed sensor was utilized to determine progesterone in milk samples.

  1. Metatranscriptomic and metagenomic description of the bacterial nitrogen metabolism in waste water wet oxidation effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Crovadore

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is a common method for reducing the amount of sludge solids in used waters and enabling biogas production. The wet oxidation process (WOX improves anaerobic digestion by converting carbon into methane through oxidation of organic compounds. WOX produces effluents rich in ammonia, which must be removed to maintain the activity of methanogens. Ammonia removal from WOX could be biologically operated by aerobic granules. To this end, granulation experiments were conducted in 2 bioreactors containing an activated sludge (AS. For the first time, the dynamics of the microbial community structure and the expression levels of 7 enzymes of the nitrogen metabolism in such active microbial communities were followed in regard to time by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. It was shown that bacterial communities adapt to the wet oxidation effluent by increasing the expression level of the nitrogen metabolism, suggesting that these biological activities could be a less costly alternative for the elimination of ammonia, resulting in a reduction of the use of chemicals and energy consumption in sewage plants. This study reached a strong sequencing depth (from 4.4 to 7.6 Gb and enlightened a yet unknown diversity of the microorganisms involved in the nitrogen pathway. Moreover, this approach revealed the abundance and expression levels of specialised enzymes involved in nitrification, denitrification, ammonification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA and nitrogen fixation processes in AS. Keywords: Applied sciences, Biological sciences, Environmental science, Genetics, Microbiology

  2. Wet oxidative degradation of cellulosic wastes 5- chemical and thermal properties of the final waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskander, S.B.; Saleh, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the residual solution arising from the wet oxidative degradation of solid organic cellulosic materials, as one of the component of radioactive solid wastes, using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Were incorporated into ordinary Portland cement matrix. Leaching as well as thermal characterizations of the final solidified waste forms were evaluated to meet the final disposal requirements. Factors, such as the amount of the residual solution incorporated, types of leachant. Release of different radionuclides and freezing-thaw treatment, that may affect the leaching characterization. Were studied systematically from the data obtained, it was found that the final solid waste from containing 35% residual solution in tap water is higher than that in ground water or sea water. Based on the data obtained from thermal analysis, it could be concluded that incorporating the residual solution form the wet oxidative degradation of cellulosic materials has no negative effect on the hydration of cement materials and consequently on the thermal stability of the final solid waste from during the disposal process

  3. Performance improvement and better scalability of wet-recessed and wet-oxidized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takhar, Kuldeep; Meer, Mudassar; Upadhyay, Bhanu B.; Ganguly, Swaroop; Saha, Dipankar

    2017-05-01

    We have demonstrated that a thin layer of Al2O3 grown by wet-oxidation of wet-recessed AlGaN barrier layer in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure can significantly improve the performance of GaN based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The wet-etching leads to a damage free recession of the gate region and compensates for the decreased gate capacitance and increased gate leakage. The performance improvement is manifested as an increase in the saturation drain current, transconductance, and unity current gain frequency (fT). This is further augmented with a large decrease in the subthreshold current. The performance improvement is primarily ascribed to an increase in the effective velocity in two-dimensional electron gas without sacrificing gate capacitance, which make the wet-recessed gate oxide-HEMTs much more scalable in comparison to their conventional counterpart. The improved scalability leads to an increase in the product of unity current gain frequency and gate length (fT × Lg).

  4. Synergetic effect of alkaline earth metal oxides and iron oxides on the degradation of hexachlorobenzene and its degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guijin; Liu, Yexuan; Huang, Linyan; Shi, Yali; Zhang, Aiqian; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Wenbin; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out over physical mixtures of a series of alkaline earth metal oxides (MO: M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and iron oxides with different crystal types (Fe(x)O(y):Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) at 300°C. These physical mixtures all showed a synergetic effect toward the degradation of HCB. A range of degradation products were identified by various methods, including tri- to penta-chlorobenzenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), tri- to penta-chlorophenols, tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) by GC-MS after derivatization, and formic and acetic acids by ion chromatography. Two degradation pathways, hydrodechlorination and oxidative degradation, appear to occur competitively. However, more sequential chlorinated benzene and phenol congeners were formed over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4) than over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) under the same conditions. The oxidative reaction dominated over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) and was promoted as the major reaction by the synergetic effect, while both the oxidative and hydrodechlorination reactions were important over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4), and both pathways are remarkably promoted by the synergetic effect. The enhanced hydrodechlorination may be attributed to free electrons generated by the transformation of Fe(3)O(4) into Fe(2)O(3), and hydrogen provided by water adsorbed on the MO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hot water extraction with in situ wet oxidation: Kinetics of PAHs removal from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadkhah, Ali A.; Akgerman, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Finding environmentally friendly and cost-effective methods to remediate soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is currently a major concern of researchers. In this study, a series of small-scale semi-continuous extractions - with and without in situ wet oxidation - were performed on soils polluted with PAHs, using subcritical water (i.e. liquid water at high temperatures and pressures, but below the critical point) as the removal agent. Experiments were performed in a 300 mL reactor using an aged soil sample. To find the desorption isotherms and oxidation reaction rates, semi-continuous experiments with residence times of 1 and 2 h were performed using aged soil at 250 deg. C and hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent. In all combined extraction and oxidation flow experiments, PAHs in the remaining soil after the experiments were almost undetectable. In combined extraction and oxidation no PAHs could be detected in the liquid phase after the first 30 min of the experiments. Based on these results, extraction with hot water, if combined with oxidation, should reduce the cost of remediation and can be used as a feasible alternative technique for remediating contaminated soils and sediments

  6. Process options for treatment of organic containing ILWs by wet oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The process chemistry, applications and experience with several wet oxidation options are reviewed along with criteria for the selection of viable systems and plant designs, covering a range of organic wastes, including solvents, cellulosic filters, chelant decontamination reagents and ion exchange resins. The use of hydrogen peroxide to treat water-cooled reactor residues containing mixed inorganic and organic filter materials with ion exchange resins is examined in further detail along with treatment of secondary arisings. The technical and financial justifications for treatment are examined along with the engineering requirements to retro-fit the required plant to an existing cement encapsulation facility. (author)

  7. Bench scale demonstration and conceptual engineering for DETOXSM catalyzed wet oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moslander, J.; Bell, R.; Robertson, D.; Dhooge, P.; Goldblatt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory and bench scale studies of the DETOX SM catalyzed wet oxidation process have been performed with the object of developing the process for treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes. Reaction orders, apparent rates, and activation energies have been determined for a range of organic waste surrogates. Reaction intermediates and products have been analyzed. Metals' fates have been determined. Bench scale units have been designed, fabricated, and tested with solid and liquid organic waste surrogates. Results from the laboratory and bench scale studies have been used to develop conceptual designs for application of the process to hazardous and mixed wastes

  8. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, P.; Holm-Nielsen, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    was investigated using 2 1 bioreactors. Wet oxidation performed for 20 min at 121 degrees C was found as the most suitable pretreatment conditions for AD manure. High ammonia concentration and significant amount of macro- and micro-nutrients in the AD manure had a positive influence on the ethanol fermentation....... No extra nitrogen source was needed in the fermentation broth. It was shown that the AD manure could successfully substitute process water in SSF of pretreated lignocellulosic fibres. Theoretical ethanol yields of 82% were achieved, giving 30.8 kg ethanol per 100 kg dry mass of maize silage. (C) 2007...

  9. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  10. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Kim, Jungkwon [Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences Department, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrera, Julian [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Metcalfe, Ian S. [Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials Department, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Font, Josep [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.font@urv.cat

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P{sub O{sub 2}}) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P{sub O{sub 2}} were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P{sub O{sub 2}}, which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD{sub RB}) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  11. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julian; Metcalfe, Ian S.; Font, Josep

    2007-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P O 2 ) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P O 2 were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P O 2 , which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD RB ) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture

  12. Aluminum oxide mask fabrication by focused ion beam implantation combined with wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhengjun; Iltanen, Kari; Chekurov, Nikolai; Tittonen, Ilkka; Grigoras, Kestutis

    2013-01-01

    A novel aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) hard mask fabrication process with nanoscale resolution is introduced. The Al 2 O 3 mask can be used for various purposes, but in this work it was utilized for silicon patterning using cryogenic deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The patterning of Al 2 O 3 is a two-step process utilizing focused ion beam (FIB) irradiation combined with wet chemical etching. Gallium (Ga + ) FIB maskless patterning confers wet etch selectivity between the irradiated region and the non-irradiated one on the Al 2 O 3 layer, and mask patterns can easily be revealed by wet etching. This method is a modification of Ga + FIB mask patterning for the silicon etch stop, which eliminates the detrimental lattice damage and doping of the silicon substrate in critical devices. The shallow surface gallium FIB irradiated Al 2 O 3 mask protects the underlying silicon from Ga + ions. The performance of the masking capacity was tested by drawing pairs consisting of a line and an empty space with varying width. The best result was seven such pairs for 1 μm. The smallest half pitch was 59 nm. This method is capable of arbitrary pattern generation. The fabrication of a freestanding single-ended tuning fork resonator utilizing the introduced masking method is demonstrated. (paper)

  13. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wangjinustb@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Matsuda, Nozomu [Bar and Wire Product Unit, Nippon steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Fukuoka, 802-8686 (Japan); Shinozaki, Nobuya [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Miyoshi, Noriko [The Center for Instrumental Analysis, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 804-8550 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takanobu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 852-8588 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S.

  14. Spectroscopic and mechanistic investigations into oxidation of aspartame by diperiodatocuprate(III in aqueous alkaline medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant I. Gowda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of aspartame (ASP by diperiodatocuprate(III (DPC in aqueous alkaline medium at 298 K and a constant ionic strength of 0.30 mol dm−3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction between aspartame and diperiodatocuprate(III in alkaline medium exhibits 1:6 stoichiometry in the reaction. The order of the reaction with respect to [diperiodatocuprate(III] was unity, while the apparent order with respect to [aspartame] was less than unity over the concentration range studied. The rate of the reaction increased with increase in [OH−] whereas the rate decreased with increase in [$ {\\text{IO}}^-_4 $]. Increasing the ionic strength of the medium increased the rate. The main products were identified by FT-IR, NMR, and LC-MS spectral studies. The probable mechanism was proposed. The activation parameters with respect to slow step of the mechanism were computed and discussed. Thermodynamic quantities were also calculated. Kinetic studies suggest that [Cu(H2IO6(H2O2] is the reactive species of Cu(III.

  15. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the first full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to project initiation and planning. There is no significant technical progress to report for the current period

  16. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  17. Effective treatment of oily scum via catalytic wet persulfate oxidation process activated by Fe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xingzhong; Guan, Renpeng; Wu, Zhibin; Jiang, Longbo; Li, Yifu; Chen, Xiaohong; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-04-05

    Oily scum, a hazardous by-product of petroleum industry, need to be deposed urgently to reduce environmental risks. This paper introduces catalytic wet persulfate oxidation (CWPO) process in the treatment of oily scum to realize risk relief. Under the activation of heat and Fe 2+ , persulfate (PS) was decomposed into sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals, which played a major role on the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. The effects of wet air oxidation (WAO) and CWPO process on the degradation of oily scum were compared. In CWPO process, the total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) content of oily scum was decreased from 92.63% to 16.75%, which was still up to 70.19% in WAO process. The degradation rate of TPHs in CWPO process was about 3.38 times higher than that in WAO process. The great performance of CWPO process was also confirmed by elemental analysis, which indicated that the C and H contents of oily scum were reduced significantly by CWPO process. These results indicated that CWPO process has high potential on the degradation of oily scum for environmental protection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The emission of nitrous oxide upon wetting a rice soil following a dry season fallow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, B. H.; Holt, L. S.; Austin, E. R.

    1993-12-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to measure nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a soil, which had been planted to flooded transplanted rice, as it was rewetted to simulate the end of a dry season fallow period. The pots of soil had been cropped to transplanted rice with two commonly used nitrogen (N) fertilizer treatments and a control, and the soil had been puddled before transplanting. Large amounts of nitrate N accumulated in the soils during the dry season fallow, and the N fertilizers applied to the previous crop had little effect on nitrate accumulation. There was little N2O emission during the nitrification period. With water additions meant to simulate rainfall events at the beginning of a wet season, the soil redox dropped slightly, and large amounts of N2O began to be emitted. Large emissions began 5 days after each of the two simulated rainy season watering events and stopped abruptly at soil saturation, even though considerable amounts of nitrate still remained in the soil after saturation. Total measured emissions amounted to 6 to 7 kg N2O-N ha-1 for the period. Although these measurements were made in a system which may have favored nitrate accumulation, they are the first known measurements of N2O made from a rice soil as it is wetted. Nitrous oxide emitted from the flooding of rice soils that have accumulated nitrate during a dry season fallow may be a major source of N2O additions to the atmosphere.

  19. Treatment of toxic and hazardous organic wastes by wet oxidation process with oxygenated water at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccinno, T.; Salluzzo, A.; Nardi, L.; Gili, M.; Luce, A.; Troiani, F.; Cornacchia, G.

    1989-11-01

    The wet oxidation process using air or molecular oxygen is a well-known process from long time. It is suitable to oxidize several types of waste refractory to the usual biological, thermal and chemical treatments. The drastic operating conditions (high pressures and temperatures) prevented its industrial development. In the last years a new interest was assigned to the process for the treatment of nuclear wastes (organic resins and exhaust organic wastes); the treatment is carried out at widely reduced operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and boiling temperature) by means of metallic catalysts and hydrogen peroxide. With some limits, the wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide at low temperature can be applied to conventional waste waters containing toxic organic compounds. In the present report are summarized the activities developed at ENEA Fuel Cycle Department by the task force 'Deox' constituted by laboratory and plant specialists in order to verify the application of the wet oxidation process to the treatment of the toxic wastes. (author)

  20. Kinetic study of methanol oxidation on Pt2Ru3/C catalyst in the alkaline media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. TRIPKOVIC

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of acridine orange (AO with double-stranded (ds The electrochemical oxidation of methanol in NaOH solution was examined on a thin film Pt2Ru3/C electrode. The XRD pattern revealed that the Pt2Ru3 alloy consisted of a solid solution of Ru in Pt and a small amount of Ru or a solid solution of Pt in Ru. It was shown that in alkaline solution, the difference in activity between Pt/C and Pt2Ru3/C is significantly smaller than in acid solution. It is proposed that the reaction follows a quasi bifunctional mechanism. The kinetic parameters indicated that the chemical reaction between adsorbed COad and OHad species could be the rate limiting step.

  1. Synthesis and electrocatalytic activity of Au/Pt bimetallic nanodendrites for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinyi; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Dong; Huang, Jianshe; You, Tianyan

    2012-02-01

    Gold/Platinum (Au/Pt) bimetallic nanodendrites were successfully synthesized through seeded growth method using preformed Au nanodendrites as seeds and ascorbic acid as reductant. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) of a series of Au/Pt nanodendrites modified electrodes in 1M KOH solution containing 1M ethanol showed that the electrocatalyst with a molar ratio (Au:Pt) of 3 exhibited the highest peak current density and the lowest onset potential. The peak current density of ethanol electro-oxidation on the Au(3)Pt(1) nanodendrites modified glassy carbon electrode (Au(3)Pt(1) electrode) is about 16, 12.5, and 4.5 times higher than those on the polycrystalline Pt electrode, polycrystalline Au electrode, and Au nanodendrites modified glassy carbon electrode (Au dendrites electrode), respectively. The oxidation peak potential of ethanol electro-oxidation on the Au(3)Pt(1) electrode is about 299 and 276 mV lower than those on the polycrystalline Au electrode and Au dendrites electrode, respectively. These results demonstrated that the Au/Pt bimetallic nanodendrites may find potential application in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (ADEFCs). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanistic Investigation of Oxidation of Phenylpropanolamine with N-Bromobenzenesulfonamide in Alkaline Medium: A Kinetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningegowda Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of phenylpropanolamine (PPA with sodium N-bromobenzenesulfonamide or bromamine-B (BAB has been investigated in alkaline medium at 308 K. The oxidation reaction obeys the rate law, – d[BAB]/dt = k [BAB] [PPA]x [OH-], where x is less than unity. The variation of ionic strength of the medium, addition of the reduction product, benzenesulfonamide, and chloride ion had no pronounced effect on the reaction rate. Decrease of dielectric permittivity of the medium by increasing the CH3CN content increased the rate. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters have been evaluated from the Arrhenius plot. The stiochiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:1, and the oxidation product of phenylpropanolamine was identified as benzaldehyde and ethylideneamine. The rate decreased in D2O medium and the normal isotope effect k' (H2O / k' (D2O is 2.18. Proton inventory studies have been made in H2O - D2O mixtures. Formation and decomposition constant of BAB-PPA complexes in the reaction scheme have been determined. The conjugate acid, C6H5SO2NHBr is assumed to be the reactive species. The proposed mechanism and the derived rate law are consistent with the observed experimental results.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanistic Study of Permanganate Oxidation of Fluorenone Hydrazone in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation kinetics of fluorenone hydrazone (FH using potassium permanganate in alkaline medium were measured at a constant ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm−3 and at 25°C using UV/VIS spectrophotometer. A first-order kinetics has been monitored in the reaction of FH with respect to [permanganate]. Less-than-unit order dependence of the reaction on [FH] and [OH−] was revealed. No pronounced effect on the reaction rate by increasing ionic strength was recorded. Intervention of free radicals was observed in the reaction. The reaction mechanism describing the kinetic results was illustrated which involves formation of 1 : 1 intermediate complex between fluorenone hydrazones and the active species of permanganate. 9H-Fluorenone as the corresponding ketone was found to be the final oxidation product of fluorenone hydrazone as confirmed by GC/MS analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. The expression rate law for the oxidation reaction was deduced. The reaction constants and mechanism have been evaluated. The activation parameters associated with the rate-limiting step of the reaction, along with the thermodynamic quantities of the equilibrium constants, have been calculated and discussed.

  4. Determination of oxygen in ternary uranium oxides by a gravimetric alkaline earth addition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, T.; Tagawa, H.

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of a gravimetric method based on alkaline earth metal addition for the determination of oxygen in ternary uranium oxides of the tupe M-U-O (M=La, Ce and Th) is described. The oxide sample is mixed with MgO or Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) and heated in air under suitable conditions. Because uranium is completely oxidized to the hexavalent state during the reaction, oxygen can be determined from the weight change. Oxygen in Lasub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x) is determined up to y = 0.8 with a standard deviation for x of +- 0.006 with MgO. For Thsub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x) the value of x is determined with Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) with a standard deviation of +- 0.01 at y = 0.8. For Cesub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x), the method can be applied only for low cerium concentrations where y = 0-0.2; the value for x with Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) at y = 0.2 showed a standard deviation of +- 0.002. (Auth.)

  5. Oxidative dissolution of ruthenium deposits onto stainless steel by permanganate ions in alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.; Maurel, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    During spent nuclear fuel reprocessing ruthenium is liable to form black ruthenium deposits on the stainless steel walls of process equipments. These deposits promote corrosion and can eventually obstruct the off-gas lines. The results of decontamination of 304L stainless steel test specimens covered with RuO(OH){sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O deposits by permanganate ions in alkaline medium are described. The ruthenium deposits were dissolved by oxidation of RuO(OH){sub 2} to RuO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions, while the permanganate ions were reduced to MnO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions and then to manganese dioxide MnO{sub 2}. The parameters affecting the kinetics of oxidative dissolution of these deposits were examined. The results indicate that the oxidative dissolution kinetics depends on the instantaneous surface area of the deposit, and that the dissolution rate increases with the concentrations of MnO{sub 4}{sup -} and OH{sup -} ions. (orig.)

  6. Conversion and Estrogenicity of 17β-estradiol During Photolytic/Photocatalytic Oxidation and Catalytic Wet-air Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistan, Mirjana; Tišler, Tatjana; Pintar, Albin

    2012-06-01

    Estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), produced by human body and excreted into municipal wastewaters, belongs to the group of endocrine disrupting compounds that are resistant to biological degradation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of E2 removal from aqueous solutions by means of catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) and photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation. CWAO experiments were conducted in a trickle-bed reactor at temperatures up to 230 °C and oxygen partial pressure of 10 bar over TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 solids. Photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation was carried out in a batch slurry reactor employing a TiO2 P-25 (Degussa) catalyst under visible or UV light. HPLC analysis and yeast estrogen screen assay were used to evaluate the removal of E2 and estrogenicity of treated samples. The latter was completely removed during photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation under UV (365 nm) light and photocatalytic oxidation under visible light. In CWAO experiments, complete removal of both E2 and estrogenicity from the feed solution were noticed in the presence of TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts.

  7. Effect of nitrogen doping on wetting and photoactive properties of laser processed zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    György, E., E-mail: egyorgy@icmab.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona (CSIC-ICMAB), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P. O. Box MG 36, 76900 Bucharest V (Romania); Pérez del Pino, A. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona (CSIC-ICMAB), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Logofatu, C. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P. O. Box MG. 7, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); Duta, A.; Isac, L. [Transilvania University of Brasov, Research Centre for Renewable Energy Systems and Recycling, Eroilor 29, 500036, Brasov (Romania)

    2014-07-14

    Zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers were submitted to laser irradiation in air or controlled nitrogen atmosphere using a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG (λ = 266 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≅ 3 ns, ν = 10 Hz) laser source. The experiments were performed in air at atmospheric pressure or in nitrogen at a pressure of 2 × 10{sup 4} Pa. The effect of the irradiation conditions, incident laser fluence value, and number of subsequent laser pulses on the surface morphology of the composite material was systematically investigated. The obtained results reveal that nitrogen incorporation improves significantly the wetting and photoactive properties of the laser processed layers. The kinetics of water contact angle variation when the samples are submitted to laser irradiation in nitrogen are faster than that of the samples irradiated in air, the surfaces becoming super-hydrophilic under UV light irradiation.

  8. Carbon supported Pd-Sn and Pd-Ru-Sn nanocatalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon supported Pd-Sn and Pd-Ru-Sn nanocatalysts were prepared by the chemical reduction method, using sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol mixture as the reducing agent. The catalytic activity towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium...

  9. Establishing the potential dependent equilibrium oxide coverage on platinum in alkaline solution and its influence on the oxygen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Gustav; Arenz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Publication year: 2012 Source:Journal of Power Sources, Volume 217 Gustav K.H. Wiberg, Matthias Arenz The oxidation process of polycrystalline platinum subjected to alkaline solution is re-examined using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and potential hold techniques in Ar, H2 and O2 purged 0.1...

  10. Changes in methane oxidation activity and methanotrophic community composition in saline alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Silva, Nancy; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J

    2014-05-01

    The soil of the former Lake Texcoco is a saline alkaline environment where anthropogenic drainage in some areas has reduced salt content and pH. Potential methane (CH4) consumption rates were measured in three soils of the former Lake Texcoco with different electrolytic conductivity (EC) and pH, i.e. Tex-S1 a >18 years drained soil (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 8.5), Tex-S2 drained for ~10 years (EC 9.0 dS m(-1), pH 10.3) and the undrained Tex-S3 (EC 84.8 dS m(-1), pH 10.3). An arable soil from Alcholoya (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 6.7), located nearby Lake Texcoco was used as control. Methane oxidation in the soil Tex-S1 (lowest EC and pH) was similar to that in the arable soil from Alcholoya (32.5 and 34.7 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively). Meanwhile, in soils Tex-S2 and Tex-S3, the potential CH4 oxidation rates were only 15.0 and 12.8 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively. Differences in CH4 oxidation were also related to changes in the methane-oxidizing communities in these soils. Sequence analysis of pmoA gene showed that soils differed in the identity and number of methanotrophic phylotypes. The Alcholoya soil and Tex-S1 contained phylotypes grouped within the upland soil cluster gamma and the Jasper Ridge, California JR-2 clade. In soil Tex-S3, a phylotype related to Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum was detected.

  11. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D it (E), and density D it,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on

  12. Platinum Catalysts Supported on Ce, Zr, Pr - Oxides in Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Jana; Rossignol, S.; Barbier Jr., J.; Duprez, D.; Kappenstein, C.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 3 (2007), s. 1248-1253 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : platinum * cerium oxide * carbonate species Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2007

  13. The cathodic reduction of dioxygen on uranium oxide in dilute alkaline aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Betteridge, J.S.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1991-09-01

    The cathodic reduction of dioxygen on uranium oxide in dilute alkaline aqueous solutions has been investigated within the context of a program to develop a comprehensive model to predict the behaviour of used CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear fuel under disposal-vault conditions. Two different kinds of ceramic UO 2 were studied: reactor-grade CANDU fuel with normal p-type electrical conductivity and low-resistance material that exhibits n-type photoelectrochemical behaviour. The transport of electroactive species in solution was controlled by varying the rotation rate of rotating disc electrodes (RDE) and rotating ring-disc electrodes (RRDE). Steady-state polarization measurements were made using the current-interrupt method to compensate for the potential drop caused by ohmic resistance. Any release of peroxide to solution from the UO 2 (disc) surface could be monitored by oxidizing it at the Au ring of an RRDE. The existing theory for the cathodic 0 2 -reduction process as applied to RDE and RRDE experiments has been reviewed as a starting point for the interpretation of the results obtained in our work. (37 figs., 2 tabs., 170 refs.)

  14. Influence of alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides on the mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, J.; Ferrier, G.A.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Joseph.Metzler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC)can cause failures of CANDU Zircaloy-4 fuel sheathing. The process occurs when a corrosive element (i.e.,iodine) interacts with a susceptible material that is under sufficient strain at a high temperature. Currently, there is an ongoing effort to improve SCC mitigation strategies for future iterations of CANDU reactors. A potential mechanism for SCC mitigation involves utilizing alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides that will sequester corrosive iodine while actively repairing a protective oxide layer on the sheath. SCC tests performed with sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O) and calcium oxide (CaO) have shown to decrease significantly the sheath degradation. (author)

  15. Optimizing Oily Wastewater Treatment Via Wet Peroxide Oxidation Using Response Surface Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Xiuqing; Wang, Xiaoyin

    2014-01-01

    The process of petroleum involves in a large amount of oily wastewater that contains high levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and toxic compounds. So they must be treated before their discharge into the receptor medium. In this paper, wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was adopted to treat the oily wastewater. Central composite design, an experimental design for response surface methodology (RSM), was used to create a set of 31 experimental runs needed for optimizing of the operating conditions. Quadratic regression models with estimated coefficients were developed to describe the COD removals. The experimental results show that WPO could effectively reduce COD by 96.8% at the optimum conditions of temperature 290 .deg. C, H 2 O 2 excess (HE) 0.8, the initial concentration of oily wastewater 3855 mg/L and reaction time 9 min. RSM could be effectively adopted to optimize the operating multifactors in complex WPO process

  16. The kinetics and mechanism of methanol oxidation on Pt and PtRu catalysts in alkaline and acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA LOVIC

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic of methanol electrochemical oxidation for a series of platinum and platinum–ruthenium catalysts was investigated. A correlation between the beginning of OHad adsorption and methanol oxidation was demonstarated on Pt single crystals and Pt nanocatalyst. The activity of the nano-structured Pt catalyst was compared with single crystal platinum electrodes assuming the Kinoshita model of nanoparticles. The ruthenium-containing catalysts shifted the onset of methanol oxidation to more negative potentials. The effect was more pronounced in acid than in alkaline media. Based on the established diagnostic criteria, the reaction between COad and OHad species according to the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism was proposed as the rate determining step in alkaline and acid media on Pt and PtRu catalysts.

  17. Carbon supported ultrafine gold phosphorus nanoparticles as highly efficient electrocatalyst for alkaline ethanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tongfei; Fu, Gengtao; Su, Jiahui; Wang, Yi; Lv, Yinjie; Zou, Xiuyong; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Xu, Lin; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We develop a new kind of carbon supported gold-phosphorus (Au-P/C) electrocatalyst by a facile and novel phosphorus reduction method, and demonstrate the Au-P/C is a highly active and stable electrocatalyst for the ethanol oxidation reaction. - Highlights: • Au-P/C catalyst is synthesized by a facile and novel white-phosphorus reduce method. • AuP particles with ultrafine particle-size are uniformly dispersed on carbon support. • Au-P/C catalyst exhibits much higher content of P 0 than reported metal/P catalysts. • Au-P/C catalysts show excellent catalytic properties for ethanol oxidation reaction. - Abstract: Herein, we develop a new kind of carbon supported gold-phosphorus (Au-P/C) electrocatalyst for the alkaline ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The Au-P/C catalysts with different Au/P ratio (i.e., AuP/C, Au 3 P 2 /C and Au 4 P 3 /C) can be obtained by a facile and novel hot-reflux method with white phosphorus (P 4 ) as reductant and ethanol as solvent. The crystal structure, composition and particle-size of the Au-P/C catalysts are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), etc. The results demonstrate that Au-P/C catalysts present an alloy phase with the high content of P, ultrafine particle-size and high dispersity on carbon support, which results in excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability towards the EOR compared with that of the free-phosphorus Au/C catalyst. In addition, among the various Au-P/C catalysts with different Au/P ratio, the AuP/C sample exhibits the best electrocatalytic performance in comparison with other Au 3 P 2 /C and Au 4 P 3 /C samples.

  18. Preparation and characterization of electrocatalysts based on palladium for electro-oxidation of alcohols in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandalise, Michele

    2012-01-01

    In this study Pd/C, Au/C, PdAu/C, PdAuPt/C, PdAuBi/C and PdAuIr/C electrocatalysts were prepared by the sodium borohydride reduction method for the electrochemical oxidation of methanol, ethanol and ethylene glycol. This methodology consists in mix an alkaline solution of sodium borohydride to a mixture containing water/isopropyl alcohol, metallic precursors and the Vulcan XC 72 carbon support. The electrocatalysts were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical oxidation of the alcohols was studied by chronoamperometry using a thin porous coating technique. The mechanism of ethanol electro-oxidation was studied by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) in situ. The most effective electrocatalysts were tested in alkaline single cells directly fed with methanol, ethanol or ethylene glycol. Preliminary studies showed that the most suitable atomic composition for preparing the ternary catalysts is 50:45:05. Electrochemical data in alkaline medium show that the electrocatalysts PdAuPt/C (50:45:05) showed the better activity for methanol electro oxidation, while PdAuIr/C was the most active for ethanol oxidation and PdAuBi/C (50:45:05) was the most effective for ethylene glycol oxidation in alkaline medium. These results show that the addition of gold in the composition of electrocatalysts increases their catalytic activities. The spectroelectrochemical FTIR in situ data permitted to conclude that C-C bond is not broken and the acetate is formed. (author)

  19. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, María V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  20. Physical and spectroscopic studies of Cr{sup 3+} doped mixed alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samdani, E-mail: samdanimohd82@gmail.com [Department of Engineering, Salalah College of Technology, Salalah (Oman); Ramadevudu, G. [Department of Physics, Vasavi College of Engineering, Ibrahimbagh, Hyderabad 500031, Telangana (India); Chary, M. Narasimha; Shareefuddin, Md. [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007, Telangana (India)

    2017-01-15

    A series of mixed alkaline earth oxide glasses xMgO-(30-x)BaO-69.8B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.2Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared and studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence experimental techniques. The optical absorption spectra revealed the characteristic octahedral symmetry of Cr{sup 3+}ions through three broad band transitions {sup 4}A{sub 2g}(F)→ {sup 4}T{sub 2g}(F), {sup 4}A{sub 2g}(F)→ {sup 4}T{sub 1g}(F), and {sup 4}A{sub 2g}(F)→ {sup 2}T{sub 1g}(P). The crystal field (Dq) and Racah parameters (B and C), the optical band gap and Urbach energies of the glass samples were also reported along with the physical properties like density and molar volume. In the EPR spectra three resonance signals corresponding to Cr3+ ions were observed. A broad signal with g = 5.110 was observed which belongs to the isolated Cr3+ centers localized in the strongly distorted octahedral (rhombic) sites of the glass network, a narrow signal (g = 1.960) corresponding to the Cr{sup 3+} centers in the weekly distorted (cubic) sites of the glass network, and a third very broad signal (g = 2.210) was also observed corresponding to Cr{sup 3+}- Cr{sup 3+} paired centers coupled by magnetic dipolar interaction. Another resonance signal with effective value g ≈ 4.220 was attributed to Fe{sup 3+} ions impurity. The number of spins (N) participating in the resonance and susceptibility (χ) values at room temperature were reported and their values varied in a non-linear manner with the composition exhibiting mixed oxide effect. The estimated molecular bonding coefficients (α) values indicated stronger ionic contribution. The Raman spectral investigations were carried out. The Photoluminescence spectra bands near 690 and 750 nm correspond to the Cr{sup 3+} centers in high and low field sites respectively. - Highlights: • Spectroscopic studies were made on alkaline earth borate glasses. • Three resonance signals

  1. Separating nano graphene oxide from the residual strong-acid filtrate of the modified Hummers method with alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xuebing, E-mail: xuebinghu2010@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Membrane, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, Jingdezhen 333001 (China); Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yu, Yun, E-mail: yunyush@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wang, Yongqing; Zhou, Jianer [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Membrane, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, Jingdezhen 333001 (China); Song, Lixin [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: By adding an alkaline (NaOH or KOH) solution, the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide undergoes fast aggregation from the residual strong-acid filtrate of the modified Hummers method and forms the stable floccules when the pH value of the filtrate is about 1.7. The acid–base interaction with the surface functional groups of the carbon layers plays a role in the aggregation of the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide. - Highlights: • The novel and high-efficient method for separating graphene oxide was showed. • Graphene oxide undergoes aggregation and forms the floccules when pH value is ∼1.7. • The acid–base interaction plays a role in the aggregation of graphene oxide. - Abstract: In the modified Hummers method for preparing graphene oxide, the yellow slurry can be obtained. After filtering through a quantitative filter paper, the strong-acid filtrate containing the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide was gained. The corresponding filtrate was added gradually with an alkaline (NaOH or KOH) solution at room temperature. The unprecipitated nano graphene oxide could undergo fast aggregation when the pH value of the filtrate was about 1.7 and formed the stable floccules. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the dominant peak of the floccules is about 11°, which accords to the peak of graphene oxide. Spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm the presence in the floccules of an abundance of oxygen functional groups and the purified graphene oxide floccules can be obtained. Atomic force microscopy measurement shows the graphene oxide floccules consists of sheet-like objects, mostly containing only a few layers (about 5 layers). Zeta potential analysis demonstrates the surface charge of the graphene oxide is pH-sensitive and its isoelectric point is ∼1.7. The flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide ascribes to the acid–base interaction with the surface functional groups of the carbon layers.

  2. High electrocatalytic performance of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber-supported nickel oxide nanocomposite for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Enizi, Abdullah M. [Department of Chemistry, King Saud University, PO Box: 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Elzatahry, Ahmed A., E-mail: aelzatahry@ksu.edu.sa [Materials Science and Technology Program, College of Arts and Science, Qatar University, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Advanced Technology and New Materials Research Institute, City of Scientific Research and Technology Applications, New Borg El-Arab City, Alexandria 21934 (Egypt); Abdullah, Aboubakr M., E-mail: bakr@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Vinu, Ajayan [Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Building X-X2-09, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes 5095 SA (Australia); Iwai, Hideo [Materials Analysis Station, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047 (Japan); Al-Deyab, Salem S. [Petrochemical Research Chair, Department of Chemistry, King Saud University, PO Box: 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A mixture of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), graphene and emeraldine base polyaniline (PANi) was electrospun and used as starting materials to prepare a nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF). • Nickel oxide was loaded on the N-CNF to form a nanocomposite which was calcined later at different temperatures. • The effect of calcination temperature on the electrocatalytic behavior of the nanocomposite was studied which shows that the nanocomposite calcined at 500 °C was proved to be very high compared to the other calcination temperatures. • The stability of catalyst was excellent and its resistance to the adsorption of the intermediates generated from the methanol oxidation was very high. - Abstract: Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber (N-CNF)–supported NiO composite was prepared by electrospinning a sol-gel mixture of graphene and polyaniline (PANi) with aqueous solutions of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) followed by a high-temperature annealing process. The electrospun was stabilized for 2 h at 280 °C, carbonized for 5 h at 1200 °C then loaded by 10% NiO. The electrocatalytic activities of the produced nanocomposite have been studied using cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry. Also, N-CNF was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), surface area (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained N-doped carbon nanofiber was found to have a nitrogen content of 2.6 atomic% with a diameter range of (140–160) nm, and a surface area (393.3 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). In addition, it showed a high electrocatalytic behavior towards methanol oxidation reaction in alkaline medium and high stability and resistivity to the adsorption of intermediates.

  3. Sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic and mixotrophic denitrification processes for drinking water treatment: elimination of excess sulfate production and alkalinity requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dursun, Nesrin

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the elimination of alkalinity need and excess sulfate generation of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification process by stimulating simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic (mixotrophic) denitrification process in a column bioreactor by methanol supplementation. Also, denitrification performances of sulfur-based autotrophic and mixotrophic processes were compared. In autotrophic process, acidity produced by denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was neutralized by the external NaHCO(3) supplementation. After stimulating mixotrophic denitrification process, the alkalinity need of the autotrophic process was satisfied by the alkalinity produced by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Decreasing and lastly eliminating the external alkalinity supplementation did not adversely affect the process performance. Complete denitrification of 75 mg L(-1) NO(3)-N under mixotrophic conditions at 4 h hydraulic retention time was achieved without external alkalinity supplementation and with effluent sulfate concentration lower than the drinking water guideline value of 250 mg L(-1). The denitrification rate of mixotrophic process (0.45 g NO(3)-N L(-1) d(-1)) was higher than that of autotrophic one (0.3 g NO(3)-N L(-1) d(-1)). Batch studies showed that the sulfur-based autotrophic nitrate reduction rate increased with increasing initial nitrate concentration and transient accumulation of nitrite was observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Activated carbon as catalyst for microwave-assisted wet peroxide oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Costa, Alicia L; Lopez-Perela, Lucia; Xu, Xiyan; Zazo, Juan A; Rodriguez, Juan J; Casas, Jose A

    2018-05-21

    This paper addresses the removal of four aromatic hydrocarbons typically found in petrochemical wastewater: benzene (B), toluene (T), o-xylene (X), and naphthalene (N), by microwave-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (MW-CWPO) using activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. Under the studied conditions, complete pollutant elimination (B, 1.28 mM; T, 1.09 mM; X, 0.94 mM; and N, 0.78 mM) was achieved, with more than 90% TOC removal after only 15-min reaction time, working at 120 °C, pH 0  = 3, AC at 1 g L -1 , and H 2 O 2 at the stoichiometric dose. Furthermore, in the case of toluene, naphthalene, and xylene, the hydroxylation and breakdown of the ring is very rapid and toxic intermediates were not detected. The process follows two steps: (i) pollutant adsorption onto AC followed by (ii) adsorbed compounds oxidation. Thus, MW-CWPO with AC as catalyst appears a promising way for a fast and effective process for B, T, X, and N removal in aqueous phase.

  5. Colorimetric study of oxidation kinetics of thiolactic acid (2 - mercaptopropionic acid) by hexacyanoferrate (III) in acid and alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachhwaha, O.P.; Potter, P.C.; Kapoor, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of thiolactic acid by hexacyanoferrate (III) in acid and alkaline media employing the calorimetric method have been described. The two compounds react in equimolar ratio in both media, but the kinetic results are different in both media. In acid medium the total order is three, two with respect to thiol and one in oxidant. The rate of the reaction shows an inverse proportionality to (H + ) and also varies inversely with decreasing dielectric constant of the medium. In alkaline medium, the total order of the reaction is two, being unity in each reactant. The rate increases with increased pH value. Additions of ferrocyanide and dithio dilactic acid have no effect on the rate in both media. Additions of a neutral electrolyte does not affect the rate in the acid medium, while a positive salt effect was observed in an alkaline medium. Activation parameters have been evaluated in both media and in a medium of low dialectric. Different reaction schemes have been proposed for acid and alkaline media and have satisfactory explained the experimental data, except for the pH rate. (author)

  6. Pd-Au/C catalysts with different alloying degrees for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Li, Yunfeng; Lv, Ren-Liang; Wang, Tie-Lin; Wang, Wei-Guo; Wang, Cun-Wen

    2014-01-01

    High alloyed Pd-Au/C catalyst is prepared through a rate-limiting strategy in water/ethylene glycol solution. Pd/C and low alloyed Pd-Au/C catalysts are prepared with trisodium citrate and sodium borohydride as stabilizing and reducing agents, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the synthesized Pd(Au) particles are well dispersed on the catalysts. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) show that the high alloyed Pd-Au/C catalyst presents a relatively homogenous structure while the low alloyed Pd-Au/C catalyst presents a Pd-rich shell/Au-rich core structure. Electrochemical characterization shows that the low alloyed Pd-Au/C catalyst exhibits the best catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in alkaline media, which could be attributed to its relatively large exposed Pd surface area as compared with the high alloyed Pd-Au/C catalyst due to its Pd-rich shell structure and its enhanced adsorption of OH ads as compared with Pd/C catalyst due to its core-shell structure

  7. Analytical aspects of the remediation of soil by wet oxidation - Characterisation of tar contaminants and their degradation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Nielsen, T.; Plöger, A.

    1999-01-01

    Wet oxidation of tar compounds gives rise to a wide range of products. Due to the incorporation of oxygen, these products become increasingly more water soluble and the analytical strategy has to take into account the different physical/chemicalproperties of the compounds. An interplay between ga...

  8. Experimental studies of applicability of the wet air oxidation for purification liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergienko, V. I.; Dobrzansky, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    The scheme of handling with liquid radioactive waste (LRW) accepted to exploitation at atomic electric station (AWS) is often connected with evaporating technologies. In this case vat residues of evaporating systems with activity 10 5 -10 6 Bq/1 and containing to 200-300 g/1 of salts are delivered up to LRW storages for lasting keeping. This schema does not correlate to the modern safety standards of handling with LRW, therefore at present numerous works are being carried on including those using technology of accumulated vat residues processing. Some successful experiments on sorption purification of high-salt LRW from cesium radionuclides giving the principal contribution into the total activity of a certain LRW are known. Unfortunately, attempts of sorption purification of the vat residues from other long-lived radionuclides (mainly from 60 Co-radionuclide) were unsuccessful up to the present time. It is found with the fact that the vat residues contain a considerable amount of complexing agent producing stable complexes with transition metal radionuclides including those of 60 Co. Extreme oxidation of the vat residues for decomposition of radioactive organic complexes is one of the solutions of this problem. The works related to oxidation of LRW including the AES vat residues with ozone, hydrogen peroxide as well as photo catalytic and electrochemical oxidation are known, however, possibilities of wet air oxidation (WAO) for LRW processing are not studied till the present time. Condition for decomposition of cobalt complex compounds and necessary excess of oxidizing agent may be easily attained with WAO usage. The necessary experiments were carried out at the experimental plant with the great interface surface (oxygen-solutions) equal to 400m -1 and 3 mm probe bed thickness. The heating time of the reactor to the working temperature 250 .deg. C did not exceed 50 seconds. 20... 50-fold oxidizer excess was achieved by the initial oxygen pressure into the reactor

  9. Development of a novel wet oxidation process for hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. The over all objective of the effort described here is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of these multi-component wastes, with the aim of providing a versatile, non-thermal method which will destroy hazardous organic compounds while simultaneously containing and concentrating toxic and radioactive metals for recovery or disposal in a readily stabilized matrix. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials. The metal catalysts are in the form of salts dissolved in a dilute acid solution. A typical catalyst composition is 60% ferric chloride, 3--4% hydrochloric acid, 0.13% platinum ions, and 0.13% ruthenium ions in a water solution. The catalyst solution is maintained at 423--473 K. Wastes are introduced into contact with the solution, where their organic portion is oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. If the organic portion is chlorinated, hydrogen chloride will be produced as a product. The process is a viable alternative to incineration for the treatment of organic mixed wastes. Estimated costs for waste treatment using the process are from $2.50/kg to $25.00/kg, depending on the size of the unit and the amount of waste processed. Process units can be mobile for on-site treatment of wastes. Results from phase 1 and 2, design and engineering studies, are described

  10. Hollow raspberry-like PdAg alloy nanospheres: High electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Hu, Yongli; Liu, Mingrui; Zheng, Yixiong

    2015-03-01

    Palladium-silver (PdAg) alloy nanospheres with unique structure were prepared using a one-pot procedure based on the galvanic replacement reaction. Their electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media was evaluated. The morphology and crystal structure of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) measurements were used to analyze the electrochemical performance of the PdAg alloy nanospheres. The SEM and TEM images showed that the PdAg alloy nanospheres exhibit a hierarchical nanostructure with hollow interiors and porous walls. Compared to the commercial Pd/C catalyst, the as-prepared PdAg alloy nanospheres exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity and stability towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline media, showing its potential as a new non-Pt electro-catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs).

