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Sample records for alkaline earth silicate

  1. [Broad excitation band alkaline-earth silicate luminescent materials activated by rare earth and its applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Lei, Ming-Kai; Luo, Xi-Xian; Xiao, Zhi-Guo

    2008-01-01

    Series of novel broad excitation band phosphors M2 MgSis O7 : Eu, Dy(M = Ca, Sr) were prepared by a high temperature solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure of compound was characterized. And the effects of part substitution of alkaline-earth on crystal structure, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence properties were also investigated. It is found that the excitation band of silicate luminescent materials extend to visible region and they exhibit yellow, green and blue long after-glow luminescence after excited by ultraviolet or visible light. Ca MgSi O7 : Eu, Dy luminescent materials can be excited effectively under the 450-480 nm range and exhibit a strong emission at 536 nm, nicely combining with blue light emitted by InGaN chips to produce white light. This promises the silicate luminescent materials a potential yellow phosphor for white LED.

  2. Nano porous alkaline earth metal silicates as free fatty acid adsorbents from Crude Palm Oil (CPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmur, Indra; Sembiring, Seri Bima; Bangun, Nimpan; Kaban, Jamaran; Putri, Nabila Karina

    2017-01-01

    Free fatty acids(FFA) from Crude Palm Oil (CPO) have been adsorbed by alkaline earth metal silicate (M-silicate : M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) adsorbents in ethanol using batch method. The adsorbents were prepared from the chloride salts of alkaline metals and Na2SiO3. The resulting white solid of the alkaline earth metal silicates were then heated at 800°C for 3 hours to enlarge their porosities. All adsorbents were characterized by SEM-EDX, XRD and BET. The EDX spectrum of SEM-EDX showed the appearance of all elements in the adsorbents, and the XRD spectrum of all adsorbents showed that they have crystobalite structure. The porosity of the adsorbents calculated by BET method showed that the porosities of the adsorbents range from 2.0884 - 2.0969 nm. All the adsorbents were used to adsorb the FFA from CPO containing 4.79%, 7.3%, 10.37% and 13.34% of FFA. The ratio of adsorbent to CPO to be used in adsorption of FFA from CPO were made 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, with adsorption time of 1 hour. We found that the maximum adsorption of FFA from CPO was given by Ca-Silicate adsorbent which was between 69.86 - 94.78%, while the lowest adsorption was shown by Mg-silicate adsorbent which was 49.32 -74.53%.

  3. Relations between structure and material properties in earth alkaline silicate basing phosphors; Struktureigenschaftsbeziehungen in Erdalkalisilikat basierenden Leuchtstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Wolfgang

    2008-03-19

    This work is basing on the relation between structure and luminescence of Eu{sup 2+} doped Earth-Alkaline-Silicates. After an overview of Earth-Alkaline-Silicates silicates with an additional cation (Li{sup +}, Al{sup 3+}) and an additional anion (Cl{sup -}, N{sup 3-}) are examined in chapter 4 and 5. Basing on this data an relation between structural influence - like ion-radii, anion and coordination polyeder - and phosphor luminescence is set up. The ability of using as an industrial phosphor is made in the final chapter. (orig.)

  4. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies of sol–gel derived alkaline-earth silicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelos G Kalampounias

    2011-04-01

    IR and Raman spectroscopies have been utilized to study the structure and vibrational modes of sol–gel-derived binary silicate glasses. The present study is motivated by the immense geological significance and focuses on the MO–SiO2 (M = Ca, Mg) binary systems in an effort to unveil the role of the CaO and MgO modifiers when incorporated to the 3D silica structure. Glasses in the composition range = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 prepared by the sol–gel method were compared with the corresponding glasses formed by appropriate mixing of SiO2 and MO powders through melting and fast cooling. The vibrational spectra of the sol–gel-derived glasses have revealed considerable changes in relative intensities as a function of the MO mole fraction. These changes signify structural modifications on the silica network. The population of the 3 species was found to increase for both modified silicate systems. The rate of increase is more pronounced in the CaO–SiO2 glasses. The extent of network depolymerization in the porous glass is higher at the same content of alkaline earth oxide compared to the bulk glass. The results are indicative of a more `defective’ nature of the sol–gel glasses compared to the corresponding melt-quenched ones.

  5. Alkaline earth silicate wools - A new generation of high temperature insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C; Harrison, Paul T C

    2012-11-01

    Intensive study of the natural asbestiform minerals that cause human diseases, and the consequent understanding of their hazardous characteristics, has enabled the development of manufactured fibres whose physical and/or chemical properties, in particular as they relate to biopersistence, have been adjusted to minimize possible harm to health. A strong driver for the developmentof new high temperature insulation materials wasthe perception of the toxicity of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF)and their classification in the EU as a category 2 carcinogen under Directive 67/548/EEC. Such classification carries with it the requirement for substitution by less hazardous materials. This paper focuses on the development of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools as a new class of high temperature insulation with the capability of such substitution in a number of applications. These wools have only a low potential to cause harm because they do not persist in lung tissue once deposited, and have produced minimal effects in experimental test systems. AES wools are increasingly being used in a wide range of high temperature applications.

  6. Role of elastic deformation in determining the mixed alkaline earth effect of hardness in silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Potuzak, M.

    2015-01-01

    been investigated previously, but the link between the resistance to elastic deformation and hardness has not yet been studied. In this work, we investigate the link between elastic deformation during indentation and Vickers hardness in a series of mixed magnesium-barium boroaluminosilicate glasses. We...... show that the mixed alkaline earth effect manifests itself as deviations from linearity in shear modulus, Poisson’s ratio, glass transition temperature, liquid fragility index, hardness, volume of densification, and volume of plastic flow. We find no correlation between the elastic part...... of the indentation and hardness, and we thus infer that elastic deformation does not play a dominant role in determining the mixed alkaline earth effect of hardness. However, interestingly, we find a strong correlation between Poisson’s ratio, volume of plastic flow, and hardness, by which the minimum in hardness...

  7. Dissolution of glass wool, rock wool and alkaline earth silicate wool: morphological and chemical changes in fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campopiano, Antonella; Cannizzaro, Annapaola; Angelosanto, Federica; Astolfi, Maria Luisa; Ramires, Deborah; Olori, Angelo; Canepari, Silvia; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wool and of other biosoluble wools in saline solution simulating physiological fluids was compared with that of a traditional wool belonging to synthetic vitreous fibers. Morphological and size changes of fibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The elements extracted from fibers were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. SEM analysis showed a larger reduction of length-weighted geometric mean fiber diameter at 4.5 pH than at 7.4 pH. At the 7.4 pH, AES wool showed a higher dissolution rate and a dissolution time less than a few days. Their dissolution was highly non-congruent with rapid leaching of calcium. Unlike rock wool, glass wool dissolved more rapidly at physiological pH than at acid pH. Dissolution of AES and biosoluble rock wool is accompanied by a noticeable change in morphology while by no change for glass wool. Biosoluble rock wool developed a leached surface with porous honeycomb structure. SEM analysis showed the dissolution for glass wool is mainly due to breakage transverse of fiber at pH 7.4. AES dissolution constant (Kdis) was the highest at pH 7.4, while at pH 4.5 only biosoluble rockwool 1 showed a higher Kdis.

  8. Lack of marked cyto- and genotoxicity of cristobalite in devitrified (heated) alkaline earth silicate wools in short-term assays with cultured primary rat alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Christina; Harrison, Paul T C; Bellmann, Bernd; Brown, Robert C; Zoitos, Bruce K; Class, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools are low-biopersistence high-temperature insulation wools. Following prolonged periods at high temperatures they may devitrify, producing crystalline silica (CS) polymorphs, including cristobalite, classified as carcinogenic to humans. Here we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic significance of cristobalite present in heated AES wools. Primary rat alveolar macrophages were incubated in vitro for 2 h with 200 µg/cm² unheated/heated calcium magnesium silicate wools (CMS1, CMS2, CMS3; heat-treated for 1 week at, or 4 weeks 150 °C below, their respective classification temperatures) or magnesium silicate wool (MS; heated for 24 h at 1260 °C). Types and quantities of CS formed, and fiber size distribution and shape were determined by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Lactate dehydrogenase release and alkaline and hOGG1-modified comet assays were used, ± aluminum lactate (known to quench CS effects), for cytotoxicity/genotoxicity screening. Cristobalite content of wools increased with heating temperature and duration, paralleled by decreases in fiber length and changes in fiber shape. No marked cytotoxicity, and nearly no (CMS) or only slight (MS) DNA-strand break induction was observed, compared to the CS-negative control Al₂O₃, whereas DQ12 as CS-positive control was highly active. Some samples induced slight oxidative DNA damage, but no biological endpoint significantly correlated with free CS, quartz, or cristobalite. In conclusion, heating of AES wools mediates changes in CS content and fiber length/shape. While changes in fiber morphology can impact biological activity, cristobalite content appears minor or of no relevance to the intrinsic toxicity of heated AES wools in short-term assays with rat alveolar macrophages.

  9. Comparative investigation on the effect of alkaline earth oxides on the intensity of absorption bands due to Cu2+, Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions in ternary silicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S P Singh; Aman; Anal Tarafder

    2004-06-01

    Absorption characteristics of Cu2+, Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions in ternary silicate (20Na2O.10RO.70SiO2, where R=Ca, Sr, Ba) glasses were investigated. The intensities of absorption bands due to Cu2+ ion was found to increase with increasing ionic radii of the alkaline earth ions whereas it was found to decrease in case of Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions with increasing ionic radii of the alkaline earth ions. The results were discussed in the light of relation between linear extinction coefficients of these ions and coulombic force of alkaline earth ions. The change in intensities of Cu2+, Mn3+ and Cr3+ ion is attributed due to change in silicate glass compositions.

  10. Alkaline earth metal thioindates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov-Ehmin, B.N.; Ivlieva, V.I.; Filatenko, L.A.; Zajtsev, B.E.; Kaziev, G.Z.; Sarabiya, M.G.

    1984-08-01

    Alkaline earth metal thioindates of MIn/sub 2/S/sub 4/ composition were synthesized by interaction of alkaline earth metal oxoindates with hydrogen sulfide during heating. Investigation into the compounds by X-ray analysis showed that calcium compound crystallizes in cubic crystal system and strontium and barium compounds in rhombic crystal system. Lattice parameters and the number of formula units were determined. Thioindates of M/sub 3/In/sub 2/S/sub 6/ composition were synthesized, their individuality was shown.

  11. Thermochemical properties of some alkaline-earth silicates and zirconates. Fission product behaviour during molten core-concrete interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntelaar, M.E.

    1996-06-19

    This thesis aims to make a contribution to a better understanding of the chemical processes occurring during an ex-vessel MCCI accident with a western-type of nuclear reactor. Chosen is for a detailed thermochemical study of the silicates and zirconates of barium and strontium. In Chapter one a short introduction in the history of (research in) nuclear safety is given, followed by the state-of-the-art of molten core-concrete interactions in Chapter two. In both Chapters the role of chemical thermodynamics on this particular subject is dealt with. The experimental work on the silicates and zirconates of barium and strontium performed for this thesis, is described in the Chapters three, four, five, six, and parts of eight. In Chapter three the basis for all thermochemical measurements, the sample preparation is given. Because the sample preparation effects the accuracy of the thermodynamic measurements, a great deal of effort is spent in optimizing the synthesis of the silicates which resulted in the TEOS-method widely employed here. In the next Chapters the different thermochemical techniques used, are described: The low-temperature heat capacity measurements and the enthalpy increment measurements in Chapter four, the enthalpy-of-solution measurements in Chapter five, and measurements to determine the crystal structures in Chapter six. (orig.).

  12. A Novel Synthesis of Alkaline Earth Silicate Phosphor Sr3MgSi2O8:Eu2+,Dy3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN,Wen; NING,Gui-Ling; WANG,Jing-Hui; LIN,Yuan

    2007-01-01

    A novel method for synthesizing long afterglow silicate phosphor Sr3MgSi2O8:Eu2+,Dy3+ using TEOS and inorganic powders as reactants was reported. Acetic acid as a catalyzer controlled the hydrolysis of TEOS by adjusting pH value of the system. The morphologies of precursor were characterized by transmission electron microscope(TEM). The structure and optical properties of the phosphor powders were systematically investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and spectrofluorometry. TEM images have reflected the core-shell structure and quasi-spherical morphology of the precursor particles. It was found that the single-phase Sr3MgSi2O8 crystalline structures were obtained at 1050 and 1250 ℃ for the samples prepared with the nano-coating method and the solid state reaction,respectively. The emission intensities of the phosphors prepared by the present method were higher than those by the conventional process. Also, the afterglow characteristic was better than that prepared by solid-state reaction in the comparable condition.

  13. Fire Resistance of Wood Impregnated with Soluble Alkaline Silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Giudice

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the fire performance of wood panels (Araucaria angustifolia impregnated with soluble alkaline silicates. Commercial silicates based on sodium and potassium with 2.5/1.0 and 3.0/1.0 silica/alkali molar ratios were selected; solutions and glasses were previously characterized. Experimental panels were tested in a limiting oxygen chamber and in a two-foot tunnel. Results displayed a high fire-retardant efficiency using some soluble silicates.

  14. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers mining and processing of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate, Fuller's Earth, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that the extensive pulmonary damage in humans was the result of direct occupational inhalation of the dusts and noted that lesions seen in animals were affected by particle size, fiber length, and concentration. The Panel considers that most of the formulations are not respirable and of the preparations that are respirable, the concentration of the ingredient is very low. Even so, the Panel considered that any spray containing these solids should be formulated to minimize their inhalation. With this admonition to the cosmetics industry, the CIR Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe as currently used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel did note that the cosmetic ingredient, Talc, is a hydrated magnesium silicate

  15. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  16. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  17. Synthesis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate based on Steel Slag with Various Alkalinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuping; PENG Xiaoqin; GENG Jianqiang; LI Bin; WANG Kaiyu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to improve the hydraulic potential properties of the slag. Therefore, a method of dynamic hydrothermal synthesis was applied to synthesize calcium silicate hydrate. The phases and nanostructures were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, and BET nitrogen adsorption. The influence of alkalinity of steel slag on its structures and properties was discussed. The experimental results show that, the main product is amorphous calcium silicate hydrate gel with flocculent or fibrous pattern with a BET specific surface area up to 77 m2/g and pore volume of 0.34 mL/g. Compared with low alkalinity steel slag, calcium silicate hydrate synthesized from higher alkalinity steel slag is prone to transform to tobermorite structure.

  18. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  19. Mixed alkaline earth effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    2013-01-01

    While the mixed alkali effect has received significant attention in the glass literature, the mixed alkaline earth effect has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we investigate the latter effect by partial substitution of magnesium for calcium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and NMR...... spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural and topological features of these glasses, and hence into the mixed alkaline earth effect. We demonstrate that the mixed alkaline earth effect manifests itself as a maximum in the amount of bonded tetrahedral units and as a minimum in liquid fragility index...

  20. Chemical Fractionation in the Silicate Vapor Atmosphere of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Eiler, John; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.10.03

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance to questions of lunar origin, the chemical composition of the Moon is not precisely known. In recent years, however, the isotopic composition of lunar samples has been determined to high precision and found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial mantle despite widespread isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar System. In the context of the giant-impact hypothesis, this level of isotopic homogeneity can evolve if the proto-lunar disk and post-impact Earth undergo turbulent mixing into a single uniform reservoir while the system is extensively molten and partially vaporized. In the absence of liquid-vapor separation, such a model leads to the lunar inheritance of the chemical composition of the terrestrial magma ocean. Hence, the turbulent mixing model raises the question of how chemical differences arose between the silicate Earth and Moon. Here we explore the consequences of liquid-vapor separation in one of the settings relevant to the lunar composition: the silicate vapor atmosphere...

  1. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  2. Magmatic (silicates/saline/sulfur-rich/CO2) immiscibility and zirconium and rare-earth element enrichment from alkaline magma chamber margins : Evidence from Ponza Island, Pontine Archipelago, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Torok, K.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid inclusions were measured from a feldspathoid-bearing syenite xenolith entrained in trachyte from Ponza, one of the islands of the Pontine Archipelago, located in the Gulf of Gaeta, Italy. The feldspathoid-bearing syenite consists mainly of potassium feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, titanite, manganoan magnetite, apatite with minor nosean, Na-rich feldspar, pyrrhotite, and rare cheralite. Baddeleyite and zirkelite occur associated with manganoan magnetite. Detailed electron-microprobe analysis reveals enrichments in REE, Y, Nb, U, Th as well as Cl and F in appropriate phases. Fluid inclusions observed in potassium feldspar are either silicate-melt or aqueous inclusions. The aqueous inclusions can be further classified as. (1) one-phase vapor, (2) two-phase (V + L) inclusions, vapor-rich inclusions with a small amount of CO2 in most cases; homogenization of the inclusions always occurred in the vapor phase between 359 and 424??C, salinities vary from 2.9 to 8.5 wt. % NaCl equivalent; and. (3) three-phase and multiphase inclusions (hypersaline/sulfur-rich aqueous inclusions sometimes with up to 8 or more solid phases). Daughter minerals dissolve on heating before vapor/liquid homogenization. Standardless quantitative scanning electron microscope X-ray fluorescence analysis has tentatively identified the following chloride and sulfate daughter crystals; halite, sylvite, glauberite. arcanite, anhydrite, and thenardite. Melting of the daughter crystals occurs between 459 and 536??C (54 to 65 wt. % NaCI equivalent) whereas total homogenization is between 640 and 755??C. The occurrence of silicate-melt inclusions and high-temperature, solute-rich aqueous inclusions suggests that the druse or miarolitic texture of the xenolith is late-stage magmatic. The xenolith from Ponza represents a portion of the peripheral magma chamber wall that has recorded the magmatic/hydrothermal transition and the passage of high solute fluids enriched in chlorides, sulfur, and

  3. Silicate sulfidation and chemical differences between enstatite chondrites and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, S. W.; Petaev, M. I.; Buseck, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic similarity between the Earth-Moon system and enstatite chondrites (ECs) led to the idea that ECs were Earth's building blocks [1-3]. However, compared to Earth's mantle, ECs have low Fe0/Fe ratios, are enriched in volatile elements, and depleted in refractory lithophile elements and Mg [4]. Therefore, deriving Earth composition from ECs requires a loss of volatiles during or prior to accretion and sequestering a large fraction of Si in the deep Earth. Alternatively, the isotopic similarity between the Earth and ECs is explained by their formation from a common precursor that experienced different evolutionary paths resulting in the chemical difference [4]. The vestiges of such a precursor are still present in the unequilibrated ECs as FeO-rich silicates with O isotopic compositions identical to bulk ECs and Earth [5]. Conversion of such a precursor into the characteristic EC mineral assemblage requires high-temperature processing in an H-poor environment with high fS2 and fO2 close to that of the classic solar nebula [6], consistent with redox conditions inferred from Ti4+/Ti3+ ratios in EC pyroxene [7]. Under such conditions reaction of FeO-rich silicates with S-rich gas results in their replacement by the assemblage of FeO-poor silicates; Fe, Mg, Ca sulfides; free silica; and Si-bearing Fe,Ni metal alloy. The progressive sulfidation of ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules results in loss of Mg and addition of Fe, Mn, S, Na, K and, perhaps, other volatiles [6]. At the advanced stages of silicate sulfidation recorded in the metal-sulfide nodules [8], a portion of Si is reduced and dissolved in the Fe,Ni metal. This process is known to fractionate Si isotopes [9,10] and would explain the differences between the ECs and Earth's mantle [11]. The sulfidation of silicates also produces porous S-rich silica, a peculiar phase observed so far only in the ECs. It consists of a sinewy SiO2-rich framework enclosing numerous vesicles filled with beam

  4. Factors Affecting Alkaline Sodium Silicate Gelation for In-Depth Reservoir Profile Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly A. Hamouda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline sodium silicate (Na-silicate is environment-friendly and possesses water-like viscosity during the injection stage for in-depth reservoir treatment to enhance sweep efficiency. Gel setting time (tg and gel strength are interrelated. Factors that accelerate tg are Na-silicate content (wt%, low pH, presence of divalent ions and temperature. Pressure drop across the gel accelerates syneresis; however, the gel appeared to remain intact. Presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions is shown to increase gel strength. With a Na-silicate content of 4.5 wt%, for example, at a pH of 10.3 and a temperature of 20 °C, gel strength almost tripled and was reached about eight times faster at the combined tested concentration of 0.009 M, based on the average effect from the coexistence of both ions. Low-salinity water (LSW has an ion composition of 25-fold diluted seawater, did not show precipitation, and could accordingly be a candidate for a pre-flush before the injection of a Na-silicate solution in the event of a field application. This is important since LSW for enhancing oil recovery is a popular method in oil industry. A suggested predictive tool (simple graphical method to estimate the effect of different factors on gelation time and gel strength is presented.

  5. Surface-treatment of Alkaline Earth Sulfides Based Phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chong-feng; CHU Ben-li; XU Jian; SU Qiang

    2004-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth sulfides based phosphors Ca0.8Sr0.2S∶Eu2+, Tm3+ were covered with a layer of protective coating with alkaline earth fluorides by heating the mixture of phosphor and NH4HF2 at elevated temperatures. The coatings were characterized by means of XRD and SEM. The optical properties of the coated phosphors and the influences of the coating on their properties have been discussed extensively. The stabilities of the coated and uncoated phosphors have been compared.

  6. The Effect of Ormosil Matrix Composition and Alkaline Earth Metal Doping on the Photochromic Response of Ormosil-Phosphotungstate Films

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira Neto,Elias P.; Simões,Mateus B.; Noveletto,Julia C.; Yabarrena,Jean M. S. C.; Ullah,Sajjad; Ubirajara P. Rodrigues Filho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, polyoxometallate based hybrid photochromic materials were prepared by incorporating phosphotungstate anion, PW12O403−, (PW) in hybrid tetraethyl orthosilicate and (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane TEOS-GPTMS derived organomodified silicates (Ormosil) matrices by sol-gel method and the resulting materials were used to prepare multilayer films by dip-coating method. The effect of alkaline earth metal cations doping and matrix composition (%GPTMS) on the photochromic res...

  7. Solvent Extraction of Alkaline Earth Metals with Alkylphosphorus Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUXin; ZHUTun

    2002-01-01

    Solvent extraction equiliria of four main alkaline earth metals (magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium) with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA), 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-(2-ethylhexyl) ester, di(2,4,4-tri-methylpentyl) phosphinic acid and IR spectra of the extracts have been studied. The selectivity order is dependent of the e/r value and hydration energy of the metal ions. The minor shift of the P→O in IR absorption of the alkaline earth metal extracts indicates that the interaction between the metal ions and P→O is much weaker for alkaline earth metals than for transitional metals. The distribution of the four alkaline earth elements between aqueous solutions and solutions of DEHPA and neutral organophosphorus compunds, tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) or tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) in kerosene have been determined at varying ratio of TBP or TOPO to DEHPA and the positive synergism is observed. The synergic effects is explained by using IR spectra of the loaded organic phase.

  8. Controlled charge exchange between alkaline earth metals and their ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, Marko; Côté, Robin

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the prospects of realizing controlled charge exchange via magnetic Feshbach resonances in cold and ultracold collisions of atoms and ions. In particular, we focus on near-resonant charge exchange in heteroisotopic combinations of alkaline earth metals, such as 9Be++10 Be9 Be+10Be+ , which exhibit favorable electronic and hyperfine structure. The quantum scattering calculations are performed for a range of initial states and experimentally attainable magnetic fields in standard coupled-channel Feshbach projection formalism, where higher-order corrections such as the mass-polarization term are explicitely included. In addition, we predict a number of magnetic Feshbach resonances for different heteronuclear isotopic combinations of the listed and related alkaline earth elements. Our results imply that near-resonant charge-exchange could be used to realize atom-ion quantum gates, as well as controlled charge transfer in optically trapped cold quantum gases. This work is partially supported by ARO.

  9. Thermochemical and thermophysical properties of alkaline-earth perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: yamanaka@nucl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kurosaki, Ken [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Takuji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuda, Tetsushi [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Ohaza-Noda 950, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0481 (Japan); Kobayashi, Shin-ichi [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Ohaza-Noda 950, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0481 (Japan); Uno, Masayoshi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2005-09-01

    In order to contribute to safety evaluation of high burnup oxide fuels, we studied the thermochemical and thermophysical properties of alkaline-earth perovskites known as oxide inclusions. Polycrystalline samples of alkaline-earth perovskites, BaUO{sub 3}, BaZrO{sub 3}, BaCeO{sub 3}, BaMoO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, SrZrO{sub 3}, SrCeO{sub 3}, SrMoO{sub 3}, SrHfO{sub 3} and SrRuO{sub 3}, were prepared and the thermal expansion coefficient, melting temperature, elastic moduli, Debye temperature, microhardness, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity were measured. The relationship between some physical properties was studied.

  10. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related...... for the topology of multicomponent melts, before accurate prediction of phase relations within boron-containing glass ceramics can be obtained....

  11. Modeling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related......-empirical optimisation of boron and alkali/alkali earth oxide activities in the liquid oxide solution, significantly improved fits between modelled and experimental results were obtained. Based on these results, it is suggested that more precise descriptions of higher order interactions need to be addressed, to account...

  12. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related......-empirical optimisation of boron and alkali/alkali earth oxide activities in the liquid oxide solution, significantly improved fits between modelled and experimental results were obtained. Based on these results, it is suggested that more precise descriptions of higher order interactions need to be addressed, to account...

  13. Interaction of alkali and alkaline earth ions with Ochratoxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poor, Miklos [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pecs, Pecs H-7624 (Hungary); Kunsagi-Mate, Sandor; Matisz, Gergely; Li, Yin; Czibulya, Zsuzsanna [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pecs, Pecs H-7624 (Hungary); Janos Szentagothai Research Center, Pecs H-7624 (Hungary); Peles-Lemli, Beata [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pecs, Pecs H-7624 (Hungary); Koszegi, Tamas, E-mail: koszegit@freemail.hu [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pecs, Pecs H-7624 (Hungary)

    2013-03-15

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth ions on the chemical equilibrium of mono- and dianionic forms of the mycotoxin Ochratoxin A (OTA) and their bonding onto the surface of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) have been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization techniques. Our results show that alkali metal ions shift the chemical equilibrium towards formation of dianionic form of OTA. Furthermore, the alkaline earth ions can compete with BSA for binding to OTA when these ions are present in millimolar concentrations. Our data also highlight the possibility that the 'free' fraction of OTA (not bound onto the surface of albumin) or at least a part of it is present in cation-bound form in body fluids. These observations are supported by stability constants and quantum-chemical calculations. Among the studied alkaline metal ions magnesium showed the highest affinity towards OTA under physiological conditions. Further research is required to analyze the potential significance of Mg{sup 2+}-OTA complex in cellular uptake and/or elimination of the toxin in the human body. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence spectroscopy reveals cation-Ochratoxin A (OTA) interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkali ions shift the equilibrium of OTA to formation of a dianionic structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline earth ions directly bind to OTA in the order: Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum chemical calculations and logK values support our experimental data.

  14. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  15. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging a rapidly evolving state-of-the-art technical base empowered by Phase I NASA SBIR funding, NanoSonic's polymer derived rare earth silicate EBCs will...

  16. Mantle Origin of Silicic Calc-alkaline Basalts to Andesites in the Central Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, S. M.; Zellmer, G. F.; Gómez-Tuena, A.; Stuart, F.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Cai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Quaternary central Mexican Volcanic Belt, constructed on ~50 km thick continental crust, erupts a broad spectrum of basaltic to dacitic calc-alkaline magmas with the arc-typical high ratios of large-ion lithophile to high-field strength elements. In order to understand their genesis, we investigated high-Mg# olivine-phyric calc-alkaline basalts to andesites from Holocene monogenetic volcanoes Tuxtepec (50.2 wt% SiO2; 9.7 wt% MgO), Yecahuazac (53.1;8.0), Suchiooc Cone (53.2;9.2), Guespalapa (54.4-61.2;5.3-7.9) and Cuatepel (55.6-58.9;5.4-7.5), and as well as one basaltic andesite from composite volcano Popocateptl (56.7;6.9). The high 3He/4He (7.3 ± 0.3 Ra; n=16) of olivine phenocrysts that crystallize at upper crustal levels, and the limited range of Sr-Nd-Hf isotope ratios preclude any significant crustal contamination of these magmas. Moreover, small, but significant differences in Sr-Nd-Hf isotope ratios and the variations of olivine phenocrysts in the Fo-Ni space conclusively rule out that these magmas were related through fractional crystallization. Consequently, the basaltic to andesitic magmas must originate from the sub-arc mantle. Building on the high-Ni content of the olivines that by far exceed Ni abundances of olivines in partial melts of peridotite, we propose that the subarc MVB mantle contains segregations of silica-excess and silica-deficient 'reaction pyroxenites' that formed through infiltration of highly reactive silicic fluids or melts from slab. Upon melting, the pyroxenites produce dacitic and basaltic initial melts, respectively, that mix in variable proportions during ascent through mantle and crust. This genetic model links the silica enrichment of the arc magmas directly to the silica flux from slab, with no requirement for any significant melt silica increase in the overlying crust.

  17. Structural variations in layered alkaline earth metal cyclohexyl phosphonates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramaswamy Murugavel; Nayanmoni Gogoi

    2009-06-01

    Two series of alkaline earth metal cyclohexyl phosphonates, M(C6H11PO3H)2(H2O) (M = Ca, Sr and Ba) (1–3) and M(C6H11PO3)(H2O) (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) (4–7) have been synthesized under mild reaction conditions. All new compounds have been characterized using elemental analysis, IR, TGA and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. The molecular structure of compound 2 determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction technique reveals a layered polymeric structure.

  18. Quantum computing with alkaline-Earth-metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Andrew J; Boyd, Martin M; Ye, Jun; Zoller, Peter

    2008-10-24

    We present a complete scheme for quantum information processing using the unique features of alkaline-earth-metal atoms. We show how two completely independent lattices can be formed for the 1S0 and 3P0 states, with one used as a storage lattice for qubits encoded on the nuclear spin, and the other as a transport lattice to move qubits and perform gate operations. We discuss how the 3P2 level can be used for addressing of individual qubits, and how collisional losses from metastable states can be used to perform gates via a lossy blockade mechanism.

  19. Study on rare earth/alkaline earth oxide-doped CeO2 solid electrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Kai; ZHEN Qiang; Song Xiwen

    2007-01-01

    Five types of rare earth/alkaline earth oxide-doped CeO2 superfine-powders were synthesized by a low-temperature combustion technique. The relevant solid electrolyte materials were also sintered by pressureless sintering at different temperatures. The results of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the grain size of the powders was approximately 20-30 nm, and rare earth/alkaline earth oxides were completely dissolved into ceria-based solid solution with fluorite structure. The electrical conductivities of the Sm2O3-CeO2 system were measured by the ac impedance technique in air at temperatures ranging from 513-900℃. The results indicated that the ionic conductivities of Sm0.20Ce0.8O1.875 solid electrolyte increase with increasing sintering temperature, and the relationship between the conductivities and measuring temperature obeys the Arrhenius equation. Then the Sm2O3-CeO2 material was further doped with other rare earth/alkaline earth oxide, and the conductivities improve with the effective index.

  20. Proposal for Laser Cooling of Alkaline Earth Monoalkoxide Free Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Louis; Kozyryev, Ivan; Matsuda, Kyle; Doyle, John M.

    2016-05-01

    Cold samples of polyatomic molecules will open new avenues in physics, chemistry, and quantum science. Non-diagonal Franck-Condon factors, technically challenging wavelengths, and the lack of strong electronic transitions inhibit direct laser cooling of nonlinear molecules. We identify a scheme for optical cycling in certain molecules with six or more atoms. Replacing hydrogen in alcohols with an alkaline earth metal (M) leads to alkaline earth monoalkoxide free radicals (MOR), which have favorable properties for laser cooling. M-O bond is very ionic, so the metal orbitals are slightly affected by the nature of R on the ligand. Diagonal Franck-Condon factors, laser accessible transitions, and a small hyperfine structure make MOR molecules suitable for laser cooling. We explore a scheme for optical cycling on the A - X transition of SrOCH3 . Molecules lost to dark vibrational states will be repumped on the B - X transition. Extension to larger species is possible through expansion of the R group since transitions involve the promotion of the metal-centered nonbonding valence electron. We will detail our estimations of the Franck-Condon factors, simulations of the cooling process and describe progress towards the Doppler cooling of MOR polyatomics.

  1. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser addressing the 3P1 level. For the 3P1 -->3S1 (688-nm) transition in strontium, the depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  2. Structural diversity of alkaline-earth 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balendra; Ramanan, Arunachalam

    2017-03-01

    Exploration of the structural landscape of the system containing divalent alkaline-earth metal ion (Mg, Ca and Sr) with the rigid 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid (TDC) under varying solvothermal condition (DMF, DMA and DEF) yielded five new crystals: [Mg(TDC) (DEF)2(H2O)1/2] (1), [Ca(TDC) (DMA)] (2), [Ca(TDC) (DMA) (H2O)] (3), [Sr(TDC) (DMA)] (4) and [Sr(TDC) (DMA) (H2O)] (5) and two known solids. Single crystal structures of all the solids are characteristic of extended coordination interaction between metal and carboxylate ions. While the smaller magnesium ion crystallized into a 2D coordination polymer, the larger calcium and strontium compounds resulted into the growth of 3D metal organic frameworks. All the solids show blue emission arising from intra ligand charge transfer.

  3. Many-body Physics with Alkaline-Earth Rydberg lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, R; Nath, R; Jones, M P A; Pohl, T

    2011-01-01

    We explore the prospects for confining alkaline-earth Rydberg atoms in an optical lattice via optical dressing of the secondary core valence electron. Focussing on the particular case of strontium, we identify experimentally accessible magic wavelengths for simultaneous trapping of ground and Rydberg states. A detailed analysis of relevant loss mechanisms shows that the overall lifetime of such a system is limited only by the spontaneous decay of the Rydberg state, and is not significantly affected by photoionization or autoionization. The van der Waals C_6 coefficients for the 5sns series are calculated, and we find that the interactions are attractive. Finally we show that the combination of magic-wavelength lattices and attractive interactions could be exploited to generate many-body Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states.

  4. Electron micrographic study of precipitates formed by interaction of silicic acid and alkaline phosphatase: contribution to a study of silica urolithiasis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, C B; Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1982-12-01

    Association of alkaline phosphatase with silicic acid in precipitates formed in dilute solution was studied as a model for the nonspecific reaction between silicic acid and protein. Precipitates contained 68-83% of the silicic acid and 52-83% of the enzyme in the original mixture and were in the form of aggregates of roundish particles 150-800 nm in diameter. Enzyme protein formed a tightly bound layer on the surface of particles formed in solutions of freshly prepared silicic acid. The similarity between the ultrastructural features of precipitates from solutions of silicic acid and of internal portions of siliceous urinary calculi from cattle suggests that deposition of silica during development of such calculi is due, at least in part, to the interaction of protein with silicic acid in urine.

  5. Zircon saturation in silicate melts: a new and improved model for aluminous and alkaline melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasoni, Fernanda; Klemme, Stephan; Rocha-Júnior, Eduardo R. V.; Berndt, Jasper

    2016-03-01

    The importance of zircon in geochemical and geochronological studies, and its presence not only in aluminous but also in alkaline rocks, prompted us to think about a new zircon saturation model that can be applied in a wide range of compositions. Therefore, we performed zircon crystallization experiments in a range of compositions and at high temperatures, extending the original zircon saturation model proposed by Watson and Harrison (Earth Planet Sci Lett 64:295-304, 1983) and Boehnke et al. (Chem Geol 351:324-334, 2013). We used our new data and the data from previous studies in peraluminous melts, to describe the solubility of zircon in alkaline and aluminous melts. To this effect, we devised a new compositional parameter called G [ {( {3 \\cdot {{Al}}2 {{O}}3 + {{SiO}}2 )/({{Na}}2 {{O}} + {{K}}2 {{O}} + {{CaO}} + {{MgO}} + {{FeO}}} )} ] (molar proportions), which enables to describe the zircon saturation behaviour in a wide range of rock compositions. Furthermore, we propose a new zircon saturation model, which depends basically on temperature and melt composition, given by (with 1σ errors): ln [ {{Zr}} ] = ( {4.29 ± 0.34} ) - ( {1.35 ± 0.10} ) \\cdot ln G + ( {0.0056 ± 0.0002} ) \\cdot T( °C ) where [Zr] is the Zr concentration of the melt in µg/g, G is the new parameter representing melt composition and T is the temperature in degrees Celsius. The advantages of the new model are its straightforward use, with the G parameter being calculated directly from the molar proportions converted from electron microprobe measurements, the temperature calculated given in degrees Celsius and its applicability in a wider range of rocks compositions. Our results confirm the high zircon solubility in peralkaline rocks and its dependence on composition and temperature. Our new model may be applied in all intermediate to felsic melts from peraluminous to peralkaline compositions.

  6. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  7. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  8. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  9. Carbon and sulfur budget of the silicate Earth explained by accretion of differentiated planetary embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei; Monteleone, Brian; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2016-10-01

    The abundances of volatile elements in the Earth's mantle have been attributed to the delivery of volatile-rich material after the main phase of accretion. However, no known meteorites could deliver the volatile elements, such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and sulfur, at the relative abundances observed for the silicate Earth. Alternatively, Earth could have acquired its volatile inventory during accretion and differentiation, but the fate of volatile elements during core formation is known only for a limited set of conditions. Here we present constraints from laboratory experiments on the partitioning of carbon and sulfur between metallic cores and silicate mantles under conditions relevant for rocky planetary bodies. We find that carbon remains more siderophile than sulfur over a range of oxygen fugacities; however, our experiments suggest that in reduced or sulfur-rich bodies, carbon is expelled from the segregating core. Combined with previous constraints, we propose that the ratio of carbon to sulfur in the silicate Earth could have been established by differentiation of a planetary embryo that was then accreted to the proto-Earth. We suggest that the accretion of a Mercury-like (reduced) or a sulfur-rich (oxidized) differentiated body--in which carbon has been preferentially partitioned into the mantle--may explain the Earth's carbon and sulfur budgets.

  10. Alkaline Earth Element Adsorption onto PAA-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a study on the adsorption of calcium (Ca2+ onto polyacrylic acid-functionalized iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles (PAA-MNPs to gain an insight into the adsorption behavior of alkaline earth elements at conditions typical of produced water from hydraulic fracturing. An aqueous co-precipitation method was employed to fabricate iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles, whose surface was first coated with amine and then by PAA. To evaluate the Ca2+ adsorption capacity by PAA-MNPs, the Ca2+ adsorption isotherm was measured in batch as a function of pH and sodium chlorite (electrolyte concentration. A surface complexation model accounting for the coulombic forces in the diffuse double layer was developed to describe the competitive adsorption of protons (H+ and Ca2+ onto the anionic carboxyl ligands of the PAA-MNPs. Measurements show that Ca2+ adsorption is significant above pH 5 and decreases with the electrolyte concentration. Upon adsorption, the nanoparticle suspension destabilizes and creates large clusters, which favor an efficient magnetic separation of the PAA-MNPs, therefore, helping their recovery and recycle. The model agrees well with the experiments and predicts that the maximum adsorption capacity can be achieved within the pH range of the produced water, although that maximum declines with the electrolyte concentration.

  11. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Pollastri, Simone; Gualtieri, Alessandro F. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via S. Eufemia 19I, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  12. A general route to hollow mesoporous rare-earth silicate nanospheres as a catalyst support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Renxi; Yang, Yang; Zou, Yongcun; Liu, Xianchun; Xing, Yan

    2014-02-17

    Hollow mesoporous structures have recently aroused intense research interest owing to their unique structural features. Herein, an effective and precisely controlled synthesis of hollow rare-earth silicate spheres with mesoporous shells is reported for the first time, produced by a simple hydrothermal method, using silica spheres as the silica precursors. The as-prepared hollow rare-earth silicate spheres have large specific surface area, high pore volume, and controllable structure parameters. The results demonstrate that the selection of the chelating reagent plays critical roles in forming the hollow mesoporous structures. In addition, a simple and low-energy-consuming approach to synthesize highly stable and dispersive gold nanoparticle-yttrium silicate (AuNPs/YSiO) hollow nanocomposites has also been developed. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol with AuNPs/YSiO hollow nanocomposites as the catalyst has clearly demonstrated that the hollow rare-earth silicate spheres are good carriers for Au nanoparticles. This strategy can be extended as a general approach to prepare multifunctional yolk-shell structures with diverse compositions and morphologies simply by replacing silica spheres with silica-coated nanocomposites.

  13. Ultrasonic Monitoring of the Interaction between Cement Matrix and Alkaline Silicate Solution in Self-Healing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Ouarabi, Mohand; Antonaci, Paola; Boubenider, Fouad; Gliozzi, Antonio S; Scalerandi, Marco

    2017-01-07

    Alkaline solutions, such as sodium, potassium or lithium silicates, appear to be very promising as healing agents for the development of encapsulated self-healing concretes. However, the evolution of their mechanical and acoustic properties in time has not yet been completely clarified, especially regarding their behavior and related kinetics when they are used in the form of a thin layer in contact with a hardened cement matrix. This study aims to monitor, using linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods, the evolution of a sodium silicate solution interacting with a cement matrix in the presence of localized cracks. The ultrasonic inspection via linear methods revealed that an almost complete recovery of the elastic and acoustic properties occurred within a few days of healing. The nonlinear ultrasonic measurements contributed to provide further insight into the kinetics of the recovery due to the presence of the healing agent. A good regain of mechanical performance was ascertained through flexural tests at the end of the healing process, confirming the suitability of sodium silicate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious systems.

  14. Ultrasonic Monitoring of the Interaction between Cement Matrix and Alkaline Silicate Solution in Self-Healing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohand Ait Ouarabi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline solutions, such as sodium, potassium or lithium silicates, appear to be very promising as healing agents for the development of encapsulated self-healing concretes. However, the evolution of their mechanical and acoustic properties in time has not yet been completely clarified, especially regarding their behavior and related kinetics when they are used in the form of a thin layer in contact with a hardened cement matrix. This study aims to monitor, using linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods, the evolution of a sodium silicate solution interacting with a cement matrix in the presence of localized cracks. The ultrasonic inspection via linear methods revealed that an almost complete recovery of the elastic and acoustic properties occurred within a few days of healing. The nonlinear ultrasonic measurements contributed to provide further insight into the kinetics of the recovery due to the presence of the healing agent. A good regain of mechanical performance was ascertained through flexural tests at the end of the healing process, confirming the suitability of sodium silicate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious systems.

  15. IGCC sulfur compounds abatement with earth alkaline sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramon Alvarez-Rodriguez; Carmen Clemente-Jul [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros de Minas

    2007-07-01

    In Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process, in the reference plant built in Puertollano, Spain by Elcogas, a consortium formed by several utilities and engineering companies with a technology that is one of the most promising electricity generation options, both from the environmental and the efficiency point of view and that allows an efficient and environmentally friendly use of national coal, and also a refinery residue, petroleum coke, the high sulphur contents in coal and specially in petcoke, their presence in the feedstock, led to significant contents of gaseous sulphur compounds whose advanced removal has been the aim of this project. Different sorbents to reduce the presence of H{sub 2}S have been researched and between them the earth alkaline compounds, dolomite and calcite that react with H{sub 2}S to give calcium sulphide have been chosen due to their properties and low cost. The calcium sulphide is a reactive product because it reacts with water to regenerate the H{sub 2}S but it can be converted in calcium sulphate, inert product with diverse uses. This conversion to sulphate present some problems of possible lack of total conversion and different conditions to improve this conversion have been investigated. The tests have been carried out with dolomite and calcite and firstly the sulphuration of the same have been produced using a mixture of gases that simulates the IGCC gas and after their oxidation has been studied. The influence of the conditions of sulfurization and oxidation on the final conversion of calcium sulphide to sulphate as the presence of H{sub 2}O vapour, the variation in the composition of the gases, the temperature and the bed length have been evaluated. The solid products obtained have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy and chemical analysis to assess the evolution and progress of the reactions. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The MCVD synthesis and characterization of water tolerant fiber optic waveguides based on alkaline earth-doped silicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Kevin F.

    Optical fibers that transmit throughout the entire telecommunications spectrum (1.2--1.7 mum) are presently manufactured by the removal of hydrogen or OH from the host preform glass. Hydrogen-oxygen torches are utilized in the conventional preform manufacturing process, but result in the formation of hydroxyls in germanium-doped silica fiber. The hydroxyl species generate unacceptably high losses for long haul telecommunications systems. This thesis has explored an alternative strategy for reducing OH-related absorption in silica-based glasses. Alkaline earth modifiers have been introduced via the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process to successfully damp out and dramatically reduce the extrinsic attenuation associated with both water and hydrogen. Specifically, alkaline earth ions were introduced into alumino-silicate glasses to form MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, CaO-Al 2O3-SiO2, and SrO-Al2O3-SiO 2 compositions. The utilization of halide precursors based on the vapor delivery of rare earths was incorporated into the existing MCVD set-up to fabricate these optical preforms. Both the bulk preforms and fibers drawn from them were characterized to determine relevant optical properties, including the attenuation, index profiles and extinction coefficients arising from OH in each host. The data indicate that modification of the silica glass structure through the additions of modifying ions can significantly reduce OH related absorption. For example, the doping of alkaline earth ions decreased the extinction coefficient measured at the 1.39 mum) OH overtone, to values reinforced by a series of experiments documenting their resistance to hydrogen induced losses.

  17. THE TRANSFER OF ALKALINE EARTH-METAL ION AT W/NB INTERFACE FACILITATED BY JOSAMYCIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范瑞溪; 狄俊伟

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the invesligation of the transfer behaviour of the alkaline earth-metal cations across the water/nitrobenzene interface facilitated by josamycin in the nitrobenzene phase using semi-differential cyclic voltammetry .The peak height is directly proportional to the concentration of josaycin (nb) and to the potential scan rate.The complexes formed from alkaline earth-metal ions and josamycin at the w/nb interface are ML22+ ion.

  18. Making Earth's earliest continental crust - an analogue from voluminous Neogene silicic volcanism in NE-Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Sylvia E.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Riishuus, Morten S.; Deegan, Frances M.; Harris, Chris; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2014-05-01

    Borgarfjörður Eystri in NE-Iceland represents the second-most voluminous exposure of silicic eruptive rocks in Iceland and is a superb example of bimodal volcanism (Bunsen-Daly gap), which represents a long-standing controversy that touches on the problem of crustal growth in early Earth. The silicic rocks in NE-Iceland approach 25 % of the exposed rock mass in the region (Gústafsson et al., 1989), thus they significantly exceed the usual ≤ 12 % in Iceland as a whole (e.g. Walker, 1966; Jonasson, 2007). The origin, significance, and duration of the voluminous (> 300 km3) and dominantly explosive silicic activity in Borgarfjörður Eystri is not yet constrained (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992), leaving us unclear as to what causes silicic volcanism in otherwise basaltic provinces. Here we report SIMS zircon U-Pb ages and δ18O values from the region, which record the commencement of silicic igneous activity with rhyolite lavas at 13.5 to 12.8 Ma, closely followed by large caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions from the Breiðavik and Dyrfjöll central volcanoes (12.4 Ma). Silicic activity ended abruptly with dacite lava at 12.1 Ma, defining a ≤ 1 Myr long window of silicic volcanism. Magma δ18O values estimated from zircon range from 3.1 to 5.5 (± 0.3; n = 170) and indicate up to 45 % assimilation of a low-δ18O component (e.g. typically δ18O = 0 ‰, Bindeman et al., 2012). A Neogene rift relocation (Martin et al., 2011) or the birth of an off-rift zone to the east of the mature rift associated with a thermal/chemical pulse in the Iceland plume (Óskarsson & Riishuus, 2013), likely brought mantle-derived magma into contact with fertile hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. The resulting interaction triggered large-scale crustal melting and generated mixed-origin silicic melts. Such rapid formation of silicic magmas from sustained basaltic volcanism may serve as an analogue for generating continental crust in a subduction-free early Earth (e.g. ≥ 3 Ga, Kamber et

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese-doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sreehari Sastry; B Rupa Venkateswara Rao

    2015-04-01

    Alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses doped with Mn(II) are characterized by spectroscopic techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman. Optical absorption spectrum exhibits four bands which are characteristic of Mn(II) in distorted octahedral site symmetry. The crystal field parameter Dq and Racah interelectronic-repulsion parameters and have been evaluated. All investigated samples exhibit EPR signals which are characteristic to the Mn2+ ions. The shapes of spectra are also changed with varying alkaline earth ions content. FTIR spectra show specific vibrations of phosphate units. The characteristic Raman bands of these glasses due to stretching and bending vibrations were identified and analysed by varying alkaline earth content. The intensity and frequency variations for the characteristic phosphate group vibrations have been correlated with the changes of the structural units present in these glasses. Depolymerization of the phosphate chains in all the glasses is observed with replacement of alkaline earth content by spectroscopic studies. This leads to a strong decrease of the average chain length and a small decrease of the average P–O–P bridging angle with replacement of alkaline earth content.

  20. Dynamics of dipolar defects in rare earth-doped alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, Forrest Taylor

    Alkaline-earth fluoride crystals such as SrF2 provide an excellent sample material for investigating the physics of point defects in crystal lattices. High quality crystals are easily grown, and they readily accept many dopant ions into the lattice, particularly rare earth ions. Rare earth dopant ions (typically trivalent) occupy substitutional sites in the lattice by replacing a Sr2+ ion. Due to the extra charge of the rare earth ion, charge compensation is often provided by an extra fluoride ion (F--) located in a nearby interstitial position. If located in the nearest-neighbor (nn) interstitial position, it forms a defect with C4n symmetry; if located in the next-nearest-neighbor (nnn) intersitial position, it forms a defect with C3n symmetry. Given sufficient thermal energy, this interstitial F ion can move to adjacent interstitial sites and hence reorient the defect. The rate w at which the ion moves from one interstitial site to another is well described by a simple Arrhenius expression: w=n0e-E/kT , where n0 is the attack frequency of the F-- and E is the activation energy. This motion can profoundly affect both the electronic polarizability of the material and the polarization of light emitted or absorbed by the rare earth ion. This thesis describes the normal mode motion of interstitial ions which may occupy either nn or nnn interstitial sites. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), I observed the relative populations of nn and nnn defects in SrF2 doped with Gd3+ as a function of temperature. These measurements show that dipolar reorientation of the nnn F occurs through the nn interstitial position. Not all interstitial F-- motion is thermally driven. Fluorescence depolarization measurements of SrF2:Pr3+ indicate that optically stimulating a Pr3+ may induce interstitial motion of a nn F--. Such motion was confirmed by showing that nn defects in SrF2:Pr3+ may be polarized at very low temperatures when the sample is illuminated with resonant light. I

  1. Extent of metal-silicate disequilibrium during accretion and early differentiation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, D. C.; Nimmo, F.; Morbidelli, A.; Frost, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, Mars, Venus and Mercury accreted on a timescale of 10-100 My through a series of violent collisions with planetesimals and embryos. The high energy of such impacts was sufficient to cause deep magma ocean formation which facilitated the segregation of metal and silicate liquids. Planetary cores thus formed as a multistage process that was inseparable from the accretion process. In order to better understand the formation and early differentiation of the terrestrial planets, we are integrating a multistage core-formation model with N-body accretion simulations. Constraints on model parameters are the compositions of the Earth's primitive mantle and, to a lesser extent, the mantles of Mars and Mercury which may be FeO rich and FeO-poor respectively. We use a least-squares minimization to optimise 4 model parameters. Elements currently considered include Si, O, Ni, Co, W, Nb, Cr, Ta and V. We concentrate on recent N-body simulations that result in an approximately Earth-mass planet at ~1 AU. In order to satisfy the model constraints, accretion has to be heterogeneous, with embryos and planetesimals originating in the inner part of the solar system (e.g. emulsify and equilibrate in a magma ocean and (2) the fraction of magma oceans that are involved in the equilibration process for both impacting planetesimals and embryos. Both estimates are crucial for interpreting Hf-W age determinations. Best results are obtained when the fraction of silicate mantle/magma ocean that interacts chemically with the metallic cores of impactors is limited and lies in the range 0.003 to 0.1, depending on the size of the impactor and magma ocean depth. The degree of incomplete metal equilibration depends on the extent to which the impactor's mantle participates in the metal-silicate equilibration process.

  2. Metal-silicate Partitioning and Its Role in Core Formation and Composition on Super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Laura; Jacobsen, Stein B.; Remo, John L.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2017-02-01

    We use a thermodynamic framework for silicate-metal partitioning to determine the possible compositions of metallic cores on super-Earths. We compare results using literature values of the partition coefficients of Si and Ni, as well as new partition coefficients calculated using results from laser shock-induced melting of powdered metal-dunite targets at pressures up to 276 GPa, which approaches those found within the deep mantles of super-Earths. We find that larger planets may have little to no light elements in their cores because the Si partition coefficient decreases at high pressures. The planet mass at which this occurs will depend on the metal-silicate equilibration depth. We also extrapolate the equations of state (EOS) of FeO and FeSi alloys to high pressures, and present mass–radius diagrams using self-consistent planet compositions assuming equilibrated mantles and cores. We confirm the results of previous studies that the distribution of elements between mantle and core will not be detectable from mass and radius measurements alone. While observations may be insensitive to interior structure, further modeling is sensitive to compositionally dependent properties, such as mantle viscosity and core freeze-out properties. We therefore emphasize the need for additional high pressure measurements of partitioning as well as EOSs, and highlight the utility of the Sandia Z-facilities for this type of work.

  3. Heterogeneous Earth Accretion and Incomplete Metal-Silicate Reequilibration at High Pressure During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, D. C.; Mann, U.; Frost, D. J.; Kegler, P.; Holzheid, A.; Palme, H.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new model of core formation, based on the partitioning of siderophile elements, that involves accreting the Earth through a series of collisions with smaller bodies that had already differentiated at low pressure. Each impact results in a magma ocean in which the core of the impactor reequilibrates with silicate liquid at high pressure before merging with the Earth's protocore. The oxygen contents of the chondritic compositions of the proto-Earth and impactors can be varied. The compositions of coexisting metal and silicate are determined through mass balance combined with partitioning equations for Ni, FeO, Si and other siderophile elements. The oxygen fugacity is fixed by the partitioning of FeO and is a function of P, T and bulk oxygen content. An important constraint for core formation is that core-mantle partition coefficients for Ni and Co must both converge to values of 23-28. Based on a recent study of the partitioning of Ni and Co over a wide P-T range (Kegler et al., EPSL, submitted) together with other published data, this constraint is not satisfied by a single- stage core formation model at any conditions because the partition coefficients converge at values that are much too low. In the present multi-stage model, the correct values can be reached if only part of each impactor core reequilibrates with silicate liquid in the magma ocean (as proposed by previous models based on Hf-W isotope studies). Physically, this would mean that impactor cores fail to emulsify completely as they sink through the magma ocean. Incorporating other elements (e.g. V and Cr) in the model requires, in addition, that the bulk composition of the impactors changes during accretion from reduced (FeO-poor) to oxidised FeO-rich). Then, with the resulting increase in fO2, incomplete reequilibration of the cores during the final 20-30% of Earth accretion is required to satisfy the Ni-Co constraint. In addition, this model enables the concentrations of O and Si in the

  4. effects of mixed of mixed of mixed alkaline earth oxides in potash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of mixed alkaline earth oxide. The aim of this ... been studied. As for the method used, raw materials were collected, batch calculations were made, and the batches ... This research work therefore ...

  5. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  6. Conformation Switching in Gas-Phase Complexes of Histidine with Alkaline Earth Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R. C.; Hopkinson, A. C.; Oomens, J.; Siu, C. K.; Siu, K. W. M.; Steill, J. D.; Verkerk, U. H.; Zhao, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of gas-phase doubly charged alkaline earth complexes of histidine reveals a transition from dominance of the zwitterion (salt bridge, SB) conformation with Ba2+ to substantial presence of the canonical (charge-solvated, CS) conformation with Ca2+. T

  7. Propane selective oxidation on alkaline earth exchanged zeolite Y: room temperature in situ IR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jiang; Mojet, Barbara L.; Ommen, van Jan G.; Lefferts, Leon

    2003-01-01

    The effect of zeolite Y ion-exchanged with a series of alkaline-earth cations on selective propane oxidation at room temperature was studied with in situ infrared spectroscopy. Isopropylhydroperoxide was observed as a reaction intermediate and can be decomposed into acetone and water. Contrary to pr

  8. FORMATION (DECOMPOSITION) ENTHALPY CALCULATIONS FOR CRYSTAL LATTICES OF ALKALINE-EARTH FLUORIDES

    OpenAIRE

    Gruba, O.; Germanyuk, N.; Ryabukhin, A.

