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Sample records for alkali silicate glasses

  1. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown

  2. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  3. Contributions to the mixed-alkali effect in molecular dynamics simulations of alkali silicate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Lammert, Heiko; Heuer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The mixed-alkali effect on the cation dynamics in silicate glasses is analyzed via molecular dynamics simulations. Observations suggest a description of the dynamics in terms of stable sites mostly specific to one ionic species. As main contributions to the mixed--alkali slowdown longer residence times and an increased probability of correlated backjumps are identified. The slowdown is related to the limited accessibility of foreign sites. The mismatch experienced in a foreign site is stronge...

  4. On the origin of the mixed alkali effect on indentation in silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, J. C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    deformation processes (elastic deformation, plastic deformation, and densification) and Hv in two mixed sodium–potassium silicate glass series. We show that the mixed alkali effect in Hv originates from the nonlinear scaling of the resistance to plastic deformation. We thus confirm a direct relation between...

  5. Electronic structure and Fano antiresonance of chromium Cr(III) ions in alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical properties of the Cr3+ doped in alkali silicate glasses X2O–SiO2 with different modifier cations X=Li, Na and K have been investigated by Villian et al. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the electronic energy levels of Cr3+ in these glasses. This analysis based on the Racah theory was carried out for the Chromium (III) center with an Oh site symmetry. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of glass matrix modifier on the Racah B, C and crystal-field Dq parameters. The effect of the glass matrix environment on these parameters is also reported by comparison with alkali cadmium borosulphate, phosphate and borate glasses. The interference dips observed in the broad band 4T2g(4F) result from interaction with the 2Eg(2G) and 2T1g(2G) sharp levels are known as the Fano antiresonance model. This feature is qualitatively studied using the adiabatic potential surfaces for the quartet 4T2g(4F) and doublet 2Eg(2G) levels. - Highlights: • The electronic structure of Cr3+ in alkali silicate glasses X2O–SiO2 (X=Li,Na,K) was performed. • The theoretical study, based on Racah theory, permits us to deduce the energy levels. • The observed interference dip in absorption spectra is related to Fano antiresonance

  6. About the nature of thermoradiation affection on the 'blue' luminescence of alkali-silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of combined thermal and radiation action on 'blue' luminescence of alkali-silicate glasses with without admixtures of Fe3+ ions was studied. Exciton mechanism was supposed for explanation of 3.4 eV gamma-luminescence band as well as for 5.96 eV absorption band in optical absorption spectrum of glass. The increase of glass transparency is connected with the increase of capture radius and the localization of excitation electron subsystem is due to increase of the disorder degree(structure homogeneity) and electron-phonon interaction.(A.A.D.)

  7. Electronic structure and Fano antiresonance of chromium Cr(III) ions in alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taktak, Olfa, E-mail: taktak.olfa@gmail.com; Souissi, Hajer; Souha, Kammoun

    2015-05-15

    The optical properties of the Cr{sup 3+} doped in alkali silicate glasses X{sub 2}O–SiO{sub 2} with different modifier cations X=Li, Na and K have been investigated by Villian et al. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the electronic energy levels of Cr{sup 3+} in these glasses. This analysis based on the Racah theory was carried out for the Chromium (III) center with an O{sub h} site symmetry. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of glass matrix modifier on the Racah B, C and crystal-field Dq parameters. The effect of the glass matrix environment on these parameters is also reported by comparison with alkali cadmium borosulphate, phosphate and borate glasses. The interference dips observed in the broad band {sup 4}T{sub 2g}({sup 4}F) result from interaction with the {sup 2}E{sub g}({sup 2}G) and {sup 2}T{sub 1g}({sup 2}G) sharp levels are known as the Fano antiresonance model. This feature is qualitatively studied using the adiabatic potential surfaces for the quartet {sup 4}T{sub 2g}({sup 4}F) and doublet {sup 2}E{sub g}({sup 2}G) levels. - Highlights: • The electronic structure of Cr{sup 3+} in alkali silicate glasses X{sub 2}O–SiO{sub 2} (X=Li,Na,K) was performed. • The theoretical study, based on Racah theory, permits us to deduce the energy levels. • The observed interference dip in absorption spectra is related to Fano antiresonance.

  8. Thermoluminescence studies on alkali-silicate glass doped with dysprosium oxide for use in radiation dosimetry measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laopaiboon, Raewat; Bootjomchai, Cherdsak, E-mail: cherdsak_per@hotmail.co.th

    2015-02-15

    Alkali-silicate glass doped with dysprosium oxide was prepared and investigated. Recycled window glass (RWG) was substituted with pure SiO{sub 2} chemical as starting material. Physical properties of the glass samples such as density, molar volume and ion concentrations were determined. The thermoluminescence properties such as sensitivity and linearity of the glass samples were investigated. Trap depth parameters were studied using the glow curve shape method. Moreover, the optical absorption of the glass samples was studied with the transition mechanisms of Dy{sup 3+} ions. - Highlights: • The physical properties of the glass samples were determined. • Results indicate that the structure of the glass more compactness with doped Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Glass samples doped 0.100 mol% of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} show highest sensitivity and linearity. • Trap depth parameters were determined by using the glow curve shape method.

  9. Thermoluminescence studies on alkali-silicate glass doped with dysprosium oxide for use in radiation dosimetry measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali-silicate glass doped with dysprosium oxide was prepared and investigated. Recycled window glass (RWG) was substituted with pure SiO2 chemical as starting material. Physical properties of the glass samples such as density, molar volume and ion concentrations were determined. The thermoluminescence properties such as sensitivity and linearity of the glass samples were investigated. Trap depth parameters were studied using the glow curve shape method. Moreover, the optical absorption of the glass samples was studied with the transition mechanisms of Dy3+ ions. - Highlights: • The physical properties of the glass samples were determined. • Results indicate that the structure of the glass more compactness with doped Dy2O3. • Glass samples doped 0.100 mol% of Dy2O3 show highest sensitivity and linearity. • Trap depth parameters were determined by using the glow curve shape method

  10. Alkali Silicate Glass Coatings for Mitigating the Risks of Tin Whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Dave; Wilcoxon, Ross; Lower, Nate; Grossman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Alkali silicate glass (ASG) coatings were investigated as a possible method for inhibiting tin whisker initiation and growth. The aqueous-based ASG formulations used in this study were deposited with equipment and conditions that are typical of those used to apply conventional conformal coatings. Processes for controlling ASG coating properties were developed, and a number of ASG-based coating combinations were applied to test components with pure tin surfaces. Coatings were applied both in a laboratory environment at Rockwell Collins and in a manufacturing environment at Plasma Ruggedized Solutions. Testing in elevated humidity/temperature environments and subsequent inspection of the test articles identified coating combinations that inhibited tin whisker growth as well as other material combinations that actually accelerated tin whisker growth. None of the coatings evaluated in this study, including conventional acrylic and Parylene conformal coatings, completely prevented the formation of tin whiskers. Two of the coatings were particularly effective at reducing the risks of whisker growth, albeit through different mechanisms. Parylene conformal coating almost, but not completely, eliminated whisker formation, and only a few tin whiskers were found on these surfaces during the study. A composite of ASG and alumina nanoparticles inhibited whisker formation to a lesser degree than Parylene, but did disrupt whisker growth mechanisms so as to inhibit the formation of long, and more dangerous, tin whiskers. Additional testing also demonstrated that the conformal coatings had relatively little effect on the dielectric loss of a stripline test structure operating at frequencies over 30 GHz.

  11. Silicate species of water glass and insights for alkali-activated green cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Helén; Bernin, Diana; Ramser, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    Despite that sodium silicate solutions of high pH are commonly used in industrial applications, most investigations are focused on low to medium values of pH. Therefore we have investigated such solutions in a broad modulus range and up to high pH values (˜14) by use of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and silicon nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si-NMR). The results show that the modulus dependent pH value leads to more or less charged species, which affects the configurations of the silicate units. This in turn, influences the alkali-activation process of low CO2 footprint cements, i.e. materials based on industrial waste or by-products.

  12. Silicate species of water glass and insights for alkali-activated green cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helén Jansson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite that sodium silicate solutions of high pH are commonly used in industrial applications, most investigations are focused on low to medium values of pH. Therefore we have investigated such solutions in a broad modulus range and up to high pH values (∼14 by use of infrared (IR spectroscopy and silicon nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si-NMR. The results show that the modulus dependent pH value leads to more or less charged species, which affects the configurations of the silicate units. This in turn, influences the alkali-activation process of low CO2 footprint cements, i.e. materials based on industrial waste or by-products.

  13. Silicate species of water glass and insights for alkali-activated green cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite that sodium silicate solutions of high pH are commonly used in industrial applications, most investigations are focused on low to medium values of pH. Therefore we have investigated such solutions in a broad modulus range and up to high pH values (∼14) by use of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and silicon nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si-NMR). The results show that the modulus dependent pH value leads to more or less charged species, which affects the configurations of the silicate units. This in turn, influences the alkali-activation process of low CO2 footprint cements, i.e. materials based on industrial waste or by-products

  14. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Thomsen, E. C.; Williams, R. T.; Choi, J.-P.; Canfield, N. L.; Bonnett, J. F.; Stevenson, J. W.; Shyam, A.; Lara-Curzio, E.

    2011-03-01

    An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ∼17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700 and 850 °C using back pressures ranging from 1.4 to 6.8 kPa (0.2-1.0 psi). Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

  15. On the structure of defect centers in γ-irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases, R.; Griscom, D. L.

    1984-02-01

    An EPR study after room temperature γ-irradiation on potassium silicate glasses of two chemical compositions and different 17O and 29Si isotopic enrichments has been carried out. Isochronal anneal experiments on 17O-enriched samples have confirmed the model for the trapped-hole center HC 1 as comprising a trapped hole on a pure 2p π orbital of a single nonbridging oxygen. Besides the well known HC 1 and HC 2 EPR spectra, new resonances have been isolated and identified as due to three types of oxygen-related defects (interstitial O 2- ions; O 2- bonded to the glass network; and interstitial ozonide ions O 3-). Using 29Si-enriched samp simulations a 370 G doublet has been demonstrated to arise from an E'-like defect for which a tentative model is given. The formation of all these defects by irradiation depends on chemical composition of the glass.

  16. Comparative study on the change in index of refraction in ion-exchange interdiffusion in alkali-silicate glasses containing calcium, strontium, barium and titanium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different ability to ion exchange from the salts of lithium-sodium-silicate glass melt containing calcium (or strontium, or barium) and titanium oxides in addition has been shown. CaO, SrO and BaO have negative effect, but TiO2 -positive one on the fullness of ion exchange of lithium-sodium and on the rate of interdiffusion in alkali-silicate glass. The value of change in index of refraction of glass with TiO2 is twice higher than glass with calcium oxide (or strontium, or barium) as the fourth component

  17. Multilevel Tunnelling Systems and Fractal Clustering in the Low-Temperature Mixed Alkali-Silicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Jug

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal and dielectric anomalies of window-type glasses at low temperatures (T<1 K are rather successfully explained by the two-level systems (2LS standard tunneling model (STM. However, the magnetic effects discovered in the multisilicate glasses in recent times, magnetic effects in the organic glasses, and also some older data from mixed (SiO21−x(K2Ox and (SiO21−x(Na2Ox glasses indicate the need for a suitable extension of the 2LS-STM. We show that—not only for the magnetic effects, but also for the mixed glasses in the absence of a field—the right extension of the 2LS-STM is provided by the (anomalous multilevel tunnelling systems (ATS proposed by one of us for multicomponent amorphous solids. Though a secondary type of TS, different from the standard 2LS, was invoked long ago already, we clarify their physical origin and mathematical description and show that their contribution considerably improves the agreement with the experimental data. In spite of dealing with low-temperature properties, our work impinges on the structure and statistical physics of glasses at all temperatures.

  18. Multilevel tunnelling systems and fractal clustering in the low-temperature mixed alkali-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jug, Giancarlo; Paliienko, Maksym

    2013-01-01

    The thermal and dielectric anomalies of window-type glasses at low temperatures (T right extension of the 2LS-STM is provided by the (anomalous) multilevel tunnelling systems (ATS) proposed by one of us for multicomponent amorphous solids. Though a secondary type of TS, different from the standard 2LS, was invoked long ago already, we clarify their physical origin and mathematical description and show that their contribution considerably improves the agreement with the experimental data. In spite of dealing with low-temperature properties, our work impinges on the structure and statistical physics of glasses at all temperatures. PMID:23861652

  19. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Thomsen, E. C.; Choi, J.-P.; Stevenson, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is being evaluated as a candidate sealant for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 wt.% alkalis (K + Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealant. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating during short term testing. In this study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed couples were first isothermally aged for 1000 h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. Chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results. Overall the compliant sealing glass showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ coated metallic interconnect of minimum reaction and hermetic behavior at 700-750 °C in dual environment.

  20. Volume of ionic sites in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molar volume data of alkali and alkaline earth silicate glasses have been used to calculate the free volume associated with the bridging and nonbridging oxygen and modifier ions. The free volume associated with the bridging oxygen is constant (15.39 x 10-24 cm3) for all modifier ions up to 33.3 mol% modifier oxide. It decreases (in alkali or alkaline earth silicate glasses) with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The nonbridging oxygen ion is associated with a constant free volume (6.50 x 10-24 cm3) in all cases. Modifier ions are associated with free volume that increases with increasing number of nonbridging oxygen ions per structural unit and/or radius of the modifier ion. The used model explores the change in the free volume due to changing the concentration of alkali oxides in mixed alkali silicate glasses. The results show that, in such glasses, the free volume related to a certain type of alkali oxide increases with increasing content

  1. Radiation effects on transport and bubble formation in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (pulsed EPR, time-resolved EPR, high-frequency EPR, ENDOR) has been used to structurally characterize metastable point defects in irradiated alkali borate, silicate, and borosilicate glasses and to study mobile interstitial H atoms. In addition, the yield of radiolytic oxygen has been determined by outgassing. Several mechanisms for the defect formation in oxide glasses have been established

  2. CO 2 fluid and silicate glass as monitors of alkali basalt/peridotite interaction in the mantle wedge beneath Gobernador Gregores, Southern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambelluri, M.; Vannucci, R.; De Stefano, A.; Preite-Martinez, M.; Rivalenti, G.

    2009-01-01

    A suite of mantle-wedge amphibole + phlogopite-bearing spinel peridotite xenoliths in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts from Southern Patagonia (Gobernador Gregores, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina) contains carbonic fluid inclusions, glass and carbonate in several textural domains. Here we present a microstructural and fluid inclusion study showing that fluid (corresponding to pure CO 2) and glass post-date the hydrous mantle assemblage and formed soon before and/or during xenolith entrainement in the host alkali basalt. The high densities preserved by a number of CO 2 inclusions indicate that fluid infiltration took place at mantle depths. The low densities pertaining to the majority of analyzed fluid inclusions derive from inclusion re-equilibration during xenolith ascent. Glass occurs in reaction haloes around clinopyroxene, amphibole and phlogopite, where it hosts microlites of new pyroxene, olivine and locally carbonate. Glass veins cut the mantle minerals and locally contain primary carbonate. Glasses vary widely in composition depending on the textural domains and attain Si- and alkali-rich compositions (SiO 2 = 47.0-68.3 wt.%; Na 2O + K 2O = 5.8-12.2 wt.%). Incompatible trace element patterns of glasses in anhydrous xenoliths are closely similar to those of the host alkali basalts, whereas the compositions of interstitial and vein glasses in the hydrous xenoliths indicate that a compositional control has been exerted by the local mineral assemblage (mainly amphibole). The δ18O values of carbonate from the glass pockets and veins in the xenoliths, as well as of carbonate globules and amygdales in the host basalts are in the range 19.62 to 21.04‰. Corresponding δ13C values are - 9.25 to - 10.12‰ and - 7.59 to - 9.32‰, respectively. These values are very different from those of primary carbonatites and the δ18O values clearly exceed those expected for minerals and glasses from mantle assemblages. The similarity of isotopic ratios of carbonates from both

  3. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  4. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  5. Calcium silicate hydrate: Crystallisation and alkali sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneous single C-S-H gels has been prepared for the investigation of alkali binding potential and crystallisation. A distribution coefficient, Rd, was introduced to express the partition of alkali between solid and aqueous phases at 25 deg. C. Rd is independent of alkali hydroxide concentration and depends only on Ca:Si ratio over wide ranges of alkali concentration. The trend of numerical values of Rd indicates that alkali bonding into the solid improves as its Ca:Si ratio decreases. Reversibility is demonstrated, indicating a possibility of constant Rd value of the material. Al has been introduced to form C-A-S-H gels and their alkali sorption properties also determined. Al substituted into C-S-H markedly increases Rd, indicating enhancement of alkali binding. However, the dependence of Rd on alkali concentration is non-ideal with composition. A two-site model for bonding is presented. Crystallisation both under saturated steam and 1 bar vapour pressure has been investigated. It has been shown that heat treatment by saturated steam causes crystallisation of gels. The principal minerals obtained were (i) C-S-H gel and Ca(OH)2 at -55 deg. C, (ii) 1.1 nm tobermorite, jennite and afwillite at 85 -130 deg. C, and (iii) xonotlite, foshagite and hillebrandite at 150-180 deg. C. Properties of crystalline C-S-H were also reported for reversible phase transformation, pH conditioning ability, seeding effect and solubility. At 1 bar pressure, crystallisation is slower than in saturated steam due to lower water activity. Tobermorite-like nanodomains develop during reaction at low Ca/Si ratios. In some Ca-rich compositions, Ca(OH)2 is exsolved and occurs as nano-sized crystallites. (author)

  6. EXAFS studies of sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved Th, U, Np, and Pu have been studied using the EXAFS technique. Th4+, U4+, Np4+, and Pu4+ ions in the silicate glasses are 8-fold coordinated to oxygen neighbors. The higher valent U6+ and Np5+ ions have complex local symmetries. The U6+ ions appear in a uranyl configuration with 2 oxygen atoms at 1.85A and 4 at 2.25A from the U ion. The Np5+ local symmetry is more complex and difficult to determine uniquely. The U6+ glasses show substantial clustering of the uranium atoms. A structural model, with nearly planar uranyl sheets sandwiched between alkali and silica layers, is used to explain the U6+ EXAFS data. This model allows us to understand why U6+ ions are much more soluble in the glasses than the actinide 4+ ions. 4 references, 2 figures

  7. Photo-induced processes in silicate glasses exposed to IR femotosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical properties variation in silicate glasses (fused silica, boro-silicate crowns K8 (Russia) and BK7 (USA), and high purity alkali-silicate glass) after exposure to high-power femtosecond laser radiation at 0.85 μm have been studied. The laser spectral line broadening leading to the supercontinuum generation in visible and UV spectral regions was observed in all studied glasses. Color center generation and intrinsic luminescence were found in boro- and alkali-silicate glasses. It is believed that these processes result from linear and/or two-photon absorption of the short-wavelength part of this supercontinuum which causes glass matrix ionization. No color center absorption in the visible region was observed in fused silica at irradiances up to the laser damage threshold. It was concluded that there is no significant ionization of fused silica under exposure to IR femtosecond laser pulses with irradiance below laser induced damage threshold

  8. Local structure of alkalis in mixed-alkali borate glass to elucidate the origin of mixed-alkali effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomei Tokuda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the structural analysis of Na+ and Cs+ in sodium cesium borate crystals and glasses using 23Na and 133Cs magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR spectroscopy. The composition dependence of NMR spectra of the borate was similar to that of the silicate: (1 the peak position of cesium borate crystals shifted to upfield for structures with larger Cs+ coordination numbers, (2 the MAS NMR spectra of xNa2O-yCs2O-3B2O3 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, x + y = 1 glass showed that the average coordination number (CN of both the alkali cations decreases with increasing Cs+/(Na+ + Cs+ ratio. However, the degree of decrement in borates is much smaller than that in silicates. We have considered that the small difference in CN is due to 4-coordinated B, because it is electrically compensated by the alkali metal ions resulting in the restriction of having various coordinations of O to alkali metal.

  9. Alkali-Activated Aluminium-Silicate Composites as Insulation Materials for Industrial Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembovska, L.; Bajare, D.; Pundiene, I.; Bumanis, G.

    2015-11-01

    The article reports on the study of thermal stability of alkali-activated aluminium- silicate composites (ASC) at temperature 800-1100°C. ASC were prepared by using calcined kaolinite clay, aluminium scrap recycling waste, lead-silicate glass waste and quartz sand. As alkali activator, commercial sodium silicate solution modified with an addition of sodium hydroxide was used. The obtained alkali activation solution had silica modulus Ms=1.67. Components of aluminium scrap recycling waste (aluminium nitride (AlN) and iron sulphite (FeSO3)) react in the alkali media and create gases - ammonia and sulphur dioxide, which provide the porous structure of the material [1]. Changes in the chemical composition of ASC during heating were identified and quantitatively analysed by using DTA/TG, dimension changes during the heating process were determined by using HTOM, pore microstructure was examined by SEM, and mineralogical composition of ASC was determined by XRD. The density of ASC was measured in accordance with EN 1097-7. ASC with density around 560 kg/m3 and heat resistance up to 1100°C with shrinkage less than 5% were obtained. The intended use of this material is the application as an insulation material for industrial purposes at elevated temperatures.

  10. Density of mixed alkali borate glasses: A structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density of mixed alkali borate glasses has been correlated with the glass structure. It is assumed that in such glasses each alkali oxide associates with a proportional quantity of B2O3. The number of BO3 and BO4 units related to each type of alkali oxide depends on the total concentration of alkali oxide. It is concluded that in mixed alkali borate glasses the volumes of structural units related to an alkali ion are the same as in the corresponding binary alkali borate glass. This reveals that each type of alkali oxide forms its own borate matrix and behaves as if not affected with the presence of the other alkali oxide. Similar conclusions are valid for borate glasses with three types of alkali oxide

  11. Density of mixed alkali borate glasses: A structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doweidar, H. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)]. E-mail: hdoweidar@mans.edu.eg; El-Damrawi, G.M. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); Moustafa, Y.M. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); Ramadan, R.M. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)

    2005-05-15

    Density of mixed alkali borate glasses has been correlated with the glass structure. It is assumed that in such glasses each alkali oxide associates with a proportional quantity of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The number of BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} units related to each type of alkali oxide depends on the total concentration of alkali oxide. It is concluded that in mixed alkali borate glasses the volumes of structural units related to an alkali ion are the same as in the corresponding binary alkali borate glass. This reveals that each type of alkali oxide forms its own borate matrix and behaves as if not affected with the presence of the other alkali oxide. Similar conclusions are valid for borate glasses with three types of alkali oxide.