  11. Reversible switching of wetting properties and erasable patterning of polymer surfaces using plasma oxidation and thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Zeeshan; Atay, Ipek; Soydan, Seren; Yagci, M. Baris; Jonáš, Alexandr; Yilgor, Emel; Kiraz, Alper; Yilgor, Iskender

    2018-05-01

    Polymer surfaces reversibly switchable from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic by exposure to oxygen plasma and subsequent thermal treatment are demonstrated. Two inherently different polymers, hydrophobic segmented polydimethylsiloxane-urea copolymer (TPSC) and hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are modified with fumed silica nanoparticles to prepare superhydrophobic surfaces with roughness on nanometer to micrometer scale. Smooth TPSC and PMMA surfaces are also used as control samples. Regardless of their chemical structure and surface topography, all surfaces display completely reversible wetting behavior changing from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and back for many cycles upon plasma oxidation followed by thermal annealing. Influence of plasma power, plasma exposure time, annealing temperature and annealing time on the wetting behavior of polymeric surfaces are investigated. Surface compositions, textures and topographies are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and white light interferometry (WLI), before and after oxidation and thermal annealing. Wetting properties of the surfaces are determined by measuring their static, advancing and receding water contact angle. We conclude that the chemical structure and surface topography of the polymers play a relatively minor role in reversible wetting behavior, where the essential factors are surface oxidation and migration of polymer molecules to the surface upon thermal annealing. Reconfigurable water channels on polymer surfaces are produced by plasma treatment using a mask and thermal annealing cycles. Such patterned reconfigurable hydrophilic regions can find use in surface microfluidics and optofluidics applications.

  12. Substrate inhibition: Oxidation of D-sorbitol and D-mannitol by potassium periodate in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman Kumar, Y.; Venkata Nadh, R.; Radhakrishnamurti, P. S.

    2014-05-01

    In the oxidation of D-sorbitol and D-mannitol by potassium periodate in alkaline media, substrate inhibition was observed with both substrates, i.e., a decrease in the rate of the reaction was observed with an increase in the concentration of substrate. The substrate inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complex between the substrate and periodate. The reactions were found to be first order in case of periodate and a positive fractional order with hydroxide ions. Arrhenius parameters were calculated for the oxidation of sorbitol and mannitol by potassium periodate in alkali media.

  13. In Vivo Alkaline Comet Assay and Enzyme-modified Alkaline Comet Assay for Measuring DNA Strand Breaks and Oxidative DNA Damage in Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Bishop, Michelle E; Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E; Davis, Kelly J; Manjanatha, Mugimane G

    2016-05-04

    Unrepaired DNA damage can lead to genetic instability, which in turn may enhance cancer development. Therefore, identifying potential DNA damaging agents is important for protecting public health. The in vivo alkaline comet assay, which detects DNA damage as strand breaks, is especially relevant for assessing the genotoxic hazards of xenobiotics, as its responses reflect the in vivo absorption, tissue distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of chemicals, as well as DNA repair process. Compared to other in vivo DNA damage assays, the assay is rapid, sensitive, visual and inexpensive, and, by converting oxidative DNA damage into strand breaks using specific repair enzymes, the assay can measure oxidative DNA damage in an efficient and relatively artifact-free manner. Measurement of DNA damage with the comet assay can be performed using both acute and subchronic toxicology study designs, and by integrating the comet assay with other toxicological assessments, the assay addresses animal welfare requirements by making maximum use of animal resources. Another major advantage of the assays is that they only require a small amount of cells, and the cells do not have to be derived from proliferating cell populations. The assays also can be performed with a variety of human samples obtained from clinically or occupationally exposed individuals.

  14. Toluene removal by oxidation reaction in spray wet scrubber: experimental, modeling and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumporn Nikom

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Toluene, an important volatile organic compound (VOC, is used in many kinds of industries, such as painting, printing, coating, and petrochemical industries. The emission of toluene causes serious air pollution, odor problem, flammability problem and affects human health. This paper proposes the removal of toluene from waste air using a spray wet scrubber combining the absorption and oxidation reaction. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl solution was used as the scrubbing liquid in the system. NaOCl, the strongest oxidative agent, presents an effective toluene removal. As the scrubbed toluene is reacted, recirculation of the scrubbing liquid could be operated with a constant removal efficiency throughout the operting time. The investigated variables affecting the removal efficiency were air flow rate, inlet toluene concentration, NaOCl concentration, scrubbing liquid flow rate and size of spray nozzle. Influence of the scrubbing parameters was experimentally studied to develop a mathematical model of the toluene removal efficiency. The removal model reveals that the increase of scrubbing liquid flow rate, toluene concentration, and NaOCl concentration together with the decrease of air flow rate and size of spray nozzle can increase the toluene removal efficiency. Optimization problem with an objective function and constraints was set to provide the maximum toluene removal efficiency and solved by Matlab optimization toolbox. The optimization constraints were formed from the mathematical model and process limitation. The solution of the optimization was an air flow rate of 100 m3/h, toluene concentration of 1500 ppm, NaOCl concentration of 0.02 mol/l, NaOCl solution feed rate of 0.8 m3/h, and spray nozzle size of 0.5 mm. Solution of the optimization gave the highest toluene removal efficiency of 91.7%.

  15. Pretreatment of corn stover using wet oxidation to enhance enzymatic digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Eniko; Schmidt, Anette S; Réczey, Kati; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is an abundant, promising raw material for fuel ethanol production. Although it has a high cellulose content, without pretreatment it resists enzymatic hydrolysis, like most lignocellulosic materials. Wet oxidation (water, oxygen, mild alkali or acid, elevated temperature and pressure) was investigated to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Six different combinations of reaction temperature, time, and pH were applied. The best conditions (60 g/L of corn stover, 195 degrees C, 15 min, 12 bar O2, 2 g/L of Na2CO3) increased the enzymatic conversion of corn stover four times, compared to untreated material. Under these conditions 60% of hemicellulose and 30% of lignin were solubilized, whereas 90% of cellulose remained in the solid fraction. After 24-h hydrolysis at 50 degrees C using 25 filter paper units (FPU)/g of drymatter (DM) biomass, the achieved conversion of cellulose to glucose was about 85%. Decreasing the hydrolysis temperature to 40 degrees C increased hydrolysis time from 24 to 72 h. Decreasing the enzyme loading to 5 FPU/g of DM biomass slightly decreased the enzymatic conversion from 83.4 to 71%. Thus, enzyme loading can be reduced without significantly affecting the efficiency of hydrolysis, an important economical aspect.

  16. Wet Oxidation of Fine Soil Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons: A Way towards a Remediation Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Collivignarelli

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experimental study was to assess the feasibility of using a wet oxidation (WO process for treating fine soil with a high level of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs. Two samples of soil were spiked with two different contaminants (motor oil, and motor oil + diesel. The samples were subjected to a WO bench plant test, where the effect of the main process parameters (i.e., temperature and reaction time on the removal of TPHs was investigated. Results show that the WO process is effective for the decontamination of hydrocarbons, and a strong reduction (>85% can be obtained with the typical working conditions of a full-scale plant (temperature = 250 °C, reaction time = 30 min. The solid residue resulting from the WO process was characterized in order to evaluate the recovery options. In terms of chemical characterization, the contents of the pollutants comply with the Italian regulations for commercial and industrial site use. Moreover, the results of the leaching test suggested that these residues could be reused for ceramic and brick manufacturing processes.

  17. Determination of boron in graphite by a wet oxidation decomposition/curcumin photometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo; Toida, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The wet oxidation decomposition of graphite materials has been studied for the accurate determination of boron using a curcumin photometric method. A graphite sample of 0.5 g was completely decomposed with a mixture of 5 ml of sulfuric acid, 3 ml of perchloric acid, 0.5 ml of nitric acid and 5 ml of phosphoric acid in a silica 100 ml Erlenmeyer flask fitted with an air condenser at 200degC. Any excess of perchloric and nitric acids in the solution was removed by heating on a hot plate at 150degC. Boron was distilled with methanol, and then recovered in 10 ml of 0.2 M sodium hydroxide. The solution was evaporated to dryness. To the residue were added curcumin-acetic acid and sulfuric-acetic acid. The mixture was diluted with ethanol, and the absorbance at 555 nm was measured. The addition of 5 ml of phosphoric acid proved to be effective to prevent any volatilization loss of boron during decomposition of the graphite sample and evaporation of the resulting solution. The relative standard deviation was 4-8% for samples with 2 μg g -1 levels of boron. The results on CRMs JAERI-G5 and G6 were in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  18. Decomposition and Mineralization of Dimethyl Phthalate in an Aqueous Solution by Wet Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar-Ren Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl phthalate (DMP was treated via wet oxygen oxidation process (WOP. The decomposition efficiency ηDMP of DMP and mineralization efficiency ηTOC of total organic carbons were measured to evaluate the effects of operation parameters on the performance of WOP. The results revealed that reaction temperature T is the most affecting factor, with a higher T offering higher ηDMP and ηTOC as expected. The ηDMP increases as rotating speed increases from 300 to 500 rpm with stirring enhancement of gas liquid mass transfer. However, it exhibits reduction effect at 700 rpm due to purging of dissolved oxygen by overstirring. Regarding the effects of pressure PT, a higher PT provides more oxygen for the forward reaction with DMP, while overhigh PT increases the absorption of gaseous products such as CO2 and decomposes short-chain hydrocarbon fragments back into the solution thus hindering the forward reaction. For the tested PT of 2.41 to 3.45 MPa, the results indicated that 2.41 MPa is appropriate. A longer reaction time of course gives better performance. At 500 rpm, 483 K, 2.41 MPa, and 180 min, the ηDMP and ηTOC are 93 and 36%, respectively.

  19. Radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and wet thermal oxidation of ZnO thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. F.; Chua, S. J.; Hu, G. X.; Gong, H.; Xiang, N.

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied the growth and wet thermal oxidation (WTO) of ZnO thin films using a radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. X-ray diffraction reveals a preferred orientation of [1010]ZnO(0002)//[1120]Al 2 O 3 (0002) coexisted with a small amount of ZnO (1011) and ZnO (1013) crystals on the Al 2 O 3 (0001) substrate. The ZnO (1011) and ZnO (1013) crystals, as well as the in-plane preferred orientation, are absent from the growth of ZnO on the GaAs(001) substrate. WTO at 550 deg. C improves the crystalline and the photoluminescence more significantly than annealing in air, N 2 and O 2 ambient; it also tends to convert the crystal from ZnO (1011) and ZnO (1013) to ZnO (0002). The evolution of the photoluminescence upon WTO and annealing reveals that the green and orange emissions, centered at 520 and 650 nm, are likely originated from oxygen vacancies and oxygen interstitials, respectively; while the 420 nm emission, which is very sensitive to the postgrowth thermal processing regardless of the substrate and the ambient gas, is likely originated from the surface-state related defects

  20. Cobalt hydroxide film on Pt as co-catalyst for oxidation of polyhydric alcohols in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Debasmita; Das, Kaushik

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of chemically prepared Co(OH) 2 film on Pt has been studied in alkaline medium using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Amount of Co(OH) 2 deposited increases linearly with the number of times of deposition. The deposit is of fibrous structure, as shown by scanning electron microphotograph. There is evidence of Co II /Co III and Co III /Co IV redox transitions during the cyclic potential scan. The former oxidation proceeds under diffusion control. The Co(OH) 2 deposit acts as an efficient co-catalyst for anodic oxidation of ethanediol, propanediol and glycerol on Pt in alkaline medium. This is demonstrated by appreciable enhancement of the alcohol oxidation currents upon deposition of Co(OH) 2 on Pt. Among the alcohols studied, the highest oxidation currents are obtained for ethanediol, both on Co(OH) 2 /Pt and bare Pt. Co(OH) 2 alone also acts as a redox mediator for alcohol oxidation at more positive potentials.

  1. Alkaline Ionic Liquid Modified Pd/C Catalyst as an Efficient Catalyst for Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Bin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of HMF into FDCA was carried out by a simple and green process based on alkaline ionic liquid (IL modified Pd/C catalyst (Pd/C-OH−. Alkaline ionic liquids were chosen to optimize Pd/C catalyst for special hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity, redox stability, and unique dissolving abilities for polar compounds. The Pd/C-OH− catalyst was successfully prepared and characterized by SEM, XRD, TG, FT-IR, and CO2-TPD technologies. Loading of alkaline ionic liquid on the surface of Pd/C was 2.54 mmol·g−1. The catalyst showed excellent catalytic activity in the HMF oxidation after optimization of reaction temperature, reaction time, catalyst amount, and solvent. Supported alkaline ionic liquid (IL could be a substitute and promotion for homogeneous base (NaOH. Under optimal reaction conditions, high HMF conversion of 100% and FDCA yield of 82.39% were achieved over Pd/C-OH− catalyst in water at 373 K for 24 h.

  2. Oxidative Stress as Estimated by Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase Levels Amplifies the Alkaline Phosphatase-Dependent Risk for Mortality in ESKD Patients on Dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Torino (Claudia); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); J.L.C.M. van Saase (Jan); M. Postorino (Maurizio); G.L. Tripepi (Giovanni); F. Mallamaci (Francesca); C. Zoccali (Carmine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAlkaline phosphatase (Alk-Phos) is a powerful predictor of death in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and oxidative stress is a strong inducer of Alk-Phos in various tissues. We tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress, as estimated by a robust marker of systemic oxidative

  3. Effects of the wet air on the properties of the lanthanum oxide and lanthanum aluminate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jin Hyung; Choi, Doo Jin

    2006-01-01

    Lanthanum oxide and lanthanum aluminate thin films were deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown films were stored in wet ambient and dry ambient for days and annealed after storage and also the structural and the electrical properties of the films were investigated. As the storage time increased, the La 2 O 3 films stored in wet ambient showed rapid reaction with moisture and the properties degraded. In case of the LAO films, although the thickness of the film also increased during hydration, the properties of the film did not so much changed due to the role of the incorporated aluminum. The LAO films showed better hydration resistance characteristics and so more suitable for conventional wet cleaning process in semiconductor fabrication

  4. Ruthenium and Platinum Catalysts Supported on Ce, Zr, Pr-O Mixed Oxides Prepared by Soft Chemistry for Acetic Acid Wet Air Oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Jana; Rossignol, S.; Barbier Jr., J.; Mesnard, D.; Kappenstein, C.; Duprez, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 72, 1-2 (2007), s. 1-10 ISSN 0926-3373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : sol-gel * catalytic wet air oxidation * acetic acid Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2007

  5. Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys in Wet Air; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Kramer; A. Thom; O. Degirmen; V. Behrani; M. Akinc

    2002-01-01

    Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing uses such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. The present work investigated the effect of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of Mo-Si-B phase assemblages. Three alloys were studied: Alloy 1= Mo(sub 5)Si(sub 3)B(sub x) (T1)- MoSi(sub 2)- MoB, Alloy 2= T1- Mo(sub 5)SiB(sub 2) (T2)- Mo(sub 3)Si, and Alloy 3= Mo- T2- Mo(sub 3)Si. Tests were conducted at 1000 and 1100C in controlled atmospheres of dry air and wet air nominally containing 18, 55, and 150 Torr H(sub 2)O. The initial mass loss of each alloy was approximately independent of the test temperature and moisture content of the atmosphere. The magnitude of these initial losses varied according to the Mo content of the alloys. All alloys formed a continuous, external silica scale that protected against further mass change after volatilization of the initially formed MoO(sub 3). All alloys experienced a small steady state mass change, but the calculated rates cannot be quantitatively compared due to statistical uncertainty in the individual mass measurements. Of particular interest is that Alloy 3, which contains a significant volume fraction of Mo metal, formed a protective scale. All alloys formed varying amounts of subscale Mo and MoO(sub 2). This implies that oxygen transport through the external silica scale has been significantly reduced. For all alloys, water vapor accelerated the growth of a multiphase interlayer at the silica scale/unoxidized alloy interface. This interlayer is likely composed of fine Mo and MoO(sub 2) that is dispersed within a thin silica matrix. Alloy 3 was particularly sensitive to water accelerated growth of this interlayer. At 1100 C, the scale thickness after 300 hours increased from about 20 mm in dry air to nearly 100 mm in wet air

  6. EFFECTS OF ALKALINE SANDY LOAM ON SULFURIC SOIL ACIDITY AND SULFIDIC SOIL OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Michael

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available  In poor soils, addition of alkaline sandy loam containing an adequate proportion of sand, silt and clay would add value by improving the texture, structure and organic matter (OM for general use of the soils. In acid sulfate soils (ASS, addition of alkaline sandy would improve the texture and leach out salts as well as add a sufficient proportion of OM for vegetation establishment. In this study, addition of alkaline sandy loam into sulfuric soil effectively increased the pH, lowered the redox and reduced the sulfate content, the magnitude of the effects dependent on moisture content. Addition of alkaline sandy loam in combination with OM was highly effective than the effects of the lone alkaline sandy loam. When alkaline sandy was added alone or in combination with OM into sulfidic soil, the effects on pH and the redox were similar as in the sulfuric soil but the effect on sulfate content was variable. The effects under aerobic conditions were higher than under anaerobic conditions. The findings of this study have important implications for the general management of ASS where lime availability is a concern and its application is limited.International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-3, June-August 2015Page: 42-54

  7. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angermann, Heike, E-mail: angermann@helmholtz-berlin.de

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D{sub it}(E), and density D{sub it,min} of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly

  8. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Oxidation of an Antiallergic Drug with Bromamine-T in Acid and Alkaline Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puttaswamy; Anu Sukhdev

    2012-01-01

    Cetrizine dihydrochloride (CTZH) is widely used as an anti-allergic drug. Sodium N-bromo-p-toluenesulfonamide or bromamine-T (BAT) is the bromine analogue of chloramine-T (CAT) and is found to be a better oxidizing agent than CAT. In the present research, the kinetics of oxidation of CTZH with BAT in acid and alkaline media was studied at 313 K. The experimental rate laws obtained are: -d[BAT]/dt = k[BAT] [CTZH] 0.80 [H + ] -0.48 in acid medium and -d[BAT]/dt = k[BAT][CTZH] 0.48 [OH - ] 0.52 [PTS] -0.40 in alkaline medium where PTS is p-toluenesulfonamide. Activation parameters and reaction constants were evaluated. The solvent isotope effect was studied using D 2 O. The dielectric effect is positive. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:1 and the oxidation products were identified as 4-chlorobenzophenone and (2-piperazin-1-yl-ethoxy)-acetic acid in both media. The rate of oxidation of CTZH is faster in acid medium. Suitable mechanisms and related rate laws have been worked out

  9. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Oxidation of an Antiallergic Drug with Bromamine-T in Acid and Alkaline Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttaswamy; Anu Sukhdev [Bangalore Univ., Bangalore (India)

    2012-11-15

    Cetrizine dihydrochloride (CTZH) is widely used as an anti-allergic drug. Sodium N-bromo-p-toluenesulfonamide or bromamine-T (BAT) is the bromine analogue of chloramine-T (CAT) and is found to be a better oxidizing agent than CAT. In the present research, the kinetics of oxidation of CTZH with BAT in acid and alkaline media was studied at 313 K. The experimental rate laws obtained are: -d[BAT]/dt = k[BAT] [CTZH]{sup 0.80}[H{sup +}]{sup -0.48} in acid medium and -d[BAT]/dt = k[BAT][CTZH]{sup 0.48}[OH{sup -}]{sup 0.52}[PTS]{sup -0.40} in alkaline medium where PTS is p-toluenesulfonamide. Activation parameters and reaction constants were evaluated. The solvent isotope effect was studied using D{sub 2}O. The dielectric effect is positive. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:1 and the oxidation products were identified as 4-chlorobenzophenone and (2-piperazin-1-yl-ethoxy)-acetic acid in both media. The rate of oxidation of CTZH is faster in acid medium. Suitable mechanisms and related rate laws have been worked out.

  10. A ternary nanocatalyst of Ni/Cr/Co oxides with high activity and stability for alkaline glucose electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yingying; Yang, Haihong; Li, Benqiang; An, Yarui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ni-Cr-Co nanomaterial was synthesized by thermal decomposition method. • Ni 4 -Cr 1 -Co 1.5 has the highest GOR activity among the prepared catalysts. • A catalytic current density of 23.8 mA × cm −2 is attained for alkaline GOR. - Abstract: A novel ternary nanocatalyst of Ni-Cr-Co oxides is synthesized as anode electro-catalysts for glucose oxidation. The nanostructure is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), which indicates that the catalyst particles are well dispersed with average size of 30 nm when the calcination temperature is 500 °C. The electrochemical performance is evaluated via cyclic voltammetry (CV). Compared with the bimetallic Ni-Cr and Ni-Co nanocatalysts, Ni-Cr-Co electrocatalysts exhibites more negative onset potential (0.4 V) and high oxidation peak current density (23.8 mA cm −2 ) in alkaline media towards glucose oxidation. Meanwhile, the results also show that the Ni-Cr-Co nanomaterial possesses good performance of anti-poisoning capability, reproducibility and long-time stability, which make it an excellent candidate for fuel cell electrocatalyst.

  11. Wet oxidation treatment of organic household waste enriched with wheat straw for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation into ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.

    2004-01-01

    Organic municipal solid waste enriched with wheat straw was subjected to wet-oxidation as a pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation into bio-ethanol. The effect of tempera (185-195degrees C), oxygen pressure (3-12) and sodium carbonate (0-2 g l(-1)) addition on enzymatic...... in the treated waste could be converted into respectively hexose and pentose sugars compared to 46% for cellulose and 36% for hemicellulose in the raw waste. For all wet oxidation conditions tested, total carbohydrate recoveries were high (> 89%) and 44-66% of the original lignin could be converted into non......-toxic carboxylic acids mainly (2.2-4.5 % on DS basis). Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the treated waste at 10% DS by Saccharomyces cerevisae yielded average ethanol concentrations of 16.5 to 22 g l(-1) for enzyme loadings of 5 and 25 FPU g(-1) DS, respectively. The cellulose to ethanol...

  12. Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Coated onto Macronutrient Fertilizers in an Alkaline Calcareous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Narges; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Kirby, Jason K.; Beak, Douglas G.; Stacey, Samuel P.; McLaughlin, Mike J.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles may provide a more soluble and plant available source of Zn in Zn fertilizers due to their greater reactivity compared to equivalent micron- or millimetre-sized (bulk) particles. However, the effect of soil on solubility, spatial distribution and speciation of ZnO nanoparticles has not yet been investigated. In this study, we examined the diffusion and solid phase speciation of Zn in an alkaline calcareous soil following application of nanoparticulate and bulk ZnO coated fertilizer products (monoammonium phosphate (MAP) and urea) using laboratory-based x-ray techniques and synchrotron-based μ-x-ray fluorescence (μ–XRF) mapping and absorption fine structure spectroscopy (μ–XAFS). Mapping of the soil-fertilizer reaction zones revealed that most of the applied Zn for all treatments remained on the coated fertilizer granule or close to the point of application after five weeks of incubation in soil. Zinc precipitated mainly as scholzite (CaZn2(PO4)2.2H2O) and zinc ammonium phosphate (Zn(NH4)PO4) species at the surface of MAP granules. These reactions reduced dissolution and diffusion of Zn from the MAP granules. Although Zn remained as zincite (ZnO) at the surface of urea granules, limited diffusion of Zn from ZnO-coated urea granules was also observed for both bulk and nanoparticulate ZnO treatments. This might be due to either the high pH of urea granules, which reduced solubility of Zn, or aggregation (due to high ionic strength) of released ZnO nanoparticles around the granule/point of application. The relative proportion of Zn(OH)2 and ZnCO3 species increased for all Zn treatments with increasing distance from coated MAP and urea granules in the calcareous soil. When coated on macronutrient fertilizers, Zn from ZnO nanoparticles (without surface modifiers) was not more mobile or diffusible compared to bulk forms of ZnO. The results also suggest that risk associated with the presence of ZnO NPs in calcareous soils would be the

  13. Alkaline peroxide treatment of ECF bleached softwood kraft pulps: part 2. effect of increased fiber charge on refining, wet-end application, and hornification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng Dang; Thomas Elder; Jeffery S. Hsieh; Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2007-01-01

    The effect of increased fiber charge on refining, cationic starch adsorption, and hornification was examined. Two pulps were investigated: (1) a softwood (SW) kraft pulp (KP) which was bleached elementally chlorine-free (ECF) and sewed as control; and (2) a control pulp treated with alkaline peroxide, which had a higher fiber charge. It was shown that increased fiber...

  14. High Electrocatalytic Performance of CuCoNi@CNTs Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode towards Methanol Oxidation in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina A. Hamza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel non-precious multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs—supported metal oxide electrocatalyst was developed for methanol electrooxidation in alkaline medium. The catalyst was fabricated by simultaneous electrodeposition of copper-cobalt-nickel ternary nanostructures (CuCoNi on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE modified with CNTs. The proposed electrode was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The electrochemical behavior and the electrocatalytic performance of the suggested electrode towards the oxidation of methanol were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV, linear sweep voltammetry (LSV, and chronoamperometry (CA in alkaline medium. Several parameters were investigated, e.g., deposition time, potential scan rate, etc. Compared to Cu, Co, or Ni mono electrocatalysts, the electrode based on ternary-metals exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity and stability towards methanol electrooxidation. For instance, CuCoNi@CNTs/GCE has shown at least 2.5 times electrocatalytic activity and stability compared to the mono eletrocatalysts. Moreover, the present study found that the optimized loading level is 1500 s of simultaneous electrodeposition. At this loading level, it was found that the relation between the Ip/ν1/2 function and scan rate gives the characteristic features of a catalytic process. The enhanced activity and stability of CuCoNi@CNTs/GCE was attributed to (i a synergism between three metal oxides coexisting in the same structure; (ii the presence of CNTs as a support for the metal oxides, that offers high surface area for the deposited tertiary alloy and suppresses the aggregation and sintering of the metals oxide with time; as well as (iii the increase of the conductivity of the deposited semiconducting metal oxides.

  15. Electrocatalytic activity and operational stability of electrodeposited Pd-Co films towards ethanol oxidation in alkaline electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Lok-kun; Zafferoni, Claudio; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Innocenti, Massimo; Vizza, Francesco; Zangari, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are usually run with Pd anodic catalysts, but their performance can be improved by utilizing alloys of Pd and Co. The oxyphilic Co serves to supply ample -OH to the ethanol oxidation reaction, accelerating the rate limiting step at low overpotential under alkaline conditions. Pd-Co films with compositions between 20 and 80 at% Co can be prepared by electrodeposition from a NH3 complexing electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetry studies show that the ethanol oxidation peak exhibits increasing current density with increasing Co content, reaching a maximum at 77% Co. In contrast, potentiostatic measurements under conditions closer to fuel cell operating conditions show that a 50 at% Co alloy has the highest performance. Importantly, the Co-Pd film is also found to undergo phase and morphological transformations during ethanol oxidation, resulting in a change from a compact film to high surface area flake-like structures containing Co3O4 and CoOOH; such a transformation instead is not observed when operating at a constant potential of 0.7 VRHE.

  16. Microwave activation of palladium nanoparticles for enhanced ethanol electrocatalytic oxidation reaction in alkaline medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rohwer, MB

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available in alkaline medium (in terms of high mass activity stability and fast reaction kinetics). The remarkable microwave-induced properties on the Pd catalyst promise to revolutionize the use of microwave for catalyst activation for enhanced heterogeneous catalysis...

  17. Three-dimensional block copolymer nanostructures by the solvent-annealing-induced wetting in anodic aluminum oxide templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiang-Jui; Chung, Pei-Yun; Chi, Mu-Huan; Kao, Yi-Huei; Chen, Jiun-Tai

    2014-09-01

    Block copolymers have been extensively studied over the last few decades because they can self-assemble into well-ordered nanoscale structures. The morphologies of block copolymers in confined geometries, however, are still not fully understood. In this work, the fabrication and morphologies of three-dimensional polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) nanostructures confined in the nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates are studied. It is discovered that the block copolymers can wet the nanopores using a novel solvent-annealing-induced nanowetting in templates (SAINT) method. The unique advantage of this method is that the problem of thermal degradation can be avoided. In addition, the morphologies of PS-b-PDMS nanostructures can be controlled by changing the wetting conditions. Different solvents are used as the annealing solvent, including toluene, hexane, and a co-solvent of toluene and hexane. When the block copolymer wets the nanopores in toluene vapors, a perpendicular morphology is observed. When the block copolymer wets the nanopores in co-solvent vapors (toluene/hexane = 3:2), unusual circular and helical morphologies are obtained. These three-dimensional nanostructures can serve as naontemplates for refilling with other functional materials, such as Au, Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 . © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Reaction mechanisms at 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface during wet SiC oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Toru; Hori, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Masashi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    The reaction processes at the interface between SiC with 4H structure (4H-SiC) and SiO2 during wet oxidation are investigated by electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory. Our calculations for 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces with various orientations demonstrate characteristic features of the reaction depending on the crystal orientation of SiC: On the Si-face, the H2O molecule is stable in SiO2 and hardly reacts with the SiC substrate, while the O atom of H2O can form Si-O bonds at the C-face interface. Two OH groups are found to be at least necessary for forming new Si-O bonds at the Si-face interface, indicating that the oxidation rate on the Si-face is very low compared with that on the C-face. On the other hand, both the H2O molecule and the OH group are incorporated into the C-face interface, and the energy barrier for OH is similar to that for H2O. By comparing the calculated energy barriers for these reactants with the activation energies of oxide growth rate, we suggest the orientation-dependent rate-limiting processes during wet SiC oxidation.

  19. Pretreatment of wheat straw using combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis resulting in convertible cellulose and hemicellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Bjerring Olesen, A.; Fernqvist, T.

    1996-01-01

    to 10 min) gave about 85% w/w yield of converting cellulose to glucose. The process water, containing dissolved hemicellulose and carboxylic acids, has proven to be a direct nutrient source for the fungus Aspergillus niger producing exo-beta-xylosidase. Furfural and hydroxymethyl-furfural, known...

  20. Two dimensional visible-light-active Pt-BiOI photoelectrocatalyst for efficient ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Hu, Jiayue; Sun, Mingjuan; Zhu, Mingshan

    2018-02-01

    Two dimensional (2D) BiOI nanoplates were synthesized and used as support for the deposition of Pt nanoparticles. Owing to broad visible light absorption (up to 660 nm), the as-obtained Pt-BiOI electrode was used as effective photoelectrocatalyst in the application of catalytic ethanol oxidation in alkaline media under visible light irradiation. Compared to dark condition, the Pt-BiOI modified electrode displayed 3 times improved catalytic activity towards ethanol oxidation under visible light irradiation. The synergistic effect of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic, and the unique of 2D structures contribute to the improvement of catalytic activity. The mechanism of enhanced photoelectrocatalytic process is proposed. The present results suggest that 2D visible-light-activated BiOI can be served as promising support for the decoration of Pt and applied in the fields of photoelectrochemical and photo-assisted fuel cell applications

  1. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-01-01

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains ∼240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is 137 Cs. The waste also contains ∼0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed 90 Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO 2 , H 2 O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is injected into the pressurized

  2. Application of advanced oxidation processes for cleaning of industrial water generated in wet dedusting of shaft furnace gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplicka, Marianna; Kurowski, Ryszard; Jaworek, Katarzyna; Bratek, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies into advanced oxidation processes in 03 and 03/UV systems. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) was conducted to reduce the load of impurities in circulating waters from wet de-dusting of shaft furnace gases. Besides inorganic impurities, i.e. mainly arsenic compounds (16 g As L(-1) on average), lead, zinc, chlorides and sulphates, the waters also contain some organic material. The organic material is composed of a complex mixture that contains, amongst others, aliphatic compounds, phenol and its derivatives, pyridine bases, including pyridine, and its derivatives. The test results show degradation of organic and inorganic compounds during ozonation and photo-oxidation processes. Analysis of the solutions from the processes demonstrated that the complex organic material in the industrial water was oxidized in ozonation and in photo-oxidation, which resulted in formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Kinetic degradation of selected pollutants is presented. Obtained results indicated that the O3/UV process is more effective in degradation of organic matter than ozonation. Depending on the process type, precipitation of the solid phase was observed. The efficiency of solid-phase formation was higher in photo-oxidation with ozone. It was found that the precipitated solid phase is composed mainly of arsenic, iron and oxygen.

  3. Optimization of Pt-Ir on carbon fiber paper for the electro-oxidation of ammonia in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, Bryan K.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2010-01-01

    Plating bath concentrations of Pt(IV) and Ir(III) have been optimized as well as the total catalytic loading of bimetallic Pt-Ir alloy for the electro-oxidation of ammonia in alkaline media at standard conditions. This was accomplished using cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and statistical optimization tools. Concentrations of Pt(IV) and Ir(III) of the plating bath strongly influence electrode surface atomic compositions of the Pt-Ir alloy directly affecting the electro-oxidation behavior of ammonia. Several anode materials were studied using cyclic voltammetry, which demonstrated that Pt-Ir was the most active catalyst for the electro-oxidation of ammonia. Criteria for optimization were minimizing the climatic oxidation overpotential for ammonia and maximizing the exchange current density. Optimized bath composition was found to be 8.844 ± 0.001 g L -1 Pt(IV) and 4.112 ± 0.001 g L -1 Ir(III) based on electrochemical techniques. Physical characterization of the electrodes by SEM indicates that the plating bath concentrations of Pt and Ir influence the growth and deposition behavior of the alloy.

  4. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Co3(PO42 Nanospheres for Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Methanol in Alkaline Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakarn Arunachalam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost and high-performance advanced electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells are of key significance for the improvement of environmentally-pleasant energy technologies. Herein, we report the facile synthesis of cobalt phosphate (Co3(PO42 nanospheres by a microwave-assisted process and utilized as an electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. The phase formation, morphological surface structure, elemental composition, and textural properties of the synthesized (Co3(PO42 nanospheres have been examined by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm investigations. The performance of an electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol over a Co3(PO42 nanosphere-modified electrode was evaluated in an alkaline solution using cyclic voltammetry (CV and chronopotentiometry (CP techniques. Detailed studies were made for the methanol oxidation by varying the experimental parameters, such as catalyst loading, methanol concentration, and long-term stability for the electro-oxidation of methanol. The good electrocatalytic performances of Co3(PO42 should be related to its good surface morphological structure and high number of active surface sites. The present investigation illustrates the promising application of Co3(PO42 nanospheres as a low-cost and more abundant electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

  5. Correlation of Surface Adsorption and Oxidation with a Floatability Difference of Galena and Pyrite in High-Alkaline Lime Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaopeng; Ruan, Renman; Xia, Liuyin; Li, Li; Sun, Heyun; Jia, Yan; Tan, Qiaoyi

    2018-02-27

    When it comes to Pb-Zn ores with high amounts of pyrite, the major problem encountered is the low separation efficiency between galena and pyrite. By virtue of high dosage of lime and collector sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate (DDTC), pyrite and zinc minerals are depressed, allowing the galena to be floated. However, there have been significant conflicting reports on the flotation behavior of galena at high pH. In this context, correlation of the surface adsorption and oxidation with the floatability difference of galena and pyrite in high-alkaline lime systems would be a key issue for process optimization. Captive bubble contact angle measurements were performed on freshly polished mineral surfaces in situ exposed to lime solutions of varying pH as a function of immersion time. Furthermore, single mineral microflotation tests were conducted. Both tests indicated that the degree of hydrophobicity on the surfaces of galena and pyrite increased in the presence of DDTC at natural or mild pulp pH. While in a saturated lime solution, at pH 12.5, DDTC only worked for galena, but not for pyrite. Surface chemistry analysis by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-SIMS) confirmed the preference of DDTC on the galena surface at pH 12.5, which contributed to a merit recovery. Further important evidence through measurements of Tof-SIMS, ion chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that in high-alkaline lime systems, the merit floatability of galena could exclude the insignificant contribution of elemental sulfur (S 8 ) and was dominantly attributed by the strong adsorption of DDTC. In contrast, the poor flotation response of pyrite at high pH was due to the prevailing adsorption of CaOH + species. This study provides an important surface chemistry evidence for a better understanding of the mechanism on the better selectivity in the galena-pyrite separation adopting high-alkaline lime systems.

  6. Selective Oxidation and Reactive Wetting During Hot-Dip Galvanizing of a 1.0 pct Al-0.5 pct Si TRIP-Assisted Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellhouse, E. M.; McDermid, J. R.

    2012-07-01

    Selective oxidation and reactive wetting during continuous galvanizing were studied for a low-alloy transformation induced plasticity (TRIP)-assisted steel with 0.2 pct C, 1.5 pct Mn, 1.0 pct Al and 0.5 pct Si. Three process atmospheres were tested during annealing prior to galvanizing: 220 K (-53 °C) dew point (dp) N2-20 pct H2, 243 K (-30 °C) dp N2-5 pct H2 and 278 K (+5 °C) dp N2-5 pct H2. The process atmosphere oxygen partial pressure affected the oxide chemistry, morphology and thickness. For the 220 K (-53 °C) dp and 243 K (-30 °C) dp process atmospheres, film and nodule-type manganese, silicon and aluminum containing oxides were observed at the surface. For the 278 K (+5 °C) dp atmosphere, MnO was observed at the grain boundaries and as thicker localized surface films. Oxide morphology, thickness and chemistry affected reactive wetting, with complete wetting being observed for the 220 K (-53 °C) dp and 243 K (-30 °C) dp process atmospheres and incomplete reactive wetting being observed for the 278 K (+5 °C) dp atmosphere. Complete reactive wetting for the 220 K (-53 °C) dp and 243 K (-30 °C) dp process atmospheres was attributed to a combination of zinc bridging of oxides, aluminothermic reduction of surface oxides and wetting of the oxides. Incomplete wetting for the 278 K (+5 °C) dp atmosphere was attributed to localized thick MnO films.

  7. Speciation and Oxidative Stability of Alkaline Soluble, Non-Pertechnetate Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Amity [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peterson, James M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chatterjee, Sayandev [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walter, Eric D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cho, Herman M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The long half-life, complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes, and high mobility in subsurface environments make technetium (Tc) one of the most difficult contaminants to dispose of and/or remediate. Technetium exists predominantly in the liquid tank waste phase as the relatively mobile form of pertechnetate, TcO4-. However, based on experimentation to date a significant fraction of the soluble Tc cannot be effectively separated from the wastes and may be present as a non- pertechnetate species. The presence of a non-pertechnetate species significantly complicates disposition of low-activity waste (LAW), and the development of methods to either convert them to pertechnetate or to separate directly is needed. The challenge is the uncertainty regarding the chemical form of the alkaline-soluble low-valent non-pertechnetate species in the liquid tank waste. This report summarizes work done in fiscal year (FY) 2014 exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium(I) species, [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants.

  8. Production of zinc and manganese oxide particles by pyrolysis of alkaline and Zn-C battery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebin, Burçak; Petranikova, Martina; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Production of zinc and manganese oxide particles from alkaline and zinc-carbon battery black mass was studied by a pyrolysis process at 850-950°C with various residence times under 1L/minN2(g) flow rate conditions without using any additive. The particular and chemical properties of the battery waste were characterized to investigate the possible reactions and effects on the properties of the reaction products. The thermodynamics of the pyrolysis process were studied using the HSC Chemistry 5.11 software. The carbothermic reduction reaction of battery black mass takes place and makes it possible to produce fine zinc particles by a rapid condensation, after the evaporation of zinc from a pyrolysis batch. The amount of zinc that can be separated from the black mass is increased by both pyrolysis temperature and residence time. Zinc recovery of 97% was achieved at 950°C and 1h residence time using the proposed alkaline battery recycling process. The pyrolysis residue is mainly MnO powder with a low amount of zinc, iron and potassium impurities and has an average particle size of 2.9μm. The obtained zinc particles have an average particle size of about 860nm and consist of hexagonal crystals around 110nm in size. The morphology of the zinc particles changes from a hexagonal shape to s spherical morphology by elevating the pyrolysis temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Wet-Chemical Preparation of Silicon Tunnel Oxides for Transparent Passivated Contacts in Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Malte; Pomaska, Manuel; Lentz, Florian; Finger, Friedhelm; Rau, Uwe; Ding, Kaining

    2018-05-02

    Transparent passivated contacts (TPCs) using a wide band gap microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H(n)), silicon tunnel oxide (SiO 2 ) stack are an alternative to amorphous silicon-based contacts for the front side of silicon heterojunction solar cells. In a systematic study of the μc-SiC:H(n)/SiO 2 /c-Si contact, we investigated selected wet-chemical oxidation methods for the formation of ultrathin SiO 2 , in order to passivate the silicon surface while ensuring a low contact resistivity. By tuning the SiO 2 properties, implied open-circuit voltages of 714 mV and contact resistivities of 32 mΩ cm 2 were achieved using μc-SiC:H(n)/SiO 2 /c-Si as transparent passivated contacts.

  10. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of lignin in a three-phase reactor with aromatic aldehyde production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales F.G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a process of catalytic wet air oxidation of lignin obtained from sugar-cane bagasse is developed with the objective of producing vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in a continuous regime. Palladium supported on g-alumina was used as the catalyst. The reactions in the lignin degradation and aldehyde production were described by a kinetic model as a system of complex parallel and series reactions, in which pseudo-first-order steps are found. For the purpose of producing aromatic aldehydes in continuous regime, a three-phase fluidized reactor was built, and it was operated using atmospheric air as the oxidizer. The best yield in aromatic aldehydes was of 12%. The experimental results were compatible with those values obtained by the pseudo-heterogeneous axial dispersion model (PHADM applied to the liquid phase.

  11. Precision Recess of AlGaN/GaN with Controllable Etching Rate Using ICP-RIE Oxidation and Wet Etching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokolovskij, R.; Sun, J.; Santagata, F.; Iervolino, E.; Li, S.; Zhang, G.Y.; Sarro, P.M.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2016-01-01

    A method for highly controllable etching of AlGaN/GaN for the fabrication of high sensitivity HEMT based sensors is developed. The process consists of cyclic oxidation of nitride with O2 plasma using ICP-RIE etcher followed by wet etching of the oxidized layer. Previously reported

  12. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-01-01

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 /ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  13. Catalytic wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater on ruthenium-based eggshell catalysts in a bubbling bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Sun, Y; Xu, A H; Lu, X Y; Du, H Z; Sun, C L; Li, C

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic wet air of coke-plant wastewater was studied in a bubbling bed reactor. Two types of supported Ru-based catalysts, eggshell and uniform catalysts, were employed. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater, supported Ru uniform catalysts showed high activity for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia/ammonium compounds (NH3-N) removal at temperature of 250 degrees C and pressure of 4.8 MPa, and it has been demonstrated that the catalytic activity of uniform catalyst depended strongly on the distribution of active sites of Ru on catalyst. Compared to the corresponding uniform catalysts with the same Ru loading (0.25 wt.% and 0.1 wt.%, respectively), the eggshell catalysts showed higher activities for CODcr removal and much higher activities for NH3-N degradation. The high activity of eggshell catalyst for treatment of coke-plant wastewater can be attributed to the higher density of active Ru sites in the shell layer than that of the corresponding uniform catalyst with the same Ru loading. It has been also evidenced that the active Ru sites in the internal core of uniform catalyst have very little or no contribution to CODcr and NH3-N removal in the total oxidation of coke-plant wastewater.

  14. Selective Recovery of Yttrium and Ytterbium Oxides from Abu Rusheid REEs Concentrate via Alkaline Leaching and Solvent Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sheikh, E.M.

    2017-01-01

    The REEs concentrate prepared from Abu Rusheid lamprophyre ore material is found to assay 44.65% Y_2O_3 and 13.87% Yb_2O_3 together with less amounts of 10 other REEs. This concentrate has been subjected to alkaline leaching process using seven different alkali reagents (single or mixed). From the obtained results, the mixed Na_2CO_3/(NH_4)HCO_3 reagent has been able to leach up to 87.32 % of Yb and 98.73% of Y together with a minor amount of Eu( 1.44)%. Finally, TBP extractant has been used to separate highly pure Yb and Y concentrate oxides from the nitrate solution

  15. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Triethylene Glycol and Tetraethylene Glycol by Ditelluratoargentate (III in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhuan Shan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of triethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol by ditelluratoargentate (III (DTA in alkaline liquids has been studied spectrophotometrically in the temperature range of 293.2 K–313.2 K. The reaction rate showed first-order dependence in DTA and fractional order with respect to triethylene glycol or tetraethylene glycol. It was found that the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs increased with an increase in concentration of OH− and a decrease in concentration of H4TeO6 2−. There was a negative salt effect and no free radicals were detected. A plausible mechanism involving a two-electron transfer was proposed, and the rate equations derived from the mechanism explained all the experimental results and observations. The activation parameters along with the rate constants of the rate-determining step were calculated.

  16. Nanocarbon/oxide composite catalysts for bifunctional oxygen reduction and evolution in reversible alkaline fuel cells: A mini review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengjie; Wang, Lei; Yang, Haipeng; Zhao, Shuai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Gang

    2018-01-01

    A reversible fuel cell (RFC), which integrates a fuel cell with an electrolyzer, is similar to a rechargeable battery. This technology lies on high-performance bifunctional catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the fuel cell mode and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in the electrolyzer mode. Current catalysts are platinum group metals (PGM) such as Pt and Ir, which are expensive and scarce. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop PGM-free catalysts for large-scale application of RFCs. In this mini review, we discussed the most promising nanocarbon/oxide composite catalysts for ORR/OER bifunctional catalysis in alkaline media, which is mainly based on our recent progress. Starting with the effectiveness of selected oxides and nanocarbons in terms of their activity and stability, we outlined synthetic methods and the resulting structures and morphologies of catalysts to provide a correlation between synthesis, structure, and property. A special emphasis is put on understanding of the possible synergistic effect between oxide and nanocarbon for enhanced performance. Finally, a few nanocomposite catalysts are discussed as typical examples to elucidate the rules of designing highly active and durable bifunctional catalysts for RFC applications.