    2015-01-01

    A series of calculations of structural and thermochemical properties has been carried out for the alkaline-earth fluorides. The calculations have been carried out using the modified model of effective ionic radii and the model of enthalpy calculation for the crystal lattice. The results of the calculations are in accordance with the known experimental data within confidence intervals.

  9. Desorption of acetone from alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolite after propane selective oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jiang; Mojet, B.L.; Ommen, van J.G.; Lefferts, L.

    2004-01-01

    The desorption of products from a series of alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolites after room-temperature propane selective oxidation was investigated by in situ infrared and mass spectroscopy. The intermediate product, isopropylhydroperoxide (IHP), did not desorb during temperature-programmed-desorpti

  10. Doping of graphite by an alkaline-earth metal to reduce the work function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baturin, AS; Nikolski, KN; Knyazev, AI; Tchesov, RG; Sheshin, EP

    2004-01-01

    A technique for reducing the work function of a field-emission graphite cathode by doping it by an alkaline-earth metal (barium) is suggested. A model of formation of a barium monolayer on the cathode surface is proposed. Field-emission tests show that the operating voltage of the doped cathode is l

  11. Calculated Structural Phase-Transitions in the Alkaline-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    The local-density approximation and the linear muffin-tin orbital method have been used within the atomic-sphere approximation to calculate structural energy differences for all the alkaline earth metals at zero temperature. At ordinary pressure the calculations predict the crystal structure...

  12. Temperature, Salinity, Oxygen, Phosphate, Silicate, Nitrite, pH and Alkalinity data collected in the Black Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea and Western Basin from R/Vs GORIZONT and OKEANOGRAF, 1960 - 1969 (NODC Accession 0074609)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, Salinity, Oxygen, Phosphate, Silicate, Nitrite, pH and Alkalinity data collected in the Black Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea and Western Basin of the Mediterranean...

  13. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, silicate, nitrite, alkalinity, and pH data collected by multiple former Soviet Union institutions from Okhotsk Sea from 1981-09-23 to 1988-06-17 (NODC Accession 0081217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, silicate, nitrite, alkalinity, and pH data collected by multiple former Soviet Union institutions from Okhotsk...

  14. Les silicates alcalins, matière de base des mousses minérales isolantes. Etude bibliographique Alkaline Silicates, As a Basic Material for Insulating Mineral Foams. Bibliographie Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesage J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cette étude bibliographique, on décrit les méthodes d'obtention des silicates alcalins ainsi que leurs propriétés et les propriétés de leurs polymères en insistant sur l'influence du pH, de la concentration et de la température sur la polymérisation et les caractéristiques des polymères obtenus. On présente ensuite le mode d'obtention des mousses à partir de solutions aqueuses de silicates, ainsi que leurs propriétés et l'influence de divers additifs tels que les agents tensioactifs, moussants, gélifiants ou les agents de durcissement sur les propriétés des mousses. II ressort de cette bibliographie que des mousses polysilicates solubles peuvent être obtenues à partir de solutions de silicates à faible rapport molaire SiO2/Na2O. Par ailleurs, en faisant varier la composition des solutions de silicates alcalins et par l'emploi d'additifs, il est possible de produire une gamme très variée de mousses polysilicates dont les propriétés d'isolation, de solubilité et de résistance mécanique, voire de perméabilité, sont très variées, ce qui leur ouvre la voie à de nombreuses possibilités de débouchés industriels. This article gives a bibliographic description of methods for obtaining alkaline silicates as well as their properties and the properties of their polymers. Emphasis is placed on the influence of the pH, and on the influence of the concentration and temperature on the polymerization and the characteristics of the polymers obtained. Then a method is recommended for obtaining foams from aqueous silicate solutions together with the properties of such foams and the influence of different additives such as surfactants, foaming agents, gelling agents and hardening agents on the properties of foams. This bibliographic study shows that soluble polysilicate foams may be obtained from silicate solutions with a low SiO2/Na2O molar ratio. Furthermore, by varying the composition of alkaline silicate solutions and by

  15. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits–A deposit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements are not as rare in nature as their name implies, but economic deposits with these elements are not common and few deposits have been large producers. In the past 25 years, demand for rare earth elements has increased dramatically because of their wide and diverse use in high-technology applications. Yet, presently the global production and supply of rare earth elements come from only a few sources. China produces more than 95 percent of the world's supply of rare earth elements. Because of China's decision to restrict exports of these elements, the price of rare earth elements has increased and industrial countries are concerned about supply shortages. As a result, understanding the distribution and origin of rare earth elements deposits, and identifying and quantifying our nation's rare earth elements resources have become priorities. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusive complexes, as well as their weathering products, are the primary sources of rare earth elements. The general mineral deposit model summarized here is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related REE deposits are discussed together because of their spatial association, common enrichment in incompatible elements, and similarities in genesis. A wide variety of commodities have been exploited from carbonatites and alkaline igneous rocks, such as rare earth elements, niobium, phosphate, titanium, vermiculite, barite, fluorite, copper, calcite, and zirconium. Other enrichments include manganese, strontium, tantalum, thorium, vanadium, and uranium.

  16. Major Pb Loss in the Silicate Earth at ~ 4.52 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, J. D.; Albarede, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Thorpe, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of galenas from volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits have been used widely in the past to track terrestrial Pb evolution for several important reasons. First, the galenas in the VMS ores have U/Pb=0, which lock in their Pb isotopic compsitions at the time of their formation. Second, the syngenetic nature of the VMS ores means that the galenas likely average the Pb isotopic composition of the host volcanic rocks. Third, many VMS deposits are hosted by juvenile mantle-derived rocks with little or no interaction with older evolved crust. In this study we focused on the VMS deposits in the Abitibi and Wawa greenstone belts (Subprovinces) in the Superior Province of Canada. All deposits are late Archean in age (~2.7 Ga) and are hosted by juvenile, mantle-derived volcanic rocks, as evidenced by both their Nd and Hf isotopic compositions. We analyzed the Pb isotopic compositions of galenas from 8 VMS districts in the Abitibi and Wawa greenstone belts. Each individual VMS district has a narrow range of Pb isotopic compositions but collectively the deposits define a coherent array with the least radiogenic compositions at Matagami (207Pb/204Pb = 14.32 and 206Pb/204Pb = 13.11) and the most radiogenic compositions at Noranda (207Pb/204Pb = 14.49 and 206Pb/204Pb = 13.31), both in the Abitibi greenstone belt. These districts differ in age by nearly 30 m.y. from 2.73 Ga to 2.70 Ga. When these compositions are normalized to a common age of 2.70 Ga, they define a highly linear array in 207Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/204Pb. Using single stage Pb evolution beginning at 4.56 the VMS array at 2.7 Ga lies to the right of the Geochron and aligns with the 2.62 Ga Geochron in future Pb space. This assumes, however, that Earth’s major U/Pb fractionation occurs at 4.56 Ga and that silicate Earth Pb evolves with a high μ throughout its history. A more likely scenario is that Pb began with a very low μ in the solar nebula, increased moderately due to volatile

  17. Mineralogy and trace element chemistry of the Siliceous Earth of Barmer basin, Rajasthan: Evidence for a volcanic origin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Sisodia; U K Singh; G Lashkari; P N Shukla; A D Shukla; N Bhandari

    2005-04-01

    We report the presence of a 3-5 cm thick loose fragmental layer in the Siliceous Earth at Matti ka Gol in the Barmer basin of Rajasthan. Petrographic, chemical and mineralogical study reveals the presence of abundant volcanic debris such as glass shards, agglutinates, hollow spheroids, kinked biotites, feldspars showing oscillatory zoning, olivines, ilmenite and native iron. The presence of similar particles in the whole section suggests that the Siliceous Earth is a volcanic ash. Stratigraphic correlation, palynological and microvertebrate data suggest that the Siliceous Earth may have deposited over a short span of time during the Upper Cretaceous to Lower Palaeocene. In view of the possibility that this section may contain K/T impact debris, we looked for grains having impact signatures. Some patches of the Siliceous Earth of Bariyara show the presence of Ni-rich (< 0.5%) vesicular glasses, sanidine spherules, magnesioferrite crystals, soot, etc., but because of their low abundance, it is not possible to establish if they are volcanic, micrometeorite ablation products or a part of the K/T impact ejecta.

  18. Molecular dynamics of liquid alkaline-earth metals near the melting point

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Baria; A R Jani

    2010-10-01

    Results of the studies of the properties like binding energy, the pair distribution function (), the structure factor (), specific heat at constant volume, velocity autocorrelation function (VACF), radial distribution function, self-diffusion coefficient and coordination number of alkaline-earth metals (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) near melting point using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique using a pseudopotential proposed by us are presented in this article. Good agreement with the experiment is achieved for the binding energy, pair distribution function and structure factor, and these results compare favourably with the results obtained by other such calculations, showing the transferability of the pseudopotential used from solid to liquid environment in the case of alkaline-earth metals.

  19. Solvation structures and dynamics of alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Mandal, Ratnamala; Tembe, B. L.

    2016-09-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations of alkaline earth metal halides have been carried out to investigate their structural and dynamical properties in supercritical water. Potentials of mean force (PMFs) for all the alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water have been computed. Contact ion pairs (CIPs) are found to be more stable than all other configurations of the ion pairs except for MgI2 where solvent shared ion pair (SShIP) is more stable than the CIP. There is hardly any difference in the PMFs between the M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and the X- (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ions whether the second X- ion is present in the first coordination shell of the M2+ ion or not. The solvent molecules in the solvation shells diffuse at a much slower rate compared to the bulk. Orientational distribution functions of solvent molecules are sharper for smaller ions.

  20. Long-range interactions between the alkali-metal atoms and alkaline earth ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of interaction potentials among the alkali atoms and alkaline earth ions is very useful in the studies of cold atom physics. Here we carry out theoretical studies of the long-range interactions among the Li, Na, K, and Rb alkali atoms with the Ca$^+$, Ba$^+$, Sr$^+$, and Ra$^+$ alkaline earth ions systematically which are largely motivated by their importance in a number of applications. These interactions are expressed as a power series in the inverse of the internuclear separation $R$. Both the dispersion and induction components of these interactions are determined accurately from the algebraic coefficients corresponding to each power combination in the series. Ultimately, these coefficients are expressed in terms of the electric multipole polarizabilities of the above mentioned systems which are calculated using the matrix elements obtained from a relativistic coupled-cluster method and core contributions to these quantities from the random phase approximation. We also compare our estim...

  1. Environmental effects on fatigue of alkaline earth aluminosilicate glass with varying fictive temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Striepe, Simon; Deubener, Joachim; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup;

    2013-01-01

    The influence of relative humidity on microhardness, stress intensity, crack resistance, and sub-critical crack growth of an alkaline earth aluminosilicate glass has been studied by Vickers indentation. Quenched and annealed glasses with a wide range of fictive temperatures (ΔTf ≈ 130 K) are comp......The influence of relative humidity on microhardness, stress intensity, crack resistance, and sub-critical crack growth of an alkaline earth aluminosilicate glass has been studied by Vickers indentation. Quenched and annealed glasses with a wide range of fictive temperatures (ΔTf ≈ 130 K......) are compared in order to determine the influence of the thermal history on these properties. Vickers hardness is found to be essentially unaffected by the environmental conditions, while the stress intensity factor (fracture toughness) and the crack resistance decrease significantly with increasing humidity...

  2. Helical ternary complexes of alkaline earth picrates with open-chain crown ether

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟生; 温永红; 刘雪原; 谭民裕

    2003-01-01

    Four solid complexes of alkaline earth picrates with N,N,N′,N′-tetraphenyl-3,6,9-tri- oxaundecanediamide (TTD), M (Pic)2TTD (1, M = Mg; 2, M = Ca; 3, M = Sr; 4, M = Ba), have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity measurement, IR spectra, 1H NMR spectra and TG-DTA techniques. Crystal structure of complex 3 shows that the Sr(Ⅱ) ion is 9-coordinated by five oxygen atoms from TTD and four oxygen atoms from two bidentate picrates, and the coordination polyhedron is distorted tricapped trigonal prism. TTD as a pentadentate ligand forms a right-handed helical coordination structure. The chelating helical chain has a relative fixed radius and then shows a high coordination selectivity to metal ion. The high selectivity of TTD to alkaline earth ions is explained elementarily from the special coordination structures.

  3. Properties of the triplet metastable states of the alkaline-earth atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Mitroy, J

    2004-01-01

    The static and dynamic properties of the alkaline-earth atoms in their metastable state are computed in a configuration interaction approach with a semi-empirical model potential for the core. Among the properties determined are the scalar and tensor polarizabilities, the quadrupole moment, some of the oscillator strengths and the dispersion coefficients of the van der Waals interaction. A simple method for including the effect of the core on the dispersion parameters is described.

  4. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Qiang, E-mail: dong@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro [Department of Research Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Miyamae cho-7, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  5. Spectroscopic studies of copper doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, S. Sreehari; Rao, B. Rupa Venkateswara

    2014-02-01

    In this paper spectroscopic investigation of Cu2+ doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses was done through the spectroscopic techniques like X-ray diffraction, Ultra Violet (UV) absorption Spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR - X band), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy. Alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses containing 0.1% copper oxide (CuO) were prepared by the melt quenching technique. Spectroscopic studies indicated that there is a greater possibility for the copper ions to exist in Cu2+ state in these glasses. The optical absorption spectra indicated that the absorption peak of Cu2+ is a function of composition. The maxima absorption peak was reported at 862 nm for strontium lead zinc phosphate glass. Bonding parameters were calculated for the optical and EPR data. All these spectral results indicated clearly that there are certain structural changes in the present glass system with different alkaline earth contents. The IR and Raman spectra noticed the breaking of the P-O-P bonds and creating more number of new P-O-Cu bonds.

  6. Spectroscopic studies of copper doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, S. Sreehari, E-mail: sreeharisastry@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjunanagar 522510 (India); Rao, B. Rupa Venkateswara [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjunanagar 522510 (India); Department of Physics, V.R. Siddhartha Engineering College, Vijayawada 52007 (India)

    2014-02-01

    In this paper spectroscopic investigation of Cu{sup 2+} doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses was done through the spectroscopic techniques like X-ray diffraction, Ultra Violet (UV) absorption Spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR – X band), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy. Alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses containing 0.1% copper oxide (CuO) were prepared by the melt quenching technique. Spectroscopic studies indicated that there is a greater possibility for the copper ions to exist in Cu{sup 2+} state in these glasses. The optical absorption spectra indicated that the absorption peak of Cu{sup 2+} is a function of composition. The maxima absorption peak was reported at 862 nm for strontium lead zinc phosphate glass. Bonding parameters were calculated for the optical and EPR data. All these spectral results indicated clearly that there are certain structural changes in the present glass system with different alkaline earth contents. The IR and Raman spectra noticed the breaking of the P–O–P bonds and creating more number of new P–O–Cu bonds.

  7. Ion Probe Study of Silicate Inclusions from Colomera (IIE) Iron Meteorite:the Rare Earth Element Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSU Weibiao

    2004-01-01

    Coupled with a petrographical study, I carried out an ion probe study of rare earth element microdistributions in mineral phases of silicate inclusions from the Colomera IIE iron meteorite. Most mineral grains have homogeneous REEs, but show considerable inter-grain variations by a factor of 2 to 100. The whole rock REE abundances for Colomera,estimated by combining REE data with modal abundances, are relatively LREE-enriched with REEs of ~10'CI, which suggest that Colomera silicates were highly differentiated and might represent a low degree partial melt (~10%) of a chondritic source. REE geochemistry of Colomera silicate inclusions points to an origin that involves differentiation,dynamic mixing, remelting, reduction, recrystallization, and subsequent rapid cooling near the surface of a planetary body.

  8. Effects of alkaline earth metal ion complexation on amino acid zwitterion stability: Results from infrared action spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, M. F.; Oomens, J.; Saykally, R. J.; Williams, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The structures of isolated alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and theory. These results indicate that arginine, glutamine, proline, serine, and valine all adopt zwitterionic structures when complexed with diva

  9. Distribution of Sb, As, Ge, and In between metal and silicate during accretion and core formation in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Nickodem, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.; Boujibar, A.; Righter, M.; Lapen, T. J.

    2017-02-01

    A large number of siderophile (iron-loving) elements are also volatile, thus offering constraints on the origin of volatile elements in differentiated bodies such as Earth, Moon, Mars and Vesta. Metal-silicate partitioning data for many of these elements is lacking, making their overall mantle concentrations in these bodies difficult to model and origin difficult to distinguish between core formation and volatile depletion. To address this gap in understanding, we have undertaken systematic studies of four volatile siderophile elements - Sb, As, Ge and In - at variable temperature and variable Si content of metal. Several series were carried out at 1 GPa, and between 1500 and 1900 °C, for both C saturated and C-free conditions. The results show that temperature causes a decrease in the metal/silicate partition coefficient for all four elements. In addition, activity coefficients for each element have been determined and show a very strong dependence on Si content of Fe alloy. Si dissolved in metal significantly decreases the metal/silicate partition coefficients, at both 1600 and 1800 °C. The combination of temperature and Si content of the metal causes reduction of the metal-silicate partition coefficient to values that are close to those required for an origin of mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations by metal-silicate equilibrium processes. Combining these new results with previous studies on As, Sb, Ge, and In, allowed derivation of predictive expressions for metal/silicate partition coefficients for these elements which can then be applied to Earth. The expressions are applied to two scenarios for continuous accretion of Earth; specifically for constant and increasing fO2 during accretion. The results indicate that mantle concentrations of As, Sb, Ge, and In can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium during an accretion scenario. The modeling is not especially sensitive to either scenario, although all element concentrations are explained better by a

  10. Effects of Rare Earth and Alkaline Earth on Spheroidizing of Eutectic Carbides in Low Tungsten White Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Hanguang; Zou Dening

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten Alloy White Cast Iron(TAWCI) has great brittleness and narrow application scope. The influences of Rare earth element(Ce) and alkaline earth elements ( K, Na) on the microstructures and performances of TAWCI were researched, and the idea estimating spheroidizing effect of carbides using Circular Degree (C. D) were put forward. The result shows that eutectics carbide tums into sphericity from network after modification, and carbide is refined and uniformly distributed and the C. D of eutectic carbide increases. The mechanism of carbide spheroidizing was analyzed. The impact toughness and wear resistance of TAWCI obviously improve with the rise of C. D of carbides.The service life of modified TAWCI roll is 35 % higher than that of high chromium cast iron roll, and its production cost is reduced by 25 %.

  11. Elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation of Zn between metal and silicate and geochemical estimation of the S content of the Earth's core

    CERN Document Server

    Mahan, B; Pringle, E A; Moynier, F

    2016-01-01

    Zinc metal-silicate fractionation provides experimental access to the conditions of core formation and Zn has been used to estimate the S contents of the Earth's core and of the bulk Earth, assuming that they share similar volatility and that Zn was not partitioned into the Earth's core. We have conducted a suite of partitioning experiments to characterize Zn metal-silicate elemental and isotopic fractionation as a function of time, temperature, and composition. Experiments were conducted at temperatures from 1473-2273K, with run durations from 5-240 minutes for four starting materials. Chemical and isotopic equilibrium is achieved within 10 minutes. Zinc metal-silicate isotopic fractionation displays no resolvable dependence on temperature, composition, or oxygen fugacity. Thus, the Zn isotopic composition of silicate phases can be used as a proxy for bulk telluric bodies. Results from this study and literature data were used to parameterize Zn metal-silicate partitioning as a function of temperature, pressu...

  12. Creation of trapped electrons and holes in alkaline-earth fluoride crystals doped by rare-earth ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzhabov, E.

    2002-06-01

    Defects in Ce 3+- and Eu 2+-doped alkaline-earth fluorides, created by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons with energy lower than that of the band gap, were investigated by various methods: thermostimulated luminescence, photostimulated luminescence and optical absorption. The CaF 2:Eu 2+ thermoluminescence curves in the range of 60-330 K due to various types of trapped holes were the same after VUV illumination as after X-ray irradiation. Thermoluminescence curves of Ce 3+-doped alkaline-earth fluorides created by VUV illumination or X-ray irradiation were generally similar. However, Vk thermoluminescence peaks were absent in VUV-illuminated CaF 2:Ce 3+ and SrF 2:Ce 3+ crystals. Creation of Ce 2+ characteristic bands was observed in photostimulated luminescence spectra as well as in optical absorption spectra of vacuum ultraviolet-illuminated or X-ray-irradiated Ce 3+-doped crystals. The proposed mechanism of creation of trapped hole and trapped electron defects by vacuum ultraviolet illumination involves charge transfer-type transitions, in which the electron transfers from valence band to an impurity level, lying in the band gap. Comparison of all involved energies of transitions in the crystals investigated shows that the sum of all transition energies is less than that of the band gap by 1-3 eV. This energy difference can be considered as the energy of lattice relaxation around created Ce 2+ or Eu + ions.

  13. STARK STRUCTURE OF THE RYDBERG STATES OF ALKALINE-EARTH ATOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郅妙婵; 戴长建; 李士本

    2001-01-01

    The Stark effects of the Rydberg states in the alkaline-earth atoms are studied theoretically. Using a method similar to the treatment of alkali atoms, the properties of the Stark states of Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms in the regions far away from the perturbers are investigated. The Stark maps for Mg (n=16, M=0), Ca (n=10, M=0), Sr (n=12,M=0) and Ba (n=13, |M|=0,1) are presented. Topics such as the general methods of calculation, the treatment of fine structure, and the structure of level anti-crossings are discussed. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental Stark maps is satisfactory.

  14. Mantle convection and the distribution of geochemical reservoirs in the silicate shell of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Uwe; Hendel, Roland

    2010-05-01

    We present a dynamic 3-D spherical-shell model of mantle convection and the evolution of the chemical reservoirs of the Earth`s silicate shell. Chemical differentiation, convection, stirring and thermal evolution constitute an inseparable dynamic system. Our model is based on the solution of the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy, angular momentum, and four sums of the number of atoms of the pairs 238U-206Pb, 235U-207Pb, 232Th-208Pb, and 40K-40Ar. Similar to the present model, the continental crust of the real Earth was not produced entirely at the start of the evolution but developed episodically in batches [1-7]. The details of the continental distribution of the model are largely stochastic, but the spectral properties are quite similar to the present real Earth. The calculated Figures reveal that the modeled present-day mantle has no chemical stratification but we find a marble-cake structure. If we compare the observational results of the present-day proportion of depleted MORB mantle with the model then we find a similar order of magnitude. The MORB source dominates under the lithosphere. In our model, there are nowhere pure unblended reservoirs in the mantle. It is, however, remarkable that, in spite of 4500 Ma of solid-state mantle convection, certain strong concentrations of distributed chemical reservoirs continue to persist in certain volumes, although without sharp abundance boundaries. We deal with the question of predictable and stochastic portions of the phenomena. Although the convective flow patterns and the chemical differentiation of oceanic plateaus are coupled, the evolution of time-dependent Rayleigh number, Rat , is relatively well predictable and the stochastic parts of the Rat(t)-curves are small. Regarding the juvenile growth rates of the total mass of the continents, predictions are possible only in the first epoch of the evolution. Later on, the distribution of the continental-growth episodes is increasingly stochastic

  15. Valence determination of rare earth elements in lanthanide silicates by L 3-XANES spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsova, Antonina N.; Guda, Alexander A.; Goettlicher, Joerg; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Taroev, Vladimir K.; Kashaev, Anvar A.; Suvorova, Lyudmila F.; Tauson, Vladimir L.

    2016-05-01

    Lanthanide silicates have been hydrothermally synthesized using Cu and Ni containers. Chemical formulae of the synthesized compounds correspond to K3Eu[Si6O15] 2H2O, HK6Eu[Si10O25], K7Sm3[Si12O32], K2Sm[AlSi4O12] 0.375H2O, K4Yb2[Si8O21], K4Ce2[Al2Si8O24]. The oxidation state of lanthanides (Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb) in these silicates has been determined using XANES spectroscopy at the Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb, L 3- edges. The experimental XANES spectra were recorded using the synchrotron radiation source ANKA (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) and the X-ray laboratory spectrometer Rigaku R- XAS. By comparing the absorption edge energies and white line intensities of the silicates with the ones of reference spectra the oxidation state of lanthanides Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb has been found to be equal to +3 in all investigated silicates except of the Ce-containing silicate from the run in Cu container where the cerium oxidation state ranges from +3 (Ce in silicate apatite and in a KCe silicate with Si12O32 layers) to +4 (starting CeO2 or oxidized Ce2O3).

  16. Open system models of isotopic evolution in Earth's silicate reservoirs: Implications for crustal growth and mantle heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Seema; Paul, Debajyoti; Stracke, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    An open system evolutionary model of the Earth, comprising continental crust (CC), upper and lower mantle (UM, LM), and an additional isolated reservoir (IR) has been developed to study the isotopic evolution of the silicate Earth. The model is solved numerically at 1 Myr time steps over 4.55 Gyr of Earth history to reproduce both the present-day concentrations and isotope ratios of key radioactive decay systems (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and U-Th-Pb) in these terrestrial reservoirs. Various crustal growth scenarios - continuous versus episodic and early versus late crustal growth - and their effect on the evolution of Sr-Nd-Pb isotope systematics in the silicate reservoirs have been evaluated. Modeling results where the present-day UM is ∼60% of the total mantle mass and a lower mantle that is non-primitive reproduce the estimated geochemical composition and isotope ratios in Earth's silicate reservoirs. The isotopic evolution of the silicate Earth is strongly affected by the mode of crustal growth; only an exponential crustal growth pattern with crustal growth since the early Archean satisfactorily explains the chemical and isotopic evolution of the crust-mantle system and accounts for the so-called Pb paradoxes. Assuming that the OIB source is located in the deeper mantle, our model could, however, not reproduce its target ɛNd of +4.6 for the UM, which has been estimated from the average isotope ratios of 32 individual ocean island localities. Hence, either mantle plumes sample the LM in a non-representative way, or the simplified model set-up does not capture the full complexity of Earth's lower mantle (Nd isotope) evolution. Compared to the results obtained for a 4.55 Ga Earth, a model assuming a protracted U-Pb evolution of silicate Earth by ca. 100 Myr reproduces a slightly better fit for the Pb isotope ratios in Earth's silicate reservoirs. One notable feature of successful models is the early depletion of incompatible elements (as well as rapid decrease in Th/U) in

  17. Health Effects of Alkaline Diet and Water, Reduction of Digestive-tract Bacterial Load, and Earthing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2016-04-01

    In the article, the author discusses the issue of chronic, low-grade acidosis that is thought to be brought about primarily by 2 factors: (1) advancing age, with a consequent decline in renal function; and (2) diet. An acid-forming diet can induce low-grade metabolic acidosis, which causes very small decreases in blood pH and plasma bicarbonate (HCO3-) that remain within the range considered to be normal. However, if the duration of the acidosis is prolonged or chronically present, even a low degree of acidosis can become significant. This article reviews supporting evidence in the literature that has shown that consumption of abundant alkaline-forming foods can result in improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass, protection from chronic illnesses, reduced tumor-cell invasion and metastasis, and effective excretion of toxins from the body. In addition, a large number of studies showing the benefits of alkaline water (mineral water) have revealed that people consuming water with a high level of total dissolved solids (TDS) (ie, with a high mineral content) have shown a lower incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer and lower total mortality rates. Consumption of alkaline water also may prevent osteoporosis and protect pancreatic beta cells with its antioxidant effects. In addition, this article discusses the literature that shows that reducing digestive-tract bacterial load can play an important role in increasing blood alkalinity toward the normal upper limit. That change occurs through good oral hygiene, flossing of teeth, perfect chewing of food, and bowel evacuation as soon as possible. Finally, the author reviews the literature that shows that earthing (ie, the direct contact of the human body with the earth) can supply a current of plentiful electrons. Earthing has been shown to reduce acute and chronic inflammation, blood glucose in patients with diabetes, red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, and blood

  18. Long-range interacting many-body systems with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Olmos, B; Singh, Y; Schreck, F; Bongs, K; Lesanovsky, I

    2012-01-01

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms exhibit long-range dipolar interactions, which are generated via the coherent exchange of photons on the 3P_0-3D_1-transition of the triplet manifold. In case of bosonic strontium, which we discuss here, this transition has a wavelength of 2.7 \\mu m and a dipole moment of 2.46 Debye, and there exists a magic wavelength permitting the creation of optical lattices that are identical for the states 3P_0 and 3D_1. This interaction enables the realization and study of mixtures of hard-core lattice bosons featuring long-range hopping, with tuneable disorder and anisotropy. We derive the many-body Master equation, investigate the dynamics of excitation transport and analyze spectroscopic signatures stemming from coherent long-range interactions and collective dissipation. Our results show that lattice gases of alkaline-earth-metal atoms permit the creation of long-lived collective atomic states and constitute a simple and versatile platform for the exploration of many-body systems with lon...

  19. Selective Uptake of Alkaline Earth Metals by Cyanobacteria Forming Intracellular Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Nithavong; Benzerara, Karim; Georgelin, Thomas; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Poinsot, Mélanie; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Cordier, Laure

    2016-11-01

    The uptakes of calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) by two cyanobacterial strains, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 and Gloeomargarita lithophora, both forming intracellular carbonates, were investigated in laboratory cultures. In the culture medium BG-11 amended with 250 μM Ca and 50 or 250 μM Sr and Ba, G. lithophora accumulated first Ba, then Sr, and finally Ca. Sr and Ba were completely accumulated by G. lithophora cells at rates between 0.02 and 0.10 fmol h(-1) cell(-1) and down to extracellular concentrations below the detection limits of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Accumulation of Sr and Ba did not affect the growth rate of the strain. This sequential accumulation occurred mostly intracellularly within polyphosphate and carbonate granules and resulted in the formation of core-shell structures in carbonates. In contrast, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 showed neither a preferential accumulation of heavier alkaline earth metals nor core-shell structures in the carbonates. This indicated that fractionation between alkaline earth metals was not inherent to intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria but was likely a genetically based trait of G. lithophora. Overall, the capability of G. lithophora to sequester preferentially Sr and Ba at high rates may be of considerable interest for designing new remediation strategies and better understanding the geochemical cycles of these elements.

  20. Nanocrystalline Powders of Alkaline-Earth Phosphates as Precursors for Bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parhi Purnendu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone is a nanocomposite made of calcium phosphates and collagen. Collagen has a typical fibrous structure, with diameter ranging from 100 nm to 2 µm. It is suggested that calcium hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO46(OH2 in the size range 5-50 nm embedded in the collagen framework provides mechanical strength to bone. Among calcium phosphates, apatites are found to be the most suitable for bone regeneration due to its biocompatibility. A contemporary theme is to prepare nanocrystallites of alkaline-earth phosphates that can be employed as precursors for making novel bioceramics. In this paper, we present our attempts to prepare nano-sized particles of alkaline-earth hydroxyapatites, A10(PO46(OH2 where A= Ca, Sr and Ba through a metathetical route. Our work involved the use of same reactants treated under different reaction conditions. While hydrothermal route yielded well-crystalline nanorods, microwave resulted in agglomerated hydroxyapatites and reverse micellear route gave low crystalline apatites with less agglomeration.

  1. Temperature-induced collapse of alkaline Earth cation-polyacrylate anion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, Sebastian; Schweins, Ralf; Huber, Klaus

    2007-09-06

    Polyacrylate anions are used to inhibit CaCO3 precipitation and may be a promising additive to control formation of inorganic nanoparticles. The origin of this applicability lies in specific interactions between the alkaline earth cations and the carboxylate functions along the polyacrylate chains. In the absence of CO32- anions, these interactions eventually cause precipitation of polyelectrolytes. Extended investigation of dilute sodium polyacrylate solutions approaching this precipitation threshold revealed a dramatic shrinking of the PA coil dimensions once the threshold is reached (Eur. Phys. J. E 2001, 5, 117). Recent isothermal calorimetric titration experiments by Antonietti et al. (Macromolecules 2004, 37, 3444) indicated that the driving force of this precipitation is entropic in nature. In the present work, we investigated the impact of temperature on the structural changes of dissolved polyacrylate chains decorated with alkaline earth cations. To this end, large polyacrylate chains were brought close to the precipitation threshold by the addition of distinct amounts of Ca2+ or Sr2+ cations. The resulting structural intermediates were then subjected to temperature variations in the range of 15 degrees C polyacrylate coils were recorded by means of light and neutron scattering. As a major result, we could unambiguously demonstrate that the coils can reversibly be collapsed and extended by increasing and decreasing the temperature, respectively.

  2. Siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth: New clues from metal-silicate partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzheid, A.; Borisov, A.; Palme, H.

    1993-01-01

    New, precise data on the solubilities of Ni, Co, and Mo in silicate melts at 1400 C and fO2 from IW to IW-2 are presented. The results suggest NiO, CoO as stable species in the melt. No evidence for metallic Ni or Co was found. Equilibrium was ensured by reversals with initially high Ni and Co in the glass. Mo appears to change oxidation state at IW-1, from MoO3 to MoO2. Metal-silicate partition coefficients calculated from these data and recent data on Pd indicate similar partition coefficients for Pd and Mo at the conditions of core formation. This unexpected result constrains models of core formation in the Earth.

  3. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: ([3])Li(+), ([3])Na(+), ([4])K(+), ([4])Rb(+), ([6])Cs(+), ([3])Be(2+), ([4])Mg(2+), ([6])Ca(2+), ([6])Sr(2+) and ([6])Ba(2+), but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of ([6])Na(+), the ratio Ueq(Na)/Ueq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈([6])Na(+)-O(2-)〉 (R(2) = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li(+) in

  4. Electric dipole polarizability of alkaline-Earth-metal atoms from perturbed relativistic coupled-cluster theory with triples

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Angom, D

    2014-01-01

    The perturbed relativistic coupled-cluster (PRCC) theory is applied to calculate the electric dipole polarizabilities of alkaline Earth metal atoms. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit atomic Hamiltonian is used and we include the triple excitations in the relativistic coupled-cluster (RCC) theory. The theoretical issues related to the triple excitation cluster operators are described in detail and we also provide details on the computational implementation. The PRCC theory results are in good agreement with the experimental and previous theoretical results. We, then, highlight the importance of considering the Breit interaction for alkaline Earth metal atoms.

  5. Lifshitz and other transitions in alkaline-earth 122 pnictides under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quader, Khandker; Widom, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We carry out T =0 first-principles total energy calculations in the entire set of alkaline 122-pnictides (A Fe2As2 ; A = alkaline-earth element Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra) as a function of hydrostatic pressure. We find multiple distinct transitions to occur, namely an enthalpic transition in which the zero-pressure striped antiferromagnetic orthorhombic (OR-AFM) phase becomes thermodynamically less stable than a competing tetragonal (T) phase, a magnetic transition in which the OR-AFM phase loses its magnetism and orthorhombicity, and a lattice parameter anomaly in which the tetragonal c-axis collapses and a collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase becomes stable. Our results for energy band dispersions and spectra, lattice parameters, enthalpies, magnetism, and elastic constants over a wide range of hydrostatic pressure provide a coherent understanding of these experimentally observed transitions. In particular, the T-cT transition and anomalies in lattice parameters and elastic properties, observed at finite temperatures, are interpreted as arising from proximity to T =0 Lifshitz transitions, wherein pressure causes nontrivial changes in the Fermi surface topology in these materials.

  6. Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2016-06-01

    Using the state-of-the-art emissions-driven Max Planck Institute Earth system model, we explore the impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) with a scenario based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) framework. Addition of 114 Pmol of alkalinity to the surface ocean stabilizes atmospheric CO2 concentration to RCP4.5 levels under RCP8.5 emissions. This scenario removes 940 GtC from the atmosphere and mitigates 1.5 K of global warming within this century. The climate adjusts to the lower CO2 concentration preventing the loss of sea ice and high sea level rise. Seawater pH and the carbonate saturation state (Ω) rise substantially above levels of the current decade. Pronounced differences in regional sensitivities to AOA are projected, with the Arctic Ocean and tropical oceans emerging as hot spots for biogeochemical changes induced by AOA. Thus, the CO2 mitigation potential of AOA comes at a price of an unprecedented ocean biogeochemistry perturbation with unknown ecological consequences.

  7. Alkali and alkaline earth element geochemistry of Los Humeros Caldera, Puebla, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surendra P.

    1984-03-01

    Results of the measurements of alkali (K, Rb and Cs) and alkaline earth (Ba and Sr) elements on seven pre-caldera and twenty post-caldera samples of Los Humeros volcanics (Pliocene to Recent) are described. These data are interpreted in terms of the known solid-liquid partition coefficients. It appears that fractional crystallization is a dominant petrogenetic process and is controlled by the observed modal phases, namely plagioclase, olivine and clinopyroxene (in decreasing importance), and perhaps, in addition, biotite and titanomagnetite in the later stages of the differentiation sequence. The available major element chemistry and mass-balance calculations support these conclusions. Sr and Nd isotopic data further suggest that these magmas were generated in the underlying mantle, fractionated in a shallow-level magma chamber and underwent very insignificant sialic contamination before eruption.

  8. Linear alkaline earth metal phosphinate coordination polymers: synthesis and structural characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Jeffrey A; Huttenstine, Ashley L; Schmidt, Zachery A; White, Michael R; Oliver, Allen G

    2014-06-01

    Reaction of alkaline earth metal salts with diphenylphosphinic acid in dimethylformamide solvent afforded four coordination polymers: [Mg3(O2PPh2)6(DMF)2]·2DMF (I), [Ca(O2PPh2)2(DMF)2] (II), [Sr(O2PPh2)2(DMF)2] (III) and [Ba(O2PPh2)2(DMF)2] (IV) (where DMF is N,N-dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that all four compounds produce linear chain structures in the solid state, with the Ca, Sr and Ba forming isostructural crystals. The bulk materials were characterized by FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analyses.

  9. Preparations of Pure Alkaline Earth Molybdate Phases from Single Molecular Precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ya-qi; ZHAO Hong; FANG Zhi-min; WAN Hui-lin; XIONG Ming; ZHOU Zhao-hui

    2004-01-01

    The pure phases of alkaline earth molybdates MMoO4, where M=Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba, were synthesized via the calcination of the related citrato oxomolybdate complexes. The mixed metal oxides can be highly dispersed at the atomic level due to the existence of uniform citrato oxomolybdenum precursors in definite composition. The complexing effect helps to produce the fine-grained oxides with particle size in the ultrafine scale(<100 nm) at heat-treatment temperatures below 500 ℃. The structures of the precursor complexes and the finally heat-treated particles were studied by means of IR, XRD, DSC, DTA and TG techniques. The morphologies of the particles were observed by using the SEM technique. The average particle sizes were calculated to be in the range of 30-50 nm based on X-ray diffraction line-broadening and SEM images, indicating the poor conglomeration of crystallite at low temperatures.

  10. Theoretical study of the alkaline-earth (LiBe)+ ion: structure, spectroscopy and dipole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanmi, C.; Farjallah, M.; Berriche, H.

    2017-03-01

    We study theoretically the structure and spectroscopic properties of the alkali alkaline-earth (LiBe)+ ion. The potential energy curves and their spectroscopic parameters, permanent and transition dipole moments are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The (LiBe)+ ion is modelled as two valence electron system moving in the field of Be2+ and Li+ cores, which are described by pseudopotentials. In addition, effective core-polarization potentials are included to correct the energy. The molecular calculations are performed using a standard quantum chemistry approach based on the pseudopotential model, Gaussian basis sets, effective core polarization potentials, and full configuration interaction (CI) calculations. The precision of our spectroscopic parameters are discussed by comparison with currently available theoretical results. A rather good agreement is observed for the ground and first excited states. The permanent dipole moments reveal many abrupt changes, which are localized at particular distances corresponding to the positions of the avoided crossings.

  11. Quantum degenerate mixtures of alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hideaki; Takasu, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Yoshifumi; Doyle, John M; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2011-05-20

    We realize simultaneous quantum degeneracy in mixtures consisting of the alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms Li and Yb. This is accomplished within an optical trap by sympathetic cooling of the fermionic isotope ⁶Li with evaporatively cooled bosonic ¹⁷⁴Yb and, separately, fermionic ¹⁷³Yb. Using cross-thermalization studies, we also measure the elastic s-wave scattering lengths of both Li-Yb combinations, |a(⁶Li-¹⁷⁴Yb)| = 1.0 ± 0.2 nm and |a(⁶Li-¹⁷³Yb)| = 0.9 ± 0.2 nm. The equality of these lengths is found to be consistent with mass-scaling analysis. The quantum degenerate mixtures of Li and Yb, as realized here, can be the basis for creation of ultracold molecules with electron spin degrees of freedom, studies of novel Efimov trimers, and impurity probes of superfluid systems.

  12. Alkaline-earth metal hydrides as novel host lattices for Eu(II) luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Kohlmann, Holger; Sayede, Adlane; Springborg, Michael

    2011-07-04

    Luminescence of divalent europium has been investigated for the first time in metal hydrides. A complete solid-solution series was found for the pseudobinary system Eu(x)Sr(1-x)H(2) [a = 637.6(1) pm -12.1(3)x pm, b = 387.0(1)-6.5(2)x pm, c = 732.2(2)-10.1(4)x pm]. Europium-doped alkaline-earth hydrides Eu(x)M(1-x)H(2) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) with a small europium concentration (x = 0.005) exhibit luminescence with maximum emission wavelengths of 764 nm (M = Ca), 728 nm (M = Sr), and 750 nm (M = Ba); i.e., the emission energy of divalent europium shows an extremely large red shift compared to the emission energies of fluorides or oxides. Theoretical calculations (LDA+U) confirm decreasing band gaps with increasing europium content of the solid solutions.

  13. Photon Hall Scattering from Alkaline-earth-like atoms and Alkali-like ions

    CERN Document Server

    van Tiggelen, B A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of observing a magneto-transverse scattering of photons from alkaline-earth-like atoms as well as alkali-like ions and provide orders of magnitude. The transverse magneto-scattering is physically induced by the interference between two possible quantum transitions of an outer electron in a S-state, one dispersive electric-dipole transition to a P-orbital state and a second resonant electric-quadrupole transition to a P-orbital state. In contrast with previous mechanisms proposed for such an atomic photonic Hall effect, no real photons are scattered by the electric-dipole allowed transition, which increases the ratio of Hall current to background photons significantly. The main experimental challenge is to overcome the small detection threshold, with only 10^{-5} photons scattered per atom per second.

  14. Thermal poling of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses with intrinsically high dielectric breakdown strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas J.; Lanagan, Michael T.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2012-04-01

    Per the rectification model of thermal poling, it has been proposed that intrinsic breakdown strength plays a strong limiting role in the internal DC fields supported by the glass from the poling process. One might therefore hypothesize proportionately larger second-order nonlinearity (SON) in glasses with intrinsically high dielectric breakdown strength. We test these ideas by thermal poling of two different commercial alkali-free alkaline-earth boroaluminosilicate display glasses—one with barium only (AF45 from Schott), and the other with a mixture of alkaline-earth ions (OA-10 G from NEG). Not only are such compositions relevant from a commercial standpoint, they are also interesting in that they have been recently shown to exhibit remarkably high intrinsic dielectric breakdown strengths of 11-14 MV/cm. Quantitative Maker fringe and stack Maker-fringe measurements provide an accurate evaluation of the poling-induced SON susceptibilities, and indicate maximum χ(2) values of 0.44 and 0.26 pm/V in these glasses. These values are comparable to those reported for silica and other multicomponent glasses. Thus, the hypothesis that higher χ(2) would be observed in high intrinsic breakdown strength glasses was not validated. Based on our application of the rectification model, internal fields of the order 2-4 MV/cm were calculated, which are well below the measured intrinsic breakdown strengths at room temperature. The most plausible explanation for these observations is nonlinear electronic conduction effects taking place within the depletion region at the poling temperature, limiting internal fields to a fraction of the breakdown field.

  15. Alkaline earth-based coordination polymers derived from a cyclotriphosphazene-functionalized hexacarboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yajing; Bai, Dongjie; Feng, Yunlong; He, Yabing

    2016-10-01

    Combination of hexakis(4-carboxylatephenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene with alkaline earth ions of increasing ionic radii (Mg2+, Ca2+ and Ba2+) under different solvothermal conditions yielded three new coordination polymers, and their crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The magnesium compound displays a three dimensional (3D) network structure constructed from the deprotonated ligand and the secondary building block Mg(COO)4, which can be rationalized as a (4,6)-connected topological net with the Schläfli symbol of (44·62)3(49·66)2. The calcium compound consists of 1D infinite "Ca-O" inorganic chains connected by the deprotonated ligands to from a 3D framework. The barium compound exhibits a 3D framework in which 1D "Ba-O" inorganic chains are connected together by the deprotonated organic linkers. Due to the semi-rigid nature, the ligand adopts distinctly different conformations in the three compounds. The metal ions' influence exerted on the final structure of the resulting coordination polymers is also discussed. When the radii of alkaline earth ions increases descending down the group from Mg(II) to Ba(II), the coordination number becomes larger and more versatile: from 6 in the magnesium compound, to 6,7 and 10 in the calcium compound, and to 8 and 9 in the barium compound, thus substantially influencing the resulting final framework structures. Also, the photophysical properties were investigated systematically, revealing that the three compounds are photoluminscent in the solid state at room temperature. This work demonstrates that although the multiplicity of conformation in the hexacarboxylate ligand based on the inorganic scaffold cyclotriphosphazene makes it difficult to predict how this ligand will form extended network, but provides unique opportunities for the formation of diverse inorganic-organic hybrids exhibiting rich structural topologies.

  16. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  17. Raman and Rietveld structural characterization of sintered alkaline earth doped ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira Junior, Jose Marcio; Brum Malta, Luiz Fernando; Garrido, Francisco M.S. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Athos da Silveira Ramos, 149, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco A, room 632, CEP 68563, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ogasawara, Tsuneharu [Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos - Graduacao de Engenharia, Centro de Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, CEP 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Medeiros, Marta Eloisa, E-mail: chico@iq.ufrj.br [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Athos da Silveira Ramos, 149, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco A, room 632, CEP 68563, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    Nanocrystalline calcium and strontium singly doped ceria and co-doped ceria materials for solid electrolytes were prepared via a hydrothermal route. The effect of the hydrothermal treatment time on the solid solution composition was evaluated. Sr doped ceria was the most difficult to form, due to the Sr{sup 2+} large ionic radius. The small crystal size (12-16 nm) of powders allowed sintering into dense ceramic pellets at 1350 Degree-Sign C for 5 h. Raman spectroscopy evidenced a great lattice distortion for Sr doped and co-doped ceria materials, explaining the deterioration of the electrical properties for these ceramics. Besides that, a second phase was detected for Sr doped ceria pellet by using X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement of XRD data. Impedance measurements showed that Ca-doped ceria behaves as the best ionic conductor ({sigma}{sub g} 390 Degree-Sign C = 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}) since the nominal composition was achieved; on the other hand, Sr doped ceria performed as resistive materials since Sr incorporation into ceria lattice was critical. These results enhance the close interlace between electrical performance and chemical composition of alkaline earth doped ceria. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermally synthesized calcium doped ceria nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incorporation of alkaline earth dopant into ceria lattice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman and Rietveld structural characterization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium doped ceria ceramic pellets with high ionic conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Problems associated with the Sr{sup 2+} incorporation into ceria lattice.

  18. Ab Initio Calculation of 19F NMR Chemical Shielding for Alkaline-earth-metal Fluorides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI,Shu-Hui(蔡淑惠); CHEN,Zhong,(陈忠); LU,Xin(吕鑫); CHEN,Zhi-Wei(陈志伟); WAN,Hui-Lin(万惠霖)

    2001-01-01

    Gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method atHartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFr) lev-els,respectively,was employed to calculate 19F NMR chemi-cal shieldings of solid state alkaline-earth-metal fluorides MF2 (M = Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba).The results show that,although thecalculated19F chemical shieldings tend to be larger than the experinental values,they have a fairly good linear relation-ship with the observed ones.The calculated results based on different combinations of basis sets show that the B3LYP (ahybrid of DFT with HF) predictions are greatly superior tothe I-IF predictions.When a basis set of metal atom with ef- fecfive core potential (ECP) has well representation of valencewavefunction,especially wavefuncfion of d component,andproper definition of core electron nmnher,it can be applied toobtain 19F chemical shielding which is dose to that of all-elec-tron calculation.Tne variation of 19F chemical shielding of al-kaline-earth-metal fluorides correlates well with the latticefactor A/R2.``

  19. Optical and electronic properties of conductive ternary nitrides with rare- or alkaline-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavetis, S.; Hodroj, A.; Metaxa, C.; Logothetidis, S.; Pierson, J. F.; Patsalas, P.

    2016-12-01

    Conductive nitrides, such as TiN, are key engineering materials for electronics, photonics, and plasmonics; one of the essential issues for such applications is the ability of tuning the conduction electron density, the resistivity, and the electron scattering. While enhancing the conduction electron density and blueshifting the intraband absorption towards the UV were easily achieved previously, reducing the conduction electron density and redshifting the intraband absorption into the infrared are still an open issue. The latter is achieved in this work by alloying TiN by rare earth (RE = Sc, Y, La) or alkaline earth (AE = Mg, Ca) atoms in Ti substitutional positions. The produced TixRE1-xN and TixAE1-xN thin film samples were grown by a hybrid arc evaporation/sputtering process, and most of them are stable in the B1 cubic structure. Their optical properties were studied in an extensive spectral range by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The ellipsometric spectra were analyzed and quantified by the Drude-Lorentz model, which provided the conduction electron density, the electron mean free path, and the resistivity. The observed interband transitions are firmly assigned, and the optical and electrical properties of TixRE1-xN and TixAE1-xN are quantitatively correlated with their composition and crystal structure.

  20. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with al

  1. Long-range interactions of excited He atoms with the alkaline earth atoms Mg, Ca, and Sr

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2013-04-05

    Dispersion coefficients for the long-range interactions of the first four excited states of He, i.e., He(2 1, 3 S) and He(2 1, 3 P), with the low-lying states of the alkaline earth atoms Mg, Ca, and Sr are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of multipole transition operators.

  2. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314131116; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with

  3. Characterization of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth nitrates by vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, S.

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Infrared spectra of sodium and potassium alkaline-metal nitrates and magnesium and calcium alkali-earth nitrates in solid phase had been recorded in order to assign the fundamental bands. The influence of the dispersal médium (alkaline halide, employed in the solid sample preparation have been discussed. The quantitative measurements of the band in ten sities at 1387 cm-1 (present in the I.R. spectra of the four nitrates in KBr médium allowed us to determine the Lambert-Beer law slopes for each compound. These values are differents (bearing in mind experimental random errors, so we have could to affirm the nonexistence of solid solution between the nitrate and the alkaline halide médium. The L-B law obtained by us can be used for the Identification differentiation and quantitative analysis of these nitrates in solid phase, even if they are present in a very low concentration.

    Se ha realizado la asignación de los espectros infrarrojo (IR de los nitratos alcalinos, sódico y potásico, y de los alcalinotérreos, magnésico y cálcico, en estado sólido. Se ha visto la influencia del medio dispersante (haluro alcalino, utilizado en la preparación de la muestra sólida. El estudio cuantitativo de la absorbencia de la banda a 1.387 cm-1 (presente en los espectros IR de los cuatro nitratos en medio KBr permite determinar las pendientes de la Ley de Lambert-Beer Se comprueba que dichas pendientes son diferentes lo que conduce a poder afirmar que no se produce disolución sólida entre el KBr y el nitrato alcalino o alcalinotérreo. La determinación de la ley de Lambert-Beer permite la identificación y el análisis cualitativo y cuantitativo por espectroscopia IR de estos nitratos cuando están presentes en bajas concentraciones en muestras sólidas.

  4. Emergence of silicic continents as the lower crust peels off on a hot plate-tectonic Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Priyadarshi; Gerya, Taras; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2017-09-01

    The rock record and geochemical evidence indicate that continental recycling has been occurring since the early history of the Earth. The stabilization of felsic continents in place of Earth's early mafic crust about 3.0 to 2.0 billion years ago, perhaps due to the initiation of plate tectonics, implies widespread destruction of mafic crust during this time interval. However, the physical mechanisms of such intense recycling on a hotter, (late) Archaean and presumably plate-tectonic Earth remain largely unknown. Here we use thermomechanical modelling to show that extensive recycling via lower crustal peeling-off (delamination but not eclogitic dripping) during continent-continent convergence was near ubiquitous during the late Archaean to early Proterozoic. We propose that such destruction of the early mafic crust, together with felsic magmatism, may have caused both the emergence of silicic continents and their subsequent isostatic rise, possibly above the sea level. Such changes in the continental character have been proposed to influence the Great Oxidation Event and, therefore, peeling-off plate tectonics could be the geodynamic trigger for this event. A transition to the slab break-off controlled syn-orogenic recycling occurred as the Earth aged and cooled, leading to reduced recycling and enhanced preservation of the continental crust of present-day composition.

  5. The fluvial geochemistry, contributions of silicate, carbonate and saline-alkaline components to chemical weathering flux and controlling parameters: Narmada River (Deccan Traps), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Harish; Chakrapani, Govind J.; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2011-02-01

    The Narmada River in India is the largest west-flowing river into the Arabian Sea, draining through the Deccan Traps, one of the largest flood basalt provinces in the world. The fluvial geochemical characteristics and chemical weathering rates (CWR) for the mainstream and its major tributaries were determined using a composite dataset, which includes four phases of seasonal field (spot) samples (during 2003 and 2004) and a decade-long (1990-2000) fortnight time series (multiannual) data. Here, we demonstrate the influence of minor lithologies (carbonates and saline-alkaline soils) on basaltic signature, as reflected in sudden increases of Ca 2+-Mg 2+ and Na + contents at many locations along the mainstream and in tributaries. Both spot and multiannual data corrected for non-geological contributions were used to calculate the CWR. The CWR for spot samples (CWR spot) vary between 25 and 63 ton km -2 year -1, showing a reasonable correspondence with the CWR estimated for multiannual data (CWR multi) at most study locations. The weathering rates of silicate ( SilWR), carbonate ( CarbWR) and evaporite ( Sal-AlkWR) have contributed ˜38-58, 28-45 and 8-23%, respectively to the CWR spot at different locations. The estimated SilWR (11-36 ton km -2 year -1) for the Narmada basin indicates that the previous studies on the North Deccan Rivers (Narmada-Tapti-Godavari) overestimated the silicate weathering rates and associated CO 2 consumption rates. The average annual CO 2 drawdown via silicate weathering calculated for the Narmada basin is ˜0.032 × 10 12 moles year -1, suggesting that chemical weathering of the entire Deccan Trap basalts consumes approximately 2% (˜0.24 × 10 12 moles) of the annual global CO 2 drawdown. The present study also evaluates the influence of meteorological parameters (runoff and temperature) and physical weathering rates (PWR) in controlling the CWR at annual scale across the basin. The CWR and the SilWR show significant correlation with runoff

  6. Metal-silicate partitioning during core formation on super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L. K.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, D. D.; Remo, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Separation of the Earth into a rocky mantle and metallic Fe core is a problem long studied in the planetary science community (e.g. [1]). The timing of core formation influences the abundances of the siderophile elements found in the Earth's mantle, and the mechanism of core formation influences the degree of chemical equilibration between the rocky mantle and the core at the time of metal separation. However, limited work has been done on formation of metallic cores and its effects on mantle chemistry in rocky planets larger than the Earth. Super-Earths, exoplanets with masses up to ~ 5 Earth masses and radii up to ~1.6-1.7 Earth radii, have significantly larger internal pressures and consequently higher internal temperatures than the Earth, therefore conclusions from Earth-centric studies of core formation may be erroneous. Partitioning coefficients for many of the relevant elements (e.g. Fe, Ni, Si, O, etc.) are available in the literature, but only to relatively low pressures. The relevant pressures for super-Earths are significantly larger. However, data on Fe-O-Ni-Si partitioning at pressures (200-500 GPa) and temperatures relevant to super-Earths have been measured by laser-induced shocks with the ZBL laser at Sandia National Laboratory with a method described in [2]. We will present a model which integrates this data with lower pressure partition coefficients from the literature (e.g. [3],[4],[5]), with special emphasis on Fe and O, to describe partitioning behavior at high pressures and discuss its implications for core size and composition on rocky super-Earths. [1] Ringwood, A.E. (1977) Geochem. J. 11, 111-135. [2] Remo, J.L., Petaev, M.I., Jacobsen, S. B. (2008) LPSC abstract, 1420. [3] Frost, D.J. et al. (2010) JGR, B02202. [4] Kombayashi, T. (2014) JGR, 4164-4177. [5] Rubie, D.C. et al. (2011) EPSL, 301, 31-42. [5

  7. The tungsten isotopic composition of Eoarchean rocks: Implications for early silicate differentiation and core-mantle interaction on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Nakai, Shun'ichi; Sahoo, Yu Vin; Takamasa, Asako; Hirata, Takafumi; Maruyama, Shigenori

    2010-03-01

    We have measured 182W/ 184W for Eoarchean rocks from the Itsaq Gneiss Complex (3.8-3.7 Ga pillow meta-basalts, a meta-tonalite, and meta-sediments) and Acasta Gneiss Complex (4.0-3.6 Ga felsic orthogneisses) to assess possible W isotopic heterogeneity within the silicate Earth and to constrain W isotopic evolution of the mantle. The data reveal that 182W/ 184W values in the Eoarchean samples are uniform within the analytical error and indistinguishable from the modern accessible mantle signature, suggesting that the W isotopic composition of the upper mantle has not changed significantly since the Eoarchean era. The results imply either that chemical communication between the mantle and core has been insignificant in post-Hadean times, or that a lowermost mantle with a distinctive W isotope signature has been isolated from mantle convective cycling. Most terrestrial rock samples have a 0.2 ɛ142Nd/ 144Nd higher than the chondrite average. This requires either the presence of a hidden enriched reservoir formed within the first 30 Ma of the Solar System, or the bulk Earth having a ˜ 5% higher Sm/Nd than the chondrite average. We explored the relevance of the 182Hf- 182W isotope system to the 146Sm- 142Nd isotope system during early silicate differentiation events on Earth. In this context, we demonstrate that the lack of resolvable 182W excesses in the Itsaq rocks, despite 142Nd excesses compared to the modern accessible mantle, is more consistent with the view that the bulk Earth has a non-chondritic Sm/Nd. In the non-chondritic Sm/Nd Earth model, the 182W- 142Nd chronometry constrains the age of the source mantle depletion for the Itsaq samples to more than ˜ 40 Ma after the Solar System origin. Our results cannot confirm the previous report of 182W anomalies in the Eoarchean Itsaq meta-sediments, which were interpreted as reflecting an impact-derived meteoritic component.