  12. Synthesis, structure peculiarities and electric conductivity of alkali metal-rare earth silicates (germanates)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of obtaining of rare earth-alkali metal silicates (germanates) is studied. The analysis of possibilities of structural disordering of alkaline cations in these structures is given. The interaction of the structure of different by the composition alkali alkali metal - rare earth silicates with electric conductivity values is shown

  13. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  14. Effect of Tm2O3 concentration and hydroxyl content on the emission properties of Tm doped silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tm2O3-doped multi-component silicate glasses without alkali ions are prepared using a conventional melt quenching method. The Judd–Ofelt theory is applied to calculate the intensity parameters of the resultant glass. The intensity parameters of silicate glasses without alkali ions are larger than those of silicate glasses with alkali ions. The spontaneous radiation probability of the transition from 3F4 to 3H6 of glasses without alkali ions is 191.89 s−1, which is larger than that of glasses with alkali ions. Moreover, the measured lifetime of the 3F4 energy level of glasses is larger too. Emission cross section results show a maximum value 3.89×10−21 cm2 at 1882 nm. These findings indicate that the glass in this study can be used to realize ∼2 μm lasers. The effect of variations in Tm2O2 concentration on the emission properties is also studied. Cross-relaxation and emission intensity enhance with increasing Tm2O3 content. However, the lifetime of the 3F4 level decreases because of concentration quenching. The influence of OH groups on the emission properties is also investigated. -- Highlights: • Tm2O3 doped silicate glass with no alkali ions is reported. • Radiative properties has been determined using the Judd–Ofelt theory. • Effect of Tm2O3 concentration on emission properties is studied. • Influence of hydroxyl groups on emission properties is investigated

  15. X-ray absorption study of Ti-bearing silicate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Dingwell, Donald B.; Paris, Eleonora; Seifert, Friedrich; Mottana, Annibale; Romano, Claudia

    1994-01-01

    Ti K-edge XANES spectra have been collected on a series of Ti-bearing silicate glasses with metasilicate and tetrasilicate compositions. The intensity of the preedge feature in these spectra has been found to change with glass composition and varies from 29 to 58% (normalized intensity) suggesting a variation in structural environent around the absorbing atom. The pre-edge peak intensity increases for the alkali titanium tetrasilicate glasses from 35% to 58% in the order Li < Na < K < Rb, Cs ...

  16. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  17. Dysprosium (III)-doped novel silicate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stara-Janakova, S.; Spirková, J.; Míka, M.; Oswald, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2009), s. 79-84. ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : dysprosium silicate glass Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.728, year: 2009 www.elsevier.com/locate/optmat

  18. EXAFS studies of silicate glasses containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium silicate glasses containing hexavalent uranium ions have been studied using the EXAFS technique. The U6+ ions appear in the uranyl configuration with two oxygen atoms at 1.85 A and four to five at 2.2-2.3 A. In the glasses (0.25Na2O.0.75SiO2)sub(1-x)(UO3)sub(x) with x = 0.02 to x = 0.1, planar (or nearly planar) uranium containing clusters, with U-U distances of 3.3 A, are observed. A layered model is proposed to describe these glasses. (Auth.)

  19. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  20. The structure of alkali silicate gel by total scattering methods

    KAUST Repository

    Benmore, C.J.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of the alkali silicate gel (ASR) collected from the galleries of Furnas Dam in Brazil was determined by a pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of high energy X-ray diffraction data. Since this method is relatively new to concrete structure analysis a detailed introduction on the PDF method is given for glassy SiO2. The bulk amorphous structure of the dam material is confirmed as no Bragg peaks are observed in the scattered intensity. The real space results show that the local structure of the amorphous material is similar to kanemite (KHSi2O5:3H2O) however the long range layer structure of the crystal is broken up in the amorphous state, so that ordering only persists of the length scale of a few polyhedra. The silicate layer structure is a much more disordered than predicted by molecular dynamics models. The X-ray results are consistent with the molecular dynamics model of Kirkpatrick et al. (2005) [1] which predicts that most of the water resides in pores within the amorphous network rather than in layers. The total scattering data provide a rigorous basis against which other models may also be tested. © 2010.

  1. Ion-implantation damage in silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, G. W.

    Ion implantation is a rapid technique for simulating damage induced by alpha recoil nuclei in nuclear waste forms. The simulation has been found to be quite good in TEM comparisons with natural alpha decay damage in minerals, but leach rate differences have been observed in glass studies and were attributed to dose rate differences. The similarities between ion implantation and recoil nuclei as a means of producing damage suggest that insights into the long term behavior of glass waste forms can be obtained by examination of what is known about ion implantation damage in silicate glasses. This paper briefly reviews these effects and shows that leaching results in certain nuclear waste glasses can be understood as resulting from plastic flow and track overlap. Phase separation is also seen to be a possible consequence of damage induced compositional changes.

  2. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: pengfei.wang@dit.ie [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic [Light-Matter Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Farrell, Gerald [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  3. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg Kα irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  4. Photo-induced changes of silicate glasses optical parameters at multi-photon laser radiation absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the results of investigations of the mechanisms of photo-induced changes of alkali-silicate (crown) and lead-silicate (flint) glasses optical parameters upon the exposure to the intense laser radiation, and the basic regularities of these processes are reported. These investigations were performed in Research Center open-quotes S. I. Vavilov State Optical Instituteclose quotes during last 15 years. The kinetics of stable and unstable CC formation and decay, the effect of widely spread impurity ions on these processes, the characteristics of fundamental and impure luminescence, the kinetics of refractive index change under conditions of multi-photon glass matrix excitation, and other properties are considered. On the basis of analysis of received regularities it was shown that the nonlinear coloration of alkali-silicate glasses (the fundamental absorption edge is nearly 6 eV) takes place only as a result of two-photon absorption. Important efforts were aimed at the detection of three- or more photon matrix ionization of these glasses, but they were failed. However it was established that in the lead silicate glasses the long-wave carriers mobility boundary (> 5.6 eV) is placed considerably higher the fundamental absorption edge (∼ 3.5 eV) of material matrix. This results in that the linear color centers formation in the lead silicate glasses is not observed. The coloration of these glasses arises only from the two- or three-photon matrix ionization, and the excitation occurs through virtual states that are placed in the fundamental absorption region. In the report the available mechanisms of photo-induced changes of glasses optical parameters, and some applied aspects of this problem are discussed

  5. Raman spectra and structure study of silicate glasses and their liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Jinglin; JIANG Guochang; CHEN Hui; XU Kuangdi

    2006-01-01

    Stress index of tetrahedron (SIT) was defined to describe the topological connectivities among various silicon-oxygen tetrahedra (SiOT) in anionic clusters of binary silicate crystals, glasses, and melts. It was found that the value of SIT was well correlated with the wavenumber of Raman active symmetric stretching vibration of non-bridging oxygen of SiOT. The spatial fractional dimension of hyperfine structure was introduced while comparative analysis was made with the value of SIT. It can be concluded that the concepts of SIT, vibrational wavenumber, and spatial fractional dimension were inherently and holographically correlated and exhibit isomorphic representations of complex structure of binary silicates.Experimental Raman spectra of binary silicates with different alkali cations were investigated. It was demonstrated that alkali cations have little effect on the vibrational wavenumber of symmetric stretching of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) of SiOT, but remarkably affect its Raman active optical cross section, as was consensus resulted from ab initio calculation. It can also be concluded that the spatial fractional dimension of binary silicate is predominantly determined by the hyperfine structure of the anionic clusters and little affected by alkali cations, although the species of anionic clusters and their distributions were originally assigned by the content of alkali oxides. And Raman optical activity extinct effect of isolated SiOT at high basicity should be considered while being applied to quantitatively analysis.

  6. Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Ishu; Reddy, AlluAmarnath; Muñoz, Francisco; Choi, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hae-Won; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U; Ferreira, José M F

    2014-11-01

    We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 system. The (29)Si and (31)P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na2O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q(2)(Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1h and 7 days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris-HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na(+)/Mg(2+) ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. PMID:25280692

  7. Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Ishu; Reddy, AlluAmarnath [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Muñoz, Francisco [Ceramics and Glass Institute (CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Choi, Seong-Jun [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae-Won [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Tulyaganov, Dilshat U. [Turin Polytechnic University in Tashkent, 100095 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Ferreira, José M.F., E-mail: jmf@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2014-11-01

    We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO–MgO–SiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–CaF{sub 2} system. The {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na{sub 2}O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q{sup 2}(Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h and 7 days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris–HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. - Highlights: • Na{sup +} did not induce significant structural changes in chemical Si environment. • Sodium is more prone to affect the chemical environment around P. • Increasing Na{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ratios hinder bio-mineralization and chemical durability. • Alkali-containing glasses confer cyto-toxicity to the cell culture medium.

  8. Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO–MgO–SiO2–P2O5–CaF2 system. The 29Si and 31P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na2O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q2(Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h and 7 days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris–HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na+/Mg2+ ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. - Highlights: • Na+ did not induce significant structural changes in chemical Si environment. • Sodium is more prone to affect the chemical environment around P. • Increasing Na+/Mg2+ ratios hinder bio-mineralization and chemical durability. • Alkali-containing glasses confer cyto-toxicity to the cell culture medium

  9. A calculation of spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high alkali domain spreads out due to the use of cement materials for the construction of the repository of radioactive wastes. Sudden change of pH at this alkali front produces colloidal silicic acid (polymeric silicic acid) in addition to the deposition of supersaturated monomeric silicic acid onto the fracture surface of flow-pathway. The colloidal silicic acid also deposits with relatively small rate-constant in the co-presence of solid phase. Once the flow-path surface is covered with the amorphous silica, the surface seriously degrades the sorption behavior of radionuclides (RNs). Therefore, so far, the authors have examined the deposition rates of supersaturated silicic acid. This study summarized the deposition rate-constants defined by the first-order reaction equation under various conditions of co-presence of amorphous silica powder. Then, using the smallest rate-constant (1.0x10-12 m/s in the co-presence of calcium ion of 1 mM) and a simulation code, COLFRAC-MRL, the spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front was estimated. The results suggested the clogging caused by the deposition of colloidal silicic acid in flow-path. The altered spatial range in the flow-path was limited to around 30 m in fracture and to several centimeters in rock matrix. (author)

  10. A calculation of spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high alkali domain spreads out due to the use of cement materials for the construction of the repository of radioactive wastes. Sudden change of pH at this alkali front produces colloidal silicic acid (polymeric silicic acid) in addition to the deposition of supersaturated monomeric silicic acid onto the fracture surface of flow-pathway. The colloidal silicic acid also deposits with relatively small rate-constant in the co-presence of solid phase. Once the flow-path surface is covered with the amorphous silica, the surface seriously degrades the sorption behavior of radionuclides (RNs). Therefore, so far, the authors have examined the deposition rates of supersaturated silicic acid. This study summarized the deposition rate-constants defined by the first-order reaction equation under various conditions of co-presence of amorphous silica powder. Then, using the smallest rate-constant (1.0×10-12 m/s in the co-presence of calcium ions of 1 mM) and a simulation code, COLFRAC-MRL, the spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front was estimated. The results suggested the clogging caused by the deposition of colloidal silicic acid in flow-path. The altered spatial range in the flow-path was limited to around 30 m in fracture and to several centimeters in rock matrix. (author)

  11. Wear and chemistry of zirconium-silicate, aluminium-silicate and zirconium-aluminium-silicate glasses in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the chemical durability, in alkaline solutions, of zirconium silicate, aluminium silicate, zirconium/aluminium silicate glasses as a function of glass composition is carried out. The glasses were tested using standard DIN-52322 method, where the glass samples are prepared in small polished pieces and attacked for 3 hours in a 800 ml solution of 1N (NaOH + NA2CO3) at 970C. The results show that the presence of ZrO2 in the glass composition increases its chemical durability to alkaline attack. Glasses of the aluminium/zirconium silicate series were melted with and without TiO2. It was shown experimentally that for this series of glasses, the presence of both TiO2 and ZrO2 gave better chemical durability results. However, the best overall results were obtained from the simpler zirconium silicate glasses, where it was possible to make glasses with higher values of ZrO2. (Author)

  12. Computer simulation study of low-energy excitations of silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten silicate and aluminosilicate glasses with different number densities and connectivities were studied by molecular dynamics simulation using the computer program DLPOLY. The radial distribution functions, phonon densities of states and flexibilities of the glass networks were determined, and compared with those determined for silica. The large-scale flexibility of silica was found to be similar to that of some of the glasses studied in this work, particularly in relation to rigid-unit-mode-type motions. The degree of localization of vibrations in fully networked glasses was found to be similar to that in silica, but the vibrations in glasses containing non-bridging oxygen atoms were found to be more localized. This is thought to be due to clustering of alkali cations, which in turn necessarily produces clusters of tetrahedra. (author)

  13. Effect of electron irradiation on Na-K silicate glass investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and pattern recognition method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesiak, B.; Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr; Gedeon, O.; Jozwik, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 354, č. 32 (2008), 3840-3848. ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : amorphous metals * metallic glasses * compositions * XPS * mixed-alkali effect * oxide glasses * alkali silicates Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.449, year: 2008

  14. SON68 glass dissolution driven by magnesium silicate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results are reported on the effect of magnesium silicate precipitation on the mechanisms and rate of borosilicate glass dissolution. Leaching experiments with SON68 glass, a borosilicate containing no Mg, were carried out in initially deionized water at 50 °C with a glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume ratio of 20,000 m−1. After 29 days of alteration the experimental conditions were modified by the addition of Mg to trigger the precipitation of Mg-silicate. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate the importance of other parameters such as pH or dissolved silica on the mechanisms of precipitation of Mg-silicates and their consequences on the glass dissolution rate. Mg-silicates precipitate immediately after Mg is added. The amount of altered glass increases with the quantity of added Mg, and is smaller when silicon is added in solution. A time lag is observed between the addition of magnesium and the resumption of glass alteration because silicon is first provided by partial dissolution of the previously formed alteration gel. It is shown that nucleation does not limit Mg-silicate precipitation. A pH above 8 is necessary for the phase to precipitate under the investigated experimental conditions. On the other hand the glass alteration kinetics limits the precipitation if the magnesium is supplied in solution at a non-limiting rate

  15. Calorimetric signature of structural heterogeneity in a ternary silicate glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Yang, G.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural heterogeneity in a silicate glass by hyperquenching–annealing–calorimetry approach. The results show a striking phenomenon: two separated sub-Tg relaxation peaks appear on the calorimetric curve of the hyperquenched CaO–MgO–SiO2 glass, implying the existence of two...

  16. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi2O+yNa2O+80B2O3 (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li2O and Na2O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO4/2)− into (BO3/2)−. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category

  17. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhashini, Bhattacharya, Soumalya; Shashikala, H. D.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2014-04-01

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi2O+yNa2O+80B2O3 (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li2O and Na2O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO4/2)- into (BO3/2)-. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category.

  18. A study of rare earth doped silicate and phosphate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Bowron, Daniel Timothy

    1994-01-01

    The complementary techniques of X-ray diffraction and EXAFS have been applied to silicate and phosphate glass systems containing varying quantities of rare earth elements. The silicate systems that have been studied are rare earth doped fibre optic preforms of interest to the optoelectronics and telecommunications industry. Techniques were developed to allow spatially resolved diffraction and EXAFS data to be taken from the small ~1mm diameter core region of the preforms. Absorpt...

  19. Raman signature modification induced by copper nanoparticles in silicate glass

    OpenAIRE

    Colomban, Philippe; D. Screiber, Henry

    2005-01-01

    Composite materials formed by metal nanoclusters embedded in glasses/glazes have been produced for centuries (Roman hematinum and Renaissance alassonti, Coptic lustre-painted glass and Islamic lustre ceramics). Comparisons were drawn from Raman analyses of alkali borosilicate glasses coloured by copper as “blue” Cu2+ (peak absorption at 750 nm), as “colourless” Cu+, and as “opaque red” Cu0 (peak absorptions at ~420 and 570 nm). In particular, Raman analyses of copper-ruby glasses containing C...

  20. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  1. Low-frequency Raman scattering in alkali tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelos G Kalampounias

    2008-10-01

    Raman scattering has been employed to study the alkali-cation size dependence and the polarization characteristics of the low-frequency modes for the glass-forming tellurite mixtures, 0.1M2O–0.9TeO2 (M = Na, K, Rb and Cs). The analysis has shown that the Raman coupling coefficient alters by varying the type of the alkali cation. The addition of alkali modifier in the tellurite network leads to the conversion of the TeO4 units to TeO3 units with a varying number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. Emphasis has also been given to the lowfrequency modes and particular points related to the low-frequency Raman phenomenology are discussed in view of the experimental findings.

  2. High-Q bismuth silicate nonlinear glass microsphere resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Ganapathy; Lee, Timothy; Ding, Ming; Brambilla, Gilberto; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Koizumi,Fumihito; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a bismuth-silicate glass microsphere resonator has been demonstrated. At wavelengths near 1550 nm, high-modes can be efficiently excited in a 179-μm diameter bismuth-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of circa 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as were observed. The dependence of the spectral response on variations in the input power level was studied in detail to gain an insight in...

  3. Lead Silicate Glass Microsphere Resonators With Absorption-Limited Q

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Murugan, Genapathy; Lee, Timothy; Feng, Xian; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Loh, Wei; Brambilla, Gilberto; Wilkinson, James; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a lead-silicate glass microsphere resonator. We show that at the wavelengths near 1555 nm high Q modes can be efficiently excited from a 109 μm diameter lead-silicate glass microsphere via evanescent coupling using a tapered silica fiber with a waist diameter of 2 μm. Resonances with Q-factors as high as 0.9×107 were observed. This is very close to the theoretical material-limited Q-factor and is the highest Q-factor reported so far from a non...

  4. Shear viscosity of alkali and alkaline earth titanium silicate liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Dingwell, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The shear viscosities of l3 silicate liquids along the NarSiOr-TiO, and CaSiOr-TiO, joins as well as six liquids based on the sphene stoichiometry X#TiSiO. (where X represents Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ca, and Sr) have been measured in equilibrium with air using the concentric cylinder method. The NarSiOr-TiO, join was investigated from l0 to 50 mol0/oT iO, in the temperaturer ange 1000-1150 "C, whereast he CaSiO3-TiO,jo in was investigated from l0 to 80 molo/oT iO, in the temperature range of 1400-...

  5. Nanogratings formation in multicomponent silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancry, M.; Zimmerman, F.; Desmarchelier, R.; Tian, J.; Brisset, F.; Nolte, S.; Poumellec, B.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the formation of porous nanogratings in various oxide glasses including TiO2-doped silica, GeO2 and alumino-borosilicate by near-IR femtosecond laser radiation. ULE and GeO2 glasses exhibit similar birefringence to pure silica, whereas Borofloat 33 reveals twice weaker amplitude. Using quantitative birefringence measurements, small-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy, we correlate birefringence and porous nanolayers formation according to laser repetition rate and glass composition. We show that heat accumulation is a crucial parameter limiting the glass decomposition and thus nanogratings formation.

  6. Modifier constraints in alkali ultraphosphate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, B.P.; Mauro, J.C.; Yue, Yuanzheng;

    2014-01-01

    In applying the recently introduced concept of cationic constraint strength [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 214501 (2014)] to bond constraint theory (BCT) of binary phosphate glasses in the ultraphosphate region of xR2O-(1-x)P2O5 (with x ≤ 0.5 and R = {Li, Na, Cs}), we demonstrate that a fundamental...... limitation of BCT can be overcome. The modifiers are considered to exist in either “isolated” or “crosslinking” sites, in line with the so-called modifier sub-network [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] and each site is associated with a certain number of constraints. We estimate the compositional dependence...

  7. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  8. Hardness and incipient plasticity in silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.;

    2014-01-01

    ,61(2013)], we observed a minimum ofHv in CaO/MgO sodium aluminosilicate glasses at CaO/MgO = 1:1 and postulated that this minimum is linked to a maximum in plastic flow. However, the origin of this link has not been experimentally verified. In this work, we attempt to do so by exploring the links among Hv......, volume recovery ratio (VR), and plastic deformation volume (VP) under indentation, glass transition temperature (Tg), Young’s modulus (E), and liquid fragility index (m) in CaO/MgO and CaO/Li2O sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We confirm the negative deviations from linearity and find that the maximum...

  9. 6Li-doped silicate glass for thermal neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass formulations are described that contain high concentrations of 6Li and are suitable for use as thermal neutron shielding. One formulation contained 31 mol% of 6Li2O and 69 mol% of SiO2. Studies were performed on a second formulation that contained as much as 37 mol% of 6Li2O and 59 mol% of SiO2, with 4 mol% Al2O3 added to prevent crystallization at such high 6Li2O concentrations. These lithium silicate glasses can be formed into a variety of shapes using conventional glass fabrication techniques. Examples include flat plates, disks, hollow cylinders, and other more complex geometries. Both in-beam and in-core experiments have been performed to study the use and durability of Li silicate glasses. In-core experiments show the glass can withstand the intense radiation fields near the core of a reactor. The neutron attenuation of the glasses used in these studies was 90%/mm. In-beam studies show that the glass is effective for reducing the gamma-ray and neutron fields near experiments. ((orig.))

  10. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-24

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm(-1) in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si(4+) ions by Al(3+) and Na(+) ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties. PMID:26815634

  11. Femtosecond Laser Induced Rewritable Optical Memory in Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiongwei; QIU Jianrong; ZHU Congshan; K.Hirao; GAN Fuxi

    2001-01-01

    A novel method for producing rewritable optical memory with ultra-high storage density and ultra-high recording and readout speed is presented. A 120 fs, 800 nm, 1 kHz laser focused by an objective lens is used to produce recording bits in glass with high transmittance contrast. These recording bits can be erased by heat-treatment. The mechanism has been discussed by means of the absorption and electron spin resonance(ESR) spectra of silicate glasses before and after irradiation by the laser. The absorption of glasses increases greatly after irradiation because of color-center generation through multi-photon absorption. ESR spectra shows that the color-center induced in the glass are hole-trapped defects. The color-center disappears when the glass heated because the holes and electrons at traps are released by thermal stimulation and recombine again.