  17. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure and Thermochemistry of Alkaline-Earth Oxide-Coated Thermionic Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, E. K.; Bassey, E.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1998-01-01

    NASA LeRC has a broad, active cathode technology development program in which both experimental and theoretical studies are being employed to further development of thermionic cathodes for use as electron sources in vacuum devices for communications and other space applications. One important type of thermionic cathode under development is the alkaline-earth oxide-coated (BaO, SrO, CaO) cathode. Significant improvements in the emission characteristics of this cathode have been obtained through modification of the chemical composition and morphology of the oxide coating, with the best result thus far coming from the addition of In2O3 and Sc2O3. Whereas the In2O3 produces a finer, more uniform particle structure, the exact chemical state and role of the Sc2O3 in the emission enhancement is unknown. The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to combine the studies of the surface chemistry and electron emission at NASA LeRC of chemically modified oxide coatings with a study of the thermochemistry and crystal structure using X-ray diffraction equipment and expertise at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). The study at CAU is intended to provide the description and understanding of the structure and thermochemistry needed for further improvement and optimization of the modified coatings. A description of the experimental procedure, preliminary X-ray diffraction test results, together with the design of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber necessary for high temperature thermochemistry studies will be presented.

  18. Comparative study of the luminescence of structures with Ge nanocrystals formed by dry and wet oxidation of SiGe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RodrIguez, A; Ortiz, M I; Sangrador, J; RodrIguez, T; Avella, M; Prieto, A C; Torres, A; Jimenez, J; Kling, A; Ballesteros, C

    2007-01-01

    The luminescence emission of structures containing Ge nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix obtained by dry and wet oxidation of polycrystalline SiGe layers has been studied as a function of the oxidation time and initial SiGe layer thickness. A clear relationship between the intensity of the luminescence, the structure of the sample, the formation of Ge nanocrystals and the oxidation process parameters that allows us to select the appropriate process conditions to get the most efficient emission has been established. The evolution of the composition and thickness of the growing oxides and the remaining SiGe layer during the oxidation processes has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. For dry oxidation, the luminescence appears suddenly, regardless of the initial SiGe layer thickness, when all the Si of the SiGe has been oxidized and the remaining layer of the segregated Ge starts to be oxidized forming Ge nanocrystals. Luminescence is observed as long as Ge nanocrystals are present. For wet oxidation, the luminescence appears from the first stages of the oxidation, and is related to the formation of Ge-rich nanoclusters trapped in the mixed (Si and Ge) growing oxide. A sharp increase of the luminescence intensity for long oxidation times is also observed, due to the formation of Ge nanocrystals by the oxidation of the layer of segregated Ge. For both processes the luminescence is quenched when the oxidation time is long enough to cause the full oxidation of the Ge nanocrystals. The intensity of the luminescence in the dry oxidized samples is about ten times higher than in the wet oxidized ones for equal initial thickness of the SiGe layer

  19. Treatment of Row Leachate Using Catalytic Wet Oxidation Processes in Combination Hydrogen Peroxide, A Case Study of Isfahan Composting Factory Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Karimi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of toxic organic compounds is one of the major applications of the Wet Air Oxidation (WAO processes. The process can be defined  as the oxidation of substances, either in the form of solutions or suspensions, with the use of an oxidant (oxygen or air at elevated pressure and temperature. The aim of this paper was to study of Catalytic Wet Oxidation (CWAO with hydrogen peroxide to improve removal efficiency of organic matter and ammonia mainly produced in Isfahan composting factory leachate. The experiment was carried out by adding 1.5 Lit pretreated leachate sample to 3 Lit autoclave reactor. Four parameters are considered: pressure (8–12 bar; temperature (100–300 °C; retention time (30–90 min; H2O2 (1–5 mL/L.The highest removal efficiencies of COD and BOD were achieved at 300°C; approximately 44% and 48% were destroyed, respectively. On the other hand, highest ammonium removal efficiency was achieved at 100 °C in which approximately 63.8% was removed. The efficiency of aqueous phase oxidation can be largely improved by the use of H2O2 as catalyst. Therefore, catalytic wet oxidation would provide an environmentally attractive option for control of organic and toxic wastes problems. Temperature was found to be the most important control variable of the wet oxidation process of leachate.

  20. Direct synthesis of nanocrystalline oxide powders by wet-chemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Srdić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent period there is a great need for increasing the knowledge of tailoring the innovative procedures for the synthesis of electroceramic nanopowders and materials with improved quality for specific application. In order to produce electroceramics with desirable microstructure and properties, synthesis of stoichiometric, ultra-fine and agglomerate free powders with narrow size distributions is one of the most important steps. Within this scope, in the present paper we summarize our recent results on direct synthesis of some important perovskites and ferrites nanopowders by wet-chemical techniques.

  1. Assessment of methane emission and oxidation at Air Hitam Landfill site cover soil in wet tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Elfithri, Rahmah

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH₄) emissions and oxidation were measured at the Air Hitam sanitary landfill in Malaysia and were modeled using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change waste model to estimate the CH₄ generation rate constant, k. The emissions were measured at several locations using a fabricated static flux chamber. A combination of gas concentrations in soil profiles and surface CH₄ and carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions at four monitoring locations were used to estimate the CH₄ oxidation capacity. The temporal variations in CH₄ and CO₂ emissions were also investigated in this study. Geospatial means using point kriging and inverse distance weight (IDW), as well as arithmetic and geometric means, were used to estimate total CH₄ emissions. The point kriging, IDW, and arithmetic means were almost identical and were two times higher than the geometric mean. The CH₄ emission geospatial means estimated using the kriging and IDW methods were 30.81 and 30.49 gm(−2) day(−1), respectively. The total CH₄ emissions from the studied area were 53.8 kg day(−1). The mean of the CH₄ oxidation capacity was 27.5 %. The estimated value of k is 0.138 year(−1). Special consideration must be given to the CH₄ oxidation in the wet tropical climate for enhancing CH₄ emission reduction.

  2. Oxidation of D-glucose and D-fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions. III. Kinetic approach to the product distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, H.G.J.; Kuster, Ben

    1972-01-01

    Based on a previously reported, integral reaction-scheme for the homogeneous oxidation of -glucose and -fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions, a kinetic model covering the product distribution has been developed. The model consists of a repeated set of reactions with constant rate

  3. Wet Chemical Oxidation and Stabilization of Mixed and Low Level Organic Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.A.; Livingston, R.R.; Burge, D.A.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1998-03-01

    Mixed acid oxidation is a non-incineration process capable of destroying organic compounds, including papers, plastics, resins, and oils, at moderate temperatures and pressures. The technology, developed at the Savannah River Site, uses a mixture of an oxidant (nitric acid) and a carrier acid (phosphoric acid). The carrier acid acts as a holding medium which allows appreciable amounts of the oxidant to be retained in solution at atmospheric pressure and at the temperatures needed for oxidation. The phosphoric acid also provides the raw materials for making a final waste which contains the metal contaminants from the waste stream. Savannah River has designed, built, and started up a 40-liter pilot reaction vessel to demonstrate the process and its sub-systems on a larger scale than earlier testing. The unit has been demonstrated and has provided important data on the operation of the oxidation and acid recovery systems. Specific results will be presented on oxidation conditions, acid recovery efficiency, chloride removal, metal retention, and process monitoring. Additional studies have been conducted with a smaller vessel in a radioactive hood. Testing with plutonium-bearing waste simulants was performed to make preliminary predictions about the behavior of plutonium in the process. Samples of the remaining phosphoric acid from these tests has been converted to two separate final forms for analysis. Results will be presented on plutonium fractionation during the oxidation process and waste form stability

  4. THEORETICAL-ANALYSIS OF THE O(1S) BINDING-ENERGY SHIFTS IN ALKALINE-EARTH OXIDES - CHEMICAL OR ELECTROSTATIC CONTRIBUTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PACCHIONI, G; BAGUS, PS

    1994-01-01

    We report results from ab initio cluster-model calculations on the O(1s) binding energy (BE) in the alkaline-earth oxides, MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO; all these oxides have a cubic lattice structure. We have obtained values for both the initial- and final-state BE's. A simple point-charge model, where

  5. Optical properties of alkaline earth borate glasses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ... devices; radiation shields, surgical lasers and their glass ceramic counter ... Alkaline earth oxides improve glass forming capability while heavy metal ... reports on optical properties of MO-B2O3 glasses containing alkaline earth oxides.

  6. ABB wet flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niijhawan, P.

    1994-12-31

    The wet limestone process for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is outlined. The following topics are discussed: wet flue gas desulfurization, wet FGD characteristics, wet scrubbers, ABB wet FGD experience, wet FGD forced oxidation, advanced limestone FGD systems, key design elements, open spray tower design, spray tower vs. packed tower, important performance parameters, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, influence by L/G, limestone utilization, wet FGD commercial database, particulate removal efficiencies, materials of construction, nozzle layout, spray nozzles, recycle pumps, mist elimination, horizontal flow demister, mist eliminator washing, reagent preparation system, spray tower FGDS power consumption, flue gas reheat options, byproduct conditioning system, and wet limestone system.

  7. Solid-phase electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide films in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basirun, Wan J.; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Mahmoudian, Mohammad R.; Ebadi, Mehdi

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) film was evaporated onto graphite and used as an electrode to produce electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) films by electrochemical reduction in 6 M KOH solution through voltammetric cycling. Fourier transformed infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of ERGO. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterization of ERGO and GO films in ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple with 0.1 M KCl supporting electrolyte gave results that are in accordance with previous reports. Based on the EIS results, ERGO shows higher capacitance and lower charge transfer resistance compared to GO.

  8. Purification and characterization of thiol dependent, oxidation-stable serine alkaline protease from thermophilic Bacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysha Kamran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline serine protease was purified to homogeneity from culture supernatant of a thermophilic, alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. by 80% ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by CM-cellulose and DEAE-cellulose ion exchange column chromatography. The enzyme was purified up to 16.5-fold with 6900 U/mg activity. The protease exhibited maximum activity towards casein at pH 8.0 and at 80 °C. The enzyme was stable at pH 8.0 and 80 °C temperature up to 2 h. The Ca2+ and Mn2+ enhanced the proteolytic activity up to 44% and 36% as compared to control, respectively. However, Zn2+, K+, Ba2+, Co2+, Hg2+ and Cu2+ significantly reduced the enzyme activity. PMSF (phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride completely inhibited the protease activity, whereas the activity of protease was stimulated up to two folds in the presence of 5 mM 2-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme was also stable in surfactant (Tween-80 and other commercial detergents (SDS, Triton X-100.

  9. LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

    2004-03-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young

  10. Smart Methods for Linezolid Determination in the Presence of Alkaline and Oxidative Degradation Products Utilizing Their Overlapped Spectral Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Monem Hegazy, M.; Shaaban Eissa, M.; Abd El-Sattar, O. I.; Abd El-Kawy, M. M.

    2014-09-01

    Linezolid (LIN) is considered the first available oxazolidinone antibacterial agent. It is susceptible to hydrolysis and oxidation. Five simple, accurate, sensitive and validated UV spectrophotometric methods were developed for LIN determination in the presence of its alkaline (ALK) and oxidative (OXD) degradation products in bulk powder and pharmaceutical formulation. Method A is a second derivative one (D2) in which LIN is determined at 240.9 nm. Method B is a pH-induced differential derivative one where LIN is determined using the fourth derivative (D4) of the difference spectra (ΔA) at 285.3 nm. Methods C, D, and E are manipulating ratio spectra, where C is the double divisor-ratio difference spectrophotometric one (DD-RD) in which LIN was determined by calculating the amplitude difference at 243.7 and 267.6 nm of the ratio spectra. Method D is the double divisor-first derivative of ratio spectra (DD-DD1) in which LIN was determined at 270.2 nm. Method E is a mean centering of ratio spectra one (MCR) in which LIN was determined at 318.0 nm. The developed methods have been validated according to ICH guidelines. The results were statistically compared to that of a reported HPLC method and there was no significant difference regarding both accuracy and precision.

  11. Microstructure characteristic of ceramic coatings fabricated on magnesium alloys by micro-arc oxidation in alkaline silicate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, H.F. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: Guohf@hit.edu.cn; An, M.Z. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: mzan@hit.edu.cn; Huo, H.B. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xu, S. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, L.J. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2006-09-15

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) of AZ31B magnesium alloys was studied in alkaline silicate solutions at constant applied current densities. The microstructure, phase composition and elemental distribution of ceramic coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). There are two inflections in the voltage-time response, three regions were identifiable and each of the regions was almost linear. The pores with different shapes distributed all over the coating surface, the number of the pores was decreasing, while the diameter was apparently increasing with prolonged MAO treatment time. There were also cracks on the coating surface, resulting from the rapid solidification of the molten oxide. The ceramic coating was comprised of two layers, an outer loose layer and an inner dense layer. The ceramic coating was mainly composed of forsterite phase Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and MgO; the formation of MgO was similar to conversional anodizing technology, while formation of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} was attributed to a high temperature phase transformation reaction. Presence of Si and O indicated that the electrolyte components had intensively incorporated into coatings.

  12. Ion bombardment effects on surface states in selected oxide systems: rutile and alkaline earth titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the surface states of n-type TiO 2 and SrTiO 3 is discussed and the role of ion bombardment in modifying the properties of these states is elucidated. Insofar as possible, the interrelationships between oxide nonstoichiometry, surface states, ion bombardment effects and photoelectrolysis are explored

  13. effects of mixed of mixed of mixed alkaline earth oxides in potash

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Si, P) are network formers, and that materials whose. Nigerian ... made by mixing sand (SiO2), potassium carbonates. (K2Co3) .... The edges of the glass were grounded using ..... surface energies of minerals; theoritical estimate for oxides ...

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-leucine by alkaline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    oxidative products were identified by spot test and GC-MS. The reaction ... Amino acids can undergo many types ... cases because of its limited solubility and stability in aqueous ... anism of this drug by DPC, there was a need for under-.

  15. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gwon Woo; Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively

  16. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gwon Woo [Biomass and Waste Energy Laboratory, KIER, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju [Environmental and Plant Engineering Research Institute, KICT, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively.

  17. Wet etching mechanism and crystallization of indium-tin oxide layer for application in light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shui-Hsiang; Kong, Hsieng-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Chen, Guan-Yu

    2018-01-01

    In the article, we describe the etching mechanism of indium-tin oxide (ITO) film, which was wet-etched using a solution of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and ferric chloride (FeCl3). The etching mechanism is analyzed at various etching durations of ITO films by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and selective area diffraction (SAD) analysis. In comparison with the crystalline phase of SnO2, the In2O3 phase can be more easily transformed to In3+ and can form an inverted conical structure during the etching process. By adjusting the etching duration, the residual ITO is completely removed to show a designed pattern. This is attributed to the negative Gibbs energy of In2O3 transformed to In3+. The result also corresponds to the finding of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis that the Sn/In ratio increases with increasing etching duration.

  18. Effect of Composition and Mass Ratio on the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Catalyst Cu–Fe–La/FSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO technology is used for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater and also for investigating the catalyst performance indicators such as catalyst activity and stability. The catalyst activity is mainly reflected from the water decolorization and CODCr removal rates, and the stability of the catalyst is mainly reflected by the quantity of metal dissolution. The experimental results showed that the prepared Cu–Fe–La/FSC catalyst with a 1:1:2 ratio of Cu–Fe–La by the impregnation method exhibited good activity for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater by the CWAO method, and the decolorization and CODCr removal rates using this catalyst were 98.7% and 78.6%, respectively, with a higher catalytic activity, lower concentration of metal dissolution, and good stability.

  19. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, Henrik B.

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops....... The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...... oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy...

  20. Water resistant surfaces using zinc oxide structured nanorod arrays with switchable wetting property

    OpenAIRE

    Ennaceri, H.; Wang, L.; Erfurt, D.; Riedel, W.; Mangalgiri, G.; Khaldoun, A.; El Kenz, A.; Benyoussef, A.; Ennaoui, A

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an experimental approach for fabricating super hydrophobic coatings based on a dual roughness structure composed of zinc oxide nanorod arrays coated with a sputtered zinc oxide nano layer. The ZnO nanorod arrays were grown by means of a low temperature electrochemical deposition technique 75 C on FTO substrates. The ZnO nanorods show a 002 orientation along the c axis, and have a hexagonal structure, with an average length of 710 nm, and average width of 156 nm. On th...

  1. Hydrolysis of solubilized hemicellulose derived from wet-oxidized wheat straw by a mixture of commercial fungal enzyme preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skammelsen Schmidt, Anette; Thomsen, Alle Belinda; Woidemann, Anders [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Tenkanen, Maija [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland)

    1998-04-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of the solubilized hemicellulose fraction from wet-oxidized wheat straw was investigated for quantification purposes. An optimal hydrolysis depends on factors such as composition of the applied enzyme mixture and the hydrolysis conditions (enzyme loading, hydrolysis time, pH-value, and temperature). A concentrated enzyme mixture was used in this study prepared at VTT Biotechnology and Food Research, Finland, by mixing four commercial enzyme preparations. No distinctive pH-value and temperature optima were identified after a prolonged incubation of 24 hours. By reducing the hydrolysis time to 2 hours a temperature optimum was found at 50 deg. C, where a pH-value higher than 5.2 resulted in reduced activity. An enzyme-substrate-volume-ratio of 0.042, a pH-value of 5.0, and a temperature of 50 deg. C were chosen as the best hydrolysis conditions due to an improved monosaccharide yield. The hydrolysis time was chosen to be 24 hours to ensure equilibrium and total quantification. Even under the best hydrolysis conditions, the overall sugar yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis was only 85% of that of the optimal acid hydrolysis. The glucose yield were approximately the same for the two types of hydrolyses, probably due to the high cellulase activity in the VTT-enzyme mixture. For xylose and arabinose the enzymatic hydrolysis yielded only 80% of that of the acid hydrolysis. As the pentoses existed mainly as complex polymers their degradation required many different enzymes, some of which might be missing from the VTT-enzyme mixture. Furthermore, the removal of side-choins from the xylan backbone during the wet-oxidation pretreatment process might enable the hemicellulosic polymers to interact and precipitate, hence, reducing the enzymatic digestibility of the hemicellulose. (au) 8 tabs., 10 ills., 65 refs.

  2. Oxidation of sodium (2-14C) acetate with alkaline permanganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the oxidation of sodium acetate with permanganate in alkile and neutral media have been investigated using (2- 14 C) acetate. The reaction is first order with respect to both permanganate and acetate ions. The initial second order rate constants depend linearly on the square of the hydroxide ion concentration. Arrhenius activation energy of the oxidation reaction carried out in 12M NaOH is 24.0 kcal/mole in the temperature interval of 50-100 deg C. The mechanism of the principal path leading to the oxalate formation and the mechanism of the side reaction resulting in the carbon dioxide production have been proposed and discussed. (author)

  3. Characterization of Pt-Pd/C Electrocatalyst for Methanol Oxidation in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Mahapatra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pt-Pd/C electrocatalyst was synthesized on graphite substrate by the electrochemical codeposition technique. The physicochemical characterization of the catalyst was done by SEM, XRD, and EDX. The electrochemical characterization of the Pt-Pd/C catalyst for methanol electro-oxidation was studied over a range of NaOH and methanol concentrations using cyclic voltammetry, quasisteady-state polarization, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The activity of methanol oxidation increased with pH due to better OH species coverage on the electrode surface. At methanol concentration (>1.0 M, there is no change in the oxidation peak current density because of excess methanol at the electrode surface and/or depletion of OH− at the electrode surface. The Pt-Pd/C catalyst shows good stability and the low value of Tafel slope and charge transfer resistance. The enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes is ascribed to the synergistic effect of higher electrochemical surface area, preferred OH− adsorption, and ad-atom contribution on the alloyed surface.

  4. Investigation of the Alkaline Electrochemical Interface and Development of Composite Metal/Metal-Oxides for Hydrogen and Oxygen Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael

    Understanding the fundamentals of electrochemical interfaces will undoubtedly reveal a path forward towards a society based on clean and renewable energy. In particular, it has been proposed that hydrogen can play a major role as an energy carrier of the future. To fully utilize the clean energy potential of a hydrogen economy, it is vital to produce hydrogen via water electrolysis, thus avoiding co-production of CO2 inherent to reformate hydrogen. While significant research efforts elsewhere are focused on photo-chemical hydrogen production from water, the inherent low efficiency of this method would require a massive land-use footprint to achieve sufficient hydrogen production rates to integrate hydrogen into energy markets. Thus, this research has primarily focused on the water splitting reactions on base-metal catalysts in the alkaline environment. Development of high-performance base-metal catalysts will help move alkaline water electrolysis to the forefront of hydrogen production methods, and when paired with solar and wind energy production, represents a clean and renewable energy economy. In addition to the water electrolysis reactions, research was conducted to understand the de-activation of reversible hydrogen electrodes in the corrosive environment of the hydrogen-bromine redox flow battery. Redox flow batteries represent a promising energy storage option to overcome the intermittency challenge of wind and solar energy production methods. Optimization of modular and scalable energy storage technology will allow higher penetration of renewable wind and solar energy into the grid. In Chapter 1, an overview of renewable energy production methods and energy storage options is presented. In addition, the fundamentals of electrochemical analysis and physical characterization of the catalysts are discussed. Chapter 2 reports the development of a Ni-Cr/C electrocatalyst with unprecedented mass-activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline

  5. Scavenging ratios, wet deposition, and in-cloud oxidation: An application to the oxides of sulphur and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    With special regard to the class of substances in precipitation that potentially originate from both gaseous and particulate precursors, the process of precipitation scavenging is discussed. A model relating daily average ground level scavenging ratios (W) to nucleation scavenging and in-cloud chemical transformation is introduced and is used as guidance in the regression analysis of 3 years of SO 4 = and NO 3 - scavenging-ratio observations made at six locations in eastern Canada. It was found that W of SO 4 = -, NO 3 = -, and SO 4 = -bearing particles is inversely proportional to the one-third power of the precipitation amount in the event. The best regression model explained 41% of the variance in log W for SO 4 = . It included the effects of location, precipitation amount, precipitation type, and in-cloud SO 2 oxidation. The last effect accounted for 50% of the variance explained. The analysis predicts that, on average, in-cloud SO 2 oxidation accounts for 42--79% of the SO 4 = observed in rain and with the exception of one site, less than 20% of the SO 4 = observed in snow. These results are consistent with a mechanism of SO 2 oxidation involving photochemically produced H 2 O 2 . A similar analysis for NO 3 - supports the hypothesis that throughout the year much of the NO 3 - in precipitation originates from in-cloud NO 2 oxidation. It suggests that, depending on location, oxidation of 0.5--1.2 ppbv of NO 2 is sufficient to explain observations. One possible mechanism of oxidation is the reaction with O 3 to form NO 3 and hence soluble N 2 O 5

  6. The effect of iridium(III) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehula, Stjepko, E-mail: krehul@irb.hr [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Music, Svetozar [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-03-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the precipitation of iron oxides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-FeOOH caused significant changes in the microstructural properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} caused an increase in the Morin transition temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} ions caused a phase transformation {alpha}-(Fe,Ir)OOH {yields} {alpha}-(Fe,Ir){sub 2}O{sub 3} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + Ir{sup 0}. - Abstract: The effect of the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. The presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions in the precipitation system strongly influenced the phase composition, magnetic, structural and morphological properties of obtained samples. The formation of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) along with {alpha}-FeOOH in the first stage of hydrothermal treatment and the transformation of {alpha}-FeOOH and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) by a longer hydrothermal treatment was caused by the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-FeOOH brought about changes in unit-cell dimensions, crystallinity, particle size and shape, hyperfine magnetic field and infrared bands positions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} led to an increase in the temperature of the Morin transition; Moessbauer spectroscopy showed the presence of

  7. Wet-Oxidation of Spent Organic Waste Tri-butyl Phosphate/Diluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dessouky, M.I.; Abed El-Aziz, M.M.; El-Mossalamy, E.H.; Aly, H.F.

    1999-01-01

    Tri-Butyl Phosphate was used in reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in the purex process. The amount of uranium retained in the organic phase depends on the type of TBP/Diluent. Destruction of spent TBP is of high interest in waste management. In the present work, oxidative degradation of TBP diluted with kerosene, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and toluene using potassium permanganate as oxidant was carried out to produce stable inorganic dry particle residue which is then immobilized in different matrices. The different factors affecting the destruction of spent waste was investigated. The up take and decontamination factor for both 152 and 154 Eu and 181 Hf and the analysis of the final product have been studied

  8. One - Step synthesis of nitrogen doped reduced graphene oxide with NiCo nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaei, Karim; Marzang, Kamaran

    2016-01-15

    Development of anode catalysts and catalyst supporting carbonaceous material containing non-precious metal have attracted tremendous attention in the field of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs). Herein, we report the synthesis and electrochemical properties of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (NRGO) supported Co, Ni and NiCo nanocomposites. The metal NRGO nanocomposites, in which metal nanoparticles are embedded in the highly porous nitrogen-doped graphene matrix, have been synthesized by simply and one-pot method at a mild temperature using GO, urea choline chloride and urea as reducing and doping agent. The fabricated NiCo/NRGO exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity (with Tafel slope of 159.1mVdec(-1)) and high stability for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The superior performance of the alloy based NRGO is attributed to high surface area, well uniform distribution of high-density nitrogen, metal active sites and synergistic effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 49 CFR 173.159 - Batteries, wet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Batteries, wet. 173.159 Section 173.159... Batteries, wet. (a) Electric storage batteries, containing electrolyte acid or alkaline corrosive battery fluid (wet batteries), may not be packed with other materials except as provided in paragraphs (g) and...

  10. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  11. Development of a novel wet oxidation process for hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes and evaluates the DETOX sm process for processing of mixed wastes. Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides, often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. The DETOX sm process, patented by Delphi Research, uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials. Included are the following subject areas: project description (phases I-IV); results of all phases; and future work. 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. Cermet sintering on the oase of molybdenum, nickel, aluminium oxide in dry and wet hydrogen medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.V.; Lutskaya, E.Eh.

    1985-01-01

    Cermet sintering on the base of molybdenum, nickel and aluminium oxide in dry and wer hydrogen medium is studied. It is stated that presence of water vapours permits to decrease sintering temperature of molybdenum containing cermets and to prepare dense nickeliferous cermets. Cermet density can he rather high at final stages of sintering that is probably conditioned by decrease of growth rate of corundum crystals. Pressing pressure activates cermet siptering at intermediate stages and it is low effective at finite stages of condensation. Constancy of relative reduction of void volume is preserved only at final stages of sintering

  13. Facile and scalable fabrication engineering of fullerenol nanoparticles by improved alkaline-oxidation approach and its antioxidant potential in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-yang; Xiong, Feng-xia; Fan, Yi-kang; Li, Juan; Wang, He-zhong; Xing, Geng-mei; Yan, Feng-ming; Tai, Fu-ju; He, Rui

    2016-11-01

    A feasible in operation, labor-saving and low-cost one-step technology to fabricate fullerenol nanoparticles (FNPs) up to 10 g in laboratory was developed by improved alkaline-oxidation approach using moderately concentrated sodium hydroxide solution as the hydroxylation agent and o-dichlorobenzene as the solvent. This strategy paves the avenue for industrial-scale bulk production of FNPs. The resulted product, [C60(OH)22·8H2O]n, were characterized by various measurements including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometer, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic light scattering analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and electron spin resonance spectrometer. Radical scavenging assay in vitro confirmed the high efficiency of water-soluble [C60(OH)22·8H2O]n as a novel radical scavenger. Furthermore, [C60(OH)22·8H2O]n as an excellent candidate has the potential to serve as the plant defense stimulation agent in maize.

  14. Facile and scalable fabrication engineering of fullerenol nanoparticles by improved alkaline-oxidation approach and its antioxidant potential in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fu-yang; Xiong, Feng-xia; Fan, Yi-kang; Li, Juan; Wang, He-zhong; Xing, Geng-mei; Yan, Feng-ming; Tai, Fu-ju; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    A feasible in operation, labor-saving and low-cost one-step technology to fabricate fullerenol nanoparticles (FNPs) up to 10 g in laboratory was developed by improved alkaline-oxidation approach using moderately concentrated sodium hydroxide solution as the hydroxylation agent and o-dichlorobenzene as the solvent. This strategy paves the avenue for industrial-scale bulk production of FNPs. The resulted product, [C_6_0(OH)_2_2·8H_2O]_n, were characterized by various measurements including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, high-resolution "1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometer, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic light scattering analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and electron spin resonance spectrometer. Radical scavenging assay in vitro confirmed the high efficiency of water-soluble [C_6_0(OH)_2_2·8H_2O]_n as a novel radical scavenger. Furthermore, [C_6_0(OH)_2_2·8H_2O]_n as an excellent candidate has the potential to serve as the plant defense stimulation agent in maize.

  15. Facile and scalable fabrication engineering of fullerenol nanoparticles by improved alkaline-oxidation approach and its antioxidant potential in maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fu-yang [Henan Agricultural University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Grain Crops, State Key Laboratory of Wheat and Maize Crop Science, College of Life Science (China); Xiong, Feng-xia; Fan, Yi-kang [Henan Agricultural University, NanoAgro Center, College of Plant Protection (China); Li, Juan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lab. for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Wang, He-zhong [Henan Agricultural University, NanoAgro Center, College of Plant Protection (China); Xing, Geng-mei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lab. for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Yan, Feng-ming [Henan Agricultural University, NanoAgro Center, College of Plant Protection (China); Tai, Fu-ju, E-mail: taifj2008@163.com [Henan Agricultural University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Grain Crops, State Key Laboratory of Wheat and Maize Crop Science, College of Life Science (China); He, Rui, E-mail: herui@henau.edu.cn [Henan Agricultural University, NanoAgro Center, College of Plant Protection (China)

    2016-11-15

    A feasible in operation, labor-saving and low-cost one-step technology to fabricate fullerenol nanoparticles (FNPs) up to 10 g in laboratory was developed by improved alkaline-oxidation approach using moderately concentrated sodium hydroxide solution as the hydroxylation agent and o-dichlorobenzene as the solvent. This strategy paves the avenue for industrial-scale bulk production of FNPs. The resulted product, [C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22}·8H{sub 2}O]{sub n}, were characterized by various measurements including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, high-resolution {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometer, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic light scattering analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and electron spin resonance spectrometer. Radical scavenging assay in vitro confirmed the high efficiency of water-soluble [C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22}·8H{sub 2}O]{sub n} as a novel radical scavenger. Furthermore, [C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22}·8H{sub 2}O]{sub n} as an excellent candidate has the potential to serve as the plant defense stimulation agent in maize.

  16. Swift heavy ion induced de wetting of metal oxide thin films on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolse, T.; Paulus, H.; Bolse, W.

    2006-01-01

    We have observed that thin oxide coatings (NiO, Fe 2 O 3 ) tend to dewet their Si substrate when being bombarded with swift heavy ions (350-600 MeV Au ions) even though the irradiation was carried out about 80 K and hence, the films never reached their melting point. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy reveal a surprising similarity of the dewetting morphologies with those observed for molten polymer films on Si, which have recently been reported by others [S. Herminghaus, K. Jakobs, K. Mecke, J. Bischof, A. Fery, M. Ibn-Elhaj, S. Schlagowsky, Science 282 (1998) 916; R. Seemann, S. Herminghaus, K. Jacobs, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13 (2001) 4925]. Like in that cases also here heterogeneous and homogeneous hole nucleation could be identified. Heterogeneous nucleation is less pronounced in Fe 2 O 3 /Si than in NiO/Si. The occurrence of spinodal-like dewetting cannot be detected unambiguously. The dewetting kinetics were determined by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and found to slightly differ for the two compounds. The dewetting kinetics as well as the final dewetting pattern strongly depend on the initial film thicknesses. No dewetting occurs for film thicknesses above about 150 nm, while for very small thicknesses below about 40 nm the film decays into nm-sized spherical droplets. At intermediate film thicknesses percolated networks of small oxide bridges are formed

  17. Wet Chemical Oxidation of Organic Waste Using Nitric-Phosphoric Acid Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.A.

    1998-10-06

    Experimental progress has been made in a wide range of areas which support the continued development of the nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation process for combustible, solid organic wastes. An improved understanding of the overall process operation has been obtained, acid recovery and recycle systems have been studied, safety issues have been addressed, two potential final waste forms have been tested, preliminary mass flow diagrams have been prepared, and process flowsheets have been developed. The flowsheet developed is essentially a closed-loop system which addresses all of the internally generated waste streams. The combined activities aim to provide the basis for building and testing a 250-400 liter pilot-scale unit. Variations of the process now must be evaluated in order to address the needs of the primary customer, SRS Solid Waste Management. The customer is interested in treating job control waste contaminated with Pu-238 for shipment to WIPP. As a result, variations for feed preparation, acid recycle, and final form manufacturing must be considered to provide for simpler processing to accommodate operations in high radiation and contamination environments. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate a nitric-phosphoric acid destruction technology which can treat a heterogeneous waste by oxidizing the solid and liquid organic compounds while decontaminating noncombustible items.

  18. Evaluation on nitrogen oxides and nanoparticle removal and nitrogen monoxide generation using a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehana, Kotaro; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from power plants and combustion sources cause air pollution problems. Selective catalytic reduction technology is remarkably useful for NOx removal. However, there are several drawbacks such as preparation of reducing agents, usage of harmful heavy metals, and higher cost. On the other hand, trace NO is a vasodilator agent and employed in inhalation therapies for treating pulmonary hypertension in humans. Considering these factors, in the present study, a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor, which can control NOx and nanoparticle emissions and generate NO, is investigated. The fundamental characteristics of the reactor are investigated. First, the experiment of nanoparticle removal is carried out. Collection efficiencies of over 99% are achieved for nanoparticles at 50 and 100 ml min‑1 of liquid flow rates. Second, experiments of NOx removal under air atmosphere and NOx generation under nitrogen atmosphere are carried out. NOx-removal efficiencies of over 95% under the air plasma are achieved in 50–200 ml min‑1 liquid flow rates. Moreover, under nitrogen plasma, NOx is generated, of which the major portion is NO. For example, NO concentration is 25 ppm, while NOx concentration is 31 ppm at 50 ml min‑1 liquid flow rate. Finally, experiments of NO generation under the nitrogen atmosphere with or without flowing water are carried out. When water flows on the inner surface of the reactor, approximately 14 ppm of NO is generated. Therefore, NO generation requires flowing water. It is considered that the reaction of N and OH, which is similar to the extended Zeldovich mechanism, could occur to induce NO formation. From these results, it is verified that the wet-type plasma reactor is useful for NOx removal and NO generation under nitrogen atmosphere with flowing water.

  19. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  20. Arsenic mobilization in an oxidizing alkaline groundwater: Experimental studies, comparison and optimization of geochemical modeling parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeznezami, Saeedreza; Lam, Jacquelyn R.; Xiang, Yang; Reynolds, Matthew D.; Davis, James A.; Lin, Tiffany; Jay, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) mobilization and contamination of groundwater affects millions of people worldwide. Progress in developing effective in-situ remediation schemes requires the incorporation of data from laboratory experiments and field samples into calibrated geochemical models. In an oxidizing aquifer where leaching of high pH industrial waste from unlined surface impoundments led to mobilization of naturally occurring As up to 2 mg L −1 , sequential extractions of solid phase As as well as, batch sediment microcosm experiments were conducted to understand As partitioning and solid-phase sorptive and buffering capacity. These data were combined with field data to create a series of geochemical models of the system with modeling programs PHREEQC and FITEQL. Different surface complexation modeling approaches, including component additivity (CA), generalized composite (GC), and a hybrid method were developed, compared and fitted to data from batch acidification experiments to simulate potential remediation scenarios. Several parameters strongly influence the concentration of dissolved As including pH, presence of competing ions (particularly phosphate) and the number of available sorption sites on the aquifer solids. Lowering the pH of groundwater to 7 was found to have a variable, but limited impact (<63%) on decreasing the concentration of dissolved As. The models indicate that in addition to lowering pH, decreasing the concentration of dissolved phosphate and/or increasing the number of available sorption sites could significantly decrease the As solubility to levels below 10 μg L −1 . The hybrid and GC modeling results fit the experimental data well (NRMSE<10%) with reasonable effort and can be implemented in further studies for validation. - Highlights: • Samples were collected from an oxidizing aquifer where high pH waste has led to mobilization of naturally occurring As. • Three surface complexation modeling approaches were used in modeling adsorption

  1. Influence of alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides on the mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, J.; Ferrier, G.A.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Joseph.Metzler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates strategies to mitigate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Zircaloy-4 sheathing materials. The CANLUB coatings currently used in CANDU reactors contain both alkali metal and alkaline earth metal impurities, which can exist as oxides (e.g., Na{sub 2}O and CaO). It is believed that when the corrosive fission product iodine reacts with these oxides, the iodine can be sequestered through the formation of an iodide (e.g.,NaI and CaI{sub 2}). The subsequent O{sub 2} release may repair cracks in the protective ZrO{sub 2} layer on the sheathing, shielding the Zircaloy-4 sheathing from further corrosive fission product attack. For this investigation, O{sub 2} gas, Na{sub 2}O, and CaO were separately introduced into an environment wherein slotted Zircaloy-4 rings endure mechanical stresses in iodine vapour at high temperatures. Controlled additions of O{sub 2} gas created a slight reduction in the corrosive attack on Zircaloy-4 sheathing, while the inclusion of Na{sub 2}O and CaO lead to greater reductions. (author)

  2. Boosting the catalytic activity of natural magnetite for wet peroxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Torrellas, Silvia; Munoz, Macarena; Mondejar, Victor; de Pedro, Zahara M; Casas, Jose A

    2018-06-02

    This work explores the modification of naturally occurring magnetite by controlled oxidation (200-400 °C, air atmosphere) and reduction (300-600 °C, H 2 atmosphere) treatments with the aim of boosting its activity in CWPO. The resulting materials were fully characterized by XRD, XPS, TGA, TPR, SEM, and magnetization measurements, allowing to confirm the development of core-shell type structures. The magnetite core of the solid remained unchanged upon the treatment whereas the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of the shell was modified (e.g. 0.42, 0.11 and 0.63 values were calculated for pristine Fe 3 O 4 , Fe 3 O 4 -O400, and Fe 3 O 4 -R400, respectively). The performance of the catalysts was tested in the CWPO of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) (5 mg L -1 ) under ambient conditions and circumneutral pH (pH 0  = 5), using the stoichiometric dose of H 2 O 2 (25 mg L -1 ) and a catalyst load of 1 g L -1 . The key role of the ferrous species on the mineral shell was evidenced. Whereas the oxidation of magnetite led to significantly slower degradation rates of the pollutant, its reduction gave rise to a dramatic increase, achieving the complete removal of SMX in 1.5 h reaction time with the optimum catalyst (Fe 3 O 4 -R400) compared to the 3.5 h required with the pristine mineral. A reaction mechanism was proposed for SMX degradation, and a kinetic equation based on the Eley-Rideal model was accordingly developed. This model successfully fitted the experimental results. The stability of Fe 3 O 4 -R400 was evaluated upon five sequential runs. Finally, the versatility of the catalytic system was proved in real environmentally relevant water matrices.

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of iron and alkalinity generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Kustermans, Caroline; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2017-07-01

    The addition of iron salts is one of the most commonly used dosing strategies for sulfide control in sewers. However, iron salts decrease the sewage pH which not only reduces the effectiveness of sulfide precipitation but also enhances the release of residual sulfide to the sewer atmosphere. Equally important, concentrated iron salt solutions are corrosive and their frequent transport, handling, and on-site storage often come with Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) concerns. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a novel sulfide control approach using electrochemical systems with parallel placed iron electrodes. This enabled combining anodic dissolved iron species release with cathodic hydroxyl anion production, which alleviates all the aforementioned concerns. A long-term experiment was successfully carried out achieving an average sulfide removal efficiency of 95.4 ± 4.4% at low voltage input of 2.90 ± 0.54 V over the course of 8 weeks. This electrochemical method was demonstrated to successfully achieve efficient sulfide control. In addition, it increases the sewage pH, thereby overcoming the drawbacks associated with the pH decrease in the case of conventional iron salt dosing. Ferrous ions were produced at an overall coulombic efficiency (CE) of 98.2 ± 1.2%, whereas oxygen evolution and direct sulfide oxidation were not observed. Short-term experiments showed that increasing either inter-electrode gap or current density increased the cell voltage associated with the increase in the ohmic drop of the system. Overall, this study highlights the practical potential of in-situ generation of dissolved iron species and simultaneous hydroxyl anion generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Iron-doped nickel oxide nanocrystals as highly efficient electrocatalysts for alkaline water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominykh, Ksenia; Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Sicklinger, Johannes; Stefanic, Goran; Döblinger, Markus; Müller, Alexander; Pokharel, Aneil; Böcklein, Sebastian; Scheu, Christina; Bein, Thomas; Fattakhova-Rohlfing, Dina

    2015-05-26

    Efficient electrochemical water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is considered a promising technology to overcome our dependency on fossil fuels. Searching for novel catalytic materials for electrochemical oxygen generation is essential for improving the total efficiency of water splitting processes. We report the synthesis, structural characterization, and electrochemical performance in the oxygen evolution reaction of Fe-doped NiO nanocrystals. The facile solvothermal synthesis in tert-butanol leads to the formation of ultrasmall crystalline and highly dispersible FexNi1-xO nanoparticles with dopant concentrations of up to 20%. The increase in Fe content is accompanied by a decrease in particle size, resulting in nonagglomerated nanocrystals of 1.5-3.8 nm in size. The Fe content and composition of the nanoparticles are determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, while Mössbauer and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analyses reveal a substitutional incorporation of Fe(III) into the NiO rock salt structure. The excellent dispersibility of the nanoparticles in ethanol allows for the preparation of homogeneous ca. 8 nm thin films with a smooth surface on various substrates. The turnover frequencies (TOF) of these films could be precisely calculated using a quartz crystal microbalance. Fe0.1Ni0.9O was found to have the highest electrocatalytic water oxidation activity in basic media with a TOF of 1.9 s(-1) at the overpotential of 300 mV. The current density of 10 mA cm(-2) is reached at an overpotential of 297 mV with a Tafel slope of 37 mV dec(-1). The extremely high catalytic activity, facile preparation, and low cost of the single crystalline FexNi1-xO nanoparticles make them very promising catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction.

  5. Enrichment of Thermophilic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea from an Alkaline Hot Spring in the Great Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Huang, Z.; Jiang, H.; Wiegel, J.; Li, W.; Dong, H.

    2010-12-01

    One of the major advances in the nitrogen cycle is the recent discovery of ammonia oxidation by archaea. While culture-independent studies have revealed occurrence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nearly every surface niche on earth, most of these microorganisms have resisted isolation and so far only a few species have been identified. The Great Basin contains numerous hot springs, which are characterized by moderately high temperature (40-65 degree C) and circumneutral or alkaline pH. Unique thermophilic archaea have been identified based on molecular DNA and lipid biomarkers; some of which may be ammonia oxidizers. This study aims to isolate some of these archaea from a California hot spring that has pH around 9.0 and temperature around 42 degree C. Mat material was collected from the spring and transported on ice to the laboratory. A synthetic medium (SCM-5) was inoculated with the mat material and the culture was incubated under varying temperature (35-65 degree C) and pH (7.0-10.0) conditions using antibiotics to suppress bacterial growth. Growth of the culture was monitored by microscopy, decrease in ammonium and increase in nitrite, and increases in Crenarchaeota and AOA abundances over time. Clone libraries were constructed to compare archaeal community structures before and after the enrichment experiment. Temperature and pH profiles indicated that the culture grew optimally at pH 9.0 and temperature 45 degree C, which are consistent with the geochemical conditions of the natural environment. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the final OTU was distantly related to all known hyperthermophilic archaea. Analysis of the amoA genes showed two OTUs in the final culture; one of them was closely related to Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis. However, the enrichment culture always contained bacteria and attempts to separate them from archaea have failed. This highlights the difficulty in bringing AOA into pure culture and suggests that some of the AOA may

  6. Extraction-wet oxidation process using sulphuric acid for treatment of TBP-dodecane wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshingkar, D.S.; Kartha, P.K.S.

    1998-03-01

    In the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, 30% n-tributyl phosphate in hydrocarbon diluent is used for extraction of uranium and plutonium from the spent fuel by Purex process. When TBP-dodecane can no longer be purified from its degradation products, it is discarded as alpha bearing, intermediate level wastes containing plutonium and ruthenium-106. To overcome shortcomings of extraction-pyrolysis and saponification processes, studies were undertaken to find the suitability of H 2 SO 4 as an alternative extractant for TBP. Oxidation of TBP to H 3 PO 4 using H 2 O 2 was also explored as H 3 PO 4 can be treated by known procedures for removal of plutonium and ruthenium-106. The experiments were conducted with aged spent solvent wastes discharged from reprocessing plant at Trombay using H 2 SO 4 and H 2 SO 4 - H 3 PO 4 mixture. The decontamination factors (DFs) for alpha activity were found to be satisfactory. The DFs for ruthenium were lower as compared to those obtained in experiments with simulated degraded waste. The gas chromatographic analysis of separated diluent revealed high branched alkane content and low n-dodecane content of separated diluent. It is very much different from that of diluent currently in use. Hence incineration of separated diluent is recommended. (author)

  7. Engineering development and demonstration of DETOXSM wet oxidation for mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Goldblatt, S.D.; Moslander, J.E.; Robertson, D.T.; Rogers, T.W.; Zigmond, J.A.