  8. Surface fractal dimensions and textural properties of mesoporous alkaline-earth hydroxyapatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilchis-Granados, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, México, DF (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Facultad de Química, Av. Paseo Colón esquina con Paseo Tollocan s/n Toluca, México (Mexico); Granados-Correa, F., E-mail: francisco.granados@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, México, DF (Mexico); Barrera-Díaz, C.E. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Facultad de Química, Av. Paseo Colón esquina con Paseo Tollocan s/n Toluca, México (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    This work examines the surface fractal dimensions (D{sub f}) and textural properties of three different alkaline-earth hydroxyapatites. Calcium, strontium and barium hydroxyapatite compounds were successfully synthesized via chemical precipitation method and characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and N{sub 2}-physisorption measurements. Surface fractal dimensions were determined using single N{sub 2}-adsorption/desorption isotherms method to quantify the irregular surface of as-prepared compounds. The obtained materials were also characterized through their surface hydroxyl group content, determined by the mass titration method. It was found that the D{sub f} values for the three materials covered the range of 0.77 ± 0.04–2.33 ± 0.11; these results indicated that the materials tend to have smooth surfaces, except the irregular surface of barium hydroxyapatite. Moreover, regarding the synthesized calcium hydroxyapatite exhibited better textural properties compared with the synthesized strontium and barium hydroxyapatites for adsorbent purposes. However, barium hydroxyapatite shows irregular surface, indicating a high population of active sites across the surface, in comparison with the others studied hydroxyapatites. Finally, the results showed a linear correlation between the surface hydroxyl group content at the external surface of materials and their surface fractal dimensions.

  9. Photo-bleaching effect in divalent samarium-doped alkaline-earth fluorohalides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Weiping [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China); Jang, Kiwan; Cho, Hyungab; Chung, Yonghwa; Park, Seongtae; Lee, Yongill [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changdae [Mokpo National University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-15

    When a CW laser was focused on a sample of divalent samarium-doped alkaline-earth fluorohalides (Mg{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FCl{sub 0.5}Br{sub 0.5} : Sm{sup 2+} or BaFCl{sub 0.5}Br{sub 0.5} : Sm{sup 2+}), the fluorescence intensity of Sm{sup +2} ions decreased rapidly. Under irradiation from a 488-nm laser with a power density of 10 W/cm{sup 2}, the intensity of the {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 0} (Sm{sup 2+}) emission decreased as much as 96 % of its initial intensity in 30 minutes (for an X-ray-reduced sample). The so-called photo-bleaching effect can be influenced by the processes used for sample synthesis, such as the reduction method, the grinding process or X-ray irradiation. The decreasing curves obtained in the photo-bleaching experiments were fitted, a biexponential decreasing mode was found, which included a fast decrease (time constant {approx}tens of seconds) and a slow decrease (time constant {approx}hundreds of seconds). There was no evidence to support the divalent samarium ions being photo-ionized into trivalent samarium ions in the photobleaching process. The most probable mechanism for the photo-bleaching effect involves structural defects and color centers in the samples.

  10. Syntheses, structure and properties of Alkaline-earth metal salts of 4-Nitrophenylacetic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIKSHANDARKOIL R SRINIVASAN; KIRAN T DHAVSKAR; CHRISTIAN NÄTHER

    2016-11-01

    The synthesis, crystal structure, spectral characteristics and thermal properties of alkaline-earth metal salts of 4-nitrophenylacetic acid (4-npaH) namely, [Mg(H₂O)₆](4-npa)₂·4H₂O (4-npa = 4-nitrophenylacetate) (1), [Ca(H₂O)₂(4-npa)₂] (2) and [Sr(H₂O)₃(4-npa)₂]·4.5H₂O(3) are reported. In 1, the 4-npa ion functions as a charge balancing counter anion for the octahedral [Mg(H₂O)6]²⁺ unit with the Mg(II) ion situated on a centre of inversion. The two unique lattice water molecules link the [Mg(H₂O)₆]²⁺ cations and 4-npa anions with the aid of O-H· · ·O interactions. Compounds 2 and 3 are one-dimensional (1-D) coordination polymers containing an eight coordinated Ca(II) situated in a general position and a nine coordinated Sr(II) located on a twofold axis. The μ₂-bridging tridentate binding modes of the crystallographically independent 4-npa ligands in 2 and the unique 4-npa ligand in 3 link the bivalent metal ions into an infinite chain with alternating Ca· · · Ca separations of 3.989 and 4.009 Å, respectively, and a single Sr· · · Sr separation of 4.194Å in the 1-D chain.

  11. Nitridomanganates of alkaline-earth metals. Synthesis, structure, and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, Alexander

    2016-12-02

    The main goal of the present work was the synthesis of alkaline-earth nitridomanganates (AE{sub x}Mn{sub y}N{sub z}) with extended anionic structures and the characterization of their electronic and magnetic properties. Up to now, only compounds with isolated nitridomanganate anions have been reported in the discussed ternary systems. A systematic exploratory synthesis, employing high-temperature treatment of AE nitrides and Mn under controlled N2 pressure, yielded more than ten new nitridomanganates. Their crystal structures contain anionic building blocks of different dimensionalities, ranging from isolated species to three-dimensional frameworks. In general, the formation of Mn-rich compositions was found to be driven by the emergence of Mn-Mn interactions, which creates a link between nitridometalates and transition-metal-rich binary nitrides. The obtained nitridomanganates display a plethora of interesting phenomena, such as large spin-orbit coupling, magnetic frustration, quenching of magnetism due to Mn-Mn interactions, and metal-insulator transition.

  12. Collective non-equilibrium spin exchange in cold alkaline-earth atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Oscar Leonardo; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline-earth atomic (AEA) clocks have recently been shown to be reliable simulators of two-orbital SU(N) quantum magnetism. In this work, we study the non-equilibrium spin exchange dynamics during the clock interrogation of AEAs confined in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice and prepared in two nuclear levels. The two clock states act as an orbital degree of freedom. Every site in the lattice can be thought as populated by a frozen set of vibrational modes collectively interacting via predominantly p-wave collisions. Due to the exchange coupling, orbital state transfer between atoms with different nuclear states is expected to happen. At the mean field level, we observe that in addition to the expected suppression of population transfer in the presence of a large magnetic field, that makes the single particle levels off-resonance, there is also an interaction induced suppression for initial orbital population imbalance. This suppression resembles the macroscopic self-trapping mechanism seen in bosonic systems. However, by performing exact numerical solutions and also by using the so-called Truncated Wigner Approximation, we show that quantum correlations can significantly modify the mean field suppression. Our predictions should be testable in optical clock experiments. Project supported by NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, ARO, AFOSR, and MURI-AFOSR.

  13. Experimental investigation of the partitioning of phosphorus between metal and silicate phases - Implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, H. E.; Drake, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study is reported of the partitioning of Phosphorus between solid metal and basaltic silicate liquid as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity and of the implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body (EPB). The relationship established between the partition coefficient and the fugacity is given at 1190 C by log D(P) = -1.12 log fO2 - 15.95 and by log D(P) = -1.53 log fO2 17.73 at 1300 C. The partition coefficient D(P) was determined, and it is found to be consistent with a valence state of 5 for P in the molten silicate. Using the determined coefficient the low P/La ratios of the earth, moon, and eucrites relative to C1 chondrites can be explained. The lowering of the P/La ratio in the eucrites relative to Cl chondrite by a factor of 40 can be explained by partitioning P into 20-25 wt% sulfur-bearing metallic liquid corresponding to 5-25% of the total metal plus silicate system. The low P/La and W/La ratios in the moon may be explained by the partitioning of P and W into metal during formation of a small core by separation of liquid metal from silicate at low degrees of partial melting of the silicates. These observations are consistent with independent formation of the moon and the earth.

  14. Ionic conductivity of apatite-type rare-earth silicates prepared by mechanical milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, L.G.; Rodriguez-Reyna, E.; Moreno, K.J.; Escalante-Garcia, J.I. [Cinvestav-Saltillo, Apartado Postal 663, 25000-Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico); Fuentes, A.F. [Cinvestav-Saltillo, Apartado Postal 663, 25000-Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)], E-mail: fuentesaf@live.com

    2009-05-12

    Apatite-type silicates, RE{sub 10-x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sup '}{sub 2+y} (RE = La, Nd, Gd and Dy), were prepared by mechanical milling (MM) starting from stoichiometric mixtures of the constituent oxides, RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. XRD patterns collected after grinding the starting mixtures in a planetary ball mill for 9 h contain only the characteristic reflections of the target materials. The electrical properties were analyzed on sintered pellets by using impedance spectroscopy and the isothermal conductivity data were successfully fitted to a Jonscher-type empirical expression {sigma}'({omega}) {proportional_to} {omega}{sup n} with a decreasing fractional exponent n as the RE{sup 3+} cation size increases. Activation energies for oxygen migration were found to decrease and conductivity to increase as the size of the RE{sup 3+} cation increases with the highest conductivity values obtained for the apatite-type lanthanum silicate. In addition, we also show that the electrical properties of the as-prepared materials are influenced by the silicon source used in their synthesis.

  15. Elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation of Zn between metal and silicate and geochemical estimation of the S content of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Brandon; Siebert, Julien; Pringle, Emily A.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Zinc metal-silicate fractionation provides experimental access to the conditions of core formation and Zn has been used to estimate the S contents of the Earth's core and of the bulk Earth, assuming that they share similar volatility and that Zn was not partitioned into the Earth's core. Therefore, Zn provides both direct and indirect information into the origin and eventual fate of volatile and siderophile elements on Earth. However, the partitioning of Zn between metal and silicate - as well as the associated isotopic fractionation - is not well known. We have conducted a suite of partitioning experiments to characterize Zn elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation between metal and silicate as a function of time, temperature, and composition. Experiments were conducted at 2 GPa and temperatures from 1473 K to 2273 K in a piston cylinder apparatus, with run durations from 5 to 240 min for four distinct starting materials. Chemical and isotopic equilibrium is achieved within 10 min of experimental outset. Zinc metal-silicate isotopic fractionation displays no resolvable dependence on temperature, composition, or oxygen fugacity within the data set. Therefore, the Zn isotopic composition of silicate phases can be used as a proxy for bulk telluric bodies. Partitioning results from this study and data from literature were used to robustly parameterize Zn metal-silicate partitioning as a function of temperature, pressure, and redox state. Using this parametric characterization and viable formation conditions, we have estimated a range of Zn contents in the cores of iron meteorite parent bodies (i.e. iron meteorites) of ∼0.1-150 ppm, in good agreement with natural observations. We have also calculated the first geochemical estimates for the Zn contents of the Earth's core and of the bulk Earth, at 242 ± 107 ppm and 114 ± 34 ppm (respectively), that consider the slightly siderophile behavior of Zn. These estimates of the Zn contents of the Earth's core and

  16. Driving force for the hydration of the swelling clays: case of montmorillonites saturated with alkaline-earth cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Fabrice; Douillard, Jean-Marc; Bildstein, Olivier; Gaudin, Cedric; Prelot, Benedicte; Zajac, Jerzy; Van Damme, Henri

    2013-04-01

    Important structural modifications occur in swelling clays upon water adsorption. The multi-scale evolution of the swelling clay structure is usually evidenced by various experimental techniques. However, the driving force behind such phenomena is still not thoroughly understood. It appears strongly dependent on the nature of the interlayer cation. In the case of montmorillonites saturated with alkaline cations, it was inferred that the compensating cation or the layer surface could control the hydration process and thus the opening of the interlayer space, depending on the nature of the interlayer cation. In the present study, emphasis is put on the impact of divalent alkaline-earth cations compensating the layer charge in montmorillonites. Since no experimental technique offers the possibility of directly determining the hydration contributions related to interlayer cations and layer surfaces, an approach based on the combination of electrostatic calculations and immersion data is developed here, as already validated in the case of montmorillonites saturated by alkaline cations. This methodology allows to estimate the hydration energy for divalent interlayer cations and therefore to shed a new light on the driving force for hydration process occurring in montmorillonites saturated with alkaline-earth cations. Firstly, the surface energy values obtained from the electrostatic calculations based on the Electronegativity Equalization Method vary from 450 mJ m(-2) for Mg-montmorillonite to 1100 mJ m(-2) for Ba-montmorillonite. Secondly, considering both the hydration energy for cations and layer surfaces, the driving force for the hydration of alkaline-earth saturated montmorillonites can be attributed to the interlayer cation in the case of Mg-, Ca-, Sr-montmorillonites and to the interlayer surface in the case of Ba-montmorillonites. These results explain the differences in behaviour upon water adsorption as a function of the nature of the interlayer cation

  17. The contents of alkali and alkaline earth metals in soils of the southern Cis-Ural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asylbaev, I. G.; Khabirov, I. K.

    2016-01-01

    The contents and distribution patterns of alkali and alkaline earth metals in soils and rocks of the southern Cis-Ural region were studied. A database on the contents of these metals was developed, the soils were classified with respect to their provision with these metals, and corresponding schematic maps showing their distribution in soils of the region were compiled. It was found that the contents of these metals decrease from east to west (from the Yuryuzan-Aisk Piedmont Plain to the Ufa Plateau and to the Belebeevsk Upland), and their distribution patterns change. Among alkali metals, the highest accumulation in the soils is typical of potassium, sodium, and cesium; among alkaline earth metals, of strontium and barium.

  18. Spin-Orbit-Coupled Correlated Metal Phase in Kondo Lattices: An Implementation with Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, L.; Schachenmayer, J.; Rey, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We show that an interplay between quantum effects, strong on-site ferromagnetic exchange interaction, and antiferromagnetic correlations in Kondo lattices can give rise to an exotic spin-orbit coupled metallic state in regimes where classical treatments predict a trivial insulating behavior. This phenomenon can be simulated with ultracold alkaline-earth fermionic atoms subject to a laser-induced magnetic field by observing dynamics of spin-charge excitations in quench experiments.

  19. Spin-Orbit-Coupled Correlated Metal Phase in Kondo Lattices: An Implementation with Alkaline-Earth Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, L; Schachenmayer, J; Rey, A M

    2016-09-23

    We show that an interplay between quantum effects, strong on-site ferromagnetic exchange interaction, and antiferromagnetic correlations in Kondo lattices can give rise to an exotic spin-orbit coupled metallic state in regimes where classical treatments predict a trivial insulating behavior. This phenomenon can be simulated with ultracold alkaline-earth fermionic atoms subject to a laser-induced magnetic field by observing dynamics of spin-charge excitations in quench experiments.

  20. Ocean-Based Alkalinity Enhancement: Mitigation Potential, Side Effects and the Fate of Added Alkalinity Assessed in an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, M. F.; Ilyina, T.

    2014-12-01

    Artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) has been proposed as a mean to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. Whilst the mitigation potential of this geo-engineering technology may sound promising, it poses environmental risks. Within the Priority Program "Climate Engineering" of the German Science Foundation (DFG), we investigate the mitigation potential of AOA to reduce atmospheric CO2 and counteract the consequences of ocean acidification. We are particularly interested in the residence time of the added alkalinity at the ocean surface because it must stay in the upper ocean in order to increase the oceanic CO2 uptake. The mitigation potential, risks and the unintended consequences of this geo-engineering method are also exhaustively studied. These questions are tackled through the analysis of different alkalinity enhancement scenarios in the state-of-the-art Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-ESM) in a configuration based on the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Model scenarios are designed so that AOA is performed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentrations similar to values of the stabilization scenario RCP4.5, while fossil fuel CO2 emissions follow the pathway of the high-CO2 scenario RCP8.5. Alkalinity is added globally into the upper 12 meters of the ocean in different seasons and years. We found that on the time scale of relevance (i.e. from years to decades), season and location are key aspects to take into account in the implementation of AOA. This is because of inhomogeneous vertical mixing of added alkalinity due to the mixed layer depth which is established by the season. We also show that the rate of addition greatly determines impact and outcome of this geo-engineering method. Changes driven by the implementation of this method in the ocean biogeochemistry are also discussed. For instance, the associated changes in the carbon cycle, marine oxygen levels, saturation state of

  1. Many-body forces and stability of the alkaline-earth tetramers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Torrejon, C.C. [Centro Nacional de Supercomputo, IPICyT, A.C., Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, 78216 San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Kaplan, Ilya G., E-mail: kaplan@iim.unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-360, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-03-18

    Graphical abstract: Many-body forces effect. In a three-particle system, the two-body interaction energies depend upon coordinates of all three particles. The comparative study of the interaction energy and its many-body decomposition for alkaline-earths tetramers Be{sub 4}, Mg{sub 4}, and Ca{sub 4} at the all-electron CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level is performed. For study of dependence of the binding energy and the orbital population on the cluster size the corresponding dimers and trimers were also calculated at the same level of theory. In comparison with weakly bound dimers, the binding energy in trimers and, especially, in tetramers drastically increases; e.g., E{sub b}/N in Be{sub 3} is 7 times larger and in Be{sub 4} is 18.4 times larger than in Be{sub 2}. This sharp increase is explained as a manifestation of many-body forces. The trimers and tetramers are stabilized by the three-body forces, whereas the two- and four-body forces are repulsive. The attractive contribution to the three-body forces has a three-atom electron exchange origin. The natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis reveals a relatively large np-population in trimers and tetramers. The population of the valence np-orbitals leads to the sp-hybridization providing the covalent bonding. Research highlights: {yields} The alkaline-earths trimers and tetramers are stabilized by the three-body forces. {yields} Two- and four-body forces are repulsive for trimers and tetramers. {yields} The attractive contribution to the three-body forces has a three-atom electron exchange origin. {yields} The population of the np-orbitals leads to the sp-hybridization providing the covalent bonding. - Abstract: The comparative study of the interaction energy and its many-body decomposition for Be{sub 4}, Mg{sub 4}, and Ca{sub 4} at the all-electron CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level is performed. For study of dependence of the binding energy and the orbital population on the cluster size the corresponding dimers and

  2. Alkaline-Earth-Catalysed Cross-Dehydrocoupling of Amines and Hydrosilanes: Reactivity Trends, Scope and Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Clément; Dorcet, Vincent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Tobisch, Sven; Sarazin, Yann

    2016-03-18

    Alkaline-earth (Ae=Ca, Sr, Ba) complexes are shown to catalyse the chemoselective cross-dehydrocoupling (CDC) of amines and hydrosilanes. Key trends were delineated in the benchmark couplings of Ph3 SiH with pyrrolidine or tBuNH2 . Ae{E(SiMe3)2}2 ⋅(THF)x (E=N, CH; x=2-3) are more efficient than {N^N}Ae{E(SiMe3)2}⋅(THF)n (E=N, CH; n=1-2) complexes (where {N^N}(-) ={ArN(o-C6H4)C(H)=NAr}(-) with Ar=2,6-iPr2 -C6H3) bearing an iminoanilide ligand, and alkyl precatalysts are better than amido analogues. Turnover frequencies (TOFs) increase in the order Ca30 products) includes diamines and di(hydrosilane)s. Kinetic analysis of the Ba-promoted CDC of pyrrolidine and Ph3SiH shows that 1) the kinetic law is rate=k[Ba](1) [amine](0) [hydrosilane](1), 2) electron-withdrawing p-substituents on the arylhydrosilane improve the reaction rate and 3) a maximal kinetic isotopic effect (kSiH/kSiD =4.7) is seen for Ph3SiX (X=H, D). DFT calculations identified the prevailing mechanism; instead of an inaccessible σ-bond-breaking metathesis pathway, the CDC appears to follow a stepwise reaction path with N-Si bond-forming nucleophilic attack of the catalytically competent Ba pyrrolide onto the incoming silane, followed by rate limiting hydrogen-atom transfer to barium. The participation of a Ba silyl species is prevented energetically. The reactivity trend Cametal centre and decreasing Ae-Namide bond strength upon descending Group 2.

  3. Microstructure and creep behavior of magnesium-aluminum alloys containing alkaline and rare earth additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddock, Nicholas David

    In the past few decades governmental regulation and consumer demands have lead the automotive companies towards vehicle lightweighting. Powertrain components offer significant potential for vehicle weight reductions. Recently, magnesium alloys have shown promise for use in powertrain applications where creep has been a limiting factor. These systems are Mg-Al based, with alkaline earth or rare earth additions. The solidification, microstructure, and creep behavior of a series of Mg-4 Al- 4 X:(Ca, Ce, La, and Sr) alloys and a commercially developed AXJ530 (Mg--5 Al--3 Ca--0.15 Sr) alloy (by wt%) have been investigated. The order of decreasing freezing range of the five alloys was: AX44, AXJ530, AJ44, ALa44 and ACe44. All alloys exhibited a solid solution primary alpha-Mg phase surrounded by an interdendritic region of Mg and intermetallic(s). The primary phase was composed of grains approximately an order of magnitude larger than the cellular structure. All alloys were permanent mold cast directly to creep specimens and AXJ530 specimens were provided in die-cast form. The tensile creep behavior was investigated at 175 °C for stresses ranging from 40 to 100 MPa. The order of decreasing creep resistance was: die-cast AXJ530 and permanent mold cast AXJ530, AX44, AJ44, ALa44 and ACe44. Grain size, solute concentration, and matrix precipitates were the most significant microstructural features that influenced the creep resistance. Decreases in grain size or increases in solute concentration, both Al and the ternary addition, lowered the minimum creep rate. In the Mg-Al-Ca alloys, finely distributed Al2Ca precipitates in the matrix also improved the creep resistance by a factor of ten over the same alloy with coarse precipitates. The morphology of the eutectic region was distinct between alloys but did not contribute to difference in creep behavior. Creep strain distribution for the Mg-Al-Ca alloys developed heterogeneously on the scale of the alpha-Mg grains. As

  4. Influence of the redox state on the neptunium sorption under alkaline conditions. Batch sorption studies on titanium dioxide and calcium silicate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tits, Jan; Laube, Andreas; Wieland, Erich [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Gaona, Xavier [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2014-07-01

    Wet chemistry experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the redox state and aqueous speciation on the uptake of neptunium by titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) under alkaline conditions. TiO{sub 2} was chosen as a reference sorbent to determine the surface complexation behaviour of neptunium under alkaline conditions. C-S-H phases are important constituents of cement and concrete. They may contribute significantly to radionuclide retention due to their high recrystallization rates making incorporation the dominating sorption mechanism for many radionuclides (e.g. the actinides) on these materials. The sorption of neptunium on both solids was found to depend strongly on the degree of hydrolysis. On TiO{sub 2}R{sub d} values for Np(IV), Np(V) and Np(VI) are identical at pH = 10 and decrease with progressing hydrolysis in case of Np(V) and Np(VI). On C-S-H phases, R{sub d} values for the three redox states are also identical at pH = 10. While the R{sub d} values for Np(VI) sorption on C-S-H phases decrease with progressing hydrolysis, the R{sub d} values for Np(IV) and Np(V) sorption are not affected by the pH. In addition to the effect of hydrolysis, the presence of Ca is found to promote Np(V) and Np(VI) sorption on TiO{sub 2} whereas on C-S-H phases, the present wet chemistry data do not give unambiguous evidence. Thus, the aqueous speciation appears to have a similar influence on the sorption of the actinides on both types of solids despite the different sorption mechanism. The similar R{sub d} values for Np(IV,V,VI) sorption at pH = 10 can be explained qualitatively by invoking inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion between OH groups in the coordination sphere of Np(V) and Np(VI). This mechanism was proposed earlier in the literature for the prediction of actinide complexation constants with inorganic ligands. A limiting coordination number for each Np redox state, resulting from the inter-ligand electrostatic

  5. The contribution of amphibole from deep arc crust to the silicate Earth's Nb budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepolo, Massimo; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    The continental crust (CC) and the depleted mantle (DM) are generally assumed to be complementary reservoirs within the Earth. However, the mixture between CC and upper mantle does not generate the Nb/Ta and Nb/La ratios of chondrites. A reservoir with superchondritic ratios for Nb/Ta and Nb/La is thus required in the Earth's system. The occurrence of a hidden amphibole reservoir in the lower arc crust has been recently proposed. This, coupled with the capability of calcic amphibole to give rise to a superchondritic Nb/Ta and Nb/La reservoir, led us to determine to what extent amphibole-rich ultramafic rocks can account for the Nb (and Nb/Ta, Nb/La as well) imbalance on Earth. We have considered lower crust mafic and ultramafic amphibole-rich intrusive rocks from collisional settings worldwide. Because CC is considered to have primarily formed in collisional setting these rocks are important for its genetic model. We modeled Nb, Ta and La contents of the hidden Nb reservoir by mass balance calculations between continental crust, depleted mantle and primitive mantle. Modeling shows that amphibole-rich mafic lower crust can solve the so-called Nb paradox if large volumes of materials are supposed to be returned into the mantle during the Earth's history. A possible mechanism is recycling, particularly in Precambrian times, of eclogites that underwent pre-eclogitic melting in the amphibolite facies field and then recrystallized under eclogite-facies conditions.

  6. Recent advances in tailoring the aggregation of heavier alkaline earth metal halides, alkoxides and aryloxides from non-aqueous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2006-11-21

    This overview on one of the subjects treated in our group deals with the synthesis and study of low-dimensional polymer and molecular solid state structures formed with alkaline earth metal ions in non-aqueous solvents. We have chosen several synthetic approaches in order to obtain such compounds. The first concept deals with the "cutting out" of structural fragments from a solid state structure of a binary compound, which will be explained with reference to BaI2. Depending on the size and concentration of oxygen donor ligands, used as chemical scissors on BaI2, three-, two-, one- and zero-dimensional derived adducts of BaI2 are obtained, comparable to a structural genealogy tree for BaI2. A second part deals with the supramolecular approach for the synthesis of low dimensional polymeric compounds based on alkaline earth metal iodides, obtained by the combination of metal ion coordination with hydrogen bonding between the cationic complexes and their anions. Certain circumstances allow rules to be established for the prediction of the dimensionality of a given compound, contributing to the fundamental problem of structure prediction in crystal engineering. A third section describes a synthetic approach for generating pure alkaline earth metal cage compounds as well as alkali and alkaline earth mixed metal clusters. A first step deals with different molecular solvated alkaline earth metal iodides which are investigated as a function of the ligand size in non-aqueous solvents. These are then reacted with some alkali metal compound in order to partially or totally eliminate alkali iodide and to form the targeted clusters. These unique structures of ligand stabilized metal halide, hydroxide and/or alkoxide and aryloxide aggregates are of interest as potential precursors for oxide materials and as catalysts. Approaches to two synthetic methods of the latter, sol-gel and (MO)CVD (metal-organic chemical vapour deposition), are investigated with some of our compounds. (D

  7. Recent Alkaline Lakes: Clues to Understanding the Evolution of Early Planetary Alkaline Oceans and Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kazmierczak, J.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract New models suggest that terrestrial weathering consumes 0.26GtC/a (72% silicate-, 28% carbonateweathering), equivalent to a loss of one atmospheric C content every 3700a. Rapid weathering leads in volcanic areas to alkaline conditions, illustrated by the crater lake of Niuafo`ou/Tonga and Lake Van/Turkey, the largest soda lake on Earth. Alkaline conditions cause high CaCO3 supersaturation, permineralization of algal mats and growth of stromatolites. Alkaline conditions can nearly depress free [Ca2+] to levels necessary for proteins to function. Therefore early oceans on Earth (and possibly on Mars) should have been alkaline (i.e. "Soda Oceans"). Recent findings of MgSO4 in top soils on Mars may be misleading about the early history of martian oceans.

  8. Alkaline-alkaline earth fluoride carbonate crystals ABCO3F (A = K, Rb, Cs; B = Ca, Sr, Ba) as nonlinear optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Guohong; Ye, Ning; Huang, Ling; Lin, Xinsong

    2011-12-14

    A new series of alkaline-alkaline earth fluoride carbonates (KSrCO(3)F, RbSrCO(3)F, KCaCO(3)F, RbCaCO(3)F, CsCaCO(3)F, and Cs(3)Ba(4)(CO(3))(3)F(5)) were synthesized by spontaneous crystallization with molten fluxes. Their crystal structures, except for Cs(3)Ba(4)(CO(3))(3)F(5), exhibit the stacking of [AF](∞) (A = K, Rb, Cs) and [B(CO(3))](∞) (B = Ca, Sr) layers, and the coplanar alignment of [CO(3)] triangles. The results from the UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy study of the powder samples indicated that the short-wavelength absorption edges were all below 200 nm, except for Cs(3)Ba(4)(CO(3))(3)F(5), which is about 210 nm. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) on polycrystalline samples was measured using the Kurtz and Perry technique, which indicated that these carbonates are all phase-matchable materials in both visible and the UV region, and their measured SHG coefficients were about 3.33, 3.33, 3.61, 1.11, 1.11, and 1.20 times as large as that of d(36) (KDP), respectively. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Magneto-optical investigations of rare earth doped sol-gel derived silicate xerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secu, C.E.; Polosan, S. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optical Processes in Nanostructured Materials Department, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele, 077125 (Romania); Secu, M., E-mail: msecu@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optical Processes in Nanostructured Materials Department, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele, 077125 (Romania)

    2011-08-15

    Rare-earth doped xerogels (Eu{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}) were prepared by using the sol-gel method and their magneto-optical and optical properties have been studied. The Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) spectra are quite similar to those recorded in the RE-doped fluorozirconate glasses; the fine structures shown by the MCD spectra are better resolved compared to the optical absorption spectra. The MCD technique has been correlated with optical measurements in order to investigate the site symmetry in the particular case of Eu{sup 3+}-doped xerogel and oxyfluoride glasses. In the xerogel, coordination symmetry around the Eu{sup 3+} ions is close to D{sub 3h} and is lower in the oxyfluoride glass. - Highlights: > Rare-earth doped xerogels (Eu{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}) were prepared by the sol-gel method. > MCD and luminescence methods were applied to probe the site symmetry in europium doped xerogel and oxyfluoride glasses. > Rare-earth site symmetry is close to D{sub 3h} in xerogel and is lower in oxyfluoride glass.

  10. Reduction-induced inward diffusion and crystal growth on the surfaces of iron-bearing silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Tao, H.Z.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sodium inward diffusion (i.e., sodium diffusion from surface toward interior) in iron containing alkaline earth silicate glasses under reducing conditions around Tg and the induced surface crystallization. The surface crystallization is caused by formation of a silicate-gel layer...... first and then the growth of silica crystals on the glass surface. The type of alkaline earth cations has a strong impact on both the glass transition and the surface crystallization. In the Mg-containing glass, a quartz layer forms on the glass surface. This could be attributed to the fact that Mg2...

  11. Study on removing silicate scale on disk disperser with the alkaline phonochemistry method%碱性声化学法溶除盘式热分散机硅酸盐垢的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红; 葛杰; 张辉; 皮成忠

    2011-01-01

    The comparative tests of removing silicate scale with alkaline-dissolving and alkaline ultrasonic-dissolving methods was carried out considering their merits of ultrasonic and chemical methods, and the feasibility and the optimal technical parameters of removing the silicate scale rapidly and safely at low temperature and normal atmosphere were examined at different conditions of alkaline andultrasonic-alkaline methods. The results showed that the scale-removing efficiency was only 24.05 % when using 15 % NaOH solution at 90 ℃ for 3 h. However, the scale-removing efficiency reached to 60 % in 5 % NaOH solution at 90 ℃ for 1 h or in 10% NaOH solution at 80 ℃ for 1 h when combining with ultrasonic method. It was indicated that the dissolving rate of silicate scale in the ultrasonic solution was 4.01-9. 45 times faster than that of in non-ultrasonic solution. Therefore, silicate scale on disk disperser could be dissolved quickly, safely, cleanly and effectively by phonochemistry, the highest ratio of dissolving silicate scale was up to 63.27 %.%综合超声法和化学法去除硅酸盐垢的优点,进行了不同条件下的碱溶法和碱性声化学法溶解硅酸盐垢实验,探索低温、常压条件下清除废纸脱墨热分散盘片硅酸盐垢的可行性及较佳技术参数.研究结果表明:无超声时,15%NaOH溶液90℃反应3h后的溶垢率只有24.05%;加超声后,5% NaOH溶液90℃或10%NaOH溶液80℃反应1h后的溶垢率高达60%;而相同条件下,声化学的溶垢率是碱法溶垢率的4.01~9.45倍.超声与化学结合的声化学除垢方法,能够快速、安全、清洁、有效地溶解热分散机盘片上的硅酸盐垢,溶垢率最高可达63.27%.

  12. Eocene seasonality and seawater alkaline earth reconstruction using shallow-dwelling large benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Müller, Wolfgang; Oron, Shai; Renema, Willem

    2013-11-01

    Intra-test variability in Mg/Ca and other (trace) elements within large benthic foraminifera (LBF) of the family Nummulitidae have been investigated using laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). These foraminifera have a longevity and size facilitating seasonal proxy retrieval and a depth distribution similar to 'surface-dwelling' planktic foraminifera. Coupled with their abundance in climatically important periods such as the Paleogene, this means that this family of foraminifera are an important but under-utilised source of palaeoclimatic information. We have calibrated the relationship between Mg/Ca and temperature in modern Operculina ammonoides and observe a ˜2% increase in Mg/Ca °C-1. O. ammonoides is the nearest living relative of the abundant Eocene genus Nummulites, enabling us to reconstruct mid-Eocene tropical sea surface temperature seasonality by applying our calibration to fossil Nummulites djokdjokartae from Java. Our results indicate a 5-6 °C annual temperature range, implying greater than modern seasonality in the mid-Eocene (Bartonian). This is consistent with seasonal surface ocean cooling facilitated by enhanced Eocene tropical cyclone-induced upper ocean mixing, as suggested by recent modelling results. Analyses of fossil N. djokdjokartae and Operculina sp. from the same stratigraphic interval demonstrate that environmental controls on proxy distribution coefficients are the same for these two genera, within error. Using previously published test-seawater alkaline earth metal distribution coefficients derived from an LBF of the same family (Raitzsch et al., 2010) and inorganic calcite, with appropriate correction systematics for secular Mg/Casw variation (Evans and Müller, 2012), we use our fossil data to produce a more accurate foraminifera-based Mg/Casw reconstruction and an estimate of seawater Sr/Ca. We demonstrate that mid-Eocene Mg/Casw was ≲2 molmol, which is in contrast to the model most

  13. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  14. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  15. Carbon substituting for oxygen in silicates: A novel mechanism for carbon incorporation in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, M. M.; Tavakoli, A.; Ionescu, E.; Mera, G.; Riedel, R.; Navrotsky, A.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, carbon in the deep Earth has been thought of in terms of either carbonate at high oxygen fugacities or graphite or diamond under more reducing conditions. However, material science studies of amorphous Si-O-C polymer derived ceramics have demonstrated that carbon can be accommodated as an anion substituting for oxygen in mixed silica tetrahedra. Furthermore these structures are energetically favorable relative to a mixture of crystalline silica, silicon carbide, and graphite by ten or more kJ/g.atom. Thermodynamic stability suggests that these nano-structured composites are a potentially important storage mechanism for carbon under moderately reducing conditions. Here we expand the scope of the previous work by examining the compositional effect of geologically relevant cations (calcium and magnesium) on the thermodynamic stability, nanostructure, and ability to accommodate carbon of these composites. Silicon oxy-carbides doped with magnesium, magnesium and calcium or undoped resisted crystallization at 1100 C under inert atmosphere. 29Si NMR of the samples shows a similar distribution of silicon between end-member and mixed sites (Table 1). Results are presented from studies utilizing NMR, high temperature solution calorimetry, and microprobe. Table 1. Percentages of Si species in each material as determined by 29Si NMR.

  16. A simple melting theory applied to alkali halide, alkaline-earth chalcogenide, and alkali chalco-genide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Chen, L. R.

    2005-06-01

    A useful and simple method for studying the melting temperature T-m of ion compounds has been developed by using analyses originally due to diffusional force theory, incorporating Pandey's formulation and Harrison's potential function. The calculated values of T-m for a wide range of compounds of types IA-VII (alkali halide), IIA-VI (alkaline-earth chalcogenide), and IA-VI (alkali chalcogenide) are found to agree fairly well with experimental values for T-m and to be superior to results from previous approaches involving similar methods.

  17. Microcalorimetric study on host-guest complexation of naphtho-15-crown-5 with four ions of alkaline earth metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ming-zhi; ZHU Lan-ying; GAO Xi-ke; DOU Jian-min; SUN De-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters of complexation of naphto- 15-crown-5 with four alkaline earth ions in aqueous media was determined using titration microcalorimetry at 298.15 K. The stability of the complexes, thermal effect and entropy effect of the complexation is discussed on the basis of the guest ions structure and the solvent effect. The stability constants tendency to vary with ion radius was interpreted. Complex of naphtha-15-crown-5 with calcium ion is very stable due to the synergism of static electric interaction and size selectivity between the host and the guest.

  18. Quantum efficiency of silica-coated rare-earth doped yttrium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes-Vásquez, D., E-mail: dcervant@cnyn.unam.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada, Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana No. 3918, Zona Playitas, C.P. 22860 Ensenada, B.C., México (Mexico); Contreras, O.E.; Hirata, G.A. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22800 Ensenada, B.C., México (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    The photoluminescent properties of rare earth-activated white-emitting Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce,Tb nanocrystalline phosphor prepared by two different methods, pressure-assisted combustion synthesis and sol–gel, were studied. The synthesized phosphor samples were post-annealed at 1373 K and 1623 K in order to obtain the X1-Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} and X2-Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} phases, respectively, which were confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. Photoluminescence analysis showed the contribution of two blue-emission bands within the 380–450 nm region originating from 5d–4f transitions in Ce{sup 3+} ions and a well-defined green emission of Tb{sup 3+} ions located at 545 nm corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 5} electronic transitions. Thereafter, Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce,Tb powders were coated with colloidal silica in order to investigate the effect of silica coatings on their luminescent properties. Absolute fluorescence quantum efficiency measurements were carefully performed, which revealed an increase of 12% of efficiency in coated compared with bare-Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce,Tb phosphor. -- Highlights: • Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce,Tb phosphor powders were successfully coated with colloidal silica. • Post-annealing treatments improved the quantum efficiency of silica-coated Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce,Tb phosphors. • Absolute fluorescence quantum efficiency measurements showed an increase of 12%.

  19. Three interesting coordination compounds based on metalloligand and alkaline-earth ions: Syntheses, structures, thermal behaviors and magnetic property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Chi

    2016-09-01

    Based on metalloligand LCu ([Cu(2,4-pydca)2]2-, 2,4-pydca2- = pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylate) and alkaline-earth ions (Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+), three interesting coordination compounds, [Ca(H2O)7][LCu·H2O]·H2O (1), {Sr[LCu·H2O]·4H2O}n (2), and {Ba[LCu·H2O]·8H2O}n (3), have been synthesized and well-characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that 1 features a discrete 0D coordination compound, while 2 and 3 exhibit the 2D network and 1D chain structures, respectively. Compound 2 is constructed from {LCu}2 dimers connected with {Sr2} units, which is fabricated by two Sr2+ ions bridged via two μ2-O bridges, while compound 3 is formed by 1D {Ba}n chain linked with metalloligands LCu and exhibits an interesting sandwich like chain structure. It is noted that the coordination numbers of alkaline-earth ions are in positive correlation with their radiuses. Moreover, the magnetic property of compound 2 has been studied.

  20. Binding and selectivity of phenazino-18-crown-6-ether with alkali, alkaline earth and toxic metal species: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nasarul; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2017-02-01

    The interactions of phenazino-crown ether ligands with alkali, alkaline earth and selected toxic species were investigated using density functional theory modelling by employing B3PW91/6-311G ++ (d, p) level of theory. The complex stability was analysed in terms of binding energies, perturbation energies, position of highest molecular orbital and energy gap values. In general, the complexes formed by P18C6-1a ligand with metal cations were found to be more stable than those with P18C6-1b. Among alkali and alkaline earth metals complexes having highest stability was observed for the complex formed by P18C6-1a with Be2+. Computational calculations of P18C6 ligand with toxic metal ions reveals that the P18C6-Cr6+ metal complexes acquire envelop like geometry, leading to higher binding energy values. Comparing the binding energies of neutral and monocations of Ag and Hg, the former had higher value both in neutral as well as monocation state. Thus, the stability of metal complexes is determined not only by the ligand but also by the type of metal ion. In solvent systems the stability constants of metal complexes were found increasing with decreasing permittivity of the solvent. This reflects the inherited polar character of the protic solvents stabilises the cation, resulting in decrease of effective interaction of ligand with the metal ion.

  1. An estimate of the Bulk Silicate Earth potassium isotopic composition based on MC-ICPMS measurements of basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang (王昆), Kun; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-04-01

    We report a method for high-precision potassium isotope measurements that improves by an order of magnitude the precision compared to previous methods. The purification of K is achieved through ion exchange chromatography on AG50W-X8 cation exchange resins. The 41K/39K ratios are analyzed with a GV Instruments IsoProbe P Multiple-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) equipped with a hexapole collision gas cell. With this technique, the argon-hydride interferences as well as the large 40Ar+ peak from the Ar-plasma are eliminated. The 41K/39K ratios can thus be obtained with a precision of 0.05 per mil. The precision and accuracy of this method is validated with gravimetrically determined 41K or 39K enriched standards. New precise K isotopic compositions of three terrestrial basalts (BCR-2, BHVO-1 and a MORB) are also reported. These basalts have indistinguishable K isotopic compositions and are used to define a reference value of -0.479 ± 0.027 per mil for the 41K/39K ratio of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) relative to a Merck Suprapur potassium nitrate standard. Seawater and sylvites from evaporite deposits have similar 41K/39K ratios, but higher by up to 0.227 per mil compared to the Merck Suprapur standard. Other commercially available K-salts/solutions also have 41K/39K ratios similar to the Merck standard, while a SPEX K-chloride was higher by 0.384 per mil. This shows that K isotope variations will be useful as a tracer in low-temperature geochemistry processes.

  2. Modification of TiO{sub 2} electrode with a series of alkaline-earth carbonates. Performance improvement of quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Chun; Wang, Liduo; Wu, Xueming; Qiu, Yong [Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering; Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, alkaline-earth carbonates (CaCO{sub 3}, SrCO{sub 3} and BaCO{sub 3}) modified TiO{sub 2} electrodes are synthesized by dipping TiO{sub 2} electrode into alkaline-earth hydroxide or alkaline-earth acetate aqueous solutions. When applied to quasi-solid-state DSSC, hydroxide-treated TiO{sub 2} electrodes have increased open-circuit photovoltages (Voc). Among the three alkaline-earth hydroxides, Ba(OH){sub 2} treatment improved the DSSC performance best. The Voc improves from 0.66 V to 0.71 V and the overall conversion efficiency ({eta}) improves by 15% under100 mW/cm{sup 2}. As to acetates, not only the Voc is increased (from 0.68V to 0.74V), but also short-circuit photocurrent(Isc) is improved by Sr(OAc){sub 2} Ba(OAc){sub 2} The overall conversion efficiency improves by 22%. Dark current measurement indicate that in the presence of alkaline-earth carbonates, the TiO2 conduction band shifts to the negative direction, leading to the increase in Voc.

  3. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of A1050 aluminium alloy in homogeneous silicate-alkaline electrolytes with edta{sup 4−} complexes of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, La and Ba under alternating polarization conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogov, A.B., E-mail: alex-lab@bk.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 3, Acad. Lavrentiev Ave., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Scientific and Technical Centre “Pokrytie-A” (OOO), 15, Dzerzhinskogo Ave., Novosibirsk, 630015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of coatings containing a number of transition elements by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on aluminium A1050 alloy. The paper discusses PEO coatings obtained in silicate-alkaline electrolytes containing complexes of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, La and Ba with ethylenediaminetetraacetic anion edta{sup 4−}. It is also focused on the chemical basis of the electrolyte components choice and their role in the process of PEO. Possible mechanism of coating formation process is also discussed. Alternating current mode (symmetrical sinusoidal current pulses, initial average current density - 100 mA cm{sup −2}) was used to produce the coatings. The PEO process was characterized by behaviours of the anodic and cathodic peak voltage curves. Coating surfaces and cross sections are studied by optical dark field microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray and energy dispersive analysis. - Highlights: • Alkaline homogeneous electrolyte with transition metal-edta{sup 4-} complexes. • Coatings contain Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, La, Ba elements in alumina-silica matrix. • Alternating symmetric sinusoidal current of 100 mA cm{sup −2} was applied. • Borax buffer solution and silicate passivating agent were used.

  4. Difference of coordination between alkali- and alkaline-earth-metal ions to a symmetrical α,α',δ,δ'-tetramethylcucurbit[6]uril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jian; Yu, Da-Hai; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Xue, Sai-Feng; Tao, Zhu; Wei, Gang

    2011-08-01

    To explore differences in coordination between alkali- and alkaline-earth-metal ions and cucurbit[n]urils, a water-soluble α,α',δ,δ'-tetramethylcucurbit[6]uril (TMeQ[6]) was used to synthesize a series of complexes and their supramolecular assemblies, based on the coordination of TMeQ[6] with alkali- and alkaline-earth-metal ions. The complexes and corresponding supramolecular assemblies were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Unlike cucurbituril (Q[6]), which formed the metal-Q[6] polymers based on the direct coordination of carbonyl oxygen atoms to the alkali-metal ions, TMeQ[6] formed metal-TMeQ[6] polymers based on the direct coordination of carbonyl oxygen atoms with the alkaline-earth-metal ions rather than the alkali-metal ions.

  5. Dispersion coefficients for the interaction of inert gas atoms with alkali and alkaline earth ions and alkali atoms with their singly ionized ions

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Sukhjit; Sahoo, B K; Arora, Bindiya

    2016-01-01

    We report the dispersion coefficients for the interacting inert gas atoms with the alkali ions, alkaline earth ions and alkali atoms with their singly charged ions. We use our relativistic coupled-cluster method to determine dynamic dipole and quadrupole polarizabilities of the alkali atoms and singly ionized alkaline earth atoms, whereas a relativistic random phase approximation approach has been adopted to evaluate these quantities for the closed-shell configured inert gas atoms and the singly and doubly ionized alkali and alkaline earth atoms, respectively. Accuracies of these results are adjudged from the comparison of their static polarizability values with their respective experimental results. These polarizabilities are further compared with the other theoretical results. Reason for the improvement in the accuracies of our estimated dispersion coefficients than the data listed in [At. Data and Nucl. Data Tables 101, 58 (2015)] are discussed. Results for some of the atom-ion interacting systems were not...

  6. Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Ishu; Reddy, AlluAmarnath [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Muñoz, Francisco [Ceramics and Glass Institute (CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Choi, Seong-Jun [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae-Won [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Tulyaganov, Dilshat U. [Turin Polytechnic University in Tashkent, 100095 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Ferreira, José M.F., E-mail: jmf@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2014-11-01

    We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO–MgO–SiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–CaF{sub 2} system. The {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na{sub 2}O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q{sup 2}(Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h and 7 days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris–HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. - Highlights: • Na{sup +} did not induce significant structural changes in chemical Si environment. • Sodium is more prone to affect the chemical environment around P. • Increasing Na{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ratios hinder bio-mineralization and chemical durability. • Alkali-containing glasses confer cyto-toxicity to the cell culture medium.

  7. Prospects for sympathetic cooling of polar molecules: NH with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth atoms--a new hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldán, Pavel; Zuchowski, Piotr S; Hutson, Jeremy M

    2009-01-01

    We explore the potential energy surfaces for NH molecules interacting with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth atoms using highly correlated ab initio electronic structure calculations. The surfaces for interaction with alkali-metal atoms have deep wells dominated by covalent forces. The resulting strong anisotropies will produce strongly inelastic collisions. The surfaces for interaction with alkaline-earth atoms have shallower wells that are dominated by induction and dispersion forces. For Be and Mg the anisotropy is small compared to the rotational constant of NH, so that collisions will be relatively weakly inelastic. Be and Mg are thus promising coolants for sympathetic cooling of NH to the ultracold regime.

  8. Synthesis by coprecipitation technique and spectroscopic properties of some phosphates. [Yttrium or rare earth and potassium and alkaline earth metal phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbus, A.; Duranceau, C.; Zambon, D.; Cousseins, J.C. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (FR))

    1991-01-01

    The coprecipitation process has been used for the synthesis of some KBLn(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds where B is an alkaline earth metal and Ln a lanthanide or yttrium. After the gel stage, an amorphous powder is obtained by drying, the thermal evolution of which is studied by X-ray diffraction. The temperature of calcination for the different powders is included in the 500-700{sup 0}C range, lower than that of the classical solid state synthesis, 800-1000{sup 0}C. The final phosphates crystallize with monoclinic or tetragonal symmetry. The spectroscopic properties of some Eu{sup 3+}-doped compounds prepared by coprecipitation technique are reported.

  9. Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba, as thermoelectric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Parker and David J Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2Sn, Sr2Sn and Ba2Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli—roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

  10. Physical and optical absorption studies of Fe{sup 3+} - ions doped lithium borate glasses containing certain alkaline earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhogi, Ashok [VNR Vignana Jyothi Institute of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad, Telangana (India); Kumar, R. Vijaya [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana (India); Kistaiah, P., E-mail: pkistaiah@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad, Telangana (India)

    2016-05-23

    Iron ion doped lithium borate glasses with the composition 15RO-25Li{sub 2}O-59B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-1Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where R= Ca, Sr and Ba) have been prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique and characterized to investigate the physical and optical properties using XRD, density, molar volume and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The optical absorption spectra exhibit a band at around 460 nm which is assigned to {sup 6}A{sub 1g}(S) → 4E{sub g} (G) of Fe{sup 3+} ions with distorted octahedral symmetry. From ultraviolet absorption edges, the optical band gap and Urbach energies have been evaluated. The effect of alkaline earths on these properties is discussed.

  11. Static and Dynamic Structure Factors with Account of the Ion Structure for High-temperature Alkali and Alkaline Earth Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sadykova, S P; Tkachenko, I M

    2010-01-01

    The $e-e$, $e-i$, $i-i$ and charge-charge static structure factors are calculated for alkali and Be$^{2+}$ plasmas using the method described by Gregori et al. in \\cite{bibGreg2006}. The dynamic structure factors for alkali plasmas are calculated using the method of moments \\cite{bibAdam83}, \\cite{bibAdam93}. In both methods the screened Hellmann-Gurskii-Krasko potential, obtained on the basis of Bogolyubov's method, has been used taking into account not only the quantum-mechanical effects but also the ion structure \\cite{bib73}. PACS: 52.27.Aj (Alkali and alkaline earth plasmas, Static and dynamic structure factors), 52.25.Kn (Thermodynamics of plasmas), 52.38.Ph (X-ray scattering)

  12. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  13. Rare earth elements and titanium in plants, soils and groundwaters in the alkaline-ultramafic complex of Salitre, MG Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceccantini, G. [Instituto de Biociencias, Sao Paulo, (Brazil). Dept. de Botanica; Figueiredo, A.M.G. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Radioquimica; Sondag, F.; Soubies, F. [ORSTOM, 93 - Bondy (France); Soubies, F. [Universite Paul Sabatier, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1997-12-31

    The contents of rare earth elements (REE) and titanium in various plant species, in groundwaters and in soils from the alkaline-ultramafic complex of Salitre, have been determined. Due to the the particular mineralogy of the bedrock, REE and Ti exhibit high concentrations in the soils. Despite this, plants generally present REE concentrations within the ranges usually found in plants, and the transfer factor from soil to plant is at least ten times below the range reported in the literature, confirming that the concentrations of REE in the plants are widely independent of the soil content. All species present normalized patterns similar to those of the soils, characterized by an enrichment in light REE. Several plants show Ti concentrations about three times higher than the reference values. It is suggested that in the studied ecosystem, the plant metabolism affect the REE distribution in the groundwaters, leading to an enrichment of the superficial waters in heavy REE

  14. Physical and optical absorption studies of Fe3+ - ions doped lithium borate glasses containing certain alkaline earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogi, Ashok; Kumar, R. Vijaya; Kistaiah, P.

    2016-05-01

    Iron ion doped lithium borate glasses with the composition 15RO-25Li2O-59B2O3-1Fe2O3 (where R= Ca, Sr and Ba) have been prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique and characterized to investigate the physical and optical properties using XRD, density, molar volume and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The optical absorption spectra exhibit a band at around 460 nm which is assigned to 6A1g(S) → 4Eg (G) of Fe3+ ions with distorted octahedral symmetry. From ultraviolet absorption edges, the optical band gap and Urbach energies have been evaluated. The effect of alkaline earths on these properties is discussed.

  15. High-T sub c thin films on low microwave loss alkaline-rare-earth-aluminate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolewski, R.; Gierlowski, P.; Kula, W.; Zarembinski, S.; Lewandowski, S.J.; Berkowski, M.; Pajaczkowska, A. (Instytut Fizyki, Polska Akatlemia Nauk, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02668 Warszawa (PL)); Gorshunov, B.P.; Lyudmirsky, D.B.; Sirotinsky, O.I. (Institute of General Physics, USSR Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilova Street, SU-117924 Moscow (SU))

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the alkaline-rare-earth aluminates (K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type perovskites) which are an excellent choice as the substrate material for the growth of high-T{sub c} thin films suitable for microwave and far-infrared applications. The CaNdAlO{sub 4}, and SrLaAlO{sub 4} single crystals have been grown by Czochralski pulling and fabricated into the form of (001) oriented wafers. The Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O films deposited on these substrates by a single-target magnetron sputtering exhibited very good superconducting and structural properties.