  12. Potassium-silicate glass exposed to low energy H+ beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Pristine potassium-silicate glass was irradiated with 5 keV protons. ► Surface relaxation increases amount of K and NBO in the surface layer. ► Enhanced bombardment leads to a continuous decrease of NBO and K. ► A constant surplus of K in elemental state was found on the glass surface. - Abstract: Pristine surface of binary potassium silicate glass 85SiO2·15K2O was prepared in vacuum and irradiated with a 5 keV proton beam within the range of 0.6–103 C/m2. The response of glass surface was monitored by XPS and the evolution of atomic concentrations divided it into two stages. During the first one, amounts of both potassium and non-bridging oxygen (NBO) increase in the surface layer and are governed by surface relaxation. The second stage is characterised by a continuous decrease of NBO and K. Comparison of K and NBO concentrations yielded a constant surplus of K proving the existence of potassium elemental state on the glass surface. Ratio of bridging oxygen (BO) and silicon is conserved during proton bombardment. The extrapolation of the glass response to the enhanced irradiation predicts a formation of substoichiometric SiOx with some elemental K on the topmost surface.

  13. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhashini,, E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com; Bhattacharya, Soumalya, E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com; Shashikala, H. D., E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com; Udayashankar, N. K., E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal-575025 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi{sub 2}O+yNa{sub 2}O+80B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO{sub 4/2}){sup −} into (BO{sub 3/2}){sup −}. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category.

  14. Local structure of alkalis in mixed-alkali borate glass to elucidate the origin of mixed-alkali effect

    OpenAIRE

    Yomei Tokuda; Yuya Takahashi; Hirokazu Masai; Shunichi Kaneko; Yoshikatsu Ueda; Shigeto Fujimura; Toshinobu Yoko

    2015-01-01

    We report the structural analysis of Na+ and Cs+ in sodium cesium borate crystals and glasses using 23Na and 133Cs magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. The composition dependence of NMR spectra of the borate was similar to that of the silicate: (1) the peak position of cesium borate crystals shifted to upfield for structures with larger Cs+ coordination numbers, (2) the MAS NMR spectra of xNa2O-yCs2O-3B2O3 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, x + y = 1) glass showe...

  15. Chemical bonding and structural ordering of cations in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific surrounding of cations in multicomponent silicate glasses is briefly presented. Information about interatomic distances and site geometry may be gained by using spectroscopic methods among which x-ray absorption spectroscopy may be used for the largest number of glass components. Scattering of x-rays and neutrons may also be used to determine the importance of medium range order around specific cations. All the existing data show that cations occur in sites with a well-defined geometry, which are in most cases connected to the silicate polymeric network. Medium range order has been detected around cations such as Ti, Ca and Ni, indicating that these elements have an heterogeneous distribution within the glassy matrix. (authors)

  16. Mixed alkali tungsten borate glasses – Optical and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edukondalu, A.; Kavitha, B.; Samee, M.A. [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Kareem Ahmmed, Shaik [M.J. College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rahman, Syed, E-mail: syedrahman848@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Siva Kumar, K. [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► The MAE in the Li{sub 2}O–Na{sub 2}O–WO{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses was studied through density, optical and MDSC. ► Optical band gap (E{sub opt}) and Urbach energy (ΔE) have been evaluated. ► The FTIR studies on the present glasses indicates the presence of BO{sub 3}, BO{sub 4}, WO{sub 3}, WO{sub 6} and Li units. ► The values of E{sub opt} and ΔE show non-linear behavior with compositional parameter showing the MAE. ► The glass basicity and interaction parameter were observed to be less. -- Abstract: Glasses with composition xLi{sub 2}O-(30-x)Na{sub 2}O-10WO{sub 3}-60B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 mol%) were prepared by the melt quenching technique. Density, refractive index and glass transition temperature varies non-linearly with glass composition indicting the presence of mixed alkali effect. Optical energy band gap for various indirect and direct (allowed and forbidden) transitions were determined using Tauc plots. IR spectral study reveals the existence of BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} groups with W–O–W vibrations in the present glasses. Based on good correlation among refractive index based electronic polarizability of oxide ions, optical basicity and the Yamashita–Kurosawa’s interaction parameter, the present Li{sub 2}O–Na{sub 2}O–WO{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses were classified as semi covalent oxides.

  17. Mixed alkali tungsten borate glasses – Optical and structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The MAE in the Li2O–Na2O–WO3–B2O3 glasses was studied through density, optical and MDSC. ► Optical band gap (Eopt) and Urbach energy (ΔE) have been evaluated. ► The FTIR studies on the present glasses indicates the presence of BO3, BO4, WO3, WO6 and Li units. ► The values of Eopt and ΔE show non-linear behavior with compositional parameter showing the MAE. ► The glass basicity and interaction parameter were observed to be less. -- Abstract: Glasses with composition xLi2O-(30-x)Na2O-10WO3-60B2O3 (where x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 mol%) were prepared by the melt quenching technique. Density, refractive index and glass transition temperature varies non-linearly with glass composition indicting the presence of mixed alkali effect. Optical energy band gap for various indirect and direct (allowed and forbidden) transitions were determined using Tauc plots. IR spectral study reveals the existence of BO3 and BO4 groups with W–O–W vibrations in the present glasses. Based on good correlation among refractive index based electronic polarizability of oxide ions, optical basicity and the Yamashita–Kurosawa’s interaction parameter, the present Li2O–Na2O–WO3–B2O3 glasses were classified as semi covalent oxides

  18. The Characterisation of Silicate Glasses Implanted with Ag+ Ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Kormunda, M.; Kolitsch, A.

    Melville: American Institute of Physics, 2011, s. 327-334. ISBN 978-0-7354-0986-6. ISSN 0094-243X. [11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques. Crete (GR), 12.06.2011-18.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ion implantation * silicate glasses * metal nanoparticles * Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy * optical absorption Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  19. Coloration processes in soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of mechanical stretching upon room temperature γ coloration of soda-lime silicate (SLS) glasses has been investigated. Optical absorption measurements were performed to follow the formation and thermal bleaching of the induced color centers. It has been shown that the mechanical deformation reduces the coloration effectivity and thermal stability of the created centers. It has been proposed that increase of the concentration of the non-bridging oxygens accelerate the bleaching processes

  20. Structural changes between soda-lime silicate glass and melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction has been used to study the structure of a glass and melt of composition 75SiO2-15Na2O-10CaO. RMC modeling of the neutron and X-ray diffraction data for the glass allowed the determination of the Na and Ca environment. The structure has been investigated at 300 K, just below the glass transition at 823 K and in the melt at 1273 K. The short range order does not present important modifications with temperature while significant reorganization appears at the medium range order. These latter changes can be associated with the Si and O pairs and indicate the relaxation of the silicate network. This indicates that the glass formation involved structural rearrangement during cooling. (authors)

  1. Tin in silicate glasses: structure, thermodynamics and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work Moessbauer spectroscopy is used to investigate the oxidation states and structures of tin in silicate glasses. Thermal treatment of the glasses in atmospheres with varying oxygen partial pressure leads to the simultaneous appearance of reduction and diffusion. Experiments with varying treatment time give the opportunity to study diffusion and reduction processes in detail. Comparison of the hyperfine parameters of reference materials with measured parameter provides information about the local surroundings of the tin atoms. An octahedral surrounding for Sn4+ is presumed, while Sn2+ and three oxygen atoms form a tetrahedral coordination.

  2. Fluorescence properties of Eu3+-doped alumino silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Andreas; Kuhn, Stefan; Tiegel, Mirko; Rüssel, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Alumino silicate glasses of a very broad range of molar compositions doped with 1 ṡ 1020 Eu3+ cm-3 (about 0.2 mol% Eu2O3) were prepared. As network modifier oxides Li2O, Na2O, K2O, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, PbO, Y2O3 and La2O3 have been used. All glasses show relatively broad fluorescence excitation and emission spectra. For most glasses only a weak effect of the glass composition on the excitation and emission spectra is observed. Although the glasses should be structurally similar, notable differences are found for the fluorescence lifetimes. These increase steadily with decreasing mean atomic weight, decreasing refractive index and decreasing optical basicity of the glasses, which may be explained by local field effects. An exception from this rule are the strontium, barium and potassium containing glasses, which show significantly increased fluorescence lifetimes despite of their high refractive index, optical basicity and molecular weight. The non mono-exponential fluorescence decay curves as well as the fluorescence spectra indicate a massive change in the local surroundings of the doped rare earth ions for these glasses.

  3. Mixed-alkali effect in sodium-potassium glasses irradiated with electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gedeon, O.; Jurek, Karel; Drbohlav, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 356, 9-10 (2010), s. 456-460. ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/1269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : mixed-alkali effect * radiation effects * atomic force microscopy * alkali silicates Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2010

  4. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  5. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO2–(60−x)Bi2O3–40SiO2 with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10−1 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623–703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), so called crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence in some Cu+ doped alkali fluoro-silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OSL and TL in some Cu doped alkali fluoro-silicates were studied. These investigations show that the materials possess good OSL properties and the sensitivity is comparable to that of the commercial α-Al2O3:C phosphor. Of the several fluoro-silicate phosphors studied Cu doped Na2SiF6 is found to be highly sensitive. The initial OSL intensity averaged over first second using blue and green light stimulation, were found to be 1.2 and 13.3 times respectively of Al2O3:C. The simple preparation procedure, high OSL sensitivity, fast decay, and high photoionization cross-section will make these phosphors suitable for on-line radiation dosimetry, particularly in medical dosimetry applications. -- Highlights: • Intense TL and OSL in Cu doped Alkali fluorosilicates was observed. • The OSL sensitivity is comparable to commercial Al2O3:C (Landauer). • The phosphor possesses fast OSL decay, high sensitivity moderate to high fading. • These phosphors are more suitable for online radiation dosimetry using OSL

  7. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  8. Laser induced changes of refractive index of lead - silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of photoinduced changes of refractive index of the TΦ lead - silicate glasses (analogous with the SF glasses from Schott catalog) under the effect of high power laser radiation with quantum energy less bandgap have been studied. It is shown that the laser induced color centers results in increase of refractive index into the exposed bulk during the laser pulse action. This leads to considerable redistribution of irradiance and decrease of laser radiation brightness even in the case of optical elements less 1 mm thickness. The observed effect may be connected both with radiation induced dilatation of matter and heating of interaction region owing to absorption of radiation by color centers. Comparison the kinetics of refractive index change of the glass after exposure by laser pulse at 0.53 μm and the kinetics of color centers decay allowed to draw a conclusion about heat character of observed changes

  9. Experimental determination of partition coefficients for Rb, Sr, and Ba between alkali feldspar and silicate liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partitioning of Rb, Sr and Ba between alkali feldspar and a synthetic granitic melt has been determined at 8 kb and 720 to 7800C for a single quaternary granite composition. The results suggest that Henry's Law is obeyed by Rb up to approximately 0.8 wt.%Rb2O in both the liquid and in the alkali feldspar. The measured D values for Rb range from 0.77 to 1.1 For Ba, Henry's Law is obeyed up to approximately 0.6 wt.% BaO in the liquid and approximately 5 wt.% BaO in the alkali feldspar. D values for Ba range from 6.4 to 14. For Sr there is only a crude relationship between concentration in the liquid and concentration in the alkali feldspar at concentrations greater than approximately 0.6wt.%SrO in the liquid and approximately 0.4 wt.% SrO in the alkali feldspar. D values for Sr range from 1.2 to 5.0. Partitioning of Sr is apparently sensitive to the concentration of Ba in the system and this partly explains the failure of Sr to obey Henry's Law. Linear least-squares fits to the partitioning data as a function of temperature suggest inverse correlation between temperature and D values. Rb shows only a slight temperature effect whereas Ba and Sr appear to be rather strongly affected by temperature, but the temperature range examined here is small compared to the scatter in the data making these trends relatively uncertain. Other factors that appear to affect partitioning, especially of Sr, are growth rate, development of sector zoning, and Or content of the alkali feldspar. These factors severely limit the use of partitioning of these elements in alkali feldspar as geothermometers. The technique for measuring growth rates utilized here combined with measurement of trace element depletion in diffusion boundary layers adjacent to the alkali feldspar crystals makes it possible to estimate diffusivities for Ba and Sr. These estimates suggest a difference of 2 orders of magnitude between diffusivities for Ba and Sr in a vapor-saturated melt and those measured for a dry

  10. Spectroscopic study of silicate glass structure. Application to the case of iron and magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last 10 years, I focused my research topics on silicate glass structure. More specifically I have been interested by two main components of natural and technological silicate glasses, Fe and Mg. Using solid state spectroscopic methods adapted to the disordered nature of glass coupled to molecular dynamics simulation and modeling or ab initio calculation, I have studied the environment of iron and magnesium and their impact on glass properties. Information on the distribution of environments in glasses have been extracted. (author)

  11. High thermal neutron flux effects on structural and macroscopic properties of alkali-borosilicate glasses used as neutron guide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffy, R.; Peuget, S.; Schweins, R.; Beaucour, J.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The behaviour of four alkali-borosilicate glasses under homogeneous thermal neutron irradiation has been studied. These materials are used for the manufacturing of neutron guides which are installed in most facilities as devices to transport neutrons from intense sources such as nuclear reactors or spallation sources up to scientific instruments. Several experimental techniques such as Raman, NMR, SANS and STEM have been employed in order to understand the rather different macroscopic behaviour under irradiation of materials that belong to a same glass family. The results have shown that the remarkable glass shrinking observed for neutron doses below 0.5 ·1018 n/cm2 critically depends upon the presence of domains where silicate and borate network do not mix.

  12. Characterization of Silicate Glasses Implanted with Ag+ Ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Kormunda, M.; Kolitsch, A.

    Crete: 11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques, 2011, s. 25-25. [11th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques. Crete (GR), 12.06.2011-18.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Grant ostatní: UJEP Usti nad Labem(CZ) iga ujep 5322215000901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ion implantation * silicate glasses * metal nanoparticles * Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy * optical absorption Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  14. Cracking phenomena in lithium-di-silicate glass ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat Banerjee

    2001-04-01

    Lithium-di-silicate glass ceramic (Li2O, SiO2) with uniformly oriented crystals was placed on a Vickers indentation with extrusion axis horizontally parallel to the base axis. The material was rotated through 0°– 90° and at each angle a 20 N load was applied to ascertain the crack path. It was observed that the crack length decreases and the crack deviates from its original path with increasing angle. The deviation of the crack was correlated with the component of the crack driving force and the theoretical strength of the aligned crystals at different angles.

  15. Enzyme stabilization by glass-derived silicates in glass-exposed aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, J.A.; Moffett, J.R.; Arun, P.; Lam, D.; Todorov, T.I.; Brothers, A.B.; Anick, D.J.; Centeno, J.; Namboodiri, M.A.A.; Jonas, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the solutes leaching from glass containers into aqueous solutions, and to show that these solutes have enzyme activity stabilizing effects in very dilute solutions. Methods: Enzyme assays with acetylcholine esterase were used to analyze serially succussed and diluted (SSD) solutions prepared in glass and plastic containers. Aqueous SSD preparations starting with various solutes, or water alone, were prepared under several conditions, and tested for their solute content and their ability to affect enzyme stability in dilute solution. Results: We confirm that water acts to dissolve constituents from glass vials, and show that the solutes derived from the glass have effects on enzymes in the resultant solutions. Enzyme assays demonstrated that enzyme stability in purified and deionized water was enhanced in SSD solutions that were prepared in glass containers, but not those prepared in plastic. The increased enzyme stability could be mimicked in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of silicates to the purified, deionized water that enzymes were dissolved in. Elemental analyses of SSD water preparations made in glass vials showed that boron, silicon, and sodium were present at micromolar concentrations. Conclusions: These results show that silicates and other solutes are present at micromolar levels in all glass-exposed solutions, whether pharmaceutical or homeopathic in nature. Even though silicates are known to have biological activity at higher concentrations, the silicate concentrations we measured in homeopathic preparations were too low to account for any purported in vivo efficacy, but could potentially influence in vitro biological assays reporting homeopathic effects. ?? 2009 The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  16. Analysis of an altered simple silicate glass using different mineral and glass standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative analyses of alteration products formed during the aqueous corrosion of glass were performed using four different sets of standards: relevant mineral standards, an NBS glass standard, and the unreacted center of the reacted glass. A simple silicate glass (containing Na, Mg, Al, Si, and Ca) was reacted in water vapor at 200/degree/C for 14 days. Up to eight alteration phases, including a Mg-rich smectite clay and a zeolite intermediate in composition between Ca-harmotome and phillipsite, formed on the glass surface. A set of EDS spectra of the bulk glass, the clay, and the zeolite were collected from a polished cross-section of the reacted sample. Results are discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Study of Using Certain Composition of Bismuth Silicate Glass and Glass Ceramic for Gamma Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismuth silicate glass with composition 20, 80 wt. % respectively was prepared. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that this glass has a very good stability when exposed to γ irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using it as a shielding material. Many properties should be investigated to fulfill this application. Study of density and molar volume to understand the structural properties, also the mechanical properties are verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing its durability in a base solution. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 295 - 553 K, which proved that this glass has very low conductivity even at high temperatures. The corresponding glass ceramic was prepared by means of heat treatment, and the formed phases were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also the probability of using this glass ceramic as a shielding material was investigated

  18. XPS study of CaO in sodium silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows that CaO added to silicate glasses behaves much like Na2O in converting bridging oxygen sites to nonbridging sites. Good correspondence with model predictions was obtained but deviations were still sufficiently large to warrant attention. We speculate that some CaO may remain unreacted or that small-scale phase separation may occur. XPS core level shifts were monitored and possible charge-transfer effects were considered. Preliminary theoretical calculations utilizing a molecular-cluster approach were presented. XPS spectra for various glass compositions were simulated by appropriately combining local densities of state calculated for individual atoms. Dominant spectral features observed experimentally were found in the simulations. In conjunction with experiments, more carefully refined calculations will be subsequently examined. 7 figures

  19. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dult, Meenakshi; Kundu, R.S. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Murugavel, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Punia, R., E-mail: rajeshpoonia13@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Kishore, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India)

    2014-11-01

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO{sub 2}–(60−x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}–40SiO{sub 2} with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10{sup −1} Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623–703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σ{sub dc}), so called crossover frequency (ω{sub H}), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (H{sub f}) and enthalpy of migration (H{sub m}) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti{sup 3+} and Ti{sup 4+} ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses.

  20. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  1. Lifetime Predictions of a Titanium Silicate Glass with Machined Flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly

    2003-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate glass to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure and to compare the results with those of a previous study. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions. The material strength and lifetime was seen to increase due to the removal of residual stress through grinding and polishing. Influence on time-to-failure is addressed for the case with and without residual stress present. Titanium silicate glass otherwise known as ultra-low expansion (ULE)* glass is a candidate for use in applications requiring low thermal expansion characteristics such as telescope mirrors. The Hubble Space Telescope s primary mirror was manufactured from ULE glass. ULE contains 7.5% titanium dioxide which in combination with silica results in a homogenous glass with a linear expansion coefficient near zero. delayed failure . This previous study was based on a 230/270 grit surface. The grinding and polishing process reduces the surface flaw size and subsurface damage, and relieves residual stress by removing the material with successively smaller grinding media. This results in an increase in strength of the optic during the grinding and polishing sequence. Thus, a second study was undertaken using samples with a surface finish typically achieved for mirror elements, to observe the effects of surface finishing on the time-to-failure predictions. An allowable stress can be calculated for this material based upon modulus of rupture data; however, this does not take into account the problem of delayed failure, most likely due to stress corrosion, which can significantly shorten lifetime. Fortunately, a theory based on fracture mechanics has been developed enabling lifetime predictions to be made for brittle materials susceptible to delayed failure. Knowledge of the factors governing the rate of subcritical flaw growth in a given environment enables the development of

  2. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  3. Investigations in silicate glasses. I. Radiation damage. II. Optical nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of two poorly understood but technologically important physical properties of silicate glasses and related materials is described. The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance to investigate the nature of radiation-induced damage in glasses exposed to a variety of high-energy radiation sources is discussed first. Second, the measurement of the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient in a variety of optical materials related to the design of high-power laser systems is described. The radiation damage investigations rely heavily on the comparison of experimental results for different experimental situations. The comparison of EPR lineshapes, absolute spin densities and power saturation behavior is used to probe a variety of microscopic and macroscopic aspects of radiation damage in glasses. Comparison of radiation damage associated with exposure to gamma rays and fast neutrons (and combinations thereof) are interpreted in terms of the microscopic damage mechanisms which are expected to be associated with the specific radiations. Comparison of radiation damage behavior in different types of glasses is also interpreted in terms of the behavior expected for the specific materials. The body of data which is generated is found to be internally self-consistent and is also generally consistent with the radiation damage behavior expected for specific situations. A new and versatile technique for measuring the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient, n2, in optical materials is described. The technique utilizes a 1 ns pulsed neodymium-glass laser system and time-resolved interferometry to determine the ratio of the coefficient n2 of sample materials to the n2 of CS2. This method avoids some of the complications associated with performing absolute measurements of n2 and allows the use of a relatively simple experimental technique. The measurements determine the nonlinear index ratios of the samples with an accuracy of about +-15 percent

  4. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Claire E., E-mail: whitece@princeton.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton (United States); Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University, Princeton (United States); Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Physics and Chemistry of Materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  5. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO2 alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C3S), blended C3S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C3S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements

  6. Micromechanical properties of silicate glass films on sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagrebelny, A.V.; Carter, C.B. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    1998-12-31

    The deformation of thin layers of glass on crystalline materials has been examined using newly developed experimental methods for nanomechanical testing. Continuous films of anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}), celsian (BaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}), and monticellite (CaMgSiO{sub 4}) were deposited onto Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD). Mechanical properties such as Young`s modulus and hardness were probed with a high-resolution depth-sensing indentation instrument. Nanomechanical testing, combined with AFM in-situ imaging of the deformed regions, allowed force-displacement measurements and imaging of the same regions of the specimen before and immediately after indentation. Emphasis has been placed on examining how changes in the glass composition, residual stress introduced into the films, effect of film`s heat-treatment, and the effect of substrate crystallographic orientation will affect the mechanical properties of silicate-glass films.