    1997-12-01

    DETOX SM , a catalyzed chemical oxidation process, is under development for treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes at Department of Energy sites. To support this effort, developmental engineering studies have been formed for aspects of the process to help ensure safe and effective operation. Subscale agitation studies have been preformed to identify a suitable mixing head and speed for the primary reaction vessel agitator. Mechanisms for feeding solid waste materials to the primary reaction vessel have been investigated. Filtration to remove solid field process residue, and the use of various filtration aids, has been studied. Extended compatibility studies on the materials of construction have been performed. Due to a change to Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) for the mixed waste portion of the demonstration, types of wastes suitable and appropriate for treatment at RFETS had to be chosen. A Prototype unit has been fabricated and will be demonstrated on hazardous and mixed wastes at Savannah River Site (SRS) and RFETS during 1997 and 1998. The unit is in shakedown testing at present. Data validation and an engineering evaluation will be performed during the demonstration

  8. Wet oxidation of glycerol into fine organic acids: catalyst selection and kinetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. N. Brainer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid phase oxidation of glycerol was performed producing fine organic acids. Catalysts based on Pt, Pd and Bi supported on activated carbon were employed to perform the conversion of glycerol into organic acids at 313 K, 323 K and 333 K, under atmospheric pressure (1.0 bar, in a mechanically agitated slurry reactor (MASR. The experimental results indicated glycerol conversions of 98% with production of glyceric, tartronic and glycolic acids, and dihydroxyacetone. A yield of glyceric acid of 69.8%, and a selectivity of this compound of 70.6% were reached after 4 h of operation. Surface mechanisms were proposed and rate equations were formulated to represent the kinetic behavior of the process. Selective formation of glyceric acid was observed, and the kinetic parameter values indicated the lowest activation energy (38.5 kJ/mol for its production reaction step, and the highest value of the adsorption equilibrium constant of the reactant glycerol (10-4 dm³/mol.

  9. Degradation of cellulose at the wet-dry interface. II. Study of oxidation reactions and effect of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myung-Joon; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2014-01-30

    To better understand the degradation of cellulose upon the formation of a tideline at the wet-dry interface when paper is suspended in water, the production of chemical species involved in oxidation reactions was studied. The quantitation of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals was carried out in reverse phase chromatography using triphenylphosphine and terephthalic acid, respectively, as chemical probes. Both reactive oxygen species were found in the tideline immediately after its formation, in the range of micromoles and nanomoles per gram of paper, respectively. The results indicate that hydroxyl radicals form for the most part in paper before the tideline experiment, whereas hydroperoxides appear to be produced primarily during tideline formation. Iron sulfate impregnation of the paper raised the production of hydroperoxides. After hygrothermal aging in sealed vials the hydroxyl radical content in paper increased significantly. When aged together in the same vial, tideline samples strongly influenced the degradation of samples from other areas of the paper (multi-sample aging). Different types of antioxidants were added to the paper before the tideline experiment to investigate their effect on the oxidation reactions taking place. In samples treated with iron sulfate or artificially aged, the addition of Irgafos 168 (tris(2,4-ditert-butylphenyl) phosphate) and Tinuvin 292 (bis(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate and methyl 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl sebacate) reduced the concentration of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Tinuvin 292 was also found to considerably lower the rate of cellulose chain scission reactions during hygrothermal aging of the paper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in a trickle bed reactor over a Pt/TiO2 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugans, Clayton B; Akgerman, Aydin

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol was studied in a batch and a trickle bed reactor using 4.45% Pt/TiO2 catalyst in the temperature range 150-205 degrees C. Kinetic data were obtained from batch reactor studies and used to model the reaction kinetics for phenol disappearance and for total organic carbon disappearance. Trickle bed experiments were then performed to generate data from a heterogeneous flow reactor. Catalyst deactivation was observed in the trickle bed reactor, although the exact cause was not determined. Deactivation was observed to linearly increase with the cumulative amount of phenol that had passed over the catalyst bed. Trickle bed reactor modeling was performed using a three-phase heterogeneous model. Model parameters were determined from literature correlations, batch derived kinetic data, and trickle bed derived catalyst deactivation data. The model equations were solved using orthogonal collocations on finite elements. Trickle bed performance was successfully predicted using the batch derived kinetic model and the three-phase reactor model. Thus, using the kinetics determined from limited data in the batch mode, it is possible to predict continuous flow multiphase reactor performance.

  11. Evaluation of wet air oxidation variables for removal of organophosphorus pesticide malathion using Box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgoren, Melike; Gengec, Erhan; Veli, Sevil

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with finding optimum reaction conditions for wet air oxidation (WAO) of malathion aqueous solution, by Response Surface Methodology. Reaction conditions, which affect the removal efficiencies most during the non-catalytic WAO system, are: temperature (60-120 °C), applied pressure (20-40 bar), the pH value (3-7), and reaction time (0-120 min). Those were chosen as independent parameters of the model. The interactions between parameters were evaluated by Box-Behnken and the quadratic model fitted very well with the experimental data (29 runs). A higher value of R 2 and adjusted R 2 (>0.91) demonstrated that the model could explain the results successfully. As a result, optimum removal efficiency (97.8%) was obtained at pH 5, 20 bars of pressure, 116 °C, and 96 min. These results showed that Box-Behnken is a suitable design to optimize operating conditions and removal efficiency for non-catalytic WAO process. The EC 20 value of raw wastewater was measured as 35.40% for malathion (20 mg/L). After the treatment, no toxicity was observed at the optimum reaction conditions. The results show that the WAO is an efficient treatment system for malathion degradation and has the ability of converting malathion to the non-toxic forms.

  12. An oxidant and organic solvent tolerant alkaline lipase by P. aeruginosa mutant: downstream processing and biochemical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Bisht

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular alkaline lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant has been purified to homogeneity using acetone precipitation followed by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and resulted in 27-fold purification with 19.6% final recovery. SDS-PAGE study suggested that the purified lipase has an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH for the purified lipase were 45°C and 8.0, respectively. The enzyme showed considerable stability in pH range of 7.0-11.0 and temperature range 35-55 °C. The metal ions Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ tend to increase the enzyme activity, whereas, Fe2+ and Mn2+ ions resulted in discreet decrease in the activity. Divalent cations Ca+2 and Mg+2 seemed to protect the enzyme against thermal denaturation at high temperatures and in presence of Ca+2 (5 mM the optimum temperature shifted from 45°C to 55°C. The purified lipase displayed significant stability in the presence of several hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic solvents (25%, v/v up to 168 h. The pure enzyme preparation exhibited significant stability and compatibility with oxidizing agents and commercial detergents as it retained 40-70% of its original activities. The values of Km and Vmax for p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP under optimal conditions were determined to be 2.0 mg.mL-1 and 5000 μg.mL-1.min-1, respectively.

  13. Microwave alkaline roasting-water dissolving process for germanium extraction from zinc oxide dust and its analysis by response surface methodology (RSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wankun; Wang, Fuchun; Lu, Fanghai

    2017-12-01

    Microwave alkaline roasting-water dissolving process was proposed to improve the germanium (Ge) extraction from zinc oxide (ZnO) dust. The effects of important parameters were investigated and the process conditions were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The Ge extraction is consistent with the linear polynomial model type. Alkali-material ratio, microwave heating temperature and leaching temperature are the significant factors for this process. The optimized conditions are obtained as follows, alkali-material ratio of 0.9 kg/kg, aging time of 1.12 day, microwave heating at 658 K for 10 min, liquid-solid ratio of 4.31 L/kg, leaching temperature at 330 K, leaching time of 47 min with the Ge extraction about 99.38%. It is in consistence with the predictive value of 99.31%. Compared to the existed alkaline roasting process heated by electric furnace in literature, the alkaline roasting temperature and holding time. It shows a good prospect on leaching Ge from ZnO dust with microwave alkaline roasting-water dissolving process.

  14. Study of poly(vinyl alcohol)/titanium oxide composite polymer membranes and their application on alkaline direct alcohol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Chiu, Shwu-Jer; Lee, Kuo-Tong; Chien, Wen-Chen; Lin, Che-Tseng; Huang, Ching-An

    The novel poly(vinyl alcohol)/titanium oxide (PVA/TiO 2) composite polymer membrane was prepared using a solution casting method. The characteristic properties of the PVA/TiO 2 composite polymer membrane were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a micro-Raman spectroscopy, a methanol permeability measurement and the AC impedance method. An alkaline direct alcohol (methanol, ethanol and isopropanol) fuel cell (DAFC), consisting of an air cathode based on MnO 2/C inks, an anode based on PtRu (1:1) black and a PVA/TiO 2 composite polymer membrane, was assembled and examined for the first time. The results indicate that the alkaline DAFC comprised of a cheap, non-perfluorinated PVA/TiO 2 composite polymer membrane shows an improved electrochemical performances. The maximum power densities of alkaline DAFCs with 4 M KOH + 2 M CH 3OH, 2 M C 2H 5OH and 2 M isopropanol (IPA) solutions at room temperature and ambient air are 9.25, 8.00, and 5.45 mW cm -2, respectively. As a result, methanol shows the highest maximum power density among three alcohols. The PVA/TiO 2 composite polymer membrane with the permeability values in the order of 10 -7 to 10 -8 cm 2 s -1 is a potential candidate for use on alkaline DAFCs.

  15. Thermodynamic study contribution of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys by high temperature mass spectroscopy, and of the wetting of yttrium oxide by uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardie, P.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature thermodynamic properties study of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys, and wetting study of yttrium oxide by uranium are presented. High temperature mass spectrometry coupled to a Knudsen effusion multi-cell allows to measure iron activity in U-Fe alloys and of gallium in U-Ga alloys, the U activity is deduced from Gibbs-Duhem equation. Wetting of the system U/Y_2O_3_-_x is studied between 1413 K and 1973 K by the put drop method visualized by X-rays. This technique also furnishes density, surface tension of U and of U-Fe alloys put on Y_2O_3_-_x. A new model of the interfacial oxygen action on wetting is done for the system U/Y_2O_3_-_x. (A.B.)

  16. Kinetics and Mechanistic Study of the Ruthenium(III Catalysed Oxidative Decarboxylation of L-Proline by Alkaline Heptavalent Manganese (Stopped flow technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Shettar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of ruthenium(III catalysed oxidation of L-Proline by permanganate in alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength has been studied spectrophotometrically using a rapid kinetic accessory. The reaction between permanganate and L-Proline in alkaline medium exhibits 2:1 stoichiometry (KMnO4: L-Proline. The reaction shows first order dependence on [permanganate] and [ruthenium(III] and apparent less than unit order dependence each in L-Proline and alkali concentrations. Reaction rate increases with increase in ionic strength and decrease in solvent polarity of the medium. Initial addition of reaction products did not affect the rate significantly. A mechanism involving the formation of a complex between catalyst and substrate has been proposed. The activation parameters were computed with respect to the slow step of the mechanism and discussed

  17. Pd-NiO decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes supported on reduced graphene oxide as an efficient electrocatalyst for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Dhanushkotti; Indra Neel, Pulidindi; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Mahendiran, Chinnathambi

    2018-06-01

    The synthesis of Pd-NiO nanoparticles decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for ethanol electrooxidation is reported. NiO nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on functionalized MWCNTs by wet impregnation method. Pd nanoparticles were formed on NiO-MWCNTs by the addition of PdCl2 and its reduction using NaBH4. The Pd-NiO/MWCNTs nanocomposite then deposited on rGO support using ultrasound irradiation which led to the formation of the Pd-NiO/MWCNTs/rGO electrocatalyst. The prepared electrocatalysts were characterized by XRD, SEM, HR-TEM and XPS analysis. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that as synthesized Pd-NiO/MWCNTs/rGO electrocatalyst exhibit higher catalytic activity (90.89 mA/cm2) than either Pd/MWCNTs/rGO (43.05 mA/cm2) or Pd/C (28.0 mA/cm2) commercial catalyst. Chronoamperometry study of Pd-NiO/MWCNTs/rGO electrocatalyst showed long-term electrochemical stability. The enhanced catalytic activity of Pd-NiO/MWCNTs/rGO electrocatalyst for electrooxidation of ethanol can be attributed to the synergistic effect between Pd & NiO active sites.

  18. Stress Survival Islet 2, Predominantly Present in Listeria monocytogenes Strains of Sequence Type 121, Is Involved in the Alkaline and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Eva; Wagner, Eva Maria; Zaiser, Andreas; Halecker, Sabrina; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-08-15

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive a variety of stress conditions leading to the colonization of different niches like the food processing environment. This study focuses on the hypervariable genetic hot spot lmo0443 to lmo0449 haboring three inserts: the stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1), the single-gene insert LMOf2365_0481 , and two homologous genes of the nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua : lin0464 , coding for a putative transcriptional regulator, and lin0465 , encoding an intracellular PfpI protease. Our prevalence study revealed a different distribution of the inserts between human and food-associated isolates. The lin0464-lin0465 insert was predominantly found in food-associated strains of sequence type 121 (ST121). Functional characterization of this insert showed that the putative PfpI protease Lin0465 is involved in alkaline and oxidative stress responses but not in acidic, gastric, heat, cold, osmotic, and antibiotic stresses. In parallel, deletion of lin0464 decreased survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses. The expression of both genes increased significantly under oxidative stress conditions independently of the alternative sigma factor σ B Furthermore, we showed that the expression of the protease gene lin0465 is regulated by the transcription factor lin0464 under stress conditions, suggesting that lin0464 and lin0465 form a functional unit. In conclusion, we identified a novel stress survival islet 2 (SSI-2), predominantly present in L. monocytogenes ST121 strains, beneficial for survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses, potentially supporting adaptation and persistence of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes strains of ST121 are known to persist for months and even years in food processing environments, thereby increasing the risk of food contamination and listeriosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this remarkable niche-specific adaptation

  19. Promotion of the oxidation of carbon monoxide at stepped platinum single-crystal electrodes in alkaline media by lithium and beryllium cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffelsma, Chantal; Rodriguez, Paramaconi; Garcia, Gonzalo; Garcia-Araez, Nuria; Strmcnik, Dusan; Marković, Nenad M; Koper, Marc T M

    2010-11-17

    The role of alkali cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Cs(+), and Be(2+)) on the blank voltammetric response and the oxidative stripping of carbon monoxide from stepped Pt single-crystal electrodes in alkaline media has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. A strong influence of the nature of the cation on both the blank voltammetric profile and the CO oxidation is observed and related to the influence of the cation on the specific adsorption of OH on the platinum surface. Especially Li(+) and Be(2+) cations markedly affect the adsorption of OH and thereby have a significant promoting effect on CO(ads) oxidation. The voltammetric experiments suggest that, on Pt(111), the influence of Li(+) (and Be(2+)) is primarily through a weakening of the repulsive interactions between the OH in the OH adlayer, whereas in the presence of steps also, the onset of OH adsorption is at a lower potential, both on steps and on terraces.

  20. Electrochemical determination of the oxidation potentials and the thermodynamic stability of the valence states of the transuranium elements in aqueous alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation potentials of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in the valance states from (III) to (VII) have been determined experimentally in 0.1-15 M NaOH. Heptavalent plutonium and americium are thermodynamically able to oxidize water with the evolution of oxygen in 0.1-15 M NaOH, neptunium(VII) in 0.1-7 M NaOH. All valance states of plutonium resist disproportionation in alkaline solutions; in the case of neptunium and americium only one disproportionation reaction is possible; of the hexavalent state in to penta- and heptavalent states. The degree of completion of the reaction can be calculated accurately from the oxidation potentials determined

  1. Post-treatment of biologically treated wastewater containing organic contaminants using a sequence of H2O2 based advanced oxidation processes: photolysis and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Sillanpää, M; Pocostales, P; Acevedo, A; Manzano, M A

    2015-03-15

    In this paper the feasibility of a multi-barrier treatment (MBT) for the regeneration of synthetic industrial wastewater (SIWW) was evaluated. Industrial pollutants (orange II, phenol, 4-chlorophenol and phenanthrene) were added to the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant. The proposed MBT begins with a microfiltration membrane pretreatment (MF), followed by hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and finishing, as a polishing step, with catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) using granular activated carbon (GAC) at ambient conditions. During the microfiltration step (0.7 μm) the decrease of suspended solids concentration, turbidity and Escherichia coli in treated water were 88, 94 and 99%, respectively. Also, the effluent's transmittance (254 nm) was increased by 14.7%. Removal of more than 99.9% of all added pollutants, mineralization of 63% of organic compounds and complete disinfection of total coliforms were reached during the H2O2/UVC treatment step (H2O2:TOC w/w ratio = 5 and an UVC average dose accumulated by wastewater 8.80 WUVC s cm(-2)). The power and efficiency of the lamp, the water transmittance and photoreactor geometry are taken into account and a new equation to estimate the accumulated dose in water is suggested. Remaining organic pollutants with a higher oxidation state of carbon atoms (+0.47) and toxic concentration of residual H2O2 were present in the effluent of the H2O2/UVC process. After 2.3 min of contact time with GAC at CWPO step, 90 and 100% of total organic carbon and residual H2O2 were removed, respectively. Also, the wastewater toxicity was studied using Vibrio fischeri and Sparus aurata larvae. The MBT operational and maintenance costs (O&M) was estimated to be 0.59 € m(-3). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  3. Synthesis of honeycomb-like mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon nanospheres as Pt catalyst supports for methanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunmao; Liu, Yong; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiying; Mao, Liqun

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the convenient synthesis of honeycomb-like mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon spheres (MNCS) using a self-assembly strategy that employs dopamine (DA) as a carbon and nitrogen precursor and a polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS173-b-PEO170) diblock copolymer as a soft template. The MNCS have large BET surface areas of up to 554 m2 g-1 and high nitrogen contents of up to 6.9 wt%. The obtained MNCS are used as a support for Pt catalysts, which promote methanol oxidation in alkaline media. The MNCS-supported Pt (Pt/MNCS) catalyst has a larger electrochemically active surface area (ESA) (89.2 m2 g-1) than does a commercially available Vulcan XC-72R supported Pt/C catalyst. Compared to the Pt/C catalyst, Pt/MNCS displays a higher peak current density (1007 mA mg-1) and is more stable during methanol oxidation. These improvements are attributed to the honeycomb-like porous structure of the MNCS and the introduction of nitrogen to the carbon support. The MNCS effectively stabilize Pt nanoparticles and assuage the agglomeration of the nanoparticles, suggesting that MNCS are potential and promising application as electrocatalyst supports in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells.

  4. Ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/MWCNT and PdAuSn/MWCNT electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Andrade e Silva, Leonardo Gondin de; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Santos, Mauro Coelho dos

    2015-01-01

    Environmental problems and the world growing demand for energy has mobilized the scientific community in finding of clean and renewable energy sources. In this context, fuel cells appear as appropriate technology for generating electricity through alcohols electro-oxidation. Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT)-supported Pd and trimetallic PdAuSn (Pd:Au:Sn 50:10:40 atomic ratio) electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The obtained materials were characterized by VC, Chronoamperometry, EDX, TEM and XRD. The catalytic activities of electrocatalysts toward ethanol electro-oxidation were evaluated in alkaline medium in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) in a range temperature 60 to 90 deg C. The best performances were obtained at 85 deg C: 33 mW.cm -2 and 31 mW.cm -2 for Pd/ MWCNT and PdAuSn/MWCNT electrocatalysts, respectively. X-ray diffractograms of electrocatalysts showed the presence of Pd-rich (fcc) and Au-rich (fcc) phases. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments showed that PdAuSn/MWCNT electrocatalyst demonstrated similar activity toward ethanol electro-oxidation at room temperature, compared to electrocatalyst Pd/MWCNT. (author)

  5. Ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/MWCNT and PdAuSn/MWCNT electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Andrade e Silva, Leonardo Gondin de; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir, E-mail: drinager@ig.com.br, E-mail: dfsilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Mauro Coelho dos [Universidade Federal do ABC (LEMN/CCNH/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Environmental problems and the world growing demand for energy has mobilized the scientific community in finding of clean and renewable energy sources. In this context, fuel cells appear as appropriate technology for generating electricity through alcohols electro-oxidation. Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT)-supported Pd and trimetallic PdAuSn (Pd:Au:Sn 50:10:40 atomic ratio) electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The obtained materials were characterized by VC, Chronoamperometry, EDX, TEM and XRD. The catalytic activities of electrocatalysts toward ethanol electro-oxidation were evaluated in alkaline medium in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) in a range temperature 60 to 90 deg C. The best performances were obtained at 85 deg C: 33 mW.cm{sup -2} and 31 mW.cm{sup -2} for Pd/ MWCNT and PdAuSn/MWCNT electrocatalysts, respectively. X-ray diffractograms of electrocatalysts showed the presence of Pd-rich (fcc) and Au-rich (fcc) phases. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments showed that PdAuSn/MWCNT electrocatalyst demonstrated similar activity toward ethanol electro-oxidation at room temperature, compared to electrocatalyst Pd/MWCNT. (author)

  6. Addition and elimination kinetics in OH radical induced oxidation of phenol and cresols in acidic and alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, M.; Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.; Emmi, S.S.; Beggiato, G.; D'Angelantonio, M.

    1999-01-01

    The rates of the two consecutive reactions, OH radical addition and H 2 O/OH - elimination, were studied by pulse radiolysis in highly acidic (pH=1.3-1.9) and alkaline (pH∼11) solutions, respectively, for phenol and for the three cresol isomers. The rate coefficient of the addition as measured by the build-up of phenoxyl radical absorbance and by a competitive method is the same (1.4±0.1)x10 10 mol -1 dm 3 s -1 both in acidic and alkaline solution. The rate coefficient of the H 2 O elimination in acidic solution is (1.6±0.2)x10 6 s -1 , whereas the coefficient of the OH - elimination in alkaline solutions is 6-8 times higher. The kinetics of the phenoxyl radical formation was described by the two-exponential equation of the consecutive reactions: the first exponential is related to the pseudo-first-order addition, while the second to the elimination reaction. No considerable structure dependence was found in the rate coefficients, indicating that the methyl substitutent in these highly acidic or alkaline solutions influences neither the addition nor the elimination rate

  7. Ethanol electro-oxidation in an alkaline medium using Pd/C, Au/C and PdAu/C electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleão; Furtunato da Silva, Dionisio; Pino, Eddy Segura; Martins da Silva, Júlio César; Brambilla de Souza, Rodrigo Fernando; Hammer, Peter; Spinacé, Estevam Vitório; Neto, Almir Oliveira; Linardi, Marcelo; Coelho dos Santos, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-supported Pd, Au and bimetallic PdAu (Pd:Au 90:10, 50:50 and 30:70 atomic ratios) electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The obtained materials were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their catalytic activities toward ethanol electro-oxidation were evaluated in an alkaline medium using electrochemical techniques, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis and a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC). EDX analyses showed that the actual Pd:Au atomic ratios were very similar to the nominal ones. X-ray diffractograms of PdAu/C electrocatalysts evidenced the presence of Pd-rich (fcc) and Au-rich (fcc) phases. TEM analysis showed a homogeneous dispersion of nanoparticles on the carbon support, with an average size in the range of 3–5 nm and broad size distributions. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) experiments revealed the superior ambient activity toward ethanol electro-oxidation of PdAu/C electrocatalysts with Pd:Au ratios of 90:10 and 50:50. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy measurements have shown that the mechanism for ethanol electro-oxidation is dependent on catalyst composition, leading to different reaction products, such as acetaldehyde and acetate, depending on the number of electrons transferred. Experiments on a single ADEFC were conducted between 50 and 90 °C, and the best performance of 44 mW cm −2 in 2.0 mol L −1 ethanol was obtained at 85 °C for the Pd:Au 90:10 catalysts. This superior performance is most likely associated with enhancement of ethanol adsorption on Pd, oxidation of the intermediates, the presence of gold oxide-hydroxyl species, low mean particle diameters and better distribution of particles on the support

  8. Enhanced activity and stability of copper oxide/γ-alumina catalyst in catalytic wet-air oxidation: Critical roles of cerium incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongli; Zhou, Yanbo; Peng, Chao; Shi, Junjun; Wang, Qingyu; He, Lingfeng; Shi, Liang

    2018-04-01

    By successive impregnation method, the Ce-modified Cu-O/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared and characterized using nitrogen adsorption-desorption, scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and H2-Temperature programming reduction (H2-TPR). In catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) process for the printing and dyeing wastewater (PDW), the effects of Ce addition on performance, mechanism and kinetics of the catalyst were investigated. The Ce addition increases the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume of the catalyst and makes the active components uniformly distributed on the catalyst surface. Formation of a stable CuAl2O4 solid solution by anchoring Cu onto the γ-Al2O3 crystal lattice leads to a significant decrease in metal leaching of the Ce-modified catalyst. The proportion of lattice oxygen in the catalyst substantially increases and the apparent activation energy of Cu-O/γ-Al2O3 catalyst decreases owing to Ce addition. Therefore, the catalytic activity and stability of the Ce-modified catalyst are considerably improved. The scavengers experiments identify the active species existed in the CWAO reaction system, with the order of reactivity: h+ > O2•- > H2O2 > HO•. This novel Cu-Ce-O/γ-Al2O3 catalyst has great potential in applications for treatment of concentrated organic wastewater due to its superior catalytic activity and improved stability.

  9. The impact of electrochemical reduction potentials on the electrocatalytic activity of graphene oxide toward the oxygen reduction reaction in an alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toh, Shaw Yong; Loh, Kee Shyuan; Kamarudin, Siti Kartom; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of graphene via the electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO). In this study, GO nanosheets from aqueous dispersion were pre-assembled on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode and then electrochemically reduced in 1 M KOH under various constant reduction potentials in the range of −0.6 V to −1.5 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy analyses revealed that the graphitic structure was substantially restored in the resulting electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO). The ERGO electrodes exhibited significantly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline medium compared with the initial GO electrode. Of the ERGO electrodes produced at various cathodic potentials, the ERGO-1.2 V electrode, which was produced at a reduction potential of −1.2 V, demonstrated the best catalytic activity toward the ORR in an alkaline medium. The ORR on GO and ERGO electrodes was shown to proceed via a two-electron mechanism at low overpotentials. The agreement between the spectroscopy results and electrochemical measurements provide strong evidence that the enhanced ORR catalytic activity is mainly attributed to the restoration of GO’s graphitic structure. Furthermore, the ERGO-1.2 V electrode showed excellent tolerance to the methanol poisoning effect compared with a Pt/C catalyst electrode.

  10. Ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/c and PdRh/C electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Pino, Eddy Segura; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Linardi, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, carbon-supported Pd (Pd/C) and bimetallic PdRh (Pd:Rh 90:10 atomic ratio) (PdRh/C) electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The morphology and composition of the obtained materials were characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (VC), Chronoamperometry (CA), Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic activities of the electrocatalysts toward the ethanol electro-oxidation were evaluated in alkaline medium in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in a range temperature of 50 to 85 deg C. The best performances were obtained at 85 deg C (25 mW.cm -2 ) and 75 deg C (38 mW.cm -2 ) for Pd/C and PdRh/C electrocatalysts, respectively. The XRD of the PdRh/C electrocatalyst showed the presence of Pd-rich (fcc) phase. CV and CA experiments showed that PdRh/C electrocatalyst demonstrated superior activity toward ethanol electro-oxidation at room temperature, compared to Pd/C electrocatalyst. (author)

  11. Ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/c and PdRh/C electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Pino, Eddy Segura; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Linardi, Marcelo, E-mail: dfsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: drinager@ig.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, carbon-supported Pd (Pd/C) and bimetallic PdRh (Pd:Rh 90:10 atomic ratio) (PdRh/C) electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The morphology and composition of the obtained materials were characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (VC), Chronoamperometry (CA), Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic activities of the electrocatalysts toward the ethanol electro-oxidation were evaluated in alkaline medium in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in a range temperature of 50 to 85 deg C. The best performances were obtained at 85 deg C (25 mW.cm{sup -2}) and 75 deg C (38 mW.cm{sup -2}) for Pd/C and PdRh/C electrocatalysts, respectively. The XRD of the PdRh/C electrocatalyst showed the presence of Pd-rich (fcc) phase. CV and CA experiments showed that PdRh/C electrocatalyst demonstrated superior activity toward ethanol electro-oxidation at room temperature, compared to Pd/C electrocatalyst. (author)

  12. Aeration to degas CO{sub 2}, increase pH, and increase iron oxidation rates for efficient treatment of net alkaline mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, C.S.; Dennis, A.; Kahler, A. [Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology

    2009-07-15

    Passive treatment systems for mine drainage use no energy other than gravity, but they require greater area than active treatment systems. Researchers are considering 'hybrid' systems that have passive and active components for increased efficiency, especially where space limitations render passive-only technology ineffective. Flow-through reactor field experiments were conducted at two large net-alkaline anthracite mine discharges in central Pennsylvania. Assuming an Fe removal rate of 20 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} and Fe loading from field data, 3.6 x 10{sup 3} and 3.0 x 10{sup 4} m{sup 2} oxidation ponds would be required for the passive treatment of Site 21 and Packer 5 discharges, respectively. However, only a small area is available at each site. This paper demonstrates aeration to drive off CO{sub 2}, increase pH, and increase Fe(II) oxidation rates, enabling treatment within a small area compared to passive treatment methods, and introduces a geochemical model to accurately predict these rates as well as semi-passive treatment system sizing parameters. Iron(II) oxidation modeling of actively aerated systems predicted that a 1-m deep pond with 10 times less area than estimated for passive treatment would lower Fe(II) concentrations to less than 1 mg L-1 at summer and winter temperatures for both sites. The use of active aeration for treatment Of CO{sub 2}-rich, net-alkaline discharges (including partially treated effluent from anoxic limestone drains) can result in considerably reduced treatment area for oxidation and may lower treatment costs, but settling of Fe hydroxides was not considered in this study. The reduced capital cost for earthmoving will need to be compared to energy and maintenance costs for aeration.

  13. Aeration to degas CO2, increase pH, and increase iron oxidation rates for efficient treatment of net alkaline mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, C.S.; Dennis, A.; Kahler, A.

    2009-01-01

    Passive treatment systems for mine drainage use no energy other than gravity, but they require greater area than active treatment systems. Researchers are considering 'hybrid' systems that have passive and active components for increased efficiency, especially where space limitations render passive-only technology ineffective. Flow-through reactor field experiments were conducted at two large net-alkaline anthracite mine discharges in central Pennsylvania. Assuming an Fe removal rate of 20 g m -2 day -1 and Fe loading from field data, 3.6 x 10 3 and 3.0 x 10 4 m 2 oxidation ponds would be required for the passive treatment of Site 21 and Packer 5 discharges, respectively. However, only a small area is available at each site. This paper demonstrates aeration to drive off CO 2 , increase pH, and increase Fe(II) oxidation rates, enabling treatment within a small area compared to passive treatment methods, and introduces a geochemical model to accurately predict these rates as well as semi-passive treatment system sizing parameters. Both net-alkaline discharges were suboxic with a pH of ∼5.7, Fe(II) concentration of ∼16 mg L -1 , and low Mn and Al concentrations. Flow rates were ∼4000 L min -1 at Site 21 and 15,000 L min -1 at Packer 5. Three-h aeration experiments with flow rates scaled to a 14-L reactor resulted in pH increases from 5.7 to greater than 7, temperature increases from 12 to 22 deg. C, dissolved O 2 increases to saturation with respect to the atmosphere, and Fe(II) concentration decreases from 16 to -1 . A 17,000-L pilot-scale reactor at Site 21 produced similar results although aeration was not as complete as in the smaller reactor. Two non-aerated experiments at Site 21 with 13 and 25-h run times resulted in pH changes of ≤0.2 and Fe(II) concentration decreases of less than 3 mg L -1 . An Fe(II) oxidation model written in a differential equation solver matched the field experiments very well using field-measured pH, temperature, dissolved O 2

  14. The Silver Oxide-Zinc Alkaline Primary Cell. Part 2. Effects of Various Types of Negative Electrodes on Cell Characteristics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shepherd, C. M

    1951-01-01

    ... (generally a potassium hydroxide solution). During discharge, the silver peroxide in the positive electrode is reduced to metallic silver and the metallic zinc in the negative electrode is oxidized either to zinc oxide or to a complex zincate ion...

  15. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    . The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...

  16. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO2/CeO2 catalyst in a slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process-Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO. A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3, the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl2 and CeCl3 in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO2/CeO2, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130ºC and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed.

  17. A Novel Approach to Estimating Nitrous Oxide Emissions during Wetting Events from Single-Timepoint Flux Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian W; Needelman, Brian A; Cavigelli, Michel A; Yarwood, Stephanie A; Maul, Jude E; Bagley, Gwendolyn A; Mirsky, Steven B

    2017-03-01

    Precipitation and irrigation induce pulses of NO emissions in agricultural soils, but the magnitude, duration, and timing of these pulses remain uncertain. This uncertainty makes it difficult to accurately extrapolate emissions from unmeasured time periods between chamber sampling events. Therefore, we developed a modeling protocol to predict NO emissions from data collected daily for 7 d after wetting events. Within a cover crop-based corn ( L.) production system in Beltsville, MD, we conducted the 7-d time series during four time periods representing a range of corn growth stages in 2013 and 2014. Treatments included mixtures and monocultures of grass and legume cover crops that were fertilized with pelletized poultry litter or urea-ammonium nitrate solution (9-276 kg N ha). Most fluxes did not exhibit the expected exponential decay over time (82%); therefore, cumulative emissions were calculated using trapezoidal integration over 7 d after the wetting event. Cumulative 7-d emissions were well correlated with single point gas fluxes on the second day after a wetting event using a generalized linear mixed model (ln[emissions] = 0.809∙ln[flux] + 2.47). Soil chemical covariates before or after a wetting event were weakly associated with cumulative emissions. The ratio of dissolved organic C to total inorganic N was negatively correlated with cumulative emissions ( = 0.23-0.29), whereas nitrate was positively correlated with cumulative emissions ( = 0.23-0.33). Our model is an innovative approach that is calibrated using site-specific time series data, which may then be used to estimate short-term NO emissions after wetting events using only a single flux measurement. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Oxidative Stress as Estimated by Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase Levels Amplifies the Alkaline Phosphatase-Dependent Risk for Mortality in ESKD Patients on Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Torino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline phosphatase (Alk-Phos is a powerful predictor of death in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD and oxidative stress is a strong inducer of Alk-Phos in various tissues. We tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress, as estimated by a robust marker of systemic oxidative stress like γ-Glutamyl-Transpeptidase (GGT levels, may interact with Alk-Phos in the high risk of death in a cohort of 993 ESKD patients maintained on chronic dialysis. In fully adjusted analyses the HR for mortality associated with Alk-Phos (50 IU/L increase was progressively higher across GGT quintiles, being minimal in patients in the first quintile (HR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.77–1.03 and highest in the GGT fifth quintile (HR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.03–1.2 (P for the effect modification = 0.02. These findings were fully confirmed in sensitivity analyses excluding patients with preexisting liver disease, excessive alcohol intake, or altered liver disease biomarkers. GGT amplifies the risk of death associated with high Alk-Phos levels in ESKD patients. This observation is compatible with the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a strong modifier of the adverse biological effects of high Alk-Phos in this population.

  19. [Wet work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Krecisz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Wet work is one of the most important risk factors of occupational skin diseases. Exposure of hands to the wet environment for more than 2 hours daily, wearing moisture-proof protective gloves for a corresponding period of time or necessity to wash hands frequently lead to the disruption of epidermal stratum corneum, damage to skin barrier function and induction of irritant contact dermatitis. It may also promote penetration of allergens into the skin and increase the risk of sensitization to occupational allergens. Exposure to wet work plays a significant role in occupations, such as hairdressers and barbers, nurses and other health care workers, cleaning staff, food handlers and metalworkers. It is more common among women because many occupations involving wet work are female-dominated. The incidence of wet-work-induced occupational skin diseases can be reduced by taking appropriate preventive measures. These include identification of high-risk groups, education of workers, organization of work enabling to minimize the exposure to wet work, use of personal protective equipment and skin care after work.

  20. Assessment for development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low-grade fuels. Final report, October 18, 1989--February 28, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundback, C.

    1995-05-01

    The ultimate goal of this program was to demonstrate safe, reliable, and effective operation of the supercritical water oxidation process (SCWO) at a pilot plant-level throughput. This program was a three phase program. Phase 1 of the program preceded MODEC's participation in the program. MODEC did participate in Phases 2 and 3 of the program. In Phase 2, the target waste and industry were pulp mill sludges from the pulp and paper industry. In Phase 3, the target was modified to be DOE-generated mixed low level waste; wastes containing RCRA hazardous constituents and radionuclide surrogates were used as model wastes. The paper describes the research unit planning and design; bench-scale development of SCWO; research and development of wet oxidation of fuels; and the design of a super-critical water pilot plant

  1. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  2. Experimental research on influencing factors of wet removal of NO from coal-fired flue gas by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Wet removal of NO from coal-fired flue gas by UV/H2O2 Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated in a self-designed UV-bubble reactor. Several main influencing factors (UV intensity, H2O2 initial concentration, initial pH value, solution temperature, NO initial concentration, liquid-gas ratio and O2 percentage content) on the NO removal efficiency were studied. The results showed that UV intensity, H2O2 initial concentration, NO initial concentration and liquid-gas ratio are the main influencing factors. In the best conditions, the highest NO removal efficiency by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process could reach 82.9%. Based on the experimental study, the influencing mechanism of the relevant influencing factors were discussed in depth.

  3. Influence of Minor Alloying Elements on Selective Oxidation and Reactive Wetting of CMnSi TRIP Steel during Hot Dip Galvanizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Lawrence; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Young Ha; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of the addition of minor alloying elements on the selective oxidation and the reactive wetting of CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by means of galvanizing simulator tests. Five TRIP steels containing small alloying additions of Cr, Ni, Ti, Cu, and Sn were investigated. After intercritical annealing (IA) at 1093 K (820 °C) in a N2 + 5 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point of 213 K (-60 °C), two types of oxides were formed on the strip surface: Mn-rich xMnO·SiO2 ( x > 1.5) and Si-rich xMnO·SiO2 ( x galvanizing. The addition of a small amount of Sn is shown to significantly decrease the density of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steels.

  4. Carbon Supported Oxide-Rich Pd-Cu Bimetallic Electrocatalysts for Ethanol Electrooxidation in Alkaline Media Enhanced by Cu/CuOx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengfeng Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different proportions of oxide-rich PdCu/C nanoparticle catalysts were prepared by the NaBH4 reduction method, and their compositions were tuned by the molar ratios of the metal precursors. Among them, oxide-rich Pd0.9Cu0.1/C (Pd:Cu = 9:1, metal atomic ratio exhibits the highest electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR in alkaline media. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM confirmed the existence of both Cu and CuOx in the as-prepared Pd0.9Cu0.1/C. About 74% of the Cu atoms are in their oxide form (CuO or Cu2O. Besides the synergistic effect of Cu, CuOx existed in the Pd-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles works as a promoter for the EOR. The decreased Pd 3d electron density disclosed by XPS is ascribed to the formation of CuOx and the spill-over of oxygen-containing species from CuOx to Pd. The low Pd 3d electron density will decrease the adsorption of CH3COads intermediates. As a result, the electrocatalytic activity is enhanced. The onset potential of oxide-rich Pd0.9Cu0.1/C is negative shifted 150 mV compared to Pd/C. The oxide-rich Pd0.9Cu0.1/C also exhibited high stability, which indicated that it is a candidate for the anode of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs.

  5. High performance nano-Ni/Graphite electrode for electro-oxidation in direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ahmed B.; Abdel-Samad, Hesham S.; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2016-09-01

    Ni/Graphite electrocatalysts (Ni/G) are successfully prepared through electrodeposition of Ni from acidic (pH = 0.8) and feebly acidic (pH = 5.5) aqueous Ni (II) baths. The efficiencies of such electrodes are investigated as anodes for direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells through their ethanol electrooxidation cyclic voltammetric (CV) response in alkaline medium. A direct proportionality between the amount of the electrodeposited Ni and its CV response is found. The amounts of the deposited Ni from the two baths are recorded using the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (eQCM). The Ni/G electrodes prepared from the feebly acidic bath show a higher electrocatalytic response than those prepared from the acidic bath. Surface morphology of the Ni particles electrodeposited from feebly acidic bath appears in a nano-scale dimension. Various electrochemical experiments are conducted to confirm that the Ni/G ethanol electrooxidation CV response greatly depends on the pH rather than nickel ion concentration of the deposition bath. The eQCM technique is used to detect the crystalline phases of nickel as α-Ni(OH)2/γ-NiOOH and β-Ni(OH)2/β-NiOOH and their in-situ inter-transformations during the potentiodynamic polarization.

  6. Controlling the Molecular Weight of Lignosulfonates by an Alkaline Oxidative Treatment at Moderate Temperatures and Atmospheric Pressure: A Size-Exclusion and Reverse-Phase Chromatography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamseddine Guizani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular weights of lignosulfonates (LSs are modified by a rather simple process involving an alkaline oxidative treatment at moderate temperatures (70–90 °C and atmospheric pressure. Starting from LSs with an average molecular weight of 90,000 Da, and using such a treatment, one can prepare controlled molecular weight LSs in the range of 30,000 to 3500 Da based on the average mass molecular weight. The LS depolymerisation was monitored via reverse-phase and size-exclusion chromatography. It has been shown that the combination of O2, H2O2 and Cu as a catalyst in alkaline conditions at 80 °C induces a high LS depolymerisation. The depolymerisation was systemically accompanied by a vanillin production, the yields of which reached 1.4 wt % (weight percentage on LS raw basis in such conditions. Also, the average molecular weight and vanillin concentration were correlated and depended linearly on the temperature and reaction duration.

  7. CO2-Free Power Generation on an Iron Group Nanoalloy Catalyst via Selective Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol to Oxalic Acid in Alkaline Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Kitano, Sho; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Miho

    2014-07-01

    An Fe group ternary nanoalloy (NA) catalyst enabled selective electrocatalysis towards CO2-free power generation from highly deliverable ethylene glycol (EG). A solid-solution-type FeCoNi NA catalyst supported on carbon was prepared by a two-step reduction method. High-resolution electron microscopy techniques identified atomic-level mixing of constituent elements in the nanoalloy. We examined the distribution of oxidised species, including CO2, produced on the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst in the EG electrooxidation under alkaline conditions. The FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst exhibited the highest selectivities toward the formation of C2 products and to oxalic acid, i.e., 99 and 60%, respectively, at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), without CO2 generation. We successfully generated power by a direct EG alkaline fuel cell employing the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst and a solid-oxide electrolyte with oxygen reduction ability, i.e., a completely precious-metal-free system.

  8. Structures and heats of formation of simple alkaline earth metal compounds: fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides for Be, Mg, and Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Feller, David; Gole, James L; Dixon, David A

    2010-09-02

    Geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are predicted for the simple alkaline earth (Be, Mg and Ca) fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] level including core-valence correlation with the aug-cc-pwCVnZ basis sets up to n = 5 in some cases. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic effects, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were necessary to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation. The calculated geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are compared with the available experimental data. For a number of these alkaline earth compounds, the experimental geometries and energies are not reliable. MgF(2) and BeF(2) are predicted to be linear and CaF(2) is predicted to be bent. BeOH is predicted to be bent, whereas MgOH and CaOH are linear. The OBeO angle in Be(OH)(2) is not linear, and the molecule has C(2) symmetry. The heat of formation at 298 K for MgO is calculated to be 32.3 kcal/mol, and the bond dissociation energy at 0 K is predicted to be 61.5 kcal/mol.