  16. Main group chemistry of 9-hydroxophenalenone: Syntheses and structural characterization of the alkaline earth and zinc complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Mukherjee; Prinson P Samuel; Carola Schulzke; Swadhin K Mandal

    2014-09-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of 9-hydroxophenalenone based alkaline earth and zinc complexes.The reaction of 9-hydroxophenalenone (HO,O-PLY (1)) with one equivalent of KN(SiMe3)2 and MI2 in THF yields heteroleptic complexes [(O,O-PLY)M(THF)]I [M= Mg (2), Ca (3), Sr (4), Ba (5); n = 1-4], while use of two equivalents of KN(SiMe3)2 in THF (with respect to PLY) produces homoleptic complex (O,O-PLY)2Mg(THF)2 (6). Moreover, reaction between two equivalents of 1 with one equivalent of ZnMe2 in THF produces complex (O,O-PLY)2Zn(THF)2 (7). All these complexes were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and elemental analyses. The solid state structures of complexes 2, 6 and 7 were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis.

  17. Characterization of alkaline-earth oxide additions to the MnO{sub 2} cathode in an aqueous secondary battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minakshi, Manickam, E-mail: minakshi@murdoch.edu.au [Extractive Metallurgy, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia); Blackford, Mark [Institute of Materials Engineering, ANSTO, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail [Institute for Environment Research, ANSTO, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2011-05-19

    Highlights: > Adding MgO in MnO{sub 2} cathode enhances the battery discharge capacity. > Mechanism appears to be different with those of our previously published results. > Capacity fade with subsequent cycling is reduced only for MgO but not for BaO. > Transferred the primary battery into a secondary while using LiOH as electrolyte. - Abstract: The effect of alkaline-earth oxide additions on aqueous rechargeable battery is investigated using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The alkaline-earth oxide additions such as magnesium oxide (MgO) and barium oxide (BaO) were physically mixed to the manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) cathode of a cell comprising zinc as an anode and aqueous lithium hydroxide as the electrolyte. The results showed that such additions greatly improved the discharge capacity of the battery (from 145 to 195 for MgO and 265 mAh/g for BaO). Capacity fade with subsequent cycling is reduced only for MgO but not for BaO. With an aim to understand the role of these additives and its improvement in cell performance, we have used microscopy, spectroscopy, ion beam analysis and diffraction based techniques to study the process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDS) results showed evidence of crystalline MnO{sub 2} particles for MgO as additive, whereas, MnO{sub 2} particles with diffused structure leading to mixture of phases is observed for BaO additives which is in agreement with X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. This work relates to improvement in the electrochemical behaviour of the Zn-MnO{sub 2} battery while the MgO additive helps to reduce the formation of manganese and zinc such as hetaerolite that hinders the lithium intercalation.

  18. Effects of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals on N-Containing Species Release during Rice Straw Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Gao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of inherent and external alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs, i.e., K, Ca and Mg on the behavior of N-containing species release during rice straw (RS pyrolysis, different pretreatments were applied in numerous experiments. Results indicate that ammonia (NH3 and hydrogen cyanide (HCN are the major N-containing species and that the yields of isocyanic acid (HNCO and nitric oxide (NO are relatively low. The removal of inhert AAEMs shifts N-containing species release to a high-temperature zone according to volatile release behavior because of the increase in activation energy. The formation selectivity of NH3, HNCO, and NO increases by demineralized pretreatment, whereas HCN selectivity decreases. The formation of HNCO is mainly affected by alkaline earth metal. N-containing species release occurs in low temperatures with the addition of external AAEMs. The activation energy of samples impregnated with CaCl2 and MgCl2 sharply decreases compared to the original RS. The total yields of N-containing species are reduced significantly in the presence of KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2 as additives. The inhibition ability of AAEMs follows the sequence MgCl2 > CaCl2 > KCl. The inhibition effect of MgCl2 can be improved by solution immersion compared with solid powder mixing. The clean biomass pyrolysis and gasification technology with low N-containing species content may be developed according to the results.

  19. Influence of alkali and alkaline earth elements on the uptake of radionuclides by Pleurototus eryngii fruit bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, J., E-mail: fguillen@unex.es [LARUEX, Dpt. Applied Physics, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Extremadura, Avda. Universidad, s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain); Baeza, A.; Salas, A. [LARUEX, Dpt. Applied Physics, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Extremadura, Avda. Universidad, s/n, 10071 Caceres (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    In the literature, there are many data available on radionuclide contents and their transfer to different species of mushrooms. There are some variables, however, which affect the transfer but are very difficult to observe in collected wild mushrooms. An example is the effect of different concentrations of alkali and alkaline earth elements in the soil. Modification of these concentrations in the soil solution has traditionally been used as a countermeasure to deal with radioactively contaminated areas. In the present work, fruiting bodies of Pleurotus eryngii, a saprophytic mushroom, were grown under controlled laboratory conditions, varying the content of alkali (potassium and caesium) and alkaline earth (calcium and strontium) elements. The transfer of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 60}Co (added to the cultures) and of natural {sup 210}Pb was analysed by increasing the content of each stable element considered. A significant, but nonlinear, enhancement of stable caesium and {sup 134}Cs was observed with increasing content of stable caesium in the substrate/mycelium. The transfer of {sup 85}Sr decreased with the addition of each stable cation, whereas the {sup 60}Co and {sup 210}Pb transfers were unaffected. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of stable potassium did not affect the uptake of radiocaesium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of stable caesium increased the stable caesium and {sup 134}Cs content in the fruiting bodies of Pleurotus eryngii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of calcium reduced the content of calcium and {sup 85}Sr in the fruiting bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These countermeasures did not work properly in the case of {sup 60}Co and {sup 210}Pb, no effect was observed.

  20. Preliminary investigations on picoplankton-related precipitation of alkaline-earth metal carbonates in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Jaquet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a routine water-quality survey in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland, suspended matter was collected by filtration on 0.2 μm membranes in July and August 2012 at the depth of maximal chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration (2 mg m–3. Examination by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous dark and gelatinous patches occluding the pores of the membranes, containing high numbers of picoplanktonic cells and, in places, clusters of high-reflectance smooth microspheres (1-2 μm in diameter. Their chemical composition, determined by semi-quantitative, energy-dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDS showed magnesium (Mg, calcium (Ca, strontium (Sr and barium (Ba (alkaline earth metals to be the dominant cations. Among the anions, phosphorus (P and carbon (C were present, but only the latter is considered here (as carbonate. The microspheres were subdivided into four types represented in a Ca-Sr-Ba ternary space. All types are confined within a domain bound by Ca>45, Sr<10 and Ba<50 (in mole %. Type I, the most frequent, displays a broad variability in Ba/Ca, even within a given cluster. Types II and III are devoid of Ba, but may incorporate P. Type IV contains only Ca. The Type I composition resembles that of benstonite, a Group IIA carbonate that was recently found as intracellular granules in a cyanobacterium from alkaline lake Alchichica (Mexico.Lake Geneva microspheres are solid, featureless and embedded in a mucilage-looking substance in the vicinity of, but seemingly not inside, picoplanktonic cells morphologically similar to Chlorella and Synechococcus. In summer 2012, the macroscopic physico-chemical conditions in lake Geneva epilimnion were such as to allow precipitation of Ca but not of Sr and Ba carbonates. Favourable conditions did exist, though, in the micro-environment provided by the combination of active picoplankton and a mucilaginous envelope. Further studies are ongoing to investigate the

  1. Partitioning of Moderately Siderophile Elements Among Olivine, Silicate Melt, and Sulfide Melt: Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Variations in the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur on the partitioning of first series transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni. and Cu) and W among coexisting sulfide melt, silicate melt, and olivine. Experiments were performed at 1 atm pressure, 1350 C, with the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur controlled by mixing CO2, CO, and SO2 gases. Starting compositions consisted of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Na2O analog for a barred olivine chondrule from an ordinary chondrite and a synthetic komatiite. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2), conditions ranged from log of f(sub O2) = -7.9 to - 10.6, with log of f(sub S2) values ranging from - 1.0 to -2.5. Our experimental results demonstrate that the f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies of sulfide melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for the first series transition metals arc proportional to their valence states. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies for the partitioning of Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu are weaker than predicted on the basis of their valence states. Variations in conditions have no significant effect on olivine/melt partitioning other than those resulting from f(sub O2)-induced changes in the valence state of a given element. The strong f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependence for the olivine/silicate melt partitioning of V is attributable to a change of valence state, from 4+ to 3+, with decreasing f(sub O2). Our experimentally determined partition coefficients are used to develop models for the segregation of sulfide and metal from the silicate portion of the early Earth and the Shergottite parent body (Mars). We find that the influence of S is not sufficient to explain the overabundance of siderophile and chalcophile elements that remained in the mantle of the Earth following core formation. Important constraints on core formation in Mars are provided by our experimental determination of the partitioning of Cu between silicate and sulfide melts. When combined with existing estimates for siderophile

  2. Theoretical Studies of the Spin Hamiltonian Parameters and Local Distortions for Cu2+ in Alkaline Earth Lead Zinc Phosphate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo-Kun; Wu, Shao-Yi; Yuan, Zi-Yi; Liu, Zi-Xuan; Jiang, Shi-Xin; Liu, Zheng; Yao, Zi-Jian; Teng, Bao-Hua; Wu, Ming-He

    2016-08-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters and local structures are theoretically studied for Cu2+-doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate (RPPZ, R=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) glasses based on the high-order perturbation calculations for a tetragonally elongated octahedral 3d9 cluster. The relative elongation ratios are found to be ρ≈3.2%, 4.4%, 4.6%, and 3.3% for R=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba, respectively, because of the Jahn-Teller effect. The whole decreasing crystal-field strength Dq and orbital reduction factor k from Mg to Sr are ascribed to the weakening electrostatic coulombic interactions and the increasing probability of productivity of nonbridge oxygen (and hence increasing Cu2+-O2- electron cloud admixtures) under PbO addition, respectively, with increasing alkali earth ionic radius. The anomalies (the largest Dq and the next highest k among the systems) for R=Ba are attributed to the cross linkage of this large cation in the network. The overall increasing order (Mg≤Bacontaining copper dopants.

  3. Catalysis by alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions in nucleophilic attack of methoxide ion on crown ethers bearing an intra-annular acetoxy group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cacciapaglia, Roberta; Lucente, Silvia; Mandolini, Luigi; Doorn, van Arie R.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Verboom, Willem

    1989-01-01

    Rates of reaction of methoxide ion with crown ethers bearing an intra-annular acetoxy group are markedly enhanced by alkali and alkaline-earth metal bromides as a result of much stronger interactions of the metal ions with transition states than with reactants. Rates of reactions of methoxide ion w

  4. Solvent Extraction of Alkaline Earth Metals with Alkylphosphorus Acids%有机磷(膦)酸对碱土金属的萃取

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许新; 朱屯

    2002-01-01

    Solvent extraction equilibria of four main alkaline earth metals (magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium) with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA), 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-(2-ethylhexyl) ester,di(2,4,4-tri-methylpentyl) phosphinic acid and IR spectra of the extracts have been studied. The selectivity order is dependent on the e/r value and hydration energy of the metal ions. The minor shift of the P-O in IR absorption of the alkaline earth metal extracts indicates that the interaction between the metal ions and P-O is much weaker for alkaline earth metals than for transitional metals. The distribution of the four alkaline earth elements between aqueous solutions and solutions of DEHPA and neutral organophosphorus compounds, tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) or tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) in kerosene have been determined at varying ratio of TBP or TOPO to DEHPA and the positive synergism is observed. The synergic effect is explained by using IR spectra of the loaded organic phase.

  5. Theoretical study on the role of surface basicity and Lewis acidity on the etherification of glycerol over alkaline earth metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calatayud, M.; Ruppert, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314003398; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline earth metal oxides (MO) are catalytically active in the etherification of glycerol. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been used to examine the reactivity of glycerol with MO surfaces with M=Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba. More specifically, the optimum glycerol adsorption mode and the str

  6. Passive behavior of magnesium alloys (Mg-Zr) containing rare-earth elements in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, R. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Ferreira, M.G.S. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal); Carmezim, M.J. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, ESTSetubal, DEM (Portugal); Montemor, M.F., E-mail: mfmontemor@ist.utl.p [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-02-28

    The passive behavior of magnesium alloys ZK31, EZ33 and WE54 was studied in alkaline media (NaOH - pH 13) in the presence and absence of chloride ions. The electrochemical properties were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and capacitance measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed for the study of the chemical composition and surface morphology of the surface films, respectively. The electrochemical impedance results revealed that the film formed on the surface of the three alloys is characterized by an increasing resistance, which stabilized with time. In the absence of chloride the film resistance was identical for all the three alloys. However, in the presence of chloride, the resistance of the film formed on the EZ33 alloy dropped nearly one order of magnitude comparatively to the other alloys. Generally, in the presence of chloride there was a decrease of the conductive character of the film. The films are homogeneous and, according to the XPS results, the outer layer seemed mainly composed of Mg(OH){sub 2} and the internal layer composed of MgO, independently of the presence of chloride. The AFM study revealed that the presence of chloride affected film morphology, namely nano-crystallites dimensions and aggregates size that increased.

  7. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  8. Formation of colloids of the tetravalent uranium under influence of silicate in neutral and low alkaline aqueous systems; Bildung von Kolloiden des tetravalenten Urans unter Einfluss von Silikat in neutralen und schwachalkalischen waessrigen Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Isabell

    2016-03-30

    This work includes the preparation and characterization of new uranium(IV) colloids which are formed and stabilized in the near neutral pH range and under environmentally relevant conditions. Conclusions on stability behavior and particle size distributions were drawn based on results obtained by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements, as well as ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation in combination with element analyzes. Spectroscopic methodes confirmed the tetravalent state of uranium in the experiments. Unlike empirical data, it is possible to generate long-term stable uranium(IV) colloids at higher concentrations. By addition of geochemical components such as carbonate and silicate, they are stable and resistant in the near neutral pH range over a long period. It was found that dissolved silica plays an essential role in the preparation of colloids. Colloid-borne uranium(IV) up to a concentration of 10{sup -3} mol/L, corresponding to 0,238 g/L, is stabilized in solutions. This concentration is about three orders of magnitude higher than so far known silicate-free aqueous uranium(IV) colloids. Through the use of different analytical methods (invasive and non-invasive) it could be shown that the resulting uranium(IV) colloids are in the nanoscalar range. A high mobility can be assumed in aquatic systems. Evidence is provided by photon correlation spectroscopy, ultrafiltration, and ultracentrifugation that uranium(IV) can form silicate-containing colloids of a size lower than 20 nm. The particles are generated in near neutral to slightly alkaline solutions containing geochemical relevant components (carbonate, silicate, sodium ions). They remain stable in aqueous suspension over years. Electrostatic repulsion due to a negative zeta potential in the near-neutral to alkaline pH range caused by the silicate stabilizes the uranium(IV) colloids. The isoelectric point of the nanoparticles is shifted towards lower pH values by the silicate. The higher the

  9. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with (29)Si and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca(2+) concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca(2+) and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation.

  10. Halogen-abstraction reactions from chloromethane and bromomethane molecules by alkaline-earth monocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Antonio; Rayón, Víctor Manuel; Molpeceres, Germán; Sordo, José Ángel; Barrientos, Carmen

    2014-08-14

    The reactions, in the gas phase, between alkali-earth monocations (Mg(+), Ca(+), Sr(+), Ba(+)) and CH3X (X = Cl, Br) have been theoretically studied. The stationary points on the potential energy surfaces were characterized at the Density Functional Theory level on the framework of the mPW1K functional with the QZVPP Ahlrichs's basis sets. A complementary kinetics study has also been performed using conventional/variational microcanonical transition state theory. In the reactions of Mg(+) with either chloro- or bromomethane the transition structure lies in energy clearly above the reactants rendering thermal activation of CH3Cl or CH3Br extremely improbable. The remaining reactions are exothermic and barrierless processes; thus carbon-halogen bonds in chloro- or bromomethane can be activated by calcium, strontium or barium monocations to obtain the metal halogen cation and the methyl radical. The Mulliken population analysis for the stationary points of the potential energy surfaces supports a "harpoon"-like mechanism for the halogen-atom abstraction processes. An analysis of the bonding situation for the stationary points on the potential energy surface has also been performed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

  11. Interaction of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement, with alkaline chlorides, analogy with clays; Interaction des silicates de calcium hydrates, principaux constituants du ciment, avec les chlorures d'alcalins. Analogie avec les argiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viallis-Terrisse, H

    2000-10-06

    This work, belonging to a more general study on the structure and reactivity of cement, deals with the experimental and theoretical analysis of the interaction of alkaline chlorides with calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement paste. The interaction of alkaline cations with C-S-H is interfacial, involving both electrostatic and surface complexation mechanisms. The C-S-H surface is constituted of silanol sites, partially dissociated due to the high pH of the interstitial solution. The calcium ions, present in large amounts in the equilibrium solution of C-S-H, constitute potential determining ions for the C-S-H surface. The alkaline ions seem to compete with calcium for the same surface sites. The adsorption isotherms show that caesium presents a better affinity than sodium and lithium for the C-S-H surface. Moreover, solid-state NMR suggests that caesium forms with the surface sites inner-sphere complexes, whereas sodium seems to keep its hydration sphere. These results are in agreement with zeta potential measurements, which let suppose a specific adsorption of caesium ions, and an indifferent behaviour of both other alkaline ions. A model for the C-S-H surface was proposed, from the electric double layer model, and mass action laws expressing the complexation of the different ionic species with the silanol sites. The whole study relies on a structural analogy with smectites, some clays presenting well-known cationic adsorption properties. The structural similarity between both minerals is enhanced by some similarities of reactivity, though significant behaviour differences could also be noted. (author)

  12. A new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid modified core-shell silica phase for chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth, transition and rare earth elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Stack, Elaine M; Omamogho, Jesse O; Glennon, Jeremy D; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-20

    Bare core-shell silica (1.7μm) has been modified with iminodiacetic acid functional groups via standard silane chemistry, forming a new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) functionalised core-shell stationary phase. The column was applied in high-performance chelation ion chromatography and evaluated for the retention of alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal cations. The influence of nitric acid eluent concentration, addition of complexing agent dipicolinic acid, eluent pH and column temperature on the column performance was investigated. The efficiencies obtained for transition and heavy metal cations (and resultant separations) were comparable or better than those previously obtained for alternative fully porous silica based chelation stationary phases, and a similarly modified monolithic silica column, ranging from ∼15 to 56μm HETP. Increasing the ionic strength of the eluent with the addition of KNO3 (0.75M) and increasing the column temperature (70°C) facilitated the isocratic separation of a mixture of 14 lanthanides and yttrium in under 12min, with HETP averaging 18μm (7μm for Ce(III)). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dark-state suppression and optimization of laser cooling and fluorescence in a trapped alkaline-earth-metal single ion

    CERN Document Server

    Lindvall, T; Tittonen, I; Madej, A A; 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.033403

    2012-01-01

    We study the formation and destabilization of dark states in a single trapped 88Sr+ ion caused by the cooling and repumping laser fields required for Doppler cooling and fluorescence detection of the ion. By numerically solving the time-dependent density matrix equations for the eight-level system consisting of the sublevels of the 5s 2S1/2, 5p 2P1/2, and 4d 2D3/2 states, we analyze the different types of dark states and how to prevent them in order to maximize the scattering rate, which is crucial for both the cooling and the detection of the ion. The influence of the laser linewidths and ion motion on the scattering rate and the dark resonances is studied. The calculations are then compared with experimental results obtained with an endcap ion trap system located at the National Research Council of Canada and found to be in good agreement. The results are applicable also to other alkaline earth ions and isotopes without hyperfine structure.

  14. Fates and roles of alkali and alkaline earth metal species during the pyrolysis and gasification of a Victorian lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mody, D.; Wu, H.; Li, C. [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    The transformation of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) species in a Victorian lignite during the pyrolysis and subsequent gasification in CO{sub 2} was studied in a novel quartz fluidised-bed reactor. Lignite samples prepared by physically adding NaCl and ion-exchanging Na{sup +} and Ca{sup ++} into the lignite were used to investigate the effects of chemical forms and valency of the AAEM species in the substrate lignite on their transformation during pyrolysis and gasification. Carboxyl-bound Na was found to be less volatile than Na present as NaCl, but more volatile than carboxyl-bound Ca during pyrolysis at temperatures between 400 and 900{sup o}C. However, the carboxyl-bound Na was volatilised to a much greater extent than the carboxyl-bound Ca in the same lignite during pyrolysis. It was seen that the loading of NaCl into the lignite did not significantly affect the char reactivity in the fluidised-bed reactor at 900{sup o}C.

  15. A Density Functional Theory Study of Codoping Characteristics of Sulfur with Alkaline Earth in Delafossite CuAlO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi-Jun; Qin, Han; Liu, Zheng-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The structural, electronic properties and formation energies of sulfur and alkaline earth codoped delafossite CuAlO2 have been investigated using the first-principles density functional theory calculations. Our results reveal that the volume of codoping systems increases with the increasing atomic radius of metal atoms. The formation energies under different growth conditions have been calculated, showing that the codoping systems are formed easily under O-rich growth conditions. Electronic band structures and density of states have been obtained. The decreased bandgaps, enhanced covalence and appearance of electron acceptors after codoping are all good for p-type conductivity. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11347199, 51402244, and 11547311, the Specialized Research Fund for Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20130184120028, the Fundamental Research Fund for the Central Universities, China under Grant Nos. 2682014CX084, 2682014ZT30, and 2682014ZT31, and the fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing in NWPU under Grant No. SKLSP201511

  16. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereijgers, Bart P C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with all studied catalyst materials, however, the selectivity for hydrogen increased from 15 % to 51 % when going from the unpromoted to a BaO-promoted catalyst. The formation of the undesired byproducts CO, methane, and dimethyl ether was considerably reduced as well. The observed trend in catalyst performance follows the trend in increasing basicity of the studied promoter elements, indicating a chemical effect of the promoter material. Superior catalytic performance, in terms of H(2) and CO selectivity, was obtained with a Au/La(2)O(3) catalyst. At 300 degrees C the hydrogen selectivity reached 80 % with only 2 % CO formation, and the catalyst displayed a stable performance over at least 24 h on-stream. Furthermore, the formation of CO was found to be independent of the oxygen concentration in the feed. The commercial lanthanum oxide used in this study had a low specific surface area, which led to the formation of relative large gold particles. Therefore, the catalytic activity could be enhanced by decreasing the gold particle size through deposition on lanthanum oxide supported on high-surface-area alumina.

  17. A preorganized metalloreceptor for alkaline earth ions showing calcium versus magnesium selectivity in water: biological activity of selected metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatori, Stefano; Ambrosi, Gianluca; Fanelli, Mirco; Formica, Mauro; Fusi, Vieri; Giorgi, Luca; Macedi, Eleonora; Micheloni, Mauro; Paoli, Paola; Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-08-25

    The N,N'-bis[(3-hydroxy-4-pyron-2-yl)methyl]-N,N'-dimethylethylendiamine (Malten = L) forms the highly stable [CuH(-2)L] species in water, in which the converging maltol oxygen atoms form an electron-rich area able to host hard metal ions. When considering the alkaline earth series (AE), the [Cu(H(-2)L)] species binds all metal ions, with the exception of Mg(2+), exhibiting the relevant property to discriminate Ca(2+) versus Mg(2+) at physiological pH 7.4; the binding of the AE metal is visible to the naked eye. The stability constant values of the trinuclear [AE{Cu(H(-2)L)}2](2+) species formed reach the maximum for Ca(2+) (log K=7.7). Ca(2+) also forms a tetranuclear [Ca{Cu(H(-2)L)}]2(4+) species at a high Ca(2+) concentration. Tri- and tetranuclear calcium complexes show blue- and pink-colored crystals, respectively. [Cu(H(-2)L)] is the most active species in inducing DNA alterations. The DNA damages are compatible with its hydrolytic cleavages.

  18. Fragment size for calculations on alkaline-earth oxides by the crystal cluster SCF-X/sub approx. /-RW method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobach, V.A.; Sobolev, A.B.; Shul' gin, B.V.

    1987-05-01

    Calculations have been performed on the clusters (A/sub x/B/sub y/) (x = 1, 13; y = 6, 14), corresponding to perfect crystals of the alkaline-earth oxides (AEO) MgO, CaO, and SrO by means of methods involving molecular clusters (MC) and crystalline clusters (CC) in the SCF-X/sub approx./-RW method. It is found that MC is unsuitable for describing perfect AEO, because they have a long-range Coulomb interaction and a potential cluster effect. Even in the CC method, the nonstoichiometric composition of (A/sub x/B/sub y/) for x < 13 and y < 14 does not allow one to obtain satisfactory agreement with the observed optical and x-ray spectra. The (A/sub 13/B/sub 14/) and (B/sub 13/A/sub 14/) clusters reproduce satisfactorily the partial composition of the valence band (VB) and the conduction band (CB), as well as the widths of those bands, the fine structure of the K emission spectrum for oxygen in MgO, and the observed electron-density distribution. A study is made of the effects of varying the radii of the spheres on the error from the region between the spheres with muffin-tin averaging.

  19. Size of the fragment for crystal cluster SCF-X/sub /-SW calculations of alkaline earth metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobach, V.A.; Sobolev, A.B.; Shul' gin, B.V.

    Calculation of (A/sub x/B/sub y/) (x=1, 13; y=6, 14) clusters, corresponding to ideal crystals of alkaline earth metal oxides (AEMO) MgO, CaO, SrO by means of molecular cluster (MC) and crystal cluster (CC) SCF-X/sub /-SW method is carried out. MC method is not suitable for description of ideal AEMO electron structure due to long-range Coulomb interaction and potential cluster effect. Even in CC method at x < 13 and y < 14 (A/sub x/B/sub y/) cluster nonstoichiometry is inhibitory to the obtaining of satisfactory agreement with the experimental optical and X-ray spectra. (A13B14) and (B13A14) clusters satisfactorily reproduce partial composition of valence band (VB) and conduction band (CB), VB and CB widths, a fine structure of oxygen K-emission spectra in MgO and also experimental distribution of electron density. Sphere radii variation effect on the value of intersphere region error with muffin-tin averaging is considered.

  20. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure and Thermochemistry of Alkaline-Earth Oxide-Coated Thermionic Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, E. K.; Bassey, E.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1998-01-01

    NASA LeRC has a broad, active cathode technology development program in which both experimental and theoretical studies are being employed to further development of thermionic cathodes for use as electron sources in vacuum devices for communications and other space applications. One important type of thermionic cathode under development is the alkaline-earth oxide-coated (BaO, SrO, CaO) cathode. Significant improvements in the emission characteristics of this cathode have been obtained through modification of the chemical composition and morphology of the oxide coating, with the best result thus far coming from the addition of In2O3 and Sc2O3. Whereas the In2O3 produces a finer, more uniform particle structure, the exact chemical state and role of the Sc2O3 in the emission enhancement is unknown. The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to combine the studies of the surface chemistry and electron emission at NASA LeRC of chemically modified oxide coatings with a study of the thermochemistry and crystal structure using X-ray diffraction equipment and expertise at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). The study at CAU is intended to provide the description and understanding of the structure and thermochemistry needed for further improvement and optimization of the modified coatings. A description of the experimental procedure, preliminary X-ray diffraction test results, together with the design of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber necessary for high temperature thermochemistry studies will be presented.

  1. Conversion of fructose, glucose, and cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by alkaline earth phosphate catalysts in hot compressed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daorattanachai, Pornlada; Khemthong, Pongtanawat; Viriya-Empikul, Nawin; Laosiripojana, Navadol; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak

    2012-12-01

    The phosphates of alkaline earth metals (calcium and strontium) synthesized by precipitation process in acetone-water media system were used as catalysts for converting fructose, glucose, and cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) under hot compressed water condition. It was found that the phosphates of calcium and strontium effectively catalyzed the HMF formation from fructose and glucose dehydration and cellulose hydrolysis/dehydration reaction, as compared with the non-catalytic system. The XRD analysis confirmed the CaP(2)O(6) and α-Sr(PO(3))(2) crystalline phases of the catalyst samples, while acid strength of both catalysts was in a range of +3.3 ≤ H(0) ≤ +4.8. From the study, CaP(2)O(6) and α-Sr(PO(3))(2) showed similar catalytic performance toward the dehydration of sugars, providing the HMF yields of 20-21% and 34-39% from glucose and fructose, respectively; whereas the total yield of glucose and HMF from the hydrolysis/dehydration of cellulose over α-Sr(PO(3))(2) (34%) was higher than that over CaP(2)O(6) (17.4%).

  2. CO2 gasification reactivity of biomass char: catalytic influence of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahijani, Pooya; Zainal, Zainal Alimuddin; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Mohammadi, Maedeh

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of alkali (Na, K), alkaline earth (Ca, Mg) and transition (Fe) metal nitrates on CO2 gasification reactivity of pistachio nut shell (PNS) char. The preliminary gasification experiments were performed in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and the results showed considerable improvement in carbon conversion; Na-char>Ca-char>Fe-char>K-char>Mg-char>raw char. Based on TGA studies, NaNO3 (with loadings of 3-7 wt%) was selected as the superior catalyst for further gasification studies in bench-scale reactor; the highest reactivity was devoted to 5 wt% Na loaded char. The data acquired for gasification rate of catalyzed char were fitted with several kinetic models, among which, random pore model was adopted as the best model. Based on obtained gasification rate constant and using the Arrhenius plot, activation energy of 5 wt% Na loaded char was calculated as 151.46 kJ/mol which was 53 kJ/mol lower than that of un-catalyzed char. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of alkaline earth metals on molecular structure of 3-nitrobenzoic acid in comparison with alkali metals effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonowicz, M; Regulska, E; Lewandowski, W

    2011-11-01

    The influence of beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium cations on the electronic system of 3-nitrobenzoic acid was studied in comparison with studied earlier alkali metal ions. The vibrational FT-IR (in KBr and ATR techniques) and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded for 3-nitrobenzoic acid and its salts. Characteristic shifts in IR and NMR spectra along 3-nitrobenzoates of divalent metal series Mg→Ba were compared with series of univalent metal Li→Cs salts. Good correlations between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra for 3-nitrobenzoates and ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, atomic radius and ionization energy of metals were found for alkaline earth metals as well as for alkali metals. The density functional (DFT) hybrid method B3LYP with two basis sets: 6-311++G** and LANL2DZ were used to calculate optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra as well as chemical shifts in NMR spectra were obtained. Geometric aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  4. Sol-Gel Synthesis and Luminescent Characteristic of Doped Eu3+ Silicate-Silica Phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liangzhun; Yu Xibin; Yang Shiping; Zhou Pingle; Tang Jinfeng; Peng Xiudong

    2005-01-01

    Eu-doped silicate complex gel nano-particles was obtained by sol-gel process and characterized with TEM, XRD, PL, etc. The well dispersed particles have particle size about 60~70 nm with specific surface area 98.3 m2·g-1. The complex gel phosphor gives a broad and strong luminescent emission originating from Eu2+ ions centered at 425 nm. The emission band shifts to shorter wavelengths with the increase of the ion radius of the alkali earth metals, but the band becomes red-shifted gradually with the increase of the ion radius of the alkali metals(except Li+). These divalent Eu2+ ions originate in inequivalent substitution of the alkaline earth ions. The presence of alkaline ions is favorable for the increasing emission intensity of the Eu2+ and lowering crystalline temperature of the silicate complex gel.

  5. Lightweight Heat Resistant Geopolymer-based Materials Synthesized from Red Mud and Rice Husk Ash Using Sodium Silicate Solution as Alkaline Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoc Thang Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer is an inorganic polymer composite with potentials to replace Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC-based materials in the future because of its lower energy consumption, minimal CO2 emissions and lower production cost as it utilizes industrial waste resources. Hence, geopolymerization and the process to produce geopolymers for various applications like building materials can be considered as green industry. Moreover, in our study, the raw materials we used are red mud and rice husk ash, which are are industrial and agricultural wastes that need to be managed to reduce their impact to the environment. The red mud and rice husk ash combined with sodium silicate (water glass solution were mixed to form geopolymer materials. Moreover, the geopolymer specimens were also tested for heat resistance at a temperature of 1000°C for 2 hours. Results suggest high heat resistance with an increase of compressive strength after exposed at high temperature.

  6. Effect of H2O on metal-silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe: Implications for the oxidation state of the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clesi, V.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Manthilake, G.; Fabbrizio, A.; Andrault, D.

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the metal-silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe during core mantle differentiation of terrestrial planets under hydrous conditions. For this, we equilibrated a molten hydrous CI chondrite model composition with various Fe-rich alloys in the system Fe-C-Ni-Co-Si-S in a multi-anvil over a range of P, T, fO2 and water content (5-20 GPa, 2073-2500 K, from 1 to 5 log units below the iron-wüstite (IW) buffer and for XH2O varying from 500 ppm to 1.5 wt%). By comparing the present experiments with the available data sets on dry systems, we observes that the effect of water on the partition coefficients of moderately siderophile elements is only moderate. For example, for iron we observed a decrease in the partition coefficient of Fe (Dmet/silFe) from 9.5 to 4.3, with increasing water content of the silicate melt, from 0 to 1.44 wt%, respectively. The evolution of metal-silicate partition coefficients of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe are modelled based on sets of empirical parameters. These empirical models are then used to refine the process of core segregation during accretion of Mars and the Earth. It appears that the likely presence of 3.5 wt% water on Mars during the core-mantle segregation could account for ∼74% of the FeO content of the Martian mantle. In contrast, water does not play such an important role for the Earth; only 4-6% of the FeO content of its mantle could be due to the water-induced Fe-oxidation, for a likely initial water concentration of 1.8 wt%. Thus, in order to reproduce the present-day FeO content of 8 wt% in the mantle, the Earth could initially have been accreted from a large fraction (between 85% and 90%) of reducing bodies (similar to EH chondrites), with 10-15% of the Earth's mass likely made of more oxidized components that introduced the major part of water and FeO to the Earth. This high proportion of enstatite chondrites in the original constitution of the Earth is consistent with the 17O,48Ca,50Ti,62Ni

  7. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  8. Structural criteria for the rational design of selective ligands. Extension of the MM3 force field to aliphatic ether complexes of the alkali and alkaline earth cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, B.P.; Rustad, J.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1994-07-13

    Structural requirements for strain-free metal ion complexation by an aliphatic ether group are investigated through the use of both ab initio molecular orbital and molecular mechanics calculations. Hartree-Fock calculations on simple models, M-O(Me)[sub 2] and M-O(Me)(Et), reveal a preference for trigonal planar geometry when aliphatic ether oxygens are coordinated to alkali and alkaline earth cations. This preference is found to be strongest in small, high-valent cations and weakest in large, low-valent cations. Results from the Hartree-Fock calculations are used to extend the MM3 force field for calculation on aliphatic ether complexes with the alkali (Li to Cs) and alkaline earth (Mg to Ba) cations. The resulting molecular model (i) reproduces the experimental crystal structures of 51 different complexes of multidentate ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations, (ii) explains experimental trends in the structure of five-membered chelate rings of aliphatic ethers, (iii) reveals a fundamental difference between the metal ion size selectivity of five-membered chelate rings of ethers versus that of amines, and (iv) rationalizes trends in the stability of four potassium complexes with the diasteriomers of dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Energetics and bonding in aluminosilicate rings with alkali metal and alkaline-earth metal charge-compensating cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Carlo; Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2012-08-23

    The stabilizing effect of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions on the oxygen donors of four- and six-membered faujausite-like rings has been calculated in terms of Kohn-Sham core-level (O1s) energy shifts with respect to these same complexes without cations. The results confirm and complement earlier investigations by Vayssilov and co-workers where Na(+) and K(+) were the only complexing cations. The oxygen donor centers in six-membered rings are stabilized by -3.6 ± 0.4, -3.9 ± 0.5, -7.3 ± 0.1, and -7.6 ± 0.2 eV by K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) adions, respectively. The energy shifts are even greater for four-membered rings where the stabilization effects attain -3.7 ± 0.1, -4.1 ± 0.1, -8.1 ± 0.1, and -9.0 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. These effects are also observed on the low-lying σ-bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals (MOs) of the oxygen framework, but in a less systematic fashion. Clear relationships with the core-level shifts are found when the effects of alkali metal complexation are evaluated through electron localization/delocalization indices, which are defined in terms of the whole wave function and not just of the individual orbitals. Complexation with cations not only involves a small but significant electron sharing of the cation with the oxygen atoms in the ring but also enhances electron exchange among oxygen atoms while reducing that between the O atoms and the Si or Al atoms bonded to them. Such changes slightly increase from Na to K and from Mg to Ca, whereas they are significantly enhanced for alkaline-earth metals relative to alkali metals. With respect to Al-free complexes, Si/Al substitution and cation charge compensation generally enhance electron delocalization among the O atoms, except between those that are linked through an Al atom, and cause either an increased or a decreased Si-O ionicity (smaller/higher electron exchange) depending on the position of O in the chain relative to the Al atom(s). The generally increased

  10. The influence of synthesis methods on the morpho - structural and luminescent characteristics of rare earth silicate phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muresan, L. E.; Cadis, A. I.; Perhaita, I.; Oprea, B. F.; Silipas, D. T.

    2013-11-01

    Cerium activated yttrium silicate (Y2SiO5:Ce) phosphors were prepared by two different wet-chemical synthesis routes namely: simultaneous addition of reagents (SimAd) and solution combustion (SC) using yttriumcerium nitrate and urea as starting materials. TEOS or SiO2 fume were used as Si sources. A comparative study regarding the morpho-structural and luminescent properties of Y2SiO5:Ce phosphors is presented. The influence of the silicon source, same as the firing temperature on the samples characteristics were discussed. TG-SDTA, FT-IR, SEM, XRD and photoluminescence investigations were used to characterize the precursors and the corresponding phosphors.

  11. Synthesis of monomeric and polymeric alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes using a phosphinoselenoic amide ligand in metal coordination sphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayeeta Bhattacharjee; Ravi K Kottalanka; Harinath Adimulam; Tarun K Panda

    2014-09-01

    We report the monomeric complexes of magnesium and calcium of composition [M(THF){2-Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}2] [M= Mg (3), n = 1 andM = Ca (4), n = 2)] and polymeric complexes of potassium and barium of composition [K(THF)2{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}] (2) and [K(THF)Ba{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}3](5) respectively. The potassium complex 2 was readily prepared by the reaction of potassium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide with phosphinoselenoic amide ligand (1) at ambient temperature. The calcium complex 4 was prepared by two synthetic routes: in the first method, commonly known as salt metathesis reaction, the potassium complex 2 was made to react with alkaline earth metal diiodide at room temperature to afford the corresponding calcium complex. The metal bis(trimethylsilyl)amides were made to react with protic ligand 1 in the second method to eliminate the volatile bis(trimethyl)silyl amine. The magnesium complex 3 and barium complex 5 were prepared only through the first method. Solid-state structures of all the new complexes were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The smaller ionic radii of Mg2+ (0.72Å) and Ca2+ (0.99Å) ions form the monomeric complex, whereas the larger ions K+ (1.38Å) and Ba2+ (1.35Å) were found to form onedimensional polymeric complexes with monoanionic ligand 1. Compound 2 serves an example of magnesium complex with a Mg-Se direct bond.

  12. Luminescence and Valence of Tb Ions in Alkaline Earth Stannates and Zirconates Examined by X-ray Absorption Fine Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kazushige; Shimizu, Yuhei; Nagamizu, Kouta; Matsuo, Masashi; Honma, Tetsuo

    2017-10-03

    The difference in Tb(3+) green luminescence intensities in doped perovskite(ABO3)-type alkaline earth stannates, AeSnO3 (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba), and the Mg codoping effect on the luminescence intensities in doped CaMO3 (M = Sn, Zr) were investigated utilizing the X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS) of the Tb LIII absorption edge. It is considered that the local symmetry at A sites is responsible for the different Tb(3+) luminescence intensities in AeSnO3 (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) doped with Tb ions at A sites. However, it was found from the XAFS spectra that some Tb ions are unintentionally stabilized at B sites as Tb(4+), especially in BaSnO3. Not only the central symmetry for Tb(3+) at A sites but also the presence of Tb(4+) at B sites were considered to bring about the absence of Tb(3+) luminescence in doped cubic BaSnO3. No obvious changes in the Tb(3+) local structure at A sites were detected between Tb single doped and Tb-Mg codoped CaMO3 (M = Sn, Zr) from the extended XAFS oscillation, but the trace of Tb(4+) at B sites in the Tb single doped sample was observed in the X-ray absorption near edge structures. It is, therefore, considered that the Tb(3+) luminescence enhancement by Mg codoping is primarily attributed to the charge compensation rather than the changes in the local structure around Tb(3+) at A sites.

  13. Alkaline-earth elements of scalp hair and presence of hypertension in housewives: A perspective of chronic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Yan, Lailai; Sun, Ying; Yan, Jingjing; Lu, Qun; Zhang, Jingxu; Li, Zhiwen

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between population intakes of alkaline-earth elements (AEEs) and hypertension risk remains under discussion. Hair AEE concentrations can indicate their intake levels into human body. Thus, we aimed to investigate an association of hair AEE concentrations with hypertension risk, and the potential effect of dietary habit on this association. We recruited 398 housewives [163 subjects with hypertension (case group) and 235 subjects without hypertension (control group)] in Shanxi Province of north China. The scalp hair grown in the recent 2 years of each subject was collected and analyzed for the four concerned AEEs [i.e. calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba)]. Our study results revealed that median concentrations (μg/g hair) of hair AEEs in the case group were systematically lower than those in control group [i.e. 701 vs. 1271 of Ca, 55.2 vs. 88.3 of Mg, 4.60 vs. 10.4 of Sr, and 1.02 vs. 1.68 of Ba]. Lower levels of the four individual AEEs of hair were associated with an increased presence of hypertension, respectively. Moreover, hair AEE concentrations were all positively correlated with the ingestion frequencies of meat, eggs, fresh vegetables, and fruits, while negatively with that of salted vegetables. A high ingestion frequency of fresh vegetables was associated with a lower prevalence of hypertension with or without adjusting confounders, while salted vegetables revealed a reverse tend. It was concluded that low hair AEEs, as markers of their long-term dietary intake, were associated with the presence of hypertension in a rural Chinese women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Band structure and electrical properties of MBE grown HfO{sub 2} - based alkaline earth Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Dudek; Grzegorz, Lupina; Grzegorz, Kozlowski; Jarek, Dabrowski; Gunther, Lippert; Hans-Joachim, Muessig; Thomas, Schroeder [IHP-Microelectronics, Frankfurt, Oder (Germany); Dieter, Schmeisser [BTU, Cottbus (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Ultra thin dielectric films (<20 nm) deposited on TiN electrodes are interesting for MIM capacitor application. High capacitance density and dielectric permittivity must be accompanied by extremely low leakage currents (10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2}) at bias 0.5 V. To achieve such low leakage currents, high band gap and proper band alignment is required. Occupied electronic states can be probed with standard laboratory photoemission methods. Probing of unoccupied states is more challenging. Synchrotron based PES in combination with XAS forms a powerful method to study the band alignment. ASAM end station located at the U 49/2 PGM 2 beamline of BESSY II (Berlin) offers excellent conditions for performing such measurements. We investigated HfO{sub 2} - based alkaline earth perovskite - BaHfO{sub 3} with subsequent admixture of TiO{sub 2}, resulting in formation of BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} compound. The analysis of data indicates that band gap for HfO{sub 2} is similar to BaHfO{sub 3} and amounts 5.8 eV; for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} it decreases to 3.8 eV. We conclude that the addition of TiO{sub 2} to BaHfO{sub 3} increases significantly the dielectric permittivity but also impacts the band gap alignment. The conduction band offset shrinks, influencing the leakage current behavior.

  15. Mixed alkali and alkaline-earth borate Li2Sr4B12O23 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshak, A. H.

    2015-10-01

    A comprehensive theoretical investigation of the electronic band structure, density of states, electron charge density distribution and the optical properties for mixed alkali and alkaline-earth borate Li2Sr4B12O23 (LSBO) single crystals were performed. The experimental geometrical structure was optimized by minimizing the forces acting on each atom. Calculations were performed using the full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FPLAPW + lo) method within the local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). Our calculations show that LSBO crystal is a direct band gap semiconductor. The calculated band gap is 4.64 eV (LDA), 4.92 eV (GGA) and 5.51 eV (mBJ). An earlier calculation using the CASTEP code within LDA obtained a band gap of about 4.66 eV. To overcome the well-known LDA underestimation of the energy gap we have used GGA and mBJ . We find that mBJ succeed by large amount in bringing the calculated bond lengths in good agreement with the experimental data. Also we found that using mBJ to calculate the optical properties gives a birefringence of about 0.068 (at λ = 586.5 nm) in excellent agreement with the experimental data (0.068 at λ = 586.5 nm). Therefore, we believe that the mBJ calculations reported here show excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Ab Initio Quantum Mechanical Study of the Structure and Stability of the Alkaline Earth Metal Oxides and Peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königstein, Markus; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1998-10-01

    We report a detailed computationally study of the stability of the alkaline earth metal peroxidesMO2(M=Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, Be) with respect to decomposition into the corresponding oxidesMOand molecular oxygen using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) techniques. A comparison between calculated and experimental binding energies indicates that the DFT method is most suitable for a correct description of the peroxide bond. The DFT reaction energies for the peroxide decompositionMO2→MO+{1}/{2}O2show that only BaO2and SrO2are thermodynamically stable compounds, while CaO2(in the calcium carbide structure), MgO2, and BeO2(in the pyrite structure) are energetically unstable with reaction energies of -24.7, -26.8, and -128.7kJ/mol, respectively, and are therefore unlikely to exist as pure compounds. The published calcium carbide structure for CaO2is probably incorrect, at least for pure calcium peroxide, since apart from the thermodynamical instability the compound is more stable in the pyrite structure by 25.5 kJ/mol. Our analysis suggests that the water and/or hydrogen peroxide content of experimentally prepared MgO2samples is necessary for the stabilization of the structure, while BeO2is clearly unstable under ambient conditions. We studied also the effect of the zero point energies and the entropies on the decomposition free energies and, for this purpose, performed atomistic lattice simulations based on interatomic potentials, which we derived from ourab initiodata; the results indicate a negligible effect of the zero point energies, while the entropy terms favor the decomposition reaction by ca. 20 kJ/mol at 298.15 K.

  17. Ab initio quantum mechanical study of the structure and stability of the alkaline earth metal oxides and peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigstein, M.; Catlow, C.R.A. [Royal Institution of Great Britain, London (United Kingdom). Davy Faraday Research Lab.

    1998-10-01

    The authors report a detailed computational study of the stability of the alkaline earth metal peroxides MO{sub 2} (M = Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, Be) with respect to decomposition into the corresponding oxides Mo and molecular oxygen using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) techniques. A comparison between calculated and experimental binding energies indicates that the DFT method is most suitable for a correct description of the peroxide bond. The DFT reaction energies for the peroxide decomposition MO{sub 2} {yields} MO + {1/2}O{sub 2} show that only BaO{sub 2} and SrO{sub 2} are thermodynamically stable compounds, while CaO{sub 2} (in the calcium carbide structure), MgO{sub 2}, and BeO{sub 2} (in the pyrite structure) are energetically unstable with reaction energies of {minus}24.7, {minus}26.8, and {minus}128.7 kJ/mol, respectively, and are therefore unlikely to exist as pure compounds. The published calcium carbide structure for CaO{sub 2} is probably incorrect, at least for pure calcium peroxide, since apart from the thermodynamical instability the compound is more stable in the pyrite structure by 25.5 kJ/mol. The analysis suggests that the water and/or hydrogen peroxide content of experimentally prepared MgO{sub 2} samples is necessary for the stabilization of the structure, while BeO{sub 2} is clearly unstable under ambient conditions. The authors studied also the effect of the zero point energies and the entropies on the decomposition free energies and, for this purpose, performed atomistic lattice simulations based on interatomic potentials, which they derived from their ab initio data; the results indicate a negligible effect of the zero point energies, while the entropy terms favor the decomposition reaction by ca. 20 kJ/mol at 298.15 K.

  18. Morphology and performances of the anodic oxide films on Ti6Al4V alloy formed in alkaline-silicate electrolyte with aminopropyl silane addition under low potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiali; Wang, Jinwei, E-mail: wangjw@ustb.edu.cn; Yuan, Hongye

    2013-11-01

    Oxide films on Ti6Al4V alloy are prepared using sodium hydroxide–sodium silicate as the base electrolyte with addition of aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APS) as additive by potentiostatic anodizing under 10 V. APS is incorporated into the films during anodizing and the surface morphology of the oxide films is changed from particle stacked to honeycomb-like porous surfaces as shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDX). The surface roughness and aminopropyl existence on the oxide films result in their differences in wettability as tested by the surface profile topography and contact angle measurements. The anti-abrasive ability of the anodic films is improved with the addition of APS due to its toughening effects and serving as lubricants in the ceramic oxide films as measured by ball-on-disk friction test. Also, potentiodynamic corrosion test proves that their anticorrosive ability in 3.5 wt.% NaCl is greatly improved as reflected by their much lower corrosion current (I{sub corr}) and higher corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) than those of the substrate.

  19. Luminescence behaviors of Eu- and Dy-codoped alkaline earth metal aluminate phosphors through potassium carbonate coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chen-Jui, E-mail: cjliang@fcu.edu.tw; Siao, Hao-Yi

    2016-07-01

    An electronic energy mechanism of activator and sensitizer was established to describe the luminescence behaviors of Eu- and Dy-codoped M(II)Al{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M(II) = Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg) phosphors through potassium carbonate coprecipitation. Experimental results demonstrated that the prepared phosphors exhibited superior crystallinity at a temperature lower than 950 °C. The phosphors are ordered according to emission intensity as follows Ca- > Ba- > Sr- > Mg-containing phosphors. The energy level for Eu{sup 2+} 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} → 4f{sup 7}, Eu{sup 3+4}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F, and Dy{sup 3+4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H transitions and the effects of nephelauxetic and crystal field in Ba-, Sr-, and Ca-containing phosphors were discussed. The energy gap, (hv){sub em}, between 5d and 4f of Eu{sup 2+} ion is strongly affected by host composition, crystal field strength, and nephelauxetic effect. The infrared emission of 4f{sub 9/2} → 6h for Dy{sup 3+} is merely depend on the transfer of energy from Eu{sup 2+} upon excited. Ca-containing phosphor with maximum (hv){sub em} is attributed to the lowest bond length of Ca−O and highest ionization potential of Ca{sup 2+} ion, which leads to the effects of crystal field and nephelauxetic greater than that in the other phosphors. - Highlights: • The list of the collected figure captions: • Develop a new coprecipitation method to prepare high efficiency phosphors. • Obtain superior crystallinity with lower calcination temperature. • Luminescence behavior of Eu- and Dy-codoped on aluminate phosphors is discussed. • Investigate the effects of alkaline earth metal containing on crystal field and nephelauxetic.

  20. Structures and Spectroscopy Studies of Two M(II-Phosphonate Coordination Polymers Based on Alkaline Earth Metals (M = Ba, Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui-Rong Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The two examples of alkaline-earth M(II-phosphonate coordination polymers, [Ba2(L(H2O9]·3H2O (1 and [Mg1.5(H2O9]·(L-H21.5·6H2O (2 (H4L = H2O3PCH2N(C4H8NCH2PO3H2, N,N′-piperazinebis(methylenephosphonic acid, (L-H2 = O3PH2CHN(C4H8NHCH2PO3 have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, PXRD, TG-DSC, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 possesses a 2D inorganic-organic alternate arrangement layer structure built from 1D inorganic chains through the piperazine bridge, in which the ligand L−4 shows two types of coordination modes reported rarely at the same time. In 1, both crystallographic distinct Ba(1 and Ba(2 ions adopt 8-coordination two caps and 9-coordination three caps triangular prism geometry structures, respectively. Compound 2 possesses a zero-dimensional mononuclear structure with two crystallographic distinct Mg(II ions. Free metal cations   [MgO6]n2+ and uncoordinated anions (L-H2n2- are joined together by static electric force. Results of photoluminescent measurement indicate three main emission bands centered at 300 nm, 378.5 nm, and 433 nm for 1 and 302 nm, 378 nm, and 434.5 nm for 2 (λex=235 nm, respectively. The high energy emissions could be derived from the intraligand π∗-n transition stations of H4L (310 nm and 382 nm, λex=235 nm, while the low energy emission (>400 nm of 1-2 may be due to the coordination effect with metal(II ions.

  1. The influence of alkaline earth metal equilibria on the rheological, melting and textural properties of Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Darren R; McSweeney, Paul L H

    2013-11-01

    The total calcium content of cheese, along with changes in the equilibrium between soluble and casein (CN)-bound calcium during ripening can have a major impact on its rheological, functional and textural properties; however, little is known about the effect of other alkaline earth metals. NaCl was partially substituted with MgCl2 or SrCl2 (8·7 and 11·4 g/kg curd, respectively) at the salting stage of cheesemaking to study their effects on cheese. Three cheeses were produced: Mg supplemented (+Mg), Sr supplemented (+Sr) and a control Cheddar cheese. Ca, Mg and Sr contents of cheese and expressible serum obtained therefrom were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Addition of Mg2+ or Sr2+ had no effect on % moisture, protein, fat and extent of proteolysis. A proportion of the added Mg2+ and Sr2+ became CN-bound. The level of CN-bound Mg was higher in the +Mg cheese than the control throughout ripening. The level of CN-bound Ca and Mg decreased during ripening in all cheeses, as did % CN-bound Sr in the +Sr cheese. The presence of Sr2+ increased % CN-bound Ca and Mg at a number of ripening times. Adding Mg2+ had no effect on % CN-bound Ca. The +Sr cheese exhibited a higher G' at 70 °C and a lower LTmax than the control and +Mg cheeses throughout ripening. The +Sr cheese had significantly lower meltability compared with the control and +Mg cheeses after 2 months of ripening. Hardness values of the +Sr cheese were higher at week 2 than the +Mg and control cheeses. Addition of Mg2+ did not influence the physical properties of cheese. Supplementing cheese with Sr appeared to have effects analogous to those previously reported for increasing Ca content. Sr2+ may form and/or modify nanocluster crosslinks causing an increase in the strength of the para-casein matrix.

  2. Silicic Large Igneous Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott Bryan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are the end-product of huge additions of magma to the continental crust both at the surface and at depth. Since the first categorisation of LIPs by Coffin & Eldholm (1994), it has been recognised that LIPs are more varied inform, age and character, and this includes the recognition of Silicic LIPs. Silicic LIPs are the largest accumulations of primary volcaniclastic rocks at the Earth's surface with areal extents >0.1 Mkm2 and extrusive and subvolcanic intrusive volumes >0.25 Mkm3. The Late Palaeozoic to Cenozoic Silicic LIP events are the best recognised and are similar in terms of their dimension, crustal setting, volcanic architecture and geochemistry.

  3. The Effect Siliceous Earth/Carbon Black Hybrid Filler on Properties of Natural Rubber%硅土/炭黑复合填料对天然橡胶性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪晓敏; 陈静; 钟杰平; 许逵; 潘荣楷; 高利军

    2016-01-01

    对硅土进行活化和改性处理,通过测定吸油值、吸碘值进行表征。将经改性处理的硅土与炭黑复合用于填充天然橡胶,进行物理机械性能测试。结果表明:硅土与炭黑并用,与单独填充炭黑相比,对橡胶的加工性能影响不明显。拉伸性能测试结果表明,复合填料与单独填充炭黑相比,能提高NR硫化胶拉伸强度,扯断伸长率提高。当硅土与炭黑质量比为2∶5时,NR硫化胶的拉伸强度达到最大。硅土和炭黑并用能增强天然橡胶的综合性能,降低成本。%Siliceous earth from Fujian was selected as raw material. The composition and structure were analyzed. Siliceous earth was modified by KH570 and characterized by iodine absorption number and DBP. The modiifed siliceous earth was blended with silica to ifll natural rubber (NR). Curing characteristics, mechanical properties of NR composites were analyzed. The results show that when carbon black and siliceous earth work together, the inlfuence on the processing performance of NR isn’t obvious. Tensile test results show that the hybrid ifller compared with carbon black used alone, can improve the tensile strength of NR composites, and signiifcantly increase the rubber elasticity. When the mass ratio of siliceous earth to carbon black is2∶5, the tensile strenth of NR composites is the best. Siliceous earth and carbon black using together can inhance the comprehensive properties of NR and reduce the cost.