  7. Neutron-scattering studies of Yb-bearing silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The static and dynamic magnetic response of the Yb3+ ions in 2Na2O·Yb2O3·6SiO2 glass and the isochemical crystalline silicate Na3YbSi3O9 has been studied by neutron diffraction, inelastic magnetic-scattering, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The rare earth sites in the glass have an average coordination number of 5.6 ± 0.5 and give a mean rare earth-oxygen bond length of 2.23 Angstrom; average Si-O and O-O coordination numbers and bond distances are comparable to those in vitreous SiO2. The magnetic excitation spectrum of the Na3YbSi3O9 material was analyzed by a crystal-field model using a method of descending symmetry. The magnetic susceptibility and the excitation spectrum of the Yb glasses can be described by a distribution of ligand-field effects on the Yb3+ ions that are similar to the nominal crystal field in crystalline Na3YbSi3O9

  8. Quantum-dot composite silicate glasses obtained by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to obtain composite materials such as nanocluster-containing silicate glasses. Depending on the choice of the pair 'implanted atom-dielectric host', ion implantation of metals in glass gives rise to the formation of new compounds and/or metallic nanoparticles. In spite of the great interest, processes governing the chemical and physical interaction between the implanted atoms and the atoms in the host matrix are not completely understood. In this paper, metal, alloy and binary compound nanocluster formation is studied after ion implantation in silica and soda-lime glass. Particular emphasis is given to the comparison among different existing approaches to the understanding of the chemical interactions in these systems. As the physical properties of these composites depend on the cluster structure, composition and size, it is important to set procedures for modifying these characteristics. Recent results indicate that thermal treatments in controlled atmosphere of gold + copper double-implanted silica favor the formation of either alloy nanoclusters or copper compounds, depending on the annealing atmosphere

  9. Uniform upconversion in high-concentration Er3+-doped soda lime silicate and aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniform upconversion in erbium-doped silicate glasses is investigated as a function of glass composition, concentration, and fabrication method. Comparisons of upconversion coefficients are made among soda lime silicate and aluminosilicate bulk glasses and soda lime silicate waveguides. Comparisons are also made with studies performed by other researchers. The results indicate that both the composition and the preparation method of the glass affect the value of the upconversion coefficient, with as much as a factor-of-4 variation observed at fixed Er3+ concentration. Values of the upconversion coefficient are found to be consistent with the Foerster endash Dexter microscopic model. copyright 1997 Optical Society of America

  10. Modifier cation effects on 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G.; Phyo, Pyae A.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the 29Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O · 4.81 SiO2, Rb2O · 3.96 SiO2, Rb2O · 2.25 SiO2, K2O · 4.48 SiO2, Na2O · 4.74 SiO2, BaO · 2.64 SiO2, and SrO · 2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance 29Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q(3) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu2+ as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of 29Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure.

  11. Modifier cation effects on (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltisberger, Jay H; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G; Phyo, Pyae A; Sanders, Kevin J; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the (29)Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O·4.81 SiO2, Rb2O·3.96 SiO2, Rb2O·2.25 SiO2, K2O·4.48 SiO2, Na2O·4.74 SiO2, BaO·2.64 SiO2, and SrO·2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance (29)Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q((3)) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu(2+) as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of (29)Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure. PMID:27187210

  12. Viscosity and thermal expansion of rare earth containing soda-lime-silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscosity, coefficient of thermal expansion, glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening temperature of soda-lime-silicate glass doped with rare earth oxides (La2O3, CeO2, Nd2O3) were investigated by the rotating crucible viscometer and dilatometry, the melting temperature and activation energy for viscous flow of the studied melt were derived on the basis of Arrhenius equation, in order to reveal the effects of rare earth elements on the behavior of soda-lime-silicate glass. The results show that introduction of rare earth oxides increases the coefficient of thermal expansion, decreases viscosity of soda-lime-silicate glass, and Nd2O3 is an exception in viscosity. The glass transition temperature, dilatometric softening temperature, melting temperature and activation energy for viscous flow of soda-lime-silicate glass doped with rare earth oxides increase with increasing cationic field strength of corresponding rare earth ions.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation of gamma radiation-induced coloration in silicate glass for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicate glass irradiated by γ-rays was investigated in this study using spectroscopic analyses which included ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The phenomenon of coloration on γ-ray-irradiated silicate glass was analyzed and the effect of annealing on the silicate coloration was also investigated. The results revealed that the coloration originates from the creation of hole-centers (HC) caused by radiation. The shade of the coloration highly correlates to the amount of these HC-related defects but can be reversed by thermal annealing. The variation in coloration is an effective predictive factor in understanding radiation damage on silicate glass. Therefore, this study is relevant in the development of radiation detectors using silicate material as well as in the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in glass form

  14. Sensitivity of Structural Results to Initial Configurations and Quench Algorithms of Lead Silicate Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemesath, Eric R.; Corrales, Louis R.

    2005-06-15

    The sensitivity of resulting structures to starting configurations and quench algorithms were characterized using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The classical potential model introduced by Damodaran, Rao, and Rao (DRR) Phys. Chem. Glasses 31, 212 (1990) for lead silicate glass was used. Glasses were prepared using five distinct initial configurations and four glass forming algorithms. In previous MD work of bulk lead silicate glasses the ability of this potential model to provide good structural results were established by comparing to experimental results. Here the sensitivity of the results to the simulation methodology and the persistence of clustering with attention to details of molecular structure are determined.

  15. Dependence of Hardness of Silicate Glasses on Composition and Thermal History

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2010-01-01

    The prediction of hardness is possible for crystalline materials, but so far not possible for glasses. In this work, several important factors that should be used for predicting the hardness of glasses are discussed. To do so, we have studied the influences of thermal history and chemical composition on hardness of silicate glasses. E-glasses of different compositions are subjected to various degrees of annealing to obtain various fictive temperatures in the glasses. It is found that hardness...

  16. The role of residual cracks on alkali silica reactivity of recycled glass aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraghechi, Hamed; Shafaatian, Seyed-Mohammad-Hadi; Fischer, Gregor;

    2012-01-01

    Despite its environmental and economical advantages, crushed recycled glass has limited application as concrete aggregates due to its deleterious alkali-silica reaction. To offer feasible mitigation strategies, the mechanism of ASR should be well understood. Recent research showed that unlike some...... percentages of reactive microcracks which may explain why ASR expansions are lowered by reducing the size of glass aggregates....

  17. Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO3 in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO3 as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B2O3, Al2O3, CaO and SiO2 by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

  18. Photoelectron, nuclear gamma-ray and infrared absorption spectroscopic studies of neptunium in sodium silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The valence state of neptunium ions in sodium silicate glasses prepared under reducing and oxidizing conditions has been investigated by the x-ray photoelectron, Moessbauer and optical absorption spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that the Np ions are tetravalent in glasses prepared under reducing conditions and pentavalent in glasses prepared under oxidizing conditions

  19. 二元碱金属硅酸盐玻璃团簇结构的拉曼散射活性及其阳离子效应%Raman Spectroscopic Quantitative Analysis of Cluster Structure of Binary Alkali Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志超; 尤静林; 王媛媛; 牛玉静; 戴苏娟

    2011-01-01

    提出一种拉曼光谱校正方法.通过计算二元碱会属硅酸盐团簇基元的拉曼光谱,对实验光谱高频区的非桥氧(Onb)对称伸缩振动的强度进行了校正,从而建立谱峰强度和团簇实际浓度的直观相关关系,同时,分析研究了二元碱金属硅酸盐玻璃阳离子对谱峰强度的影响.校正后的拉曼光谱可以真实地显示同化学成分的二元碱金属硅酸盐玻璃表观实验拉曼谱峰强度随着阳离子的不同而变化.在环境和实验条件一致的情况下,这种强度的差异显然是由阳离子的不同所引起的.%A calibration method for Raman spectroscopic quantitative analysis of binary alkaline silicate glasses is proposed. By applying ab initio quantum chemistry simulation, Raman optical activities (ROA) of various cluster units consisting of siliconoxygen tetrahedra (SiOT) with different number of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) can be obtained, Thus, experimental results could be calibrated in order to reflect and represent directly the true relative density of various silicon-oxygen tetrahedra existing inside the silicate glasses. Cation effect on the intensity of Raman bands was also observed and discussed.

  20. Optical absorption and fluorescent behaviour of titanium ions in silicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Kumar; Aman Uniyal; A P S Chauhan; S P Singh

    2003-04-01

    Titanium in normal melting conditions in air atmosphere present as Ti4+ ion in basic silicate glasses exhibited an ultra-violet cut-off in silicate glasses, viz. soda–magnesia–silica, soda–magnesia–lime–silica and soda–lime–silica glasses. This indicates that Ti4+ ion can be a good replacement for Ce4+ ion in producing UV-absorbing silicate glasses for commercial applications. The wavelength maxima at which the infinite absorption takes place in glasses was found to be around 310 nm against Ti-free blank glass in UV-region. The mechanism of electronic transition from O2- ligands to Ti4+ ion was suggested as L $\\rightarrow$ M charge transfer. The low energy tails of the ultra-violet cut-off were found to obey Urbach’s rule in the optical range 360–500 nm. The fluorescence spectra of these glasses were also studied and based on the radiative fluorescent properties it was suggested that the soda–lime–silica glass containing Ti4+ ion with greater emission crosssection would emit a better fluorescence than the corresponding soda–magnesia–lime–silica and soda–magnesia–silica glasses. The shift of emission wavelengths maxima towards longer wavelength in titania introduced silicate glasses was observed on replacement of MgO by CaO which may be attributed due to an increase in basicity of the glass system.

  1. Alkali aluminosilicate melts and glasses: structuring at the middle range order of amorphous matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Losq, C.; neuville, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviours. It is well known that several parameters impact strongly these properties, such as for instance the temperature, pressure, chemical composition and volatiles concentration, finally influencing eruptive behaviour of volcanoes. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts, like for instance the Vesuvius (Italy) or Erebus (Antartica) magmas. In an oncoming paper in Chemical Geology (Le Losq and Neuville, 2012), we have communicated results of the study of mixing Na-K in tectosilicate melts containing a high concentration of silica (≥75mol%). In the present communication, we will enlarge this first point of view to tectosilicate melts presenting a lower silica concentration. We will first present our viscosity data, and then the Adam and Gibbs theory that allows theoretically modelling Na-K mixing in aluminosilicate melts by using the so-called "mixed alkali effect". On the basis of the rheological results, the Na-K mixing cannot be explained with the ideal "mixed alkali effect", which involves random exchange of Na-K cationic pairs. To go further and as rheological properties are directly linked with structural properties, we will present our first results obtained by Raman and NMR spectroscopy. These last ones provide important structural pieces of information on the polymerization state of glasses and melts, and also on the environment of tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Rheological and structural results all highlight that Na and K are not randomly distributed in aluminosilicate glasses and melts networks. Na melts present a network with some channels and a non-random distribution of Al and Si. K networks are different. They also present a non-random distribution of Al and Si, but in two sub

  2. Changes in surface morphology of silicate glass induced by fast electron irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gedeon, O.; Jurek, Karel; Drbohlav, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 353, - (2007), s. 1946-1950. ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : radiation effects * atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy * alkali- silicates * radiation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2007

  3. Conductivity studies of lithium zinc silicate glasses with varying lithium contents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Deshpande; V K Shrikhande; M S Jogad; P S Goyal; G P Kothiyal

    2007-10-01

    The electrical conductivity of lithium zinc silicate (LZS) glasses with composition, (SiO2)0.527 (Na2O)0.054(B2O3)0.05(P2O5)0.029(ZnO)0.34–(Li2O) ( = 0.05, 0.08, 0.11, 0.18, 0.21, 0.24 and 0.27), was studied as a function of frequency in the range 100 Hz–15 MHz, over a temperature range from 546–637 K. The a.c. conductivity is found to obey Jonscher’s relation. The d.c. conductivity ($\\sigma_{d.c.}$) and the hopping frequency($\\omega_{h}$), inferred from the a.c. conductivity data, exhibit Arrhenius-type behaviour with temperature. The electrical modulus spectra show a single peak, indicating a single electrical relaxation time, , which also exhibits Arrhenius-type behaviour. Values of activation energy derived from $\\sigma_{d.c.}, \\omega_{h}$ and are almost equal within the experimental error. It is seen that $\\sigma_{d.c.}$ and $\\omega_{h}$ increase systematically with Li2O content up to 21 mol% and then decrease for higher Li2O content, indicating a mixed alkali effect caused by mobile Li+ and Na+ ions. The scaling behaviour of the modulus suggests that the relaxation process is independent of temperature but depends upon Li+ concentration.

  4. NMR studies of strontium zinc silicate based glass/glass-ceramic sealants for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass having composition 40SrO-10ZnO-40SiO2-2 B2O3-2Al2O3-2TiO2-2Cr2O3-2Y2O3, mol %) was prepared by melt-quench technique and converted into glass-ceramics by controlled crystallization. MAS-NMR spectroscopy shows the presence of mainly Q1 and Q2 silicate structural units and BO3 structural units of boron in the glass network. It is inferred from 29SiNMR and XRD that glass-ceramics have high crystallinity and during crystallization initially Sr2ZnSi2O7 crystalline phase is formed and later SrSiO3 crystalline phase crystallized. 11B and 27Al MAS-NMR of glass-ceramics depict an increase in the BO4 and AlO4 structural units with the crystallization. In accordance with XRD, NMR results also suggest the formation of solid solution of Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase with substitution of Zn/Si tetrahedral sites with B/Al. (author)

  5. XRF analysis of major and trace elements for silicate rocks using low dilution ratio fused glass

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Ryoji; ORIHASHI, Yuji

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) method to determine 10 major and 18 trace elements in silicate rocks has been investigated. The analysis is carried out on fused glass beads, containing one part rock powder, two parts of lithium metaborate/tetraborate flux and 0.3 parts of lithium n itrate by weight. Calibration lines were established using international silicate rock reference materials. The low dilution fused glass technique effectively eliminates particle size effect...

  6. Influence of curing conditions on durability of alkali-resistant glass fibres in cement matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arabi Nourredine

    2011-07-01

    Glass fibres in concrete material often increase the flexural strength. However, these fibres when in contact with cement are altered by alkali reactions due to the presence of portlandite. This study presents the results of investigation to show the effect of curing conditions on the durability of alkali-resistant glass fibres in cement matrix. Test results show that even alkali resistant fibres treated with zirconium oxide present the same degradation phenomenon. They also show that the nature of the cement has a large influence on the protection of the fibres: the Portland CEM II is less damaging than the CEM I. The substitutions of a part of cement by silica fume gave no substantial improvements to the mechanical strength of the glass fibre reinforced cement (GFRC). However, the observed microstructures in the samples show that the degradation is weakened with the addition of silica fumes. The analytical techniques used in this study are scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction.

  7. Alkali ion migration between stacked glass plates by corona discharge treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Keiga; Suzuki, Toshio; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Harada, Kenji; Nishii, Junji

    2015-05-01

    Corona discharge reflects the spatial migration of alkali ions over a gap between two glass plates. This study examined stacked glass plates containing different alkali ions treated with the corona discharge plasma generated by applied voltage of 4.5 kV at 200 °C. Protons generated at the anode electrode penetrate into the potassium-ion-containing upper glass plate, which is located 5 mm below the anode electrode. Potassium ions intruded into the lower glass plate containing sodium ions placed on the cathode electrode, even over a 1 mm gap separating the plates. Finally, the sodium ion discharged on the cathode electrode. The hydrogen atmosphere was effective at inhibiting the potassium ion reaction with ambient gases during the spatial migration between the two glass plates.

  8. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  9. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions

  10. Eu-, Tb-, and Dy-Doped Oxyfluoride Silicate Glasses for LED Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, C.F.; Wang, J.; Zhang, M.M.;

    2014-01-01

    Luminescence glass is a potential candidate for the light-emitting diodes (LEDs) applications. Here, we study the structural and optical properties of the Eu-, Tb-, and Dy-doped oxyfluoride silicate glasses for LEDs by means of X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence spectra, Commission Internationale...... de L’Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates, and correlated color temperatures (CCTs). The results show that the white light emission can be achieved in Eu/Tb/Dy codoped oxyfluoride silicate glasses under excitation by near-ultraviolet light due to the simultaneous generation of blue, green, yellow......, and red-light wavelengths from Tb, Dy, and Eu ions. The optical performances can be tuned by varying the glass composition and excitation wavelength. Furthermore, we observed a remarkable emission spectral change for the Tb3+ single-doped oxyfluoride silicate glasses. The 5D3 emission of Tb3+ can be...

  11. Structure and properties of soda lime silicate glass doped with rare earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda-lime-silicate glasses doped with different rare-earth oxides (La2O3, CeO2, Nd2O3, Gd2O3 and Y2O3) of 1 mol% content were prepared with the traditional melting-quenching methods. In order to reveal the effects of rare-earth elements on the behavior of soda-lime-silicate glass, the structure of soda-lime-silicate glasses doped with different rare-earth oxides were determined with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer using the KBr method, and viscosity of glass melts were measured by the rotating crucible viscometer, the melting temperature of the studied glasses were derived on the basis of Arrhenius Equation, moreover the density, bending strength and molar volume were measured and calculated. The effect of rare-earth dopants on the structure of soda-lime-silicate was analyzed by a shift of peak position and variation in the full-width at half-maximum. The effect of doping rare-earth oxides into glass on the viscosity, density and bending strength was interpreted by changing in structure of soda-lime-silicate glasses doped with rare-earth oxides.

  12. OBTAINMENT AND PHYSICO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE FOAMED HEAT-INSULATING MATERIAL BASED ON ALKALI SILICATE COMPOSITION AND SHUNGITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lomonosov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical and mechanical properties of foamed heat-insulating material based on alkali silicate composition and shungite were investigated. The studies determined the ratio of the components of the charge with which it is possible to obtain the optimal ratio of mechanical properties/thermal conductivity. Found that composite materials obtained from shungite filler, have a more porous structure (up to 76% of the volume of the material and are more uniform distribution of pore size (from 0.11 to 0.2 mm

  13. On the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies in Mixed Alkali Borate Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed alkali effect in oxide based glasses is one of the current research activity and studies on the behavior of spectroscopic parameters in these systems are quite important to understand the basic nature of this phenomenon. EPR studies of mixed alkali glasses Li2O-K2O-ZnO-B2O3 doped with Fe3+ and Mn2+ were carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra show typical resonances of d5 system (Fe3+ and Mn2+) in all the measured glass specimens. Evaluated hyperfine constant, number of paramagnetic centers and paramagnetic susceptibility values show deviation from the linearity with the progressive substitution of the Li ion with K in glass network.

  14. Electrical conduction in alkali borate glasses; a unique dependence on the concentration of modifier ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doweidar, H; Moustafa, Y M; El-Damrawi, G M; Ramadan, R M [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516, POB 83 (Egypt)

    2008-01-23

    The electrical conduction of Li{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses seems, at first sight, to be dominated by the activation energy. Regardless of the size of the alkali ion, there is a unique dependence of conductivity, at a certain temperature, on the alkali-alkali distance and thus on N (the number of ions per cm{sup 3}). The linear dependence of log{sigma} on N{sup -3/2} for all types of alkali ions reveals that N is the basic parameter that determines the conductivity at a certain temperature. A derived semi-empirical relation can be used to calculate the conductivity as a function of N and temperature.

  15. Electrical conduction in alkali borate glasses; a unique dependence on the concentration of modifier ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doweidar, H.; Moustafa, Y. M.; El-Damrawi, G. M.; Ramadan, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    The electrical conduction of Li2O-B2O3, Na2O-B2O3 and K2O-B2O3 glasses seems, at first sight, to be dominated by the activation energy. Regardless of the size of the alkali ion, there is a unique dependence of conductivity, at a certain temperature, on the alkali-alkali distance and thus on N (the number of ions per cm3). The linear dependence of logσ on N-3/2 for all types of alkali ions reveals that N is the basic parameter that determines the conductivity at a certain temperature. A derived semi-empirical relation can be used to calculate the conductivity as a function of N and temperature.

  16. X-ray fluorescence analysis with micro glass beads using milligram-scale siliceous samples for archeology and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Shintaro, E-mail: sichi@meiji.ac.jp [Organization for the Strategic Coordination of Research and Intellectual Properties, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    A micro glass bead technique was developed to assay precious siliceous samples for geochemical and archeological analyses. The micro-sized (approximately 3.5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in height) glass beads were prepared by mixing and fusing 1.1 mg of the powdered sample and 11.0 mg of the alkali lithium tetraborate flux for wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence determination of major oxides (Na{sub 2}O, MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}O, CaO, TiO{sub 2}, MnO, and total Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The preparation parameters, including temperature and agitation during the fusing process, were optimized for the use of a commercial platinum crucible rather than a custom-made crucible. The procedure allows preparation of minute sample amounts of siliceous samples using conventional fusing equipment. Synthetic calibration standards were prepared by compounding chemical reagents such as oxides, carbonates, and diphosphates. Calibration curves showed good linearity with r values > 0.997, and the lower limits of detection were in the 10s to 100s of μg g{sup −1} range (e.g., 140 μg g{sup −1} for Na{sub 2}O, 31 μg g{sup −1} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 8.9 μg g{sup −1} for MnO). Using the present method, we determined ten major oxides in igneous rocks, stream sediments, ancient potteries, and obsidian. This was applicable to siliceous samples with various compositions, because of the excellent agreement between the analytical and recommended values of six geochemical references. This minimal-scale analysis may be available for precious and limited siliceous samples (e.g., rock, sand, soil, sediment, clay, and archeological ceramics) in many fields such as archeology and geochemistry. - Highlights: • X-ray fluorescence determination of major oxides was performed using 1.1 mg of sample. • Preparation and measurement techniques of the XRF micro glass bead specimen were optimized. • Calibration curves using synthetic standards showed good

  17. Alkali ion migration between stacked glass plates by corona discharge treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two stacked glass plates with a 1 mm gap were treated by corona discharge. • Spatial migration of alkali ion over the gap was demonstrated. • Hydrogen gas was necessary for uniform migration. • Surface modification was done with this process without high temperature or vacuum. - Abstract: Corona discharge reflects the spatial migration of alkali ions over a gap between two glass plates. This study examined stacked glass plates containing different alkali ions treated with the corona discharge plasma generated by applied voltage of 4.5 kV at 200 °C. Protons generated at the anode electrode penetrate into the potassium-ion-containing upper glass plate, which is located 5 mm below the anode electrode. Potassium ions intruded into the lower glass plate containing sodium ions placed on the cathode electrode, even over a 1 mm gap separating the plates. Finally, the sodium ion discharged on the cathode electrode. The hydrogen atmosphere was effective at inhibiting the potassium ion reaction with ambient gases during the spatial migration between the two glass plates

  18. Alkali ion migration between stacked glass plates by corona discharge treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Keiga [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan); Suzuki, Toshio [Research Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1150 Hazawa-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8755 (Japan); Ikeda, Hiroshi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Sakai, Daisuke [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro [Production Technology Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1-1 Suehiro-cyo, Tsurumiku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kiyoshi [Research Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1150 Hazawa-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8755 (Japan); Harada, Kenji [Department of Computer Science, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Nishii, Junji, E-mail: nishii@es.hokudai.ac.jp [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Two stacked glass plates with a 1 mm gap were treated by corona discharge. • Spatial migration of alkali ion over the gap was demonstrated. • Hydrogen gas was necessary for uniform migration. • Surface modification was done with this process without high temperature or vacuum. - Abstract: Corona discharge reflects the spatial migration of alkali ions over a gap between two glass plates. This study examined stacked glass plates containing different alkali ions treated with the corona discharge plasma generated by applied voltage of 4.5 kV at 200 °C. Protons generated at the anode electrode penetrate into the potassium-ion-containing upper glass plate, which is located 5 mm below the anode electrode. Potassium ions intruded into the lower glass plate containing sodium ions placed on the cathode electrode, even over a 1 mm gap separating the plates. Finally, the sodium ion discharged on the cathode electrode. The hydrogen atmosphere was effective at inhibiting the potassium ion reaction with ambient gases during the spatial migration between the two glass plates.