  9. Treatment of toxic and hazardous organic wastes by wet oxidation process with oxygenated water at low temperature; Trattamento dei rifiuti tossici e nocivi organici mediante il processo di ossidazione ad umido con acqua ossigenata a bassa temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccinno, T; Salluzzo, A; Nardi, L [ENEA - Dipartimento Ciclo del Combustibile, Centro Ricerche Energia, Casaccia (Italy); Gili, M; Luce, A; Troiani, F [ENEA - Dipartimento Ciclo del Combustibile, Centro Ricerche Energia, Saluggia (Italy); Cornacchia, G [ENEA - Dipartimento Ciclo del Combustibile, Centro Ricerche Energia, Trisaia (Italy)

    1989-11-15

    The wet oxidation process using air or molecular oxygen is a well-known process from long time. It is suitable to oxidize several types of waste refractory to the usual biological, thermal and chemical treatments. The drastic operating conditions (high pressures and temperatures) prevented its industrial development. In the last years a new interest was assigned to the process for the treatment of nuclear wastes (organic resins and exhaust organic wastes); the treatment is carried out at widely reduced operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and boiling temperature) by means of metallic catalysts and hydrogen peroxide. With some limits, the wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide at low temperature can be applied to conventional waste waters containing toxic organic compounds. In the present report are summarized the activities developed at ENEA Fuel Cycle Department by the task force 'Deox' constituted by laboratory and plant specialists in order to verify the application of the wet oxidation process to the treatment of the toxic wastes. (author)

  10. Monitoring, field experiments, and geochemical modeling of Fe(II) oxidation kinetics in a stream dominated by net-alkaline coal-mine drainage, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta,, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Watershed-scale monitoring, field aeration experiments, and geochemical equilibrium and kinetic modeling were conducted to evaluate interdependent changes in pH, dissolved CO2, O2, and Fe(II) concentrations that typically take place downstream of net-alkaline, circumneutral coal-mine drainage (CMD) outfalls and during aerobic treatment of such CMD. The kinetic modeling approach, using PHREEQC, accurately simulates observed variations in pH, Fe(II) oxidation, alkalinity consumption, and associated dissolved gas concentrations during transport downstream of the CMD outfalls (natural attenuation) and during 6-h batch aeration tests on the CMD using bubble diffusers (enhanced attenuation). The batch aeration experiments demonstrated that aeration promoted CO2 outgassing, thereby increasing pH and the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was accurately estimated by the abiotic homogeneous oxidation rate law −d[Fe(II)]/dt = k1·[O2]·[H+]−2·[Fe(II)] that indicates an increase in pH by 1 unit at pH 5–8 and at constant dissolved O2 (DO) concentration results in a 100-fold increase in the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Adjusting for sample temperature, a narrow range of values for the apparent homogeneous Fe(II) oxidation rate constant (k1′) of 0.5–1.7 times the reference value of k1 = 3 × 10−12 mol/L/min (for pH 5–8 and 20 °C), reported by Stumm and Morgan (1996), was indicated by the calibrated models for the 5-km stream reach below the CMD outfalls and the aerated CMD. The rates of CO2 outgassing and O2ingassing in the model were estimated with first-order asymptotic functions, whereby the driving force is the gradient of the dissolved gas concentration relative to equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere. Although the progressive increase in DO concentration to saturation could be accurately modeled as a kinetic function for the conditions evaluated, the simulation of DO as an instantaneous equilibrium process did not affect the

  11. Transesterification of rapeseed oil for biodiesel production in trickle-bed reactors packed with heterogeneous Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yong-Lu; Tian, Song-Jiang; Li, Shu-Fen; Wang, Bo-Yang; Zhang, Min-Hua

    2013-05-01

    A conventional trickle bed reactor and its modified type both packed with Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalysts were studied for biodiesel production by transesterification of rapeseed oil and methanol. The effects of the methanol usage and oil flow rate on the FAME yield were investigated under the normal pressure and methanol boiling state. The oil flow rate had a significant effect on the FAME yield for the both reactors. The modified trickle bed reactor kept over 94.5% FAME yield under 0.6 mL/min oil flow rate and 91 mL catalyst bed volume, showing a much higher conversion and operational stability than the conventional type. With the modified trickle bed reactor, both transesterification and methanol separation could be performed simultaneously, and glycerin and methyl esters were separated additionally by gravity separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of synthesis of the nickel-cobalt oxide based anode electrocatalyst and of the related membrane-electrode assembly for alkaline water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Debabrata; Hnát, Jaromir; Bystron, Tomas; Paidar, Martin; Bouzek, Karel

    2017-04-01

    In this work, the Ni-Co spinel oxides are synthesized via different methods and using different calcination temperatures. Properties of the prepared materials are compared. The best route is selected and used to prepare a Ni1+xCo2-xO4 (-1 ≤ x ≤ 1) series of materials in order to investigate their catalytic activity towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The results show that hydroxide preparation yields NiCo2O4 oxide with the highest activity. 325 °C is identified as the optimum calcination temperature. Subsequently, the catalysts are tested in an electrolysis cell. To prepare an anode catalyst layer based on NiCo2O4 catalyst on top of a nickel foam substrate for membrane electrode assembly (MEA) construction, following polymer binders are used: anion-selective quaternized polyphenylene oxide (qPPO), inert polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE®), and cation-selective Nafion®. qPPO ionomer containing MEA exhibited highest OER activity. The current density obtained using a MEA containing qPPO binder attains a value of 135 mA cm-2 at a cell voltage of 1.85 V. After 7 h chronopotentiometric experiment at a constant current density of 225 mA cm-2, the MEA employing PTFE® binder shows higher stability than the other binders in alkaline water electrolysis at 50 °C. Under similar conditions, stability of the PTFE®-binding MEA is examined for 135 h.

  13. Preparation of Pt Au/C and Pt Au Bi/C electrocatalysts using electron beam irradiation for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Dionisio F.; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Cardoso, Elisangela S.Z.; Gomes, Thiago B.; Linardi, Marcelo; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Spinace, Estevam V.

    2011-01-01

    Pt Au/C (50:50) and PtAuBi/C electrocatalysts with Pt:Au:Bi atomic ratios of 50:40:10, 50:30:20 and 50:10:40 were prepared in water/2-propanol using electron beam irradiation. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied by chronoamperometry at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction measurements for all electrocatalysts prepared showed four peaks, which are associated with the planes of the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure characteristic of Pt and Pt alloys. For PtAuBi/C it was also observed the presence of a mixture of BiPt alloys and bismuth phases. The average crystallite sizes for Pt/C, PtAu/C, PtAuBi/C (50:40:10), PtAuBi/C (50:30:20) and PtAuBi/C (50:10:40) were in the range of 2.0 - 4.0 nm. The activity of the electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium showed that PtAuBi/C (50:40:10) had a higher performance for ethanol oxidation compared to others electrocatalysts prepared. (author)

  14. Electro-oxidation of methanol on gold in alkaline media: Adsorption characteristics of reaction intermediates studied using time resolved electro-chemical impedance and surface plasmon resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiongbon, K. A.; Roy, D.

    2005-12-01

    Electro-catalytic oxidation of methanol is the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells. We have studied the adsorption characteristics of the intermediate reactants of this multistep reaction on a gold film electrode in alkaline solutions by combining surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements with Fourier transform electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (FT-EIS). Methanol oxidation in this system shows no significant effects of "site poisoning" by chemisorbed CO. Our results suggest that OH - chemisorbed onto Au acts as a stabilizing agent for the surface species of electro-active methanol. Double layer charging/discharging and adsorption/desorption of OH - show more pronounced effects than adsorption/oxidation of methanol in controlling the surface charge density of the Au substrate. These effects are manifested in both the EIS and the SPR data, and serve as key indicators of the surface reaction kinetics. The data presented here describe the important role of adsorbed OH - in electro-catalysis of methanol on Au, and demonstrate how SPR and FT-EIS can be combined for quantitative probing of catalytically active metal-solution interfaces.

  15. Well-dispersed NiO nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube for methanol electrocatalytic oxidation in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Zhou, Yingke, E-mail: zhouyk888@hotmail.com; Hu, Min; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube supporting ultrafine NiO nanoparticles with high dispersity are facile synthesized. • The nitrogen doping, calcination temperature and NiO loading present great effects on the catalyst morphology, structure and electrochemical performance. • NiO-NCNT-3x-400 demonstrates remarkable catalytic activity and stability for the methanol electrolytic oxidation reaction. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube supporting NiO nanoparticles were synthesized by a chemical precipitation process coupled with subsequent calcination. The morphology and structure of the composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the electrochemical performance was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric technique. The effects of nitrogen doping, calcination temperature and content of NiO nanoparticles on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation were systematically studied. The results show that the uniformly dispersed ultrafine NiO nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube are obtained after calcination at 400 °C. The optimized composite catalysts present high electrocatalytic activity, fast charge-transfer process, excellent accessibility and stability for methanol oxidation reaction, which are promising for application in the alkaline direct methanol fuel cells.

  16. A comparative investigation of metal-support interactions on the catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Denis R. M.; Villullas, Hebe M.; Zhu, Fu-Chun; Jiang, Yan-Xia; Sun, Shi-Gang; Guo, Junsong; Sun, Lili; Chen, Rongrong

    2016-04-01

    The effects of interactions of Pt nanoparticles with hybrid supports on reactivity towards ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution are investigated. Studies involve catalysts with identical Pt nanoparticles on six hybrid supports containing carbon powder and transition metal oxides (TiO2, ZrO2, SnO2, CeO2, MoO3 and WO3). In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) results evidence that metal-support interactions produce changes in the Pt 5d band vacancy, which appears to determine the catalytic activity. The highest and lowest activities are observed for Pt nanoparticles on hybrid supports containing TiO2 and CeO2, respectively. Further studies are presented for these two catalysts. In situ FTIR reflection spectroscopy measurements, taken using both multi-stepped FTIR spectroscopy (MS-FTIR) and single potential alteration FTIR spectroscopy (SPA-FTIR), evidence that the main product of ethanol oxidation is acetate, although signals attributed to carbonate and CO2 indicate some differences in CO2 production. Fuel cell performances of these catalysts, tested in a 4.5 cm2 single cell at different temperatures (40-90 °C) show good agreement with data obtained by electrochemical techniques. Results of this comprehensive study point out the possibility of compensating a reduction of noble metal load with an increase in activity promoted by interactions between metallic nanoparticles and a support.

  17. TiO2/C composite as a support for Pd-nanoparticles toward the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estudillo-Wong, L.A.; Vargas-Gómez, A.M.; Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Manzo-Robledo, A.

    2013-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol was studied in alkaline solution on Pd nanoparticles supported on carbon black (XC-72R, C) and TiO 2 /C composite. The materials were prepared via organic colloid route at 170 °C with 5 wt% of Pd. X-ray diffraction (XRD), PdO monolayer reduction (PdO red ) and CO-stripping was employed to characterize both structure and electrochemical properties. According to this, the lattice parameter decreases from 0.3991 to 0.3905 nm due to a possible formation of Pd–Ti alloy. This modification is linked with the electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) decreasing from 22 to 18 m 2 g −1 . On the other hand, studies as a function of temperature and alcohol concentration indicated that the current for methanol electro-oxidation is higher and more stable at Pd/TiO 2 –C, with E a = 44.042 kJ mol −1 . Then, it is highly possible that at Pd/TiO 2 –C, the OH − /OH ads couple is adsorbed at the TiO 2 sites, increasing the kinetic of methanol oxidation reaction at the catalyst surface

  18. Preparation of Pt Au/C and Pt Au Bi/C electrocatalysts using electron beam irradiation for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Dionisio F.; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Cardoso, Elisangela S.Z.; Gomes, Thiago B.; Linardi, Marcelo; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Spinace, Estevam V., E-mail: dfsilva@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Pt Au/C (50:50) and PtAuBi/C electrocatalysts with Pt:Au:Bi atomic ratios of 50:40:10, 50:30:20 and 50:10:40 were prepared in water/2-propanol using electron beam irradiation. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied by chronoamperometry at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction measurements for all electrocatalysts prepared showed four peaks, which are associated with the planes of the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure characteristic of Pt and Pt alloys. For PtAuBi/C it was also observed the presence of a mixture of BiPt alloys and bismuth phases. The average crystallite sizes for Pt/C, PtAu/C, PtAuBi/C (50:40:10), PtAuBi/C (50:30:20) and PtAuBi/C (50:10:40) were in the range of 2.0 - 4.0 nm. The activity of the electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium showed that PtAuBi/C (50:40:10) had a higher performance for ethanol oxidation compared to others electrocatalysts prepared. (author)

  19. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  20. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A.; García, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ni supported over hydrotalcite calcined precursors as catalyst. ► Catalytic wet air oxidation in trickle bed reactor for Chromotrope 2R removal. ► Dye removal depends on temperature, initial dye concentration and flow rate. ► The catalyst proved to bare-usable after in situ regeneration. -- Abstract: Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg–Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min −1 and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min −1 , respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T r = 0.098 g Ni min mL −1 . After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T r = 0.098 g Ni min mL −1 , attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity

  1. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallet, Ana [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ovejero, Gabriel, E-mail: govejero@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodríguez, Araceli [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Peres, José A. [Centro de Química de Vila Real, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Apartado 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); García, Juan, E-mail: juangcia@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Ni supported over hydrotalcite calcined precursors as catalyst. ► Catalytic wet air oxidation in trickle bed reactor for Chromotrope 2R removal. ► Dye removal depends on temperature, initial dye concentration and flow rate. ► The catalyst proved to bare-usable after in situ regeneration. -- Abstract: Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg–Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min{sup −1} and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min{sup −1}, respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}. After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}, attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity.

  2. Influence of Gas Atmosphere Dew Point on the Selective Oxidation and the Reactive Wetting During Hot Dip Galvanizing of CMnSi TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Seok Jae; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Young Ha; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2013-01-01

    The selective oxidation and reactive wetting of intercritically annealed Si-bearing CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity steels were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In a N2 + 10 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point (DP) ranging from 213 K to 278 K (-60 °C to 5 °C), a continuous layer of selective oxides was formed on the surface. Annealing in a higher DP gas atmosphere resulted in a thinner layer of external oxidation and a greater depth of internal oxidation. The hot dipping was carried out in a Zn bath containing 0.22 mass pct Al, and the bath temperature was 733 K (460 °C). Coarse and discontinuous Fe2Al5- x Zn x grains and Fe-Zn intermetallics (ζ and δ) were observed at the steel/coating interface after the hot dip galvanizing (HDG) of panels were annealed in a low DP atmosphere 213 K (-60 °C). The Fe-Zn intermetallics were formed both in areas where the Fe2Al5- x Zn x inhibition layer had not been formed and on top of non-stoichiometric Fe-Al-Zn crystals. Poor wetting was observed on panels annealed in a low DP atmosphere because of the formation of thick film-type oxides on the surface. After annealing in higher DP gas atmospheres, i.e., 263 K and 278 K (-10 °C and 5 °C), a continuous and fine-grained Fe2Al5- x Zn x layer was formed. No Fe-Zn intermetallics were formed. The small grain size of the inhibition layer was attributed to the nucleation of the Fe2Al5- x Zn x grains on small ferrite sub-surface grains and the presence of granular surface oxides. A high DP atmosphere can therefore significantly contribute to the decrease of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steels processed in HDG lines.

  3. Electro-oxidation of ethylene glycol and glycerol at palladium-decorated FeCo@Fe core–shell nanocatalysts for alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells: functionalized MWCNT supports and impact on product selectivity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fashedemi, OO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available (ARTEM). The functional groups of the MWCNTs show a huge impact on the physico-chemical properties of the FeCo@Fe@Pd nanocatalyst towards the electrocatalytic oxidation of EG and GLY in alkaline media. The FeCo@Fe@Pd on –COOH-treated MWCNTs showed...

  4. Identification of anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with an alkaline saline lake in Khovsgol, Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Itai, Takaaki; Liu, Yitai; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Damdinsuren, Narantuya; Inskeep, William P

    2014-10-01

    Microbial arsenic transformation pathways associated with a saline lake located in northern Mongolia were examined using molecular biological and culturing approaches. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from saline lake sediments and soils were affiliated with haloalkaliphiles, including Bacillus and Halomonas spp. Diverse sequences of arsenate respiratory reductase (arrA) and a new group of arsenite oxidase (arxA) genes were also identified. Pure cultures of arsenate-reducing Nitrincola strain and anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing Halomonas strain were isolated. The chemoorganotrophic Halomonas strain contains arxA gene similar to that of a chemoautotrophic arsenite-oxidizing Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1. These results revealed the diversity of arsenic transformation pathways associated with a geographically distinct saline system and the potential contribution of arx-dependent arsenite oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria.

  5. Performance of carbon nanofiber supported Pd-Ni catalysts for electro-oxidation of ethanol in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyalagan, T.; Scott, Keith

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF) supported Pd-Ni nanoparticles have been prepared by chemical reduction with NaBH 4 as a reducing agent. The Pd-Ni/CNF catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical voltammetry analysis. TEM showed that the Pd-Ni particles were quite uniformly distributed on the surface of the carbon nanofiber with an average particle size of 4.0 nm. The electro-catalytic activity of the Pd-Ni/CNF for oxidation of ethanol was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The onset potential was 200 mV lower and the peak current density four times higher for ethanol oxidation for Pd-Ni/CNF compared to that for Pd/C. The effect of an increase in temperature from 20 to 60 °C had a great effect on increasing the ethanol oxidation activity.

  6. Performance of carbon nanofiber supported Pd-Ni catalysts for electro-oxidation of ethanol in alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiyalagan, T.; Scott, Keith [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF) supported Pd-Ni nanoparticles have been prepared by chemical reduction with NaBH{sub 4} as a reducing agent. The Pd-Ni/CNF catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical voltammetry analysis. TEM showed that the Pd-Ni particles were quite uniformly distributed on the surface of the carbon nanofiber with an average particle size of 4.0 nm. The electro-catalytic activity of the Pd-Ni/CNF for oxidation of ethanol was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The onset potential was 200 mV lower and the peak current density four times higher for ethanol oxidation for Pd-Ni/CNF compared to that for Pd/C. The effect of an increase in temperature from 20 to 60 C had a great effect on increasing the ethanol oxidation activity. (author)

  7. Comparing oxidative and dilute acid wet explosion pretreatment of Cocksfoot grass at high dry matter concentration for cellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2013-01-01

    into cellulose monomeric C6 sugars was achieved for WEx condition AC-E (180°C, 15 min, and 0.2% sulfuric acid). For that condition, the highest ethanol yield of 197 g/kg DM (97% of theoretical maximum value) was achieved for SSF process by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the highest concentration...... of hemicellulose C5 sugars was found for WEx pretreatment condition O2-A (160°C, 15 min, and 6 bar O2) which means that the highest potential ethanol yield was found at this moderate pretreatment condition with oxygen added. Increasing the pretreatment temperature to 180–190°C with addition of oxygen or dilute...... was investigated for cellulosic ethanol production. The biomass raw materials were pretreated using wet explosion (WEx) at 25% dry matter concentration with addition of oxygen or dilute sulfuric acid. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was significantly improved after pretreatment. The highest conversion...

  8. Highly active carbon supported ternary PdSnPtx (x=0.1-0.7) catalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline and acid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Fuchun; He, Yongwei; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Zhonghua; Ma, Zizai; Li, Ruixue

    2016-04-15

    A series of trimetallic PdSnPtx (x=0.1-0.7)/C catalysts with varied Pt content have been synthesized by co-reduction method using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. These catalysts were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The electrochemical results show that, after adding a minor amount of Pt dopant, the resultant PdSnPtx/C demonstrated more superior catalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation as compared with that of mono-/bi-metallic Pd/C or PdSn/C in alkaline solution and the PdSnPt0.2/C with optimal molar ratio reached the best. In acid solution, the PdSnPt0.2/C also depicted a superior catalytic activity relative to the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The possible enhanced synergistic effect between Pd, Sn/Sn(O) and Pt in an alloyed state should be responsible for the as-revealed superior ethanol electro-oxidation performance based upon the beneficial electronic effect and bi-functional mechanism. It implies the trimetallic PdSnPt0.2/C with a low Pt content has a promising prospect as anodic electrocatalyst in fields of alkali- and acid-type direct ethanol fuel cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glycerol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Silva, Dionisio Fortunato da; Pino, Eddy Segura; Spinace, Estevan Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Linardi, Marcelo; Santos, Mauro Coelhos dos

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-supported metal nanoparticles were prepared for fuel cell applications by radiation-induced reduction of metal ions precursors. Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts (Pd:Sn atomic ratio 90:10), prepared by using electron beam irradiation, were tested for glycerol electro-oxidation in single alkaline direct glycerol fuel cell (ADGFC). EDX analysis showed that the Pd:Sn atomic ratio is very similar to the nominal one. X-ray diffractograms of PdSn/C electrocatalyst showed the presence of Pd (fcc) phase. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) indicated that Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts have good activity for glycerol electro-oxidation, at room temperature. Experiments with single ADGFC were carried out from 60 to 90 deg C, using Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts and glycerol 2.0 mol.L -1 , as fuel. The best performance was obtained at 85 deg C, for both electrocatalysts. The Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts showed similar performance (34 mW cm -2 ), at 85 deg C. (author)

  10. Anodic oxidation of ammonia in alkaline solutions at Pt/Pt electrodes. Hakkin denkyokujo ni okeru enkisei ammonia yoeki no anodo sanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Ryoichiro; Katsuta, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Asami, Yusaku; Hirano, Katsuhiko (Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-01-05

    Anodic oxidation of ammonia in alkaline solutions on Pt/Pt electrode, in which NH {sub 3} is oxidized producing N {sub 2}, is a promising reaction in application to a fuel cell and water treatment. In this study, the relations between electrode potential and adsorbed intermediates, reaction process were elucidated by potentiodynamic method and potential step method. In measurement, a transient memory device and a microprocessor were connected to an electrolysis device as a new method, then measurement of electric potential and current and integral calculation were perfromed at high speed. Active sites of electrode were covered by Pt NH {sub x}. Faradic current corresponds to the N {sub 2} evolution was shown markedly by anodic scanning. The relation between electrode potential and reaction process was revealed by potential step method. It is found that Pt-NH {sub 2} is the active intermediate for the N {sub 2} evolution, and when current shows maximum, its coverage is nearly 0.5. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Electrochemical oxidation of ethanol using PtRh/C electrocatalysts in alkaline medium and synthesized by sodium borohydride and alcohol reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Eric Hossein

    2017-01-01

    PtRh/C were prepared by the following atomic proportions: (100,0), (0,100), (90,10), (70,30) and (50,50). The methods employed in the synthesis of these materials were reduction by sodium borohydride and reduction by alcohol. The metal salts used were H 2 PtCl 6 3•6H 2 0 and (RhNO 3 ) 3 , the support used was Carbon black XC72 and the bulk metal composition was 20% and 80% of support. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. The ethanol electrochemical oxidation mechanism was investigated by in situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy couple to an Attenuated Total Reflection technique. The electrocatalytic activity were evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry, Linear Sweep Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry techniques. The Fuel Cells tests were made in a single direct alcohol fuel cell with alkaline membrane. The working electrodes were prepared by a thin porous coating technique. X-ray diffraction allowed to verify metallic alloys, segregate phases and to calculate the percentage of metallic alloys. It was else possible to identify crystallographic phases. Infrared Spectroscopy allowed to verify that the electrochemical oxidation of ethanol was carried out by an incomplete mechanism. PtRh(70:30)/C prepared by sodium borohydride produced large amounts of carbon dioxide and acetaldehyde. Rh/C showed electrocatalytic activity when compared with other materials studied.

  12. Efficient visible-light photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous NO with graphitic carbon nitride (g–C_3N_4) activated by the alkaline hydrothermal treatment and mechanism analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Haoyu; Ou, Man; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Yu, Lemeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Various porous g–C_3N_4 samples were obtained by the alkaline hydrothermal treatment. • 0.12CN possesses the largest BET specific surface area and pore volume. • The NO conversion in the presence of 0.12CN reaches 40.4%. • Reasons for the enhanced PCO performance with treated g–C_3N_4 was analyzed. • Further mechanism of the PCO of NO relevant with active species was investigated. - Abstract: In this paper, an enhanced visible-light photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of NO (∼400 ppm) in the presence of the graphitic carbon nitride (g–C_3N_4) treated by the alkaline hydrothermal treatment is evaluated. Various g–C_3N_4 samples were treated in different concentrations of NaOH solutions and the sample treated in 0.12 mol L"−"1 of NaOH solution possesses the largest BET specific surface area as well as the optimal ability of the PCO of NO. UV–vis diffuse reflection spectra (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were also conducted, and the highly improved photocatalytic performance is ascribed to the large specific surface area and high pore volume, which provides more adsorption and active sites, the wide visible-light adsorption edge and the narrow band gap, which is favorable for visible-light activation, as well as the decreased recombination rate of photo-generated electrons and holes, which could contribute to the production of active species. Fluorescence spectra and a trapping experiment were conducted to further the mechanism analysis of the PCO of NO, illustrating that superoxide radicals (·O_2"−) play the dominant role among active species in the PCO of NO.

  13. Catalytic activity of dual catalysts system based on nano-manganese oxide and cobalt octacyanophthalocyanine toward four-electron reduction of oxygen in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dun; Chi, Dahe; Okajima, Takeyoshi; Ohsaka, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    The electrocatalysis of the dual functional catalysts system composed of electrolytic nano-manganese oxide (nano-MnOx) and cobalt octacyanophthalocyanine (CoPcCN) toward 4-electron reduction of oxygen (O 2 ) in alkaline media was studied. Nano-MnOx electrodeposited on the CoPcCN monolayer-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was clarified as the nano-rods with ca. 10-20 nm diameter by scanning electron microscopy. The peak current for O 2 reduction at the dual catalysts-modified GC electrode increases largely and the peak potential shifts by ca. 160 mV to the positive direction in cyclic voltammograms compared with those obtained at the bare GC electrode. The Koutecky-Levich plots indicate that the O 2 reduction at the dual catalysts-modified GC electrode is an apparent 4-electron process. Collection efficiencies obtained at the dual catalysts-modified GC electrode are much lower than those at the GC electrode and are almost similar to those at the Pt nano-particles modified GC electrode. The obtained results demonstrate that the dual catalysts system possesses a bifuctional catalytic activity for redox-mediating 2-electron reduction of O 2 to HO 2 - by CoPcCN as well as catalyzing the disproportionation of HO 2 - to OH - and O 2 by nano-MnOx, and enables an apparent 4-electron reduction of O 2 at a relatively low overpotential in alkaline media. In addition, it has been found that the cleaning of the dual catalysts-modified electrode by soaking in 0.1 M sulfuric acid solution enhances its catalytic activity toward the reduction of O 2

  14. Improved Ohmic-contact to AlGaN/GaN using Ohmic region recesses by self-terminating thermal oxidation assisted wet etching technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, H.; Zhu, L.; Wu, W.

    2017-06-01

    Lower Ti/Al/Ni/Au Ohmic contact resistance on AlGaN/GaN with wider rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperature window was achieved using recessed Ohmic contact structure based on self-terminating thermal oxidation assisted wet etching technique (STOAWET), in comparison with conventional Ohmic contacts. Even at lower temperature such as 650°C, recessed structure by STOAWET could still obtain Ohmic contact with contact resistance of 1.97Ω·mm, while conventional Ohmic structure mainly featured as Schottky contact. Actually, both Ohmic contact recess and mesa isolation processes could be accomplished by STOAWET in one process step and the process window of STOAWET is wide, simplifying AlGaN/GaN HEMT device process. Our experiment shows that the isolation leakage current by STOAWET is about one order of magnitude lower than that by inductivity coupled plasma (ICP) performed on the same wafer.

  15. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of organic, wet wastes for carbon cycling in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Luther, Amanda; Rabaey, Korneel; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter; Brilman, Wim

    2016-07-01

    For long-term human spaceflight missions, one of the major requirements is the regenerative life support system which has to be capable of recycling carbon, nutrients and water from both solid and liquid wastes generated by the crew and by the local production of food through living organisms (higher plants, fungi, algae, bacteria, …). The European Space Agency's Life Support System, envisioned by the MELiSSA project, consists of a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem, in which the waste receiving compartment (so-called compartment I or briefly 'CI') is based on thermophilic fermentation. However, as the waste generated by the crew compartment and food production compartment contain typical plant fibres (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), these recalcitrant fibres end up largely unaffected in the digestate (sludge) generated in the C-I compartment. Therefore, the C-I compartment has to be supplemented with a so-called fibre degradation unit (in short, FDU) for further oxidation or degradation of said plant fibres. A potential solution to degrading these plant fibres and other recalcitrant organics is their oxidation, by means of subcritical or supercritical water, into reusable CO2 while retaining the nutrients in an organic-free liquid effluent. By taking advantage of the altered physicochemical properties of water above or near its critical point (647 K, 22.1 MPa) - including increased solubility of non-polar compounds and oxygen, ion product and diffusivity - process conditions can be created for rapid oxidation of C into CO2. In this research, the oxidizer is provided as a hydrogen peroxide solution which, at elevated temperature, will dissociated into O2. The purpose of this study is to identify ideal process conditions which (a) ensure complete oxidation of carbon, (b) retaining the nutrients other than C in the liquid effluent and (c) require as little oxidizer as possible. Experiments were conducted on a continuous, tubular heated reactor and on batch

  16. The synthesis of higher oxides of alkali and alkaline earth metals in an electric discharge: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A. T.; Sadhukhan, P.

    1974-01-01

    Potassium hydroxide was subjected to the products of an electrical discharge sustained in oxygen and produced both potassium peroxide and superoxide. The conversion to higher oxides was shown to strongly depend upon the particle size of KOH, the position of KOH in the discharge zone, and the operating conditions of the discharge. Similar experiments were performed with hydroxides of lithium and calcium which do not form superoxides, but are converted to peroxides. The yields of peroxides were shown to strongly depend upon the operating conditions of the discharge. The absence of superoxides and the presence of peroxides of lithium and calcium was explained from the consideration of relative thermodynamic stability of the oxides of lithium and calcium. Thermogravimetric analysis was shown to provide a more accurate means for determining the amount of KO2 than previous methods.

  17. Spring-Thaw Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Reed Canarygrass on Wetness-Prone Marginal Soil in New York State

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, C.; Stoof, C.R.; Richards, B.K.; Rossiter, D.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    In temperate climates, a significant fraction of annual emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) from agricultural land can occur during soil thaw in late winter and early spring. The objective of this study is to determine the impact of land use change from long-term fallow grassland to managed perennial

  18. Durability of carbon-supported manganese oxide nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roche, I.; Chainet, E.; Chatenet, M.; Vondrák, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 9 (2008), s. 1195-1201 ISSN 0021-891X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4813302; GA ČR GA104/02/0731 Grant - others:CNRS(FR) 18105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : oxygen reduction reaction * rotating ring-disc electrode * carbon-supported manganese oxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.540, year: 2008

  19. Surface Grafting of Ru(II) Diazonium-Based Sensitizers on Metal Oxides Enhances Alkaline Stability for Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangle, Rachel; Sampaio, Renato N; Troian-Gautier, Ludovic; Meyer, Gerald J

    2018-01-24

    The electrografting of [Ru(ttt)(tpy-C 6 H 4 -N 2 + )] 3+ , where "ttt" is 4,4',4″-tri-tert-butyl-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine, was investigated on several wide band gap metal oxide surfaces (TiO 2 , SnO 2 , ZrO 2 , ZnO, In 2 O 3 :Sn) and compared to structurally analogous sensitizers that differed only by the anchoring group, i.e., -PO 3 H 2 and -COOH. An optimized procedure for diazonium electrografting to semiconductor metal oxides is presented that allowed surface coverages that ranged between 4.7 × 10 -8 and 10.6 × 10 -8 mol cm -2 depending on the nature of the metal oxide. FTIR analysis showed the disappearance of the diazonium stretch at 2266 cm -1 after electrografting. XPS analysis revealed a characteristic peak of Ru 3d at 285 eV as well as a peak at 531.6 eV that was attributed to O 1s in Ti-O-C bonds. Photocurrents were measured to assess electron injection efficiency of these modified surfaces. The electrografted sensitizers exhibited excellent stability across a range of pHs spanning from 1 to 14, where classical binding groups such as carboxylic and phosphonic derivatives were hydrolyzed.

  20. A time effect in the early stages of a surface oxidation of a Pt(111 plane in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. LOVIC

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A time effect in the early stages of surface oxidation of a Pt(111 plane in 0.1 M NaOH solution was studied by examining the reduction parts of the j/E profile recorded after holding the potential for various times at several values at the end of anodic-going sweeps. The processes associated with the two peaks, which appear in the anodic part of the voltammogram, are assigned to the early stages of a surface oxidation. Two OHad states are suggested based on the existence of reversibly or weakly bound OHad species and irreversibly or strongly bound OHad species. The reversibly bound OHad species are involved in the “normal” structure of the butterfly peak, while the irreversibly adsorbed OHad species can be obtained only by the slow diffusion of a part of the initially electrosorbed OH species from sites with low to sites with higher binding energies. The irreversibly reduced OHad species cannot be completely removed from the surface causing, therefore, some permanent transformation of the initial state of the surface. This kind of species was not detected in the area of the second oxidation peak. The phenomena observed in the reduction part of the j/E profile induced by a time effect in the second peak could be associated with a place-exchange mechanism between oxygen containing species, whatever they are, and the platinum surface.

  1. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, Basudev, E-mail: swain@iae.re.kr [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Mishra, Chinmayee [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hyun Seon [Sungshin University, Dept. of Interdisciplinary ECO Science, Seoul, 142-732 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Soo [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Yongin, 449-863 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11 kg/m{sup 3} of copper and 1.35 kg/m{sup 3} of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100–500 nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. - Highlights: • From the Indium-Tin-Oxide etching

  2. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11 kg/m 3 of copper and 1.35 kg/m 3 of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100–500 nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. - Highlights: • From the Indium-Tin-Oxide etching wastewater

  3. Oxidation of Commercial Petronas Diesel with Tert-Butyl Hydroperoxide Over Poly molybdate Alumina Supported Catalyst Modified With Alkaline Earth Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Nazwanie Wan Abdullah; Rusmidah Ali; Wan Azlee Wan Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    Due to strict environmental legislation for ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels, increasing technical and operational challenges are imposed to conventional hydrodesulfurization (HDS) technology. Therefore, catalytic oxidative desulfurization (Cat-ODS) has been suggested to be an alternative method to replace a conventional method which is hydrodesulfurization. In this study, catalytic oxidation of commercial diesel was performed using an oil-soluble oxidant, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP), over poly molybdate supported on alumina MoO_3-PO_4/ Al_2O_3 catalyst. A commercial Petronas diesel with 440 ppm of total sulfur was employed to evaluate the elimination of sulfur compounds. Besides, the percentage of sulfur removal was measured by (GC-FPD). Alkaline earth metals, such as Calcium (Ca), Barium (Ba) and Strontium (Sr) were introduced on the surface of MoO_3-PO_4/ Al_2O_3. The results showed that the catalytic activity decreased in the order, Ca/ MoO_3-PO_4/ Al_2O_3>Sr/ MoO_3-PO_4/ Al_2O_3> Ba/ MoO_3-PO_4/ Al_2O_3. The Ca/ MoO_3-PO_4/ Al_2O_3 catalyst was characterized by XRD and FESEM. XRD results showed that the best catalyst was highly amorphous while FESEM micrograph illustrated an aggregation and agglomeration of various particle sizes. The catalytic activity of Ca/ MoO_3-PO_4/ Al_2O_3 catalyst with various Ca/ Mo ratios were also studied. When the Ca/ Mo ratio was 15:85, the sulfur removal was the highest (79 %) at 45 degree Celsius, 30 min and O/ S molar ratio 3.0 with solvent = dimethylformamide (DMF), diesel/ solvent ratio = 1.0. (author)

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of Fe_2O_3/polypyrrole/graphene oxide composites as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Suzhen; Ma, Shaobo; Yang, Ying; Mao, Qing; Hao, Ce

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Fe_2O_3/polypyrrole/graphene oxide electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are successfully prepared through one simple polypyrrole-assisted hydrothermal method and possess very high ORR activity and are able to selectively reduce O_2 to water through the four-electron transfer reaction mechanism in alkaline electrolyte. - Abstract: Advantages in low cost, and excellent catalytic activity of Fe-based nanomaterials dispersed on nitrogen-doped graphene supports render them to be good electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Here, Fe_2O_3/polypyrrole/graphene oxide (Fe_2O_3/Ppy/GO) composites with the Fe_2O_3 embedded in the Ppy modified GO are synthesized using hydrothermal method. With an optimal iron atom content ratio of 1.6% in graphene oxide and heat treatment at 800 °C, the Fe_2O_3/Ppy/GO exhibited enhanced catalytic performance for ORR with the onset potential of −0.1 V (vs SCE), cathodic potential of −0.24 V (vs SCE), an approximate 4e"− transfer process in O_2-saturated 0.1 M KOH, and superior stability that only reduced 5% catalytic activity after 5000 cycles. The decisive factors in improving the electrocatalytic and durable performance are the intimate and large contact interfaces between nanocrystallines of Fe_2O_3 and Ppy/GO, in addition to the high electron withdrawing/storing ability and the high conductivity of GO doped with nitrogen from Ppy during the hydrothermal reaction. The Fe_2O_3/Ppy/GO showed significantly improved ORR properties and confirmed that Fe-N-C-based electrocatalysts played a key role in fuel cells.

  5. Preparation and characterization of electrocatalysts based on palladium for electro-oxidation of alcohols in alkaline medium; Preparacao e caracterizacao de eletrocatalisadores a base de paladio para oxidacao eletroquimica de alcoois em meio alcalino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandalise, Michele

    2012-07-01

    In this study Pd/C, Au/C, PdAu/C, PdAuPt/C, PdAuBi/C and PdAuIr/C electrocatalysts were prepared by the sodium borohydride reduction method for the electrochemical oxidation of methanol, ethanol and ethylene glycol. This methodology consists in mix an alkaline solution of sodium borohydride to a mixture containing water/isopropyl alcohol, metallic precursors and the Vulcan XC 72 carbon support. The electrocatalysts were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical oxidation of the alcohols was studied by chronoamperometry using a thin porous coating technique. The mechanism of ethanol electro-oxidation was studied by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) in situ. The most effective electrocatalysts were tested in alkaline single cells directly fed with methanol, ethanol or ethylene glycol. Preliminary studies showed that the most suitable atomic composition for preparing the ternary catalysts is 50:45:05. Electrochemical data in alkaline medium show that the electrocatalysts PdAuPt/C (50:45:05) showed the better activity for methanol electro oxidation, while PdAuIr/C was the most active for ethanol oxidation and PdAuBi/C (50:45:05) was the most effective for ethylene glycol oxidation in alkaline medium. These results show that the addition of gold in the composition of electrocatalysts increases their catalytic activities. The spectroelectrochemical FTIR in situ data permitted to conclude that C-C bond is not broken and the acetate is formed. (author)

  6. APPLICATION OF MAGNETIC CATALYSTS TO THE CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CWPO OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER CONTAINING NON BIODEGRADABLE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Munoz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new ferromagnetic -Al2O3-supported iron catalyst has been prepared and its activity and stability have been compared with those of a previous iron-based conventional catalyst and with the traditional homogeneous Fenton process in the oxidation of chlorophenols. The use of solid catalysts improved significantly the efficiency on the use of H2O2, achieving higher mineralization degrees. The magnetic catalyst led to significantly higher oxidation rates than the conventional one due to the presence of both Fe (II and Fe (III. On the other hand, the use of a catalyst with magnetic properties is of interest, since it allows rapid recovery after treatment using a magnetic field. Moreover, it showed a high stability with fairly low iron leaching (<1% upon CWPO runs. An additional clear advantage of this new catalyst is its easy separation and recovery from the reaction medium by applying an external magnetic field.

  7. Bi-modified Pd/C catalyst via irreversible adsorption and its catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jindi; Huang, Yiyin; Guo, Yonglang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Pd-Bi/C catalysts were easily prepared by irreversible adsorption of Bi on Pd/C surface. • The adsorption of Bi increases the oxygen-containing species obviously on Pd-Bi/C surface. • Only a little amount of Bi on Pd-Bi/C can play a significant role in ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). • Current density of EOR on Pd-Bi/C (20:1) is 2.4 times higher than that on Pd/C. • Anti-poisoning ability and durability of Pd-Bi/C (20:1) is greatly enhanced. -- Abstract: A facile approach to promote ethanol electro-oxidation on Pd-based catalysts is presented by the modification of Bi on Pd/C catalyst via irreversible adsorption. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show that the modification of Bi has no significant effect on the Pd morphology and particle size distribution. Bi(III) and Pd(0) are the dominant forms in Pd-Bi/C catalyst. Electrochemical tests show that the modification of the appropriate amount of Bi on Pd/C catalyst can remarkably enhance activity toward ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) up to about 2.4 times higher compared to Pd/C catalyst. The Pd-Bi/C (20:1) catalyst exhibits excellent stability and enhances CO tolerance. The enhanced electrochemical performance of Pd-Bi/C catalyst is attributed to the electronic effect and the bifunctional mechanism. The high exchange current density and the low apparent activation energy on Pd-Bi/C (20:1) catalyst reveal its faster kinetics and higher intrinsic activity compared to Pd/C catalyst

  8. Conditions for the formation of pure birnessite during the oxidation of Mn(II) cations in aqueous alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boumaiza, Hella [Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux et Catalyse, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université El Manar (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); Département de Génie Biologique et Chimique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées et de Technologies (INSAT), Université de Carthage, Tunis (Tunisia); Coustel, Romain [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); Medjahdi, Ghouti [Institut Jean Lamour, Centre de Compétences Rayons X et Spectroscopie (X-Gamma), UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine (France); Ruby, Christian, E-mail: Christian.ruby@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    Birnessite was synthetized through redox reaction by mixing MnO{sub 4}{sup -}, Mn{sup 2+} and OH{sup -} solutions. The Mn(VII): Mn(II) ratio of 0.33 was chosen and three methods were used consisting in a quick mixing under vigorous stirring of two of the three reagents and then on the dropwise addition of the third one. The obtained solids were characterized by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopies. Their average oxidation states were determined from ICP and CEC measurements while their surface properties were investigated by XPS. This study provides an increased understanding of the importance of dissolved oxygen in the formation of birnessite and hausmannite and shows the ways to obtain pure birnessite. The role of counter-ion ie. Na{sup +} or K{sup +} was also examined. - Graphical abstract: Pathways of birnessite formation. - Highlights: • Pure birnessite is prepared through a redox reaction. • Hausmannite formation is prevented by controlling dissolved O2. • The employed counterion influences the purity of birnessite. • Initial Mn(OH){sub 2} is oxidized by both MnO{sub 4}{sup -} and dissolved O{sub 2}.

  9. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A; García, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg-Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min(-1) and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min(-1), respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1). After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1), attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for "realistic" surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH3-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is - apart from a slight change in surface composition - identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  11. Nanoscale analysis of the influence of pre-oxidation on oxide formation and wetting behavior of hot-dip galvanized high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, M.; Duchoslav, J.; Steinberger, R.; Hesser, G.; Commenda, C.; Samek, L.; Arenholz, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-oxidized hot-dip galvanized advanced high strength steel was examined. • The interface was analyzed in detail via high energy resolution Auger spectra. • Evidence for an aluminothermic reduction of the Mn oxide was found. • A new model for galvanizing high manganese steel was developed. - Abstract: Hot-dip galvanized (HDG) 2nd generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS), nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) with 15.8 wt.% Mn, 0.79 wt.% C, was analyzed at the interface between steel and zinc by scanning Auger electron microscopy (AES) in order to confirm and improve an existing model of additional pre-oxidation treatment before annealing and immersion into the hot zinc bath. Furthermore these steel samples were fractured in the analysis chamber of the AES and analyzed without breaking vacuum. In these measurements the results of an aluminothermic reduction of the manganese and iron surface oxides on the steel could be confirmed by AES

  12. Wet cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, B. [IMC Technical Services (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    Continuous miners create dust and methane problems in underground coal mining. Control has usually been achieved using ventilation techniques as experiments with water based suppression have led to flooding and electrical problems. Recent experience in the US has led to renewed interest in wet head systems. This paper describes tests of the Hydraphase system by IMC Technologies. Ventilation around the cutting zone, quenching of hot ignition sources, dust suppression, the surface trial gallery tests, the performance of the cutting bed, and flow of air and methane around the cutting head are reviewed. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 photos.

  13. CO(2) capture properties of alkaline earth metal oxides and hydroxides: A combined density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan C

    2010-08-21

    By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO(2) absorption/desorption reactions with alkaline earth metal oxides MO and hydroxides M(OH)(2) (where M=Be,Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba) are analyzed. The heats of reaction and the chemical potential changes of these solids upon CO(2) capture reactions have been calculated and used to evaluate the energy costs. Relative to CaO, a widely used system in practical applications, MgO and Mg(OH)(2) systems were found to be better candidates for CO(2) sorbent applications due to their lower operating temperatures (600-700 K). In the presence of H(2)O, MgCO(3) can be regenerated into Mg(OH)(2) at low temperatures or into MgO at high temperatures. This transition temperature depends not only on the CO(2) pressure but also on the H(2)O pressure. Based on our calculated results and by comparing with available experimental data, we propose a general computational search methodology which can be used as a general scheme for screening a large number of solids for use as CO(2) sorbents.

  14. Carbon quantum dots directly generated from electrochemical oxidation of graphite electrodes in alkaline alcohols and the applications for specific ferric ion detection and cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengli; Xu, Yuanhong; Niu, Fushuang; Gooding, J Justin; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-04-25

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are attracting tremendous interest owing to their low toxicity, water dispersibility, biocompatibility, optical properties and wide applicability. Herein, CQDs with an average diameter of (4.0 ± 0.2) nm and high crystallinity were produced simply from the electrochemical oxidation of a graphite electrode in alkaline alcohols. The as-formed CQDs dispersion was colourless but the dispersion gradually changed to bright yellow when stored in ambient conditions. Based on UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), this colour change appeared to be due to oxygenation of surface species over time. Furthermore, the CQDs were used in specific and sensitive detection of ferric ion (Fe(3+)) with broad linear ranges of 10-200 μM with a low limit of detection of 1.8 μM (S/N = 3). The application of the CQDs for Fe(3+) detection in tap water was demonstrated and the possible mechanism was also discussed. Finally, based on their good characteristics of low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, the CQDs were successfully applied to cell imaging.

  15. Theoretical study for the reduction of N2O with CO Mediated by alkaline-earth metal oxide cations 2MO+(M=Ca, Sr, Ba)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhui; Leng Yanli; Wang Yongcheng

    2013-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of the reaction N 2 O( 0 Σ + ) + CO ( 1 Σ + )→N 2 ( 1 Σ g + ) + CO 2 ( 1 Σ g + ) mediated by alkaline-earth metal oxide cations 2 MO + (m=Ca, Sr, Ba) have been investigated by using the UB3LYP and CCSD (T) levels of theory. The O-atom affinities (OA) testified that only the 2 CaO + can capture O from N 2 O and transfer O to CO is thermodynamically allowed in three ions. The processes can be expressed as channels l and 2 for the reaction of N 2 O and CO mediated by 2 MO + (M=Ca, Sr, Ba). For the former, the main reaction processes in a two-step manner to products, the 2 MO + , as a catalyzer, transports an oxygen atom from N 2 O to CO. For the latter, firstly, the N 2 O interact with the 2 MO + to form IM1, then IM1 interact with the CO to form IM2', along the reaction pathway the intermediate species convert into products 2 1MO + , N 2 and CO 2 . From above results, the following conclusion was drawn. The channel 2 is kinetically and thermodynamically feasible. Our calculated results show the title reactions are accord with the experiment. (authors)

  16. Structures and Heats of Formation of Simple Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds II: Fluorides, Chlorides, Oxides, and Hydroxides for Ba, Sr, and Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Hill, J Grant; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2018-01-11

    Geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, heats of formation, bond dissociation energies, cohesive energies, and selected fluoride affinities (difluorides) are predicted for the late alkaline earth (Sr, Ba, and Ra) oxides, fluorides, chlorides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory CCSD(T) level. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic and pseudopotential corrections, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were included to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation following the Feller-Peterson-Dixon methodology. The calculated values are compared to the experimental data where available. In some cases, especially for Ra compounds, there are no experimental results, or the experimental energetics and geometries are not reliable or have very large error bars. All of the Sr, Ba, and Ra difluorides, dichlorides, and dihydroxides are bent structures with the OMO bond angles decreasing going down the group. The cohesive energies of bulk Be dihalides are predicted to be quite low, while those of Ra are relatively large. The fluoride affinities show that the difluorides are moderately strong Lewis acids and that such trifluorides may form under the appropriate experimental conditions.