  4. Removal of toxic and alkali/alkaline earth metals during co-thermal treatment of two types of MSWI fly ashes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Qiao, Yu; Jin, Limei; Ma, Chuan; Paterson, Nigel; Sun, Lushi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to vaporize heavy metals and alkali/alkaline earth metals from two different types of fly ashes by thermal treatment method. Fly ash from a fluidized bed incinerator (HK fly ash) was mixed with one from a grate incinerator (HS fly ash) in various proportions and thermally treated under different temperatures. The melting of HS fly ash was avoided when treated with HK fly ash. Alkali/alkaline earth metals in HS fly ash served as Cl-donors to promote the vaporization of heavy metals during thermal treatment. With temperature increasing from 800 to 900°C, significant amounts of Cl, Na and K were vaporized. Up to 1000°C in air, less than 3% of Cl and Na and less than 5% of K were retained in ash. Under all conditions, Cd can be vaporized effectively. The vaporization of Pb was mildly improved when treated with HS fly ash, while the effect became less pronounced above 900°C. Alkali/alkaline earth metals can promote Cu vaporization by forming copper chlorides. Comparatively, Zn vaporization was low and only slightly improved by HS fly ash. The low vaporization of Zn could be caused by the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4. Under all conditions, less than 20% of Cr was vaporized. In a reductive atmosphere, the vaporization of Cd and Pb were as high as that in oxidative atmosphere. However, the vaporization of Zn was accelerated and that of Cu was hindered because the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4 and copper chloride was depressed in reductive atmosphere. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Identifying the presence of a disulfide linkage in peptides by the selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide from collisionally activated alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hugh I; Beauchamp, J L

    2008-01-30

    We report a new method for identifying disulfide linkages in peptides using mass spectrometry. This is accomplished by collisional activation of singly charged cationic alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes, which results in the highly selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide (H2S2). Complexes of peptides possessing disulfide bonds with sodium and alkaline earth metal are generated using electrospray ionization (ESI). Isolation followed by collision induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged peptide complexes results in selective elimination of H2S2 to leave newly formed dehydroalanine residues in the peptide. Further activation of the product yields sequence information in the region previously short circuited by the disulfide bond. For example, singly charged magnesium and calcium ion bound complexes of [Lys8]-vasopressin exhibit selective elimination of H2S2 via low-energy CID. Further isolation of the product followed by CID yields major b- and z-type fragments revealing the peptide sequence in the region between the newly formed dehydroalanine residues. Numerous model peptides provide mechanistic details for the selective elimination of H2S2. The process is initiated starting with a metal stabilized enolate anion at Cys, followed by cleavage of the S-C bond. An examination of the peptic digest of insulin provides an example of the application of the selective elimination of H2S2 for the identification of peptides with disulfide linkages. The energetics and mechanisms of H2S2 elimination from model compounds are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  6. Chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth and transition metals a using monolithic silica column with bonded N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Jones, Phil; Paull, Brett

    2013-02-08

    A commercially available porous silica monolithic column (Onyx Monolithic Si, 100 mm×4.6 mm I.D.) was 'in-column' covalently functionalised with 2-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) groups, and applied to the simultaneous and rapid separation of alkaline earth and transition metal ions, using high-performance chelation ion chromatography (HPCIC). With a 0.3mM dipicolinic acid (DPA) containing eluent, the baseline separation of various common transition and heavy metal ions and the four alkaline earth metal ions could be achieved in under 14 min with a flow rate of just 0.8 mL/min. Detection was achieved using spectrophotometric detection at 540 nm after post-column reaction (PCR) with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR). Significant effects from variation of eluent nature, concentration and temperature upon selectivity and retention were demonstrated with the new monolithic silica chelating phase. Under optimised conditions (0.165 M LiNO(3) eluent, pH 2.5), peak efficiencies of 54,000, 60,000 and 64,000 N/m, for Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Cd(2+), respectively, were recorded, far exceeding that previously reported for IDA based chelation ion exchange columns.

  7. Enhanced Electroresponse of Alkaline Earth Metal-Doped Silica/Titania Spheres by Synergetic Effect of Dispersion Stability and Dielectric Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang-Min; Lee, Seungae; Cheong, Oug Jae; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-09-01

    A series of alkaline earth metal-doped hollow SiO2/TiO2 spheres (EM-HST) are prepared as electrorheological (ER) materials via sonication-mediated etching method with various alkaline earth metal hydroxides as the etchant. The EM-HST spheres are assessed to determine how their hollow interior and metal-doping affects the ER activity. Both the dispersion stability and the dielectric properties of these materials are greatly enhanced by the proposed one-step etching method, which results in significant enhancement of ER activity. These improvements are attributed to increased particle mobility and interfacial polarization originating from the hollow nature of the EM-HST spheres and the effects of EM metal-doping. In particular, Ca-HST-based ER fluid exhibits ER performance which is 7.1-fold and 3.1-fold higher than those of nonhollow core/shell silica/titania (CS/ST) and undoped hollow silica/titania (HST)-based ER fluids, respectively. This study develops a versatile and simple approach to enhancing ER activity through synergetic effects arising from the combination of dispersion stability and the unique dielectric properties of hollow EM-HST spheres. In addition, the multigram scale production described in this experiment can be an excellent advantage for practical and commercial ER application.

  8. Syntheses, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Crystal Structure Determination from X-Ray Powder Diffraction Data of Alkaline Earth Dicyanamides M[N(CN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergens, Barbara; Irran, Elisabeth; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2001-03-01

    The alkaline earth dicyanamides Mg[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Ca[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Sr[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, and Ba[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2} were synthesized by ion exchange using Na[N(CN){sub 2}] and the respective nitrates or bromides as starting materials. The crystal structures were determined from X-ray powder diffractometry: Mg[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Pnnm, Z=2, a=617.14(3), b=716.97(3), and c=740.35(5) pm; Ca[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2} and Sr[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, C2/c, Z=4; Ca[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, a=1244.55(3), b=607.97(1), and c=789.81(1) pm, {beta}=98.864(2){degree}; Sr[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, a=1279.63(2), b=624.756(8), and c=817.56(1) pm, {beta}=99.787(1){degree}; Ba[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 2}, Pnma, Z=4, a=1368.68(7), b=429.07(7), and c=1226.26(2) pm. The dicyanamides consist of the respective alkaline earth cations and bent planar [N(CN){sub 2}]{sup -} ions. The structural features were correlated with vibrational spectroscopic data. The thermal behavior was studied by thermoanalytical experiments.

  9. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-05

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  10. MB82- (M=Be,Mg,Ca,Sr,and Ba):Planar octacoordinate alkaline earth metal atoms enclosed by boron rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Complexes involving planar octacoordinate alkaline earth metal atoms in the centers of eight-membered boron rings have been investigated by two density functional theory (DFT) methods.BeB82-with D8h symmetry is predicted to be stable,both geometrically and electronically,since a good match is achieved between the size of the central beryllium atom and the eight-membered boron ring.By contrast,the other alkaline earth metal atoms cannot be stabilized in the center of a planar eight-membered boron ring because of their large radii.By following the out-of-plane imaginary vibrational frequency,pyramidal C8v MgB82-,CaB82-,SrB82-,and BaB82-structures are obtained.The presence of delocalized π and σ valence molecular orbitals in D8h BeB82-gives rise to aromaticity,which is reflected by the value of the nucleus-independent chemical shift.The D8h BeB82-structure is confirmed to be the global minimum on the potential energy surface.

  11. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V.; Goddard, William A., III

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  12. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  13. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  14. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  15. Production of Synthesis Gas via Methane Reforming with CO2 on Ni/SiO2 Catalysts Promoted by Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈平; 侯昭胤; 郑小明

    2005-01-01

    Ni/SiO2 catalysts promoted by alkali metals K and Cs or alkaline earth metals Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba were prepared, characterized by H2-TPR and XRD, and used for the production of synthesis gas via methane reforming with CO2. Though K and Cs promoted Ni catalysts could eliminate coke deposition, the reforming activity of these promoted catalysts was decreased heavily. Mg and Ca promoted Ni/SiO2 catalysts exhibited excellent coke resistance ability with minor loss of the reforming activity of Ni/SiO2. Ba showed poor coke resistance ability and small amount of Sr increased the formation of coke. The possible mechanism of these promoters was discussed.

  16. Volatilisation of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during the gasification of a Victorian brown coal in CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quyn, Dimple Mody; Li, Chun-Zhu [CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Department of Chemical Engineering, PO Box 36, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Hayashi, Jun-ichiro [Centre for Advanced Research of Energy Conversion Materials, Hokkaido University, N13-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2005-08-25

    A Victorian brown coal was gasified in a bench-scale quartz fluidised-bed/fixed-bed reactor in order to study the volatilisation of Na, Ca, and Mg during devolatilisation and gasification and their roles in the reactivity of chars. It was found that the majority of Na was volatilised at 900 {sup o}C under all conditions and that a Na retention limit was achieved in the char with the progress of CO{sub 2} gasification. In some cases, the presence of CO{sub 2} during devolatilisation enhanced the Na retention in the char. In contrast, the retention of Ca (and Mg) was unaffected by CO{sub 2} during devolatilisation at 900C but decreased drastically upon nascent char gasification. The fundamental differences in volatilisation between the alkali and alkaline earth metallic species are discussed in this paper.

  17. Determination of rare earth elements, uranium and thorium in geological samples by ICP-MS, using an automatic fusion machine as an alkaline digestion tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granda, Luis; Rivera, Maria; Velasquez, Colon; Barona, Diego; Carpintero, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    At the present time, rare earth elements deposits have became in strategic resources for extraction of raw materials in order to manufacture high tech devices (computers, LCD, cell phones, batteries for hybrid vehicles, fiber optics and wind turbines) (1).The appropriate analytical determination of the REE ( rare earth elements) in sediment and rock samples , is important to find potential deposits and to recognize geological environments for identifying possible alterations and mineral occurrences. The alkaline fusion, which aim is to move the entire sample from solid to liquid state by forming water soluble complexes of boron and lithium, as a previous procedure for the determination of these elements, usually takes a lot of time due to the complexity of the analysis phase and by the addition of other reagents (Tm and HF ) (2) to compensate the lack of strict temperature control. The objective of this work is to develop an efficient alternative to alkaline digestion using an electrical fusion machine, which allows to create temperature programs with advanced process control and supports up to 5 samples simultaneously, which generates a reproducibility of the method and results during the melting step. Additionally, this new method permits the processing of a larger number of samples in a shorter time. The samples analyzed in this method were weighed into porcelain crucibles and subjected to calcination for 4 hours at 950 ° C in order to determine the Lost on Ignition (LOI ) , that serves to adjust the analytical results and to preserve the shelf life of the platinum ware. Subsequently, a fraction of the calcined sample was weighed into platinum crucibles and mixed with ultra-pure lithium metaborate ( flux ) 1:4 . The crucible was then placed in the fusion machine, which was programmed to take the sample from room temperature to 950 ° C in five minutes, make a small ramp to 970 ° C maintain that temperature for five minutes and download the melt in a 10 % v / v

  18. Alkaline earth metal-based metal-organic framework: hydrothermal synthesis, X-ray structure and heterogeneously catalyzed Claisen-Schmidt reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debraj; Maity, Tanmoy; Koner, Subratanath

    2014-09-14

    Two alkaline earth metal-based carboxylate systems, [Mg(HL)(H2O)2]n (1) and [Ca(H2L)2]n (2) (H3L = chelidamic acid) have been hydrothermally synthesized, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, elemental analysis, and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Compound 1 has a 2D structure incorporating two water molecules. The dehydrated species, 1a, generated from 1 by removal of the coordinated water, has been characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis, IR, elemental analysis and variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction. Both 1 and its dehydrated species 1a catalyze the Claisen-Schmidt reaction under heterogeneous conditions, but 1a is a more effective catalyst under environmentally friendly conditions. The catalyst can readily be recovered and reused in successive cycles without detectable loss of activity. Compound 2 has a 3D structure and is thermally stable up to 540 °C, but is inactive catalytically.

  19. The coordination complex structures and hydrogen bonding in the three-dimensional alkaline earth metal salts (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) of (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2017-01-01

    (4-Aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) is used as an antihelminth in veterinary applications and was earlier used in the monosodium salt dihydrate form as the antisyphilitic drug atoxyl. Examples of complexes with this acid are rare. The structures of the alkaline earth metal (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) complexes with (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) have been determined, viz. hexaaquamagnesium bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonate] tetrahydrate, [Mg(H2O)6](C6H7AsNO3)·4H2O, (I), catena-poly[[[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O']-[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O

  20. Volatilisation of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during the pyrolysis of biomass: differences between sugar cane bagasse and cane trash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keown, Daniel M; Favas, George; Hayashi, Jun-ichiro; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2005-09-01

    Sugar cane bagasse and cane trash were pyrolysed in a novel quartz fluidised-bed/fixed-bed reactor. Quantification of the Na, K, Mg and Ca in chars revealed that pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, valence and biomass type were important factors influencing the volatilisation of these alkali and alkaline earth metallic (AAEM) species. Pyrolysis at a slow heating rate (approximately 10 K min(-1)) led to minimal (often biomass samples. Fast heating rates (>1000 K s(-1)), encouraging volatile-char interactions with the current reactor configuration, resulted in the volatilisation of around 80% of Na, K, Mg and Ca from bagasse during pyrolysis at 900 degrees C. Similar behaviour was observed for monovalent Na and K with cane trash, but the volatilisation of Mg and Ca from cane trash was always restricted. The difference in Cl content between bagasse and cane trash was not sufficient to fully explain the difference in the volatilisation of Mg and Ca.

  1. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. D. Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS2 have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS2. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS2 sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS2 monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  2. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali and alkaline-earth ions and inert gas atoms with a graphene layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients ($C_3$s) of the alkali ions (Li$^+$, Na$^+$, K$^+$ and Rb$^+$), the alkaline-earth ions (Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$ and Ra$^+$) and the inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar and Kr) with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of Dirac model. For these calculations, we have evaluated the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are, finally, given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at the room temperature.

  3. High-precision Mg isotope measurements of terrestrial and extraterrestrial material by HR-MC-ICPMS—implications for the relative and absolute Mg isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Paton, Chad; Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn

    2011-01-01

    shergottite and sea water samples. Repeated analyses of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples demonstrate that it is possible to routinely measure the relative Mg-isotope composition of silicate materials with an external reproducibility of 2.5 and 20 ppm for the m26Mg* and m25Mg values, respectively (m......-isotope composition for Earth’s mantle – and hence that of the bulk silicate Earth – to be 25Mg/24Mg 1/4 0.126896 ¿ 0.000025 and 26Mg/24Mg 1/4 0.139652 ¿ 0.000033. Given the restricted range of m25Mg obtained for bulk planetary material by the sample-standard bracketing technique and the excellent agreement between...

  4. Comparisons between adsorption and diffusion of alkali, alkaline earth metal atoms on silicene and those on silicane: Insight from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Xu; Huan-Sheng, Lu; Bo, Liu; Gang, Liu; Mu-Sheng, Wu; Chuying, Ouyang

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption and diffusion behaviors of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on silicane and silicene are both investigated by using a first-principles method within the frame of density functional theory. Silicane is staler against the metal adatoms than silicene. Hydrogenation makes the adsorption energies of various metal atoms considered in our calculations on silicane significantly lower than those on silicene. Similar diffusion energy barriers of alkali metal atoms on silicane and silicene could be observed. However, the diffusion energy barriers of alkali-earth metal atoms on silicane are essentially lower than those on silicene due to the small structural distortion and weak interaction between metal atoms and silicane substrate. Combining the adsorption energy with the diffusion energy barriers, it is found that the clustering would occur when depositing metal atoms on perfect hydrogenated silicene with relative high coverage. In order to avoid forming a metal cluster, we need to remove the hydrogen atoms from the silicane substrate to achieve the defective silicane. Our results are helpful for understanding the interaction between metal atoms and silicene-based two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20152ACB21014, 20151BAB202006, and 20142BAB212002) and the Fund from the Jiangxi Provincial Educational Committee, China (Grant No. GJJ14254). Bo Xu is also supported by the Oversea Returned Project from the Ministry of Education, China.

  5. Theoretical studies of the spin Hamiltonian parameters and local distortions for Cu{sup 2+} in alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo-Kun; Yuan, Zi-Yi; Liu, Zi-Xuan; Jiang, Shi-Xin; Liu, Zheng; Yao, Zi-Jian [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China). School of Yingcai Honors; Wu, Shao-Yi; Teng, Bao-Hua; Wu, Ming-He [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2016-11-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters and local structures are theoretically studied for Cu{sup 2+}-doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate (RPPZ, R=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) glasses based on the high-order perturbation calculations for a tetragonally elongated octahedral 3d{sup 9} cluster. The relative elongation ratios are found to be ρ ∼ 3.2%, 4.4%, 4.6%, and 3.3% for R=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba, respectively, because of the Jahn-Teller effect. The whole decreasing crystal-field strength Dq and orbital reduction factor k from Mg to Sr are ascribed to the weakening electrostatic coulombic interactions and the increasing probability of productivity of nonbridge oxygen (and hence increasing Cu{sup 2+}-O{sup 2-} electron cloud admixtures) under PbO addition, respectively, with increasing alkali earth ionic radius. The anomalies (the largest Dq and the next highest k among the systems) for R=Ba are attributed to the cross linkage of this large cation in the network. The overall increasing order (Mg≤Ba

  6. The development of silicate matrix phosphors with broad excitation band for phosphor-convered white LED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO XiXian; CAO WangHe; SUN Fei

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the recent progress in alkaline earth silicate host luminescent materials with broad excitation band for phosphor-convered white LED. Among them, the Sr-rich binary phases (Sr, Ba, Ca, Mg)2SiO4: Eu2+ and (Sr, Ba, Ca, Mg)3SiO5: Eu2+ are excellent phosphors for blue LED chip white LED. They have very broad excitation bands and exhibit strong absorption of blue radiation in the range of 450-480 nm. And they exhibit green and yellow-orange emission under the InGaN blue LED chip radiation, respectively. The luminous efficiency of InGaN-based (Sr, Ba, Ca, Mg)2SiO4: Eu2+ and (Sr, Ba, Ca, Mg)3SiO5: Eu2+ is about 70-80 lm/W, about 95%-105% that of the InGaN-based YAG:Ce, while the correlated color temperature is between 4600-11000 K. Trinary alkaline earth silicate host luminescent materials MO(M=Sr, Ca, Ba)-Mg(Zn)O-SiO2 show strong absorption of deep blue/near-ultraviolet radia-tion in the range of 370-440 nm. They can convert the deep blue/near-ultraviolet radiation into blue, green, and red emissions to generate white light. The realization of high-performance white-light LEDs by this approach presents excellent chromaticity and high color rendering index, and the application disadvantages caused by the mixture of various matrixes can be avoided. Moreover, the application prospects and the trends of research and development of alkaline earth silicate phosphors are also discussed.

  7. sup 29 Si magic angle spinning NMR spectra of alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, and rare earth metal ion exchanged Y zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Kueijung; Chern, Jeryoung (Tsinghua Univ., Taiwan (China))

    1989-02-23

    The variation of the extraframework cation location in groups IA and IIA metals and rare earth metal (RE) Y zeolites as a function of the dehydration and the rehydration is monitored by {sup 29}Si MAS NMR. Unheated hydrated zeolites give similar {sup 29}Si spectra as they present the similar cation distributions. Upon dehydration a high-field shift is observed which correlates with the distortion of bond angles in silicon-oxygen tetrahedra. The line shapes of {sup 29}Si spectra depend on the nature and the location of the exchangeable cations and the occupancy of the different sites in dehydrated and rehydrated states. The correlation between the line shape of {sup 29}Si spectra and the migration of cations from the supercages to the sodalite cages after heating treatment was studied. The results of {sup 29}Si NMR agree with the known structure data.

  8. Influence of Ce, Nd, Sm and Gd oxides on the properties of alkaline-earth borosilicate glass sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Sasmal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the influence of CeO2, Nd2O3, Sm2O3 and Gd2O3 on various properties of the melt-quench route derived SrO–CaO–ZnO–B2O3–SiO2 glass have been investigated. Both the precursor glasses and heat treated glasses are characterized by dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The density and coefficient of thermal expansion of the glasses varies in the range 3.557–3.804 g cm−3 and 10.5–11.2 × 10−6 K−1 (50–800 °C respectively. Decrease in crystallization tendency with increase in cationic field strength of the ions is well supported by the increasing crystallization activation energy of the glasses calculated by Kissinger, Augis–Bennett and Ozawa models. XPS study revealed the presence of both Ce3+ and Ce4+ ions and an increase in characteristic binding energy of the respective rare earth elements from their core level studies. The Knoop hardness of the glasses varies in the range 6.03–6.28 GPa. The glass transition, glass softening and crystallization temperature; density and hardness of the glasses increased with increase in cationic field strength of the incorporated ions. The thermomechanical properties of the Gd2O3 containing glass advocate its applicability as the most promising sealant in solid oxide fuel cell.

  9. The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interactions for the rare gases, alkali and alkaline-earth atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Li-Yan; Shi, Ting-Yun; Babb, James F; Mitroy, J

    2012-01-01

    The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interaction coefficients $Z_{111}$, $Z_{112}$, $Z_{113}$, and $Z_{122}$ are computed for many atomic combinations using standard expressions. The atoms considered include hydrogen, the rare gases, the alkali atoms (up to Rb) and the alkaline-earth atoms (up to Sr). The term $Z_{111}$, arising from three mutual dipole interactions is known as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto coefficient or the DDD (dipole-dipole-dipole) coefficient. Similarly, the terms $Z_{112}$, $Z_{113}$, and $Z_{122}$ arise from the mutual combinations of dipole (1), quadrupole (2), and octupole (3) interactions between atoms and they are sometimes known, respectively, as DDQ, DDO, and DQQ coefficients. Results for the four $Z$ coefficients are given for the homonuclear trimers, for the trimers involving two like-rare-gas atoms, and for the trimers with all combinations of the H, He, Li atoms. An exhaustive compilation of all coefficients between all possible atomic combinations is presented as supp...

  10. Structural and spectroscopic studies of water-alkaline earth ion micro clusters: an alternate approach using genetic algorithm in conjunction with quantum chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly Neogi, S.; Chaudhury, P.

    2014-08-01

    We present an approach of using a stochastic optimization technique namely genetic algorithm in association with quantum chemical methods to first elucidate structure and then infrared spectroscopy and thermochemistry of water-alkaline earth metal ion clusters. We show that an initial determination of structure using stochastic techniques and following it up with quantum chemical calculation can lead to much faster convergence to high quality structures for these systems. Infrared spectroscopic, thermochemical calculations and natural population analysis based charges on the central metal ions are done to further ascertain the correctness of the structures using our technique. We have done a comparative study with a pure density functional theory calculation and have shown that even for very poor starting guess geometries genetic algorithm in conjunction with density functional theory indeed converges to global structure while pure density functional theory can encounter problems in certain situations to arrive at global geometry. We have also discussed usefulness of Unimodal Normal distribution crossover for handling situation with real coded variables.

  11. The Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Alkaline-Earth Metals Doped Anatase TiO2: A Comparative Study of Screened Hybrid Functional and Generalized Gradient Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Gang Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline-earth metallic dopant can improve the performance of anatase TiO2 in photocatalysis and solar cells. Aiming to understand doping mechanisms, the dopant formation energies, electronic structures, and optical properties for Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba doped anatase TiO2 are investigated by using density functional theory calculations with the HSE06 and PBE functionals. By combining our results with those of previous studies, the HSE06 functional provides a better description of electronic structures. The calculated formation energies indicate that the substitution of a lattice Ti with an AEM atom is energetically favorable under O-rich growth conditions. The electronic structures suggest that, AEM dopants shift the valence bands (VBs to higher energy, and the dopant-state energies for the cases of Ca, Sr, and Ba are quite higher than Fermi levels, while the Be and Mg dopants result into the spin polarized gap states near the top of VBs. The components of VBs and dopant-states support that the AEM dopants are active in inter-band transitions with lower energy excitations. As to optical properties, Ca/Sr/Ba are more effective than Be/Mg to enhance absorbance in visible region, but the Be/Mg are superior to Ca/Sr/Ba for the absorbance improvement in near-IR region.

  12. Thermal stability of the anionic sigma complexes of 2,4,6-trinitroanisole with the methylates of the alkaline-earth metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaz, A.I.; Soldatova, T.A.; Golopolosova, T.V.; Gitis, S.S.

    1987-09-10

    The study of the stability of the 1,1-dimethoxy-2,4,6-trinitrocyclohexadienates of the alkali metals when they are heated in air showed that their temperature of decomposition and the heat effect of the process are dependent on the nature of the cation. Our study centered on the thermal decomposition of the products resulting from the addition of the methylates of calcium, strontium, and barium to 2,4,6-trinitroanisole. For a quantitative assessment of the process we used the combined methods of differential-thermal analysis and differential thermogravimetry. The anionic sigma-complexes of 2,4,6-trinitroanisole with the methylates of the alkaline-earth metals decompose on heating into the corresponding picrates; at the same time, when one passes from the calcium slat to the strontium and barium salts the decomposition temperature and the heat effect of the process show a drop which is linked to the structure both of the complexes and of the picrates forming therefrom.

  13. Dipole Polarizability of Alkali-Metal (Na, K, Rb) - Alkaline-Earth-Metal (Ca,Sr) Polar molecules - Prospects of Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Gopakumar, Geetha; Hada, Masahiko; Kajita, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Electronic open-shell ground-state properties of selected alkali-metal (AM) - alkaline-earth-metal (AEM) polar molecules are investigated. We determine potential energy curves of the 2{\\Sigma}+ ground state at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with partial triples (CCSD(T)) level of electron correlation. Calculated spectroscopic constants for the isotopes (23Na, 39K, 85Rb) - (40Ca, 88Sr) are compared with available theoretical and experimental results. The variation of the permanent dipole moment (PDM), average dipole polarizability, and polarizability anisotropy with internuclear distance is determined using finite-field perturbation theory at the CCSD(T) level. Owing to moderate PDM (KCa: 1.67 D, RbCa: 1.75 D, KSr: 1.27 D, RbSr: 1.41 D) and large polarizability anisotropy (KCa: 566 a.u., RbCa: 604 a.u., KSr: 574 a.u., RbSr: 615 a.u.), KCa, RbCa, KSr, and RbSr are potential candidates for alignment and orientation in combined intense laser and external static electric fields.

  14. Transfer of alkaline earth elements in mothers' milk and doses from {sup 45}Ca, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 226}Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.J.; Phipps, A.W.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D

    2003-07-01

    An international programme of work is currently under way to develop methods for calculating doses to infants from ingestion of radionuclides present in mothers' milk. This paper considers the special case of the alkaline earth elements. Models have been developed for {sup 45}Ca, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 226}Ra and the sensitivity of results to various changes in parameter values is discussed. A complication when calculating doses from intakes of radium is that the International Commission on Radiological Protection has previously recommended that doses from decay products of radium should be calculated using element-specific biokinetic models (so-called independent biokinetics). An extension of this method to the models for breastfeeding is proposed. Preliminary estimates of the doses received by the infant for a number of maternal intake scenarios show that doses to the infant can exceed the corresponding adult dose, such as for {sup 45}Ca (ratio = 3.1) while, in other cases such as {sup 90}Sr, the infant dose can be a significant fraction of the adult dose. (author)

  15. [High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma with a Fassel-torch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Yu; Gong, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Ben-Li

    2006-02-01

    High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP-HCL) excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a Fassel-torch has been investigated. In wide condition ranges only IFS was observed, whilst atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was not detectable. More intense ionic fluorescence signal was observed at lower observation heights and at lower incident RF powers. Without introduction of any reduction organic gases into the ICP, the limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) of Ba was improved by 50-fold over that of a conventional pulsed (CP) HCL with the Baird sleeve-extended torch. For Ca and Sr, the LODs by HCMP-HCL-ICP-IFS and CP-HCL-ICP-AFS show no significant difference. Relative standard deviations were 0.6%-1.4% (0.1-0.2 microg x mL(-1), n = 10) for 5 ionic fluorescence lines. Preliminary studies showed that the intensity of ionic fluorescence could be depressed in the presence of K, Al and P.

  16. Low-Field Knight Shift Measurement at Sb Site for Alkaline-Earth Filled Skutterudites AFe4Sb12 (A = Sr and Ca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Atsurou; Matsumura, Masahiro; Kato, Harukazu; Nishioka, Takashi; Matsuoka, Eiichi; Hayashi, Katsuyuki; Takabatake, Toshirou

    2008-06-01

    121Sb Knight shift K measurement has been carried out by applying a perturbing field to the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum in alkaline-earth filled skutterudites AFe4Sb12 (A = Ca and Sr), which are close to ferromagnetic instability. The hyperfine coupling constant was determined for the first time as -14.9 kOe/μB f.u. from the K-χ plot. This relatively large value suggests a strong Fe-Sb covalent bonding. The intrinsic spin susceptibility χspin derived from K markedly decreases at low temperatures after Curie-Weiss-like increase at high temperatures, which seems to be responsible for the absence of ferromagnetic order. Using the T-dependence of χspin, the unusual gap-like suppression of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by temperature 1/T1T in our previous report is reasonably explained by assuming the spin dependent-term to be proportional to χspin and the gap-like suppression of the spin-independent term.

  17. The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interactions for the rare gases, alkali, and alkaline-earth atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li-Yan; Yan, Zong-Chao; Shi, Ting-Yun; Babb, James F; Mitroy, J

    2012-03-14

    The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interaction coefficients Z(111), Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) are computed for many atomic combinations using standard expressions. The atoms considered include hydrogen, the rare gases, the alkali atoms (up to Rb), and the alkaline-earth atoms (up to Sr). The term Z(111) arising from three mutual dipole interactions is known as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto coefficient or the DDD (dipole-dipole-dipole) coefficient. Similarly, the terms Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) arise from the mutual combinations of dipole (1), quadrupole (2), and octupole (3) interactions between atoms and they are sometimes known, respectively, as dipole-dipole-quadrupole, dipole-dipole-octupole, and dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole coefficients. Results for the four Z coefficients are given for the homonuclear trimers, for the trimers involving two like-rare-gas atoms, and for the trimers with all combinations of the H, He, and Li atoms. An exhaustive compilation of all coefficients between all possible atomic combinations is presented as supplementary data.

  18. Mechanochemical synthesis, structure, and properties of solid solutions of alkaline earth metal fluorides: Ma1-xMbxF2 (M: Ca, Sr, Ba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, M.; Scholz, G.; Düvel, A.; Heitjans, P.; Kemnitz, E.

    2016-10-01

    The capability of mechanochemical synthesis for the formation of solid solutions of alkaline earth metal fluorides Ma1-xMbxF2 (M: Ca, Sr, Ba) was tested by fluorination of metal acetates and metal hydroxides with ammonium fluoride directly at milling. Evidence was found for a mutual substitution of cations on their lattice positions in Ca1-xSrxF2 and Ba1-xSrxF2 samples. For the Ba/Ca-system this synthesis route is only partially successful. X-ray diffraction and 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize all samples concerning their crystal structure and local fluorine coordination. Calculations of 19F chemical shifts with the superposition model along with probability calculations for the intensity of the individual 19F lines, performed in dependence on the molar composition of the samples, perfectly agree with the experimental findings. The fluoride ion conductivity of as-prepared samples, determined by temperature dependent DC conductivity measurements, is significantly higher than those of crystalline binary fluorides. Moreover, a higher F- ion conductivity is observed for samples with higher mixing grade in the Ca/Sr-and the Ba/Sr-systems.

  19. Ab initio properties of the ground-state polar and paramagnetic europium-alkali-metal-atom and europium-alkaline-earth-metal-atom molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tomza, Michał

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the electronic ground state of the polar and paramagnetic europium-$S$-state-atom molecules have been investigated. Ab initio techniques have been applied to compute the potential energy curves for the europium-alkali-metal-atom, Eu$X$ ($X$=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs), europium-alkaline-earth-metal-atom, Eu$Y$ ($Y$=Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), and europium-ytterbium, EuYb, molecules in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the high-spin electronic ground state. The spin restricted open-shell coupled cluster method restricted to single, double, and noniterative triple excitations, RCCSD(T), was employed and the scalar relativistic effects within the small-core energy-consistent pseudopotentials were included. The permanent electric dipole moments and static electric dipole polarizabilities were computed. The leading long-range coefficients describing the dispersion interaction between atoms at large internuclear distances $C_6$ are also reported. The EuK, EuRb, and EuCs molecules are examples of species poss...

  20. Production and precipitation of rare earth elements in acidic to alkaline coal mine discharges, Appalachian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.; Hedin, B. C.; Wallrich, I. L. R.; Hedin, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Abandoned coal mine discharges are a serious threat to ground and surface waters due to their high metal content and often high acidity. However, these discharges represent a potential source of rare earth elements (REE), many of which are considered to be critical resources. Trace element data from 18 coal mine drainage (CMD) sites within the Appalachian Basin suggest CMD is enriched in total REE by 1-4 orders of magnitude relative to concentrations expected in unaffected surface or ground waters. When normalized to the North American Shale Composite (NASC), the discharges generally show a pattern of enrichment in the middle REE, including several identified as critical resources (Nd, Eu, Dy, Tb). In contrast, shale, sandstone and coal samples from Appalachian Basin coal-bearing units have concentrations and patterns similar to NASC, indicating that the REE in CMD are fractionated during interaction with rock in the mine pool. The highest total REE contents (up to 2800 mg/L) are found in low-pH discharges (acid mine drainage, or AMD). A precipitous drop in REE concentration in CMD with pH ≥6.6 suggests adsorption or precipitation of REE in the mine pool at circumneutral pH. Precipitated solids from 21 CMD active and passive treatment sites in the Appalachian Basin, including Fe oxy-hydroxides, Ca-Mg lime slurries, and Si- and Al-rich precipitates, are enriched in total REE content relative to the average CMD discharges by about four orders of magnitude. Similar REE trends in the discharges and precipitates, including MREE enrichment, suggest minimal fractionation of REE during precipitation; direct comparisons over multiple seasonal cycles are needed to confirm this. Although the data are limited, Al-rich precipitates generally have high REE concentrations, while those in iron oxy-hydroxides tend to be lower. Based on the area of mined coal in the Appalachian Basin, estimated infiltration rates, and the mean REE flux from discharges analyzed in this study and

  1. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots.

  2. Silicate diagenesis in deep-sea sediments from the Tonga fore-arc (SW Pacific): a strontium and rare earth elements signature; Diagenese des silicates des series sedimentaires de l'avant-arc Tonga (Pacifique sud-ouest): etude de la signature en strontium et en terres rares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitali, F.; Stille, P. [Centre de Geochimie de la Surface (UMR du CNRS 7517), 67 - Strasbourg (France); Blanc, G. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Dept. de Geologie et d' oceanographie, UMR CNRS 5805, 33 - Talence (France); Toulkeridis, T. [Colegio de Ciencias e Ingenieria, Universidad San Francisco de Quito (Ecuador)

    2000-06-01

    {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr isotopic ratios, strontium and Rare Earth Element concentrations obtained on volcano-sedimentary rocks and separated clay mineral and zeolite fractions reveal a formation by pore water-volcanic rock interaction for most of the hydrous silicate minerals of the Site 841 ODP collected from the Tonga fore-arc. Unusual strontium concentrations and isotopic ratios recorded in the Miocene tuffs associated with specific REE patterns indicate that the formation of these hydrous silicates does not follow a simple burial diagenesis model, but was related to the cooling of intruding basaltic sills in the Miocene volcano-sedimentary series. Migration of strontium into the pore water in response to the heat flow induced the formation of Sr-bearing zeolites such as clinoptilolite, heulandite and chabazite. No evidence of any influence of a further thermal pulse in the Eocene rhyolitic tuffs could be found. As recorded by the chemistry of their clay mineral fraction, the rhyolitic tuffs developed a polyphasic diagenetic process, which might have been influenced by a possible circulation of a fluid into structurally weak areas. (authors)

  3. Promoting alkali and alkaline-earth metals on MgO for enhancing CO2 capture by first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Jeong Woo; Lee, Kwang Soon; Lee, Won Bo

    2014-12-07

    Developing next-generation solid sorbents to improve the economy of pre- and post-combustion carbon capture processes has been challenging for many researchers. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising sorbent because of its moderate sorption-desorption temperature and low heat of sorption. However, its low sorption capacity and thermal instability need to be improved. Various metal-promoted MgO sorbents have been experimentally developed to enhance the CO2 sorption capacities. Nevertheless, rigorous computational studies to screen an optimal metal promoter have been limited to date. We conducted first-principles calculations to select metal promoters of MgO sorbents. Five alkali (Li-, Na-, K-, Rb-, and Cs-) and 4 alkaline earth metals (Be-, Ca-, Sr-, and Ba-) were chosen as a set of promoters. Compared with the CO2 adsorption energy on pure MgO, the adsorption energy on the metal-promoted MgO sorbents is higher, except for the Na-promoter, which indicates that metal promotion on MgO is an efficient approach to enhance the sorption capacities. Based on the stabilized binding of promoters on the MgO surface and the regenerability of sorbents, Li, Ca, and Sr were identified as adequate promoters among the 9 metals on the basis of PW91/GGA augmented with DFT+D2. The adsorption energies of CO2 on metal-promoted MgO sorbents for Li, Ca, and Sr atoms are -1.13, -1.68, and -1.48 eV, respectively.

  4. Unimolecular and hydrolysis channels for the detachment of water from microsolvated alkaline earth dication (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-02-07

    We examine theoretically the three channels that are associated with the detachment of a single water molecule from the aqueous clusters of the alkaline earth dications, [M(H2O)n]2+, M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, n ≤ 6. These are the unimolecular water loss (M2+(H2O)n-1 + H2O) and the two hydrolysis channels resulting to the loss of hydronium ([MOH(H2O)n-2]+ + H3O+) and Zundel ([MOH(H2O)n-3]+ + H3O+(H2O)) cations. The Potential Energy Curves (PECs) corresponding to those three channels were constructed at the Møller-Plesset second order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with basis sets of double- and triple-ζ quality. We furthermore investigated the water and hydronium loss channels from the mono-hydroxide water clusters with up to four water molecules, [MOH(H2O)n]+, 1 ≤ n ≤ 4. Our results indicate the preference of the hydronium loss and possibly the Zundel cation loss channels for the smallest size clusters, whereas the unimolecular water loss channel is preferred for the larger ones as well as the mono-hydroxide clusters. Although the charge separation (hydronium and Zundel cation loss) channels produce more stable products when compared to the ones for the unimolecular water loss, they also require the surmounting of high energy barriers, a fact that makes the experimental observation of fragments related to these hydrolysis channels difficult.

  5. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G., E-mail: john.mccaffrey@nuim.ie [Department of Chemistry, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland—Maynooth, County Kildare (Ireland)

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y{sup 1}P←a{sup 1}S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm{sup −1}). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr{sub 2} while this transition is quenched in Ba{sub 2}. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba{sub 2} indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  6. Interaction of Rydberg atoms in circular states with the alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironchuk, E. S.; Narits, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S., E-mail: vlebedev@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The resonant mechanism of interaction of alkaline-earth atoms having a low electron affinity to Rydberg atoms in circular (l = vertical bar m vertical bar = n–1) and near-circular states has been studied. To describe the dynamics of resonant processes accompanied by nonadiabatic transitions between ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule, an approach based on the integration of coupled equations for the probability amplitudes has been developed taking into account the possibility of the decay of an anion in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core of a highly excited atom. The approach involves the specific features of the problem associated with the structure of the wavefunction of a Rydberg electron in states with high orbital angular momenta l ∼ n–1. This approach provides a much more accurate description of the dynamics of electronic transitions at collisions between atoms than that within the modified semiclassical Landau–Zener model. In addition, this approach makes it possible to effectively take into account many channels of the problem. The cross sections for resonant quenching of Rydberg states of the Li(nlm) atom with given principal n, orbital l = n–1, and magnetic m quantum numbers at thermal collisions with the Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms have been calculated. The dependences of the results on n, m, and angle α between the relative velocity of the atoms and the normal to the plane of the orbit of the Rydberg electron have been obtained. The influence of orientational effects on the efficiency of the collisional destruction of circular and near-circular states has been studied. The results indicate a higher stability of such states to their perturbations by neutral particles as compared to usually studied nl states with low values of l (l ≪ n)

  7. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations.

  8. Fullerene-C60 and crown ether doped on C60 sensors for high sensitive detection of alkali and alkaline earth cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghmarzi, Fatemeh Alipour; Zahedi, Mansour; Mola, Adeleh; Abedini, Saboora; Arshadi, Sattar; Ahmadzadeh, Saeed; Etminan, Nazanin; Younesi, Omran; Rahmanifar, Elham; Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Fullerenes are effective acceptor components with high electron affinity for charge transfer. The significant influences of chemical adsorption of the cations on the electrical sensitivity of pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages could be the basis of new generation of electronic sensor design. The density functional theory calculation for alkali and alkaline earth cations detection by pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages are considered at B3LYP level of theory with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis have been performed to understand the nature of intermolecular interactions between the cations and nanocages. Also, the natural bond orbital analysis have been performed to assess the intermolecular interactions in detail. Furthermore, the frontier molecular orbital, energy gap, work function, electronegativity, number of transferred electron (∆N), dipole moment as well as the related chemical hardness and softness are investigated and calculated in this study. The results show that the adsorption of cations (M=Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) are exothermic and the binding energy in pristine C60 nanocage and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 increases with respect to the cations charge. The results also denote a decrease in the energy gap and an increase in the electrical conductivity upon the adsorption process. In order to validate the obtained results, the density of state calculations are employed and presented in the end as well.

  9. Alkaline Earth Metal Zirconate Perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)) Derived from Molecular Precursors and Doped with Eu(3+) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drąg-Jarząbek, Anna; John, Łukasz; Petrus, Rafał; Kosińska-Klähn, Magdalena; Sobota, Piotr

    2016-03-24

    The effect of alkaline earth metal alkoxides on the protonation of zirconocene dichloride was investigated. This approach enabled the design of compounds with preset molecular structures for generating high-purity binary metal oxide perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)). Single-source molecular precursors [Ba4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2(η(2) -HOR)2 (HOR)2 Cl4], [Sr4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 (HOR)4 Cl4], [Ca4 Zr2 (μ6-O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 Cl4], and [Ca6 Zr2 (μ2 ,η(2)-OR)12 (μ-Cl)2 (η(2) -HOR)4 Cl6 ]⋅8 CH2 Cl2 were prepared via elimination of the cyclopentadienyl ring from Cp2 ZrCl2 as CpH in the presence of M(OR)2 and alcohol ROH (ROH=CH3OCH2 CH2OH) as a source of protons. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds were then thermally decomposed to MCl2 /MZrO3 mixtures. Leaching of MCl2 from the raw powder with deionized water produced highly pure perovskite-like oxide particles of 40-80 nm in size. Luminescence studies on Eu(3+)-doped MZrO3 revealed that the perovskites are attractive host lattices for potential applications in display technology.

  10. Interaction of Rydberg atoms in circular states with the alkaline-earth Ca(4 s 2) and Sr(5 s 2) atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironchuk, E. S.; Narits, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    The resonant mechanism of interaction of alkaline-earth atoms having a low electron affinity to Rydberg atoms in circular ( l = | m| = n-1) and near-circular states has been studied. To describe the dynamics of resonant processes accompanied by nonadiabatic transitions between ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule, an approach based on the integration of coupled equations for the probability amplitudes has been developed taking into account the possibility of the decay of an anion in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core of a highly excited atom. The approach involves the specific features of the problem associated with the structure of the wavefunction of a Rydberg electron in states with high orbital angular momenta l ~ n-1. This approach provides a much more accurate description of the dynamics of electronic transitions at collisions between atoms than that within the modified semiclassical Landau-Zener model. In addition, this approach makes it possible to effectively take into account many channels of the problem. The cross sections for resonant quenching of Rydberg states of the Li( nlm) atom with given principal n, orbital l = n-1, and magnetic m quantum numbers at thermal collisions with the Ca(4 s 2) and Sr(5 s 2) atoms have been calculated. The dependences of the results on n, m, and angle α between the relative velocity of the atoms and the normal to the plane of the orbit of the Rydberg electron have been obtained. The influence of orientational effects on the efficiency of the collisional destruction of circular and near-circular states has been studied. The results indicate a higher stability of such states to their perturbations by neutral particles as compared to usually studied nl states with low values of l ( l ≪ n).

  11. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  12. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  13. Chemical composition of modern and fossil hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation - Part 2: Alkaline earth elements as tracers of watershed hydrochemistry and provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Kullmer, O.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2012-11-01

    This study demonstrates that alkaline earth elements in enamel of hippopotamids, in particular Ba and Sr, are tracers for water provenance and hydrochemistry in terrestrial settings. The studied specimens are permanent premolar and molar teeth found in modern and fossil lacustrine sediments of the Western Branch of the East African Rift system (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and from modern fluvial environments of the Nile River. Concentrations in enamel vary by two orders of magnitude for Ba (120-9336 μg g-1) as well as for Sr (9-2150 μg g-1). The variations are partially induced during post-mortem alteration and during amelogenesis, but the major contribution originates ultimately from the variable water chemistry in the habitats of the hippopotamids which is controlled by the lithologies and weathering processes in the watershed areas. Amelogenesis causes a distinct distribution of MgO, Ba and Sr in modern and fossil enamel, in that element concentrations increase along profiles from the outer rim towards the enamel-dentin junction by a factor of 1.3-1.9. These elements are well correlated in single specimens, thus suggesting that their distribution is determined by a common, single process, which can be described by closed system Rayleigh crystallization of bioapatite in vivo. Enamel from most hippopotamid specimens has Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca which are typical for herbivores. However, Ba/Sr ranges from 0.1 to 3 and varies on spatial and temporal scales. Thus, Sr concentrations and Ba/Sr in enamel differentiate between habitats having basaltic mantle rocks or Archean crustal rocks as the ultimate sources of Sr and Ba. This provenance signal is modulated by climate change. In Miocene to Pleistocene enamel from the Lake Albert region, Ba/Sr decreases systematically with time from 2 to 0.5. This trend can be correlated with changes in climate from humid to arid, in vegetation from C3 to C4 biomass as well as with increasing evaporation of the lake water

  14. Rare earth doped silicate-oxyfluoride glass ceramics incorporating LaF3 nano-crystals for UV-LED color conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Suk-Rok; Choi, Yong Gyu; Im, Won Bin; Lee, Ki Seok; Chung, Woon Jin

    2013-09-01

    Rare earth doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics with LaF3 nano-crystals formed inside were fabricated for color converter of UV-LED. Among various rare earth ions, Dy3+ and Eu3+ showed practically utilizable visible emissions under UV-LED excitation of 365 nm. The visible emission has been improved by the formation of LaF3 brought by heat treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy along with its energy dispersive spectra confirmed the formation of LaF3 nano-crystals. Compositional dependence and the effects of heat treatment conditions on the visible emissions have been investigated. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of the glasses were also examined for Dy3+ singly doped and co-doped samples. The effect of LaF3 nano-crystals and co-dopants on the visible emission properties of Dy3+ was discussed.

  15. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico); Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J., E-mail: arturoj.hernandez@upr.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico)

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  16. Characterization of Electrochemical and Morphological Properties of Iron-Phosphate-Silicate Chemical Garden Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doloboff, I. J.; Barge, L. M.; Russell, M. J.; Kanik, I.

    2012-03-01

    Examination of the growth of Fe^2^+, phosphate, and silicate chemical garden structures to understand properties of similar structures that may have formed at Hadean alkaline hydrothermal vents which may play an important role in the emergence of life.

  17. First-principles study of fission product (Xe, Cs, Sr) incorporation and segregation in alkaline earth metal oxides, HfO2, and MgO-HfO2 interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In order to close the nuclear fuel cycle, advanced concepts for separating out fission products are necessary. One approach is to use a dispersion fuel form in which a fissile core is surrounded by an inert matrix that captures and immobilizes the fission products from the core. If this inert matrix can be easily separated from the fuel, via e.g. solution chemistry, the fission products can be separated from the fissile material. We examine a surrogate dispersion fuel composition, in which hafnia (HfO{sub 2}) is a surrogate for the fissile core and alkaline earth metal oxides are used as the inert matrix. The questions of fission product incorporation in these oxides and possible segregation behavior at interfaces are considered. Density functional theory based calculations for fission product elements (Xe, Sr, and Cs) in these oxides are carried out. We find smaller incorporation energy in hafnia than in MgO for Cs and Sr, and Xe if variation of charge state is allowed. We also find that this trend is reversed or reduced for alkaline earth metal oxides with large cation sizes. Model interfacial calculations show a strong tendency of segregation from bulk MgO to MgO-HfO{sub 2} interfaces.

  18. Syntheses, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Crystal Structure Determination from X-Ray Powder Diffraction Data of Alkaline Earth Dicyanamides M[N(CN) 2] 2 with M=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Barbara; Irran, Elisabeth; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2001-03-01

    The alkaline earth dicyanamides Mg[N(CN)2]2, Ca[N(CN)2]2, Sr[N(CN)2]2, and Ba[N(CN)2]2 were synthesized by ion exchange using Na[N(CN)2] and the respective nitrates or bromides as starting materials. The crystal structures were determined from X-ray powder diffractometry: Mg[N(CN)2]2, Pnnm, Z=2, a=617.14(3), b=716.97(3), and c=740.35(5) pm; Ca[N(CN)2]2 and Sr[N(CN)2]2, C2/c, Z=4; Ca[N(CN)2]2, a=1244.55(3), b=607.97(1), and c=789.81(1) pm, β=98.864(2)°; Sr[N(CN)2]2, a=1279.63(2), b=624.756(8), and c=817.56(1) pm, β=99.787(1)°; Ba[N(CN)2]2, Pnma, Z=4, a=1368.68(7), b=429.07(7), and c=1226.26(2) pm. The dicyanamides consist of the respective alkaline earth cations and bent planar [N(CN)2]- ions. The structural features were correlated with vibrational spectroscopic data. The thermal behavior was studied by thermoanalytical experiments.

  19. Core-decomposition-facilitated fabrication of hollow rare-earth silicate nanowalnuts from core-shell structures via the Kirkendall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenli; Zou, Rui; Yang, Xianfeng; Huang, Ningyu; Huang, Junjian; Liang, Hongbin; Wang, Jing

    2015-08-28

    Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2SiO5 interlayer by facilitating the initial nucleation of the Kirkendall nanovoids and accelerating the interfacial diffusion of Y2O3@SiO2 core@shell. The simple concept developed herein can be employed as a general Kirkendall effect strategy without the assistance of any catalytically active Pt nanocrystals or gold motion for future fabrication of novel hollow nanostructures. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of rare-earth ion doped hollow Y2SiO5 nanoparticles are researched.

  20. Core-decomposition-facilitated fabrication of hollow rare-earth silicate nanowalnuts from core-shell structures via the Kirkendall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenli; Zou, Rui; Yang, Xianfeng; Huang, Ningyu; Huang, Junjian; Liang, Hongbin; Wang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2SiO5 interlayer by facilitating the initial nucleation of the Kirkendall nanovoids and accelerating the interfacial diffusion of Y2O3@SiO2 core@shell. The simple concept developed herein can be employed as a general Kirkendall effect strategy without the assistance of any catalytically active Pt nanocrystals or gold motion for future fabrication of novel hollow nanostructures. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of rare-earth ion doped hollow Y2SiO5 nanoparticles are researched.Hollow micro-/nanostructures have been widely applied in the fields of lithium ion batteries, catalysis, biosensing, biomedicine, and so forth. The Kirkendall effect, which involves a non-equilibrium mutual diffusion process, is one of many important fabrication strategies for the formation of hollow nanomaterials. Accordingly, full understanding of the interdiffusion process at the nanoscale is very important for the development of novel multifunctional hollow materials. In this work, hollow Y2SiO5 nanowalnuts have been fabricated from the conversion of YOHCO3@SiO2 core-shell nanospheres via the Kirkendall effect. More importantly, it was found that in the conversion process, the decomposition of YOHCO3 core imposes on the formation of the Y2Si

  1. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  2. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  3. Dependence of Hardness of Silicate Glasses on Composition and Thermal History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    composition on hardness of silicate glasses. E-glasses of different compositions are subjected to various degrees of annealing to obtain various fictive temperatures in the glasses. It is found that hardness decreases with the fictive temperature. Addition of Na2O to a SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O glass system causes......The prediction of hardness is possible for crystalline materials, but so far not possible for glasses. In this work, several important factors that should be used for predicting the hardness of glasses are discussed. To do so, we have studied the influences of thermal history and chemical...... a decrease in hardness. However, hardness cannot solely be determined from the degree of polymerisation of the glass network. It is also determined by the effect of ionic radius on hardness. However, this effect has opposite trend for alkali and alkaline earth ions. The hardness increases with ionic radius...

  4. Trace element partitioning between aqueous fluids and silicate melts measured with a proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, J.; Green, T.H. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia). School of Earth Sciences; Sie, S.H. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    A series of experiments were performed to examine the capacity of H{sub 2}O-fluids to concentrate and transport incompatible elements through peridotitic mantle and metamorphosed (eclogitic) ocean crust. Two naturally occurring rock compositions, trondhjemitic and basanitic, were used in experiments. The proton microprobe was used to determine the trace element concentrations in the solutes from H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated at 900-1100 degree C, 2.0 GPa with water saturated melts of trondhjemitic and basanitic compositions. Partitioning data for H{sub 2}O-fluids and silicate melts show that H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated with mantle peridotites will not be strongly enriched in trace elements relative to their wallrocks, and thus they melts do not strongly concentrate alkaline earths Th and U, relative to high-field strength elements. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  5. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies of the Atomic Structure of Zirconium-Doped Lithium Silicate Glasses and Glass-Ceramics, Zirconium-Doped Lithium Borate Glasses, and Vitreous Rare-Earth Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Changhyeon

    In the first part of this work, the atomic-scale structure around rare-earth (RE = Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy, and Er) cations (RE3+) in rare-earth sodium ultraphosphate (REUP) glasses were investigated using RE LIII -edge (RE = Nd, Er, Dy, and Eu) and K-edge (RE = Pr and Dy) Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. (RE2O 3)x(Na2O)y(P2O5) 1-x-y glasses in the compositional range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.14 and 0.3 ≤ x + y ≤ 0.4 were studied. For the nearest oxygen shell, the RE-oxygen (RE-O) coordination number decreases from 10.8 to 6.5 with increasing RE content for Pr-, Nd-, Dy-, and Er-doped sodium ultraphosphate glasses. For Eu-doped samples, the Eu-O coordination number was between 7.5 and 8.8. Also, the RE-O mean distance ranges were between 2.43-2.45 A, 2.40-2.43 A, 2.36-2.38 A, 2.30-2.35 A, and 2.28-2.30 A for Pr-, Nd-, Eu-, Dy-, and Er-doped samples, respectively. In the second part, a series of Zr-doped (3-10 mol%) lithium silicate (ZRLS) glass-ceramics and their parent glasses and a series of Zr-doped (2-6 mol% ZrO2) lithium borate (ZRLB) glasses were investigated using Zr K-edge EXAFS and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Immediate coordination environments of all ZRLS glasses are remarkably similar for different compositions. For the nearest oxygen shell, the Zr-O coordination number ranges were between 6.1 and 6.3 for nucleated and crystallized samples, respectively. Also, the Zr-O mean distance remains similar around 2.10 A. For these glasses, the composition dependence of structural parameters was small. Small changes in the coordination environment were observed for ZRLS glass-ceramics after thermal treatments. In contrast, Zr coordination environment in ZRLB glasses appear to depend appreciably on the Zr concentration. For the nearest oxygen shell, the Zr-O coordination number increased from 6.1 to 6.8 and the Zr-O distance decreased from 2.18 A to 2.14 A with decreasing ZrO2 content.