  19. Structure and topology of soda-lime silicate glasses: implications for window glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, O; Mantisi, B; Micoulaut, M

    2014-11-01

    The structural and topological properties of soda-lime silicate glasses of the form (1-2x)SiO2-xNa2O-xCaO are studied from classical molecular dynamics using a Buckingham type potential. Focus is made on three compositions (x = 6%, 12%, and 18%) which are either silica-rich or modifier-rich. We compare the results to available experimental measurements on structural properties and find that the simulated pair correlation function and total structure factor agree very well with available experimental measurements from neutron diffraction. The detail of the structural analysis shows that the Na and Ca coordination numbers tend to evolve with composition, and with increasing modifier content, changing from 5.0 to 5.6 and from 4.0 to 5.0 for Ca and Na, respectively. The analysis from topological constraints shows that the picture derived on a heuristic basis using classical valence rules remains partially valid. Ultimately, typical elastic phases are identified from the application of rigidity theory, and results indicate that the 6% system is stressed-rigid, whereas the modifier-rich composition (18%) is flexible. These results receive support from a full analysis of the vibrational density of states showing the low-energy bands at E glass. Consequences for window glass are discussed under this perspective. PMID:25295377

  20. Gadolinium borosilicate glass-bonded Gd-silicate apatite: a glass-ceramic nuclear waste form for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Gd-rich crystalline phase precipitated in a sodium gadolinium alumino-borosilicate glass during synthesis. The glass has a chemical composition of 45.4-31.1 wt% Gd2O3, 28.8-34.0 wt% SiO2,10.8-14.0 wt% Na2O, 4.3-5.9 wt% Al2O3, and 10.8-14.9 wt% B2O3. Backscattered electron images revealed that the crystals are hexagonal, elongated, acicular, prismatic, skeletal or dendritic, tens of μm in size, some reaching 200 μm in length. Electron microprobe analysis confirmed that the crystals are chemically homogeneous and have a formula of NaGd9(SiO4)6O2 with minor B substitution for Si. The X-ray diffraction pattern of this phase is similar to that of lithium gadolinium silicate apatite. Thus, this hexagonal phase is a rare earth silicate with the apatite structure. We suggest that this Gd-silicate apatite in a Gd-borosilicate glass is a potential glass-ceramic nuclear waste form for actinide disposition. Am, Cm and other actinides can easily occupy the Gd-sites. The potential advantages of this glass-ceramic waste form include: 1) both the glass and apatite can be used to immobilize actinides, 2) silicate apatite is thermodynamically more stable than the glass, 3) borosilicate glass-bonded Gd-silicate apatite is easily fabricated, and 4) the Gd is an effective neutron absorber.Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  1. Processes of luminescence sensibility and quenching of iron and lanthanide ions in silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes of sensibilization and quenching of luminescence of iron and lanthanide ions in silicate glasses were investigated. It is shown that luminescence of examined iron-containing glasses is composed of a series of wide bands, conditioned by interconfigurational transition of Fe(2) ions, electron recombination with photoionized Fe(2)+ ions, as well as by decomposition of excited Fe(3) states. All three types of luminescence centers of iron-containing glasses participate in sensibilization of Nd(3), Er(3), Yb(3) luminescence

  2. Benefits/impacts of utilizing depleted uranium silicate glass as backfill for spent fuel waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment has been made of the benefits and impacts which can be derived by filling a spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canister with depleted uranium silicate (DUS) glass at a reactor site. Although the primary purpose of the DUS glass fill would be to enhance repository performance assessment and control criticality of geologic times, a number of benefits to the waste management system can be derived from adding the DUS glass prior to shipment from the reactor site

  3. The effect of inversion of matrix and inclusions composition in liquation phospho-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitarz, M

    2011-08-15

    Silico-phosphate glasses of XCaPO(4)-SiO(2) and XCaPO(4)-AlPO(4)-SiO(2) (X=Na(+) and/or K(+)) system have been the subject of the presented investigations. Glasses belonging to those systems are characterized by a liquation phenomenon-spherical amorphous inclusions dispersed in an amorphous matrix. Thorough EDX investigations have shown that introduction of aluminum ions into the structure of phospho-silicate glasses results in inversion of matrix and inclusions composition, when XCaPO(4) exceeds 25-35% mol. Such a substantial influence of aluminum ions on phospho-silicate glasses texture as well as matrix and inclusions composition (inversion) must be a result of structural changes. (27)Al MAS NMR research stated that aluminum ions in structures of XCaPO(4)-AlPO(4)-SiO(2) phospho-silicate glasses always acts as a glass-forming ion-i.e. aluminum always occupies fourfold coordinated sites. (23)Na and (31)P MAS NMR research has shown that the inversion of matrix and inclusions composition, brought about by introduction of aluminum ions into the structure of phospho-silicate glasses, is an outcome of a change in phosphorous and alkaline ions coordination. PMID:20864392

  4. Viscosity and Softening Behavior of Alkali Zinc Sulfophosphate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da, Ning; Krolikowski, Sebastian; Nielsen, Karsten Hansgaard;

    2010-01-01

    We report on the softening properties and viscosity of glasses from the system ZnO-Na2O-SO3-P2O5 for low-temperature sealing applications. Up to a ratio of network-forming ions PO(4)3-:SO(4)2- of about 2:1, a gradual substitution of P2O5 by SO3 results in decreasing glass transition and softening...

  5. Thermoluminescence properties of alkali borate glasses containing neodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoluminescence properties of sodium borate glasses as a function of neodymium oxide content as well as the divalent metal oxides (RO = ZnO, MgO and CaO) in replacement of Na2O have been investigated. It is observed that the addition of Nd2O3 imparts to the host glass a monopeak glow curve according to an active luminescent centre (E ≅ 0.97 eV to 1.232 eV). The gradual addition of neodymium oxide to the sodium borate glass causes gradual enhancement in the TL-intensity up to a quenching concentration value (4 g Nd2O3 added to 100 g of borate glass) above which a draw back in TL-intensity occurs. On the other hand the replacement of 5 wt% Na2O by RO shows that CaO dominates the other two divalent metal oxides used, as it possesses a much deeper luminescent trap (1.232 eV). The results obtained suggest that these glasses can be used in radiation detection and dosimetry. The γ-induced Tl-signal of such type of glass is found to be reproducible within an acceptable error of not more than 3.5% in all individual and group scattering over the detector samples each of which is used 10 times for evaluating the same γ-dose. (orig./HP)

  6. Indentation recovery of soda-lime silicate glasses containing titania, zirconia and hafnia at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The addition of titania, zirconia and hafnia in soda-lime silicate glass increases density, elastic moduli, Vickers hardness and brittleness. ► The effect of titania, zirconia and hafnia on the indentation recovery of soda-lime silicate glass is studied at 25 °C and 100 °C. ► The highest indentation recovery rate of glasses is observed within the first 6 h. ► The indentation recovery rate of glasses decreases with the increase in the size of tetravalent metal cations added. ► All the indentations exhibit three common features: elasticity, viscoelasticity and plasticity. - Abstract: From thermal treatment of indentations made on glass, the densification contribution to the total indentation deformation can be estimated. In this work, we studied the physico-mechanical properties and low-temperature indentation recovery of soda-lime silicate glasses with the composition of (in wt%) 73SiO2–12CaO–15Na2O–xTiO2 (ZrO2 or HfO2), where x is 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. The obtained results demonstrated that the addition of group IV B metal oxides (TiO2, ZrO2 and HfO2) into soda-lime silicate glass increased density, elastic moduli, Vickers hardness and brittleness due to the higher atomic weight of additives, increased network connectivity, higher strength of individual bonds formed and lower molar volume, respectively. Indentation recovery of glass samples containing 8 wt% TiO2 (G5), 8 wt% ZrO2 (G9) and 8 wt% HfO2 (G13) was comparatively estimated with that of a pure soda-lime silicate glass (G1), as a reference, on the basis of the depth change of indentation impressions at low temperatures, 25 °C and 100 °C, for different periods with a maximum of 48 h. It was found that the higher indentation recovery for all four samples was observed at both temperatures within the first 6 h due to stored strain energy in deformation zone but equilibrium was not reached even after 48 h because of low thermal treatment temperatures, which generally provide a

  7. Plutonium silicate alteration phases produced by aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses loaded with ∼10 wt % plutonium were found to produce plutonium-silicate alteration phases upon aqueous corrosion under a range of conditions. The phases observed were generally rich in lanthanide (Ln) elements and were related to the lanthanide orthosilicate phases of the monoclinic Ln2SiO5 type. The composition of the phases was variable regarding [Ln]/[Pu] ratio, depending upon type of corrosion test and on the location within the alteration layer. The formation of these phases likely has implications for the incorporation of plutonium into silicate alteration phases during corrosion of titanate ceramics, high-level waste glasses, and spent nuclear fuel

  8. TEM studies of silver nanoparticles in phase-separated soda lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterise the microstructure of a phase-separated soda lime silicate glass in which sodium was partially substituted by silver during the ion exchange process. To transform the dopant ions into nanosized particles of colloidal silver, high-temperature annealing (in air and hydrogen) and irradiation (γ-rays from a 60Co source) were used. It has been stated that both treatments affect not only the dopant ions but also the morphology of the matrix. A variety of the induced changes could be exploited for new applications of multicomponent soda lime silicate glasses

  9. Preparation and properties of silicate glasses containing CdSexTe1-x nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One analyzed conditions of CdSexTe1-x (0≤x≤1) ultradispersion particles in silicate glass. It is shown that when CdTe, CdSe compounds and CdSexTe1-x solid solutions are added to glass blend in finely dispersed state semiconducting phase is formed within matrix during glass making and is identified upon melt cooling down to the room temperatures in the form of nanoparticles. Peculiarities of absorption spectra of glasses are dictated by composition and concentration of nanoparticles of semiconducting phase and their crystalline structure

  10. Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2012-04-01

    In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO{sub 3} in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO{sub 3} as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and SiO{sub 2} by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Soda-Lime Silicate Glass Tempering

    OpenAIRE

    Carre, H.; Daudeville, L.

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with the computation of residual and transient stresses in a tempered glass plate. The modelling takes into account the viscoelastic behavior and the structural relaxation of glass. The evolution of stresses with time during the rapid cooling is computed. Simulation results are compared with experimental ones from the literature available. Levels of transient tensile stress in the surface are analysed.

  12. Silicate glass alteration enhanced by iron: origin and long-term implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicate glasses are used as containment matrices for deep geological disposal of nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing. Understanding the dissolution mechanisms of glasses in contact with iron, an element present in large amounts in the immediate environment (overpack, clay-stone, etc.) would be a major breakthrough toward predicting radionuclide release in the geosphere after disposal. Two different reacted glass-iron interfaces - a short-term nuclear system and a long-term archaeological system - were examined using a multi-scale and multi-analytical approach including, for the first time on samples of this type, STXM under synchrotron radiation. Comparisons revealed remarkable similarities between the two systems and shed light on Fe-Si interactions, including migration of iron within a porous gel layer and precipitation of Fe-silicates that locally increase short-term glass alteration and are sustainable over the long-term. (authors)

  13. Tin-containing silicates: Alkali salts improve methyl lactate yield from sugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolborg, Søren; Sádaba, Irantzu; Osmundsen, Christian Mårup;

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on increasing the selectivity to methyl lactate from sugars using stannosilicates as heterogeneous catalyst. All group I ions are found to have a promoting effect on the resulting methyl lactate yield. Besides, the alkali ions can be added both during the preparation of the...

  14. Iron modified structural and optical spectral properties of bismuth silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron bismuth silicate glasses have been successfully synthesized by melt quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the glass samples is ascertained by the XRD patterns. The values of density, molar volume and crystalline volume have been measured and are found to decrease with increase in iron content. The glass transition temperature measured using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) also varies with increase in Fe2O3 content. The Raman and FTIR spectra of the studied glass system taken at room temperature suggests that Fe2O3 modifies the structure of bismuth silicate glasses and it acts as both network modifier as well as network former. Bismuth also plays the role of both network modifier (BiO6 octahedra) as well as network former (BiO3 pyramids) and SiO2 exists in SiO4 tetrahedral structural units with two non-bridging oxygens. The Hydrogenic excitonic model is found to be applicable to the studied glass compositions. The variation in Urbach energy value observed for the studied glass samples suggests the possibility of increase in the number of glass defects. The metallization criterion for the synthesized glass samples is determined and found to be in the range 0.30–0.38

  15. Iron modified structural and optical spectral properties of bismuth silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Rajesh [Department of Physics, Maharishi Dayanand University, Rohtak, Haryana 124001 (India); Kundu, R.S. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Punia, R., E-mail: rajeshpoonia13@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Aghamkar, P. [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India); Kishore, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India)

    2014-10-01

    Iron bismuth silicate glasses have been successfully synthesized by melt quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the glass samples is ascertained by the XRD patterns. The values of density, molar volume and crystalline volume have been measured and are found to decrease with increase in iron content. The glass transition temperature measured using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) also varies with increase in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. The Raman and FTIR spectra of the studied glass system taken at room temperature suggests that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the structure of bismuth silicate glasses and it acts as both network modifier as well as network former. Bismuth also plays the role of both network modifier (BiO{sub 6} octahedra) as well as network former (BiO{sub 3} pyramids) and SiO{sub 2} exists in SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral structural units with two non-bridging oxygens. The Hydrogenic excitonic model is found to be applicable to the studied glass compositions. The variation in Urbach energy value observed for the studied glass samples suggests the possibility of increase in the number of glass defects. The metallization criterion for the synthesized glass samples is determined and found to be in the range 0.30–0.38.

  16. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li2O-(72-x)SiO2-xZnO-5.1Na2O-1.3P2O5-4.1B2O3, 5.5≤x≤17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q2, Q3 and Q4 sites are identified from 29Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q3 and Q4 resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From 31P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-(Q0) and pyro-phosphate (Q1) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li2Si2O5), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li3Zn0.5SiO4), tridymite (SiO2) and cristobalite (SiO2) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using 29Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, 31P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li3PO4 and (Na,Li)3PO4 in the glass-ceramics. - Graphical abstract: 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR analyses were carried out on multi-component Li2O-SiO2-ZnO-Na2O-P2O5-B2O3 glasses and glass-ceramics developed for sealing application. Structural data are reported, including phase separation process and quantification of amorphous and crystalline phases

  17. Rare-earth doped sol-gel silicate glasses for scintillator applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodini, N.; Fasoli, M.; Martini, M.; Morazzoni, F.; Rosetta, E.; Scotti, R.; Spinolo, G.; Vedda, A.; Nikl, Martin; Solovieva, Natalia; Baraldi, A.; Capelletti, R.; Francini, R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 158, - (2003), s. 463-467. ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 462 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : silicate glasses * scintillators * rare-earth doping * radio-luminescence * thermoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.407, year: 2003

  18. UV-laser-induced nanoclusters in silver ion-exchanged soda-lime silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excimer-laser irradiation (ArF: 193 nm) was performed on silver-exchanged commercial soda-lime silicate glass. Silver nanoclusters were obtained with an average size dependent on the irradiation time, without subsequent heating. Laser irradiation induces the reduction of silver ions and promotes the silver atoms aggregation

  19. Precipitation of Secondary Phases from the Dissolution of Silicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Basaltic and anorthositic glasses were subjected to aqueous weathering conditions in the laboratory where the variables were pH, temperature, glass composition, solution composition, and time. Leached layers formed at the surfaces of glasses followed by the precipitation of X-ray amorphous iron and titanium oxides in acidic and neutral solutions at 25 C over time. Glass under oxidative hydrothermal treatments at 150 C yielded a three-layered surface; which included an outer smectite layer, a Fe-Ti oxide layer and an innermost thin leached layer. The introduction of Mg into solutions facilitated the formation of phyllosilicates. Aqueous hydrothermal treatment of anorthositic glasses (high Ca, low Ti) at 200 C readily formed smectite, whereas, the basaltic glasses (high Ti) were more resistant to alteration and smectite was not observed. Alkaline hydrothermal treatment at 2000e produced zeolites and smectites; only smectites formed at 200 C in neutral solutions. These mineralogical changes, although observed under controlled conditions, have direct applications in interpreting planetary (e.g., meteorite parent bodies) and terrestrial aqueous alteration processes.

  20. Structural, dielectric and AC conductivity properties of Co2+ doped mixed alkali zinc borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, B. J.; Banu, Syed Asma; Harshitha, G. A.; Shilpa, T. M.; Shruthi, B.

    2013-02-01

    The Co2+ doped 19.9ZnO+5Li2CO3+25Na2CO3+50B2O3 (ZLNB) mixed alkali zinc borate glasses have been prepared by a conventional melt quenching method. The structural (XRD & FT-IR), dielectric and a.c. conductivity (σac) properties have been investigated. Amorphous nature of these glasses has been confirmed from their XRD pattern. The dielectric properties and electrical conductivity (σac) of these glasses have been studied from 100Hz to 5MHz at the room temperature. Based on the observed trends in the a.c. conductivities, the present glass samples are found to exhibit a non-Debye behavior.

  1. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies of sol–gel derived alkaline-earth silicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelos G Kalampounias

    2011-04-01

    IR and Raman spectroscopies have been utilized to study the structure and vibrational modes of sol–gel-derived binary silicate glasses. The present study is motivated by the immense geological significance and focuses on the MO–SiO2 (M = Ca, Mg) binary systems in an effort to unveil the role of the CaO and MgO modifiers when incorporated to the 3D silica structure. Glasses in the composition range = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 prepared by the sol–gel method were compared with the corresponding glasses formed by appropriate mixing of SiO2 and MO powders through melting and fast cooling. The vibrational spectra of the sol–gel-derived glasses have revealed considerable changes in relative intensities as a function of the MO mole fraction. These changes signify structural modifications on the silica network. The population of the 3 species was found to increase for both modified silicate systems. The rate of increase is more pronounced in the CaO–SiO2 glasses. The extent of network depolymerization in the porous glass is higher at the same content of alkaline earth oxide compared to the bulk glass. The results are indicative of a more `defective’ nature of the sol–gel glasses compared to the corresponding melt-quenched ones.

  2. Soda-lime silicate glass under hydrostatic pressure and indentation: a micro-Raman study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman micro-spectroscopy is used to analyse the plastic behaviour of window glass (a soda-lime silicate glass) under high hydrostatic pressure and Vickers indentation. We show pressure-induced irreversible structural changes, notably an increase of Q2 species at the expense of Q3. For the first time, a very accurate Raman↔pressure calibration curve has been established. Local density variations of a Vickers indented window glass have been characterized by micro-Raman mapping using a high spatial resolution device. The effects of glass depolymerization on indentation and hydrostatic compression are discussed. Differences between window glass and pure SiO2 glass behaviour under high stresses are also highlighted and analysed at a local scale.

  3. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study uranium, neptunium, and plutonium oxides in silicate-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using XPS as the principal investigative tool, the bonding properties of selected metal oxides added to silicate glass are being examined. In this paper, the results of XPS studies of uranium, plutonium, and neptunium in binary and multicomponent silicate-based glasses are presented. Models are proposed to account for the very diverse bonding properties of 6+ and 4+ actinide ions in glass. 15 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  4. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study of uranium, neptunium and plutonium oxides in silicate-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using XPS as the principal investigative tool, we are in the process of examining the bonding properties of selected metal oxides added to silicate glass. In this paper, we present results of XPS studies of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium in binary and multicomponent silicate-based glasses. Models are proposed to account for the very diverse bonding properties of 6+ and 4+ actinide ions in the glasses

  5. Effect of the addition of Na2O on the thermal stability of alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths have been prepared by concentrated solar way. Their recrystallization, the structural and microstructural properties as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of these glasses have been studied. The results show the effect of sodium addition on the thermal stability of the materials, the vitreous transition temperature and the recrystallization temperature. A heat treatment has allowed to reveal the formation of sodium apatite micro-crystallites and of lanthanum silicate in the glasses. (O.M.)

  6. Ho3+/Yb3+ codoped silicate glasses for 2  μm emission performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruijie; Cai, Muzhi; Lu, Yu; Tian, Ying; Huang, Feifei; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie

    2016-03-10

    This paper discuss a series of Ho3+/Yb3+ codoped silicate glasses prepared by the melting method. 2 μm emissions of the samples are observed under the pump of 980 nm LD. The Judd-Ofelt parameters (Ωλ) and radiative properties are calculated and analyzed; the spontaneous transition probability can reach 78.71  s-1. From the fluorescence spectra, the peak absorption and emission cross section of Ho3+ are 2.36×10-21 and 5.05×10-21  cm2, respectively. In addition, we analyze the energy transfer process of Yb3+:  F5/22 level to Ho3+:  I65 level. Considering the luminance properties and good thermal property, we indicate that Ho3+/Yb3+ codoped silicate glass is a potential laser glass for the efficient 2 μm laser. PMID:26974803

  7. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.