  17. Role of Ru(IlI) as an inhibitor in oxidation of lactose by (Cu(bipy)2)2+ in alkaline medium: spectrophotometric and kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Manjula; Srivastava, Jaya; Rahmani, Shahla

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of oxidation of lactose by (Cu(bipy) 2 ) 2+ in alkaline medium using Ru(III) as an inhibitor has been studied spectrophotometrically at 40 °C. The studies show that the rate of the reaction is zero order with respect to (Cu(bipy) 2 ) 2+ and first order with respect to (lactose). The order of reaction is found to be two at low concentrations of OH - (from 1.48×10 5 to 3.47×10 5 M) and less than two at its high concentrations (from 4.27×10 5 to 6.31×10 5 M). There is a substantial decrease in the pseudo-zero order rate constant with increase in the concentration of Ru(III) chloride, indicating the role of Ru(III) chloride as an inhibitor. Decrease in the rate with increase in dielectric constant of the medium is observed, while ionic strength of the medium and bipyridyl concentration has no influence on the rate. Based on kinetic data and spectrophotometric evidences, a suitable mechanism is proposed for the studied reaction. (author)

  18. Commercial alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses for sealing solid oxide cell stacks. Part I: Development of glass-ceramic microstructure and thermomechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Karsten; Balic-Zunic, Tonci

    2018-01-01

    Sealing performance in solid oxide cell (SOC) stacks and the devitrification process of commercially available alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses containing 48‐61 mol% SiO2, 18‐28 mol% CaO, 1‐7 mol% MgO, 7‐10 mol% Al2O3, 1‐11 mol% B2O3 plus minor amounts of Na2O, K2O, FeO, and TiO2 were...... investigated and quantified through analysis of phase assemblages as function of heat treatments above the glass transition temperatures using the electron microprobe and powder X‐ray diffraction. For two of these glasses devitrification behavior was compared to the devitrification behavior of similar glasses...... produced in the laboratory. Glasses were characterized after annealing in air at 800°C and 850°C for up to 6 weeks. Even though the glasses lie within a relatively narrow compositional range, sealing performance and the resulting microstructures differed significantly. Best thermomechanical properties...

  19. Morphology-dependent electrocatalytic performance of Fe2(MoO43 for electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoming Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemically synthesized nanosphere, nanorod and nanotube Fe2(MoO43 at optimized temperature and current density are characterized with XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS. Crystal lattices of the three types Fe2(MoO43 detected by HRTEM are well matched with the simulation analysis results from Materials Studio 6.0 based on the inorganic crystal structure database (ICSD data and the modified XRD lattice parameters. The ratios of Fe/Mo on the surface resulted from XPS analysis are 1.47, 1.63 and 2.22 respectively for nanosphere, nanorod and nanotube. The mixture of Fe2(MoO43 with polytetrafluoroethylene dispersion are coated on glass carbon substrate as electrode for electrocatalytic performance test by cyclic voltammetries in 0.1 mol/L KOH and 1 mol/L methanol electrolyte. Methanol oxidation peak current density of the Nanotube- Fe2(MoO43/GCEs electrode is 3.27 mA/cm2 higher than 2.8 mA/cm2 of platinum foil electrode, which shows enhanced catalytic activity of Nanotube-Fe2(MoO43/GCEs. The cyclic stability in terms of peak current retention are 91%, 92% and 88% respectively for Nanosphere-Fe2(MoO43/GCE, Nanorod-Fe2(MoO43/GCE and Nanotube-Fe2(MoO43/GCE electrode after 220 cycles. It is concluded that nanosized Fe2(MoO43 could be promising alternative non-noble electro-catalysts for electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline medium.

  20. Two 3D structured Co-Ni bimetallic oxides as cathode catalysts for high-performance alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shu, Chengyong; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Yuanzhen; Liu, Yongning

    2017-09-01

    Two NiCo2O4 bimetallic oxides were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. SEM and TEM observations show that these materials have three-dimensional (3D) dandelion-like (DL) and flower-like (FL) morphologies. Their large specific surface areas (90.68 and 19.8 m2·g-1) and porous structures provide many active sites and effective transport pathways for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Electrochemical measurements with a rotating ring-disc electrode (RRDE) indicate that the electron transfer numbers of the NiCo2O4-DL and NiCo2O4-FL catalysts for ORR in an alkaline solution are 3.97 and 3.91, respectively. Fuel cells were assembled with the bimetallic oxides, PtRu/C and a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) as cathode catalysts, anode catalyst and electrolyte film, respectively. For NiCo2O4-DL, the peak power density reaches up to 73.5 mW·cm-2 at 26 °C, which is the highest room-temperature value reported to date. The high catalytic activity of NiCo2O4 is mainly attributed to the presence of many Co3+ cations that directly donate electrons to O2 to reduce it via a more efficient and effective route. Furthermore, the catalytic performance of NiCo2O4-DL is superior to that of NiCo2O4-FL because it has a higher specific surface area and is less crystalline.

  1. Electro-oxidation of methanol in alkaline conditions using Pd–Ni nanoparticles prepared from organometallic precursors and supported on carbon vulcan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo-Robledo, A., E-mail: amanzor@ipn.mx [UPALM, Laboratorio de Electroquímica y Corrosión, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas-IPN (Mexico); Costa, Natália J. S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Philippot, K. [CNRS, LCC, Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination (France); Rossi, Liane M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Ramírez-Meneses, E. [Universidad Iberoamericana, Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas (Mexico); Guerrero-Ortega, L. P. A. [UPALM, Laboratorio de Electroquímica y Corrosión, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas-IPN (Mexico); Ezquerra-Quiroga, S. [Universidad Iberoamericana, Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas (Mexico)

    2015-12-15

    Oxidation of low-molecular weight alcohols as energy sources using metal nanoparticles has attracted considerable interest for use as a power source in portable electronic devices. In this work, a series of mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles based on palladium and nickel (Pd, Pd{sub 90}Ni{sub 10}, Pd{sub 50}Ni{sub 50}, Pd{sub 10}Ni{sub 90}, and Ni) have been synthesized from organometallic precursors, namely tris(dibenzylideneacetone) dipalladium(0), Pd{sub 2}(dba){sub 3}, and bis(1,5-cyclooctadiene)nickel(0), Ni(cod){sub 2}. Well-defined metal particles in the nanometric scale from 4.2 to 6.3 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared nanoparticles were mixed with a carbon Vulcan matrix (10 % wt. of the catalyst in turn) for investigation as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in alkaline conditions. The i–E profiles from cyclic voltammetry for the monometallic systems indicated a redox process attributed only to palladium or nickel, as expected. With the bimetallic nanomaterials, the redox process and the i–E characteristics are functions of the amount of nickel associated to palladium. From a fundamental point of view, it has been established that the OH ions’ interfacial interaction and the MOR kinetics are affected by the presence of nickel (decreasing the faradic current) as supported by the current versus potential profiles obtained as a function of methanol concentration and with temperature variation.

  2. Precipitation of uranium oxide by reduction in alkaline solution; Precipitation d'oxyde d'uranium par reduction en milieu alcalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottier, P; Claus, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In the first part of the report the authors study the reaction mechanism for this reduction which makes it possible to precipitate a hydrated uranium oxide from alkaline uranyl carbonate solutions. The research into the effects of different variables on numerous cycles are then summarized. Optical, X-ray and thermogravimetric examinations then make it possible to predict the properties of this oxide. In the second part the authors carry out calculations for the continuous operation of single cells and cells in series. These calculations give the data required for the construction of 2 cells having capacities of 0.3 and 10 litres. Results obtained from the continuous operation of this latter cell lead to certain conclusions concerning the applicability of this method to the hydrometallurgy of uranium. (authors) [French] Dans une premiere partie, les auteurs etudient le mecanisme de reaction de cette reduction qui permet la precipitation d'un oxyde d'uranium hydrate dans les solutions d'uranyle-carbonates alcalins. Les etudes de diverses variables sur de nombreux cycles sont ensuite resumees. Puis des examens optiques, aux rayons X et par thermogravimetrie, permettent de proposer une hypothese sur les proprietes de l'oxyde obtenu. Dans la deuxieme partie, les auteurs developpent un calcul prevoyant la marche continue de cellules uniques et en cascades. De ces calculs on tire les elements permettant la realisation de deux cellules de 0,3 et 10 litres. Des resultats de marche continue sur cette derniere cellule, on peut conclure a l'applicabilite de cette methode a l'hydrometallurgie de l'uranium. (auteurs)

  3. Optical properties of alkaline earth borate glasses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The alkaline earth borate glasses containing heavy metal oxides show good solubility of rare-earth ions. Glasses containing PbO exhibit low glass transition temperature (Tg) and high ..... These oxygen ions carry a partial negative charge and.

  4. Morphological changes in bone tissue around titanium implants subjected to micro-arc oxidation in alkaline electrolytes with and without the use of «CollapAn-gel»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalmin O.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to conduct comparative study of the features of reparative processes in the bone during installation of titanium implants with sandblasted exposed microarc subsequent oxidation in alkaline electrolyte using osteoinductive formulation without the use of this preparation. Material and Methods. Histologically examined tissue samples from 24 adult rabbits in the region of titanium implant with osteoinductive formulation and without after 7, 14, 28, 56 and 112 days postoperatively. Results. It has been revealed that the installation of titanium implants subjected to micro-arc oxidation in alkaline electrolytes without the use of osteoinductive preparation leads to a moderate inflammatory response and the processes of bone formation take more time. When using identical implants with osteoinductive preparation «CollapAn-gel» led to a less expressed inflammatory response and a more active process of bone formation. Conclusion. The use of titanium implants subjected to sandblasting followed microarc oxidation in alkaline electrolytes is optimally combined with osteoinductive agents as it provides the best clinical results and highlights shorter time of bone regeneration.

  5. A comparative study between the dissolution and the leaching methods for the separation of rare earths, uranium and thorium from hydrous metal oxide cake obtained by the alkaline digestion of monazite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chayavadhanangkur, C.; Busamongkol, A.; Hongsirinirachorn, S.; Rodthongkom, C.; Sirisena, K.

    1986-12-01

    Methods for the group-separation of rare-earths, thorium and uranium from hydrous metal oxide cake obtained by the alkaline digestion of monazite were studied. Leaching of the hydrous metal oxide cake at pH between 4-5 separates the elements under investigation into 3 major groups which are suitable to be used as feed materials for further purification. Total dissolution and gradient precipitation at pH 4-5 yields a poorer separation in comparison to the leaching method

  6. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cell absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Jascha [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Lehmann, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.lehmann@ftf.lth.se [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch. [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Bär, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.baer@helmholtz-berlin.de [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Chemie, Brandenburgische Technische Universität Cottbus-Senftenberg, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Sadewasser, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.sadewasser@inl.int [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-12-21

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for “realistic” surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH{sub 3}-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is – apart from a slight change in surface composition – identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  7. Damage-free back channel wet-etch process in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors using a carbon-nanofilm barrier layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dongxiang; Zhao, Mingjie; Xu, Miao; Li, Min; Chen, Zikai; Wang, Lang; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2014-07-23

    Amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (IZO-TFTs) with damage-free back channel wet-etch (BCE) process were investigated. A carbon (C) nanofilm was inserted into the interface between IZO layer and source/drain (S/D) electrodes as a barrier layer. Transmittance electron microscope images revealed that the 3 nm-thick C nanofilm exhibited a good corrosion resistance to a commonly used H3PO4-based etchant and could be easily eliminated. The TFT device with a 3 nm-thick C barrier layer showed a saturated field effect mobility of 14.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a subthreshold swing of 0.21 V/decade, an on-to-off current ratio of 8.3 × 10(10), and a threshold voltage of 2.0 V. The favorable electrical performance of this kind of IZO-TFTs was due to the protection of the inserted C to IZO layer in the back-channel-etch process. Moreover, the low contact resistance of the devices was proved to be due to the graphitization of the C nanofilms after annealing. In addition, the hysteresis and thermal stress testing confirmed that the usage of C barrier nanofilms is an effective method to fabricate the damage-free BCE-type devices with high reliability.

  8. Bubble-free ozone addition through ceramic membranes for wet-oxidative waste water treatment; Blasenfreier Ozoneintrag durch keramische Membranen zur nassoxidativen Abwasserbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janknecht, P.; Wilderer, P.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Pruefamt fuer Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    A prerequisite for successful wet oxidation is very accurately tuned and carefully monitored process control. In the alternative, a decline in water quality is actually possible. In particular, earlier studies in the ozonification of landfill leachate encountered problems in reducing levels of AOX in the presence of halogenated hydrocarbons. Serious problems in process control may arise when ozone is conventionally added and forms bubbles in the presence of surface-active substances; this foam accumulates and is so persistent as to evade mechanical control. Since the formation of foam is directly due to gas bubbles carried in, bubble-free addition of ozone through a membrane may be a viable approach. (orig.) [German] Voraussetzung fuer den Erfolg einer Nassoxidation ist eine sehr genau eingestellte und sorgfaeltig ueberwachte Prozessfuehrung, da anderenfalls auch eine Verschlechterung der Wasserqualitaet eintreten kann; insbesondere haben sich hier bei frueheren Untersuchungen zur Ozonung von Deponiesickerwaessern Schwierigkeiten bei der Reduzierung des AOX-Wertes in Anwesenheit von halogenierten Kohlenwasserstoffen ergeben. Gravierende Schwierigkeiten in der Prozessfuehrung kann Schaum bereiten, der sich bei konventionellem Blaseneintrag des Ozons in Anwesenheit von oberflaechenaktiven Substanzen bildet, sich in der Anlage ansammelt und dabei so bestaendig ist, dass er auf mechanische Weise nicht zu kontrollieren ist. Da die Schaumbildung direkt auf die eingetragenen Gasblasen zurueckzufuehren ist, stellt der blasenfreie Eintrag von Ozon durch eine Membran einen moeglichen Loesungsansatz dar. (orig.)

  9. Two and three way spectrophotometric-assisted multivariate determination of linezolid in the presence of its alkaline and oxidative degradation products and application to pharmaceutical formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Maha Abd El-Monem; Eissa, Maya Shaaban; Abd El-Sattar, Osama Ibrahim; Abd El-Kawy, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Linezolid (LIN) is determined in the presence of its alkaline (ALK) and oxidative (OXD) degradation products without preliminary separation based on ultraviolet spectrophotometry using two-way chemometric methods; principal component regression (PCR) and partial least-squares (PLS), and three-way chemometric methods; parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and multi-way partial least squares (N-PLS). A training set of mixtures containing LIN, ALK and OXD; was prepared in the concentration ranges of 12-18, 2.4-3.6 and 1.2-1.8 μg mL-1, respectively according to a multilevel multifactor experimental design. The multivariate calibrations were obtained by measuring the zero-order absorbance from 220 to 320 nm using the training set. The validation of the multivariate methods was realized by analyzing their synthetic mixtures. The capabilities of the chemometric analysis methods for the analysis of real samples were evaluated by determination of LIN in its pharmaceutical preparation with satisfactory results. The accuracy of the methods, evaluated through the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), was 0.058, 0.026, 0.101 and 0.026 for LIN using PCR, PLS, PARAFAC and N-PLS, respectively. Protolytic equilibria of LIN and its degradation products were evaluated using the corresponding absorption spectra-pH data obtained with PARAFAC. The obtained pKa values of LIN, ALK and OXD are 5.70, 8.90 and 6.15, respectively. The results obtained were statistically compared to that of a reported HPLC method, and there was no significant difference between the proposed methods and the reported method regarding both accuracy and precision.

  10. Degradation of amaranth dye in alkaline medium by ultrasonic cavitation coupled with electrochemical oxidation using a boron-doped diamond anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Willyam R.P.; Steter, Juliana R.; Lanza, Marcos R.V.; Motheo, Artur J.

    2014-01-01

    Amaranth dye is used widely in the processing of paper, textiles, foods, cosmetics, beverages and medicines, and effluents contaminated with this compound are discharged daily into the environment. Recent studies have shown that azo dyes, especially those such as amaranth dye that have been classified as endocrine disruptors, may cause adverse effects to animal and human health. This paper describes the application of electrochemical oxidation (with a boron-doped diamond BDD thin-film anode) coupled with ultrasound sonolysis (20 kHz and 523 W cm −2 ) to the removal of amaranth dye from dilute alkaline solution. The electrochemical and sonoelectrochemical processes (ECh and SECh, respectively) were carried out at constant current density (10 to 50 mA cm −2 ) in a single compartment cylindrical cell. Sonolysis was virtually less useful for the decolorization and degradation of amaranth dye, whilst ECh and SECh were more effective in degrading the dye with almost complete removal (90 - 95%) attained after 90 min of experiment at an applied current density of 50 mA cm −2 . Degradation of the dye followed pseudo first-order kinetics in both processes, but the rate of reaction was faster with the SECh treatment confirming a synergistic effect between the cavitation process and the electrochemical system. Additionally, at low applied current densities (10 and 25 mA cm −2 ), SECh was considerably more effective than ECh for the amaranth dye mineralization. Although at 35 and 50 mA cm −2 , the two processes showed the respective removal of total organic carbon values: (i) 85% for the ECh and 90% for the SECh at 35 mA cm −2 ; (ii) 96% for the ECh and 98% for the SECh at 50 mA cm −2 . It is concluded that SECh presented the most favorable results for the decontamination of wastewaters containing azo dye compounds

  11. A Cuprous Oxide Thin Film Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry and Other Voltammetry Methods and a Comparison to Different Thin Film Electrodes on the Detection of Glucose in an Alkaline Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Dai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A cuprous oxide (Cu2O thin layer served as the base for a non-enzymatic glucose sensor in an alkaline medium, 0.1 NaOH solution, with a linear range of 50–200 mg/dL using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV measurement. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS study confirmed the formation of the cuprous oxide layer on the thin gold film sensor prototype. Quantitative detection of glucose in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and undiluted human serum was carried out. Neither ascorbic acid nor uric acid, even at a relatively high concentration level (100 mg/dL in serum, interfered with the glucose detection, demonstrating the excellent selectivity of this non-enzymatic cuprous oxide thin layer-based glucose sensor. Chronoamperometry and single potential amperometric voltammetry were used to verify the measurements obtained by DPV, and the positive results validated that the detection of glucose in a 0.1 M NaOH alkaline medium by DPV measurement was effective. Nickel, platinum, and copper are commonly used metals for non-enzymatic glucose detection. The performance of these metal-based sensors for glucose detection using DPV were also evaluated. The cuprous oxide (Cu2O thin layer-based sensor showed the best sensitivity for glucose detection among the sensors evaluated.

  12. Oxide (CeO{sub 2}, NiO, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4})-promoted Pd/C electrocatalysts for alcohol electrooxidation in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Changwei; Tian, Zhiqun; Jiang, San Ping [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Shen, Peikang [School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated Pt/C, Pd/C and oxide (CeO{sub 2}, NiO, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4})-promoted Pd/C for electrooxidation reactions of methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol and glycerol in alkaline media. The results show that Pd/C electrocatalysts alone have low activity and very poor stability for the alcohol electrooxidation. However, addition of oxides like CeO{sub 2}, NiO, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} significantly promotes catalytic activity and stability of the Pd/C electrocatalysts for the alcohol electrooxidation. The Pd-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} (2:1, w:w)/C shows the highest activity for the electrooxidation of methanol, EG and glycerol while the most active catalyst for the ethanol electrooxidation is Pd-NiO (6:1, w:w)/C. On the other hand, Pd-Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C shows significantly better performance stability than other oxide-promoted Pd/C for the alcohol electrooxidation. The poor stability of the Pd-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C electrocatalysts is most likely related to the limited solubility of cobalt oxides in alkaline solutions. (author)

  13. Ceramic joining through reactive wetting of alumina with calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phase analysis of the fractured joint surface clearly indicate reactive wetting of the alumina ceramics. This wetting enhances ... ally considered oxide materials for many applications. .... three cases but is more pronounced in the case of C12A7.

  14. Wet etching rates of InGaZnO for the fabrication of transparent thin-film transistors on plastic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Chienliu; Shih, Wen-Pin; Dai, Ching-Liang

    2010-01-01

    The wet etch process for amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO or a-InGaZnO) by using various etchants is reported. The etch rates of a-IGZO, compared to another indium-based oxides including indium gallium oxide (IGO), indium zinc oxide (IZO), and indium tin oxide (ITO), are measured by using acetic acid, citric acid, hydrochloric acid, perchloric acid, and aqua ammonia as etchants, respectively. In our experimental results, the etch rate of the transparent oxide semiconductor (TOS) films by using acid solutions ranked accordingly from high to low are IZO, IGZO, IGO and ITO. Comparatively, the etch rate of the TOS films by using alkaline ammonia solution ranked from high to low are IGZO, IZO, IGO and ITO, in that order. Using the proposed wet etching process with high etch selectivity, bottom-gate-type thin-film transistors (TFTs) based on a-IGZO channels and Y 2 O 3 gate-insulators were fabricated by radio-frequency sputtering on plastic substrates. The wet etch processed TFT with 30 μm gate length and 120 μm gate width exhibits a saturation mobility of 46.25 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , a threshold voltage of 1.3 V, a drain current on-off ratio > 10 6 , and subthreshold gate voltage swing of 0.29 V decade -1 . The performance of the TFTs ensures the applicability of the wet etching process for IGZO to electronic devices on organic polymer substrates.

  15. Conference: the wet catalytic oxidation, a technology for the removal of organic pollutants in industrial waters; Conference: l'oxydation voie humide catalytique, une technologie pour l'elimination des polluants organiques dans les eaux industrielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, M. [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse - CNRS, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In this conference, it is taken stock on the use of catalysts in the wet oxidation process. Supported (TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}....) heterogeneous metallic catalysts (Pt, Ru...) are particularly studied. It is shown that this type of catalysts can answer to the required characteristics: activity for the removal of organic matter, lack of active metal leaching in aqueous acid medium, no deactivation...Examples are given. (O.M.)

  16. Continuous wet oxidation pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass with subsequent continuous ethanol production; Kontinuerlig vaadoxidationsforbehandling af lignocelluloseholdige biomasser med efterfoelgende kontinuerlig ethanolfremstilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahring, B.K.; Torry-Smith, M.; Loeth, A.H.

    2001-07-01

    In this project the possibility of implementing a UASB-reactor for detoxification of the recirculation water is investigated. Bioethanol- effluent (BEE) made from wet-oxidized wheat straw (60 g-wheat straw/l-water) fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A3M4 is in this project used to simulate the effluent from a commercial bioethanol plant. To investigate the gas potential and conversion of inhibitors, BEE is investigated both in batch and in a laboratory scale UASB reactor. In batch tests the conversion of acetovanillon, 2-furan acid and 4-hydroxyacetophenon was investigated with the substances themselves, as single substrat, and by co-digestion with BEE. The experiments show that the conversion of the three substances together with BEE had a positive influence on the decomposition and the inhibition levels. Tests with conversion of BEE in a laboratory scale UASB-reactor showed that by loading up to 29 g-COD/l it was possible to obtain a COD-reduction at 80% (w/w). At the same time GC-analyses of vanillin acid, homo vanillin acid, aceton vanillon, syringon acid, acetosyringon, syringol, 4-hydroxybenzo acid, 4-hydroxbenzaldenhyde, 2-furan acid, and phenol showed that all these substances were converted in the UASB-reactor. Economical calculations carried out on the basis of the results from the experiments indicate that the implementation of a UASB-cleaning step for cleaning the bioethanol process water can be carried out with a economical profit, which among other means a short payback time on the investment. It is things concluded that the implementation of a UASB-cleaning step is a qualified method to detoxify process water for bioethanol production and thereby reduce the total production costs of the commercial bioethanol production based on lignocelluslose materials. The necessity of tests with repeated recirculations are indicated, because continuous reuse of the process water can result in up-concentration of any inhibitors

  17. Abatement of phenolic mixtures by catalytic wet oxidation enhanced by Fenton's pretreatment: Effect of H2O2 dosage and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.; Yustos, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Simon, E.; Garcia-Ochoa, F.

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of a phenolic mixture containing phenol, o-cresol and p-cresol (500 mg/L on each pollutant) has been carried out using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst, placed in a continuous three-phase reactor. Total pressure was 16 bar and temperature was 127 deg. C. Pollutant conversion, mineralization, intermediate distribution, and toxicity were measured at the reactor outlet. Under these conditions no detoxification of the inlet effluent was found even at the highest catalyst weight (W) to liquid flow rate (Q L ) ratio used. On the other hand, some Fenton Runs (FR) have been carried out in a batch way using the same phenolic aqueous mixture previously cited. The concentration of Fe 2+ was set to 10 mg/L. The influence of the H 2 O 2 amount (between 10 and 100% of the stoichiometric dose) and temperature (30, 50, and 70 deg. C) on phenols conversion, mineralization, and detoxification have been analyzed. Phenols conversion was near unity at low hydrogen peroxide dosage but mineralization and detoxification achieved an asymptotic value at each temperature conditions. The integration of Fenton reagent as pretreatment of the CWO process remarkably improves the efficiency of the CWO reactor and allows to obtain detoxified effluents at mild temperature conditions and relatively low W/Q L values. For a given phenolic mixture a temperature range of 30-50 deg. C in the Fenton pretreatment with a H 2 O 2 dosage between 20 and 40% of the stoichiometric amount required can be proposed

  18. Photocatalytic oxidation removal of Hg"0 using ternary Ag/AgI-Ag_2CO_3 hybrids in wet scrubbing process under fluorescent light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Anchao; Zhang, Lixiang; Chen, Xiaozhuan; Zhu, Qifeng; Liu, Zhichao; Xiang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Ag/AgI-Ag_2CO_3 hybrids were employed for Hg"0 removal under fluorescent light. • Superoxide radical (·O_2"−) played a key role in Hg"0 removal. • NO exhibited a significant effect on Hg"0 removal in comparison to SO_2. • The mechanism for enhanced Hg"0 removal over Ag/AgI-Ag_2CO_3 was proposed. - Abstract: A series of ternary Ag/AgI-Ag_2CO_3 photocatalysts synthesized using a facile coprecipitation method were employed to investigate their performances of Hg"0 removal in a wet scrubbing reactor. The hybrids were characterized by N_2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, SEM-EDS, HRTEM, XPS, DRS and ESR. The photocatalytic activities of Hg"0 removal were evaluated under fluorescent light. The results showed that AgI content, fluorescent light irradiation, reaction temperature all showed significant influences on Hg"0 removal. NO exhibited significant effect on Hg"0 removal in comparison to SO_2. Among these ternary Ag/AgI-Ag_2CO_3 hybrids, Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag_2CO_3 showed the highest Hg"0 removal efficiency, which could be ascribed to the effective separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs between AgI and Ag_2CO_3 and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect in the visible region by metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag"0 NPs). The trapping studies of reactive radicals showed that the superoxide radicals (·O_2"−) may play a key role in Hg"0 removal under fluorescent light. According to the experimental and characterization results, a possible photocatalytic oxidation mechanism for enhanced Hg"0 removal over Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag_2CO_3 hybrid under fluorescent light was proposed.

  19. Electrical and physical characterizations of the effects of oxynitridation and wet oxidation at the interface of SiO2/4H-SiC(0001) and (000\\bar{1})

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Hiromu; Kitai, Hidenori; Tsujimura, Masatoshi; Kiuchi, Yuji; Nakata, Daisuke; Ono, Shuichi; Kojima, Kazutoshi; Fukuda, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kunihiro; Yamasaki, Kimiyohi; Okumura, Hajime

    2016-04-01

    The effects of oxynitridation and wet oxidation at the interface of SiO2/4H-SiC(0001) and (000\\bar{1}) were investigated using both electrical and physical characterization methods. Hall measurements and split capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements revealed that the difference in field-effect mobility between wet oxide and dry oxynitride interfaces was mainly attributed to the ratio of the mobile electron density to the total induced electron density. The surface states close to the conduction band edge causing a significant trapping of inversion carriers were also evaluated. High-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HR-RBS) analysis and high-resolution elastic recoil detection analysis (HR-ERDA) were employed to show the nanometer-scale compositional profile of the SiC-MOS interfaces for the first time. These analyses, together with cathode luminescence (CL) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), suggested that the deviations of stoichiometry and roughness at the interface defined the effects of oxynitridation and wet oxidation at the interface of SiO2/4H-SiC(0001) and (000\\bar{1}).

  20. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  1. Synthesis of CoO/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite as an Alternative Additive for the Nickel Electrode in Alkaline Secondary Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Gaoliang; Chang, Kun; Shangguan, Enbo; Tang, Hongwei; Li, Bao; Chang, Zhaorong; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Wang, Haijiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CoO/RGO nanosheets with sandwiched structures were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • CoO/RGO composite can be as a good additive for Ni-MH battery. • Using CoO/RGO as the additive can greatly reduce the utilization of CoO in the commercial battery. • Particularly, the high rate capability of the electrode was enhanced significantly. - Abstract: A series of CoO/reduced graphene oxide (CoO/RGO) composites with different proportions are successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal method. As an additive for the nickel-based alkaline secondary battery cathode, the electrochemical performances of the proposed CoO/RGO composite are systematically investigated on its cyclic stability, rate capability, capacity recovery performance, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in comparison with commercial CoO. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images show that the CoO nanoparticles are in-situ anchored on the surface of soft and flexible graphene sheets. Electrochemical results indicate that the CoO/RGO composites exhibite the highest performance when the weight ratio of CoO and RGO is 5:5. The optimized CoO/RGO composites as an additive for the nickel electrode not only can substantially reduce the CoO additive but also possess good electrochemical performances, especially for the high-rate capability. The discharge capacity of the nickel electrode with 5 wt% of CoO/RGO (5:5) addition deliver a high discharge capacity of 284.3, 264.6,235.4 and 208.6 mAh g"−"1 at 0.2, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 C, respectively. The capacity recovery rate at 0.2 C can reach 98.4%. CV and EIS test indicate that the incorporation of RGO can significantly enhance the reversible property, current density of cathodic peak, proton diffusion and conductivity of the nickel electrode.

  2. Technical-economical feasibility of the wet oxidation process: Experiences on real scale plant. Part I; Fattibilita` tecnico-economica del processo di ossidazione ad umido: Esperienze di trattamento su impianto a piena scala. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collivignarelli, Carlo; Bertanza, Giorgio [Brescia, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile; Baldi, Marco [Pavia, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Idraulica e Ambientale; Bissolotti, Giorgio; Calvi, Riccardo [SIAD Spa, Bergamo (Italy); Del Rio, Mauro; Pergetti, Mauro [AGAC, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    In the first part of this work the wet oxidation process is compared with some other oxidation treatments (like Fenton oxidation, oxidation, also with UV light, incineration, ect.) in order to assess its proper application field. Besides, the main cases in which wet oxidation is employed in wastewater treatment are described and the results of some previous experiences of the authors are summarized. In the second part they discuss the results of an experimentation carried out on a real scale treatment plant (maximum inflow rate 1,5 m{sup 3}/h). The plant was fed with low biodegradable wastewaters (COD = 2.5 - 175 g/L) coming from different industrial sectors. The following process conditions were maintained: temperature = 280-300 deg C, final pressure = 11-12.5 MPa. From the results of the experimentation they concluded that this process is suitable or the pre-treatment of wastewaters with high non-biodegradable matter content, with COD initial concentrations from 10-20 up to 150 g/L. In these conditions, it is also convenient from the economical point of view, with respect to other chemical-physical of thermal processes. In order to achieve the full functionality within an industrial waste treatment facility, some operating measures are required aimed to homogenize the treated wastewater, which has carefully characterized.

  3. Technical-economical feasibility of the wet oxidation process: Experiences on real scale plant. Part II; Fattibilita` tecnico-economica del processo di ossidazione ad umido: Esperienze di trattamento su impianto a piena scala. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collivignarelli, Caro; Bertanza, Giorgio [Brescia, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile; Baldi, Marco [Pavia, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Idraulica e Ambientale; Bissolotti, Giorgio; Calvi Riccardo [SIAD Spa, Bergamo (Italy); Del Rio, Mauro; Pergetti, Mauro [AGAC, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    In the first part of this work the wet oxidation process is compared with some other oxidation treatments (like Fenton oxidation, oxidation, also with UV light, incineration, ect.) in order to assess its proper application field. Besides, the main cases in which wet oxidation is employed in wastewater treatment are described and the results of some previous experiences of the authors are summarized. In the second part they discuss the results of an experimentation carried out on a real scale treatment plant (maximum inflow rate 1,5 m{sup 3}/h). The plant was fed with low biodegradable wastewaters (COD = 2.5 - 175 g/L) coming from different industrial sectors. The following process conditions were maintained: temperature = 280-300 deg C, final pressure = 11-12.5 MPa. From the results of the experimentation they concluded that this process is suitable or the pre-treatment of wastewaters with high non-biodegradable matter content, with COD initial concentrations from 10-20 up to 150 g/L. In these conditions, it is also convenient from the economical point of view, with respect to other chemical-physical of thermal processes. In order to achieve the full functionality within an industrial waste treatment facility, some operating measures are required aimed to homogenize the treated wastewater, which has carefully characterized.

  4. Effect of the nature of alkali and alkaline-earth oxides on the structure and crystallization of an alumino-borosilicate glass developed to immobilize highly concentrated nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintas, A.; Caurant, D.; Majerus, O.; Charpentier, T.; Dussossoy, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    A complex rare-earth rich alumino-borosilicate glass has been proved to be a good candidate for the immobilization of new high level radioactive wastes. A simplified seven-oxides composition of this glass was selected for this study. In this system, sodium and calcium cations were supposed in other works to simulate respectively all the other alkali (R + = Li + , Rb + , Cs + ) and alkaline-earth (R 2+ = Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations present in the complex glass composition. Moreover, neodymium or lanthanum are used here to simulate all the rare-earths and actinides occurring in waste solutions. In order to study the impact of the nature of R + and R 2+ cations on both glass structure and melt crystallization tendency during cooling, two glass series were prepared by replacing either Na + or Ca 2+ cations in the simplified glass by respectively (Li + , K + , Rb + , Cs + ) or (Mg 2+ , Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations. From these substitutions, it was established that alkali ions are preferentially involved in the charge compensation of (AlO 4 ) - entities in the glass network comparatively to alkaline-earth ions. The glass compositions containing calcium give way to the crystallization of an apatite silicate phase bearing calcium and rare-earth ions. The melt crystallization tendency during cooling strongly varies with the nature of the alkaline-earth. (authors)

  5. DETERMINATION OF SULFUR DIOXIDE, NITROGEN OXIDES, AND CARBON DIOXIDE IN EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC UTILITY PLANTS BY ALKALINE PERMANGANATE SAMPLING AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A manual 24-h integrated method for determining SO2, NOx, and CO2 in emissions from electric utility plants was developed and field tested downstream from an SO2 control system. Samples were collected in alkaline potassium permanganate solution contained in restricted-orifice imp...

  6. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The pH, alkalinity, and acidity of mine drainage and associated waters can be misinterpreted because of the chemical instability of samples and possible misunderstandings of standard analytical method results. Synthetic and field samples of mine drainage having various initial pH values and concentrations of dissolved metals and alkalinity were titrated by several methods, and the results were compared to alkalinity and acidity calculated based on dissolved solutes. The pH, alkalinity, and acidity were compared between fresh, unoxidized and aged, oxidized samples. Data for Pennsylvania coal mine drainage indicates that the pH of fresh samples was predominantly acidic (pH 2.5-4) or near neutral (pH 6-7); ??? 25% of the samples had pH values between 5 and 6. Following oxidation, no samples had pH values between 5 and 6. The Standard Method Alkalinity titration is constrained to yield values >0. Most calculated and measured alkalinities for samples with positive alkalinities were in close agreement. However, for low-pH samples, the calculated alkalinity can be negative due to negative contributions by dissolved metals that may oxidize and hydrolyze. The Standard Method hot peroxide treatment titration for acidity determination (Hot Acidity) accurately indicates the potential for pH to decrease to acidic values after complete degassing of CO2 and oxidation of Fe and Mn, and it indicates either the excess alkalinity or that required for neutralization of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (= -net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral pH after oxidation had negative Hot Acidity; samples that had pH mine drainage treatment can lead to systems with insufficient Alkalinity to neutralize metal and H+ acidity and is not recommended. The use of net alkalinity = -Hot Acidity titration is recommended for the planning of mine drainage treatment. The use of net alkalinity = (Alkalinitymeasured - Aciditycalculated) is recommended with some cautions

  7. The optimization, kinetics and mechanism of m-cresol degradation via catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with sludge-derived carbon catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yamin [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wei, Huangzhao; Zhao, Ying [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Wenjing [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Chenglin, E-mail: clsun@dicp.ac.cn [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The sludge derived carbon modified with 0 °C acid was used as catalyst in CWPO. • RSM was used to optimize CWPO reaction conditions of m-cresol for the first time. • The kinetic model was disclosed to be correlated with residue target concentration. • The proposed degradation pathways of m-cresol were well proven by DFT method. - Abstract: The sludge-derived carbon catalyst modified with 0 °C HNO{sub 3} solution was tested in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of m-cresol (100 mg L{sup −1}) with systematical mathematical models and theoretical calculation for the first time. The reaction conditions were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) as T = 60 °C, initial pH = 3.0, C{sub 0,H2O2(30%)} = 1.20 g L{sup −1} (lower than the stoichiometric amount of 1.80 g L{sup −1}) and C{sub cat} = 0.80 g L{sup −1}, with 96% of m-cresol and 47% of TOC converted after 16 min and 120 min of reaction, respectively, and ξ (mg TOC/g H{sub 2}O{sub 2} fed) = 83.6 mg/g. The end time of the first kinetic period in m-cresol model was disclosed to be correlated with the fixed residue m-cresol concentration of about 33%. Furthermore, the kinetic constants in models of TOC and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exactly provide convincing proof of three-dimensional response surfaces analysis by RSM, which showed the influence of the interaction between organics and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on effective H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilization. The reaction intermediates over time were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometer based on kinetics analysis. Four degradation pathways for m-cresol were proposed, of which the possibility and feasibility were well proven by frontier molecule orbital theory and atomic charge distribution via density functional theory method.

  8. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  9. A novel IrNi@PdIr/C core-shell electrocatalyst with enhanced activity and durability for the hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bowen; Yu, Hongmei; Jia, Jia; Jun, Chi; Gao, Xueqiang; Yao, Dewei; Sun, Xinye; Song, Wei; Yi, Baolian; Shao, Zhigang

    2018-03-08

    Herein, a novel non-platinum core-shell catalyst, namely, IrNi@PdIr/C was prepared via a galvanic replacement reaction; it exhibits enhanced hydrogen oxidation activity and excellent stability under alkaline conditions. Electrochemical experiments demonstrated that the mass and specific activities at 50 mV of IrNi@PdIr/C are 2.1 and 2.2 times that of commercial Pt/C in 0.1 M KOH at 298 K, respectively. Moreover, accelerated degradation tests have shown that the electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) of IrNi@PdIr/C reduces by only 5.1%, which is almost 4 times less than that of commercial Pt/C and the mass activity at 50 mV of IrNi@PdIr/C after 2000 potential cycles is still 1.8 times higher than that of aged Pt/C. XRD and XPS analysis suggest that the enhanced HOR activity is attributed to the weakening of the hydrogen binding to the PdIr overlayers induced by the IrNi core. The better stability to potential cycling can be associated with the PdIr shell, which inhibits oxide formation. These results suggest that IrNi@PdIr/C is a promising non-platinum anode catalyst for alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells.

  10. Validation of ion chromatography for the determination of transition metal ions along with alkali, alkaline earth metal elements for uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Prakash, Amrit; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2009-02-01

    The present report describes the use of Ion chromatography (IC) methods with spectrophotometric and direct conductivity detection for the determination of transition metal elements and alkali alkaline earth metal ions in UO 2 pellets. Transmet analytical column and Metrosep- cation 1-2 column were used for the separation of transition metal elements and alkali and alkaline earth metal elements respectively. Oxalic acid and mixture of pyridine 2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), Na 2 SO 4 and NaCl were used as mobile phase for the separation of transition metal ions and monitored after post - column reaction with 4,2-pyridylazo resorcinol (PAR) at 520nm spectrophotometrically. In the determination of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions the interference of transition metals are removed by complexing them with PDCA. Mixture of tartaric acid and PDCA employed in the separation of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions and monitored on direct conductivity detector. Mobile phase composition was optimised for the base line separation. Calibration plots of Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ , Mn 2+ , Li + , Na + , K + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ were linear over a wide dynamic range with regression coefficient better than 0.999. Detection limit of above ions were between 5-30ppb. To prevent the overloading of the cation exchange column, uranium matrix was removed from UO 2 sample by solvent extraction with 30% TBP - TOPO/CCl 4 . Ten sintered UO2 pellets of same lot were analysed and R.S.D. ±10% was obtained. These methods were validated by analysis of ILCE standards of UO 2 . (author)

  11. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  12. Introduction to wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indekeu, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    In these lectures the field of wetting phenomena is introduced from the point of view of statistical physics. The phase transition from partial to complete wetting is discussed and examples of relevant experiments in binary liquid mixtures are given. Cahn's concept of critical-point wetting is examined in detail. Finally, a connection is drawn between wetting near bulk criticality and the universality classes of surface critical phenomena. (author)

  13. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent

  14. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Dolfine Kosters, N.; Daanen, h.a.m.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In daily life, people interact with textiles of different degrees of wetness, but little is known about the me-chanics of wetness perception. This paper describes an experiment with six conditions regarding haptic dis-crimination of the wetness of fabrics. Three materials were used: cotton wool,

  15. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    In daily life, people interact with textiles of different degrees of wetness, but little is known about the mechanics of wetness perception. This paper describes an experiment with six conditions regarding haptic discrimination of the wetness of fabrics. Three materials were used: cotton wool,

  16. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  17. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of A1050 aluminium alloy in homogeneous silicate-alkaline electrolytes with edta{sup 4−} complexes of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, La and Ba under alternating polarization conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogov, A.B., E-mail: alex-lab@bk.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 3, Acad. Lavrentiev Ave., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Scientific and Technical Centre “Pokrytie-A” (OOO), 15, Dzerzhinskogo Ave., Novosibirsk, 630015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of coatings containing a number of transition elements by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on aluminium A1050 alloy. The paper discusses PEO coatings obtained in silicate-alkaline electrolytes containing complexes of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, La and Ba with ethylenediaminetetraacetic anion edta{sup 4−}. It is also focused on the chemical basis of the electrolyte components choice and their role in the process of PEO. Possible mechanism of coating formation process is also discussed. Alternating current mode (symmetrical sinusoidal current pulses, initial average current density - 100 mA cm{sup −2}) was used to produce the coatings. The PEO process was characterized by behaviours of the anodic and cathodic peak voltage curves. Coating surfaces and cross sections are studied by optical dark field microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray and energy dispersive analysis. - Highlights: • Alkaline homogeneous electrolyte with transition metal-edta{sup 4-} complexes. • Coatings contain Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, La, Ba elements in alumina-silica matrix. • Alternating symmetric sinusoidal current of 100 mA cm{sup −2} was applied. • Borax buffer solution and silicate passivating agent were used.

  18. Oxidation of D-glucose and D-fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions. Part I. An integral reaction scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, H.G.J.; Kuster, B.F.M.

    1971-01-01

    The homogeneous oxidn. of D-glucose and D-fructose with O in aq., alk. solns. is studied, and a reaction scheme proposed to account for the obsd. reaction products. Formation of enolate anions is followed by non-oxidative reactions (involving double-bond migration and cleavage) and by oxidative

  19. Metallurgical treatment of Waelz oxides by alkaline leaching using ammonium carbonate; Tratamiento metalurgico de los oxidos Waelz mediante lixiviacion alcalina utilizando carbonato amonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meseguer, V.; Lozano, L.J.; Juan, D. de [Dpto. Ingenieria Quimica Cartagena. Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    1997-09-01

    A method to carry out the treatment of the Waelz oxides is proposed, and the principal stages implicated are studied laboratory-scale. The process consists of the oxides leaching with an ammonium carbonate/ammonia solution, followed the recovery of the zinc leached by means of its precipitation as zinc basic carbonate. The process stages that have been studied are: Waelz oxides leaching, loaded leach purification, zinc precipitation, zinc basic carbonate washing and zinc basic carbonate transformation. The designed treatment presents a null environmental impact, and more than 90% of the zinc contained in the Waelz oxides, as well as 80% of the copper and cadmium contents could be recovered. Also, the process presents great flexibility as soon as zinc could be recovered in the most convenient form (zinc metal, oxide or salt). (Author) 14 refs.