  6. Quantum mechanical study of molecular collisions at ultra-low energy: applications to alkali and alkaline-earth systems; Etude quantique de collisions moleculaires a ultra-basse energie: applications aux alcalins et alcalino-terreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quemener, G

    2006-10-15

    In order to investigate the collisional processes which occur during the formation of molecular Bose-Einstein condensates, a time-independent quantum mechanical formalism, based on hyperspherical coordinates, has been applied to the study of atom-diatom dynamics at ultra-low energies. We present theoretical results for three alkali systems, each composed of lithium, sodium or potassium atoms, and for an alkaline-earth system composed of calcium atoms. We also study dynamics at large and positive atom-atom scattering length. Evidence for the suppression of inelastic processes in a fermionic system is given, as well as a linear relation between the atom-diatom scattering length and the atom-atom scattering length. (author)

  7. Effect of para-substituents on alkaline earth metal ion extraction by proton di-ionizable calix[4]arene-crown-6 ligands in cone, partial-cone and 1,3-alternate conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Liu, Dazhan; Gega, Jerzy; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Purkiss, David W; Bartsch, Richard A

    2007-01-21

    Two carboxylic acid or N-(X)sulfonyl carboxamide groups were incorporated into calix[4]arene-crown-6 compounds to afford di-ionizable ligands for use in divalent metal ion separations. Acidities of the N-(X)sulfonyl carboxamide groups were tuned by variation of the electron-withdrawing properties of X. Cone, partial-cone and 1,3-alternate conformations were obtained by different synthetic strategies and their structures verified by NMR spectroscopy. Competitive solvent extractions of alkaline earth metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform were performed and the results compared with those reported previously for di-ionizable p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene-crown-6 analogues to probe the influence of the para-substituent on the calix[4]arene scaffold on extraction selectivity and efficiency.

  8. Counterion influence on the vibrational wavenumbers in ternary and quaternary metal hydride salts, A2MH6 (A = alkali metal, alkaline earth, and lanthanides; M = Ir, Fe, Ru, Os, Pt, Mn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Denis F R; Moyer, Ralph O

    2012-02-06

    The wavenumbers of the ν(3) metal-hydrogen stretching mode (T(1u)) in the IR spectra of both ternary and quaternary hexahydrido salts of transition metals from groups 7 to 10 ([Mn(I)H(6)](5-), [Fe(II)H(6)](4-), [Ru(II)H(6)](4-), [Os(II)H(6)](4-), [Ir(III)H(6)](3-), and [Pt(IV)H(6)](2-)) depend linearly upon the ionization energies of the counterions (alkali metal, alkaline earth, and lanthanide) with a separate line for each metal. This relationship provides quantitative support for the charge-transfer mechanism for explaining the stabilities of these compounds.

  9. Effect of alkaline earth oxides on the physical and spectroscopic properties of Dy3+- doped Li2O-B2O3 glasses for white emitting material application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshad, L.; Rooh, G.; Kirdsiri, K.; Srisittipokakun, N.; Damdee, B.; Kim, H. J.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-02-01

    Li2O-MO-B2O3:0.5Dy2O3 glasses mixed with four different alkaline earth modifier oxides MgO, CaO, SrO and BaO were synthesized by melt quench technique. Their physical properties like density, molar volume and refractive index were measured at room temperature and the effect of alkaline earth modifier oxides were studied. Also, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been acquired at room temperature. The Judd-Ofelt theory was effectively used to characterize these spectra and spectral intensities (ƒcal), Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) and certain radiative properties have been determined. Radiative life-times (τR), branching ratios (βcal), and emission cross-sections (σp) and optical gain parameters (σp × τR) were calculated from the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters and the variation in these parameters with the variation of glass matrix are discussed. Yellow/Blue (Y/B) ratio and chromacity color coordinates (x,y) are calculated from the emission spectra which indicates the white light generation from all the investigated samples. The correlated color temperature (CCT) for the studied glasses is found to be 4418 K. The fluorescence decay time (τexp) of the 4F9/2 level of Dy3+ has been measured from the decay profiles and compared with calculated lifetimes (τcal). Among all the studied glass matrices, the glass containing BaO exhibits high value of branching ratio, large emission cross-section and high optical gain parameter for 6F9/2 → 6H13 at 575 nm. The results indicates the suitability of all the studied glasses for laser action and white light generation.

  10. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine.

  11. Transition from alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanism during evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon (Western Central Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéblemont, Denis; Bouton, Pascal; Préat, Alain; Goujou, Jean-Christian; Tegyey, Monique; Weber, Francis; Ebang Obiang, Michel; Joron, Jean Louis; Treuil, Michel

    2014-11-01

    We report new geochemical data for the volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with the evolution of the Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon during Paleoproterozoic times (c. 2.1-2 Ga). Filling of this basin has proceeded through four main sedimentary or volcano-sedimentary episodes, namely FA, FB, FC and FD. Volcanism started during the FB episode being present only in the northern part of the basin (Okondja sub-basin). This volcanism is ultramafic to trachytic in composition and displays a rather constant alkaline geochemical signature. This signature is typical of a within-plate environment, consistent with the rift-setting generally postulated for the Francevillian basin during the FB period. Following FB, the FC unit is 10-20 m-thick silicic horizon (jasper) attesting for a massive input of silica in the basin. Following FC, the FD unit is a c. 200-400 m-thick volcano-sedimentary sequence including felsic tuffs and epiclastic rocks. The geochemical signatures of these rocks are totally distinct from those of the FB alkaline lavas. High Th/Ta and La/Ta ratios attest for a calc-alkaline signature and slight fractionation between heavy rare-earth suggests melting at a rather low pressure. Such characteristics are comparable to those of felsic lavas associated with the Taupo zone of New Zealand, a modern ensialic back-arc basin. Following FD, the FE detrital unit is defined only in the Okondja region, probably associated with a late-stage collapse of the northern part of the basin. It is suggested that the alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanic transition reflects the evolution of the Francevillian basin from a diverging to a converging setting, in response to the onset of converging movements in the Eburnean Belt of Central Africa.

  12. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...... silicate nanocomposites and their structure-properties relationship. In the first part of the thesis, thermoplastic layered silicates were obtained by extrusion. Different modification methods were tested to observe the intercalation treatment effect on the silicate-modifier interactions. The silicate...

  13. Importance of silicate weathering, recharge and mixing processes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    zones with distinct water types and isotopic contents displayed through this investigation are the results of ion ... Br supports the highly weathering processes of the aquifer matrix which seem even to affect by ...... Alkaline and alkaline earth trace elements (Sr and Li) ..... by Cl which would enhance metal release in solution.

  14. Vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and transition metals in NaCl-dominated hydrothermal fluids: An experimental study from 360 to 465 °C, near-critical to halite saturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pester, Nicholas J.; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E.

    2015-11-01

    Multi-phase fluid flow is a common occurrence in magmatic hydrothermal systems; and extensive modeling efforts using currently established P-V-T-x properties of the NaCl-H2O system are impending. We have therefore performed hydrothermal flow experiments (360-465 °C) to observe vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and first row transition metals in NaCl-dominated source solutions. The data allow extraction of partition coefficients related to the intrinsic changes in both chlorinity and density along the two-phase solvus. The coefficients yield an overall decrease in vapor affinity in the order Cu(I) > Na > Fe(II) > Zn > Ni(II) ⩾ Mg ⩾ Mn(II) > Co(II) > Ca > Sr > Ba, distinguished with 95% confidence for vapor densities greater than ∼0.2 g/cm3. The alkaline earth metals are limited to purely electrostatic interactions with Cl ligands, resulting in an excellent linear correlation (R2 > 0.99) between their partition coefficients and respective ionic radii. Though broadly consistent with this relationship, relative behavior of the transition metals is not well resolved, being likely obscured by complex bonding processes and the potential participation of Na in the formation of tetra-chloro species. At lower densities (at/near halite saturation) partitioning behavior of all metals becomes highly non-linear, where M/Cl ratios in the vapor begin to increase despite continued decreases in chlorinity and density. We refer to this phenomenon as "volatility", which is broadly associated with substantial increases in the HCl/NaCl ratio (eventually to >1) due to hydrolysis of NaCl. Some transition metals (e.g., Fe, Zn) exhibit volatility prior to halite stability, suggesting a potential shift in vapor speciation relative to nearer critical regions of the vapor-liquid solvus. The chemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal fluids appears affected by this process during magmatic events, however, our results do not support suggestions of subseafloor halite precipitation

  15. Effect of Minor Elements on Silicate Cement Clinker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Congyun; ZHANG Mingfei; ZHANG Meixiang; LONG Shizong; CHEN Yuankui; MA Baoguo

    2005-01-01

    The effect of rare-earth and HX addition agent on the burn-ability of silicate cement clinker was investigated by orthogonal experiment. The result shows, compared with blank sample, f- CaO of the samples added with rare-earth and HX agent drops by 84.95% , its 3d and 28d compressive strength enhances by 24.40%and 16.90%, respectively. It was discovered by means of X-ray diffraction and high temperature microscope analysis that sintering temperature of the sample added with rare-earth and HX addition agent is about 1320℃. At the same time, the burning temperature of tricalcium silicate desends and its crystal growth forming-rate increases.Tricalcium silicate content in burning clinker is higher and its crystal is larger.

  16. Crystal-chemical controls on the partitioning of Sr and Ba between plagioclase feldspar, silicate melts, and hydrothermal solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blundy, J.D.; Wood, B.J. (Bristol Univ. (England))

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the factors which control the partitioning of alkaline earth elements (Ba and Sr) between plagioclase feldspar and silicate melts, specifically the respective role of crystal chemistry, melt chemistry, and temperature. We have selected plagioclase because of the wealth of volcanic and experimental data, the compositional simplicity of plagioclase, and its relevance to many petrological problems. We begin our study by examining experimental data on Sr partitioning between plagioclase and hydrothermal solutions in an attempt to constrain the role of crystal chemistry. We establish a simple thermodynamic model for trace element partitioning between plagioclase and hydrothermal solutions. This treatment is then extended to the plagioclase-melt system using available data from both experimental and volcanic systems in order to derive a general equation for Sr and Ba partitioning. Finally we consider the geochemical applications and implications of our findings.

  17. High hydrogen loading of thin palladium wires through alkaline earth carbonates' precipitation on the cathodic surface - evidence of a new phase in the Pd-H system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celani, F.; Spallone, A.; Di Gioacchino, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Marini, P.; Di Stefano, V.; Nakamura, M. [EURESYS, Rome (Italy); Pace, S. [Salerno Univ., Salerno (Italy). Dept. of Physics, Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia; Mancini, A. [ORIM S.r.l., Piediripa, MC (Italy); Tripodi, P. [Stanford Research Institut International, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    A new protocol for the electrolytic loading of hydrogen (H) in thin palladium (Pd) wires has been developed. In order to increase the cathodic overvoltage, which is known to be the main parameter capable to enhance the electrolytic H loading of Pd, the catalytic action of the Pd surface versus H-H recombination has been strongly reduced by precipitation of a thin layer of alkaline-earth carbonates on the cathode. A set of electrolytes has been employed, containing small amounts of hydrochloric or sulfuric acid and strontium or calcium ions. The H loading has been continuously evaluated through ac measurements of the Pd wire resistance. Uncommonly low resistivity values, leading to an estimate of exceptionally high H loading, have been observed. Evidence of the existence of a new phase in the very high H content region of the Pd-H system has been inferred on the basis of the determination of the temperature coefficient of the electrical resistivity. Mainly for this purpose a thin layer of Hg was galvanically deposed on the cathodic surface, in order to prevent any H deloading during the measurements. The results have been fully reproduced in other 2 well equipped and experienced Laboratories (Italy, USA).

  18. Synthesis and alkaline earth metal cation extraction by proton di-ionizable p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene-crown-5 compounds in cone, partial-cone and 1,3-alternate conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Purkiss, David W; Bartsch, Richard A

    2006-03-21

    Synthetic strategies for novel, proton di-ionizable p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene-crown-5 compounds in cone, partial-cone and 1,3-alternate conformations are reported. Selective linkage of the two diametrical phenolic oxygens in p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene with tetraethylene glycol ditosylate gave 1,3-bridged p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene-crown-5. The two remaining phenolic units were alkylated using NaH and KH as the bases to give the cone and partial-cone conformers, respectively. Preparation of the 1,3-alternate conformers utilized a different sequence in which O-alkylation was followed by crown ether ring formation. Structures of these new ligands were elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. These proton-ionizable ligands were tested for their solvent extraction properties toward alkaline earth metal cations. Surprising differences in their extraction behaviors are noted compared to those reported previously for di-ionizable p-tert-butylcalix[4]arenecrown-6 analogues.

  19. Eu(2+)-Activated Alkaline-Earth Halophosphates, M5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) for NUV-LEDs: Site-Selective Crystal Field Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Kim, Sung-Chul; Bae, Jong-Seong; Kim, Sungyun; Kim, Seung-Joo; Park, Jung-Chul

    2016-09-06

    Eu(2+)-activated M5(PO4)3X (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) compounds providing different alkaline-earth metal and halide ions were successfully synthesized and characterized. The emission peak maxima of the M5(PO4)3Cl:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) compounds were blue-shifted from Ca to Ba (454 nm for Ca, 444 nm for Sr, and 434 nm for Ba), and those of the Sr5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (X = F, Cl, Br) compounds were red-shifted along the series of halides, F → Cl → Br (437 nm for F, 444 nm for Cl, and 448 nm for Br). The site selectivity and occupancy of the activator ions (Eu(2+)) in the M5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) crystal lattices were estimated based on theoretical calculation of the 5d → 4f transition energies of Eu(2+) using LCAO. In combination with the photoluminescence measurements and theoretical calculation, it was elucidated that the Eu(2+) ions preferably enter the fully oxygen-coordinated sites in the M5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) compounds. This trend can be well explained by "Pauling's rules". These compounds may provide a platform for modeling a new phosphor and application in the solid-state lighting field.

  20. Coordination of alkaline earth metal ions in the inverted cucurbit[7]uril supramolecular assemblies formed in the presence of [ZnCl4]2- and [CdCl4]2-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Xue, Sai-Feng; Tao, Zhu; Xiao, Xin

    2015-05-01

    A convenient method to isolate inverted cucurbit[7]uril (iQ[7]) from a mixture of water-soluble Q[n]s was established by eluting the soluble mixture of Q[n]s on a Dowex (H(+) form) column so that iQ[7] could be selected as a ligand for coordination and supramolecular assembly with alkaline earth cations (AE(2+)) in aqueous HCl solutions in the presence of [ZnCl(4)](2-) and [CdCl(4)](2-) anions as structure-directing agents. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that both iQ[7]-AE(2+) -[ZnCl(4)](2-) -HCl and iQ[7]-AE(2+) -[CdCl(4)](2-) -HCl interaction systems yielded supramolecular assemblies, in which the [ZnCl(4)](2-) and [CdCl(4)](2-) anions presented a honeycomb effect, and this resulted in the formation of linear iQ[7]/AE(2+) coordination polymers through outer-surface interactions of Q[n]s.

  1. Effect of Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} alkaline earth ions on luminescence properties of BaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Eu nanophosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Abhay D., E-mail: abhay_d1984@yahoo.co.i [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur 440020 (India); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, VNIT, Nagpur 440011 (India); Valechha, Arti; Valechha, Dolly; Kumar, Animesh [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur 440020 (India); Peshwe, D.R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, VNIT, Nagpur 440011 (India); Dhoble, S.J. [Kamla Nehru College, Sakkardara Square, Nagpur 440009 (India)

    2009-07-15

    Nanosized barium aluminate materials was doped by divalent cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}) and Eu{sup 2+} having nominal compositions Ba{sub 1-x}MxAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Eu (M=Ca and Sr) (x=0.1-0.5), were synthesized by the combustion method. These phosphors were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and photoluminescence measurement. The photoluminescence characterization showed the presence of Eu ion in divalent form which gave emission bands peaking at 444 nm for the 320 nm excitation (solid-state lighting excitation), while for 254 nm it gave the same emission wavelength of low intensity (1.5 times) compared to 320 nm excitation. It was also observed that alkaline earth metal (Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+}) dopants increase the intensity of Eu{sup 2+} ion in BaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19} lattice, thus this phosphor may be useful for solid-state lighting.

  2. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  3. Equation of state and transport properties of silicates under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, T.; Hamel, S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the physical properties of silicates under high temperature and pressure is fundamental to an accurate description of planetary interiors and evolution models. For example, earth's mantle is a rocky silicate shell constituting about 84% of Earth's volume. Possible chemical compositions include SiO2 and some other silicates such as MgSiO3 and CaSiO3. Moreover, Moon forming scenarios often invoke giant impacts between silicate-rich objects.Similarly, the existence of a rocky core or mantle with silicate as the major component is frequently assumed in models of giant planets, such as Jupiter or Saturn and Uranus and Neptune.Consequently, constructing planetary interior and evolution models requires knowledge of silicate's equation of state and its optical and transport properties at high pressures and temperatures.

  4. Study of conformational and acid-base properties of norbadione A and pulvinic derivatives: Consequences on their complexation properties of alkaline and alkaline earth cations; Etude des proprietes conformationnelles et acido-basiques de la norbadione A et de derives pulviniques: consequences sur leurs proprietes complexantes de cations alcalins et alcalino-terreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuad, P

    2006-01-15

    This work deals with the study of norbadione A, a pigment extracted from mushrooms and known to complex cesium cations. The study of the acid-base properties of norbadione A has allowed to determine the relative acidity of the seven protonable functions of the molecule and to reveal a reversible isomerization of the double exocyclic bond of the pulvinic moieties. The observed change of configuration is induced by a hydrogen bond of the H-O-H type and by electrostatic interactions. Moreover, the microscopic protonation mechanism of the norbadione A has been analyzed, considering three different study media where the acid-base properties of the norbadione A are compared. In the presence of 0.15 mol.l{sup -1} of NaCl, it has been observed a remarkable cooperativity in the protonation of the enol groups. At last, the use of different analytical methods (NMR, potentiometry and calorimetry) has allowed to study the complexing properties of the norbadione A towards cesium and other alkaline and rare earth cations. (O.M.)

  5. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    OpenAIRE

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  6. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  7. Pilot scale direct flotation of a phosphate ore with silicate-carbonate gangue.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The present pilot scale study addresses the direct flotation route for the concentration of a phosphate ore bearing a silicate-carbonate gangue. The target was to selectively separate apatite from a phosphate ore bearing silicate/carbonate gangue using flotation columns. Based on the results of a previous laboratory scale investigation, a reagents scheme was selected and tested, using, under alkaline conditions, corn starch and a natural collector extracted from the distillation of coconut oi...

  8. Influence of alkali and alkaline earth ions on the -alkylation of the lower rim phenolic-OH groups of -tert-butyl-calix[4]arene to result in amide-pendants: Template action of K+ and the structure of K+ bound tetra-amide derivative crystallized with a -tert-butylcalix[4]arene anion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amjad Ali; Chebrolu P Rao; Philippe Guionneau

    2008-03-01

    Role of alkali and alkaline earth ions on the formation of calix[4]arene-amide derivatives through -alkylation of the lower rim phenolic-OH groups in general and template action of K+ in particular have been explored. Na+ and K+ ions among alkali, and Ca2+ and Sr2+ ions among alkaline earth have shown tetra-amide derivatives bound to metal ion species. Among all these, potassium salts act as template and yields a K+ bound tetra-amide derivative where the charge is counter balanced by a calix[4] arene-monoanion and the product is crystallographically characterized. Change in the amide precursor used in these -alkylation reactions has no effect on the type of the amide derivative formed. Also demonstrated is a direct one-step reaction for the preparation of 1,3-di-amide derivative in high yield and low reaction period using CsHCO3.

  9. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  10. Trace element geochemistry of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex, India: Evidence for fractional crystallization and silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotiranjan S Ray; P N Shukla

    2004-12-01

    Carbonatites are believed to have crystallized either from mantle-derived primary carbonate magmas or from secondary melts derived from carbonated silicate magmas through liquid immiscibility or from residual melts of fractional crystallization of silicate magmas. Although the observed coexistence of carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks in most complexes, their coeval emplacement in many, and overlapping initial 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios are supportive of their cogenesis; there have been few efforts to devise a quantitative method to identify the magmatic processes. In the present study we have made an attempt to accomplish this by modeling the trace element contents of carbonatites and coeval alkaline silicate rocks of Amba Dongar complex, India. Trace element data suggest that the carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks of this complex are products of fractional crystallization of two separate parental melts. Using the available silicate melt-carbonate melt partition coefficients for various trace elements, and the observed data from carbonatites, we have tried to simulate trace element distribution pattern for the parental silicate melt. The results of the modeling not only support the hypothesis of silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility for the evolution of Amba Dongar but also establish a procedure to test the above hypothesis in such complexes.

  11. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David J.; Banwart, Steve A.; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Romero-Gonzalez, Maria E.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increased with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later, independently evolved ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, and from gymnosperm to angiosperm hosts with both fungal groups. This led to ‘trenching’ of silicate mineral surfaces by AM and EM fungi, with EM gymnosperms and angiosperms releasing calcium from basalt at twice the rate of AM gymnosperms. Our findings indicate mycorrhiza-driven weathering may have originated hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously recognized and subsequently intensified with the evolution of trees and mycorrhizas to affect the Earth's long-term CO2 and climate history. PMID:22859556

  12. The influence of different alkaline earth oxides on the structural and optical properties of undoped, Ce-doped, Sm-doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, H. A.; Arzumanyan, G. M.; Möncke, D.

    2016-12-01

    Undoped, singly Sm doped, Ce doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses with different alkaline earth modifiers were prepared by melt quenching. The structure of the prepared glasses was investigated by FT-IR and Raman, as well as by optical spectroscopy. The effect of the optical basicity of the host glass matrix on the added active dopants was studied, as was the effect doping had on the phosphate structural units. The optical edge shifts toward higher wavelengths with an increase in the optical basicity due to the increased polarizability of the glass matrix, but also with increasing CeO2 concentration as a result of Ce3+/Ce4+ inter valence charge transfer (IV-CT) absorption. The optical band gap for direct and indirect allowed transitions was calculated for the undoped glasses. The glass sample containing Mg2+ modifier ions is found to have the highest value (4.16 eV) for the optical band gap while Ba2+ has the lowest value (3.61 eV). The change in the optical band gap arises from the structural changes and the overall polarizability (optical basicity). Refractive index, molar refractivity Rm and molar polarizability αm values increase with increasing optical basicity of the glasses. The characteristic absorption peaks of Sm3+ were also investigated. For Sm/Ce co-doped glasses, especially at high concentration of CeO2, the absorption of Ce3+ hinders the high energy absorption of Sm3+ and this effect becomes more obvious with increasing optical basicity.

  13. The influence of alkaline earth ions on the structural organization of acetone probed by the noncoincidence effect of the nu(C=O) band: experimental and quantum chemical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Maria Grazia; Torii, Hajime; Musso, Maurizio

    2010-01-07

    We have investigated the Raman noncoincidence effect (NCE = nu(aniso)-nu(iso), where nu(aniso) and nu(iso) are the anisotropic and the isotropic Raman frequencies) of the nu(C=O) band of acetone arising from the interactions of this solvent with the metal ions in acetone electrolytic solutions of alkaline earth metal (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) perchlorates. Assisted by the results of ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations carried out at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level with the 6-31+G(2df,p) and LanL2DZ basis sets, we have been able to attribute the anisotropic and isotropic components of this band to the formation of acetone-metal ion clusters, (acetone)(n)M(2+), and to interpret its high and negative NCE, opposed to the positive NCE of the bulk liquid, as the consequence of the large separation between the higher frequency of the in-phase mode (active in the Raman isotropic spectrum) and the lower (average) frequency of the n- 1 out-of-phase modes (predominantly active in the Raman anisotropic spectrum). The negative sign of the NCE is compatible with the transition dipole coupling (TDC) mechanism. The comparison between the observed NCE for each electrolytic solution at the concentrations used in this study and those calculated for the different solvation numbers n of each (acetone)(n)M(2+)cluster gives a clear indication of the highest stability of the hexa-coordinated cluster for the Mg(2+) ion, but leaving uncertain (n = 6 or 8) this conclusion for the acetone clusters of the remaining M(2+) ions. We have interpreted the observed and calculated decrease of the magnitude of NCE with the ion size through the ion polarizing power in the light of the ion effective charge and its distance (M(2+)...O=C) from the C=O oscillators.

  14. Alkaline earth stannates: The next silicon?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab, E-mail: sohrab.ismail-beigi@yale.edu; Ahn, Charles H. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structure and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Walker, Frederick J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structure and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Cheong, Sang-Wook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Rabe, Karin M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Semiconductor materials are being used in an increasingly diverse array of applications, with new device concepts being proposed each year for solar cells, flat-panel displays, sensors, memory, and spin transport. This rapid progress of invention outpaces the development of new semiconductor materials with the required properties and performance. In many applications, high carrier mobility at room temperature is required in addition to specific functional properties critical to the device concept. We review recent developments on high mobility stannate perovskite oxide materials and devices.

  15. PARAMAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE ALKALINE EARTH FLUORIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    decreases with increasing temperature; and the temperature dependance is stronger for SrF2. The results have been interpreted using the Simanek-Orbach theory of a phonon-induced hyperfine field. (Author)

  16. Alkaline earth stannates: The next silicon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Ismail-Beigi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor materials are being used in an increasingly diverse array of applications, with new device concepts being proposed each year for solar cells, flat-panel displays, sensors, memory, and spin transport. This rapid progress of invention outpaces the development of new semiconductor materials with the required properties and performance. In many applications, high carrier mobility at room temperature is required in addition to specific functional properties critical to the device concept. We review recent developments on high mobility stannate perovskite oxide materials and devices.

  17. Electrical properties of alkaline earth fluorohalide crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachour, D. (Lab. PHASE, C.R.N., 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Sieskind, M. (Groupe d' Optique, Non-Lineaire, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Geist, P. (C.R.N.-G.O.P.A., 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1991-07-01

    The ionic conductivity of undoped BaFCl, BaFBr, BaFI, SrFCl, and SrFBr single crystals is measured. The activation energies for a variety of anion vacancy mechanisms and the Schottky energy are defined. They are found to be in good agreement with Baetzold's theoretical data. Partial measurements of the static dielectric constant point out that these materials show an important dipolar contribution which is connected with their antiferroelectric character. (orig.).

  18. Positron elastic scattering from alkaline earth targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Luis A.; Assafrão, Denise; Mohallem, José R.

    2016-07-01

    A previously reported model potential approach [Poveda et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 052702 (2013)] was extended to study low energy positron elastic scattering from beryllium and magnesium. The cross sections were computed for energies ranging from 10-5 eV up to well above the positronium formation threshold. The present results are in good agreement with previous reports, including the prediction of a p-wave resonance in the cross section for magnesium. The emergence of this shape resonance is connected to a trend observed in the evolution of the partial wave cross section in going from Be to Mg target. This trend lead us to speculate that a sharp d-wave resonance should be observed in positron elastic scattering from calcium. The positron-target binding energies are investigated in detail, both using the scattering information and by direct computation of the bound state energies using the model potentials. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70120-y

  19. Turbulent Mixing of Metal and Silicate during Planet Accretion – and interpretation of the Hf-W chronometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Stevenson, David

    2010-01-01

    to the last major metal–silicate re-equilibration, believed to coincide with time of the Moon-forming impact. However, we show that large cores have limited ability to reset the Hf–W systemin the silicate Earth. Excess 182W in bulk silicate Earth is more sensitive to early core formation processes than......In the current view of planet formation, the final assembly of the Earth involved giant collisions between protoplanets (N1000 kmradius), with theMoon formed as a result of one such impact.At this stage the colliding bodies had likely differentiated into a metallic core surrounded by a silicate...... mantle. During the Moon-forming impact, nearly all metal sank into the Earth's core. Weinvestigate towhat extent large self-gravitating iron cores can mix with surrounding silicate and howthis influences the short-lived chronometer, Hf–W, used to infer the age of the Moon. We present fluid dynamical...

  20. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation – Part 2: Alkaline earth elements as tracers of watershed hydrochemistry and provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ssemmanda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For reconstructing environmental change in terrestrial realms the geochemistry of fossil bioapatite in bones and teeth is among the most promising applications. This study demonstrates that alkaline earth elements in enamel of Hippopotamids, in particular Ba and Sr are tracers for water provenance and hydrochemistry. The studied specimens are molar teeth from Hippopotamids found in modern and fossil lacustrine settings of the Western Branch of the East African Rift system (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi and from modern fluvial environments of the Nile River. Concentrations in enamel vary by ca. two orders of magnitude for Ba (120–9336 μg g−1 as well as for Sr (9–2150 μg g−1. Concentration variations in enamel are partly induced during post-mortem alteration and during amelogenesis, but the major contribution originates from the variable water chemistry in the habitats of the Hippopotamids which is dominated by the lithologies and weathering processes in the watershed areas. Amelogenesis causes a distinct distribution of Ba and Sr in modern and fossil enamel, in that element concentrations increase along profiles from the outer rim towards the enamel-dentin junction by a factor of 1.3–1.5. These elements are well correlated with MgO and Na2O in single specimens, thus suggesting that their distribution is determined by a common, single process. Presuming that the shape of the tooth is established at the end of the secretion process and apatite composition is in equilibrium with the enamel fluid, the maturation process can be modeled by closed system Rayleigh crystallization. Enamel from many Hippopotamid specimens has Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca which are typical for herbivores, but the compositions extend well into the levels of plants and carnivores. Within enamel from single specimens these element ratios covary and provide a specific fingerprint of the Hippopotamid habitat. All specimens together, however, define subparallel

  1. Carbonate-silicate melt immiscibility, REE mineralising fluids, and the evolution of the Lofdal Intrusive Suite, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodeving, Sarah; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Swinden, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The Lofdal Intrusive Suite, Namibia, consists of calcio-carbonatite and silica-undersaturated alkaline intrusive rocks ranging in composition from phono-tephrite to phonolite (and nepheline syenite). The most primitive of these rocks is the phono-tephrite, which, on the basis of its Y/Ho and Nb/Ta ratios, is interpreted to have formed by partial melting of the mantle. Roughly linear trends in major and trace element contents from phono-tephrite to phonolite and nepheline syenite indicate that the latter two rock types evolved from the phono-tephrite by fractional crystallisation. The nepheline syenite, however, has a lower rare earth element (REE) content than the phonolite. The carbonatite has a primitive mantle-normalised REE profile roughly parallel to that of the silica-undersaturated alkaline igneous rocks, although the absolute REE concentrations are higher. Like the phono-tephrite, it also has a mantle Y/Ho ratio. However, the Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios are significantly higher. Moreover, the carbonatite displays strong negative Ta, Zr and Hf anomalies on spidergrams, whereas the silicate rocks display positive anomalies for these elements. Significantly, this behaviour is predicted by the corresponding carbonatite-silicate melt partition coefficients, as is the behaviour of the REE. Based on these observations, we interpret the carbonatite to represent an immiscible liquid that exsolved from the phono-tephrite or possibly the phonolite melt. The result was a calcio-carbonatite that is enriched in the heavy REE (HREE) relative to most other carbonatites. Fluids released from the corresponding magma are interpreted to have been the source of the REE mineralisation that is currently the target of exploration.

  2. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić Lela Munjas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon (Si is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4, as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K, the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel, silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide, and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4 in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  3. Sodium Silicate Behavior in Porous Media Applied for In-Depth Profile Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein A. Akhlaghi Amiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses alkaline sodium silicate (Na-silicate behavior in porous media. One of the advantages of the Na-silicate system is its water-like injectivity during the placement stage. Mixing Na-silicate with saline water results in metal silicate precipitation as well as immediate gelation. This work demonstrated that low salinity water (LSW, sea water diluted 25 times could be used as a pre-flush in flooding operations. A water override phenomenon was observed during gel formation which is caused by gravity segregation. Dynamic adsorption tests in the sand-packed tubes showed inconsiderable adsorbed silicon density (about 8.5 × 10−10 kg/cm3 for a solution with 33 mg/L silicon content, which is less than the estimated mono-layer adsorption density of 1.4 × 10−8 kg/cm3. Na-silicate enhanced water sweep efficiency after application in a dual-permeability sand-pack system, without leak off into the oil-bearing low permeability (LP zone. Field-scale numerical sensitivity studies in a layered reservoir demonstrated that higher permeability and viscosity contrasts and lower vertical/horizontal permeability ratio result in lower Na-silicate leakoff into the matrix. The length of the mixing zone between reservoir water and the injected Na-silicate solution, which is formed by low salinity pre-flush, acts as a buffer zone.

  4. Chemical composition of modern and fossil hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation – Part 2: Alkaline earth elements as tracers of watershed hydrochemistry and provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ssemmanda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that alkaline earth elements in enamel of hippopotamids, in particular Ba and Sr, are tracers for water provenance and hydrochemistry in terrestrial settings. The studied specimens are permanent premolar and molar teeth found in modern and fossil lacustrine sediments of the Western Branch of the East African Rift system (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi and from modern fluvial environments of the Nile River. Concentrations in enamel vary by two orders of magnitude for Ba (120–9336 μg g−1 as well as for Sr (9–2150 μg g−1. The variations are partially induced during post-mortem alteration and during amelogenesis, but the major contribution originates ultimately from the variable water chemistry in the habitats of the hippopotamids which is controlled by the lithologies and weathering processes in the watershed areas. Amelogenesis causes a distinct distribution of MgO, Ba and Sr in modern and fossil enamel, in that element concentrations increase along profiles from the outer rim towards the enamel–dentin junction by a factor of 1.3–1.9. These elements are well correlated in single specimens, thus suggesting that their distribution is determined by a common, single process, which can be described by closed system Rayleigh crystallization of bioapatite in vivo. Enamel from most hippopotamid specimens has Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca which are typical for herbivores. However, Ba/Sr ranges from 0.1 to 3 and varies on spatial and temporal scales. Thus, Sr concentrations and Ba/Sr in enamel differentiate between habitats having basaltic mantle rocks or Archean crustal rocks as the ultimate sources of Sr and Ba. This provenance signal is modulated by climate change. In Miocene to Pleistocene enamel from the Lake Albert region, Ba/Sr decreases systematically with time from 2 to 0.5. This trend can be correlated with changes in climate from humid to arid, in vegetation from C3 to C4 biomass as well as with increasing

  5. Decomposition kinetics of alkaline earth carbonates by integral approximation method Cinética de decomposição de carbonatos de terra alcalina pelo método de aproximação integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maitra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The decomposition kinetics of four synthetic alkaline earth metal carbonates (MgCO3, CaCO3, SrCO3 and BaCO3 was studied under non-isothermal conditions from thermo-gravimetric measurements as compared to. The integral approximation method of Coats and Redfern was used to determine the kinetic parameters for the decomposition processes. The decomposition reactions followed mostly first order kinetics and the activation energy of the decomposition reactions increased with the increase in the molecular mass of the carbonates. The change in enthalpy for the decomposition processes was also calculated and compared with the activation energies for the decomposition processes. The activation energy of the decomposition process for all the carbonates was higher than the enthalpy of the reaction excepting SrCO3.A cinética de decomposição de quatro carbonatos sintéticos de metais de terra alcalina (MgCO3, CaCO3, SrCO3 e BaCO3 foi estudada sob condições não isotérmicas por meio de medidas de termogravimétricas e feita sua comparação. O método de aproximação integral de Coats e Redfern foi usado para determinar os parâmetros cinéticos dos processos de decomposição. As reações de decomposição seguiram principalmente cinética de primeira ordem e a energia de ativação para as reações de decomposição aumentou com o aumento da massa molecular dos carbonatos. A variação na entalpia para os processos de decomposição foi também calculada e comparada com as energias de ativação. A energia de ativação dos processos de decomposição de todos os carbonatos foi maior que a entalpia da reação excepto para SrCO3.

  6. 中温商业SCR催化剂碱和碱土中毒特性研究%Study on alkali and alkaline earths poisoning characteristics for a commercial SCR catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈伯雄; 卢凤菊; 高兰君; 岳时吉

    2016-01-01

    The poisoning of a commercial selective catalytic reduction ( SCR ) catalysts by alkali ( K ) and alkaline earths ( Ca) has been simulated in the laboratory. The techniques of N2 adsorption, scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3-temperature program desorption, H2-temperature program reduction were used to identify the changes of physical chemical characteristics of the catalysts before and after the simulated poisoning. The results indicated that the poisoning of K and Ca did not damage the basic pore structure of the SCR catalyst, but decreased the BET surface area and pore volume. The poisoning by K and Ca changed the chemical valence state of V and decreased the reducibility of V. The poisoning by K and Ca decreased the amount of chemically adsorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface as well as acidity of the catalysts. The poisoning by K and Ca lowered the SCR activity of the catalysts and the poisoning by Ca was more serious than K.%在实验室条件下对选择性催化还原( SCR)商业催化剂的碱( K)和碱土( Ca)中毒进行了模拟,并采用液氮吸附、扫描电镜、能谱分析、NH3-程序升温脱附、H2-程序升温还原等方法对催化剂中毒前后的物理化学性质变化进行了表征。结果表明, K和Ca的中毒没有破坏商业中温SCR催化剂孔的基本结构,但K和Ca的中毒使催化剂的比表面积和孔容减小。 K和Ca的中毒在一定程度上改变了催化剂表面钒的价态,导致了钒的还原能力减弱,同时降低催化剂表面化学吸附氧。钾中毒和钙中毒使催化剂的表面酸量降低。钾和钙中毒造成中温SCR催化剂的脱硝活性降低,并且Ca中毒造成的催化剂活性降低要明显高于K中毒。

  7. Preparation of Silica by Alkaline-Heating and Precipitation Method from Corn Straw Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Xudong Chen; Ming Xie; Huaibin Wang; Yingxi Xue; Zhengqi Li

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of silica by an alkaline-heating and precipitation method from corn straw ash (CSA) obtained from a biomass power plant was the focus of this study. Sodium hydroxide was used as the silica extraction reagent, and H2SO4 was the precipitator. The concentration of sodium hydroxide solution was confirmed to have a significant influence on the production of sodium silicate from CSA. The optimum technological parameters for the preparation of sodium silicate and the suitable paramet...

  8. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of chondrites and silicate planetary reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Merdian, Alexandra; Holmden, Chris; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Haßler, Kathrin; Wille, Martin; Reitter, Elmar

    2016-06-01

    The depletion of chromium in Earth's mantle (∼2700 ppm) in comparison to chondrites (∼4400 ppm) indicates significant incorporation of chromium into the core during our planet's metal-silicate differentiation, assuming that there was no significant escape of the moderately volatile element chromium during the accretionary phase of Earth. Stable Cr isotope compositions - expressed as the ‰-difference in 53Cr/52Cr from the terrestrial reference material SRM979 (δ53/52CrSRM979 values) - of planetary silicate reservoirs might thus yield information about the conditions of planetary metal segregation processes when compared to chondrites. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of 7 carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, 5 HED achondrites and 2 martian meteorites determined by a double spike MC-ICP-MS method are within uncertainties indistinguishable from each other and from the previously determined δ53/52CrSRM979 value of -0.124 ± 0.101‰ for the igneous silicate Earth. Extensive quality tests support the accuracy of the stable Cr isotope determinations of various meteorites and terrestrial silicates reported here. The uniformity in stable Cr isotope compositions of samples from planetary silicate mantles and undifferentiated meteorites indicates that metal-silicate differentiation of Earth, Mars and the HED parent body did not cause measurable stable Cr isotope fractionation between these two reservoirs. Our results also imply that the accretionary disc, at least in the inner solar system, was homogeneous in its stable Cr isotopic composition and that potential volatility loss of chromium during accretion of the terrestrial planets was not accompanied by measurable stable isotopic fractionation. Small but reproducible variations in δ53/52CrSRM979 values of terrestrial magmatic rocks point to natural stable Cr isotope variations within Earth's silicate reservoirs. Further and more detailed studies are required to investigate whether silicate

  9. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  10. Core Formation Timescale, Silicate-Metal Equilibration, and W Diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Q.; Jacobsen, B.; Tinker, D.; Lesher, C.

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which material accreted to the proto-Earth and segregated to form the core was chemically and isotopically equilibrated with the silicate mantle is an outstanding problem in planetary science. This is particularly important when attempting to assign a meaningful age for planetary accretion and core formation based on Hf-W isotope systematics. The Earth and other terrestrial planets likely formed by accretion of previously differentiated planetesimals. For the planetesimals themselves the most important energy source for metal-silicate differentiation is the combined radioactive heating due to decay of 26Al (half-life 0.7 Ma) and 60Fe (half-life 1.5 Ma). It is expected that the fractionation of Hf and W during planetesimal core formation will lead to a divergence in the W isotopic compositions of the core and silicate portions of these bodies. This expectation is supported by the enormously radiogenic 182W signatures reported for basaltic eucrites. The observation that the W isotopic compositions of the silicate portions of Earth, Moon and Mars are similar and markedly less radiogenic than eucrites suggests that during planet accretion the pre-differentiated metallic core material containing low 182W must have equilibrated extensively with the more radiogenic (high 182W) silicate material to subdue the ingrowth of 182W in the silicate mantle of the planets. The standard theory of planet formation predicts that after runaway and oligarchic growth, the late stage of planet formation is characterized by impact and merging of Mars-sized objects. This is a tremendously energetic process estimated to raise the temperature of the proto-Earth to about 7000K (a temperature equivalent to a mass spectrometer's plasma source, which indiscriminately ionizes all incoming elements). After the giant impacts, the proto-Earth had a luminosity and surface temperature close to a low mass star for a brief period of time. Stevenson (1990) argued that emulsification caused

  11. Modifier cation effects on 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G.; Phyo, Pyae A.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the 29Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O · 4.81 SiO2, Rb2O · 3.96 SiO2, Rb2O · 2.25 SiO2, K2O · 4.48 SiO2, Na2O · 4.74 SiO2, BaO · 2.64 SiO2, and SrO · 2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance 29Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q(3) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu2+ as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of 29Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure.

  12. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  13. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  14. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  15. Influence of alkali, silicate, and sulfate content of carbonated concrete pore solution on mild steel corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huet, B. [Schlumberger Carbon Services, Schlumberger Riboud Product Center, Clamart (France); L' Hostis, V. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Tricheux, L. [CEBTP-SOLEN, Elancourt, (France); Idrissi, H. [Laboratoire MATEIS UMR CNRS, Equipe RI2S, Department Science et Genie des Materiaux, Villeurbanne, (France)

    2010-02-15

    The increase in the rebar corrosion rate due to the concrete carbonation is the major cause of reinforced concrete degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of mild steel rebars in simulated carbonated concrete solution. For this purpose, thermodynamic calculations, electrochemical techniques, gravimetric measurements, and surface analyses were used. Thermodynamic investigations of the nature of the interstitial solution provides an estimation of the influence of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2} {sup -}) and alkali (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) content on carbonate alkalinity of the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O open system (pCO{sub 2} = 0.3 mbar). In this system, calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) remain thermodynamically unstable and amorphous silica controls silicate aqueous content at 100 ppm. Electrochemical results highlight a decrease in the corrosion rate with increasing carbonate alkalinity and the introduction of silicate. The introduction of sulfate at fixed carbonate alkalinity shows a dual effect: at high carbonate alkalinity, the corrosion rate is increased whereas at low carbonate alkalinity, corrosion rate is decreased. Those results are supported by surface analysis. Authors conclude that silicate and sulfate release from cement hydrates and fixation of alkali on carbonated hydrates are key parameters to estimate mild steel corrosion in carbonated concrete. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Influence of alkali, silicate, and sulfate content of carbonated concrete pore solution on mild steel corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Hostis, V. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Lab Etud Comportement Betons and Argiles, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Huet, B. [Schlumberger Riboud Prod Ctr, Schlumberger Carbon Serv, F-92142 Clamart (France); Tricheux, L. [CEBTP SOLEN, F-78990 Elancourt (France); Idrissi, H. [CNRS, Lab MATEIS UMR 5510, Equipe RI2S, Dept Sci and Genie Mat, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-07-01

    The increase in the rebar corrosion rate due to the concrete carbonation is the major cause of reinforced concrete degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of mild steel rebars in simulated carbonated concrete solution. For this purpose, thermodynamic calculations, electrochemical techniques, gravimetric measurements, and surface analyses were used. Thermodynamic investigations of the nature of the interstitial solution provides an estimation of the influence of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and alkali (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) content on carbonate alkalinity of the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O open system (pCO{sub 2}=0. 3 mbar). in this system, calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) remain thermodynamically unstable and amorphous silica controls silicate aqueous content at 100 ppm. Electrochemical results highlight a decrease in the corrosion rate with increasing carbonate alkalinity and the introduction of silicate. The introduction of sulfate at fixed carbonate alkalinity shows a dual effect: at high carbonate alkalinity, the corrosion rate is increased whereas at low carbonate alkalinity, corrosion rate is decreased. Those results are supported by surface analysis. Authors conclude that silicate and sulfate release from cement hydrates and fixation of alkali on carbonated hydrates are key parameters to estimate mild steel corrosion in carbonated concrete. (authors)

  17. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  18. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  19. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of complexation of alkaline-earth and lanthanide cations by poly-amino-carboxylate ligands; Simulations par mecanique quantique et dynamique moleculaire de la complexation de cations alcalino-terreux et lanthanides par des ligands polyaminocarboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, S

    1999-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on lanthanide(III) and alkaline-earth(II) complexes with poly-amino-carboxylates (ethylene-diamino-tetra-acetate EDTA{sup 4-}, ethylene-diamino-tri-acetate-acetic acid EDTA(H){sup 3-}, tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane-tetra-acetate DOTA{sup 4-}, methylene-imidine-acetate MIDA{sup 2-}) are reported. First, a consistent set of Lennard-Jones parameters for La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Lu{sup 3+} cations has been derived from free energy calculations in aqueous solution. Observed differences in hydration free energies, coordination distances and hydration numbers are reproduced. Then, the solution structures of 1:1 complexes of alkaline-earth and/or lanthanide cations with EDTA{sup 4-}, EDTA(H){sup 3-}, DOTA{sup 4-} and 1:2 complexes of lanthanide cations with MIDA{sup 2-} were studied by MD in water. In addition, free energy calculations were performed to study, for each ligand, the relative thermodynamic stabilities of complexes with Ca{sup 2+} vs Sr{sup 2+} and vs Ba{sup 2+} on the one hand, and with La{sup 3+} vs Eu{sup 3+} and vs Lu{sup 3+} on the other hand. Model does not take into account explicitly polarization and charge transfer. However, the results qualitatively agree with experimental complexation data (structure and selectivities). (author)

  20. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  1. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  2. Barium boron aluminum silicate glass system for solid state optical gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, M. J.; Karczewski, J.; Jasinski, P.; Chrzan, A.; Kalinowski, P.; Szymczewska, D.; Jasinski, G.

    2016-11-01

    Recent increasing demand for new eco-friendly materials and for low cost fabrication process for use in optical sensors field, raise concern about alternative materials for this application. We have designed two glass-ceramics compositions from the quaternary ROAl2O3- SiO2-B2O3(R=Ba) alkali-earth aluminum silicate system, labeled B72 and B69, with high refractive index (>1.6), large values of Abbe number (94.0 and 53.0, respectively), and free of lead and arsenic. We present an analysis and discussion of experimental optical properties, thermal and thermo-chemical stability along with important properties such as transition temperature (Tg), onset of crystallization (Tx) as well transport properties as ionic conductivity behavior in the quaternary glass-ceramic system containing boron for use as optical sensors. Complex Impedance Spectra (Bode Plot) and Potentiodynamic Polarization curves (Tafel plots) measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 600 to 850°C. The most probable conductivity mechanism is a thermally activated process of mobile ions overcoming a potential barrier (EA), according to the Arrhenius regime. Here we report that charge transfer is caused by the flux of electrons, in the region of elevated temperatures (>700°C), and is affected by immiscibility of crystals, nucleation and growth type, that causes phase separation. We found conductivity (σ) values from 10-9 to 10-5 S/cm at temperatures between 700 and 850°C. Our results highlight a need for research on ion mobility in the glassy network above the transition range, and the effect cause by metastable immiscibility in the alkaline-earth glasses are exposed. The two glass compositions B72 and B69 can be tailored by proper use as glassy optical sensor.

  3. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Lithium Zirconium Silicate for CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Bhosale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were prepared by precipitation, template and sol-gel meth-ods. The samples were prepared with several mol ratios of Li:Zr:Si. The preparation of lithium zirco-nium silicate samples by precipitation method were carried out by using the lithium nitrate, zirconyl nitrate, zirconium(IV oxypropoxide and tetramethylorthosilicate (TEOS as precursors. The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were prepared by using cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (C-TAB and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAOH by template method. The samples of lithium zirconium silicate were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, 29Si-MAS NMR and FTIR. The surface area, alkalinity / acidity of the samples of lithium zirconium silicate were measured. The TGA analysis of lithium zirco-nium silicate samples was done. The CO2 captured by the samples of lithium zirconium silicate was es-timated. The captured CO2 by the samples of lithium zirconium silicate was found to be in the range 3.3 to 8.6 wt%. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 27th March 2014; Revised: 31st July 2014; Accepted: 2nd August 2014How to Cite: Bhosale, T.S. , Gaikwad, A.G. (2014. Preparation and Characterization of Lithium Zirconium Silicate for CO2 Capture. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9(3: 249-262. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6646.249-262Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6646.249-262

  5. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  6. Determining the Metal/Silicate Partition Coefficient of Germanium: Implications for Core and Mantle Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are several hypotheses for the thermal state of the early Earth. Some hypothesize a shallow magma ocean, or deep magma ocean, or heterogeneous accretion which requires no magma ocean at all. Previous models are unable to account for Ge depletion in Earth's mantle relative to CI chondrites. In this study, the element Ge is used to observe the way siderophile elements partition into the metallic core. The purpose of this research is to provide new data for Ge and to further test these models for Earth's early stages. The partition coefficients (D(sub Ge) = c(sub metal)/c(sub silicate), where D = partition coefficient of Ge and c = concentration of Ge in the metal and silicate, respectively) of siderophile elements were studied by performing series of high pressure, high temperature experiments. They are also dependent on oxygen fugacity, and metal and silicate composition. Ge is a moderately siderophile element found in both the mantle and core, and has yet to be studied systematically at high temperatures. Moreover, previous work has been limited by the low solubility of Ge in silicate melts (less than 100 ppm and close to detection limits for electron microprobe analysis). Reported here are results from 14 experiments studying the partitioning of Ge between silicate and metallic liquids. The Ge concentrations were then analyzed using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) which is sensitive enough to detect ppm levels of Ge in the silicate melt.

  7. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05).

  8. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  9. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  10. Mbosi: An anomalous iron with unique silicate inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clarke, Roy S., Jr.; Wasson, John T.

    1996-09-01

    The Mbosi iron meteorite contains millimeter size silicate inclusions. Mbosi is an ungrouped iron meteorite with a Ge/Ga ratio >10, which is an anomalous property shared with the five-member IIF iron group, the Eagle Station pallasites and four other ungrouped irons. Neither the IIF group nor the four other ungrouped irons are known to have silicate inclusions. Chips from three Mbosi inclusions were studied, but most of the work concentrated on a whole 3.1 mm circular inclusion. This inclusion consists of a mantle and a central core of different mineralogies. The mantle is partially devitrified quartz-normative glass, consisting of microscopic crystallites of two pyroxenes and plagioclase, which are crystalline enough to give an x-ray powder diffraction pattern but not coarse enough to permit analyses of individual minerals. The core consists of silica. The bulk composition does not match any known meteorite type, although there is a similarity in mode of occurrence to quartz-normative silicate inclusions in some HE irons. Mbosi silicate appears to be unique. The bulk rare earth element (REE) pattern of the mantle is flat at ≅ 7×C1; the core is depleted in REE but shows a small positive Eu anomaly. The O-isotope composition of bulk silicate lies on a unit slope mixing line (parallel and close to the C3 mixing line) that includes the Eagle Station pallasites and the iron Bocaiuva (related to the IIF irons); all of these share the property of having Ge/Ga ratios >10. It is concluded that Mbosi silicate represents a silica-bearing source rock that was melted and injected into metal. Melting occurred early in the history of the parent body because the metal now shows a normal Widmanstätten structure with only minor distortion that was caused when the parent body broke up and released meteorites into interplanetary space. The cause of Ge/Ga ratios being >10 in these irons is unknown. The fact that silicates in Mbosi, Bocaiuva (related to IIF irons) and the Eagle

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Silicate Bioceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng; NING Congqin; ZHOU Yue; CHEN Lei; LIN Kaili; CHANG Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Four kinds of pure silicate ceramic particles, CaSiO3, Ca3SiO5, bredigite and akermanite were prepared and their bactericidal effects were systematically investigated. The phase compositions of these silicate ceramics were characterized by XRD. The ionic concentration meas urement revealed that the Calcium (Ca) ion concentration were relatively higher in Ca3SiO5 and bredigite, and much lower in CaSiO3 and akermanite. Accordingly, the pH values of the four silicate ceramics extracts showed a positive correlation with the particle concentrations. Meanwhile, by decreasing the particle size, higher Ca ion concentrations can be achieved, leading to the increase of aqueous pH value as well. In summary, all of the four silicate ceramics tested in our study showed antibacterial effect in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, the order of their antibacterial activity against E.coli from strong to weak is Ca3SiO5, bredigite, CaSiO3 and akermanite.

  12. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  13. [Advances of alkaline amylase production and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-04-01

    Alkaline amylase is one of alkaline enzymes with optimum pH in the alkaline range, and it could keep stability and efficiently hydrolyze starch under alkaline conditions. Alkaline amylase finds wide applications in textile, detergent, pharmaceutical, food and other fields. Alkaline amylases could be produced by alkaliphilic microorganisms. In this work, the advances of alkaline amylase production and applications were reviewed.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Removal and Conversion to Ocean Alkalinity: Why and How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Drastic reduction in anthropogenic CO2 emissions is the most obvious way to stabilize atmospheric CO2. However, there is growing risk that effective emissions reduction policies and technologies will not engage soon enough to avoid significant CO2-induced climate and ocean acidification impacts. This realization has lead to increased interest (e.g., IPCC AR5, 2014; NRC/NAS, 2014) in the possibility of pro-actively increasing CO2 removal (CDR) from the atmosphere above the 55% of our emissions that are already removed from air by natural land and ocean processes. While a variety of biotic, abiotic, and hybrid CDR methods have been proposed, those involving geochemistry have much to recommend them. These methods employ the same geochemical reactions that naturally and effectively remove excess planetary CO2 and neutralize ocean acidity on geologic time scales. These reactions proceed when the hydrosphere, acidified by excess air CO2, contacts and reacts with carbonate and silicate minerals (>90% of the Earth's crust), producing dissolved bicarbonates and carbonates, i.e., ocean alkalinity. This alkalinity is eventually removed and the excess carbon stored via carbonate precipitation. So while the importance and global effectiveness of such reactions are not in question, it remains to be seen if this very slow, natural CDR could be safely and cost-effectively accelerated to help manage air CO2 levels on human rather than geologic time scales. Various terrestrial and marine, geochemistry-based CDR methods will be reviewed including: 1) the addition of minerals to soils and the ocean, 2) removal of CO2 from waste streams, esp. from biomass energy, via wet mineral contacting, and 3) the production and use of mineral derivatives, e.g. oxides or hydroxides, as CDR agents. The additional potential environmental benefits (e.g., reversal of ocean carbonate saturation loss) and impacts (e.g., increased mineral extraction), as well as potential economics will also be discussed.

  15. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  16. Three-dimensional culture of dental pulp stem cells in direct contact to tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widbiller, M; Lindner, S R; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G; Galler, K M

    2016-03-01

    Calcium silicate cements are biocompatible dental materials applicable in contact with vital tissue. The novel tricalcium silicate cement Biodentine™ offers properties superior to commonly used mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Objective of this study was to evaluate its cytocompatibility and ability to induce differentiation and mineralization in three-dimensional cultures of dental pulp stem cells after direct contact with the material. Test materials included a new tricalcium silicate (Biodentine™, Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France), MTA (ProRoot® MTA, DENSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialities, Johnson City, TN, USA), glass ionomer (Ketac™ Molar Aplicap™, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), human dentin disks and polystyrene. Magnetic activated cell sorting for to the surface antigen STRO-1 was performed to gain a fraction enriched with mesenchymal stem cells. Samples were allowed to set and dental pulp stem cells in collagen carriers were placed on top. Scanning electron microscopy of tricalcium silicate cement surfaces with and without cells was conducted. Cell viability was measured for 14 days by MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity was evaluated (days 3, 7, and 14) and expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, DSPP, and RUNX2) was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase data was performed to compare different materials as well as time points (Mann-Whitney U test, α = 0.05). Cell viability was highest on tricalcium silicate cement, followed by MTA. Viability on glass ionomer cement and dentin disks was significantly lower. Alkaline phosphatase activity was lower in cells on new tricalcium silicate cement compared to MTA, whereas expression patterns of marker genes were alike. Increased cell viability and similar levels of mineralization-associated gene expression in three-dimensional cell cultures on the novel tricalcium silicate cement and mineral

  17. 21 CFR 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diatomaceous earth. 573.340 Section 573.340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additive Listing § 573.340 Diatomaceous earth. (a) Identity. The additive consists of siliceous skeletal...