    2014-09-24

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  8. Effects of alkali ions on thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er3+-doped gallogermanate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since information transportation capacity of optical communication network increases rapidly, new optical materials are always demanded with gain bandwidth desirably much broader than traditional erbium-doped silica fiber amplifier (EDFA). We show here in this paper the erbium-doped gallogermanate glasses with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) more than 50 nm. Incorporation of alkali ions such as Li+, Na+, K+ into the system can on the one hand improve the thermal stability of the glasses, and on the other hand enhance the emission at 1.5 μm due to the 4I13/2→4I15/2 transition of Er3+ and suppress the upconversion process at the same time. This particularly works best for the case of K+ inclusion. This work might give a general idea on controlling the Er3+ luminescence by simply adjusting the glass component and find a potential laser glass applicable to developing new broadband fiber amplifier. -- Research highlights: → We report on spectroscopic properties of Er3+-doped Ga2O3-GeO2-R2O (GGR, R=Li, Na and K) glasses for 1.53 μm fiber amplifier. Effects of alkali metal ions on the thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er3+-doped GGR glasses have been investigated. → Incorporation of alkali ions such as Li+, Na+, K+ into the system can on the one hand improve the thermal stability of the glasses, and on the other hand enhance the emission at 1.5 μm due to the 4I13/2→4I15/2 transition of Er3+ and suppress the upconversion process at the same time. This particularly works best for the case of K+ inclusion. This work might give a general idea on controlling the Er3+ luminescence by simply adjusting the glass component and find a potential laser glass applicable to developing new broadband fiber amplifier.

  9. Spectral Properties of Erbium-Doped Oxyfluoride Silicate Glasses for Broadband Optical Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐时清; 杨中民; 戴世勋; 杨建虎; 温磊; 胡丽丽; 姜中宏

    2003-01-01

    The new oxyfluoride silicate glasses of Er3+-doped 50SiO2-(50-x)PbO-xPbF2 were prepared. With increasing PbF2 content in the glass composition, the fluorescence full width at half maximum and lifetimes of the 4I13/2level of Er3+ increase, while the refractive indices and densities decrease. Er3+-doped 50SiO2-50PbF2 glass showed broad fluorescence spectra of 1.55μm with a large stimulated emission cross-section and long lifetimes of 4I13/2level of Er3+. Compared with other glass hosts, the gain bandwidth properties of Er3+-doped 50SiO2-50PbF2glass are close to those of tellurite and bismuth glasses, and have advantages over those of silicate, phosphate and germante glasses. The broad and flat 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 emission of Er3+ around 1.55μm can be used as host material for potential broadband optical amplifier in wavelength-division-multiplexing network system.

  10. Glass Forming Ability of Sub-Alkaline Silicate Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetere, F. P.; Iezzi, G.; Behrens, H.; Holtz, F.; Ventura, G.; Misiti, V.; Mollo, S.; Perugini, D.

    2014-12-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) and critical cooling rate (Rc) of six natural sub-alkaline melts from basalt to rhyolite (i.e., B100, B80R20, B60R40, B40R60, B20R80, and R100) have been quantified through cooling-induced solidification experiments of 9000, 1800, 180, 60, 7 and 1 °C/h conducted at ambient pressure and air buffering conditions, in a temperature range between 1300 °C (superliquidus region) and 800 °C (glass transition region), The phase proportion in each run-product was determined by image analysis on about 500 BS-SEM microphotographs. The phase assemblage consists of glass, clinopyroxene, spinel, and plagioclase with the occurrence of sporadic olivine, orthopyroxene and melilite. Both the glass and crystalline fractions are well correlated with the composition of residual melt. Generally, the amount of crystals decreases with increasing cooling rate. However, some exceptions occurs showing no correlations or even opposite trends. For the example of, Al2O3 and CaO in clinopyroxenes from B100, B80R20, B60R40 and B40R60, their concentrations scale as a function of both cooling rate and the degree of clinopyroxene crystallization. The value of Rc changes of 5 order of magnitude from retrieve the solidification conditions of aphyric, degassed and oxidised lavas. Indeed, the relationship between crystal content and cooling kinetics suggests that the solidification path is more complex than previously assumed and strongly non-linear. This finding has also implications to design glass-ceramics based on natural, accessible and low-cost starting materials.

  11. Reduction-induced inward diffusion and crystal growth on the surfaces of iron-bearing silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Tao, H.Z.; Zhang, Y.F.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sodium inward diffusion (i.e., sodium diffusion from surface toward interior) in iron containing alkaline earth silicate glasses under reducing conditions around Tg and the induced surface crystallization. The surface crystallization is caused by formation of a silicate-gel layer...... first and then the growth of silica crystals on the glass surface. The type of alkaline earth cations has a strong impact on both the glass transition and the surface crystallization. In the Mg-containing glass, a quartz layer forms on the glass surface. This could be attributed to the fact that Mg2...

  12. Barium silicate glass/Inconel X-750 interaction. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Jr., P. V.; Siegel, W. T.; Miley, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    Water reactor safety programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have required the development of specialized instrumentation. An example is the electrical conductivity-sensitive liquid level transducer developed for use in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) in which the operation of the sensing probe relies upon the passage of current through the water between the center pin of the electrode and its shell such that when water is present the resulting voltage is low, and conversely, when water is absent the voltage is high. The transducer's ceramic seal is a hot-pressed glass ceramic; its metal housing is Inconel X-750. The ceramic material provides an essential dielectric barrier between the center pin and the outer housing. The operation of the probe as well as the integrity of the PWR environment requires a hermetically-bonded seal between the ceramic and the metal. However, during testing, an increasing number of probe assemblies failed owing to poor glass-to-metal seals as well as void formation within the ceramic. Therefore, a program was initiated to characterize the metallic surface with respect to pre-oxidation treatment and determine optimum conditions for wetting and bonding of the metal by the glass to obtain baseline data relevant to production of acceptable transducer seals.

  13. Barium silicate glass/Inconel X-750 interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water reactor safety programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have required the development of specialized instrumentation. An example is the electrical conductivity-sensitive liquid level transducer developed for use in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) in which the operation of the sensing probe relies upon the passage of current through the water between the center pin of the electrode and its shell such that when water is present the resulting voltage is low, and conversely, when water is absent the voltage is high. The transducer's ceramic seal is a hot-pressed glass ceramic; its metal housing is Inconel X-750. The ceramic material provides an essential dielectric barrier between the center pin and the outer housing. The operation of the probe as well as the integrity of the PWR environment requires a hermetically-bonded seal between the ceramic and the metal. However, during testing, an increasing number of probe assemblies failed owing to poor glass-to-metal seals as well as void formation within the ceramic. Therefore, a program was initiated to characterize the metallic surface with respect to pre-oxidation treatment and determine optimum conditions for wetting and bonding of the metal by the glass to obtain baseline data relevant to production of acceptable transducer seals

  14. Effect of the nature of alkali and alkaline-earth oxides on the structure and crystallization of an alumino-borosilicate glass developed to immobilize highly concentrated nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex rare-earth rich alumino-borosilicate glass has been proved to be a good candidate for the immobilization of new high level radioactive wastes. A simplified seven-oxides composition of this glass was selected for this study. In this system, sodium and calcium cations were supposed in other works to simulate respectively all the other alkali (R+ = Li+, Rb+, Cs+) and alkaline-earth (R2+ = Sr2+, Ba2+) cations present in the complex glass composition. Moreover, neodymium or lanthanum are used here to simulate all the rare-earths and actinides occurring in waste solutions. In order to study the impact of the nature of R+ and R2+ cations on both glass structure and melt crystallization tendency during cooling, two glass series were prepared by replacing either Na+ or Ca2+ cations in the simplified glass by respectively (Li+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) or (Mg2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) cations. From these substitutions, it was established that alkali ions are preferentially involved in the charge compensation of (AlO4)- entities in the glass network comparatively to alkaline-earth ions. The glass compositions containing calcium give way to the crystallization of an apatite silicate phase bearing calcium and rare-earth ions. The melt crystallization tendency during cooling strongly varies with the nature of the alkaline-earth. (authors)

  15. The role of alkalis in the solubility of H2O and CO2in silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetere, F.; Behrens, H.; Botcharnikov, R. E.; Holtz, F.; Fanara, S.

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate the role of alkalis on the behavior of H2O and CO2 in magmatic systems, the solubility of volatiles in phonotephritic melts was investigated experimentally and compared to other melt compositions. The investigated compositions have Na2O/K2O ratios (in wt %) of 0.26 (Ab1, natural phonotephrite from Alban Hills, Italy), 0.98 (Ab2) and 3.82 (Ab3). Experiments were run at 1250°C and 500 MPa in an internally heated gas pressure vessel. The mole fraction of water (XH2O) in the fluid phase composed of H2O and CO2 varied in the range from 0 to 1. For the calibration of carbon-related IR bands in glasses, the total carbon content of synthesized glass standards was measured by combustion and subsequent IR spectroscopy using an ELTRA CS800 analyzer. Karl Fischer Titration method was used to quantify the H2O content of the glasses. Absorption spectra were recorded in the mid-infrared (MIR) using a Bruker IFS88 FTIR spectrometer coupled with an IR-ScopeII microscope. CO2 is bounded in the investigated glasses as CO32- exclusively and its concentration was quantified by the peak height of the 1430 cm-1 band. A drastic change was observed in the absorption coefficients, ɛ, with values of 294 × 35, 329 × 40 and 244 × 23 L/(mol cm) , for Ab1, Ab2, and Ab3, respectively, so that the highest ɛ value is related to the Na-rich composition. There is no evident effect of the Na/K ratio on the concentrations of dissolved H2O and CO2 in the melts. The solubility of CO2 and H2O in those melts at 500 MPa is 0.95 wt % CO2 and 10.07 wt% H2O for XH2O of 0 and 1, respectively. Results are compared with the existing literature data and models and confirm the very high solubility of CO2 in phonotephritic melts [1]. Our experimental data indicate that the melt composition in terms of alkali contents influences significantly the extinction coefficient values for CO2 and that appropriate coefficients must be selected to estimate accurately the amount of dissolved CO2 in

  16. Chemical Behavior of Sulfur in Minerals and Silicate Glasses Studied Using Inner Shell Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Mori, R.; Paris, E.; Glatzel, P.; Giuli, G.; Scaillet, B.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the chemical behaviour of sulfur is of fundamental importance in explaining different geological mechanisms ranging from volcano-climatic interactions to the genesis of ore deposits. Understanding how sulphur behaves is also of great economic importance in industrial activities including glass-forming processes and the treatment of vitreous waste material from refuse incineration. The chemical behaviour of sulfur in minerals and glasses has been widely studied via X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, which probes the unoccupied density of states and thus provides information on the oxidation state and local structure of the species under study. However, the XANES spectral shape is influenced by various effects, namely the local symmetry, the ligand type, even up to high coordination spheres, and the valence electron occupation, making it difficult to systematically analyze the different spectral contributions. We use X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) as a complementary technique to avoid some of the inherent difficulties of XANES analysis, and to extract additional information on the electronic structure. The Kb lines, close to the K-edge, directly yield the p-density of occupied valence states, giving valuable information on the local coordination. We have compared XANES and Kb XES experimental data on sulfur- bearing minerals with ab initio quantum-chemical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), in order to visualize the molecular orbitals and to extract information about the chemical bonding in these compounds. The S Ka emission lines, which arise from 2p to 1s transitions, are expected to be mostly free from chemical bond effects except for small energy shifts that reflect the valence orbital electron population via screening effects. S Ka shifts can be readily used to determine the speciation of sulfur in silicate glasses. The electronic configuration of the sulfur atoms is obtained by calculating the

  17. Elaboration And Characterization Of Foam Glass Based On Cullet With Addition Of Soluble Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, A.; Stiti, N.; Benhaoua, F.; Boumchedda, K.; Lerari, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The politics of the energy saving and of the acoustic comfort buildings is at the heart of the research of new compounds permitting to improve the materials performance actually commercialised. With this aim in view, we'll purpose to elaborate a porous material (foam glass) with addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) of which the principal material is the waste glass in order to recycle it and improving the present laws about the waste products in closed circuit: (Finished products ← waste products← finished products). The investigations have shown that grinding waste glass to particle size less than 0.1 mm and adding 1% of Ca CO3 content provide production of material with the following properties: particle density 0,5 g/cm3, strength 17,50 MPa and water adsorption 95%, the temperature for foaming ranges were determined at 850° C. The microstructures are homogenous, with pore sizes up to 2 mm. The addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) has resulted in the foam glass of very high porosity. The foam glass is counted among the new glass products meeting certain requirements sought comfort in the building industry in particular (thermal and acoustic insulation). The product obtained present of excellent properties thermal (λ = 0,031 W/m° C) and acoustic (R = 15 dB).

  18. Elaboration And Characterization Of Foam Glass Based On Cullet With Addition Of Soluble Silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The politics of the energy saving and of the acoustic comfort buildings is at the heart of the research of new compounds permitting to improve the materials performance actually commercialised. With this aim in view, we'll purpose to elaborate a porous material (foam glass) with addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) of which the principal material is the waste glass in order to recycle it and improving the present laws about the waste products in closed circuit: (Finished products (leftarrow) waste products(leftarrow) finished products). The investigations have shown that grinding waste glass to particle size less than 0.1 mm and adding 1% of Ca CO3 content provide production of material with the following properties: particle density 0,5 g/cm3, strength 17,50 MPa and water adsorption 95%, the temperature for foaming ranges were determined at 850 deg. C. The microstructures are homogenous, with pore sizes up to 2 mm. The addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) has resulted in the foam glass of very high porosity. The foam glass is counted among the new glass products meeting certain requirements sought comfort in the building industry in particular (thermal and acoustic insulation). The product obtained present of excellent properties thermal (λ = 0,031 W/m deg. C) and acoustic (R = 15 dB).

  19. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle–glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers’ hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H2/N2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle–glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required

  20. ER3+-DOPED SODA-LIME SILICATE GLASS: ARTIFICIAL PINK GEMSTONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeranut Kaewwiset

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Er3+-doped soda-lime silicate glasses of the composition (in mol% (65-xSiO2:25Na2O:10CaO:xEr2O3 (where x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were fabricated by conventional melt quenching technique. The physical and optical properties were measured and investigated. The erbium oxide enters the glass network as a modifier by occupying the interstitial space in the network and generating the NBOs to the structure. The molar volume increases with an increase in Er2O3 content, which is attributed to the increase in the number of Non-Bridging Oxygen (NBOs. The increase of NBOs in the structure generally leads to an increase in average atomic separation. The density, molar volume and refractive index of glasses increased linearly with increasing Er2O3 concentration. The color of glasses was changed from light pink to intense pink as the Er2O3 concentration was increased from 1 to 5 mol%. The Vickers hardness of Er3+-doped glasses was found to be in the range of 450-500 HV. In this study, it can be concluded that the soda-lime silicate glasses doped with high Er2O3 concentration has intense pink color and high value of hardness which is suitable to be cut as gems.

  1. O-17 NMR studies of some silicate crystals and glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Yildirim, E K

    2000-01-01

    structure. Therefore some of the Sn has to be in three coordinated to oxygen for charge balancing. The sup 1 sup 7 O MAS NMR spectra of a partially crystallised sample showed three distinct sites which are assigned as Sn-O-Sn, Si-O-Sn, and Si-O-Si on the basis of their chemical shift. The C sub Q values obtained from the simulations of these peaks supports this assignment. The sup 2 sup 9 Si MAS NMR of the same sample showed two crystalline and a glassy peaks which are fitted to two crystalline and two glassy sites. The possible composition of this sample was calculated and found to be SiSn sub 8 O sub 1 sub 0. Crystalline and glassy silicates were investigated by means of sup 1 sup 7 O NMR. The dependence of the measured efg on the Si-O-AI bond angle was investigated in some crystalline aluminosilicate sodalites and kalsilite. The results show that C sub Q increases with increasing bond angle while eta decreases with increasing bond angle and they both follow a similar function to that found for the Si-O-Si ...

  2. Quantitative analysis of major elements in silicate minerals and glasses by micro-PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J.L.; Czamanske, G.K.; MacDonald, L.; Teesdale, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Guelph micro-PIXE facility has been modified to accommodate a second Si(Li) X-ray detector which records the spectrum due to light major elements (11 ??? Z ??? 20) with no deleterious effects from scattered 3 MeV protons. Spectra have been recorded from 30 well-characterized materials, including a broad range of silicate minerals and both natural and synthetic glasses. Sodium is mobile in some of the glasses, but not in the studied mineral lattices. The mean value of the instrumental constant H for each of the elements Mg, Al, and Si in these materials is systematically 6-8% lower than the H-value measured for the pure metals. Normalization factors are derived which permit the matrix corrections requisite for trace-element measurements in silicates to be based upon pure metal standards for Mg, Al and Si, supplemented by well-established, silicate mineral standards for the elements Na, K and Ca. Rigorous comparisons of electron microprobe and micro-PIXE analyses for the entire, 30-sample suite demonstrate the ability of micro-PIXE to produce accurate analysis for the light major elements in silicates. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. The formation of silver metal nanoparticles by ion implantation in silicate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vytykačová, S.; Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.; Špirková, J.; Macková, Anna; Mikšová, Romana; Bottger, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 371, MAR (2016), s. 245-2550. ISSN 0168-583X. [22nd International conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA). Opatija, 14.06.2015-19.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019; GA ČR GA15-01602S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : silicate glasses * silver nanoparticles * ion implantation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  4. Raman thresholds and rigid to floppy transitions in calcium silicate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Micoulaut, M.; Malki, M.; Simon, P.; Canizares, A.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline earth silicate glasses $xCaO-(1-x)SiO_2$ exhibit a well marked threshold in Raman lineshapes which can be related to the onset of network rigidity as the concentration of calcium oxide $x$ is decreased. The present results are analyzed by constraint counting algorithms and more deeply characterized by a size increasing cluster approximation that allows to perform Maxwell mechanical constraint counting beyond the usual mean-field treatment. This permits to discuss under which structur...

  5. Nd3+ Doped Silicate Glass Photonic Crystal Fiber with Random Hole Distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The fabrication of one kind of large core area Nd3+ doped silicate glass photonic crystal fiber, and demonstration of the fiber's waveguidence properties were reported. This fiber owns a random air hole distribution in the cladding. The measured minimum loss of this kind of fiber is 10 dB·m-1 at 660 nm. These fibers can sustain only a single mode at least over wavelength ranging from 660 nm to 980 nm.

  6. Infrared emissivity spectroscopy of a soda-lime silicate glass up to the melt

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane N. Santos; Meneses, Domingos de S.; Montouillout, Valérie; Echegut, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The short-range structure of an iron doped soda-lime glass was investigated by infrared emissivity spectroscopy from room temperature up to the melt. Quantitative information on the distribution of the Q^n tetrahedral units was obtained by fitting the emissivity spectra using a dielectric function model (DFM). The DFM is based on causal Gaussian bands, associated with the stretching motions of the silicate tetrahedra. The changes in the absorption modes are related to the activation of a dyna...

  7. Velocity of a freely rising gas bubble in a soda-lime silicate glass melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, E. J.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is conducted between measured velocities for the buoyant rise of single bubbles of varying size and composition, in a soda-lime silicate glass melt, with the steady state velocities predicted by the Stokes and Hadamard-Rybczynski formulas. In all cases, the data are noted to fit the Hadamard-Rybczynski expression for steady state rise speed considerably better than the Stokes formula.

  8. Fading behavior of X-ray induced color centers in soda-lime silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray induced color centers in soda-lime silicate glass were unstable at room temperature. There was a rapid fading at short-term stage and a slow fading at long-term stage. In the short-term stage, both first-order and second-order fading kinetics played roles in the fading process, while only the first-order fading controlled the long-term stage fading

  9. Annealing effect on the ultrafast dynamics of Ag nanoparticles embedded in soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag nanoparticles embedded in soda-lime silicate glasses were fabricated by the ion-exchange technique. Effects of thermal treatment on the optical nonlinearity and ultrafast dynamics of Ag nanoparticles were investigated by applying time-resolved optical Kerr effect and pump-probe techniques. The results indicate that thermal treatment is an efficient method to improve the nonlinear optical performance of this kind of material.

  10. Composition dependence of luminescence of Eu and Eu/Tb doped silicate glasses for LED applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, C.F.; Chaussedent, S.; Liu, S.;

    2013-01-01

    The Eu and Eu/Tb doped silicate glasses are good candidates for light emitting diode (LED) applications. But the optical performance of these glasses is sensitive to variations in chemical composition. In this paper we report our recent findings about the effect of addition of minor components such...... results show that the asymmetry factor and luminescence lifetimes of as-prepared materials are dependent on composition. White fluorescence is achieved in Eu/Tb co-doped glasses, which can be attributed to the simultaneous generation of red, green and blue wavelengths from Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions. The...... variation of the excitation wavelength can tune the emission spectra as well as Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of Eu/Tb co-doped glasses for specific applications. The energy transfer from Tb3+ to Eu3+ ions is investigated by analyzing fluorescence spectra and decay...

  11. Evaluation of Spectroscopic Properties of Yb3+ in Silicate-Based Heavy Metal Oxide Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴能利; 胡丽丽; 戴世勋; 杨建虎; 林傲翔

    2003-01-01

    The absorption, stimulated emission cross section and potential laser parameters of heavy metal silicate glasses doped with Ybs+ ions have been investigated. The emission cross section has been evaluated by using the measured absorption spectra and principle of reciprocity. It is found that Yb3+ in SiO2-Bi2O3-B2O3 glass has high stimulated emission cross section of 0. Gpm2 for the 2F5/2 → 2F7/2 transition and exists short measured fluorescence lifetime of 0. 78 ms. On the other hand, the stimulated emission cross section of Yb3+-doped SiO2PbO glass was 0.49pm2. Its measured fluorescence lifetime was 2.00ms. Evaluated from the good potential laser parameters, Yb3+-doped SiO2-PbO glass may be a good candidate for fibre laser applications.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of silicate and borate glasses and melts : structure, diffusion dynamics and vibrational properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of silicate and borate glasses and melts: Structure, diffusion dynamics and vibrational properties. In this work computer simulations of the model glass formers SiO2 and B2O3 are presented, using the techniques of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanical calculations, based on density functional theory (DFT). The latter limits the system size to about 100−200 atoms. SiO2 and B2O3 are the two most important network formers for industri...