  20. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting

  1. Effect of alkaline earth oxides on the physical and spectroscopic properties of Dy3+- doped Li2O-B2O3 glasses for white emitting material application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshad, L.; Rooh, G.; Kirdsiri, K.; Srisittipokakun, N.; Damdee, B.; Kim, H. J.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-02-01

    Li2O-MO-B2O3:0.5Dy2O3 glasses mixed with four different alkaline earth modifier oxides MgO, CaO, SrO and BaO were synthesized by melt quench technique. Their physical properties like density, molar volume and refractive index were measured at room temperature and the effect of alkaline earth modifier oxides were studied. Also, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been acquired at room temperature. The Judd-Ofelt theory was effectively used to characterize these spectra and spectral intensities (ƒcal), Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) and certain radiative properties have been determined. Radiative life-times (τR), branching ratios (βcal), and emission cross-sections (σp) and optical gain parameters (σp × τR) were calculated from the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters and the variation in these parameters with the variation of glass matrix are discussed. Yellow/Blue (Y/B) ratio and chromacity color coordinates (x,y) are calculated from the emission spectra which indicates the white light generation from all the investigated samples. The correlated color temperature (CCT) for the studied glasses is found to be 4418 K. The fluorescence decay time (τexp) of the 4F9/2 level of Dy3+ has been measured from the decay profiles and compared with calculated lifetimes (τcal). Among all the studied glass matrices, the glass containing BaO exhibits high value of branching ratio, large emission cross-section and high optical gain parameter for 6F9/2 → 6H13 at 575 nm. The results indicates the suitability of all the studied glasses for laser action and white light generation.

  2. Oxidative-Alkaline Leaching of Washed 241-SY-102 and 241-SX-101 Tank Sludges and Its Impact on Immobilized High-Level Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Geeting, John GH; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Vienna, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes work designed to evaluate the effectiveness of alkaline permanganate contacts at selectively removing chromium from the Hanford tank sludges 241-SY-102 and 241-SX-101. The key variables examined in this study, as compared to contact with the standard conditions of stoichiometric permanganate in 3 M hydroxide at elevated temperature, were: (a) excess permanganate and hydroxide at elevated temperature, (b) the separation of an elevated temperature 3 M hydroxide leach with either a room temperature permanganate contact or an elevated temperature permanganate contact at 0.25 M hydroxide. It was determined that sequential permanganate and caustic leaching can provide as effective removal of Cr as the combined high hydroxide permanganate contact at elevated temperature while minimizing concomitant Pu dissolution

  3. Application of alkaline waterflooding to a high acidity crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayyouh, M.H. (King Sand Univ., Riyadh (SA). Petroleum Engineering Dept.); Abdel-Waly, A.; Osman, A. (Cairo Univ. (EG). Petroleum Engineering Dept.); Awara, A.Z. (Geisum Oil Company, Cairo (EG))

    The enhanced recovery of a high acidity crude oil (South Geisum crude) by alkaline solutions is studied. Acidity, interfacial tension, and contact angle, were investigated. Displacement tests were carried out to study the effect of alkaline slug concentration, slug size, oil alkali type, temperature and viscosity on recovery. The interfacial tension between crude oil and formation water decreases with increasing alkaline concentration until a minimum, after which it increases again. Contact angle measurements indicated oil-wetting conditions that increase by the addition of alkaline solutions. At the early stages of displacement, oil recovery increases with increasing alkaline concentration until a maximum at 4% by weight NaOH concentration. Also, at such early stages, an excessive increase in alkaline concentration results in lower oil recovery. On the other hand, after the injection of many pore volumes of water, oil recovery is almost the same regardless of the alkaline concentration. Oil recovery increases with increasing alkaline slug size until a maximum at 15% PV. Sodium hydroxide slugs produce more oil recovery than sodium carbonate slugs. Oil recovery increases with increasing temperature (from 25 to 55{sup 0}C) and decreasing oil viscosity.

  4. Wet Gas Airfoil Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Tarjei Thorrud

    2011-01-01

    Subsea wet gas compression renders new possibilities for cost savings and enhanced gas recovery on existing gas wells. Technology like this opens to make traditional offshore processing plants redundant. With new technology, follows new challenges. Multiphase flows is regarded as a complex field of study, and increased knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms regarding wet gas flow is of paramount importance to the efficiency and stability of the wet gas compressor. The scope of this work was ...

  5. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  6. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  7. Kinetic study of the alkaline metals oxidation by dry oxygen; Etude cinetique de l'oxydation des metaux alcalins par l'oxygene sec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touzain, Ph. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-15

    The oxidation of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and sodium-potassium alloys by dry oxygen is studied at several temperatures and in the oxygen pressure range 40 to 400 mmHg. One distinguishes three different oxidation behaviours (inflammation, ignition and slow combustion) whose zones are precised in function of the temperature. The slow oxidation kinetic laws, the composition of oxides and the motive of oxides colorations are determined. At least, the experimental data are construed theoretically. (author) [French] L'oxydation du lithium, du sodium, du potassium, du rubidium, du cesium et des alliages sodium-potassium par l'oxygene sec est etudiee a diverses temperatures et a des pressions comprises entre 40 et 400 mmHg d'oxygene. On distingue trois processus d'oxydation differents (l'inflammation, l'ignition et la combustion lente) dont les domaines en fonction de la temperature sont precises. Les lois cinetiques d'oxydation lente, la nature des oxydes formes ainsi que les causes des colorations de ces oxydes sont determinees. Enfin les resultats obtenus sont interpretes theoriquement. (auteur)

  8. Kinetic study of the alkaline metals oxidation by dry oxygen; Etude cinetique de l'oxydation des metaux alcalins par l'oxygene sec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touzain, Ph [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-15

    The oxidation of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and sodium-potassium alloys by dry oxygen is studied at several temperatures and in the oxygen pressure range 40 to 400 mmHg. One distinguishes three different oxidation behaviours (inflammation, ignition and slow combustion) whose zones are precised in function of the temperature. The slow oxidation kinetic laws, the composition of oxides and the motive of oxides colorations are determined. At least, the experimental data are construed theoretically. (author) [French] L'oxydation du lithium, du sodium, du potassium, du rubidium, du cesium et des alliages sodium-potassium par l'oxygene sec est etudiee a diverses temperatures et a des pressions comprises entre 40 et 400 mmHg d'oxygene. On distingue trois processus d'oxydation differents (l'inflammation, l'ignition et la combustion lente) dont les domaines en fonction de la temperature sont precises. Les lois cinetiques d'oxydation lente, la nature des oxydes formes ainsi que les causes des colorations de ces oxydes sont determinees. Enfin les resultats obtenus sont interpretes theoriquement. (auteur)

  9. The electro-oxidation of the mixture of formaldehyde and 2-propanol on gold (100 and (111 single crystal planes in alkaline medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANISLAV Z. NIKOLIC

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of formaldehyde on the oxidation of 2-propanol and vice versa on gold single crystal planes (100 and 111 was studied. An activating effect in the reaction of the simultaneous oxidation of 2-propanol and formaldehyde was obtained on a gold (100 plane. In the case of a gold (111 electrode, the activation effect was not obtained. It was concluded that the adsorption of formaldehyde on the electrode surface prevents the adsorption of poisoning species formed during the electro-oxidation of 2-propanol on the Au(100 plane, while this is not the case on the Au(111 plane. The different behaviour is caused by the difference in the symmetry of the surface atoms of these two Au single-crystal planes.

  10. Controllable synthesis of cobalt oxide nanoflakes on three-dimensional porous cobalt networks as high-performance cathode for alkaline hybrid batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Minghua, E-mail: chenminghuahrb@126.com [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and Applications, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Xia, Xinhui, E-mail: helloxxh@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Applications for Batteries of Zhejiang Province, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, Jiawei; Qi, Meili; Yin, Jinghua; Chen, Qingguo [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and Applications, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Construct self-supported porous Co networks. • Porous Co/CoO composite films show high capacity and good cycling life. • Porous conductive metal network is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. - Abstract: Herein we report porous three-dimensional cobalt networks supported CoO nanoflakes by the combination of successive electro-deposition methods. The electrodeposited Co networks have average large pores of ∼5 μm and all the branches are composed of interconnected nanoparticles. CoO nanoflakes with thickness of ∼15 nm are uniformly coated on the Co networks forming self-supported Co/CoO composite films. The as-prepared Co/CoO composite films possess combined properties of porous structure and strong mechanical stability. As cathode for alkaline hybrid batteries, the Co/CoO composite films exhibit good electrochemical performances with high capacity of 83.5 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 A g{sup −1} and stable high-rate cycling life (65 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 A g{sup −1} after 15,000 cycles). The hierarchical porous architecture provides positive roles in the enhancement of electrochemical properties, including fast electronic transportation path, short diffusion of ions and high contact area between the active material and the electrolyte.

  11. Commercial alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses for sealing solid oxide cell stacks Part II: Characterization of devitrification and glass-ceramic phase assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Karsten; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2018-01-01

    The devitrification process and formation of crystalline phases from commercial alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses containing 48-61 mol% SiO2, 18-28 mol% CaO, 1-7 mol% MgO, 7-10 mol% Al2O3, 1-11 mol% B2O3 plus minor amounts of Na2O, K2O, FeO and TiO2 were quantified through analysis...... of phase assemblages as function of heat treatments above the glass transition temperatures using the electron microprobe and powder X-ray diffraction. Treatments at 800 °C and 850 °C lasted up to 6 weeks. Results indicate that devitrification was strongly activated through presence of heterogeneous...... nucleation, and that the growth mechanism gradually changed from three-dimensional growth at the onset of devitrification towards one-dimensional growth in later stages, when heterogeneous nucleation was absent or less dominating. Most glasses developed entangled and fibrous microstructures with little...

  12. Tuning of structural, light emission and wetting properties of nanostructured copper oxide-porous silicon matrix formed on electrochemically etched copper-coated silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, M.

    2017-01-01

    Matrices of copper oxide-porous silicon nanostructures have been formed by electrochemical etching of copper-coated silicon surfaces in HF-based solution at different etching times (5-15 min). Micro-Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the nature of copper oxide in the matrix changes from single-phase copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) to single-phase copper (II) oxide (CuO) on increasing the etching time. This is accompanied with important variation in the content of carbon, carbon hydrides, carbonyl compounds and silicon oxide in the matrix. The matrix formed at the low etching time (5 min) exhibits a single broad "blue" room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) band. On increasing the etching time, the intensity of this band decreases and a much stronger "red" PL band emerges in the PL spectra. The relative intensity of this band with respect to the "blue" band significantly increases on increasing the etching time. The "blue" and "red" PL bands are attributed to Cu2O and porous silicon of the matrix, respectively. In addition, the water contact angle measurements reveal that the hydrophobicity of the matrix surface can be tuned from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic state by controlling the etching time.

  13. Morphology and performances of the anodic oxide films on Ti6Al4V alloy formed in alkaline-silicate electrolyte with aminopropyl silane addition under low potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiali; Wang, Jinwei; Yuan, Hongye

    2013-01-01

    Oxide films on Ti6Al4V alloy are prepared using sodium hydroxide–sodium silicate as the base electrolyte with addition of aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APS) as additive by potentiostatic anodizing under 10 V. APS is incorporated into the films during anodizing and the surface morphology of the oxide films is changed from particle stacked to honeycomb-like porous surfaces as shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDX). The surface roughness and aminopropyl existence on the oxide films result in their differences in wettability as tested by the surface profile topography and contact angle measurements. The anti-abrasive ability of the anodic films is improved with the addition of APS due to its toughening effects and serving as lubricants in the ceramic oxide films as measured by ball-on-disk friction test. Also, potentiodynamic corrosion test proves that their anticorrosive ability in 3.5 wt.% NaCl is greatly improved as reflected by their much lower corrosion current (I corr ) and higher corrosion potential (E corr ) than those of the substrate.

  14. Morphology and performances of the anodic oxide films on Ti6Al4V alloy formed in alkaline-silicate electrolyte with aminopropyl silane addition under low potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiali; Wang, Jinwei, E-mail: wangjw@ustb.edu.cn; Yuan, Hongye

    2013-11-01

    Oxide films on Ti6Al4V alloy are prepared using sodium hydroxide–sodium silicate as the base electrolyte with addition of aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APS) as additive by potentiostatic anodizing under 10 V. APS is incorporated into the films during anodizing and the surface morphology of the oxide films is changed from particle stacked to honeycomb-like porous surfaces as shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDX). The surface roughness and aminopropyl existence on the oxide films result in their differences in wettability as tested by the surface profile topography and contact angle measurements. The anti-abrasive ability of the anodic films is improved with the addition of APS due to its toughening effects and serving as lubricants in the ceramic oxide films as measured by ball-on-disk friction test. Also, potentiodynamic corrosion test proves that their anticorrosive ability in 3.5 wt.% NaCl is greatly improved as reflected by their much lower corrosion current (I{sub corr}) and higher corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) than those of the substrate.

  15. Anionic catalyst binders based on trimethylamine-quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) for alkaline electrolyzers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Jan; Hnát, J.; Brožová, Libuše; Žitka, Jan; Bouzek, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 473, 1 January (2015), s. 267-273 ISSN 0376-7388 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) * bromination * trimethylamine Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.557, year: 2015

  16. Comparative electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol, ethylene glycol and glycerol in alkaline medium at Pd-decorated FeCo@Fe/C core-shell nanocatalysts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fashedemi, OO

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ) were explored, and compared with those of the Pd/C alone. FeCo@Fe@Pd/C exhibited a remarkable performance in all three alcohols but its best electrocatalytic activity was found in the oxidation of EG where the electrocatalytic rate constant (K...

  17. Particle-assisted wetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Yan Feng; Tierno, Pietro; Marczewski, Dawid; Goedel, Werner A

    2005-01-01

    Wetting of a solid surface by a liquid is dramatically impeded if either the solid or the liquid is decorated by particles. Here it is shown that in the case of contact between two liquids the opposite effect may occur; mixtures of a hydrophobic liquid and suitable particles form wetting layers on a water surface though the liquid alone is non-wetting. In these wetting layers, the particles adsorb to, and partially penetrate through, the liquid/air and/or the liquid/water interface. This formation of wetting layers can be explained by the reduction in total interfacial energy due to the replacement of part of the fluid/fluid interfaces by the particles. It is most prominent if the contact angles at the fluid/fluid/particle contact lines are close to 90 0

  18. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  19. The photoelectrocatalytic activity, long term stability and corrosion performance of NiMo deposited titanium oxide nano-tubes for hydrogen production in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Mehmet Erman; Mert, Başak Doğru; Kardaş, Gülfeza; Yazıcı, Birgül

    2017-11-01

    In this study, titanium oxide nano-tubes are doped with Ni and Mo particles with various chemical compositions, in order to put forth the efficiency of single and binary coatings on hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in 1 M KOH. The characterization was achieved by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The water wettability characteristics of electrode surfaces were investigated using contact angle. The long-term catalyst stability and corrosion performance were determined by current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Furthermore, photoelectrochemical behavior was determined via linear sweep voltammetry. Results showed that, nano-structured Ni and Mo deposited titanium oxide nano-tubes decrease the hydrogen over potential and increase HER efficiency, it is stable over 168 h electrolysis and it exhibits higher corrosion performance.

  20. Alkaline earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The beryllium ion has a relatively small ionic radius. As a consequence of this small size, its hydrolysis reactions begin to occur at a relatively low pH. To determine the stability and solubility constants, however, the Gibbs energy of the beryllium ion is required. In aqueous solution calcium, like the other alkaline earth metals, only exists as a divalent cation. The size of the alkaline earth cations increases with increasing atomic number, and the calcium ion is bigger than the magnesium ion. The hydrolysis of barium(II) is weaker than that of strontium(II) and also occurs in quite alkaline pH solutions, and similarly, only the species barium hydroxide has been detected. There is only a single experimental study on the hydrolysis of radium. As with the stability constant trend, it would be expected that the enthalpy of radium would be lower than that of barium due to the larger ionic radius.

  1. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Stefania; Salvi, Paolo; Nelli, Paolo; Pesenti, Rachele; Villa, Marco; Berrettoni, Mario; Zangari, Giovanni; Kiros, Yohannes

    2012-01-01

    A short review on the fundamental and technological issues relevant to water electrolysis in alkaline and proton exchange membrane (PEM) devices is given. Due to price and limited availability of the platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts they currently employ, PEM electrolyzers have scant possibilities of being employed in large-scale hydrogen production. The importance and recent advancements in the development of catalysts without PGMs are poised to benefit more the field of alkaline electrolysis rather than that of PEM devices. This paper presents our original data which demonstrate that an advanced alkaline electrolyzer with performances rivaling those of PEM electrolyzers can be made without PGM and with catalysts of high stability and durability. Studies on the advantages/limitations of electrolyzers with different architectures do show how a judicious application of pressure differentials in a recirculating electrolyte scheme helps reduce mass transport limitations, increasing efficiency and power density.

  2. Thermal stability and oxidizing properties of mixed alkaline earth-alkali molten carbonates: A focus on the lithium-sodium carbonate eutectic system with magnesium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangini, Stefano; Scaccia, Silvera

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • TG/DSC analysis was conducted on magnesium-containing eutectic Li/Na eutectic carbonates. • Magnesium influence on the oxygen solubility properties of carbonate was also experimentally determined at 600 °C and 650 °C. • A reproducible partial decarbonation process in premelting region caused formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases. • The acidobase buffering action of magnesium oxycarbonate species could explain the high basic/oxidizing properties of such carbonate melts. • A general correlation between thermal instability in premelting region and basic/oxidizing melt properties was established. - Abstract: A comparative study on thermal behavior and oxygen solubility properties of eutectic 52/48 lithium/sodium carbonate salt containing minor additions of magnesium up to 10 mol% has been made in order to determine whether a general correlation between these two properties can be found or not. Consecutive TG/DSC heating/cooling thermal cycles carried out under alternating CO 2 and N 2 gas flows allowed to assign thermal events observed in the premelting region to a partial decarbonation process of the magnesium-alkali mixed carbonates. The observed decarbonation process at 460 °C is believed to come from initial stage of thermal decomposition of magnesium carbonate resulting in the metastable formation of magnesium oxycarbonate-like phases MgO·2MgCO 3 , in a similar manner as previously reported for lanthanum. Reversible formation and decomposition of the magnesium carbonate phase has been observed under a CO 2 gas atmosphere. The intensity of the decomposition process shows a maximum for a 3 mol% MgO addition that gives also the highest oxygen solubility, suggesting therefore that instability thermal analysis in the premelting region can be considered as providing an effective measure of the basicity/oxidizing properties of alkali carbonate melts with magnesium or, in more general terms, with cations that are strong modifiers of

  3. Wet impregnation of silver oxide on Lampung natural zeolite as an adsorbent to produce oxygen-enriched air using PSA technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianty Adenia Gita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High purity oxygen can be used for various things. Oxygen purification method to be applied on this research is the Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA technique. The adsorbent that would be used is a natural zeolite, namely ZAL (Zeolite Alam Lampung. Natural zeolite has non-polar properties, so it will adsorb gas with high quadruple moment, which is nitrogen. The varied variable is the size of adsorbent and the concentration of H2SO4. The sizes are 18-35 mesh, 35-60 mesh, and 60-100 mesh. While the H2SO4 concentration are 1M, 2M and 3M. Size of ZAL, and the concentration of sulfuric acid (H2SO4 were varied to get the optimum value. The adsorbent will be activated in aqua demine, H2SO4, NaOH, and through a calcination process. The purpose of this pre-treatment was to remove the impurities and to increase the specific surface area of zeolite. Moreover, ZAL will also be modified by wet impregnation technique using AgNO3 solution with 1%-wt loading nominal. The morphology, composition, and crystal phase were characterized by BET, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. The result of the adsorption process was analyzed by using GC (Gas Chromatograph. ZAL 35-60 mesh 1M showed the best performance on adsorbing nitrogen, with its lowest peak at 60356 μV. The result of this research suggested that ZAL itself has the main role on adsorbing nitrogen, while AgxO did not give any significant effect

  4. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH)52-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH) 5 2- has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH) 5 2- complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  5. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inst. Lavoisier, IREM UMR 8637, Univ. de Versailles Saint-Quentin, Versailles (France); Eysseric, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  6. In Situ Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Study of the Electrocatalytic Effect of PtFe/C Nanocatalyst on Ethanol Electro-Oxidation in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Gómez-Monsiváis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction has attracted considerable attention in fuel cells because of new green ethanol synthetic methods based on biomass processes that have emerged. In this study, PtFe/C and Pt/C nanoparticles were synthesized by a chemical reduction method and tested in the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic effect of the PtFe bimetallic catalyst was analyzed by in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS coupled to an electrochemical cell. X-ray diffractograms showed typical face-centered cubic structures with crystallite sizes of 3.31 and 3.94 for Pt/C and PtFe/C, respectively. TEM micrographs revealed nanoparticle sizes of 2 ± 0.4 nm and 3 ± 0.6 nm for Pt/C and PtFe/C respectively. PtFe/C exhibited a Pt90Fe10 composition by both X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A better electrocatalytic activity as function of concentration was obtained through the incorporation of a small amount of Fe into the Pt lattice and the presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ (observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to SERS experiments, the presence of these iron species promotes the chemisorption of ethanol, the formation of formic acid as main product and renewal of the catalytic sites, resulting in current densities that were at least three fold higher than the values obtained for the Pt/C nanocatalyst.

  7. Effects of calcium oxide treatment of dry and modified wet corn distillers grains plus solubles on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and apparent digestibility of feedlot steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, A R; Duckworth, M J; Shike, D W; Schoonmaker, J P; Felix, T L

    2014-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of feeding dried corn distillers grains (DDGS) or modified wet corn distillers grains (MDGS) with or without CaO treatment to feedlot steers on 1) growth performance and carcass characteristics and 2) diet digestibility, pattern of intake, and meal distribution. In Exp. 1, steers (n = 139; average initial BW = 336 ± 75 kg) were used in a randomized complete block design. Treatments were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design, and pens were randomly allotted to 1 of the 4 dietary treatments (DM basis): 1) 50% DDGS untreated, 2) 48.8% DDGS treated with 1.2% CaO, 3) 50% MDGS untreated, or 4) 48.8% MDGS treated with 1.2% CaO. The remainder of the diet was corn husklage, dry rolled corn, and vitamin and mineral supplement. In Exp. 2, fistulated steers (n = 8; average initial BW = 540 ± 250 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with the same dietary treatments as in Exp. 1. There was no interaction (P ≥ 0.14) between distillers grains plus solubles (DGS) and CaO inclusion for DMI, ADG, final BW, or USDA yield and quality grades. However, steers fed CaO-treated DGS had decreased (P < 0.01) DMI, regardless of DGS type. Because CaO treatment decreased DMI without affecting (P = 0.66) ADG, steers fed CaO-treated DGS had increased (P < 0.01) G:F compared to steers not fed CaO. The variation in DMI found in this experiment could be explained by differences in meal size and distribution. Steers fed CaO-treated DGS ate a similar (P = 0.36) number of meals but ate smaller (P < 0.01) meals. No effects (P ≥ 0.55) of CaO treatment or its interaction with DGS type were found for apparent total tract DM or NDF digestibility. However, steers fed MDGS had increased (P < 0.01) NDF digestibility compared to steers fed DDGS. In conclusion, CaO treatment of DGS improved feed efficiency when DGS-based diets were fed but did not improve digestibility.

  8. Structural and optical studies of Er3+-doped alkali/alkaline oxide containing zinc boro-aluminosilicate glasses for 1.5 μm optical amplifier applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaky, Kawa M.; Lakshminarayana, G.; Baki, S. O.; Lira, A.; Caldiño, U.; Meza-Rocha, A. N.; Falcony, C.; Kityk, I. V.; Taufiq-Yap, Y. H.; Halimah, M. K.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we report on the optical spectral properties of Er3+-doped zinc boro-aluminosilicate glasses with an addition of 10 mol % alkali/alkaline modifier regarding the fabrication of new optical materials for optical amplifiers. A total of 10 glasses were prepared using melt-quenching technique with the compositions (40-x)B2O3 - 10SiO2 - 10Al2O3 - 30ZnO - 10Li2O - xEr2O3 and (40-x)B2O3 - 10SiO2 - 10Al2O3 - 30ZnO - 10MgO - xEr2O3 (x = 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mol %). We confirm the amorphous-like structure for all the prepared glasses using X-ray diffraction (XRD). To study the functional groups of the glass composition after the melt-quenching process, Raman spectroscopy was used, and various structural units such as triangular and tetrahedral-borates (BO3 and BO4) have been identified. All the samples were characterized using optical absorption for UV, visible and NIR regions. Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ = 2, 4 and 6) were calculated from the optical absorption spectra of two glasses LiEr 2.0 and MgEr 2.0 (doped with 2 mol % of Er3+). JO parameters for LiEr 2.0 and MgEr 2.0 glasses follow the trend as Ω6>Ω2>Ω4. Using Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, we obtained radiative probability A (S-1), branching ratios (β), radiative decay lifetimes τrad (μs) of emissions from excited Er+3 ions in LiEr 2.0 and MgEr 2.0 to all lower levels. Quantum efficiency (η) of 4I13/2 and 4S3/2 levels for LiEr 2.0 and MgEr 2.0 with and without 4D7/2 level was calculated using the radiative decay lifetimes τrad. (μs) and measured lifetimes τexp. (μs). We measured the visible photoluminescence under 377 nm excitation for both LiEr and MgEr glass series within the region 390-580 nm. Three bands were observed in the visible region at 407 nm, 530 nm, and 554 nm, as a result of 2H9/2 → 4I15/2, 2H11/2 → 4I15/2 and 4S3/2 → 4I15/2 transitions, respectively. Decay lifetimes for emissions at 407 nm, 530 nm, and 554 nm were measured and they show

  9. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic performance of ZnO-CeO2 nanoparticles in wet oxidation of wastewater containing chlorinated compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anushree; Kumar, S.; Sharma, C.

    2017-11-01

    Here we report the catalytic property of ZnO-CeO2 nanoparticles towards oxidative degradation of organic pollutants present in industrial wastewater. The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method without using any surfactant. The physicochemical properties of catalysts were studied by XRD, Raman, XPS, N2-sorption, FE-SEM, TEM and EDX techniques. The characterization results confirmed the formation of porous ZnO-CeO2 nanocatalysts with high surface area, pore volume and oxygen vacancies. ZnO-CeO2 nanocatalysts exhibited appreciable efficiency in CWAO of industrial wastewater under mild conditions. The Ce40Zn60 catalyst was found to be most efficient with 72% color, 64% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 63% total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Efficient removal of chlorophenolics (CHPs, 59%) and adsorbable organic halides (AOX, 54%) indicated the feasibility of using ZnO-CeO2 nanocatalysts in degradation of non-biodegradable and toxic chlorinated compounds.

  10. Design and development of a prototype wet oxidation system for the reclamation of water and the disposition of waste residues onboard space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Laboratory investigations to define optimum process conditions for oxidation of fecal/urine slurries were conducted in a one-liter batch reactor. The results of these tests formed the basis for the design, fabrication, and testing of an initial prototype system, including a 100-hour design verification test. Areas of further development were identified during this test. Development of a high pressure slurry pump, materials corrosion studies, oxygen supply trade studies, comparison of salt removal water recovery devices, ammonia removal investigation, development of a solids grinder, reactor design studies and bearing life tests, and development of shutoff valves and a back pressure regulator were undertaken. The development work has progressed to the point where a prototype system suitable for manned chamber testing can be fabricated and tested with a high degree of confidence of success.

  11. Facile synthesis of Pt–Pd bimetallic nanoparticles by plasma discharge in liquid and their electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Lee, Yu-Jin [Center for Surface Technology and Applications, Korea Aerospace University, Gyeonggi-do, 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Gyeonggi-do, 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Wan [Center for Surface Technology and Applications, Korea Aerospace University, Gyeonggi-do, 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Bioengineering, InCheon National University, Incheon, 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Yul, E-mail: sylee@kau.ac.kr [Center for Surface Technology and Applications, Korea Aerospace University, Gyeonggi-do, 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Gyeonggi-do, 412-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    The Pt–Pd bimetallic nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications were successfully prepared by plasma discharge in aqueous solution. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. During plasma discharge, the nanoparticles were produced from the erosion of electrodes. It was noted that the erosion amount of anode electrodes was much greater than that of cathode electrodes so that the composition of Pt–Pd bimetallic nanoparticles could be changed with different power types and electrode configurations. Diffraction patterns fitted from Gaussian devolution indicated that the crystalline phase of Pt{sub 40}Pd{sub 60} products was composed of pure Pt, pure Pd and Pt–Pd alloy phases. The morphology of synthesized nanoparticles showed that nanowires connected with quasi-spherical nanoparticles with 2–3 nm in diameter were observed and large spherical particles with > 50 nm in diameter were also detected intermittently. The cyclic voltammetric measurement and continuous potential scan demonstrated that Pt{sub 40}Pd{sub 60} had much higher catalytic activity and better resistance to CO poisoning than Pt{sub 94}Pd{sub 6} and Pt{sub 1}Pd{sub 99} for methanol oxidation. These results indicate that the Pt{sub 40}Pd{sub 60} could be an excellent candidate for the direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  12. based anion exchange membrane for alkaline polymer electrolyte

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Hydroxyl ion (OH–) conducting anion exchange membranes based on modified poly (phenylene oxide) are fabricated for their application in alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs). In the present study, chloromethylation of poly(phenylene oxide) (PPO) is performed by aryl substitution rather than benzyl.

  13. Wet gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, T.F.

    1997-07-01

    The quality of gas has changed drastically in the past few years. Most gas is wet with hydrocarbons, water, and heavier contaminants that tend to condense if not handled properly. If a gas stream is contaminated with condensables, the sampling of that stream must be done in a manner that will ensure all of the components in the stream are introduced into the sample container as the composite. The sampling and handling of wet gas is extremely difficult under ideal conditions. There are no ideal conditions in the real world. The problems related to offshore operations and other wet gas systems, as well as the transportation of the sample, are additional problems that must be overcome if the analysis is to mean anything to the producer and gatherer. The sampling of wet gas systems is decidedly more difficult than sampling conventional dry gas systems. Wet gas systems were generally going to result in the measurement of one heating value at the inlet of the pipe and a drastic reduction in the heating value of the gas at the outlet end of the system. This is caused by the fallout or accumulation of the heavier products that, at the inlet, may be in the vapor state in the pipeline; hence, the high gravity and high BTU. But, in fact, because of pressure and temperature variances, these liquids condense and form a liquid that is actually running down the pipe as a stream or is accumulated in drips to be blown from the system. (author)

  14. Effects of feeding dry or modified wet distillers grains with solubles with or without supplemental calcium oxide on ruminal metabolism and microbial enzymatic activity of beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, A R; Iakiviak, M; Felix, T L

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the interaction of feeding dry (DDGS) or modified wet (MDGS) distillers grains with solubles (DGS) with or without supplemental CaO on in situ DM and NDF disappearance; ruminal pH, VFA, and methane concentration; and cellulase and xylanase activity. Fistulated steers (n = 8; average initial BW = 540 ± 250 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. Treatments were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial, and steers were randomly allotted to 1 of 4 dietary treatments: 1) 50% DDGS with 0% CaO, 2) 48.8% DDGS supplemented with 1.2% CaO, 3) 50% MDGS with 0% CaO, or 4) 48.8% MDGS supplemented with 1.2% CaO (DM basis). The remainder of the diet was husklage, dry-rolled corn, and vitamin and mineral supplement. There were no interactions (P ≥ 0.12) of DGS type and CaO addition on any parameters measured. Steers fed DDGS had a 17% increase (P < 0.01) in DMI compared to steers fed MDGS; however, CaO supplementation reduced (P = 0.03) DMI by 12%, regardless of DGS type. As expected, addition of CaO increased the pH of the diet by 1.82 pH units. This caused a time by CaO interaction (P = 0.05) for ruminal pH. Regardless of DGS type, steers supplemented with CaO tended to have increased (P = 0.09) ruminal pH at 1.5 h and had increased (P = 0.03) ruminal pH at 3 h postfeeding; however, ruminal pH did not differ (P ≥ 0.24) for the remainder of the day. There was no difference (P = 0.46) in ruminal cellulase activity when comparing type of DGS fed. However, there was a time by CaO interaction (P < 0.01); cattle fed 1.2% CaO diets had 28% greater ruminal cellulase activity only at 0 h postfeeding when compared to cattle fed 0% CaO. Furthermore, feeding supplemental CaO increased (P = 0.04) acetate to propionate ratio (A:P) regardless of type of DGS fed. Increased initial ruminal pH and cellulase activity from supplemental CaO did not increase (P = 0.48) in situ NDF disappearance. No differences (P ≥ 0.48) in ruminal methane

  15. CuO nanostructures on copper foil by a simple wet chemical route at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, S.; Das, S.; Das, N.S.; Chattopadhyay, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Uniform CuO nanostructures have been synthesized on copper foil substrates by oxidation of Cu in alkaline condition by a simple wet chemical route at room temperature. By controlling the alkaline condition (pH value) different CuO nanostructures like nanoneedles, self-assembled nanoflowers and staking of flake-like structures were achieved. The phase formation and the composition of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analysis of X-ray studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies indicated that the samples were composed of CuO. The morphologies of the films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. A possible growth mechanism is also proposed here. Band gap energies of the nanostructures were determined from the optical reflectance spectra. The different CuO nanostructures showed good electron field emission properties with turn-on fields in the range 6-11.3 V μm -1 . The field emission current was significantly affected by the morphologies of the CuO films.

  16. Wet storage integrity update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables

  17. Shifts in the abundance and community structure of soil ammonia oxidizers in a wet sclerophyll forest under long-term prescribed burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xi-En; Chen, Chengrong; Xu, Zhihong; He, Ji-Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Fire shapes global biome distribution and promotes the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) play a vital role in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen (N). However, behaviors of AOB and AOA under long-term prescribed burning remain unclear. This study was to examine how fire affected the abundances and communities of soil AOB and AOA. A long-term repeated forest fire experiment with three burning treatments (never burnt, B0; biennially burnt, B2; and quadrennially burnt, B4) was used in this study. The abundances and community structure of soil AOB and AOA were determined using quantitative PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library. More frequent fires (B2) increased the abundance of bacterium amoA gene, but tended to decrease archaeal amoA genes. Fire also modified the composition of AOA and AOB communities. Canonical correspondence analysis showed soil pH and dissolved organic C (DOC) strongly affected AOB genotypes, while nitrate-N and DOC shaped the AOA distribution. The increased abundance of bacterium amoA gene by fires may imply an important role of AOB in nitrification in fire-affected soils. The fire-induced shift in the community composition of AOB and AOA demonstrates that fire can disturb nutrient cycles. © 2013.

  18. A systemic study of stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc2O3 to Lu2O3 mediated by alkaline chlorides as complex former

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yanhui; He Peng; Chen Huani

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study has been carried out for the stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport (SC-CVT) characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc 2 O 3 to Lu 2 O 3 mediated by the vapor complexes KLnCl 4 and NaLnCl 4 (Ln = Sc, Y and La-Lu) used NaCl and KCl as complex former, respectively. The results showed that the SC-CVT characteristics are similarly for NaCl and KCl as complex former, the main deposition temperature of the rare earth chlorides LnCl 3 is in the increasing order ScCl 3 3 3 , and then with a systematically decreasing trend from the early lanthanide chlorides to the end one. The results also showed that the total transported amount of the produced chlorides is YCl 3 > ScCl 3 , and they are much higher than that of most lanthanoid chlorides. For lanthanoids, the total transported amount of chloride increases systematically from the early lanthanoid chlorides to the end one except for EuCl 3 and GdCl 3 mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, respectively, which showed the divergence effect of Gd in the total transport efficiency. But there are some differences in SC-CVT characteristics of pure rare earth oxide mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, that is the main deposition temperature region for the same rare earth element was lower for KCl than that for NaCl as complex former except for LaCl 3 , CeCl 3 , YbCl 3 and LuCl 3 , while the total transport amount of rare earth chloride for KCl as complex former is higher than that for NaCl except for LaCl 3 and EuCl 3 . More over, the discussion was carried out for Sc and Y on the one hand and the lanthanides contain 4f electron as another hand based on the 4f electron hybridization assumption. Further more, the transport characteristics of rare earth oxides with alkaline chlorides as complex former in this study were compared to that with AlCl 3 as complex former

  19. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Amer A

    2018-01-01

    Wet cupping (Al-hijamah) is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient's skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  20. Measurements of nitric oxide and ammonia soil fluxes from a wet savanna ecosystem site in West Africa during the DACCIWA field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Federica; Delon, Claire; Jambert, Corinne; Durand, Pierre; Morris, Eleanor; Evans, Mat J.; Lohou, Fabienne; Derrien, Solène; Donnou, Venance H. E.; Houeto, Arnaud V.; Reinares Martinez, Irene; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne

    2018-03-01

    It is important to correctly simulate biogenic fluxes from soil in atmospheric chemistry models at a local and regional scale to study air pollution and climate in an area of the world, West Africa, that has been subject to a strong increase in anthropogenic emissions due to a massive growth in population and urbanization. Anthropogenic pollutants are transported inland and northward from the mega cities located on the coast, where the reaction with biogenic emissions may lead to enhanced ozone production outside urban areas, as well as secondary organic aerosols formation, with detrimental effects on humans, animals, natural vegetation and crops. Here we present field measurements of soil fluxes of nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH3) observed over four different land cover types, i.e. bare soil, grassland, maize field and forest, at an inland rural site in Benin, West Africa, during the DACCIWA field campaign in June and July 2016. We observe NO fluxes up to 48.05 ngN m-2 s-1. NO fluxes averaged over all land cover types are 4.79 ± 5.59 ngN m-2 s-1, maximum soil emissions of NO are recorded over bare soil. NH3 is dominated by deposition for all land cover types. NH3 fluxes range between -6.59 and 4.96 ngN m-2 s-1. NH3 fluxes averaged over all land cover types are -0.91 ± 1.27 ngN m-2 s-1 and maximum NH3 deposition is measured over bare soil. The observations show high spatial variability even for the same soil type, same day and same meteorological conditions. We compare point daily average measurements of NO emissions recorded during the field campaign with those simulated by GEOS-Chem (Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Model) for the same site and find good agreement. In an attempt to quantify NO emissions at the regional and national scale, we also provide a tentative estimate of total NO emissions for the entire country of Benin for the month of July using two distinct methods: upscaling point measurements and using the

  1. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  2. Reactive wetting by liquid sodium on thin Au platin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Munemichi; Hamada, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    For practical use of an under-sodium viewer, the behavior of sodium wetting is investigated by modeling the reactive and non-reactive wetting of metallic-plated steels by liquid sodium to simulate sodium wetting. The non-reactive wetting simulation results showed good agreement with Tanner's law, in which the time dependencies of the droplet radius and contact angle are expressed as R N ∝ t 1/10 and θ∝ t -3/10 , respectively; therefore, the model was considered suitable for the simulation. To simulate reactive wetting, the model of fluid flow induced by the interfacial reaction was incorporated into the simulation of non-reactive wetting. The reactive wetting simulation results, such as the behavior of the precursor liquid film and central droplet, showed good agreement with sodium wetting experiments using thin Au plating at 250°C. An important result of the reactive wetting simulation is that the gradient of the reaction energy at the interface appeared on the new interface around the triple line, and that fluid flow was induced. This interfacial reactivity during sodium wetting of thin Au plating was enhanced by the reaction of sodium and nickel oxide through pinholes in the plating. (author)

  3. Carbon supported Pd-Ni and Pd-Ru-Ni nanocatalysts for the alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available be improved by operating DAFCs in alkaline medium. Moreover, catalyst materials that are much cheaper and more abundant than Pt can be used for ethanol electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in alkaline DAFCs. Furthermore, the alkaline DAFCs use...

  4. Alkalinity of the Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Anke; Wallace, Douglas W.R.; Körtzinger, Arne

    2007-01-01

    Total alkalinity (AT) was measured during the Meteor 51/2 cruise, crossing the Mediterranean Sea from west to east. AT concentrations were high (∼2600 μmol kg−1) and alkalinity-salinity-correlations had negative intercepts. These results are explained by evaporation coupled with high freshwater AT inputs into coastal areas. Salinity adjustment of AT revealed excess alkalinity throughout the water column compared to mid-basin surface waters. Since Mediterranean waters are supersaturated with r...

  5. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  6. Elevated alkalinity and sulfate adversely affect the aquatic macrophyte Lobelia dortmanna

    OpenAIRE

    Pulido, Cristina; Keijsers, Danny J. H.; Lucassen, E. C. H. E. T.; Pedersen, Ole; Roelofs, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in alkalinity and SO4 2- in softwater lakes can negatively affect pristine isoetid population because the increase in alkalinity and SO4 2- can stimulate sediment mineralization and consequently cause anoxia. The consequences of increased sediment mineralization depend on the ability of isoetids such as Lobelia dortmanna to oxidize the rhizosphere via radial O2 loss. To study how alkalinity and SO4 2- affect the isoetid L. dortmanna, and if neg...

  7. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  8. Method of cleaning alkaline metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yukio; Naito, Kesahiro; Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Nakasuji, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of used sodium and aqueous alkaline solution when cleaning used sodium and metallic sodium adhering to equipment with an aqueous alkaline solution. Method: A sodium treating container is filled with an aqueous alkaline solution, and stainless steel gauze is sunk in the container. Equipment to be cleaned such as equipment with sodium adhering to it are retained under the gauze and are thus cleaned. On the other hand, the surface of the aqueous alkaline solution is covered with a fluid paraffin liquid covering material. Thus, the hydrogen produced by the reaction of the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution will float up, pass through the liquid covering material and be discharged. The sodium will pass through the gauze and float upwardly while reacting with the aqueous alkaline solution in a partic ulate state to the boundary between the aqueous alkaline solution and up to the covering material, and thus the theratment reaction will continue. Thus, the cover material prevents the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution from scattering. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Palladium-based nanocatalysts for alcohol electrooxidation in alkaline media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available in the electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols in alkaline media compared to platinum catalysts. Recent efforts have focused on the discovery of palladium-based electrocatalysts with little or no platinum for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This chapter is an overview...

  11. Potentiodynamic characteristics of cadmium and silver in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidman, S.B.; Vilche, J.R.; Arvia, A.J.; Lopes Teijelo, M.

    1984-01-01

    The potentiodynamic and ellipsometric characteristics of cadmium and silver in alkaline solutions are studied. The phenomenology of both electrodes shows some common features which are interpreted in termo of a complex hydrated oxide anodic film structure resulting from simultaneous electrochemical and chemical reactions. The kinetics of film growth fits the predictions of nucleation and growth models. (C.L.B.) [pt

  12. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], γlg cos θ = γsg - γsl (1) In modern terms, γ denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that θ may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., θ = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number

  13. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  14. Wetting of alkanes on water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, E.; Bonn, D.; Meunier, J.; Shahidzadeh, N. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231, Cedex 05 Paris (France); Broseta, D.; Ragil, K. [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1-4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison Cedex (France); Dobbs, H.; Indekeu, J.O. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Laboratorium voor Vaste-Stoffysica en Magnetisme, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-04-01

    The wetting behavior of oil on water (or brine) has important consequences for the transport properties of oil in water-containing porous reservoirs, and consequently for oil recovery. The equilibrium wetting behavior of model oils composed of pure alkanes or alkane mixtures on brine is reviewed in this paper. Intermediate between the partial wetting state, in which oil lenses coexist on water with a thin film of adsorbed alkane molecules, and the complete wetting state, in which a macroscopically thick oil layer covers the water, these systems display a third, novel wetting state, in which oil lenses coexist with a mesoscopic (a few-nanometers-thick) oil film. The nature and location of the transitions between these wetting regimes depend on oil and brine compositions, temperature and pressure.

  15. Photocatalytic oxidation removal of Hg{sup 0} using ternary Ag/AgI-Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} hybrids in wet scrubbing process under fluorescent light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Anchao, E-mail: aczhang@qq.com [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, 454000 (China); Zhang, Lixiang; Chen, Xiaozhuan; Zhu, Qifeng; Liu, Zhichao [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, 454000 (China); Xiang, Jun, E-mail: xiangjun@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Ag/AgI-Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} hybrids were employed for Hg{sup 0} removal under fluorescent light. • Superoxide radical (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) played a key role in Hg{sup 0} removal. • NO exhibited a significant effect on Hg{sup 0} removal in comparison to SO{sub 2}. • The mechanism for enhanced Hg{sup 0} removal over Ag/AgI-Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} was proposed. - Abstract: A series of ternary Ag/AgI-Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} photocatalysts synthesized using a facile coprecipitation method were employed to investigate their performances of Hg{sup 0} removal in a wet scrubbing reactor. The hybrids were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, SEM-EDS, HRTEM, XPS, DRS and ESR. The photocatalytic activities of Hg{sup 0} removal were evaluated under fluorescent light. The results showed that AgI content, fluorescent light irradiation, reaction temperature all showed significant influences on Hg{sup 0} removal. NO exhibited significant effect on Hg{sup 0} removal in comparison to SO{sub 2}. Among these ternary Ag/AgI-Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} hybrids, Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} showed the highest Hg{sup 0} removal efficiency, which could be ascribed to the effective separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs between AgI and Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect in the visible region by metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag{sup 0} NPs). The trapping studies of reactive radicals showed that the superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) may play a key role in Hg{sup 0} removal under fluorescent light. According to the experimental and characterization results, a possible photocatalytic oxidation mechanism for enhanced Hg{sup 0} removal over Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} hybrid under fluorescent light was proposed.

  16. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Figueirinhas Pereira, Maria Carolina; Bernardino, Nelson R; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2016-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted, the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal.