  18. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  19. Surface characterization of silicate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Marta

    2012-03-28

    The success of an implanted prosthetic material is determined by the early events occurring at the interface between the material and the body. These events depend on many surface properties, with the main ones including the surface's composition, porosity, roughness, topography, charge, functional groups and exposed area. This review will portray how our understanding of the surface reactivity of silicate bioceramics has emerged and evolved in the past four decades, owing to the adoption of many complementary surface characterization tools. The review is organized in sections dedicated to a specific surface property, each describing how the property influences the body's response to the material, and the tools that have been adopted to analyse it. The final section introduces the techniques that have yet to be applied extensively to silicate bioceramics, and the information that they could provide.

  20. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  1. Turbulent metal-silicate mixing, fragmentation, and equilibration in magma oceans

    CERN Document Server

    Deguen, Renaud; Olson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Much of the Earth was built by high-energy impacts of planetesimals and embryos, many of these impactors already differentiated, with metallic cores of their own. Geochemical data provide critical information on the timing of accretion and the prevailing physical conditions, but their interpretation depends critically on the degree of metal-silicate chemical equilibration during core-mantle differentiation, which is poorly constrained. Efficient equilibration requires that the large volumes of iron derived from impactor cores mix with molten silicates down to scales small enough to allow fast metal-silicate mass transfer. Here we use fluid dynamics experiments to show that large metal blobs falling in a magma ocean mix with the molten silicate through turbulent entrainment, with fragmentation into droplets eventually resulting from the entrainment process. In our experiments, fragmentation of the dense fluid occurs after falling a distance equal to 3-4 times its initial diameter, at which point a sizable volu...

  2. Biogenic silicate accumulation in sediments, Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; DAI Jicui; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; LI Fengye; SUN Song

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that low silicate content in seawater is a major limiting factor to phytoplankton primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. However the reason of Si-limitation remains poorly understood. In the present study we measured the biogenic silicate content and discussed the accumulation of silicate in Jiaozhou Bay sediment. The results show that the biogenic silica content in the sediment of the Jiaozhou Bay is obviously much higher than those in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. The BSi:TN ratios and BSi:16P ratios in the sediment are > 1 and the OC:BSi ratio in sediment is lower than these of Redfield ratio (106:16), indicating that the decomposition rate of OC is much higher than that for BSi in similar conditions. Therefore, the majority of the biogenic silicate was buried and thus did not participate in silicate recycling. Silicate accumulation in sediment may explain why Si limits the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay. Comparing the flux of biogenic silicate from sediments with primary production rate, it can be concluded that only 15.5% of biogenic silicate is hydrolyzed during the journey from surface to bottom in seawater, thus approximate 84.5% of biogenic silicate could reach the bottom. The silicate releasing rate from the sediment to seawater is considerably lower than that of sedimentation of biogenic silicate, indicating silicate accumulation in sediment too. In a word, the silicate accumulation in sediment is the key reason of silicate limiting to phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay.

  3. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  4. Longevity of silicate ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    The demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of dental ceramics as a biocompatible and functionally sufficient alternative to conventional restorative materials. Silicate ceramic restorations are widely used for veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns in dentistry. Long-term data are of crucial importance to optimize clinical practice. The purpose of the present article is to summarize data of the Innsbruck ceramic evaluation up to 261 months with the focus on longevity and failure characteristics.

  5. Alkaline broadening in Stars

    CERN Document Server

    De Kertanguy, A

    2015-01-01

    Giving new insight for line broadening theory for atoms with more structure than hydrogen in most stars. Using symbolic software to build precise wave functions corrected for ds;dp quantum defects. The profiles obtained with that approach, have peculiar trends, narrower than hydrogen, all quantum defects used are taken from atomic database topbase. Illustration of stronger effects of ions and electrons on the alkaline profiles, than neutral-neutral collision mechanism. Keywords : Stars: fundamental parameters - Atomic processes - Line: profiles.

  6. Process-based modeling of silicate mineral weathering responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwart, Steven A.; Berg, Astrid; Beerling, David J.

    2009-12-01

    A mathematical model describes silicate mineral weathering processes in modern soils located in the boreal coniferous region of northern Europe. The process model results demonstrate a stabilizing biological feedback mechanism between atmospheric CO2 levels and silicate weathering rates as is generally postulated for atmospheric evolution. The process model feedback response agrees within a factor of 2 of that calculated by a weathering feedback function of the type generally employed in global geochemical carbon cycle models of the Earth's Phanerozoic CO2 history. Sensitivity analysis of parameter values in the process model provides insight into the key mechanisms that influence the strength of the biological feedback to weathering. First, the process model accounts for the alkalinity released by weathering, whereby its acceleration stabilizes pH at values that are higher than expected. Although the process model yields faster weathering with increasing temperature, because of activation energy effects on mineral dissolution kinetics at warmer temperature, the mineral dissolution rate laws utilized in the process model also result in lower dissolution rates at higher pH values. Hence, as dissolution rates increase under warmer conditions, more alkalinity is released by the weathering reaction, helping maintain higher pH values thus stabilizing the weathering rate. Second, the process model yields a relatively low sensitivity of soil pH to increasing plant productivity. This is due to more rapid decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) under warmer conditions. Because DOC fluxes strongly influence the soil water proton balance and pH, this increased decomposition rate dampens the feedback between productivity and weathering. The process model is most sensitive to parameters reflecting soil structure; depth, porosity, and water content. This suggests that the role of biota to influence these characteristics of the weathering profile is as important, if not

  7. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of

  8. A systemic study of stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} mediated by alkaline chlorides as complex former

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yanhui [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)]. E-mail: sunyanhui0102@163.com; He Peng [Department of Ecology, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Huani [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2007-08-30

    A systematic study has been carried out for the stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport (SC-CVT) characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} mediated by the vapor complexes KLnCl{sub 4} and NaLnCl{sub 4} (Ln = Sc, Y and La-Lu) used NaCl and KCl as complex former, respectively. The results showed that the SC-CVT characteristics are similarly for NaCl and KCl as complex former, the main deposition temperature of the rare earth chlorides LnCl{sub 3} is in the increasing order ScCl{sub 3} < YCl{sub 3} < LaCl{sub 3}, and then with a systematically decreasing trend from the early lanthanide chlorides to the end one. The results also showed that the total transported amount of the produced chlorides is YCl{sub 3} > ScCl{sub 3}, and they are much higher than that of most lanthanoid chlorides. For lanthanoids, the total transported amount of chloride increases systematically from the early lanthanoid chlorides to the end one except for EuCl{sub 3} and GdCl{sub 3} mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, respectively, which showed the divergence effect of Gd in the total transport efficiency. But there are some differences in SC-CVT characteristics of pure rare earth oxide mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, that is the main deposition temperature region for the same rare earth element was lower for KCl than that for NaCl as complex former except for LaCl{sub 3}, CeCl{sub 3}, YbCl{sub 3} and LuCl{sub 3}, while the total transport amount of rare earth chloride for KCl as complex former is higher than that for NaCl except for LaCl{sub 3} and EuCl{sub 3}. More over, the discussion was carried out for Sc and Y on the one hand and the lanthanides contain 4f electron as another hand based on the 4f electron hybridization assumption. Further more, the transport characteristics of rare earth oxides with alkaline chlorides as complex former in this study were compared to that with AlCl{sub 3} as complex former.

  9. The formation of nuggets of highly siderophile elements in quenched silicate melts at high temperatures: Before or during the silicate quench?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Cordier, P.; Righter, K.; Deldicque, D.; Hennet, L.

    2016-01-01

    The Highly Siderophile Elements (HSE) are powerful tracers of planetary differentiation. Despite the importance of their partitioning between silicate and metal for the understanding of planetary core formation, especially for the Earth and Mars, there is still a huge discrepancy between conclusions based on different high temperature (HT) experimental studies. These disagreements may be due to the presence of HSE micro and nanonuggets in HT experiments. The formation of these nuggets is still interpreted in different ways. One hypothesis is that these HSE nuggets formed during the quench of the silicate melt, while another hypothesis supposes that these nuggets formed before the quench and represented artefacts of HT experiments. The goal of this work is to clarify whether the presence of HSE nuggets in silicate melts is linked to a quench effect or not. Understanding the formation of these HSE nuggets represents thus a necessary step towards the resolution of the Earth's core formation scenarios. We performed new HT experiments (1275-2000 °C) at different oxygen fugacities (fO2), between ambient air up to ∼5 log units below the Iron-Wüstite buffer [IW-5], for two different silicate compositions (synthetic martian and terrestrial basalts) mixed with a metallic mixture of Pt-Au-Pd-Ru. Our 1275-1600 °C experiments were contained in either olivine, diopside or graphite crucible; experiments at 2000 °C were performed using a levitation method, so no capsule was necessary. Our samples contained quenched silicate melts, minerals (olivine, pyroxene, spinel depending on the run), a two-phase metallic bead and nano and micro-nuggets of HSE. Our samples underwent fine textural, structural and analytical characterizations. The distribution of the nuggets was not homogeneous throughout the quenched silicate melt. HSE nuggets were present within crystals. Dendritic textures from the quenched silicate melt formed around HSE nuggets, which could be crystallized, showing

  10. Metal-Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten from 10 to 50 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Campbell, A. J.; Danielson, L.; Rahman, Z.; Righter, K.

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical models of core formation are commonly based on core and mantle abundances of siderophile elements that partitioned between silicate and metal in a magma ocean in the early Earth. Tungsten is a moderately siderophile element that may provide constraints on the pressure, temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity conditions, and on the timing of core formation in the Earth. Previous experimental studies suggest that pressure exerts little to no influence over W metal-silicate partitioning up to 24 GPa, and indicate that the stronger influences are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity. However, core formation models based in part on W, predict metal-silicate equilibration pressures outside the available experimental pressure range, requiring extrapolation of parameterized models. Therefore, higher pressure experimental data on W were needed to constrain this important parameter.

  11. Constructing and screening a metagenomic library of a cold and alkaline extreme environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Natural cold or alkaline environments are common on Earth. A rare combination of these two extremes is found in the permanently cold (less than 6 °C) and alkaline (pH above 10) ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Southern Greenland. Bioprospecting efforts have established the ikaite columns...

  12. Process for the preparation of composite crystalline aluminium silicates and their use as catalyst (carrier)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Erp, W.A.; Huizinga, T.; Seelen-Kruijssen, J.

    1989-01-31

    A process is presented for the preparation of a composite crystalline aluminum silicate by maintaining an aqueous alkaline starting mixture comprising one or more silicon compounds, one or more aluminium compounds, one or more compounds of metals from Group Ia of the Periodic Table and organic nitrogen compounds at an elevated temperature, until composite crystalline aluminium silicate has formed. Subsequently, crystalline silicate is separated from the mother liquor, wherein the various compounds are present in the starting mixture in defined molar ratios. These silicates can be used as catalyst or catalyst carrier in dewaxing hydrocarbon oils, to which process this invention further relates. To be used in such a process, the alkali metal content of the composite silicates must be reduced to less than 0.1 wt%. If desired, the performance of the silicates can be improved by using them simultaneously as carrier for one or more catalytically active metals from Groups VIb, VIIb and VIII8 of the Periodic Table or compounds thereof. The hydrocarbon oils which are to be dewaxed are preferably selected from the group consisting of lubricating oils and transformer oils (in order to reduce their pour point), and kerosenes and gas oils (in order to reduce their freezing point). Additionally, this invention relates to hydrocarbon oils which have been dewaxed according to the process of the invention. Furthermore, the invention relates to molecular sieves which comprise a composite crystalline aluminum silicate prepared as hereinbefore described, and to the application of such molecular sieves in a process for separating hydrocarbons. 5 tabs.

  13. Pt, Au, Pd and Ru Partitioning Between Mineral and Silicate Melts: The Role of Metal Nanonuggets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Agranier, A.; Campbell, A.

    2012-01-01

    The partition coefficients of Pt and other Pt Group Elements (PGE) between metal and silicate D(sub Metal-Silicate) and also between silicate minerals and silicate melts D(sub Metal-Silicate) are among the most challenging coefficients to obtain precisely. The PGE are highly siderophile elements (HSE) with D(sub Metal-Silicate) >10(exp 3) due to the fact that their concentrations in silicates are very low (ppb to ppt range). Therefore, the analytical difficulty is increased by the possible presence of HSE-rich-nuggets in reduced silicate melts during experiments). These tiny HSE nuggets complicate the interpretation of measured HSE concentrations. If the HSE micro-nuggets are just sample artifacts, then their contributions should be removed before calculations of the final concentration. On the other hand, if they are produced during the quench, then they should be included in the analysis. We still don't understand the mechanism of nugget formation well. Are they formed during the quench by precipitation from precursor species dissolved homogeneously in the melts, or are they precipitated in situ at high temperature due to oversaturation? As these elements are important tracers of early planetary processes such as core formation, it is important to take up this analytical and experimental challenge. In the case of the Earth for example, chondritic relative abundances of the HSE in some mantle xenoliths have led to the concept of the "late veneer" as a source of volatiles (such as water) and siderophiles in the silicate Earth. Silicate crystal/liquid fractionation is responsible for most, if not all, the HSE variation in the martian meteorite suites (SNC) and Pt is the element least affected by these fractionations. Therefore, in terms of reconstructing mantle HSE abundances for Mars, Pt becomes a very important player. In the present study, we have performed high temperature experiments under various redox conditions in order to determine the abundances of Pt, Au

  14. High-temperature silicate volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A S; Keszthelyi, L; Spencer, J R; Schubert, G; Matson, D L; Lopes-Gautier, R; Klaasen, K P; Johnson, T V; Head, J W; Geissler, P; Fagents, S; Davies, A G; Carr, M H; Breneman, H H; Belton, M J

    1998-07-03

    Infrared wavelength observations of Io by the Galileo spacecraft show that at least 12 different vents are erupting lavas that are probably hotter than the highest temperature basaltic eruptions on Earth today. In at least one case, the eruption near Pillan Patera, two independent instruments on Galileo show that the lava temperature must have exceeded 1700 kelvin and may have reached 2000 kelvin. The most likely explanation is that these lavas are ultramafic (magnesium-rich) silicates, and this idea is supported by the tentative identification of magnesium-rich orthopyroxene in lava flows associated with these high-temperature hot spots.

  15. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  16. Geochemical Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Drake, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    New experimental data on the partitioning of siderophile and chalcophile elements among metallic and silicate phases may be used to constrain hypotheses of core formation in the Earth. Three current hypotheses can explain gross features of mantle geochemistry, but none predicts siderophile and chalcophile element abundances to within a factor of two of observed values. Either our understanding of metal-silicate interactions and/or our understanding of the early Earth requires revision.

  17. Timing And Processes Of Earth's Core Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegre, C. J.; Manhes, G.; Gopel, C.

    2004-12-01

    Small 182W abundance excess of terrestrial W relative to W in bulk chondrites has been recently established (Yin et al. 2002, Kleine et al. 2002, Schoenberg et al. 2002). Rapid terrestrial accretion and early core formation, with completion of the bulk metal-silicate separation within less than 30 Myr have been proposed on this basis. These studies underline how much this 182W/182Hf time scale agrees with dynamic accretion models (Wetherill, 1986) that predict a ˜10 Myr interval for the main growth stage of Earth's formation. This W model time scale for terrestrial accretion is shorter than current estimates based on Pb isotope systematics of mantle-derived basalts and terrestrial Xe isotope systematics. The end of metal-silicate differentiation and large scale mantle degassing has been defined ˜100 My after beginning of the accretion. These studies also indicate agreement of this time scale with dynamic accretion models that predict 100 My for the end of Earth's accretion. The Hf-W time scale for accretion and core formation assumes total equilibration of incoming metal and silicate of impactors with the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) during planet's growth. Recently, the assumption of incomplete equilibration of metal and silicate components with BSE has been investigated (Halliday, 2004). It is proposed that impacting core material has not always efficiently mixed with the silicate portions of the Earth before being added to the Earth's core Our approach also considers that equilibration between metal and silicate has not been complete in BSE during Earth's growth, and we argue that early part of the Earth's core has segregated through unmelted silicate material. When the baby Earth was large enough, the increase of the temperature induced Fe-FeS eutectic melting. The liquid metal segregated through the crystalline silicate matrix and formed the early part of the Earth's core. Experimental study (Yoshino et al. 2003) indicates the percolation threshold for molten

  18. Ion-specific effects influencing the dissolution of tricalcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoleau, L. [BASF Research Construction Materials and Systems, BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany); Schreiner, E., E-mail: eduard.schreiner@basf.com [BASF Materials and Systems, BASF SE, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Nonat, A., E-mail: andre.nonat@u-bourgogne.fr [Institut Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR6303 CNRS, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the dissolution kinetics of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) is driven by the deviation from its solubility equilibrium. In this article, special attention is paid to ions relevant in cement chemistry likely to interact with C{sub 3}S. In order to determine whether specific effects occur at the interface C{sub 3}S–water, particular efforts have been made to model ion activities using Pitzer's model. It has been found that monovalent cations and monovalent anions interact very little with the surface of C{sub 3}S. On the other side, divalent anions like sulfate slow down the dissolution more strongly by modifying the surface charging of C{sub 3}S. Third, aluminate ions covalently bind to surface silicate monomers and inhibit the dissolution in mildly alkaline conditions. The formation and the breaking of these bonds depend on pH and on [Ca{sup 2+}]. Thermodynamic calculations performed using DFT combined with the COSMO-RS solvation method support the experimental findings.

  19. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  20. Nanoscale zinc silicate from phytoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, S. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Rath, B. B.; Feng, C. R.; Amarasinghe, R.; Freitas, J. A.; Culbertson, J. C.; Wollmershauser, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    We report a faster, less expensive method of producing zinc silicate nanoparticles. Such particles are used in high volume to make phosphors and anti-corrosion coatings. The approach makes use of phytoliths (plant rocks), which are microscopic, amorphous, and largely silicate particles embedded in plants, that lend themselves to being easily broken down into nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of Zn2SiO4 were produced in a two stage process. In the refinement stage, plant residue, mixed with an appropriate amount of ZnO, was heated in an argon atmosphere to a temperature exceeding 1400 °C for four to six hours and then heated in air at 650 °C to remove excess carbon. TEM shows 50-100 nm nanoparticles. Raman scattering indicates that only the -Zn2SiO4 crystalline phase was present. X-ray analysis indicated pure rhombohedral R 3 bar phase results from using rice/wheat husks. Both samples luminesced predominantly at 523 nm when illuminated with X-rays or UV laser light.

  1. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  2. Chemistry of Impact-Generated Silicate Melt-Vapor Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Visscher, Channon

    2013-01-01

    In the giant impact theory for lunar origin, the Moon forms from material ejected by the impact into an Earth-orbiting disk. Here we report the initial results from a silicate melt-vapor equilibrium chemistry model for such impact-generated planetary debris disks. In order to simulate the chemical behavior of a two-phase (melt+vapor) disk, we calculate the temperature-dependent pressure and chemical composition of vapor in equilibrium with molten silicate from 2000 to 4000 K. We consider the elements O, Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti, and Zn for a range of bulk silicate compositions (Earth, Moon, Mars, eucrite parent body, angrites, and ureilites). In general, the disk atmosphere is dominated by Na, Zn, and O2 at lower temperatures (< 3000 K) and SiO, O2, and O at higher temperatures. The high-temperature chemistry is consistent for any silicate melt composition, and we thus expect abundant SiO, O2, and O to be a common feature of hot, impact-generated debris disks. In addition, the saturated silicate vapor...

  3. Effects of silicates from scaps of photovoltaic industries on powdery mildew of zucchini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, M; Alvarez, M T Moreno; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

    2012-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element on earth's surface and its use can stimulate natural defense mechanisms in plants. The effect of silicate from scraps of photovoltaic industries against powdery mildew on zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) was evaluated under greenhouse conditions. Potted plants were inoculated with a spore suspension containing 1 x 10(5) cfu/ml. The following treatments have been carried out, 3 and 10 days after pathogen inoculation: chemical fungicide (propiconazole, TILT 25 EC, Syngenta); Bacillus subtilis (250 g/hl, Serenade, Intrachem); 1% and 0.1% sodium silicate (r = 1); 1% and 0.1% sodium silicate (r = 2); tap water as control. Disease incidence and severity were assessed 7, 14 and 21days after pathogen inoculation. Results showed that the application of 1% sodium silicate (r = 1) significantly reduced the powdery mildew to a level similar to chemical control. The other treatments, including Bacillus subtilis, reduced disease severity compared to water control, but were less efficient. The use of silicates from photovoltaic industries is a valid alternative for the control of powdery mildew on zucchini, in particular in organic farming. However, silicates might not be sufficient at higher disease incidence levels, and their use is more suitable within an integrated disease control strategy.

  4. 二价碱土金属氟化物对Er3+/Tm3+/Yb3+共掺氟氧锗酸盐玻璃热稳定性和光谱特性影响的研究%Effect of Bivalent Alkaline Earth Fluorides Introduction on Thermal Stability and Spectroscopic Properties of Er3+/Tm3+/Yb3+ Co-Doped Oxyfluorogermanate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡曰博; 张新娜; 周大利; 焦清; 王荣飞; 黄劲峰; 龙晓波; 邱建备

    2012-01-01

    制备了分别含有MgF2,CaF2,SrF2或BaF2的Er3+/Tm3+/Yb3+共掺氟氧锗酸盐玻璃试样和包含BaF2纳米晶的玻璃陶瓷试样,所制备试样均具有良好的透光性.对试样的热稳定性和上转换发光特性进行了研究.通过分析试样的吸收光谱发现,随着所含二价阳离子原子量的增大,试样的紫外吸收截止波长明显向短波方向移动.结果显示:通过改变所含二价碱土金属离子的种类能够对激发光的颜色进行调节,特别值得关注的是Mg2+的影响;结果证实:通过对包含二价碱土金属的玻璃进行微晶化处理或者增加二价碱土金属的含量均能提高上转换发光的强度.%Transparent Er3+ /Tm3+ /Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses alone containing MgF2, CaF2, SrF2 or BaF2 and nano-glass-ceramics only containing BaF2 were prepared. The thermal stabilities and the up-conversion emission properties of the samples were investigated. Analyses of absorbance spectra reveal that the UV cutoff band moves slightly to shortwave band with the doping bivalent cation mass increasing. The results show that the emission color can be adjusted by changing the alkaline earth cation species in the glass matrixes, especially as Mg2+ is concerned, and the emission intensity can increase notably by heating the glass containing alkaline-earth fluoride into glass ceramic containing alkaline-earth fluoride nanocrystals or increasing the content of bivalent alkaline earth fluorides.

  5. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  6. Thin films nanostructured to multidetection catalytic from rare earth minerals: A) purification of perovskite; Filmes finos nanoestruturados para multideteccao catalitica a partir de minerais de terras raras: A) purificacao da perovskita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.G. da; Souza, C.P. de; Gomes, U.U.; Paskocimas, C.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This project aims at the use of Brazilian mineral pretreated with high contents of rare earth (La, Ce) aiming at the elaboration of thin films which have physical properties (optical, electrical and catalytic) scalable. The property of greatest interest is the interaction in terms of selective catalytic gases methane, carbon monoxide and ammonia. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transition electron microscopy (TEM). Crystalline residue samples were subjected to a series of chemical treatments followed by alkaline fusion. From a first approach, it was possible to separate the phosphate and silicate mineral residue, separating the rare earth elements to then extract the oxide phases of these materials as complex mixtures. (author)

  7. An alkaline element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arita, T.; Murakami, K.; Okha, K.

    1983-04-28

    A cathode with a dual layer active mass is installed in the disk shaped alkaline silver and zinc element. The first layer, which is turned towards the anode, contains 85 parts Ag2O, 5 parts electrolytic MnO2 and 10 parts graphite. The second layer, which contacts the bottom of the element, contains 35 parts Ag2O, 60 parts electrolytic MnO2 and 5 parts graphite. The electrical capacity of the first and second layers is 60 and 40, respectively. The first layer may be discharged with a high current density and the second layer with less current density. The element has high characteristics with comparatively low cost.

  8. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  9. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  10. Application conditions for ester cured alkaline phenolic resin sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-he Huang; Bao-ping Zhang; Yao-ji Tang

    2016-01-01

    Five organic esters with different curing speeds: propylene carbonate (i.e. high-speed ester A); 1, 4-butyrolactone; glycerol triacetate (i.e. medium-speed ester B); glycerol diacetate; dibasic ester (DBE) (i.e. low-speed ester C), were chosen to react with alkaline phenolic resin to analyze the application conditions of ester cured alkaline phenolic resin. The relationships between the curing performances of the resin (including pH value, gel pH value, gel time of resin solution, heat release rate of the curing reaction and tensile strength of the resin sand) and the amount of added organic ester and curing temperature were investigated. The results indicated the folowing: (1) The optimal added amount of organic ester should be 25wt.%-30wt.% of alkaline phenolic resin and it must be above 20wt.%-50 wt.% of the organic ester hydrolysis amount. (2) High-speed ester A (propylene carbonate) has a higher curing speed than 1, 4-butyrolactone, and they were both used as high-speed esters. Glycerol diacetate is not a high-speed ester in alkaline phenolic resin although it was used as a high-speed ester in ester cured sodium silicate sand; glycerol diacetate and glycerol triacetate can be used as medium-speed esters in alkaline phenolic resin. (3) High-speed ester A, medium-speed ester B (glycerol triacetate) and low-speed ester C (dibasic ester, i.e., DBE) should be used below 15 ºC, 35 ºC and 50 ºC, respectively. High-speed ester A or low-speed ester C should not be used alone but mixed with medium-speed ester B to improve the strength of the resin sand. (4) There should be a suitable solid content (generaly 45wt.%-65wt.% of resin), alkali content (generaly 10wt.%-15wt.% of resin) and viscosity of alkaline phenolic resin (generaly 50-300 mPa·s) in the preparation of alkaline phenolic resin. Finaly, the technique conditions of alkaline phenolic resin preparation and the application principles of organic ester were discussed.

  11. Helium in Earth's early core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Jephcoat, Andrew P.; Heber, Veronika S.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2013-11-01

    The observed escape of the primordial helium isotope, 3He, from the Earth's interior indicates that primordial helium survived the energetic process of planetary accretion and has been trapped within the Earth to the present day. Two distinct reservoirs in the Earth's interior have been invoked to account for variations in the 3He/4He ratio observed at the surface in ocean basalts: a conventional depleted mantle source and a deep, still enigmatic, source that must have been isolated from processing throughout Earth history. The Earth's iron-based core has not been considered a potential helium source because partitioning of helium into metal liquid has been assumed to be negligible. Here we determine helium partitioning in experiments between molten silicates and iron-rich metal liquids at conditions up to 16GPa and 3,000K. Analyses of the samples by ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry yield metal-silicate helium partition coefficients that range between 4.7×10-3 and 1.7×10-2 and suggest that significant quantities of helium may reside in the core. Based on estimated concentrations of primordial helium, we conclude that the early core could have incorporated enough helium to supply deep-rooted plumes enriched in 3He throughout the age of the Earth.

  12. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  13. Turbulent mixing of metal and silicate during planet accretion — And interpretation of the Hf–W chronometer

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Tais W.; Stevenson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    In the current view of planet formation, the final assembly of the Earth involved giant collisions between proto-planets (> 1000 km radius), with the Moon formed as a result of one such impact. At this stage the colliding bodies had likely differentiated into a metallic core surrounded by a silicate mantle. During the Moon-forming impact, nearly all metal sank into the Earth's core. We investigate to what extent large self-gravitating iron cores can mix with surrounding silicate and how this ...

  14. 生物活性稀土梯度涂层在碱液环境中的电极化后处理%Electric polarized post treatment of rare earth active bioceramic gradient coating in alkaline solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪震; 刘其斌; 肖明; 杨邦成

    2011-01-01

    To improve the quality of rare earth active bioceramic gradient coatings,a method of electric polarized treatment(PAS) was used to post-process the gradient coatings fabricated by wide band laser cladding in alkali liquid.The phases and corrosion resistance of the bioceramic coatings were analyzed by XRD and an electrochemical analyzer.The bioceramic coatings were immersed in simulated body fluid(SBF) to examine its bioactivity and its electrical charge.The experimental results indicate that PAS treatment not only improves the crystallinity of the coatings,but also is favourable to transform additional phases into hydroxyapatite.PAS treatment exhibits a little effect on corrosion resistance of the bioceramic coatings.Compared with as-received coatings,the coatings treated by PAS are of better bioactivity and more negative charge.%为了改善活性生物稀土梯度涂层的质量,在碱液环境中采用电极化处理法(PAS)对宽带激光熔覆生物活性稀土梯度涂层进行后处理。利用XRD和电化学分析仪对涂层的相组成和耐腐蚀性进行了研究,通过模拟体液浸泡试验考察了生物陶瓷涂层的生物活性和涂层表面的电荷分布情况。结果表明,碱液环境中电极化处理法(PAS)能够提高涂层的结晶度,使涂层中的非晶相、杂相向羟基磷灰石转化。PAS对涂层的耐腐蚀性影响不大。与未处理涂层相比,PAS处理后的涂层生物活性更好,且涂层表面产生了更多的负电荷。

  15. Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    Variation of Nernst partition coefficients ( D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO 2, H 2O, MgO and MgO/MgO + FeO total. Values of olivine/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt SiO 2 content, but generally show poor correlations with other variables. Multi-element olivine/liquidD profiles calculated from regressions of D REE-Sc-Y vs. melt MgO content are compared to results of the Lattice Strain Model to link melt MgO and: D0 (the strain compensated partition coefficient), EM3+ (Young's Modulus), and r0 (the size of the M site). Ln D0 varies linearly with Ln MgO in the melt; EM3+ varies linearly with melt MgO, with a dog-leg at ca. 1.5% MgO; and r0 remains constant at 0.807 Å. These equations are then used to calculate olivine/liquidD for these elements using the Lattice Strain Model. These empirical parameterizations of olivine/liquidD variations yield results comparable to experimental or natural partitioning data, and can easily be integrated into existing trace element modeling algorithms. The olivine/liquidD data suggest that basaltic melts in equilibrium with pure olivine may acquire small negative Ta-Hf-Zr-Ti anomalies, but that negative Nb anomalies are unlikely to develop. Misfits between results of the Lattice Strain Model and most light rare earth and large ion lithophile partitioning data suggest that kinetic effects may limit the lower value of D for extremely incompatible elements in natural situations characterized by high cooling/crystallization rates.

  16. Structural and crystallisation study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass designed for nuclear waste confinement; Etude de la structure et du comportement en cristallisation d'un verre nucleaire d'aluminoborosilicate de terre rare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintas, A

    2007-09-15

    This work is devoted to the study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass, which molar composition is 61,81 SiO{sub 2} - 3,05 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 8,94 B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 14,41 Na{sub 2}O - 6,33 CaO - 1,90 ZrO{sub 2} - 3,56 Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and envisaged for the immobilization of nuclear wastes originating from the reprocessing of high discharge burn up spent fuel. From a structural viewpoint, we investigated the role of the modifier cations on the arrangement of the glass network through different modifications of the glass composition: variation of the Na/Ca ratio and modification of the nature of the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The NMR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were useful to determine the distribution of modifier cations among the glass network and also to cast light on the competition phenomena occurring between alkali and alkaline earth cations for charge compensation of [AlO{sub 4}]{sup -} and [BO{sub 4}]{sup -} species. The neodymium local environment could be probed by optical absorption and EXAFS spectroscopies which enabled to better understand the insertion mode of Nd{sup 3+} ions among the silicate domains of the glass network. Concerning the crystallization behavior we were interested in how the glass composition may influence the crystallization processes and especially the formation of the apatite phase of composition Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}. In particular, this work underlined the important role of both alkaline earth and rare earth cations on the crystallization of the apatite phase. (author)

  17. Electrochemical characteristics and impedance spectroscopy studies of nano-cobalt silicate hydroxide for supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Yong-Qing; Tao, Feng; Li, Hu-Lin

    Cobalt silicate hydroxide (Co 3[Si 2O 5] 2[OH] 2) was prepared by chemical method for use in electrochemical capacitors. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests indicate that the material was pure hexagonal phase with uniform nanometer size distribution. Cyclic voltammeter (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements show that the cobalt silicate hydroxide-based electrode has stable electrochemical capacitor properties between potential range of 0.1-0.55 V with a maximum specific capacitance of 237 F g -1 in alkaline solution and 95% of capacity efficiency was reached after 150 cycles. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) investigation illustrates that the capacitance of the test electrode was mainly consisted of pseudo-capacitance, which was caused by underpotential deposition of H 3O + at the electrode surface.

  18. Turbulent mixing of metal and silicate during planet accretion — And interpretation of the Hf-W chronometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Tais W.; Stevenson, David J.

    2010-06-01

    In the current view of planet formation, the final assembly of the Earth involved giant collisions between proto-planets (> 1000 km radius), with the Moon formed as a result of one such impact. At this stage the colliding bodies had likely differentiated into a metallic core surrounded by a silicate mantle. During the Moon-forming impact, nearly all metal sank into the Earth's core. We investigate to what extent large self-gravitating iron cores can mix with surrounding silicate and how this influences the short-lived chronometer, Hf-W, used to infer the age of the Moon. We present fluid dynamical models of turbulent mixing in fully liquid systems, attempting to place constraints on the degree of mixing. Erosion of sinking cores driven by Rayleigh-Taylor instability does lead to intimate mixing and equilibration, but large blobs (> 10 km diameter) do not emulsify entirely. Emulsification is enhanced if most of the accreting metal cores deform into thin structures during descent through the Earth's mantle. Yet, only 1-20% of Earth's core would equilibrate with silicate during Earth's accretion. The initial speed of the impactor is of little importance. We proceed to evaluate the mixing potential for shear instabilities where silicate entrainment across vertical walls causes mixing. The turbulent structure indicates that vortices remain at the largest scale and do not mix to centimeter length scale, where diffusion operates and isotopes can equilibrate. Thus, incomplete emulsification and equilibration of accreting iron cores is likely to occur. The extent of metal-silicate equilibration provides key information for interpretation of siderophile budgets and the timing of core formation using the Hf-W chronometer. The time scale of core formation derived from the Hf-W chronometer is usually tied to the last major metal-silicate re-equilibration, believed to coincide with time of the Moon-forming impact. However, we show that large cores have limited ability to reset

  19. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  1. Characterization of silicate/Si(001) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copel, M.; Cartier, E.; Narayanan, V.; Reuter, M. C.; Guha, S.; Bojarczuk, N.

    2002-11-01

    Many of the proposed high permittivity gate dielectrics for silicon-based microelectronics rely on a stack configuration, with an SiO2 buffer layer to provide an interface. We describe a means for creating gate dielectrics with a direct yttrium silicate-silicon interface through the solid-state reaction of yttria and silicon oxynitride, avoiding the preparation of an oxide-free silicon surface. Characterization by medium-energy ion scattering indicates complete consumption of the underlying oxide through silicate formation during high-temperature annealing. Furthermore, the silicate dielectric exhibits small flat-band voltage shifts, indicating low quantities of charge, without passivation steps. Creation of a silicate-silicon interfaces by a simple route may enable the study of an alternate class of dielectrics.

  2. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  3. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  4. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2010-11-23

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth's climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO(2) sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1-5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique.

  5. Rare earth minerals and resources in the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Yasuo [Human Resource Department, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: y.kanazawa@aist.go.jp; Kamitani, Masaharu [Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8567 (Japan)

    2006-02-09

    About 200 rare earth (RE) minerals are distributed in a wide variety of mineral classes, such as halides, carbonates, oxides, phosphates, silicates, etc. Due to the large ionic radii and trivalent oxidation state, RE ions in the minerals have large coordination numbers (c.n.) 6-10 by anions (O, F, OH). Light rare earth elements (LREEs) tend to occupy the larger sites of 8-10 c.n. and concentrate in carbonates and phosphates. On the other hand, heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and Y occupy 6-8 c.n. sites and are abundant in oxides and a part of phosphates. Only a few mineral species, such as bastnaesite (Ce,La)(CO{sub 3})F, monazite (Ce,La)PO{sub 4}, xenotime YPO{sub 4}, and RE-bearing clay have been recovered for commercial production. Bayan Obo, China is the biggest RE deposit in the world. One of probable hypotheses for ore geneses is that the deposit might be formed by hydrothermal replacement of carbonate rocks of sedimentary origin. The hydrothermal fluid may be derived from an alkaline-carbonatite intrusive series. Following Bayan Obo, more than 550 carbonatite/alkaline complex rocks constitute the majority of the world RE resources. The distribution is restricted to interior and marginal regions of continents, especially Precambrian cratons and shields, or related to large-scale rift structures. Main concentrated areas of the complexes are East African rift zones, northern Scandinavia-Kola peninsula, eastern Canada and southern Brazil. Representative sedimentary deposits of REE are placer- and conglomerate-types. The major potential countries are Australia, India, Brazil, and Malaysia. Weathered residual deposits have been formed under tropical and sub-tropical climates. Bauxite and laterite nickel deposit are the representative. Ion adsorption clay without radioactive elements is known in southern China. Weathering processes concentrate REE in a particular clay mineral-layer in the weathered crusts whose source were originally REE-rich rocks like granite

  6. Preparation of magnetic carbon nanotubes with hierarchical copper silicate nanostructure for efficient adsorption and removal of hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Yanwei; Ding, Lei; Zheng, Jing; Xu, Jingli

    2016-07-01

    The controllable synthesis of materials with the desired structure and dimensionality is of great significance in material science. In this work, the hierarchical CNTs/Fe3O4@copper silicate (CNTs/Fe3O4@CuSilicate) composites were synthesized via a simple chemical conversion route by using CNTs/Fe3O4@SiO2 nanocables as template. Firstly, magnetic CNTs composites (CNTs/Fe3O4) were synthesized by the high temperature decomposition process using the iron acetylacetonate as raw materials. Then a layer of SiO2 can be easily coated on the magnetic CNTs by the stöber method, which were then converted into CNTs/Fe3O4@CuSilicate composites by hydrothermal reaction between the silica shell and copper ions in alkaline solution. The resulting CNTs/Fe3O4@CuSilicate composites hold merits such as magnetic responsivity, good dispersibility, and large specific surface area. Moreover, the CNTs/Fe3O4@copper silicate composites have strong affinity toward bovine hemoglobin (BHb), which were successfully applied to convenient, efficient, and fast removal of abundant proteins (HHb and HSA) in human blood.

  7. Influence of silicate anions structure on desilication in silicate-bearing sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 张闻; 齐天贵; 彭志宏; 周秋生; 李小斌

    2016-01-01

    The structural changes of silicate anions in the desilication process with the addition of calcium hydrate alumino-carbonate were studied by measuring Raman spectra, infrared spectra and corresponding second derivative spectra. The results show that the desilication ratio in the solution prepared by the addition of sodium silicate (solution-SS) is much greater than that in the solution by the addition of green liquor (solution-GL), and low alumina concentration in the sodium aluminate solutions facilitates the desilication process. It is also shown that alumino-silicate anions in the solution-GL, and Q3 polymeric silicate anions in solution-SS are predominant, respectively. In addition, increasing the concentration of silica favors respectively the formation of the alumino-silicate or the Q3 silicate anions in the solution-GL or the solution-SS. Therefore, it can be inferred that the low desilication ratio in the silicate-bearing aluminate solution is mainly attributed to the existence of alumino-silicate anions.

  8. Contemporaneous trachyandesitic and calc-alkaline volcanism of the Huerto Andesite, San Juan Volcanic Field, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, F.; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Locally, voluminous andesitic volcanism both preceded and followed large eruptions of silicic ash-flow tuff from many calderas in the San Juan volcanic field. The most voluminous post-collapse lava suite of the central San Juan caldera cluster is the 28 Ma Huerto Andesite, a diverse assemblage erupted from at least 5-6 volcanic centres that were active around the southern margins of the La Garita caldera shortly after eruption of the Fish Canyon Tuff. These andesitic centres are inferred, in part, to represent eruptions of magma that ponded and differentiated within the crust below the La Garita caldera, thereby providing the thermal energy necessary for rejuvenation and remobilization of the Fish Canyon magma body. The multiple Huerto eruptive centres produced two magmatic series that differ in phenocryst mineralogy (hydrous vs anhydrous assemblages), whole-rock major and trace element chemistry and isotopic compositions. Hornblende-bearing lavas from three volcanic centres located close to the southeastern margin of the La Garita caldera (Eagle Mountain - Fourmile Creek, West Fork of the San Juan River, Table Mountain) define a high-K calc-alkaline series (57-65 wt % SiO2) that is oxidized, hydrous and sulphur rich. Trachyandesitic lavas from widely separated centres at Baldy Mountain-Red Lake (western margin), Sugarloaf Mountain (southern margin) and Ribbon Mesa (20 km east of the La Garita caldera) are mutually indistinguishable (55-61 wt % SiO2); they are characterized by higher and more variable concentrations of alkalis and many incompatible trace elements (e.g. Zr, Nb, heavy rare earth elements), and they contain anhydrous phenocryst assemblages (including olivine). These mildly alkaline magmas were less water rich and oxidized than the hornblende-bearing calc-alkaline suite. The same distinctions characterize the voluminous precaldera andesitic lavas of the Conejos Formation, indicating that these contrasting suites are long-term manifestations of San Juan

  9. Silicate weathering and CO2 consumption within agricultural landscapes, the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, S. K.; Lyons, W. B.; Carey, A. E.; Shipitalo, M. J.; Welch, S. A.; Welch, K. A.

    2012-03-01

    Myriad studies have shown the extent of human alteration to global biogeochemical cycles. Yet, there is only a limited understanding of the influence that humans have over silicate weathering fluxes; fluxes that have regulated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and global climate over geologic timescales. Natural landscapes have been reshaped into agricultural ones to meet food needs for growing world populations. These processes modify soil properties, alter hydrology, affect erosion, and consequently impact water-soil-rock interactions such as chemical weathering. Dissolved silica (DSi), Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, and total alkalinity were measured in water samples collected from five small (0.0065 to 0.383 km2) gauged watersheds at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) near Coshocton, Ohio, USA. The sampled watersheds in this unglaciated region include: a forested site (70+ year stand), mixed agricultural use (corn, forest, pasture), an unimproved pasture, tilled corn, and a recently (corn field. The first three watersheds had perennial streams, but the two corn watersheds only produced runoff during storms and snowmelt. For the perennial streams, total discharge was an important control of dissolved silicate transport. Median DSi yields (2210-3080 kg km-2 yr-1) were similar to the median of annual averages between 1979-2009 for the much larger Ohio-Tennessee River Basin (2560 kg km-2 yr-1). Corn watersheds, which only had surface runoff, had substantially lower DSi yields (corn and the forested site suggested, however, that silicate minerals weathered as alkalinity was lost via enhanced nitrification resulting from fertilizer additions to the corn watershed and from leaf litter decomposition in the forest. This same relation was observed in the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin where dominant landuse types include both agricultural lands receiving nitrogenous fertilizers and forests. Greater gains in DSi with respect to alkalinity losses in the Ohio

  10. Solid Inclusions in Au-nuggets, genesis and derivation from alkaline rocks of the Guli Massif, Northern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvorani Sami N.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 112 Au-nuggets, collected from alluvial placer deposits of the Ingarinda River from the Guli massif, located in northem Siberia, Russia, were investigated. The Guli massif consists of a huge dunite-clinopyroxenite complex (the largest complex in the world, an alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite (melilite, nephelinite, ijolite enveloping the dunite and carbonatite intrusions, associated with disseminated schlieren type chromitite and Au-Ag, Pt placer deposits. The nuggets are characterized by various sizes and shapes and show chemical compositions Au, Au-Ag and AuCu, typical for a derivate of carbon-atites and/or ultramafic complexes. A great variety of oxide, silicate, REE-minerals, carbonate and sulphide inclusions have been detected in the nuggets, which are identical in mineralogy and chemical composition to mineral constituents of the alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite surrounding the Guli dunite core complex thus, considered as the source for Au-nuggets.

  11. Turbulent Mixing of Metal and Silicate during Planet Accretion – and interpretation of the Hf-W chronometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Stevenson, David

    2010-01-01

    In the current view of planet formation, the final assembly of the Earth involved giant collisions between protoplanets (N1000 kmradius), with theMoon formed as a result of one such impact.At this stage the colliding bodies had likely differentiated into a metallic core surrounded by a silicate m...

  12. Destructive Adsorption of Carbon Tetrachloride on Alkaline Earth Metal Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Mestl, Gerhard; Rosynek, Michael P.; Krawietz, Thomas R.; Haw, James F.; Lunsford, Jack H.

    2001-01-01

    The destructive adsorption of CCl4 on MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO has been studied as a function of the reaction temperature and the amount of CCl4 injected. The reaction was followed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and 13 C mag

  13. Physicochemical study of alkaline earth metal and magnesium maleates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koblova, O.E.; Vdovina, L.M.; Frolova, L.A. (Saratovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR); Saratovskij Gosudarstvennyj Pedagogicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    Magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium maleates are synthesized. Their thermal stability in the atmosphere of air and argon is studied. It is shown that the dehydration of initial salts proceeds in the temperature range of 100-300 deg C. The decomposition of anhydrous salts takes place in the temperature range of 380-600 deg C. The values of the effective activation energy are determined.

  14. Alkaline earth oxide nanoparticles as destructive absorbents for environmental toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscovici, J.; Latreche, K. [Univ. Paris XII, Groupe de Physique des Milieux Denses, Creteil (France); Michalowicz, A. [Univ. Paris Sud, LURE, Orsay (France); Decker, S.; Lagadic, I.; Klabunde, K. [Kansas State Univ., Chemistry Dept., Manhattan, Kansas (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Sr and Ca oxide nanoparticles are very reactive materials used to mitigate atmospheric pollution and to sequester polluting molecules. We have studied the structure of SrO nanoparticles, using Sr K-edge and Fe K-edge XAFS, that were prepared with various reactivities, with or without a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating, and before and after reaction with CCl{sub 4} or SO2. For CCl4, the polluting fraction of the reagent is totally absorbed in the bulk particle. For SO{sub 2}, the results show a total reaction for the Aerogel Preparation (AP) compound. For the coated particles before reaction, the iron oxide has a very disordered structure, and it is mixed with small metallic iron clusters for Conventional Preparation (CP) compounds. (au) 4 refs.

  15. Apparent Dissolution Kinetics of Diatomite in Alkaline Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Gaoxiang; L(U) Guocheng; HE Xuwen

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution kinetics of diatomite in alkaline solution is the theoretical basis for the process optimization of alkali-diatomite reaction and its applications.In this study,the dissolution kinetics of diatomite in NaOH solution is investigated.The results indicate that the dissolution reaction fits well the unreacted shrinking core model for solid-liquid heterogeneous reactions.The apparent reaction order for NaOH is 2 and the apparent activation energy for the reaction (Ea) is 28.06 kJ.mol-1.The intra-particle diffusion through the sodium silicate layer is the rate-controlling step.When the dissolution reaction occurs at the interface of unreacted diatomite solid core,the diffusion in the trans-layer (the liquid film around the wetted particle) reduces the rate of whole dissolution process.

  16. Moessbauer effect of the alkaline and alkaline earth metal nitroprusside powders

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, T H; Kim, H S; Hong, C Y; Kim, H B; Cho, H Y; Kim, D Y; Moon, Y S

    2000-01-01

    We observe Moessbauer spectra of Fe atoms centered in nitroprusside anions of sodium nitroprusside (Na sub 2 [Fe(CN) sub 5 NO] 2H sub 2 O). potassium-nitroprusside (K sub 2 [Fe(CN)] sub 5 NO centre dot 2.5H sub 2 O), rubidium nitroprusside (Rb sub 2 [Fe(CN) sub 5 NO centre dot H sub 2 O), magnesium nitroprusside (Mg[Fe(CN) sub 5 NO], calcium nitroprusside (Ca[Fe(CN) sub 5 NO]centre dot 4H sub 2 O), and barium nitroprusside (Ba[Fe(CN) sub 5 NO]centre dot 3H sub 2 O) samples which have photochromic properties. We compare the Moessbauer parameters, the values of the isomer shifts and the quadrupole splittings of the samples with those of a sodium nitroprusside single crystal which is a standard material. The values of the isomer shifts and the quadrupole splittings of the various compounds are close to each other. The values of the line broadening of all samples are between 2.1 GAMMA sub N and 2.5 GAMMA sub N. The Moessbauer Lamb factors (f) are between 0.252(1) and 0.340(2). These values are obtained from the s...

  17. Synthesis and acid digestion of biomorphic ceramics: determination of alkaline and alkaline earth ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch Ojeda, Catalina; Sánchez Rojas, Fuensanta; Cano Pavón, José Manuel

    2007-09-01

    Ceramic and glass are some of the more recent engineering materials and those that are most resistant to environmental conditions. They belong to advanced materials in that they are being developed for the aerospace and electronics industries. In the last decade, a new class of ceramic materials has been the focus of particular attention. The materials were produced with natural, renewable resources (wood or wood-based products). In this work, we have synthesised a new biomorphic ceramic material from oak wood and Si infiltration. After the material characterization, we have optimized the dissolution of the sample by acid attack in an oven under microwave irradiation. Experimental designs were used as a multivariate strategy for the evaluation of the effects of varying several variables at the same time. The optimization was performed in two steps using factorial design for preliminary evaluation and a Draper-Lin design for determination of the critical experimental conditions. Five variables (time, power, volume of HNO3, volume H2SO4 and volume of HF) were considered as factors and as a response the concentration of different metal ions in the optimization process. Interactions between analytical factors and their optimal levels were investigated using a Draper-Lin design.

  18. Earth System Governance: Facing the Challenges of Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Camargo Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available YOUNG, Oran R. Institutional Dynamics: Emergent Patterns in International Environmental Governance. Cambridge (Massachusets, USA: The MIT Press, 2010. Earth System Governance Series. 225p. (Paperback; alkaline paper. ISBN 978-0-262-51440-8.

  19. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  20. Rare earth element patterns of the Central Indian Basin sediments related to their lithology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Roelandts, I.; Sudhakar, M.; Pluger, W.L.

    Rare earth element (REE) concentration have been determined in terrigenous, siliceous (nodule barren and nodule bearing), calcareous, and red clay from the Central Indian Basin. The bulk distribution of REE, and in particular the relative cerium...

  1. Characterization of set Intermediate Restorative Material, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and a prototype calcium silicate cement for use as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the composition of materials and leachate of a hydrated prototype cement composed of tricalcium silicate and radiopacifier and compare this to other tricalcium silicate-based cements (Biodentine and Bioaggregate) to assess whether the additives in the proprietary brand cements affect the hydration of the materials, using Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a standard root-end filling material as a control. The materials investigated included a prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The pH and calcium ion concentration of the leachate were investigated. The hydrated cements were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the cements tested were alkaline. The tricalcium silicate-based cements leached calcium in solution. Scanning electron microscopy of the prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate displayed hydrating cement grains, surrounded by a matrix composed of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The presence of calcium hydroxide was evident from the XRD plots. FT-IR indicated the occurrence of a poorly crystalline calcium silicate hydrate. Biodentine displayed the presence of calcium carbonate. Bioaggregate incorporated a phosphate-containing phase. IRM consisted of zinc oxide interspersed in an organic matrix. The hydration of prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate resulted in the formation of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which was leached in solution. The hydrated materials were composed of a cementitous phase that was rich in calcium and silicon and a radiopacifying material. Biodentine included calcium carbonate, and Bioaggregate included silica and calcium phosphate in the powders. IRM was composed of zinc oxide

  2. Catalytic Diversity in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vent Systems on Ocean Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ryan D.; Barge, Laura; Chin, Keith B.; Doloboff, Ivria J.; Flores, Erika; Hammer, Arden C.; Sobron, Pablo; Russell, Michael J.; Kanik, Isik

    2016-10-01

    Hydrothermal systems formed by serpentinization can create moderate-temperature, alkaline systems and it is possible that this type of vent could exist on icy worlds such as Europa which have water-rock interfaces. It has been proposed that some prebiotic chemistry responsible for the emergence of life on Earth and possibly other wet and icy worlds could occur as a result ofredox potential and pH gradients in submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents (Russell et al., 2014). Hydrothermal chimneys formed in laboratory simulations of alkaline vents under early Earth conditions have precipitate membranes that contain minerals such as iron sulfides, which are hypothesized to catalyze reduction of CO2 (Yamaguchi et al. 2014, Roldan et al. 2014) leading to further organic synthesis. This CO2 reduction process may be affected by other trace components in the chimney, e.g. nickel or organic molecules. We have conducted experiments to investigate catalytic properties of iron and iron-nickel sulfides containing organic dopants in slightly acidic ocean simulants relevant to early Earth or possibly ocean worlds. We find that the electrochemical properties of the chimney as well as the morphology/chemistry of the precipitate are affected by the concentration and type of organics present. These results imply that synthesis of organics in water-rock systems on ocean worlds may lead to hydrothermal precipitates which can incorporate these organic into the mineral matrix and may affect the role of gradients in alkaline vent systems.Therefore, further understanding on the electroactive roles of various organic species within hydrothermal chimneys will have important implications for habitability as well as prebiotic chemistry. This work is funded by NASA Astrobiology Institute JPL Icy Worlds Team and a NAI Director's Discretionary Fund award.Yamaguchi A. et al. (2014) Electrochimica Acta, 141, 311-318.Russell, M. J. et al. (2014), Astrobiology, 14, 308-43.Roldan, A. (2014) Chem. Comm. 51

  3. Preparation of calcium silicate absorbent from iron blast furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodnax, L F; Rochelle, G T

    2000-09-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) solids were prepared from hydrated lime and iron blast furnace slag in an aqueous agitated slurry at 92 degrees C. While it was hoped a minimal lime/slag ratio could be used to create near-amorphous CSH, the surface area of the product improved by increasing the lime/slag weight ratio to 2. The addition of gypsum to the lime/slag system dramatically improved the formation of surface area, creating solids with 139 m2/g after 30 hr of reaction when only a minimal amount of lime was present. The SO2 reactivity of solids prepared with gypsum greatly exceeded that of hydrated lime, achieving greater than 70-80% conversion of the alkalinity after 1 hr of reaction with SO2. The use of CaCl2 as an additive to the lime/slag system, in lieu of gypsum, also produced high-surface-area solids, 115 m2/g after 21 hr of reaction. However, the SO2 reactivity of these sorbents was relatively low given the high surface area. This emphasized that the correlation between surface area and SO2 reactivity was highly dependent on the solid phase, which was subsequently dependent on slurry composition.

  4. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SOME HIGH CHEMICALLY RESISTANCE SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Abo-Mosallam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi component silicate glasses based on Li₂O-MgO-P₂O₅-SiO₂ system were synthesized and modified by Na₂O /Li₂O, SrO /MgO and CaO /SrO replacements. The prepared glasses have been characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. Additionally, bulk density, microhardness, chemical durability and in vitro bioactivity were evaluated as a function of introducing different alkali and alkaline element substitutions. For comprehension the in vitro bioactivity, the glass samples were soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF solution at 37°C for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX and (FTIR were used to characterize forming hydroxyapatite layer produced on glass specimen surfaces. The results show that Na₂O/Li₂O and CaO/SrO replacements led to enhance the bioactivity behavior of the glasses. The results are harmonious with a weaker network glass structure consequence of Na₂O/Li₂O and SrO/MgO replacement in the glasses. However, the glass network connectivity increased with addition of the higher charge to size ratio of Ca2+ instead of Sr2+. The prepared glass samples had microhardness in the range, 4920-6017 MPa; density values in the range, 2.46-2.78 g/cm³ and the weight loss percent was ranged between 0.72 and 1.67 %.