  13. Raman Mapping of the Indentation-Induced Densification of a Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Kassir-Bodon, Assia; Deschamps, Thierry; Martinet, Christine; Champagnon, Bernard; Teisseire, Jérémie; Kermouche, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to map the Vickers indentation-induced densification on a window glass (soda-lime silicate glass), from the correlation between Raman spectrum and density. Both top surface and cross-section of the residual imprints were investigated. It is shown that the sample preparation needed for the investigation of the in-depth densification does not alter the results. The maximum densification ratio measured is about 3.8%, which is 60% of the maximum densification mea...

  14. ER3+-DOPED SODA-LIME SILICATE GLASS: ARTIFICIAL PINK GEMSTONE

    OpenAIRE

    Weeranut Kaewwiset; Kheamrutai Thamaphat; Jakrapong Kaewkhao; Pichet Limsuwan

    2012-01-01

    Er3+-doped soda-lime silicate glasses of the composition (in mol%) (65-x)SiO2:25Na2O:10CaO:xEr2O3 (where x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) were fabricated by conventional melt quenching technique. The physical and optical properties were measured and investigated. The erbium oxide enters the glass network as a modifier by occupying the interstitial space in the network and generating the NBOs to the structure. The molar volume increases with an increase in Er2O3 content, which is attributed to the inc...

  15. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, D.S.; Yang, G.; Zhao, Y.Q.;

    2015-01-01

    developed a method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data acquisition and analyses, which enables determination of the boron speciation in a series of ternary alkali borosilicate glasses with constant molar ratios. A script for the fast acquisition of EELS has been designed, from which the...... fraction of BO4 tetrahedra can be obtained by fitting the experimental data with linear combinations of the reference spectra. The BO4 fractions (N4) obtained by EELS are consistent with those from 11B MAS NMR spectra, suggesting that EELS can be an alternative and convenient way to determine the N4...

  16. High-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and structural relationships of mixed-alkali metals uranyl silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Liu, Hsin-Kuan; Chang, Wen-Jung; Tzou, Der-Lii; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Three mixed-alkali metals uranyl silicates, Na3K3[(UO2)3(Si2O7)2]·2H2O (1), Na3Rb3[(UO2)3(Si2O7)2] (2), and Na6Rb4[(UO2)4Si12O33] (3), have been synthesized by high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal reactions at 550 °C and 1440 bar, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and thermogravimetric analysis. Compound 1 and 2 are isostructural and contain layers of uranyl disilicate. The smaller cation, Na+, is located in the intralayer channels, whereas the larger cations, K+ and Rb+, and water molecule are located in the interlayer region. The absence of lattice water in 2 can be understood according to the valence-matching principle. The structure is related to that of a previously reported mixed-valence uranium(V,VI) silicate. Compound 3 adopts a 3D framework structure and contains a unique unbranched dreier fourfold silicate chain with the structural formula {uB,41∞}[3Si12O33] formed of Q2, Q3, and Q4 Si. The connectivity of the Si atoms in the Si12O3318- anion can be interpreted on the basis of Zintl-Klemm concept. Crystal data for compound 1: triclinic, P-1, a=5.7981(2) Å, b=7.5875(3) Å, c=12.8068(5) Å, α=103.593(2)°, β=102.879(2)°, γ=90.064(2)°, V=533.00(3) Å3, Z=1, R1=0.0278; compound 2: triclinic, P-1, a=5.7993(3) Å, b=7.5745(3) Å, c=12.9369(6) Å, α=78.265(2)°, β=79.137(2)°, γ=89.936(2)°, V=546.02(4) Å3, Z=1, R1=0.0287; compound 3: monoclinic, C2/m, a=23.748(1) Å, b=7.3301(3) Å, c=15.2556(7) Å, β=129.116(2)°, V=2060.4(2) Å3, Z=2, R1=0.0304.

  17. Sub-critical crack growth in silicate glasses: Role of network topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of water in the surrounding atmosphere can cause sub-critical crack growth (SCCG) in glasses, a phenomenon known as fatigue or stress corrosion. Here, to facilitate the compositional design of more fatigue-resistant glasses, we investigate the composition dependence of SCCG by studying fourteen silicate glasses. The fatigue curves (V-KI) have been obtained by indentation experiments through measurements of the crack length as a function of post-indentation fatigue duration. Interestingly, we find that the fatigue resistance parameter N is generally improved by increasing the alumina content and is thereby found to exhibit a fairly linear dependence on the measured Vickers hardness HV for a wide range of N and HV values. This finding highlights the important role of network topology in governing the SCCG in silicate glasses, since hardness has been shown to scale linearly with the number of atomic constraints. Our results therefore suggest that glasses showing under-constrained flexible networks, which feature floppy internal modes of deformation, are more readily attacked by water molecules, thus promoting stress corrosion and reducing the fatigue resistance

  18. Radiation induced color centers in cerium-doped and cerium-free multicomponent silicate glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅鑫杰; 宋力昕; 李家成

    2014-01-01

    The effect of doped cerium on the radiation-resistance behavior of silicate glass was investigated in our work. The ultra-violet-visible absorption spectra and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra were obtained after the cerium-rich and ce-rium-free multicomponent silicate glasses (K509 and K9) were irradiated by gamma rays with a dose range from 10 to 1000 kGy. The results showed that E’ center, oxygen deficient center (ODC) and non-bridging oxygen hole center (HC1 and HC2) were induced in K9 and K509 glasses after radiation. The concentrations of all color centers presented an exponential growth with the increase of the gamma dose. Moreover, the concentration of HC1 and HC2 in cerium-doped K509 glass was much lower than that in cerium-free K9 glass at the same dose of radiation, which could be attributed to the following mechanism:Ce3+ions capturing holes then forming Ce3++centers inhibited the formation of hole trapped color centers (HC1 and HC2) and Ce4+ions capturing electrons to form Ce3+centers suppressed the formation of electron trapped color centers like E’ center.

  19. Sub-critical crack growth in silicate glasses: Role of network topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M., E-mail: mos@bio.aau.dk [Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Aalborg University, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark); Bauchy, Mathieu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    The presence of water in the surrounding atmosphere can cause sub-critical crack growth (SCCG) in glasses, a phenomenon known as fatigue or stress corrosion. Here, to facilitate the compositional design of more fatigue-resistant glasses, we investigate the composition dependence of SCCG by studying fourteen silicate glasses. The fatigue curves (V-K{sub I}) have been obtained by indentation experiments through measurements of the crack length as a function of post-indentation fatigue duration. Interestingly, we find that the fatigue resistance parameter N is generally improved by increasing the alumina content and is thereby found to exhibit a fairly linear dependence on the measured Vickers hardness H{sub V} for a wide range of N and H{sub V} values. This finding highlights the important role of network topology in governing the SCCG in silicate glasses, since hardness has been shown to scale linearly with the number of atomic constraints. Our results therefore suggest that glasses showing under-constrained flexible networks, which feature floppy internal modes of deformation, are more readily attacked by water molecules, thus promoting stress corrosion and reducing the fatigue resistance.

  20. Optical studies in gamma-irradiated commercial soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical absorption measurements of gamma-irradiated (60Co) commercial soda-lime silicate (SLS) glasses were performed at room temperature (RT) to detect and characterize the induced radiation damage in these materials. Isothermal bleaching (RT-723 K) of the radiation-induced defects, followed the irradiation of samples. In glasses containing different amount of the glass-network modifiers (Na2O, K2O) and some multivalent transition metal cations (Fe2+/Fe3+, Ni2+ and/or Mn2+) three absorption bands have been distinguished in the wavelength region extending from 250 to 1800 nm. In contrast to the electron-type color centers, detected at low temperatures for X-irradiated nominally pure sodium silicates , we propose that the absorption bands found for gamma-irradiated SLS glasses are induced by some hole-type color centers related with nonbridging oxygen ions (NBO-) located in different surroundings. The radiation-induced enhancement of diffusivity of ions together with bond breaking and defect creation in the glass-network could give materials with well-defined nonlinear optical properties

  1. Fe2O3 Modified Physical, Structural and Optical Properties of Bismuth Silicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Parmar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-containing bismuth silicate glasses with compositions 60SiO2·(100−xBi2O3·xFe2O3 have been prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the glass samples has been ascertained by the X-ray diffraction. The density (d has been measured using Archimedes principle, molar volume (Vm has also been estimated, and both are observed to decrease with the increase in iron content. The glass transition temperature (Tg of these iron bismuth silicate glasses has been determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC technique, and it increases with the increase in Fe2O3 content. The IR spectra of these glasses consist mainly of [BiO6], [BiO3], and [SiO4] structural units. The optical properties are measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy. The optical bandgap energy (Eop is observed to decrease with the increase in Fe2O3 content, whereas reverse trend is observed for refractive index.

  2. Investigation on Er3+/Ho3+ co-doped silicate glass for ~2 µm fiber lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stable Er3+/Ho3+ co-doped lead silicate glass is developed. Luminescent properties are recorded under pumping with 808 and 1550 nm lasers. Energy-transfer mechanism and efficiency are analyzed. Energy-transfer efficiency from Er3+:4I13/2 to Ho3+:5I7 reaches 93.8% at 3 mol% Ho2O3 doping concentration. Strong luminescence is detected when pumped at 1550 nm because of efficient energy transfer from Er3+:4I13/2 to Ho3+:5I7. Peak gain coefficient at 2056 nm is detected as 1.62 cm−1. The excellent luminescent property and high stability indicate that Er3+/Ho3+ co-doped lead silicate glass can be applied in 2 µm fiber lasers. - Highlights: • Er3+/Ho3+ co-doped silicate glasses with high stability are prepared. • Strong luminescence is detected under pump of 1550 nm lasers owing to efficient energy transfer from Er3+ to Ho3+. • Transfer efficiency is calculated to be 93.8% when Ho2O3 doping concentration is up to 3 mol%. • Gain coefficient peaks at 2056 nm to be 1.62 cm−1

  3. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the 23Na, 27Al and 17O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the 17O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  4. Kinetics of iron redox reaction in silicate melts: A high temperature Xanes study on an alkali basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochain, B; Neuville, D R; Roux, J; Strukelj, E; Richet, P [Physique des Mineraux et Magmas, Geochimie-Cosmochimie, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Ligny, D de [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, LPCML, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Baudelet, F, E-mail: cochain@ipgp.jussieu.f [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin (France)

    2009-11-15

    In Earth and Materials sciences, iron is the most important transition element. Glass and melt properties are strongly affected by iron content and redox state with the consequence that some properties (i.e. viscosity, heat capacity, crystallization...) depend not only on the amounts of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}, but also on the coordination state of these ions. In this work we investigate iron redox reactions through XANES experiments at the K-edge of iron. Using a high-temperature heating device, pre-edge of XANES spectra exhibits definite advantages to make in-situ measurements and to determine the evolution of redox state with time, temperature and composition of synthetic silicate melts. In this study, new kinetics measurements are presented for a basalt melt from the 31,000-BC eruption of the Puy de Lemptegy Volcano in France. These measurements have been made between 773 K and at superliquidus temperatures up to 1923 K.

  5. Kinetics of iron redox reaction in silicate melts: A high temperature Xanes study on an alkali basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Earth and Materials sciences, iron is the most important transition element. Glass and melt properties are strongly affected by iron content and redox state with the consequence that some properties (i.e. viscosity, heat capacity, crystallization...) depend not only on the amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+, but also on the coordination state of these ions. In this work we investigate iron redox reactions through XANES experiments at the K-edge of iron. Using a high-temperature heating device, pre-edge of XANES spectra exhibits definite advantages to make in-situ measurements and to determine the evolution of redox state with time, temperature and composition of synthetic silicate melts. In this study, new kinetics measurements are presented for a basalt melt from the 31,000-BC eruption of the Puy de Lemptegy Volcano in France. These measurements have been made between 773 K and at superliquidus temperatures up to 1923 K.

  6. Kinetics of iron redox reaction in silicate melts: A high temperature Xanes study on an alkali basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochain, B.; Neuville, D. R.; de Ligny, D.; Roux, J.; Baudelet, F.; Strukelj, E.; Richet, P.

    2009-11-01

    In Earth and Materials sciences, iron is the most important transition element. Glass and melt properties are strongly affected by iron content and redox state with the consequence that some properties (i.e. viscosity, heat capacity, crystallization...) depend not only on the amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+, but also on the coordination state of these ions. In this work we investigate iron redox reactions through XANES experiments at the K-edge of iron. Using a high-temperature heating device, pre-edge of XANES spectra exhibits definite advantages to make in-situ measurements and to determine the evolution of redox state with time, temperature and composition of synthetic silicate melts. In this study, new kinetics measurements are presented for a basalt melt from the 31,000-BC eruption of the Puy de Lemptegy Volcano in France. These measurements have been made between 773 K and at superliquidus temperatures up to 1923 K.

  7. Investigation of luminescence and spectroscopic properties of Nd3+ions in cadmium alkali borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaweta; Thind, Kulwant Singh

    2016-07-01

    Neodymium doped cadmium alkali borate glasses having composition 20CdOsbnd 20R2Osbnd 59.5H3BO3sbnd 0.5Nd2O3; (R = Li, Na and K) were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the glasses was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. The physical properties such as density, refractive index, molar volume, rare earth ion concentration etc. were determined. Optical absorption and fluorescence spectra were recorded. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied on the optical absorption spectra of the glasses to evaluate the three phenomenological intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6. These parameters were in turn used to predict the radiative properties such as the radiative transition probability (A), radiative lifetime (τR) and branching ratio (βR) for the fluorescent levels of Nd3+ ion in the present glass series. The lasing efficiency of the prepared glasses has been characterized by the spectroscopic quality factor (Ω4/Ω6), the value of which is in the range of 0.2-1.5, typical for Nd3+ in different laser hosts. The variation of Ω2 with the change in alkali oxide has been attributed to the changes in the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site. The shift of the hypersensitive bands, study of the oscillator strengths and the variation of the spectral profile of the transition 4I9/2 → 4F7/2 + 4S3/2 indicate a maximum covalency of Ndsbnd O bond for glass with potassium ions. From the fluorescence spectra, peak wavelength (λp), effective line widths (Δλeff) and stimulated emission cross-section (σp) have been obtained for the three transitions 4F3/2 → 4I9/2,4F3/2 → 4I11/2 and4F3/2 → 4I13/2 of Nd3+ ion. The relatively high values of σp obtained for Nd3+ in present glass system suggest that these materials can be considered as suitable candidates for laser applications. The glass with potassium ions shows the highest value of the stimulated emission cross-section.

  8. Internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, S; Müller, R; Deubener, J; Behrens, H

    2013-11-01

    The internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silica glasses with total water content (C(W)) up to 1.9 wt. % was studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) using temperature-frequency sweeps from 723 K to 273 K and from 1 s(-1) to 50 s(-1). Total water content and concentrations of H2O molecules (C(H2O)) and OH groups (C(OH)) in the DMA specimens were determined by infrared spectroscopy. For low water contents (C(W) ≈ C(OH) 1 wt. %), where significant amounts of molecular water are evident (C(H2O) > 0.15 wt. %), however, internal friction spectra change unexpectedly: the β(OH) peak heights saturate and a low temperature shoulder appears on the β-relaxation peak. This emerging relaxation mode (β(H2O) relaxation) was assigned to the motions of H2O molecules. β(H2O) relaxation was found to be faster than β(OH) but slower than γ relaxation. Activation energy of the different relaxation modes increased in the order γ < β(H2O) < β(OH) < α. PMID:24206315

  9. The short-range structure of alkali disilicate glasses by pulsed neutron total scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-of-flight total neutron scattering experiments using pulsed neutrons with short wave-length produced by an electron linear accelerator have been carried out to measure the structure factors of SiO2 and M2O x 2 SiO2 (M = Li, Na and Li0.63Na0.37) glasses over a wide range of the scattering vector up to Q (= 4 π sin THETA/lambda) approx. 480 nm-1. The Placzek correction has been considered up to the second order in the energy transfer. The Fourier transforms of the structure factors yield the pair distribution functions highly resolved in real space, from which the stretching of the Si-O and O-O atomic distances and the number of bridging and non-bridging oxygen atoms in the alkali disilicate glass have been obtained. (orig.)

  10. The formation of silver metal nanoparticles by ion implantation in silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vytykacova, S.; Svecova, B.; Nekvindova, P.; Spirkova, J.; Mackova, A.; Miksova, R.; Böttger, R.

    2016-03-01

    It has been shown that glasses containing silver metal nanoparticles are promising photonics materials for the fabrication of all-optical components. The resulting optical properties of the nanocomposite glasses depend on the composition and structure of the glass, as well as on the type of metal ion implanted and the experimental procedures involved. The main aim of this article was to study the influence of the conditions of the ion implantation and the composition of the glass on the formation of metal nanoparticles in such glasses. Four various types of silicate glasses were implanted with Ag+ ions with different energy (330 keV, 1.2 MeV and 1.7 MeV), with the fluence being kept constant (1 × 1016 ions cm-2). The as-implanted samples were annealed at 600 °C for 1 h. The samples were characterised in terms of: the nucleation of metal nanoparticles (linear optical absorption), the migration of silver through the glass matrix during the implantation and post-implantation annealing (Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy), and the oxidation state of silver (photoluminescence in the visible region).

  11. Gallium-containing phospho‐silicate glasses: Synthesis and in vitro bioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of Ga-containing phospho-silicate glasses based on Bioglass 45S5, having molar formula 46.2SiO2·24.3Na2O·26.9CaO·2.6P2O5·xGa2O3 (x = 1.0, 1.6, 3.5), were prepared by fusion method. The reference Bioglass 45S5 without gallium was also prepared. The synthesized glasses were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 30 days in order to observe ion release and hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. All Ga-containing glasses maintain the ability of HA formation as indicated by main X-ray diffractometric peaks and/or electronic scanning microscopy results. HA layer was formed after 1 day of SBF soaking in 45S5 glass containing up to 1.6% Ga2O3 content. Moreover, gallium released by the glasses was found to be partially precipitated on the glass surface as gallium phosphate. Further increase in gallium content reduced the ion release in SBF. The maximum of Ga3+ concentration measured in solution is ∼ 6 ppm determined for 3.5% Ga2O3 content. This amount is about half of the toxic level (14 ppm) of gallium and the glasses release gallium till 30 days of immersion in SBF. Considering the above results, the studied materials can be proposed as bioactive glasses with additional antimicrobial effect of gallium having no toxic outcome. - Highlights: ► A new class of potential bioactive glasses gallium content. ► Controlled ions release from the glass surface. ► Effect of Ga2O3 content on bioactivity (hydroxyapatite formation). ► Formation of calcite when the phosphate concentration is low in SBF.

  12. The effect of electron beam irradiation on silver-sodium ion exchange in silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Alexander I.; Prosnikov, Mikhail A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown experimentally that electron irradiation of sodium-silicate glasses makes possible the control of the subsequent ion exchange Ag+ ↔ Na+ process in a salt melt. The reason of this effect is the negatively charged regions formation in a glass volume during electron irradiation. The electric field, produced by these regions in glass volume, results in positive Na+ ions field migration into them. The spatial redistribution of Na+ ions results in the decrease of the ion exchange efficiency, or the ion exchange can be even blocked. This led to the decrease of the luminescence intensity of neutral silver molecular clusters in the irradiated zone, and effect on the silver nanoparticles formation during the subsequent thermal treatment. The observed effects can be used for the control of ion exchange processes during integrated optics devices fabrication, and for the electron-beam recording of optical information.

  13. Analysis of fiber-optic lead-silicate glasses by nuclear-physics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elemental analysis of the near-surface layers of original and reduced lead-silicate glasses is performed by means of nondestructive testing methods using accelerated charged particles. The concentration profiles of hydrogen (to a depth of 0.4 μm) and lead (to a depth of 3.5 μm) are measured in 15 pairs of samples of different melts. Based on the resulting data, conclusions are reached with regard to the concentration profile of lead, reduced in the thermohydrogen treatment process to a depth of 0.4 μm. These results show how the quantities that characterize the surface composition of the samples and the volume of the glass depend on the original amount of hydrogen within the glass upon completion of the melt. 15 refs., 5 figs

  14. Insight into sodium silicate glass structural organization by multinuclear NMR combined with first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short and medium range order of silica and sodium silicate glasses have been investigated from a quantitative analysis of 29Si MAS NMR and 23Na, 17O MQMAS NMR spectra. The method described enables the extraction of the underlying 17O NMR parameter distributions of bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs), and yields site populations which are confirmed by 29Si NMR data. The extracted NMR parameter distributions and their variations with respect to the glass chemical composition can then be analyzed in terms of local structural features (bond angles and bond lengths, coordination numbers) with the help of molecular dynamics simulations combined with first-principles calculations of NMR parameters. Correlations of relevant structural parameters with 23Na, 29Si and 17O NMR interactions (isotropic chemical shift δ(iso), quadrupolar coupling constant C(Q) and quadrupolar asymmetry parameter ηQ are re-examined and their applicability is discussed. These data offer better insights into the structural organization of the glass network, including both chemical and topological disorder. Adding sodium to pure silica significantly diminishes the Si-O-Si bond angles and leads to a longer mean Si-O bond length with a slight decrease of the mean Na-O bond length. Moreover, the present data are in favor of a homogeneous distribution of Na around both oxygen species in the silicate network. Finally, our approach was found to be sensitive enough to investigate the effect of addition of a small quantity of molybdenum oxide (about 1 mol%) on the 17O MAS spectrum, opening new possibilities for investigating the Mo environment in silicate glasses. (authors)

  15. Are the dynamics of silicate glasses and glass-forming liquids embedded in their elastic properties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    According to the elastic theory of the glass transition, the dynamics of glasses and glass-forming liquids are controlled by the evolution of shear modulus. In particular, the elastic shoving model expresses dynamics in terms of an activation energy required to shove aside the surrounding atoms......, which is determined by the shear modulus. First, we here present an in situ high-temperature Brillouin spectroscopy test of the shoving model near the glass transition of eight aluminosilicate glass-forming systems. We find that the measured viscosity data agree qualitatively with the measured...... temperature dependence of shear moduli, as predicted by the shoving model. However, the model systematically underpredicts the values of fragility. Second, we also present a thorough test of the shoving model for predicting the low temperature dynamics of an aluminosilicate glass system. This is done by...