  17. Post-treatment of refinery wastewater effluent using a combination of AOPs (H2O2 photolysis and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation) for possible water reuse. Comparison of low and medium pressure lamp performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Levchuk, I; Salcedo, I; Acevedo-Merino, A; Manzano, M A

    2016-03-15

    The main aim of this work was to study the feasibility of multi-barrier treatment (MBT) consisting of filtration, hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) for post-treatment of petroleum refinery effluent. Also the possibility of water reuse or safe discharge was considered. The performance of MBT using medium (MP) and low (LP) pressure lamps was compared as well as operation and maintenance (O&M) cost. Decomposition of organic compounds was followed by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis. After filtration step (25 μm) turbidity and concentration of suspended solids decreased by 92% and 80%, respectively. During H2O2/UVC process with LP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 8 and UVC dose received by water 5.28 WUVC s cm(-2)) removal of phenolic compounds, TOC and COD was 100%, 52.3% and 84.3%, respectively. Complete elimination of phenolic compounds, 47.6% of TOC and 91% of COD was achieved during H2O2/UVC process with MP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 5, UVC dose received by water 6.57 WUVC s cm(-2)). In order to compare performance of H2O2/UVC treatment with different experimental set up, the UVC dose required for removal of mg L(-1) of COD was suggested as a parameter and successfully applied. The hydrophilicity of H2O2/UVC effluent significantly increased which in turn enhanced the oxidation of organic compounds during CWPO step. After H2O2/UVC treatment with LP and MP lamps residual H2O2 concentration was 160 mg L(-1) and 96.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Remaining H2O2 was fully consumed during subsequent CWPO step (6 and 3.5 min of contact time for LP and MP, respectively). Total TOC and COD removal after MBT was 94.7% and 92.2% (using LP lamp) and 89.6% and 95%, (using MP lamp), respectively. The O&M cost for MBT with LP lamp was estimated to be 0.44 € m(-3) while with MP lamp it was nearly five

  18. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting from instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fractures such as those at Yucca Mountain are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport

  19. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting front instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport

  20. Control of Alq3 wetting layer thickness via substrate surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Shufen; Szeto, Bryan; Fleischauer, Michael D; Veinot, Jonathan G C; Brett, Michael J

    2007-06-05

    The effects of substrate surface energy and vapor deposition rate on the initial growth of porous columnar tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3) nanostructures were investigated. Alq3 nanostructures thermally evaporated onto as-supplied Si substrates bearing an oxide were observed to form a solid wetting layer, likely caused by an interfacial energy mismatch between the substrate and Alq3. Wetting layer thickness control is important for potential optoelectronic applications. A dramatic decrease in wetting layer thickness was achieved by depositing Alq3 onto alkyltrichlorosilane-derivatized Si/oxide substrates. Similar effects were noted with increasing deposition rates. These two effects enable tailoring of the wetting layer thickness.

  1. Effect of alkaline cleaning and activation on aluminum alloy 7075-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Simon; Fahrenholtz, William G.; O'Keefe, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of alkaline cleaning and activation on the composition and thickness of the oxide layer on aluminum alloy 7075-T6 was studied. E-pH diagrams were developed to predict the effect of alkaline cleaning and activation solutions on the stability of the oxide surface layers. The thickness of the native oxide layer was determined to be ∼30 nm by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis. The outer ∼20 nm was rich in magnesium while the remaining ∼10 nm was rich in aluminum. Cleaning in a 9.1 pH alkaline solution was found to remove the magnesium-rich layer and leave behind an aluminum-rich oxide layer ∼10 nm thick. Activation in alkaline solutions of NaOH (pH > 12.9) or Na 2 CO 3 (pH > 11.5) produced an oxide that was ∼20 to 60 nm thick and rich in magnesium. Alkaline cleaning and activation altered the oxide composition and thickness making it possible for deposition of thicker cerium-based conversion coatings (∼100 to 250 nm) compared to only alkaline cleaning (∼30 nm), with application of one spray cycle of deposition solution.

  2. Effect of alkaline cleaning and activation on aluminum alloy 7075-T6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Simon, E-mail: sjwt5@mst.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Fahrenholtz, William G.; O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The effect of alkaline cleaning and activation on the composition and thickness of the oxide layer on aluminum alloy 7075-T6 was studied. E-pH diagrams were developed to predict the effect of alkaline cleaning and activation solutions on the stability of the oxide surface layers. The thickness of the native oxide layer was determined to be {approx}30 nm by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis. The outer {approx}20 nm was rich in magnesium while the remaining {approx}10 nm was rich in aluminum. Cleaning in a 9.1 pH alkaline solution was found to remove the magnesium-rich layer and leave behind an aluminum-rich oxide layer {approx}10 nm thick. Activation in alkaline solutions of NaOH (pH > 12.9) or Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (pH > 11.5) produced an oxide that was {approx}20 to 60 nm thick and rich in magnesium. Alkaline cleaning and activation altered the oxide composition and thickness making it possible for deposition of thicker cerium-based conversion coatings ({approx}100 to 250 nm) compared to only alkaline cleaning ({approx}30 nm), with application of one spray cycle of deposition solution.

  3. Wet Mars, Dry Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brain, D. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K. W.; Thrall, L.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic fields of the large terrestrial planets, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are all vastly different from each other. These differences can tell us a lot about the interior structure, interior history, and even give us clues to the atmospheric history of these planets. This poster highlights the third in a series of presentations that target school-age audiences with the overall goal of helping the audience visualize planetary magnetic field and understand how they can impact the climatic evolution of a planet. Our first presentation, "Goldilocks and the Three Planets," targeted to elementary school age audiences, focuses on the differences in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars and the causes of the differences. The second presentation, "Lost on Mars (and Venus)," geared toward a middle school age audience, highlights the differences in the magnetic fields of these planets and what we can learn from these differences. Finally, in the third presentation, "Wet Mars, Dry Mars," targeted to high school age audiences and the focus of this poster, the emphasis is on the long term climatic affects of the presence or absence of a magnetic field using the contrasts between Earth and Mars. These presentations are given using visually engaging spherical displays in conjunction with hands-on activities and scientifically accurate 3D models of planetary magnetic fields. We will summarize the content of our presentations, discuss our lessons learned from evaluations, and show (pictures of) our hands-on activities and 3D models.

  4. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David L.; Fedosseev, Alexander M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier

  5. Wetting properties of liquid lithium on lithium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krat, S.A., E-mail: stepan.krat@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Popkov, A.S. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu. M.; Pisarev, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fiflis, Peter; Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Contact angles of liquid lithium and Li{sub 3}N, Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were measured. • Liquid lithium wets lithium compounds at relatively low temperatures: Li{sub 3}N at 257 °C, Li{sub 2}O at 259 °C, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 323 °C. • Li wets Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 3}N better than previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta, TZM, stainless steel). • Li wets Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} better than most previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta). - Abstract: Liquid metal plasma facing components (LMPFC) have shown a potential to supplant solid plasma facing components materials in the high heat flux regions of magnetic confinement fusion reactors due to the reduction or elimination of concerns over melting, wall damage, and erosion. To design a workable LMPFC, one must understand how liquid metal interacts with solid underlying structures. Wetting is an important factor in such interaction, several designs of LMPFC require liquid metal to wet the underlying solid structures. The wetting of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, oxide, and carbonate) by 200 °C liquid lithium at various surface temperature from 230 to 330 °C was studied by means of contact angle measurements. Wetting temperatures, defined as the temperature above which the contact angle is less than 90°, were measured. The wetting temperature was 257 °C for nitride, 259 °C for oxide, and 323 °C for carbonate. Surface tensions of solid lithium compounds were calculated from the contact angle measurements.

  6. Reduction of nitrobenzene with alkaline ascorbic acid: Kinetics and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Chenju; Lin, Ya-Ting; Shiu, Jia-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Alkaline ascorbic acid (a.k.a. vitamin C) is capable of reductively degrading NB. • The pH above the pK_a_2 of ascorbic acid increases reductive electron transfer to NB. • The rate equation for the reactions between NB and AA is determined. • NSB, AZOXY, and AZO are identified as intermediates and aniline as a final product. • Alkaline pH is essential for AA remediation of NB contaminated soils. - Abstract: Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) exhibits the potential to reductively degrade nitrobenzene (NB), which is the simplest of the nitroaromatic compounds. The nitro group (NO_2"−) of NB has a +III oxidation state of the N atom and tends to gain electrons. The effect of alkaline pH ranging from 9 to 13 was initially assessed and the results demonstrated that the solution pH, when approaching or above the pK_a_2 of AA (11.79), would increase reductive electron transfer to NB. The rate equation for the reactions between NB and AA at pH 12 can be described as r = ((0.89 ± 0.11) × 10"−"4 mM"1"−"("a "+ "b") h"−"1) × [NB]"a "= "1"."3"5 "± "0"."1"0[AA]"b "= "0"."8"9 "± "0"."0"1. The GC/MS analytical method identified nitrosobenzene, azoxybenzene, and azobenzene as NB reduction intermediates, and aniline (AN) as a final product. These experimental results indicate that the alkaline AA reduction of NB to AN mainly proceeds via the direct route, consisting of a series of two-electron or four-electron transfers, and the condensation reaction plays a minor route. Preliminary evaluation of the remediation of spiked NB contaminated soils revealed that maintenance of alkaline pH and a higher water to soil ratio are essential for a successful alkaline AA application.

  7. Investigation of electrochemical synthesis of ferrate, Part I: Electrochemical behavior of iron and its several alloys in concentrated alkaline solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čekerevac Milan I.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to various applications of Fe(VI due to its unique properties such as oxidizing power, selective reactivity, stability of the salt, and non-toxic decomposition by-products of ferric ion. In environmental remediation processes, Fe(VI has been proposed as green oxidant, coagulant, disinfectant, and antifoulant. Therefore, it is considered as a promising multi-purpose water treatment chemical. Fe(VI has also potential applications in electrochemical energy source, as 'green cathode'. The effectiveness of ferrate as a powerful oxidant in the entire pH range, and its use in environmental applications for the removal of wide range of contaminants has been well documented by several researchers. There is scientific evidence that ferrate can effectively remove arsenic, algae, viruses, pharmaceutical waste, and other toxic heavy metals. Although Fe(VI was first discovered in early eighteen century, detailed studies on physical and chemical properties of Fe(VI had to wait until efficient synthetic and analytical methods of Fe(VI were developed by Schreyer et al. in the 1950s. Actually, there have been developed three ways for the preparation of Fe(VI compounds : the wet oxidation of Fe(II and Fe(III compounds, the dry oxidation of the same, and the electrochemistry method, mainly based on the trans passive oxidation of iron. High purity ferrates Fe(VI can be generated when electrode of the pure iron metal or its alloys are anodized in concentrated alkaline solution. It is known that the efficiency of electrochemical process of Fe(VI production depends on many factors such as current density, composition of anode material, types of electrolyte etc. In this paper, the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI solution by the anodic dissolution of iron and its alloys in concentrated water solution of NaOH and KOH is investigated. The process of transpassive dissolution of iron to ferrate(VI was studied by

  8. Wet flue gas desulphurization and new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Michelsen, M.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FDG plants is presented. The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grained limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish limestones of different origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was developed to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical correlations for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling-film column) were determined. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15%, though the effect could not be correlated. A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup -}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH-profiles, solids contents of slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No effects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory experiments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale experiments showed a decrease in limestone reactivity. (EG) EFP-95. 45 refs.; Also ph.d. thesis of Soeren Kiil

  9. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In the field of metallurgy, specifically processes for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores, problems of imbalance of ion exchange agents, contamination of recycled phosphoric acid with process organics and oxidizing agents, and loss and contamination of uranium product, are solved by removing organics from the raffinate after ion exchange conversion of uranium to uranous form and recovery thereof by ion exchange, and returning organics to the circuit to balance mono and disubstituted ester ion exchange agents; then oxidatively stripping uranium from the agent using hydrogen peroxide; then after ion exchange recovery of uranyl and scrubbing, stripping with sodium carbonate and acidifying the strip solution and using some of it for the scrubbing; regenerating the sodium loaded agent and recycling it to the uranous recovery step. Economic recovery of uranium as a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production is effected. (author)

  10. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo S Caram; Natalie Foster

    1998-01-01

    The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and may require accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained

  11. Sample preparation in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, Joaquim A.; Santos, Mirian C.; Sousa, Rafael A. de; Cadore, Solange; Barnes, Ramon M.; Tatro, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide, tertiary amines and strongly alkaline reagents for sample treatment involving extraction and digestion procedures is discussed in this review. The preparation of slurries is also discussed. Based on literature data, alkaline media offer a good alternative for sample preparation involving an appreciable group of analytes in different types of samples. These reagents are also successfully employed in tailored speciation procedures wherein there is a critical dependence on maintenance of chemical forms. The effects of these reagents on measurements performed using spectroanalytical techniques are discussed. Several undesirable effects on transport and atomization processes necessitate use of the method of standard additions to obtain accurate results. It is also evident that alkaline media can improve the performance of techniques such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and accessories, such as autosamplers coupled to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometers

  12. Comparative Batch and Column Evaluation of Thermal and Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficiency of regenerated spent commercial activated carbon for synthetic dye removal was studied using thermal and wet oxidative regeneration methods. Two types of experiments were carried out, batch adsorption experiments and continous flow (fixed bed) column experiment to study the mechanism of dye removal ...

  13. Erosion-corrosion of structural materials of wet steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomarov, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    A model of erosion-corrosion wear of elements of a wet steam zone and a condensate-feeding path of turbines is considered. It is shown that diffusion of impurities and corrosion products in pores of an oxide layer is the control mechanism under conditions of laminar flow of a media. Processes of mass transfer are controlling factors in turbulent flow

  14. Accelerated Drying of Wet Boots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dyck, Walter

    2002-01-01

    .... One such material is sodium polyacrylate. Because recent field trials with Canadian Forces soldiers have reconfirmed that donning wet combat boots is very uncomfortable, a study was done to assess the efficacy of using sodium polyacrylate...

  15. Alkaline lixiviation of uranium in granitic pegmatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambor, S.

    1980-06-01

    The work described herein concerns the determination of the experimental optimum conditions for the alkaline lixiviation of uranium based on the following parameters: time, pH, temperature, density and grane size. The samples were obtained from the Supamo complex, near the Currupia river in the Piar District of the Bolivar State in Venezuela. They have a granitic composition and graphitic texture. The uranium was found in them as a secondary oxidized mineral of green-yellow colour localized in fractures fissures, intergranular spaces and also in the mica as. Secondary uranitite. The lixiviation process was carried out using Na 2 CO 3 /NaHCO 3 buffer solution and for 100 gr. samples the best values for an efficient process were found by using 170 mesh grane size and 500 ml of pH buffer at 70 0 C for a 24 hour time period. (author)

  16. Wet-Bulb-Globe Temperature Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hour Min Pressure Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT...Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F...Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F deg F deg

  17. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERISATION OF ALKALINE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    There was no clear decrease in the yield seen in the bands and the loss of enzyme was not observed with the gel analysis. It may ... The native gel results show clear distinct bands for the 3 alkaline phosphotase isoenzymes ..... British Medical.

  18. Thermochemical and thermophysical properties of alkaline-earth perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Kurosaki, Ken; Maekawa, Takuji; Matsuda, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Shin-ichi; Uno, Masayoshi

    2005-01-01

    In order to contribute to safety evaluation of high burnup oxide fuels, we studied the thermochemical and thermophysical properties of alkaline-earth perovskites known as oxide inclusions. Polycrystalline samples of alkaline-earth perovskites, BaUO 3 , BaZrO 3 , BaCeO 3 , BaMoO 3 , SrTiO 3 , SrZrO 3 , SrCeO 3 , SrMoO 3 , SrHfO 3 and SrRuO 3 , were prepared and the thermal expansion coefficient, melting temperature, elastic moduli, Debye temperature, microhardness, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity were measured. The relationship between some physical properties was studied

  19. Alkaline resistant ceramics; Alkalimotstaandskraftiga keramer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Stig-Bjoern [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Despite durability in several environments, ceramics and refractories can not endure alkaline environments at high temperature. An example of such an environment is when burning biofuel in modern heat and power plants in which the demand for increasing efficiency results in higher combustion temperatures and content of alkaline substances in the flue gas. Some experiences of these environments has been gained from such vastly different equipment as regenerator chambers in the glass industry and MHD-generators. The grains of a ceramic material are usually bonded together by a glassy phase which despite it frequently being a minor constituent render the materials properties and limits its use at elevated temperature. The damage is usually caused by alkaline containing low-melting phases and the decrease of the viscosity of the bonding glass phase which is caused by the alkaline. The surfaces which are exposed to the flue gas in a modern power plant are not only exposed to the high temperature but also a corroding and eroding, particle containing, gas flow of high velocity. The use of conventional refractory products is limited to 1300-1350 deg C. Higher strength and fracture toughness as well as durability against gases, slag and melts at temperatures exceeding 1700 deg C are expected of the materials of the future. Continuous transport of corrosive compounds to the surface and corrosion products from the surface as well as a suitable environment for the corrosion to occur in are prerequisites for extensive corrosion to come about. The highest corrosion rate is therefore found in a temperature interval between the dew point and the melting point of the alkaline-constituent containing compound. It is therefore important that the corrosion resistance is sufficient in the environment in which alkaline containing melts or slag may appear. In environments such as these, even under normal circumstances durable ceramics, such as alumina and silicon carbide, are attacked

  20. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two

  1. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Almaiman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet cupping (Al-hijamah is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient’s skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  2. Cationic Polymers Developed for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-20

    into five categories: proton exchange membrane fuel cell ( PEMFC ), alkaline fuel cell (AFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), solid oxide fuel...SOFC and PAFC belong to high temperature fuel cell, which can be applied in stationary power generation. PEMFC and AFC belong to low temperature fuel...function of the polymer electrolyte is to serve as electrolyte to transport ions between electrodes. PEMFC uses a polymer as electrolyte and works

  3. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    CLASSROOM. 285. RESONANCE | March 2016. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline. Potassium Ferricyanide. Keywords. Alkaline potassium ferricyanide, qualitative ... Carbohydrates form a distinct class of organic compounds often .... Laboratory Techniques: A contemporary Approach, W B Saunders Com-.

  4. Wetting of water on graphene nanopowders of different thicknesses

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Belyaeva, Liubov A.; Schneider, Gré gory F.; Bonn, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    We study the wetting of graphene nanopowders by measuring the water adsorption in nanopowder flakes of different flake thicknesses. Chemical analysis shows that the graphene flakes, especially the thin ones, might exist in the partially oxidized state. We observe that the thinnest graphene nanopowder flakes do not adsorb water at all, independent of the relative humidity. Thicker flakes, on the other hand, do adsorb an increasing amount of water with increasing humidity. This allows us to assess their wetting behavior which is actually the result of the competition between the adhesive interactions of water and graphene and the cohesive interactions of water. Explicit calculation of these contributions from the van der Waals interactions confirms that the adhesive interactions between very thin flakes of graphene oxide and water are extremely weak, which makes the flakes superhydrophobic. “Liquid marble” tests with graphene nanopowder flakes confirm the superhydrophobicity. This shows that the origin of the much debated “wetting transparency” of graphene is due to the fact that a single graphene or graphene oxide layer does not contribute significantly to the adhesion between a wetting phase and the substrate.

  5. Wetting of water on graphene nanopowders of different thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Belyaeva, Liubov A.; Schneider, Grégory F.; Bonn, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    We study the wetting of graphene nanopowders by measuring the water adsorption in nanopowder flakes of different flake thicknesses. Chemical analysis shows that the graphene flakes, especially the thin ones, might exist in the partially oxidized state. We observe that the thinnest graphene nanopowder flakes do not adsorb water at all, independent of the relative humidity. Thicker flakes, on the other hand, do adsorb an increasing amount of water with increasing humidity. This allows us to assess their wetting behavior which is actually the result of the competition between the adhesive interactions of water and graphene and the cohesive interactions of water. Explicit calculation of these contributions from the van der Waals interactions confirms that the adhesive interactions between very thin flakes of graphene oxide and water are extremely weak, which makes the flakes superhydrophobic. "Liquid marble" tests with graphene nanopowder flakes confirm the superhydrophobicity. This shows that the origin of the much debated "wetting transparency" of graphene is due to the fact that a single graphene or graphene oxide layer does not contribute significantly to the adhesion between a wetting phase and the substrate.

  6. Wetting of water on graphene nanopowders of different thicknesses

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2018-04-12

    We study the wetting of graphene nanopowders by measuring the water adsorption in nanopowder flakes of different flake thicknesses. Chemical analysis shows that the graphene flakes, especially the thin ones, might exist in the partially oxidized state. We observe that the thinnest graphene nanopowder flakes do not adsorb water at all, independent of the relative humidity. Thicker flakes, on the other hand, do adsorb an increasing amount of water with increasing humidity. This allows us to assess their wetting behavior which is actually the result of the competition between the adhesive interactions of water and graphene and the cohesive interactions of water. Explicit calculation of these contributions from the van der Waals interactions confirms that the adhesive interactions between very thin flakes of graphene oxide and water are extremely weak, which makes the flakes superhydrophobic. “Liquid marble” tests with graphene nanopowder flakes confirm the superhydrophobicity. This shows that the origin of the much debated “wetting transparency” of graphene is due to the fact that a single graphene or graphene oxide layer does not contribute significantly to the adhesion between a wetting phase and the substrate.

  7. MONITORING REACTIONS IN ALKALINE DIRECT ETHANOL FUEL CELLS ASSEMBLED WITH NON-PT-CATALYST

    OpenAIRE

    Gülzow, Erich; Beyer, Monique; Friedrich, K. Andreas; Pengel, Stefanie; Fischer, Peter; Bettermann, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This contribution shows how Raman spectroscopy can be used to pursue chemical reactions within fuel cells. For this, the oxidation of ethanol occurring in an alkaline direct ethanolic fuel cell was investigated. The analysis of a sequence of Raman spectra recorded during the reaction shows that ethanol was solely oxidized to acetate in a unique reaction.

  8. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid 'marbles' with molecularly thin graphene.

  9. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  10. Safety of an alkalinizing buffer designed for inhaled medications in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael D; Walsh, Brian K; Dwyer, Scott T; Combs, Casey; Vehse, Nico; Paget-Brown, Alix; Pajewski, Thomas; Hunt, John F

    2013-07-01

    Airway acidification plays a role in disorders of the pulmonary tract. We hypothesized that the inhalation of alkalinized glycine buffer would measurably alkalinize the airways without compromising lung function or causing adverse events. We evaluated the safety of an inhaled alkaline glycine buffer in both healthy subjects and in subjects with stable obstructive airway disease. This work includes 2 open-label safety studies. The healthy controls were part of a phase 1 safety study of multiple inhalations of low-dose alkaline glycine buffer; nebulized saline was used as a comparator in 8 of the healthy controls. Subsequently, a phase 2 study in subjects with stable obstructive airway disease was completed using a single nebulized higher-dose strategy of the alkaline inhalation. We studied 20 non-smoking adults (10 healthy controls and 10 subjects with obstructive airway disease), both at baseline and after inhalation of alkaline buffer. We used spirometry and vital signs as markers of clinical safety. We used changes in fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH as surrogate markers of airway pH modification. Alkaline glycine inhalation was tolerated by all subjects in both studies, with no adverse effects on spirometric parameters or vital signs. Airway alkalinization was confirmed by a median increase in EBC pH of 0.235 pH units (IQR 0.56-0.03, P = .03) in subjects after inhalation of the higher-dose alkaline buffer (2.5 mL of 100 mmol/L glycine). Alkalinization of airway lining fluid is accomplished with inhalation of alkaline glycine buffer and causes no adverse effects on pulmonary function or vital signs.

  11. Process for recovering tungsten from alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozaki, S.; Nemoto, S.; Hazeyama, T.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for recovering tungsten from an alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores. This invention comprises adjusting the pH of an alkaline leaching solution which is obtained by lixiviating ore containing tungsten with an alkaline solution to 7--8 with acid to oxidize molybdic acid ions in the solution, adding a sulfide donor, then precipitating molybdenum sulfide compounds by adjusting the pH value of the solution to 2--3. Tungstic acid ions are recovered as calcium tungstate by the addition of a calcium ion donor after the molybdenum sulfide compounds are separated

  12. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  13. Principles and Materials Aspects of Direct Alkaline Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Hao Yu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct alkaline alcohol fuel cells (DAAFCs have attracted increasing interest over the past decade because of their favourable reaction kinetics in alkaline media, higher energy densities achievable and the easy handling of the liquid fuels. In this review, principles and mechanisms of DAAFCs in alcohol oxidation and oxygen reduction are discussed. Despite the high energy densities available during the oxidation of polycarbon alcohols they are difficult to oxidise. Apart from methanol, the complete oxidation of other polycarbon alcohols to CO2 has not been achieved with current catalysts. Different types of catalysts, from conventional precious metal catalyst of Pt and Pt alloys to other lower cost Pd, Au and Ag metal catalysts are compared. Non precious metal catalysts, and lanthanum, strontium oxides and perovskite-type oxides are also discussed. Membranes like the ones used as polymer electrolytes and developed for DAAFCs are reviewed. Unlike conventional proton exchange membrane fuel cells, anion exchange membranes are used in present DAAFCs. Fuel cell performance with DAAFCs using different alcohols, catalysts and membranes, as well as operating parameters are summarised. In order to improve the power output of the DAAFCs, further developments in catalysts, membrane materials and fuel cell systems are essential.

  14. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, O.F.; Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recovering uranium from wetprocess phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange liquidliquid solvent extraction circuits in which in the first circuit (A) the uranium is reduced to the uranous form; (B) the uranous uranium is recovered by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using a mixture of mono- and di-(Alkyl-phenyl) esters of orthophosphoric acid as the ion exchange agent; and (C) the uranium oxidatively stripped from the agent with phosphoric acid containing an oxidizing agent to convert uranous to uranyl ions, and in the second circuit (D) recovering the uranyl uranium from the strip solution by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using di(2ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as a synergist; (E) scrubbing the uranium loaded agent with water; (F) stripping the loaded agent with ammonium carbonate, and (G) calcining the formed ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium oxide, the improvement comprising: (1) removing the organics from the raffinate of step (B) before recycling the raffinate to the wet-process plant, and returning the recovered organics to the circuit to substantially maintain the required balance between the mono and disubstituted esters; (2) using hydogren peroxide as the oxidizing agent in step (C); (3) using an alkali metal carbonate as the stripping agent in step (F) following by acidification of the strip solution with sulfuric acid; (4) using some of the acidified strip solution as the scrubbing agent in step (E) to remove phosphorus and other impurities; and (5) regenerating the alkali metal loaded agent from step (F) before recycling it to the second circuit

  15. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  16. Beryllium Measurement In Commercially Available Wet Wipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant(trademark) Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  17. Oxidizer in phosphoric reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Benedetto, J. dos

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation during the manufacture of wet-process phosphoric acid affected the distribution of uranium and impurities between phosphoric acid and gypsum, by decreasing the uranium loss to gypsum and the impurities solubilization in phosphoric acid. (Author) [pt

  18. Does Surface Roughness Amplify Wetting?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 18 (2014), s. 184703 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : density functional theory * wetting * roughness Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  19. Electrochemical oxidation of ethanol using PtRh/C electrocatalysts in alkaline medium and synthesized by sodium borohydride and alcohol reduction; Oxidação eletroquímica do etanol utilizando eletrocatalisadores PtRh/C em meio alcalino e sintetizados via borohidreto de sódio e redução por álcool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Eric Hossein

    2017-07-01

    PtRh/C were prepared by the following atomic proportions: (100,0), (0,100), (90,10), (70,30) and (50,50). The methods employed in the synthesis of these materials were reduction by sodium borohydride and reduction by alcohol. The metal salts used were H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}3•6H{sub 2}0 and (RhNO{sub 3}){sub 3}, the support used was Carbon black XC72 and the bulk metal composition was 20% and 80% of support. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. The ethanol electrochemical oxidation mechanism was investigated by in situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy couple to an Attenuated Total Reflection technique. The electrocatalytic activity were evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry, Linear Sweep Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry techniques. The Fuel Cells tests were made in a single direct alcohol fuel cell with alkaline membrane. The working electrodes were prepared by a thin porous coating technique. X-ray diffraction allowed to verify metallic alloys, segregate phases and to calculate the percentage of metallic alloys. It was else possible to identify crystallographic phases. Infrared Spectroscopy allowed to verify that the electrochemical oxidation of ethanol was carried out by an incomplete mechanism. PtRh(70:30)/C prepared by sodium borohydride produced large amounts of carbon dioxide and acetaldehyde. Rh/C showed electrocatalytic activity when compared with other materials studied.

  20. Converting SDAP into gypsum in a wet limestone scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, F [Faelleskemikerne, Elsamprojekt A/S, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The ELSAM power pool has an installed electrical capacity of approx. 5 GW{sub e}, mainly firing import coal. The major base load units are equipped with desulphurization units and three different desulphurization technologies are used: the wet limestone gypsum process, the spray dry absorption process and a sulphuric acid process. Gypsum and sulphuric acid are commercialized, whereas it has been difficult to utilize the spray dry absorption product (SDAP). The main constituents of SDAP are calcium sulphide, calcium chloride, hydrated lime and impurities mainly originating from fly ash. Sulphide can be oxidized into sulphate in acidic solution - the reaction is utilized in the wet limestone gypsum process - and the possibility of using any spare capacity in the wet limestone gypsum units to oxidize the sulphide content of SDAP into sulphate and produce usable gypsum has been investigated in the laboratory and in a 400 MW{sub e} equivalent wet limestone unit. The limestone inhibition effect of the addition of SDAP is currently being studied in the laboratory in order to determine the effect of different SDAP types (plant/coal sources) on limestone reactivity before further long-term full-scale tests are performed and permanent use of the process planned. (EG)

  1. Effect of the cooking method (grilling, roasting, frying and sous-vide) on the oxidation of thiols, tryptophan, alkaline amino acids and protein cross-linking in jerky chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fábio A. P.; Ferreira, Valquíria C. S.; Madruga, Marta S.; Estévez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Broiler breast (pectoralis major) meat was submitted to salting with NaCl + NaNO3 followed by a drying process to produce jerky-type chicken. The final product (raw broiler charqui) was desalted and then cooked using grilled, roasted, fried and sous-vide techniques. Sous-vide cooked samples showed lowest results of moisture loss compared to roasted and fried ones. Fatty acid profile suffered minor changes after cooking of broiler charqui. Regarding to protein oxidation, tryptophan fluorescenc...

  2. Reduction of nitrobenzene with alkaline ascorbic acid: Kinetics and pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chenju, E-mail: cliang@nchu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University 250, Kuo-kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ya-Ting [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200 Chung Pei Road, Chung Li District, Taoyuan City 320, Taiwan (China); Shiu, Jia-Wei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University 250, Kuo-kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • Alkaline ascorbic acid (a.k.a. vitamin C) is capable of reductively degrading NB. • The pH above the pK{sub a2} of ascorbic acid increases reductive electron transfer to NB. • The rate equation for the reactions between NB and AA is determined. • NSB, AZOXY, and AZO are identified as intermediates and aniline as a final product. • Alkaline pH is essential for AA remediation of NB contaminated soils. - Abstract: Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) exhibits the potential to reductively degrade nitrobenzene (NB), which is the simplest of the nitroaromatic compounds. The nitro group (NO{sub 2}{sup −}) of NB has a +III oxidation state of the N atom and tends to gain electrons. The effect of alkaline pH ranging from 9 to 13 was initially assessed and the results demonstrated that the solution pH, when approaching or above the pK{sub a2} of AA (11.79), would increase reductive electron transfer to NB. The rate equation for the reactions between NB and AA at pH 12 can be described as r = ((0.89 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −4} mM{sup 1−(a} {sup +} {sup b)} h{sup −1}) × [NB]{sup a} {sup =} {sup 1.35} {sup ±} {sup 0.10}[AA]{sup b} {sup =} {sup 0.89} {sup ±} {sup 0.01}. The GC/MS analytical method identified nitrosobenzene, azoxybenzene, and azobenzene as NB reduction intermediates, and aniline (AN) as a final product. These experimental results indicate that the alkaline AA reduction of NB to AN mainly proceeds via the direct route, consisting of a series of two-electron or four-electron transfers, and the condensation reaction plays a minor route. Preliminary evaluation of the remediation of spiked NB contaminated soils revealed that maintenance of alkaline pH and a higher water to soil ratio are essential for a successful alkaline AA application.

  3. Review of Fabrication Methods, Physical Properties, and Applications of Nanostructured Copper Oxides Formed via Electrochemical Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech J. Stepniowski

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Typically, anodic oxidation of metals results in the formation of hexagonally arranged nanoporous or nanotubular oxide, with a specific oxidation state of the transition metal. Recently, the majority of transition metals have been anodized; however, the formation of copper oxides by electrochemical oxidation is yet unexplored and offers numerous, unique properties and applications. Nanowires formed by copper electrochemical oxidation are crystalline and composed of cuprous (CuO or cupric oxide (Cu2O, bringing varied physical and chemical properties to the nanostructured morphology and different band gaps: 1.44 and 2.22 eV, respectively. According to its Pourbaix (potential-pH diagram, the passivity of copper occurs at ambient and alkaline pH. In order to grow oxide nanostructures on copper, alkaline electrolytes like NaOH and KOH are used. To date, no systemic study has yet been reported on the influence of the operating conditions, such as the type of electrolyte, its temperature, and applied potential, on the morphology of the grown nanostructures. However, the numerous reports gathered in this paper will provide a certain view on the matter. After passivation, the formed nanostructures can be also post-treated. Post-treatments employ calcinations or chemical reactions, including the chemical reduction of the grown oxides. Nanostructures made of CuO or Cu2O have a broad range of potential applications. On one hand, with the use of surface morphology, the wetting contact angle is tuned. On the other hand, the chemical composition (pure Cu2O and high surface area make such materials attractive for renewable energy harvesting, including water splitting. While compared to other fabrication techniques, self-organized anodization is a facile, easy to scale-up, time-efficient approach, providing high-aspect ratio one-dimensional (1D nanostructures. Despite these advantages, there are still numerous challenges that have to be faced, including the

  4. Characterization and Electrocatalytic Properties of Titanium-Based Ru0.3Co0.7−xCex Mixed Oxide Electrodes for Oxygen Evolution in Alkaline Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-supported RuO2-Co3O4-CeO2 (Ru0.3Co0.7−xCex oxide, 0≤x≤0.7 electrodes were prepared by sol-gel process. The phase structure, surface morphology, and microstructure of the oxide layer were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Electrocatalytic activity and oxygen evolution reaction (OER kinetics on these electrodes in 1.0 mol⋅dm−3 KOH solution were studied by recording open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, and polarisation curves. The results showed that the appropriate content of CeO2 could reduce the grain size and increase active surface area. The electrocatalytic activity shows a strong dependence on the CeO2 content in the film. Catalytic performance of mixed oxide electrodes with 40 mol % CeO2 was the best, with the greatest voltammetric charge, 86.23 mC⋅cm−2, and the smallest apparent activation energy for OER at 0.60 V was 22.76 kJ⋅mol−1.

  5. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Laboratory Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four Wet Chemistry Laboratory units, part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This image was taken before Phoenix's launch on August 4, 2007. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Formative Assessment Probes: Wet Jeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2015-01-01

    Picture a wet towel or a puddle of water on a hot, sunny day. An hour later, the towel is dry and the puddle no longer exists. What happened to the water? Where did it go? These are questions that reveal myriad interesting student ideas about evaporation and the water cycle--ideas that provide teachers with a treasure trove of data they can use to…

  7. Methanol and ethanol electrooxidation on Pt and Pd supported on carbon microspheres in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Changwei; Cheng, Liqiang; Liu, Yingliang [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Shen, Peikang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2007-05-15

    Noble metal (Pt, Pd) electrocatalysts supported on carbon microspheres (CMS) are used for methanol and ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The results show that noble metal electrocatalysts supported on carbon microspheres give better performance than that supported on carbon black. It is well known that palladium is not a good electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation, but it shows excellently higher activity and better steady-state electrolysis than Pt for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media. The results show a synergistic effect by the interaction between Pd and carbon microspheres. The Pd supported on carbon microspheres in this paper possesses excellent electrocatalytic properties and may be of great potential in direct ethanol fuel cells. (author)

  8. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  9. Adult Bed-Wetting: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult bed-wetting: A concern? My 24-year-old husband has started to wet the bed at ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  10. Hydroxide Self-Feeding High-Temperature Alkaline Direct Formate Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinshi; Sun, Xianda; Feng, Ying

    2017-05-22

    Conventionally, both the thermal degradation of the anion-exchange membrane and the requirement of additional hydroxide for fuel oxidation reaction hinder the development of the high-temperature alkaline direct liquid fuel cells. The present work addresses these two issues by reporting a polybenzimidazole-membrane-based direct formate fuel cell (DFFC). Theoretically, the cell voltage of the high-temperature alkaline DFFC can be as high as 1.45 V at 90 °C. It has been demonstrated that a proof-of-concept alkaline DFFC without adding additional hydroxide yields a peak power density of 20.9 mW cm -2 , an order of magnitude higher than both alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells and alkaline direct methanol fuel cells, mainly because the hydrolysis of formate provides enough OH - ions for formate oxidation reaction. It was also found that this hydroxide self-feeding high-temperature alkaline DFFC shows a stable 100 min constant-current discharge at 90 °C, proving the conceptual feasibility. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrolysis of Miscanthus for bioethanol production using dilute acid presoaking combined with wet explosion pre-treatment and enzymatic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette; Teller, Philip Johan; Hilstrøm, Troels

    2008-01-01

    xylose prior to wet explosion. The acid presoaking extracted 63.2% xylose and 5.2% glucose. Direct enzymatic hydrolysis of the presoaked biomass was found to give only low sugar yields of 24-26% glucose. Wet explosion is a pre-treatment method that combines wet-oxidation and steam explosion. The effect...... of wet explosion on non-presoaked and presoaked Miscanthus was investigated using both atmospheric air and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent. All wet explosion pre-treatments showed to have a disrupting effect on the lignocellulosic biomass, making the sugars accessible for enzymatic hydrolysis......Miscanthus is a high yielding bioenergy crop. In this study we used acid presoaking, wet explosion, and enzymatic hydrolysis to evaluate the combination of the different pre-treatment methods for bioethanol production with Miscanthus. Acid presoaking is primarily carried out in order to remove...

  12. Improved hydrogen sorption kinetics in wet ball milled Mg hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Li

    2011-05-04

    In this work, wet ball milling method is used in order to improve hydrogen sorption behaviour due to its improved microstructure of solid hydrogen materials. Compared to traditional ball milling method, wet ball milling has benefits on improvement of MgH{sub 2} microstructure and further influences on its hydrogen sorption behavior. With the help of solvent tetrahydrofuran (THF), wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder has much smaller particle size and its specific surface area is 7 times as large as that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder. Although after ball milling the grain size is decreased a lot compared to as-received MgH{sub 2} powder, the grain size of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is larger than that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder due to the lubricant effect of solvent THF during wet ball milling. The improved particle size and specific surface area of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is found to be determining its hydrogen sorption kinetics especially at relatively low temperatures. And it also shows good cycling sorption behavior, which decides on its industrial applicability. With three different catalysts MgH{sub 2} powder shows improved hydrogen sorption behavior as well as the cyclic sorption behavior. Among them, the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst is found to be the most effective one in this work. Compared to the wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder, the particle size and specific surface area of the MgH{sub 2} powder with catalysts are similar to the previous ones, while the grain size of the MgH{sub 2} with catalysts is much finer. In this case, two reasons for hydrogen sorption improvement are suggested: one is the reduction of the grain size. The other may be as pointed out in some literatures that formation of new oxidation could enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics, which is also the reason why its hydrogen capacity is decreased compared to without catalysts. After further ball milling, the specific surface area of wet ball milled Mg

  13. Progress of research on the influence of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on bentonite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Weimin; Zheng Zhenji; Chen Bao; Chen Yonggui

    2011-01-01

    Based on the previous laboratory studies and numerical simulation on bentonite in alkaline environments, the effects of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite are emphasized in this paper, temperature, pH values and concentration are discussed as main affecting factors. When bentonite is exposed to alkaline cation or alkaline solution, microstructure of bentonite will be changed due to the dissolution of montmorillonite and the formation of secondary minerals, which results in the decrease of swelling pressure. The amount of the reduction of swelling pressure depends on the concentration of alkaline solution. Temperature, polyvalent cation, salinity and concentration are the main factors affecting hydraulic properties of bentonite under alkaline conditions. Therefore, future research should focus on the mechanism of coupling effects of weak alkaline solutions on the mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite under different temperatures and different pH values. (authors)

  14. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  15. A wet-chemical approach to perovskite and fluorite-type nanoceramics: synthesis and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd

    2015-01-01

    In thesis the low-temperature, wet-chemical approach to various functional inorganic oxide materials is described. The main focus of this research is to control the material’s synthesis from liquid precursor to metal oxide powder or thin film; while understanding its formation mechanism. In

  16. Comparison of anti-corrosive properties between hot alkaline nitrate blackening and hydrothermal blackening routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattah-alhosseini, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani Khan, H., E-mail: hamid.yazdanikhan@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidarpour, A. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Hamedan University of Technology, Hamedan, 65155-579 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, the oxide films were formed on carbon steel by using hot alkaline nitrate and hydrothermal treatments. A dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal method due to application of high pressure and by increasing solution temperature from boiling temperature (155 °C) to 250 °C. Oxide films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and electrochemical tests including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). These analyses showed that the magnetite film which was formed on carbon steel surface by hydrothermal treatment offers the best resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Although thicker oxide film could be obtained via hot alkaline nitrate black oxidizing, corrosion resistance was lower as a result of being highly porous and the presence of hematite. - Highlights: • Oxide films have been formed on steel by using of hot alkaline nitrate and hydrothermal treatments. • A dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal treatment. • SEM micrographs showed that a dense and protective oxide film was obtained by hydrothermal treatment. • Film formed by hydrothermal treatment could have the best resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  17. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.

    1999-12-01

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 μm mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials. This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m 3 . This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of radioactivity on

  18. Greenhouse gas microbiology in wet and dry straw crust covering pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Ruth; Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    was observed in all crusted treatments exposed to anoxia, and this was probably a result of denitrification based on NO2- and NO3- that had accumulated in the crust during oxic conditions. To reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions, floating crust should be managed to optimize conditions for methanotrophs....... microbiology had an effect on the emission of the potent greenhouse gases CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O) when crust moisture was manipulated ("Dry", "Moderate", and "Wet"). The dry crust had the deepest oxygen penetration (45 mm as compared to 20 mm in the Wet treatment) as measured with microsensors, the highest...... oxidizing bacteria were undetectable and methane oxidizing bacteria were only sparsely present in the "Wet" treatment. A change to anoxia did not affect the CH4 emission indicating the virtual absence of aerobic methane oxidation in the investigated 2-months old crusts. However, an increase in N2O emission...

  19. Deposition and early hydrologic evolution of Westwater Canyon wet alluvial-fan system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The Westwater Canyon Member is one of several large, low-gradient alluvial fans that compose the Morrison Formation in the Four Corners area. Morrison fans were deposited by major laterally migrating streams entering a broad basin bounded by highlands to the west and south. The Westwater Canyon sand framework consists of a downfan succession of 1) proximal braided channel, 2) straight bed-load channel, 3) sinuous mixed-load channel, and 4) distributary mixed-load-channel sand bodies. Regional sand distribution and facies patterns are highly digitate and radiate from a point source located northwest of Gallup, New Mexico. Early ground-water flow evolution within the Westwater Canyon fan aquifer system can be inferred by analogy with Quaternary wet-fan deposits and by the interpreted paragenetic sequence of diagenetic features present. Syndepositional flow was controlled by the downfan hydrodynamic gradient and the high horizontal and vertical transmissivity of the sand-rich fan aquifer. Dissolution and transport of soluble humate would be likely in earliest ground water, which was abundant, fresh, and slightly alkaline. With increasing confinement of the aquifer below less permeable tuffaceous Brushy Basin deposits and release of soluble constituents from volcanic ash, flow patterns stabilized, and relatively more saline, uranium-rich ground water permeated the aquifer. Uranium mineralization occurred during this early postdepositional, semiconfined flow phase. Development of overlying Dakota swamps suggests a shallow water table indicative of regional dischare or stagnation. In either event, only limited downward flux of acidic water is recorded by local, bleached, kaolinized zones where the Westwater Canyon directly underlies the Dakota swamps. Subsequent ground-water flow phases have further obscured primary alteration patterns and caused local oxidation and redistribution of uranium

  20. 1 - Aromatization of n-hexane and natural gasoline over ZSM-5 zeolite, 2- Wet catalytic oxidation of phenol on fixed bed of active carbon; 1 - Aromatisation de n-hexane et d'essence sur zeolithe ZSM-5, 2 - Oxydation catalytique en voie humide du phenol sur charbon actif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwanprasop, S.

    2005-04-15

    I - The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from n-hexane and natural gasoline over Pd loaded ZSM-5 zeolite in a tubular reactor was achieved under the suitable conditions at 400 deg. C, and 0.4 ml/min reactant feeding rate, employing ZSM-5 (0.5% Pd content) as a catalyst. Under these conditions, n-hexane and natural gasoline conversions were found to be 99.7% and 94.3%, respectively (with respective aromatic selectivity of 92.3% and 92.6%). II - Wet catalytic air oxidation of phenol over a commercial active carbon was studied in a three phase fixed bed reactor under mild temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Exit phenol concentration, COD, and intermediates were analysed. Oxidation of phenol was significantly improved when increasing operating temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and liquid space time, while up or down flow modes had only marginal effect. A complete model involving intrinsic kinetics and all mass transfer limitations gave convenient reactor simulation. (author)