  5. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  6. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  7. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  8. Osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts induced by calcium silicate and calcium silicate/β-tricalcium phosphate composite bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Lisha; Wang, Chen; Xue, Yang; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Sun, Jiao

    2012-07-01

    In this study, calcium silicate (CS) and CS/β-tricalcium phosphate (CS/β-TCP) composites were investigated on their mechanism of osteogenic proliferation and differentiation through regulating osteogenic-related gene and proteins. Osteoblast-like cells were cultured in the extracts of these CS-based bioceramics and pure β-TCP, respectively. The main ionic content in extracts was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The cell viability, mineralization, and differentiation were evaluated by MTT assay, Alizarin Red-S staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay. The expressions of BMP-2, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Runx2, ALP, and osteocalcin (OCN) at both gene and protein level were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and Western blot. The result showed that the extracts of CS-based bioceramics promoted cells proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization when compared with pure β-TCP. Accordingly, pure CS and CS/β-TCP composites stimulated osteoblast-like cells to express BMP-2/TGF-β gene and proteins, and further regulate the expression of Runx2 gene and protein, and ultimately affect the ALP activity and OCN deposition. This study suggested that the CS-based bioceramics could not only promote the expression of osteogenic-related genes but also enhance the genes to encode the corresponding proteins, which could finally control osteoblast-like cells proliferation and differentiation.

  9. 2nd Generation Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Lars; Kjartansdóttir, Cecilia Kristin; Allebrod, Frank;

    This report provides the results of the 2nd Generation Alkaline Electrolysis project which was initiated in 2008. The project has been conducted from 2009-2012 by a consortium comprising Århus University Business and Social Science – Centre for Energy Technologies (CET (former HIRC)), Technical...

  10. When can ocean acidification impacts be detected from decadal alkalinity measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. R.; Frölicher, T. L.; Dunne, J. P.; Rodgers, K. B.; Slater, R. D.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We use a large initial condition suite of simulations (30 runs) with an Earth system model to assess the detectability of biogeochemical impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the marine alkalinity distribution from decadally repeated hydrographic measurements such as those produced by the Global Ship-Based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP). Detection of these impacts is complicated by alkalinity changes from variability and long-term trends in freshwater and organic matter cycling and ocean circulation. In our ensemble simulation, variability in freshwater cycling generates large changes in alkalinity that obscure the changes of interest and prevent the attribution of observed alkalinity redistribution to OA. These complications from freshwater cycling can be mostly avoided through salinity normalization of alkalinity. With the salinity-normalized alkalinity, modeled OA impacts are broadly detectable in the surface of the subtropical gyres by 2030. Discrepancies between this finding and the finding of an earlier analysis suggest that these estimates are strongly sensitive to the patterns of calcium carbonate export simulated by the model. OA impacts are detectable later in the subpolar and equatorial regions due to slower responses of alkalinity to OA in these regions and greater seasonal equatorial alkalinity variability. OA impacts are detectable later at depth despite lower variability due to smaller rates of change and consistent measurement uncertainty.

  11. Self consistent model of core formation and the effective metal-silicate partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, H.; Labrosse, S.; Kameyama, M.

    2010-12-01

    It has been long known that the formation of the core transforms gravitational energy into heat and is able to heat up the whole Earth by about 2000 K. However, the distribution of this energy within the Earth is still debated and depends on the core formation process considered. Iron rain in the surface magma ocean is supposed to be the first mechanism of separation for large planets, iron then coalesces to form a pond at the base of the magma ocean [Stevenson 1990]. The time scale of the separation can be estimated from falling velocity of the iron phase, which is estimated by numerical simulation [Ichikawa et al., 2010] as ˜ 10cm/s with iron droplet of centimeter-scale. A simple estimate of the metal-silicate partition from the P-T condition of the base of the magma ocean, which must coincide with between peridotite liquidus and solidus by a single-stage model, is inconsistent with Earth's core-mantle partition. P-T conditions where silicate equilibrated with metal are far beyond the liquidus or solidus temperature for about ˜ 700K. For example, estimated P-T conditions are: 40GPa at 3750K for Wade and Wood, 2005, T ≧ 3600K for Chabot and Agee, 2003 and 35GPa at T ≧ 3300K for Gessmann and Rubie, 2000. Meanwhile, Rubie et al., 2003 shown that metal couldn't equilibrate with silicate on the base of the magma ocean before crystallization of silicate. On the other hand, metal-silicate equilibration is achieved only ˜ 5 s in the state of iron rain. Therefore metal and silicate simultaneously separate and equilibrate each other at the P-T condition during the course to the iron pond. Taking into account the release of gravitational energy, temperature of the middle of the magma ocean would be higher than the liquidus. Estimation of the thermal structure during the iron-silicate separation requires the development of a planetary-sized calculation model. However, because of the huge disparity of scales between the cm-sized drops and the magma ocean, a direct

  12. Factors affecting lead release in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Emily; Payne, Sarah Jane O; Hofmann, Ron; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Water quality parameters affecting sodium silicate performance in partial lead service line replacements were examined using a fractional factorial experimental design and static pipe systems. An external copper wire was used to create a galvanic connection between a former lead service line and a new copper pipe. The pipe systems were filled with lab prepared water made to mimic real water quality. Water was changed on a three times per week basis. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the impact of alkalinity (15 mg L(-1) or 250 mg L(-1) as CaCO3), nitrate (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as N), natural organic matter (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as dissolved organic carbon), and disinfectant type (1 mg L(-1) chlorine or 3 mg L(-1) monochloramine), resulting in eight treatment conditions. Fractional factorial analysis revealed that alkalinity, natural organic matter and monochloramine had a significant positive effect on galvanic current. Natural organic matter and monochloramine also had a significant positive effect with respect to both total and dissolved lead release. For the treatment conditions examined, 67-98% of the lead released through galvanic currents was stored as corrosion scales and predominantly comprised of particulate lead (96.1-99.9%) for all eight treatments. The use of monochloramine and the presence of natural organic matter (7 mg L(-1)) were not favourable for corrosion control in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements, although further studies would be required to characterize optimal water quality parameters for specific water quality types. For utilities operating with sodium silicate as a corrosion inhibitor, this work offers further evidence regarding the consideration of chlorine as a secondary disinfectant instead of monochloramine, as well as the value of controlling natural organic matter in distributed water.

  13. Alkaline resistant ceramics; Alkalimotstaandskraftiga keramer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Stig-Bjoern [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Despite durability in several environments, ceramics and refractories can not endure alkaline environments at high temperature. An example of such an environment is when burning biofuel in modern heat and power plants in which the demand for increasing efficiency results in higher combustion temperatures and content of alkaline substances in the flue gas. Some experiences of these environments has been gained from such vastly different equipment as regenerator chambers in the glass industry and MHD-generators. The grains of a ceramic material are usually bonded together by a glassy phase which despite it frequently being a minor constituent render the materials properties and limits its use at elevated temperature. The damage is usually caused by alkaline containing low-melting phases and the decrease of the viscosity of the bonding glass phase which is caused by the alkaline. The surfaces which are exposed to the flue gas in a modern power plant are not only exposed to the high temperature but also a corroding and eroding, particle containing, gas flow of high velocity. The use of conventional refractory products is limited to 1300-1350 deg C. Higher strength and fracture toughness as well as durability against gases, slag and melts at temperatures exceeding 1700 deg C are expected of the materials of the future. Continuous transport of corrosive compounds to the surface and corrosion products from the surface as well as a suitable environment for the corrosion to occur in are prerequisites for extensive corrosion to come about. The highest corrosion rate is therefore found in a temperature interval between the dew point and the melting point of the alkaline-constituent containing compound. It is therefore important that the corrosion resistance is sufficient in the environment in which alkaline containing melts or slag may appear. In environments such as these, even under normal circumstances durable ceramics, such as alumina and silicon carbide, are attacked

  14. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A. H., E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.com [New Technologies—Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Huang, Hongwei [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Kamarudin, H. [Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Auluck, S. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research—National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012, India and Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology - Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-02-28

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δε=−0.076 and the birefringence Δn(0)=0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω). The value of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| spectra with the features of ε{sub 2}(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)|, we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β{sub 111}, the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  15. Structure and Viscosity of Carbonate-Silicate Melts Using in situ Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, D. R.; Manning, C. E.; Kavner, A.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.; Kenney-Benson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical properties of carbon-rich magmas at high pressures and temperatures are a major factor controlling the deep-Earth carbon cycle, and may play a crucial role in global magmatism at depth. We have measured the structure of carbonate-silicate liquids as a function of carbon content along the calcite-wollastonite (CaCO3-CaSiO3) and calcite-forsterite (CaCO3-Mg2SiO3) compositional joins at ~1800 oC, and 3 or 6 GPa in a Paris-Edinburgh press using X-ray diffuse scattering. Pair distribution functions calculated from the scattering data confirm that CaCO3 behaves as an ionic liquid, while compositions with 40-100 wt% wollastonite contain polymerized silicate with an average connectivity (Qn) of at least two bridging O per Si (Q2). Even liquid compositions with as little as 35 wt% forsterite component contain silicate polymers, despite the absence of bridging O in the crystalline orthosilicate. As the carbonate content of the melt is increased, the average connectivity of SiO4 units linearly increases from ~Q2 for pure wollastonite liquid to >Q3 for 40 wt% wollastonite, even though less silicate is present. Analysis of Ca-Ca and Ca-Si pair correlations, as well as Ca-O bond distances, indicate that Ca2+ bonds more strongly to the silicate framework as carbonate content increases. Increasing pressure from 3 to 6 GPa at constant composition causes Qn to fall near Q0. The trends in local atomic structure with composition and pressure explain falling sphere viscometry measurements in carbonate-silicate liquids at upper mantle conditions. These viscosities are as low as 6x10-3 Pa-s for pure CaCO3, only half a log unit higher than that of water, and span ~1.6 log units between the carbonate and silicate end-members. Structural and viscosity trends taken together indicate carbonate-rich, depolymerized and highly mobile liquid at depth which transitions into silicate-rich, polymerized and much less mobile liquid as the melt ascends into the crust.

  16. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  17. Stability of calcium silicate in basic solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Mixture of CaO and SiO2 was sintered at 1 200 or 1 400 ℃ according to the mole ratio of CaO/SiO2 of 1 or 2, and then calcium silicate was leached in pure caustic or soda solution. The results indicated that calcium silicate exists much more stably in caustic solution than that in soda solution, and CaO*SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO*SiO2 whether in caustic solution or in soda solution. The increase of sintering temperature favored the stability of calcium silicate in the leaching process. When β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in soda solution, the increase of leaching temperature and time resulted in decomposing of more calcium silicate. And when β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in caustic solution at high temperature, much 2CaO*SiO2*H2O but little CaO*SiO2*H2O appeared in slag.

  18. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings cont...

  19. Expanding earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arguments in favor of an expanding earth are presented. The author believes that the theory of plate tectonics is a classic error in the history of geology. The case for the expanding earth is organized in the following way: introductory review - face of the earth, development of expanding earth concept, necessity for expansion, the subduction myth, and definitions; some principles - scale of tectonic phenomena, non-uniformitarianism, tectonic profile, paleomagnetism, asymmetry of the earth, rotation of the earth, and modes of crustal extension; regional studies - western North America, Central America, South-East Asia, and the rift oceans; tests and cause of expansion. 824 references, 197 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

  20. The fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic (NOTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUSANKA KITIC

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The content and composition of fatty acids and alkanes of Satureja adamovicii Silic and Satureja fukarekii Silic were analized by GC. It was found that unsaturated acids prevailed and that the major components were palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The hydrocarbon fractions of pentane extracts were shown to consist of the alkane homologues (C17 to C34 with nonacosane and hentriacontane being prevailing compounds.

  1. Changes in Global Silicate Weathering Feedbacks over Phanerozoic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The release of carbon from the solid Earth exerts a first-order control on the evolution of the planetary environment. This basic climate forcing is modulated by a host of chemical reactions at the Earth's surface, the pace of which are in turn regulated by tectonic forces. Together, these various pieces in the puzzle of the global carbon cycle have been identified for decades, but understanding of how they fit together has remained elusive and continues to be much debated. In particular, we now know the climate-dependence of silicate mineral weathering may vary as a function of denudation rate, which is related to tectonic drivers. This variation suggests that the strength of the weathering feedback may have varied in the past, with consequent implications for the past state of global climate. This work will survey and synthesize approaches to representing changes in the weathering feedback, showing that relatively simple parameterizations yield similar results as recently developed reactive transport approaches. This similarity gives confidence in applying the simple parameterizations to reconstructing changes in feedback strength in the geologic past, at least over Phanerozoic timescales, and allows inclusion of this effect explicitly in carbon cycle models.

  2. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. Isotopic evidence of Cr partitioning into Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frederic; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Schauble, Edwin

    2011-03-18

    The distribution of chemical elements in primitive meteorites (chondrites), as building blocks of terrestrial planets, provides insight into the formation and early differentiation of Earth. The processes that resulted in the depletion of some elements [such as chromium (Cr)] in the bulk silicate Earth relative to chondrites, however, remain debated between leading candidate causes: volatility versus core partitioning. We show through high-precision measurements of Cr stable isotopes in a range of meteorites, which deviate by up to ~0.4 per mil from those of the bulk silicate Earth, that Cr depletion resulted from its partitioning into Earth's core, with a preferential enrichment in light isotopes. Ab initio calculations suggest that the isotopic signature was established at mid-mantle magma ocean depth as Earth accreted planetary embryos and progressively became more oxidized.

  4. A nucleosynthetic origin for the Earth's anomalous (142)Nd composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, C; Borg, L E; Brennecka, G A; Shollenberger, Q R; Dauphas, N; Kleine, T

    2016-09-15

    A long-standing paradigm assumes that the chemical and isotopic compositions of many elements in the bulk silicate Earth are the same as in chondrites. However, the accessible Earth has a greater (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratio than do chondrites. Because (142)Nd is the decay product of the now-extinct (146)Sm (which has a half-life of 103 million years), this (142)Nd difference seems to require a higher-than-chondritic Sm/Nd ratio for the accessible Earth. This must have been acquired during global silicate differentiation within the first 30 million years of Solar System formation and implies the formation of a complementary (142)Nd-depleted reservoir that either is hidden in the deep Earth, or lost to space by impact erosion. Whether this complementary reservoir existed, and whether or not it has been lost from Earth, is a matter of debate, and has implications for determining the bulk composition of Earth, its heat content and structure, as well as for constraining the modes and timescales of its geodynamical evolution. Here we show that, compared with chondrites, Earth's precursor bodies were enriched in neodymium that was produced by the slow neutron capture process (s-process) of nucleosynthesis. This s-process excess leads to higher (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios; after correction for this effect, the (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios of chondrites and the accessible Earth are indistinguishable within five parts per million. The (142)Nd offset between the accessible silicate Earth and chondrites therefore reflects a higher proportion of s-process neodymium in the Earth, and not early differentiation processes. As such, our results obviate the need for hidden-reservoir or super-chondritic Earth models and imply a chondritic Sm/Nd ratio for the bulk Earth. Although chondrites formed at greater heliocentric distances and contain a different mix of presolar components than Earth, they nevertheless are suitable proxies for Earth's bulk chemical composition.

  5. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  6. Experimental, in-situ carbon solution mechanisms and isotope fractionation in and between (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melt and silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2017-02-01

    Our understanding of materials transport processes in the Earth relies on characterizing the behavior of fluid and melt in silicate-(C-O-H) systems at high temperature and pressure. Here, Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine structure of and carbon isotope partitioning between melts and fluids in alkali aluminosilicate-C-O-H systems. The experimental data were recorded in-situ while the samples were at equilibrium in a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell at temperatures and pressures to 825 °C and >1300 MPa, respectively. The carbon solution equilibrium in both (C-O-H)-saturated melt and coexisting, silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid is 2CO3 + H2O + 2Qn + 1 = 2HCO3 + 2Qn. In the Qn-notation, the superscript, n, is the number of bridging oxygen in silicate structural units. At least one oxygen in CO3 and HCO3 groups likely is shared with silicate tetrahedra. The structural behavior of volatile components described with this equilibrium governs carbon isotope fractionation factors between melt and fluid. For example, the ΔH equals 3.2 ± 0.7 kJ/mol for the bulk 13C/12C exchange equilibrium between fluid and melt. From these experimental data, it is suggested that at deep crustal and upper mantle temperatures and pressures, the δ13C-differences between coexisting silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid and (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melts may change by more than 100‰ as a function of temperature in the range of magmatic processes. Absent information on temperature and pressure, the use of carbon isotopes of mantle-derived magma to derive isotopic composition of magma source regions in the Earth's interior, therefore, should be exercised with care.

  7. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  8. Chlorine solubility in evolved alkaline magmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Carroll

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of Cl solubility in trachytic to phonolitic melts provide insights into the capacity of alkaline magmas to transport Cl from depth to the earth?s surface and atmosphere, and information on Cl solubility variations with pressure, temperature and melt or fluid composition is crucial for understanding the reasons for variations in Cl emissions at active volcanoes. This paper provides a brief review of Cl solubility experiments conducted on a range of trachytic to phonolitic melt compositions. Depending on the experimental conditions the melts studied were in equilibrium with either a Cl-bearing aqueous fluid or a subcritical assemblage of low- Cl aqueous fluid + Cl-rich brine. The nature of the fluid phase(s was identified by examination of fluid inclusions present in run product glasses and the fluid bulk composition was calculated by mass balance. Chlorine concentrations in the glass increase with increasing Cl molality in the fluid phase until a plateau in Cl concentration is reached when melt coexists with aqueous fluid + brine. With fluids of similar Cl molality, higher Cl concentrations are observed in peralkaline phonolitic melts compared with peraluminous phonolitic melts; overall the Cl concentrations observed in phonolitic and trachytic melts are approximately twice those found in calcalkaline rhyolitic melts under similar conditions. The observed negative pressure dependence of Cl solubility implies that Cl contents of melts may actually increase during magma decompression if the magma coexists with aqueous fluid and Cl-rich brine (assuming melt-vapor equilibrium is maintained. The high Cl contents (approaching 1 wt% Cl observed in some melts/glasses from the Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei areas suggest saturation with a Cl-rich brine prior to eruption.

  9. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  10. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  11. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  12. Tracking bubble evolution inside a silicic dike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Okumura, Satoshi; Arzilli, Fabio; Borrajo, Javier; Recio, Clemente; Ban, Masao; Gonzalo, Juan C.; Benítez, José M.; Douglas, Madison; Sasaki, Osamu; Franco, Piedad; Gómez-Barreiro, Juan; Carnicero, Asunción

    2016-10-01

    Pressure estimates from rapidly erupted crustal xenoliths constrain the depth of intrusion of the silicic lavas hosting them. This represents an opportunity for tracking magmatic bubble's evolution and quantifying the variation in bubble volume during rapid magma ascent through a volcanic dike just prior to eruption. The petrology, stable-isotope geochemistry and X-ray micro-tomography of dacites containing crustal xenoliths, erupted from a Neogene volcano in SE Spain, showed an increase in porosity from ~ 1.7 to 6.4% from ~ 19 to 13 km depth, at nearly constant groundmass and crystal volumes. This result provides additional constraints for experimental and numerical simulations of subvolcanic magma-crust degassing processes in silicic systems, and may allow the characterization of volcanic eruptive styles based on volatile content.

  13. Recycle of silicate waste into mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Minwoo; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2011-04-15

    Template synthesis of porous carbon materials usually requires selective removal of template silica from the carbon/silica composites. It not only involves waste of valuable chemicals, but also poses significant environmental concerns including high waste treatment cost. Recycling of silicates released from such nanocasting methods is successfully performed for the first time to regenerate valuable mesoporous MCM and SBA type silica materials, which will not only help in saving valuable chemicals, but also in decreasing chemical waste, contributing in improvement of our environmental standards. This approach can thus improve cost effectiveness for the mass production of nanostructured carbon and others utilizing silica directed nanocasting method by recycling otherwise silicate waste into highly desirable valuable mesoporous silica.

  14. Six White Dwarfs with Circumstellar Silicates

    CERN Document Server

    Jura, M; Zuckerman, B

    2008-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope spectra reveal 10 micron silicate emission from circumstellar dust orbiting six externally-polluted white dwarfs. Micron-size glasses with an olivine stoichiometry can account for the distinctively broad wings that extend to 12 microns; these particles likely are produced by tidal-disruption of asteroids. The absence of infrared PAH features is consistent with a scenario where extrasolar rocky planets are assembled from carbon-poor solids.

  15. Ion release, porosity, solubility, and bioactivity of MTA Plus tricalcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Siboni, Francesco; Primus, Carolyn M; Prati, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate MTA Plus (Prevest Denpro Limited, Jammu, India, for Avalon Biomed Inc) material's properties, namely calcium release, the pH change, solubility, water sorption, porosity, surface morphology, and apatite-forming ability after immersion in simulated body fluid. Two tricalcium silicate powders (MTA Plus and ProRoot MTA; Dentsply Tulsa Specialties, Tulsa, OK) and Dycal (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE) were tested. After incubation at 37°C and 99% relative humidity, calcium and hydroxyl ion release were tested up to 28 days in deionized water at 37°C. Water absorption, interconnected pores, apparent porosity, and solubility were measured after 24 hours of immersion in deionized water at 37°C. The morphologic and elemental analysis of the materials' surfaces were examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x-ray analysis after storage at 37°C for 1-28 days in simulated body fluid using the ISO 23317 method. All 3 materials created an alkaline pH within 3 hours, which continued for 28 days. MTA Plus had a higher ion release than ProRoot MTA and Dycal; the use of the MTA Plus gel enhanced the initial calcium release and the increase of the pH. Both MTA materials were more porous, water soluble, and water sorptive than Dycal and more bioactive. After aging in simulated body fluid, MTA Plus material caused precipitation of an apparent calcium phosphate layer. MTA Plus showed improved reactivity and prolonged capability to release calcium and increase the local pH to alkaline values in comparison with ProRoot MTA. These pronounced ion-releasing properties are interlinked with its noticeable porosity, water sorption, and solubility and with the formation of calcium phosphorus minerals. The finer calcium silicate powder may explain the higher ion release, water sorption, porosity, and solubility of MTA Plus compared with ProRoot MTA. For clinicians, MTA Plus represents a lower-cost bioactive tricalcium

  16. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  17. Exomoon Climate Models with the Carbonate-Silicate Cycle and Viscoelastic Tidal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The habitable zone for exomoons with Earth-like properties is a non-trivial manifold, compared to that of Earth-like exoplanets. The presence of tidal heating, eclipses and planetary illumination in the exomoon energy budget combine to produce both circumstellar and circumplanetary habitable regions. Analytical calculations suggest that the circumplanetary habitable region is defined only by an inner edge (with its outer limits determined by orbital stability). Subsequent calculations using 1D latitudinal climate models indicated that the combined effect of eclipses and ice-albedo feedback can produce an outer edge to the circumplanetary habitable zone. But is this outer edge real, or an artefact of the climate model's relative simplicity? We present an upgraded 1D climate model of Earth-like exomoon climates, containing the carbonate-silicate cycle and viscoelastic tidal heating. We conduct parameter surveys of both the circumstellar and circumplanetary habitable zones, and we find that the outer circumplane...

  18. Sodium silicate solutions from dissolution of glasswastes. Statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Carrasco, M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It has studied the solubility process of four different waste glasses (with different particle sizes, 125 µm in alkaline solutions (NaOH and NaOH/Na₂CO₃ and water as a reference and under different conditions of solubility (at room temperature, at 80°C and a mechano-chemical process. Have established the optimal conditions of solubility and generation of sodium silicates solutions, and these were: the smaller particle size (Se ha estudiado el proceso de solubilidad de cuatro diferentes residuos vítreos (con distintas granulometrías, 125 µm en disoluciones alcalinas de NaOH y NaOH/Na₂CO₃ y agua como medio de referencia y bajo distintas condiciones de solubilidad (a temperatura ambiente, a 80°C y con un proceso mecano-químico. Se han establecido las condiciones óptimas de solubilidad y generación de disoluciones de silicato sódico, y estas son: menor tamaño de partícula del residuo vítreo (inferior a 45 µm, con la disolución de NaOH/Na₂CO₃ y tratamiento térmico a 80°C durante 6 horas de agitación. El análisis estadístico realizado a los resultados obtenidos da importancia a las variables estudiadas y a las interacciones de las mismas. A través de ²⁹Si RMN MAS se ha confirmado la formación, tras los procesos de disolución, de un silicato monomérico, apto para su utilización como activador en la preparación de cementos y hormigones alcalinos.

  19. Impact-induced melting during accretion of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    de Vries, Jellie; Melosh, H Jay; Jacobson, Seth A; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Rubie, David C

    2016-01-01

    Because of the high energies involved, giant impacts that occur during planetary accretion cause large degrees of melting. The depth of melting in the target body after each collision determines the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration and thus geochemical fractionation that results from core-mantle differentiation. The accretional collisions involved in forming the terrestrial planets of the inner Solar System have been calculated by previous studies using N-body accretion simulations. Here we use the output from such simulations to determine the volumes of melt produced and thus the pressure and temperature conditions of metal-silicate equilibration, after each impact, as Earth-like planets accrete. For these calculations a parametrised melting model is used that takes impact velocity, impact angle and the respective masses of the impacting bodies into account. The evolution of metal-silicate equilibration pressures (as defined by evolving magma ocean depths) during Earth's ac...

  20. Effect of silicate solutions on metakaolinite based cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xue-jun; LI Hua-jian; SUN Heng-hu

    2006-01-01

    High performance metakaolinite based cementitious materials were prepared with metakaolinite as main component, and the different modules of Na and Na-K silicate solutions as diagenetic agent. The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by different silicate solutions, compressive strengths of pastes hydrated for 3 d and 28 d with Na-K silicate solution (The modulus is 1) are about 43.68 and 78.52 MPa respectively. By analyzing the mechanical properties of Metakaolinite based cementitious materials, the diagenetic effect of lower module is better than higher module, and Na-K silicate solution is better than Na silicate solution. The structure of the Na and Na-K silicate solutions is studied with IR and 29Si NMR, the reason of the lower module and Na-K silicate solution improving the mechanical properties is that the low module silicate solution has lower polymeric degree of silicon dioxide, and the higher polymeric degree of silicon oxide tetrahedron(Q4) in Na-K silicate solution is less than Na silicate solution.

  1. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  2. S-Isotope Fractionation between Fluid and Silicate Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, A.; Holtz, F.; Shimizu, N.; Behrens, H.; Mandeville, C. W.; Simon, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    -melt) of 0.9985 × 0.0007 was determined for 1030°C. In contrast, at reducing conditions (QFM to QFM+1), the experimentally determined fluid-melt S-isotope fractionation was about one order of magnitude larger than predicted by the equations provided by Miyoshi et al. [4]; i.e., α(H2Sgas - S2-melt) was found to decrease from 1.0037 × 0.0009 at 1050°C to 1.0025 × 0.0011 at 1200°C. Thus, T dependences derived from previous experiments conducted at T ≤ 1000°C and using molten salt [4], are probably not applicable to silicate melts at magmatic P and T, at least under reducing conditions. Model calculations indicate that differences of up to ~30 ‰ between δ34S of the fluid and δ34S of the source melt can be reached during open system degassing of reduced systems. [1] Mandeville et al. (2008), EOS Trans. AGU 83(53), V13-F07. [2] Holloway and Blank (1994), Rev. Mineral. 30, 187-230. [3] Mandeville et al. (2009), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 2978-3012. [4] Miyoshi et al. (1984), Geochem. J. 18, 75-84. [5] Richet et al. (1977), Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 5, 65-110. [6] Taylor et al. (1986), Rev. Mineral. 16, 185-225.

  3. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability

  4. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of "deceleration aging factor" as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models.

  5. Vaporization of the Earth: Application to Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce; Jr,

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are about 3 dozen known super-Earth (M < 10 MEarth), of which 8 are transiting planets suitable for atmospheric follow-up observations. Some of the planets are exposed to extreme temperatures as they orbit close to their host stars, e.g., CoRot-7b, and all of these planets have equilibrium temperatures significantly hotter than the Earth. Such planets can develop atmospheres through (partial) vaporization of their crustal and/or mantle silicates. We investigated the chemical equilibrium composition of such heated systems from 500 - 4000 K and total pressures from 10-6 to 10+2 bars. The major gases are H2O and CO2 over broad temperature and pressure ranges, and Na, K, O2, SiO, and O at high temperatures and low pressures. We discuss the differences in atmospheric composition arising from vaporization of SiO2-rich (i.e., felsic) silicates (like Earth's continental crust) and MgO-, FeO-rich (i.e., mafic) silicates like the bulk silicate Earth. The computational results will be useful in plann...

  6. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  7. Stable chromium isotopic composition of meteorites and metal-silicate experiments:Implications for fractionation during core formation

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnand, P; WILLIAMS, H. M.; Parkinson, I. J.; Wood, B.J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    We present new mass independent and mass dependent Cr isotope compositions for meteorites measured by double spike thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Small differences in both mass independent 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth are reported and are very similar to previously published values. Carbonaceous chondrites are characterised by an excess in 54Cr compared to ordinary and enstatite chondrites which make mass independent Cr isotopes a useful tool for distinguishing bet...

  8. Absorption of light by lead silicate borate glasses containing gadolinium tellurite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanchenko, L.A.; Obolonchik, V.A.; Ovcharenko, N.V.; Frankfurt, V.M.; Serdyuk, V.A.; Zaletilo, L.S.

    1987-03-01

    The authors investigate how the properties of lead silicate borate glasses change when rare-earth tellurites are added to them. The choice of glasses based on PbO was prompted by the fact that they are low-melting and will dissolve large amounts of compounds of type Ln/sub 2/Te/sub 3/O/sub 9/. The compositions of the resultant glasses are shown. The refractive indices and absorption edge in the visible region of the spectrum is also presented. The dependences of the absorptive index of glasses in both visible and in IR regions are shown, as is the reflection spectra in the IR.

  9. Viscosity of Carbonate-Silicate Melts Using Ultra-High Resolution Falling Sphere Viscometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, D. R.; Kavner, A.; Manning, C. E.; Park, C.; Kono, Y.; Kenney-Benson, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonatites are carbon-rich magmas that participate in the deep-Earth carbon cycle, and may be precursors to many types of terrestrial magmatism. [1] Viscosity is a crucial parameter in determining migration rates and behavior of melts from the upper mantle to Earth's surface, but very little is known about the viscosity of carbonate-silicate liquids at conditions relevant to Earth's interior. To examine the viscosity of carbonate-silicate liquids as a function of composition, we performed in situ falling sphere viscosity experiments using a high speed X-ray camera and Paris-Edinburgh press at the HPCAT beamline (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory). Mixtures from the CaCO3-CaSiO3 (calcite-wollastonite) binary system were used to simulate mantle silicate carbonatites. Samples were loaded using the experimental setup of Yamada et al [2], held at 3 GPa, and heated until the sample was fully molten (between 1350-1650 oC). The high speed camera recorded the falling rate of a platinum sphere placed near the top of the sample chamber, enabling the calculation of terminal velocity and hence viscosity. Results indicate that pure CaCO3 at upper mantle conditions has a very low viscosity of ~0.006 Pa-s, only a little higher than that of water. This viscosity is 2-6 times lower than that of potassium carbonates at similar pressures (2.5-4.0 GPa) but at somewhat lower temperatures (800-1200 oC). [3] Our measured viscosity as a function of increasing silicate content increases along a log-linear trend, reaching 0.256 Pa-s for CaSiO3 liquid. This heavy dependence of viscosity on composition has implications for melt migration processes at different depths, suggesting either viscosity-driven or porosity-driven migration depending on both extent of melting and carbonate content. [1] Dasgupta, R. et al. (2013) Nature 493, 211-215. [2] Yamada, A. et al. (2011) Rev. Sci. Instr. 82, 015103. [3] Dobson, D. et al. (1996) Earth Plan. Sci. Lett. 143, 207-215.

  10. Red-emitting alkaline-earth rare-earth pentaoxometallates powders prepared by metal carboxylates solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kyu-Seog Hwang; Sung-Dae Kim; Seung Hwangbo; Jin-Tae Kim

    2013-06-01

    Moisture-insensitive metal carboxylates that are mostly liquids at room temperature have been first applied to the preparation of strontium europium aluminate (Sr2EuAlO5) powders for red-emitting phosphor under near ultraviolet radiation. Strontium naphthenate, aluminium-2-ethylhexanoate and europium-2-ethylhexanoate were dissolved with toluene to prepare starting solution. Precursor pyrolyzed at 500 °C for 240 min was finally annealed at 900–1200 °C for 240 min in Ar. X-ray diffraction analysis, field emission–scanning electron microscope and fluorescent spectrophotometer were used to evaluate structural and optical properties. For the 1000 °C-annealed powders with regular shape and narrow size distribution confirmed by FE–SEM observation, strong red emission at 615nm under the excitation of 395nm maximum was reached, then the higher annealed samples at above 1100 °C gave the lower emission intensities.

  11. Luminescence of vanadium and rare earth ions in alkaline earth sulfates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.; Pietersen, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    The luminescence of samples MeSO4---V, RE (Me = Mg, Ca, Ba) depends strongly on the nature of the Me ions. The amount of association of the V5+ and RE3+ ions can be estimated from the measured quantum efficiencies

  12. Mineralogy and origin of rhizoliths on the margins of saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya Rift Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Richard Alastair; Owen, Richard Bernhart; Renaut, Robin W.; Scott, Jennifer J.; Jones, Brian; Ashley, Gail M.

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of rhizoliths occurs around the margins of Lake Bogoria, Kenya. These include root casts, moulds, tubules, rhizocretions, and permineralised root systems. These rhizoliths are variably composed of opaline silica, calcite, zeolites (mainly analcime), fluorite, and possibly fluorapatite, either alone or in combinations. Some rhizoliths are infilled moulds with detrital silicate grains. Most rhizoliths are in situ, showing both vertical and horizontal orientations. Reworked rhizoliths have been concentrated locally to form dense rhizolites. Hot-spring fluids, concentrated by evapotranspiration and capillary evaporation, have provided most of the silica for the permineralisation of the plant tissues. Precipitation involved the growth of silica nanospheres and microspheres that coalesced into homogeneous masses. Calcite rhizoliths formed following evaporative concentration, evapotranspiration, and (or) CO 2 degassing of Ca-bearing runoff water that infiltrated the sediment, or by mixing of runoff with saline, alkaline groundwater. Fluorite precipitated in areas where mixing of hot-spring and meteoric waters occurred, or possibly where hot-spring fluids came into contact with pre-existing calcite. Zeolitic rhizoliths formed during a prolonged period of aridity, when capillary rise and evaporative pumping brought saline, alkaline waters into contact with detrital silicate minerals around roots.

  13. The origin of life in alkaline hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, V.; Herschy, B.; Whicher, A.; Camprubí, E.; Lane, N.

    2016-12-01

    The origin of life remains one of Science's greatest unresolved questions. The answer will no doubt involve almost all the basic disciplines, including Physics, Chemistry, Astronomy, Geology, and Biology. Chiefly, it is the link between the latter two that must be elucidated: how geochemistry gave rise to biochemistry. Serpentinizing systems such as alkaline hydrothermal vents offer the most robust combination of conditions to have hosted the origin of life on the early Earth, while bearing many parallels to modern living cells. Stark gradients of concentration, pH, oxidation/reduction, and temperature provided the ability to synthesise and concentrate organic products, drive polymerisation reactions, and develop an autotrophic lifestyle independent of foreign sources of organics. In the oxygen-depleted waters of the Hadean, alkaline vents would have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with the relatively acidic CO2-rich waters of the ocean, through interconnected micropores made of thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. Perhaps not coincidentally, the unit cells of these Fe(Ni)S minerals closely resemble the active sites of crucial ancestral bioenergetic enzymes. Meanwhile, differences in pH across the thin barriers produced natural proton gradients similar to those used for carbon fixation in modern archaea and bacteria. At the earliest stages, the problem of the origin of life is the problem of the origin of carbon fixation. I will discuss work over the last decade that suggests several possible hypotheses for how simple one-carbon molecules could have given rise to more complex organics, particularly within a serpentinizing alkaline hydrothermal vent. I will discuss the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria, thought to be the earliest representatives of each domain, to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in

  14. Martian alkaline basites chemically resemble basic rocks of the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G.

    The comparative wave planetology [1, 5] successfully overcomes the most principal martian test having now analyses of alkaline rocks from Columbia Hills [2, 3, 4]. This kind of rocks was predicted earlier on basis of the wave paradigm having stated that "the higher planetary relief range - the higher density difference between lithologies composing hypsometrically (tectonically) contrasting blocks [5]. This paradigm declares that "celestial bodies are dichotomic"(Theorem 1), "celestial bodies are sectoral" (Theorem 2), "celestial bodies are granular"(Theorem 3), "angular momenta of different level blocks tend to be equal" (Theorem 4)[1, 5]. Mars is a typical terrestrial planet but the farthest from Sun and thus with the smallest tide effects. Nevertheless it has the highest relief range and seems to be most distorted (ellipsoid in shape) and broken by deep fissures. The wave approach explains this by a warping action of standing waves of 4 ortho- and diagonal directions - they are the longest and highest in the martian case. These interfering warping waves caused by the elliptic keplerian orbits implying periodically changing accelerations and inertia-gravity forces produce inevitable tectonic dichotomy (the fundamental wave 1 long 2πR), sectoring (wave 2, πR, and other overtones), granulation. A granule size depends on an orbital frequency: the higher frequency the smaller granule. The Earth's granule, as a scale, is πR/4 (see it in NASA's PIA04159), Venus ` πR/6, Mercury's πR/16, Mars' πR/2 (the sizes are strictly tied to orb. fr.). Along with the granule sizes increase relief ranges ( Mercury ˜5 km, Venus 14, Earth 20, Mars ˜30) and compositional (density) difference between lowland and highland lithologies [5]. The lowland compositions become Fericher and denser: enstatite (Mercury), Mg-basalt (Venus), tholeiite (Earth), Fe-basalt (Mars). The highland compositions get less dense, lighter: anorthosite, alkaline basalt, andesite and conditional "albitite

  15. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  16. Nitridosilicates - a significant extension of silicate chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnick, W.; Huppertz, H. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Lab. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    1997-05-01

    A new dimension in silicate chemistry becomes accessible through substitution of oxygen by nitrogen. Multinary nitridosilicates, such as Ln{sub 3}Si{sub 6}N{sub 11} (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) shown on the right, are built up from SiN{sub 4} tetrahedra into network structures. Owing to the stability of the covalent Si-N bonds and the high degree of condensation, the nitridosilicates show remarkable chemical and thermal stabilities, similar to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. (orig.) 22 refs.

  17. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartzman, D. [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  18. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  19. Trace element and isotope studies in oxide/phosphate/silicate inclusions of iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.

    1996-01-01

    Under the above grant research was funded in the following areas: 1. Pallasites: Rare earth element measurements in phosphates to determine if all pallasites fit into only two trace element groups. This work has been completed. 2. HIAB irons: To complete work on the only known silicate inclusion in a IIIAB iron meteorite. This work has been completed. 3. IIIAB irons: To continue the search for Cr-53 excesses in IIIAB iron meteorite phosphates. A part of this work has been completed 4. IIIAB irons: To complete the identification of the phosphate minerals in IIIAB iron meteorites and try to determine the phase relations and chemical history of trace element distributions during the core formation process. Work on this has been largely completed and preliminary results have been reported. The final work is being assessed prior to preparation of a manuscript for publication. 5. IIE irons: To complete work on the unique silicate assemblage in the IIE iron meteorite. Work on this was completed and a paper published. 6. Ungrouped irons: A partially devitrified silicate glass inclusion has been found in the ungrouped iron meteorite. Preliminary work on this has been reported. All the work on this has been now completed and a manuscript has been prepared and submitted for publication.

  20. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  1. In Vitro Screening of the Apatite-Forming Ability, Biointeractivity and Physical Properties of a Tricalcium Silicate Material for Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Gandolfi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Calcium silicate-based materials are hydraulic self-setting materials with physico-chemical properties suitable for endodontic surgery and good biological/clinical outcomes. The study aim was to evaluate the bio-properties (biointeractivity and apatite-forming ability and selected physical properties (porosity, water sorption, solubility, and setting time of Biodentine, a tricalcium silicate material for endodontics and restorative dentistry, compared to that of ProRoot MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as gold standard material. Methods: Biodentine and ProRoot MTA pastes were prepared and analyzed for calcium release and alkalinizing activity (3 h–28 days, setting time, water sorption, porosity, solubility, surface microstructure and composition, and apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid. Results: Biodentine showed higher calcium release, alkalinizing activity, and solubility but higher open and apparent porosity, water sorption, and a markedly shorter setting time. Calcium phosphate (CaP deposits were noted on material surfaces after short ageing times. A CaP coating composed of spherulites was detected after 28 days. The thickness, continuity, and Ca/P ratio of the coating differed markedly between the materials. Biodentine showed a coating composed by denser but smaller spherulites, while ProRoot MTA showed large but less dense aggregates of spherulitic deposits. Conclusions: Biodentine showed a pronounced ability to release calcium and extended alkalinizing activity interlinked with its noticeable porosity, water sorption, and solubility: open porosities provide a broad wet biointeractive surface for the release of the calcium and hydroxyl ions involved in the formation of a CaP mineral. Biodentine is a biointeractive tricalcium silicate material with interesting chemical-physical properties and represents a fast-setting alternative to the conventional calcium silicate MTA-like cements.

  2. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico [Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Iannace, Salvatore [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples, Italy and IMAST SCRAL, Piazza Bovio 22 Napoli 80133 (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (∼500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  3. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Boldrin MESTIERI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus.Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs.Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3 and kept in supplemented medium to obtain hDPCs adherent cultures. Cell characterization assays were performed to prove the osteogenic potential. The evaluated materials were: MTA Plus (MTAP; MTA Fillapex (MTAF and FillCanal (FC. Biocompatibility was evaluated with MTT and Neutral Red (NR assays, after hDPCs exposure for 24 h to different dilutions of each sealer extract (1:2, 1:3 and 1:4. Unexposed cells were the positive control (CT. Bioactivity was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzymatic assay in cells exposed for one and three days to sealer extracts (1:4 dilution. All data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post-test (p≤0.05%.Results MTT and NR results showed suitable cell viability rates for MTAP at all dilutions (90-135%. Cells exposed to MTAF and FC (1:2 and 1:4 dilutions showed significant low viability rate when compared to CT in MTT. The NR results demonstrated cell viability for all materials tested. In MTAP group, the cells ALP activity was similar to CT in one and three days of exposure to the material. MTAF and FC groups demonstrated a decrease in ALP activity when compared to CT at both periods of cell exposure.Conclusions The hDPCs were suitable for the evaluation of new endodontic materialsin vitro. MTAP may be considered a promising material for endodontic treatments.

  4. Silicate mineralogy at the surface of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft has revealed geochemical diversity across Mercury's volcanic crust. Near-infrared to ultraviolet spectra and images have provided evidence for the Fe2+-poor nature of silicate minerals, magnesium sulfide minerals in hollows and a darkening component attributed to graphite, but existing spectral data is insufficient to build a mineralogical map for the planet. Here we investigate the mineralogical variability of silicates in Mercury's crust using crystallization experiments on magmas with compositions and under reducing conditions expected for Mercury. We find a common crystallization sequence consisting of olivine, plagioclase, pyroxenes and tridymite for all magmas tested. Depending on the cooling rate, we suggest that lavas on Mercury are either fully crystallized or made of a glassy matrix with phenocrysts. Combining the experimental results with geochemical mapping, we can identify several mineralogical provinces: the Northern Volcanic Plains and Smooth Plains, dominated by plagioclase, the High-Mg province, strongly dominated by forsterite, and the Intermediate Plains, comprised of forsterite, plagioclase and enstatite. This implies a temporal evolution of the mineralogy from the oldest lavas, dominated by mafic minerals, to the youngest lavas, dominated by plagioclase, consistent with progressive shallowing and decreasing degree of mantle melting over time.

  5. Stability of foams in silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander A.; Sahagian, Dork L.; Kutolin, Vladislav A.

    1993-12-01

    Bubble coalescence and the spontaneous disruption of high-porosity foams in silicate melts are the result of physical expulsion of interpore melt (syneresis) leading to bubble coalescence, and diffusive gas exchange between bubbles. Melt expulsion can be achieved either along films between pairs of bubbles, or along Plateau borders which represent the contacts between 3 or more bubbles. Theoretical evaluation of these mechanisms is confirmed by experimental results, enabling us to quantify the relevant parameters and determine stable bubble size and critical film thickness in a foam as a function of melt viscosity, surface tension, and time. Foam stability is controlled primarily by melt viscosity and time. Melt transport leading to coalescence of bubbles proceeds along inter-bubble films for smaller bubbles, and along Plateau borders for larger bubbles. Thus the average bubble size accelerates with time. In silicate melts, the diffusive gas expulsion out of a region of foam is effective only for water (and even then, only at small length scales), as the diffusion of CO 2 is negligible. The results of our analyses are applicable to studies of vesicularity of lavas, melt degassing, and eruption mechanisms.

  6. Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichelberger, J.C.

    1989-06-30

    Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...... required days-weeks, both reactions probably being diffusion controlled. Applying the values for specific surface area and site densities for ferrihydrite used by Dzombak & Morel (1990) (600 m2 g-1, 3.4 mumole m-2) the constants pK(al)intr 6.93 +/- 0.12, pK(a2)intr = 8.72 +/- 0.17 and log K(Si) = 3.62 were...... calculated by using the FITEQL optimization routine. Use of the specific surface area actually measured (269 m2 g-1) gave a poorer fit of the experimental data. Due to the slow adsorption of silicate and hence long shaking times, changes in the surface characteristics of the ferrihydrite seem to take place...

  8. The Nitrogen Budget of Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We comprehensively compile and review N content in geologic materials to calculate a new N budget for Earth. Using analyses of rocks and minerals in conjunction with N-Ar geochemistry demonstrates that the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) contains \\sim7\\pm4 times present atmospheric N (4\\times10^18 kg N, PAN), with 27\\pm16\\times10^18 kg N. Comparison to chondritic composition, after subtracting N sequestered into the core, yields a consistent result, with BSE N between 17\\pm13\\times10^18 kg to 31\\pm24\\times10^18 kg N. In the chondritic comparison we calculate a N mass in Earth's core (180\\pm110 to 300\\pm180\\times10^18 kg) and discuss the Moon as a proxy for the early mantle. Significantly, we find the majority of the planetary budget of N is in the solid Earth. The N estimate herein precludes the need for a "missing N" reservoir. Nitrogen-Ar systematics in mantle rocks and basalts identify two mantle reservoirs: MORB-source like (MSL) and high-N. High-N mantle is composed of young, N-rich material subducted from the...

  9. Handbook of Indigenous Foods Involving Alkaline Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkar, P.K.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    This book details the basic approaches of alkaline fermentation, provides a brief history, and offers an overview of the subject. The book discusses the diversity of indigenous fermented foods involving an alkaline reaction, as well as the taxonomy, ecology, physiology, and genetics of predominant m

  10. Tungsten geochemistry and implications for understanding the Earth's interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Ricardo; McDonough, William F.

    2008-08-01

    The concentration of tungsten (W) in basaltic melts provides a window into the behavior of this element during core-mantle separation, crust formation, silicate differentiation, and potentially core-mantle interaction. We have analyzed an extensive suite of modern basalts ( n = 86) for their trace element chemistry via laser ablation ICP-MS, with barium (Ba), thorium (Th), uranium (U), and W concentrations typically determined to ≤ 5% (2 σ) uncertainty. We find that the partitioning behavior of U mirrors that of W during basalt genesis, whereas Ba and Th both behave more incompatibly. The W/U ratio of our complete sample suite (0.65 ± 0.45, 2 σ) is representative of the mean modern mantle, and is indistinguishable from that of mid-ocean ridge basalts (W/U MORB = 0.65 ± 0.41, n = 52), ocean island basalts (W/U OIB = 0.63 ± 0.07, n = 10), and back-arc basin basalts (W/U BABB = 0.62 ± 0.09, n = 12). This ratio is also consistent with the W/U ratio of the continental crust, and thus represents the W/U ratio of the entire silicate portion of the Earth. Assuming a concentration of 20 ± 8 (2 σ) ng/g U in the bulk silicate Earth, the abundance of W in the silicate Earth is 13 ± 10 ng/g. Following mass balance, this implies a mean modern mantle and core composition of 8.3 ± 7.1 ng/g W and 500 ± 120 ng/g W, respectively. Additionally, the MORB source is modeled to contain approximately 3.0 ± 2.3 ng/g W, indicating a four-fold depletion of the highly incompatible elements in the MORB source relative to the silicate Earth. Although both the isotopic composition of W and the constancy of the silicate Earth W/U ratio allow for potential insight into core-mantle exchange, both of these proxies are extremely dependent on the chemical composition of the source. A case study of three Hawaiian picrites with enrichments in 186Os- 187Os but terrestrial ɛ182W can be explained by: i) a lack of a core component in the Hawaiian "plume," ii) crustal contamination, or iii) a

  11. Metal mobilization under alkaline conditions in ash-covered tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinmei; Alakangas, Lena; Wanhainen, Christina

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine element mobilization and accumulation in mill tailings under alkaline conditions. The tailings were covered with 50 cm of fly ash, and above a sludge layer. The tailings were geochemically and mineralogically investigated. Sulfides, such as pyrrhotite, sphalerite and galena along with gangue minerals such as dolomite, calcite, micas, chlorite, epidote, Mn-pyroxene and rhodonite were identified in the unoxidized tailings. The dissolution of the fly ash layer resulted in a high pH (close to 12) in the underlying tailings. This, together with the presence of organic matter, increased the weathering of the tailings and mobilization of elements in the uppermost 47 cm of the tailings. All primary minerals were depleted, except quartz and feldspar which were covered by blurry secondary carbonates. Sulfide-associated elements such as Cd, Fe, Pb, S and Zn and silicate-associated elements such as Fe, Mg and Mn were released from the depletion zone and accumulated deeper down in the tailings where the pH decreased to circum-neutral. Sequential extraction suggests that Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, S and Zn were retained deeper down in the tailings and were mainly associated with the sulfide phase. Calcium, Cr, K and Ni released from the ash layer were accumulated in the uppermost depletion zone of the tailings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  13. Effects of Zn Content on Crystal Structure, Cytocompatibility, Antibacterial Activity, and Chemical Stability in Zn-Modified Calcium Silicate Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Yu, Jiangming; Xie, Youtao; Huang, Liping; Ye, Xiaojian; Zheng, Xuebin

    2013-08-01

    In our previous study, Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings possess not only excellent chemical stability but also well antibacterial activity. Still, effects of zinc content on these properties and cytocompatibility remain unclear. In this paper, two kinds of Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings (ZC0.3, ZC0.5) were fabricated on Ti-6Al-4V substrates via plasma spraying technology. X-ray diffraction results and transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the ZC0.5 coating was composed of pure hardystonite (Ca2ZnSi2O7) phase, while, besides Ca2ZnSi2O7 phase, the amorphous CaSiO3 phase was also detected in the ZC0.3 coating. Chemical stability in Tris-HCl buffer solution and antibacterial activity of the Zn-modified calcium silicate coatings increased with an increase in zinc content. In vitro cytocompatibility evaluation demonstrated that the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen type I (COLI) secretion of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells on Zn-modified coatings were significantly enhanced compared to the Zn-free coating and Ti-6Al-4V control, and no cytotoxicity appeared on Zn-modified coatings. The better antibacterial activity and the enhanced capability to promote MC3T3-E1 cells differentiation of Zn-modified coatings should be attributed to the slow and constant Zn2+ releasing from the coatings.

  14. A Possible Carbon-rich Interior in Super-Earth 55 Cancri e

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Mousis, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial planets in the solar system, such as the Earth, are oxygen-rich, with silicates and iron being the most common minerals in their interiors. However, the true chemical diversity of rocky planets orbiting other stars is yet unknown. Mass and radius measurements are used to constrain the interior compositions of super-Earths (exoplanets with masses of 1 - 10 Earth masses), and are typically interpreted with planetary interior models that assume Earth-centric oxygen-rich compositions. Using such models, the super-Earth 55 Cancri e (mass of 8 Earth masses, radius of 2 Earth radii) has been suggested to bear an interior composition consisting of Fe, silicates, and an envelope (>= 10% by mass) of super-critical water. We report that the mass and radius of 55 Cancri e can also be explained by a carbon-rich solid interior made of Fe, C, SiC, and/or silicates and without a volatile envelope. While the data allow Fe mass fractions of up to 40%, a wide range of C, SiC and/or silicate mass fractions are possib...

  15. Formation of low-T hydrated silicates in modern microbialites from Mexico and implications for microbial fossilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyen, Nina; Benzerara, Karim; Li, Jinhua; Groleau, Alexis; Balan, Etienne; Robert, Jean-Louis; Esteve, Imene; Tavera, Rosaluz; Moreira, David; Lopez-Garcia, Purificacion

    2015-10-01

    Microbialites are organo-sedimentary rocks found in abundance throughout the geological record back to ~3.5 Ga. Interpretations of the biological and environmental conditions under which they formed rely on comparisons with modern microbialites. Therefore, a better characterization of diverse modern microbialites is crucial to improve such interpretations. Here, we studied modern microbialites from three Mexican alkaline crater lakes: Quechulac, La Preciosa and Atexcac. The geochemical analyses of water solutions showed that they were supersaturated to varying extents with several mineral phases, including aragonite, calcite, hydromagnesite, as well as hydrated Mg-silicates. Consistently, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses revealed that microbialites are composed of a diversity of mineral phases including aragonite and sometimes calcite, hydromagnesite, and more interestingly, a poorly-crystalline hydrated silicate phase. Coupling of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry microanalyses on polished sections showed that this latter phase is abundant, authigenic, magnesium-rich and sometimes associated with iron and manganese. This mineral phase is similar to kerolite, a hydrated poorly crystalline talc-like phase (Mg3Si4O10(OH)2·nH2O). Diverse microfossils were permineralized by this silicate phase. Some of them were imaged in 3D by FIB-tomography showing that their morphologically was exquisitely preserved down to the few nm-scale. The structural and chemical features of these fossils were further studied using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy at the carbon and magnesium K-edges and iron L2,3-edges. These results showed that organic carbon is pervasively associated with kerolite. Overall, it is suggested that the poorly-crystalline hydrated magnesium-rich silicate forms in many alkaline lakes and has a strong potential for fossilization of

  16. Formation of low-T hydrated silicates in modern microbialites from Mexico and implications for microbial fossilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina eZeyen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbialites are organo-sedimentary rocks found in abundance throughout the geological record back to ~3.5 Ga. Interpretations of the biological and environmental conditions under which they formed rely on comparisons with modern microbialites. Therefore, a better characterization of diverse modern microbialites is crucial to improve such interpretations. Here, we studied modern microbialites from three Mexican alkaline crater lakes: Quechulac, La Preciosa and Atexcac. The geochemical analyses of water solutions showed that they were supersaturated to varying extents with several mineral phases, including aragonite, calcite, hydromagnesite, as well as hydrated Mg-silicates. Consistently, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses revealed that microbialites are composed of a diversity of mineral phases including aragonite and sometimes calcite, hydromagnesite, and more interestingly, a poorly-crystalline hydrated silicate phase. Coupling of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry microanalyses on polished sections showed that this latter phase is abundant, authigenic, magnesium-rich and sometimes associated with iron and manganese. This mineral phase is similar to kerolite, a hydrated poorly crystalline talc-like phase (Mg3Si4O10(OH2·nH2O. Diverse microfossils were permineralized by this silicate phase. Some of them were imaged in 3D by FIB-tomography showing that their morphologically was exquisitely preserved down to the few nm-scale. The structural and chemical features of these fossils were further studied using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy at the carbon and magnesium K-edges and iron L2,3-edges. These results showed that organic carbon is pervasively associated with kerolite. Overall, it is suggested that the poorly-crystalline hydrated magnesium-rich silicate forms in many alkaline lakes and has a strong potential

  17. Chemical compositions of aqueous fluid, silicate melt, and supercritical fluid in the vicinity of the second critical endpoint in the system peridotite-H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mibe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Ono, S.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the chemical compositions of fluid and melt is fundamental in understanding the magma genesis and chemical differentiation in the Earth's interior. We investigated the stability fields of aqueous fluid, silicate melt, and supercritical fluid magma using in-situ x-ray radiography and the second critical endpoint in the system peridotite-H2O was determined to be around 3.8 GPa (Mibe et al., 2007, JGR). Using the quenched recovered samples obtained by Mibe et al. (2007), we determined the chemical compositions of aqueous fluid, silicate melt, and supercritical fluid in the vi