  16. Characterization of radiative properties of Nd2O3 doped phosphate and silicate glasses for solid state laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nd2O3 doped calcium aluminium phosphate and calcium aluminium silicate glasses prepared to compare their absorption and emission properties. Radiative lifetime of the excited state 4F3/2 derived by Judd-Ofelt theory applied to the absorption spectra. Using the photoluminescence spectrometer the steady state emission and relaxation time from excited energy level recorded under green light excitation. Phosphate glass has higher emission cross-section, higher radiative lifetime but less quantum efficiency due to non-radiative quenching through hydroxyl ions compared to silicate glass for Nd3+:4F3/2→4I9/2 emission

  17. Effect of Glass Powder on Chloride Ion Transport and Alkali-aggregate Reaction Expansion of Lightweight Aggregate Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi; SHI Caijun; SONG Jianming

    2009-01-01

    The effects of glass powder on the strength development, chloride permeability and potential alkali-aggregate reaction expansion of lightweight aggregate concrete were investigated.Ground blast furnace slag, coal fly ash and silica fume were used as reference materials. The re-placement of cement with 25% glass powder slightly decreases the strengthes at 7 and 28 d, but shows no effect on 90 d's. Silica fume is very effective in improving both the strength and chloride penetra-tion resistance, while ground glass powder is much more effective than blast furnace slag and fly ash in improving chloride penetration resistance of the concrete. When expanded shale or clay is used as coarse aggregate, the concrete containing glass powder does not exhibit deleterious expansion even if alkali-reactive sand is used as fine aggregate of the concrete.

  18. The effect of nano scale inhomogeneity and silicate network connectivity on the activity of glasses with biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations of six soda-lime phospho silicate glasses are analyzed to identify correlations between specific structural features of the glasses and their biological activity, namely the dissolution in physiological fluids and the rate of deposition of a bone-like apatite film on their surface. Structural markers of the bioactivity can be identified in the silicate connectivity and the formation of nanometer-size calcium clusters separated from the silicate network, with the latter associated with less bioactive or bio-inactive compositions. The simulations show how these key structural features are affected by the glass composition, and suggest that different strategies (i.e. compositional ranges)can be employed to modify them in a rational and systematic way, in order to steer the biological activity of the glass towards the level required by different biomedical applications.

  19. Water cleaning ability and local structure of iron-containing soda-lime silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relationship between waste-water cleaning ability and local structure of iron-containing soda-lime silicate glass, 15Na2O·15CaO·xFe2O3·(70-x)SiO2 (x = 10–50 in mass%), abbreviated as NCFSx glass, was investigated by means of 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, redox titration with KMnO4 for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Mössbauer spectra of NCFSx glass with “x” of 10 and 30 were composed of two doublets: one due to FeIIIO4 tetrahedra (Td) with isomer shift (δ) of 0.23–0.26 mm s − 1 and quadrupole splitting (Δ) 1.01–1.04 mm s − 1, and the other due to FeIIO6 octahedra (Oh) with δ of 1.00–1.03 mm s − 1 and Δ of 2.03–2.05 mm s − 1. Absorption area for FeII(Td) was decreased from 9.7 to 6.5 and 0.0 % when “x” was increased from 10 to 30 and 50. A leaching test performed with 500 mL of artificial waste water and 2.0 g of NCFS50 revealed waste-water cleaning ability of soda-lime glass, e.g., COD was reduced from 280 to 55.2 mg L − 1 after 10 day-leaching. After 10 day-leaching, it proved that iron was dissolved into waste water to a level of 5.3 7 x 10-1 mg L − 1. These results prove that organic matter could be effectively decomposed with iron-containing soda-lime silicate glass.

  20. Formation of color centers in a soda-lime silicate glass by excimer laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated defect generation in soda-lime silicate and iron-doped soda-lime silicate glasses by excimer laser irradiation in order to apply coloration due to radiation-induced defects as a coloring technique for practical glass products. The laser irradiation generated various kinds of defects, i.e., non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs), E' centers, and trapped electron centers, as does x-ray and γ-ray irradiation. The amounts of generated NBOHCs, monitored by the absorption intensity, increased at first with the irradiation time for both the ArF and XeF lasers, and eventually became saturated. The saturated values for the ArF laser irradiation were almost the same regardless of the laser intensity, whereas those for the XeF laser irradiation were dependent on the intensity; a higher intensity generated a larger amount of NBOHCs. From the comparison of the energies of the photon and the absorption edge of the soda-lime silicate glasses, the defect generation reactions were expected to be one-photon and two-photon processes for the ArF and XeF lasers, respectively. In order to explain the defect generation behavior, we used a simple kinetic model in which the NBOHCs are reversibly generated and annihilated through the photo-reaction. The model includes a stretched exponential function, which is often observed for reactions occurring in amorphous materials. The dependences of the amounts of the generated NBOHCs on the irradiation time and intensity of the laser pulses derived from the model were consistent with the experimental results.

  1. Aqueous corrosion of silicate glasses. Analogy between volcanic glasses and the French nuclear waste glass R7T7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of borosilicate glasses upon aqueous corrosion is controlled for long periods of time (>10,000 years) by processes which are not directly accessible by means of laboratory experiments. The analogical approach consists here to compare leaching performances between the french nuclear waste glass R7T7 and natural volcanic glasses, basaltic and rhyolitic ones. The three glasses were leached in the same conditions; open system, 90 deg C, initial pH of 9.7. Basaltic and R7T7 glasses having the same kinetic of dissolution, the basaltic glass was chosen as the best analogue. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  2. Compositional investigation of ∼2 μm luminescence of Ho{sup 3+}-doped lead silicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xueqiang; Huang, Feifei; Gao, Song [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100039 (China); Wang, Xin; Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Ho{sup 3+}-doped lead silicate glass with lowest maximum phonon energy possesses highest ∼2 μm luminescence intensity. - Highlights: • With increment of lead oxide, maximum phonon energy in lead silicate glass decreased. • ∼2 μm luminescent intensity of Ho{sup 3+} increased with increment of lead oxide. • Lowest lead oxide content glass possesses highest quantum efficiency due to low maximum phonon energy. - Abstract: Lead silicate glass samples with varying lead oxide content were prepared in this study, and their luminescent properties were examined and analyzed. It was found that with increasing lead oxide content, the maximum phonon energies of the glass samples decreased, while their spontaneous transition probabilities first increased and then decreased. The influence of the spontaneous transition rate, A{sub 10}, and the multi-phonon relaxation rate, W{sub 10}, on the sample luminescent properties was analyzed using rate equations. As a result, it was found that with increasing lead oxide content, W{sub 10}/A{sub 10} decreased, while the quantum efficiency increased. Thus, the luminescent intensity at ∼2 μm increased in the glass samples with increased lead oxide content. The high luminescent intensity and long lifetime indicate that silicate glasses containing high levels of lead oxide could potentially be used in ∼2 μm lasers.

  3. Optical waveguides in Er3+/Yb3+-codoped silicate glasses fabricated by proton implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Fu, Li-Li; Zhu, Xu-Feng; Guo, Hai-Tao; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao; Wei, Wei

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a planar waveguide was fabricated by proton implantation in Er3+/Yb3+-codoped silicate glasses with energies of (500 + 550) keV and fluences of (1 + 2) × 1016 ions/cm2. The end-face coupling method was employed to determine whether the light could be confined in the waveguide or not. The prism coupling technique was applied to measure the guided mode spectrum and the intensity calculation method was used to construct the refractive index profile. With the profile, a near-field intensity distribution was calculated by the finite difference beam propagation method. The obtained results may be helpful in developing integrated optical devices.

  4. Study of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ ion implantation into silicate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Kolitsch, A.; Machovič, V.; Stara, S.; Míka, M.; Špirková, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 356, 44-49 (2010), s. 2468-2472. ISSN 0022-3093. [XII International Conference on the Physics of Non-Crystalline Solids. Foz do Iguaçu, PR, Brazil, 06.09.-09.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041; GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Ion implantation * Silicate glasses * Metal nanoparticles * RBS Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2010

  5. Relationships between structure and properties of silicate glasses implanted with Au+ ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Pešička, J.; Šlouf, Miroslav; Husinsky, W.; Machovič, Vladimír; Špirková, J.

    Madarsko : ICOOPMA, book of abstracts, Budapešt, 2010. s. 116-116. [ICOOPMA 2010 - Fourth International Conference on Optical, Optoelectronic and Photonic Materials and Application. 15.08.2010-20.08.2010, Budapešť] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : Silicate glasses * Ion implantation * Gold Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  6. DSC and TMDSC studies on glass transition temperature of alkali rare earth metaphosphate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodová, Miroslava; Brožek, J.; Nitsch, Karel

    Praha : Czechoslovak Association for Crystal Growth (CSACG), 2012 - (Kožíšek, Z.; Nitsch, K.). s. 60-60 ISBN 978-80-260-2357-9. [Joint Seminar – Development of materials science in research and education /22./. 03.09.2012-07.09.2012, Lednice] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : DSC * TMDSC * glass transition temperature Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  7. Intense 1.6 μm fluorescence of Nd3+ doped cadmium bismuth silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, Judd-Ofelt analysis is applied to rare-earth (RE = Nd3+) doped cadmium bismuth silicate (20CdO⋅xSiO2⋅(79.5−x)Bi2O3⋅0.5Nd2O3 (CSBN)) glasses in order to evaluate their potential as well as both glass laser systems and optical materials. The phenomenological Judd-Ofelt parameters (Ω2, Ω4, Ω6) are determined for RE ions with their quality factors and compared with the equivalent parameters for several other hosts. The calculated value of stimulated emission cross-section for 4F3/2→4I11/2 has high and varies 14.72×10−20 to 9.66×10−20 cm2 with Bi2O3 content in the host glass. The results point out that the glass system is good candidate for the development of photonics devices which are operating near infrared spectral range. Further, the FTIR results reveal that the glasses have BiO6, SiO4 and non-bridging oxygen as local structure

  8. Impact of Fe and Ce ions on radiation stability of silicate glass surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of available publications shows that the presence of different dynamic and statistical heterogeneity in optical insulator may result in generation of different non-linear phenomena. However, the issue about the relation of radiation stability of irradiated optical insulator, that has a wrought structure and different compounds, remains unsettled. We investigated a glass used for production of window to introduce radiation into the laser source cell of multi discharging ions. It is exposed to laser and ionizing radiation of high-temperature plasma under real conditions. That is why the experimental conditions, close to real operating conditions, were established. For this purpose, the laser radiation of 108 -1011 Wt/cm2 was focused to silicate glass surface irradiated by g-rays of up to 1010 R. The investigation outcomes on radiation stability of the glass with different concentration of Fe (the Fe content was determined by laser mass-spectrometry method) showed that the increase of impure Fe content in the glass resulted in a decrease of qpor and an increase of quantity and sizes of cavities. The glass painting worsens its radiation stability

  9. NMR Study on Structural Characteristics of Rare Earth Doped Boro-Alumino-Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The structural characteristics of Re2O3 doped B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses and factors such as the component and heat-treating conditions affecting the glass structure were investigated by magic angle spin nuclear magnetic resonance(MAS NMR) spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It is found that, in B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass, the boron coordination sites are mainly of trigonal (B(3)) and tetrahedral (B(4)), and the aluminum coordination sites are Al(4), Al(5) and partly of Al(6). With the increase of BaO content in the B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass, B(3) gradually changes to B(4), and Al(5), Al(6) changes to Al(4). On the other hand, compared with Ba2+, RE3+ can accumulate the boron network because of its higher field strength, which results in a large network structure. With the increase of samarium oxide, the silicate coordination Q4 (3T) will have predominance gradually. Heat-treatment has little effect on the boron and aluminum coordination sites in the glass structure.

  10. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by 29Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of 29Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 13000C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T1 and T2) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for 23Na and 29Si

  11. Some effects of γ-irradiation in soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosized metallic silver particles have been formed in multicomponent commercial soda-lime silicate glasses partly substituted with ionic silver and irradiated at room temperature by γ-rays from a 60Co-source (1.33 MeV). To characterize the obtained composites, combined measurements of thermally stimulated depolarization current and optical absorption, accompanied by microspectrophotometric analysis and electron microscopy observations have been used. It has been shown that γ-irradiation might be an effective means to modify and control the concentration, size and spatial distribution of the dopant within the near-surface layer of the glass-matrix. This procedure also allows the conversion of some glassy areas in this region into a partially crystalline material with improved mechanical characteristics

  12. ESR and spectral studies of Er3+ ions in soda-lime silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron spin resonance (ESR), optical absorption spectra and photoluminescence spectra of Er3+ ions in soda-lime silicate glasses doped with different concentrations of Er2O3 have been studied. The glasses of the composition (in mol%) (65-x)SiO2:25Na2O:10CaO:xEr2O3 (where x=0.02, 0.05, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) were prepared by the melt quenching method. ESR measurements were carried out at room temperature down to 1.62 K. Absorption spectra were investigated in the UV-VIS-NIR region from 300 to 1800 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were observed in the spectral range 500-800 nm under 514.5 nm argon-ion laser line excitation.

  13. Sub-nanoscale nanoimprint fabrication of atomically stepped glassy substrates of silicate glass and acryl polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2015-11-01

    In the nanoimprint process, the resolution limit of patterning has attracted much attention from both scientific and industrial aspects. In this article, we briefly review the main achievements of our research group on sub-nanoscale nanoimprint fabrication of atomically patterned glassy substrates of oxide glass and polymer. By applying the sapphire (α-Al2O3 single crystal) wafers with self-organized nanopatterns of atomic steps as thermal nanoimprinting molds, we successfully transferred their nanoscale patterns onto the surfaces of glassy substrates such as soda-lime silicate glasses and poly(methyl methacrylate) polymers. The surfaces of nanoimprinted glassy materials exhibited regularly arrayed atomic stairs with 0.2-0.3 nm step height, which were in good agreement with the sub-nanopatterns of sapphire molds. These atomically stepped morphologies on the glassy substrates were found to be stable for about 1 year.

  14. Fluorescence and radiative properties of Nd3+ ions doped zinc bismuth silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Fluorescence spectra of ZBSN5 glass (Inset: Energy levels depicting the various lasing transitions of Nd3+ ions (4F3/2 → 4I9/2,11/2)) -- Highlights: • Hypersensitive bands of Nd3+ (4I9/2 → 4G5/2, 2G7/2; 586 nm) ions are shifted. • Fluorescence studies show that ZBSN glasses may be used as lasing materials. • Bi3+ cations are incorporated in the glass network as [BiO6] octahedral units. -- Abstract: Glasses having composition 20ZnO⋅xSiO2⋅(79.5−x)Bi2O3⋅0.5Nd2O3 with x varying from 10 to 50 mol% have been synthesized. The amorphous nature of the glasses was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. Optical absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured at ambient temperature. This paper reports on different physical and absorption spectral properties of Nd3+ doped zinc bismuth silicate glasses with varying content of Bi2O3 to understand its influences on hypersensitive band intensities. From the recorded absorption spectra, Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters Ωλ = (λ = 2, 4, 6) have been evaluated with their quality factors and are used to compute the radiative properties of Nd3+ glasses. The calculated Judd–Ofelt parameters are found to decreasing with decrease in Bi2O3 content in the glass which may be due to the decrease in Nd–O bond covalency. From these intensity parameters various radiative properties like spontaneous emission probability (Arad), radiative life time (τr), fluorescence branching ratio (βr) and stimulated emission cross-section (σ) for various emission bands have been calculated. The stimulated emission cross-section of fluorescence transition 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 have high values and varies from 15.19 × 10−20 cm2 to 5.73 × 10−20 cm2 with Bi2O3 content in the host glass. The results point out this glass system as good candidate to be used in the development of photonics devices operating in the near infrared spectral range. Further, the FTIR results reveal that the glasses have BiO6, SiO4 and non

  15. Forward dissolution rate of silicate glasses of nuclear interest in clay-equilibrated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the influence of neutral or slightly basic clay-equilibrated groundwater on the forward dissolution rate of nuclear borosilicate glasses. The forward rate measured for the SON68 glass, a 26-oxide glass of nuclear interest, is about five times higher in clay-equilibrated groundwater than in deionized water. The corresponding apparent activation energy, measured between 30 degrees C and 90 degrees C. is similar for both media, indicating that glass dissolution is likely controlled by the hydrolysis of Si-O bonds in both solutions. The specific effect of clay-equilibrated groundwater appears to be related to a surface phenomenon; aluminum-oxygen and zirconium-oxygen bonds appear to be less impacted by clay-equilibrated groundwater than silicon-oxygen bonds. More particularly, this work shows that the influence of clay-equilibrated groundwater on the forward dissolution rate is due to its ionic strength with cations predominating over anions, although not all tested cations have the same effect. The effect is due mainly to calcium ions, although the concentration of sodium ions in the clay-equilibrated water tested was four times higher than that of calcium ions. The specific influence of alkali metal (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) and alkaline earth (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) ions shows that all cations do not have the same effect on the forward glass dissolution rate and that the rate increases with the mole fraction of surface metal sites. The presence of calcium in the glass does not prevent this particular effect. (authors)

  16. Unusual anti-thermal degradation of bismuth NIR luminescence in bismuth doped lithium tantalum silicate laser glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Linling; Wang, Liping; Peng, Mingying; Xu, Shanhui; Zhang, Qinyuan

    2016-08-01

    For application of bismuth laser glasses in either fiber amplifier or laser, their performance stability in long run should be understood especially in extreme conditions. However, so far, there are few reports on it. Here, we found, after the cycle experiments on heating and cooling, that the proper increase of lithium content in lithium tantalum silicate laser glass can lead to unusual anti-thermal degradation of bismuth NIR luminescence, which completely differs from the scenario in germanate glass. FTIR, 29Si MAS NMR spectra, absorption and dynamic photoluminescence spectra are employed to unravel how this happens. The results illustrate that it should be due to the decrease of polymerization of silicate glass network, which in turn allows the regeneration at 250°C, and therefore, the content increase of bismuth NIR emission centers. In the meanwhile, we noticed though Bi luminescence can be thermally quenched its peak does not shift along with temperature, which seldom appears in laser materials. The unique property might guarantee the unshift of Bi fiber laser wavelength once such glass was made into fiber devices even as the environmental temperature changes. The role of lithium is discussed in the evolution of glass structures, the suppression of glass heterogeneity, and the thermal stability of Bi luminescence, and it should be helpful to design homogeneous silicate laser glass with outstanding thermal stability. PMID:27505827

  17. TRPLS (Time Resolved Photoluminescence) studies of U and Am in sol-gel derived alkali barium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speciation studies of U and Am in alkali barium borosilicate glasses, prepared via sol-gel route were carried out using time resolved photoluminescence (TRPLS) spectroscopic technique. The PL spectrum of the uranium containing glass showed green emission band at 540 nm without any vibronic structure along with excitation peaks at 275, 323, 348 and 412 nm. These data indicated the presence of uranium as uranate (UO6)6- in the glass matrix. Am was stabilized in the matrix in its trivalent form which was confirmed from its excitation, emission and decay time data. (author)

  18. Fluorescence and thermal stress properties of Yb3+-doped alumino silicate glasses for ultra high peak power laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various alumino silicate glasses (network modifier ions: Li+, Mg2+, Zn2+ and/or La3+) doped with 1  ×  1020 Yb3+ cm−3 (about 0.2 mol% Yb2O3) were prepared. The glasses were studied with respect to their thermo-mechanical and fluorescence properties. Huge differences are found for the coefficients of thermal expansion which determine the thermal shock resistance of the material and hence are required for ultra-high power laser applications. Here, zinc and magnesium alumino silicate glasses show the lowest values. The fluorescence lifetimes of the glasses increase with decreasing average atomic weight of the glass composition (685–1020 µs). All glasses show broad and smooth emission spectra with little variations due to compositional changes. Mixed lithium zinc or lithium magnesium alumino silicate glasses could be promising new laser materials especially with respect to ultra-high peak power systems or applications with high repetition rates. (letter)

  19. Silicate Based Glass Formulations for Immobilization of U.S. Defense Wastes Using Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Gary L.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marra, James C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Crawford, Charles L.; Vienna, John D.

    2014-05-22

    The cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) is an alternative technology to the currently deployed liquid-fed, ceramic-lined, Joule-heated melter for immobilizing of U.S. tank waste generated from defense related reprocessing. In order to accurately evaluate the potential benefits of deploying a CCIM, glasses must be developed specifically for that melting technology. Related glass formulation efforts have been conducted since the 1990s including a recent study that is first documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to summarize the silicate base glass formulation efforts for CCIM testing of U.S. tank wastes. Summaries of phosphate based glass formulation and phosphate and silicate based CCIM demonstration tests are reported separately (Day and Ray 2013 and Marra 2013, respectively). Combined these three reports summarize the current state of knowledge related to waste form development and process testing of CCIM technology for U.S. tank wastes.

  20. Photoluminescence of atomic gold and silver particles in soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the chemistry and photophysics of atomic gold and silver particles in inorganic glasses. By synchrotron irradiation of gold-doped soda-lime silicate glasses we could create and identify unambiguously the gold dimer as a stable and bright luminescing particle embedded in the glassy matrix. The gold dimer spectra coincide perfectly with rare gas matrix spectra of Au2. The glass matrix is, however, stable for years, and is hence perfectly suited for various applications. If the irradiated gold-doped sample is annealed at 550 deg. C a bright green luminescence can be recognized. Intense 337 nm excitation induces a decrease of the green luminescence and the reappearance of the 753 nm Au2 emission, indicating a strong interrelationship between both luminescence centers. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations indicate that the green luminescence can be assigned to noble metal dimers bound to silanolate centers. These complexes are recognized as the first stages in the further cluster growth process, which has been investigated with small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In silver-doped glasses, Ag deg. atoms can be identified with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy after synchrotron activation. Annealing at 300 deg. C decreases the concentration of Ag1, but induces an intense white light emission with 337 nm excitation. The white luminescence can be decomposed into bands that are attributed to small silver clusters such as Ag2, Ag3 and Ag4, and an additional band matching the green emission of gold-doped glasses

  1. Light induced dielectric constant of Alumina doped lead silicate glass based on silica sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diantoro, Markus; Natalia, Desi Ayu; Mufti, Nandang; Hidayat, Arif

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies on glass ceramic compounds have been conducted intensively. Two major problems to be solved are to simplify the fabrication process by reducing melting temperature as well as improving various properties for various fields of technological application. To control the dielectric constant, the researchers generally use a specific dopant. So far there is no comprehensive study to control the dielectric constant driven by both of dopant and light intensity. In this study it is used Al2O3 dopant to increase the light induced dielectric constant of the glass. The source of silica was taken from local silica sands of Bancar Tuban. The sands were firstly leached using hydrochloric acid to improve the purity of silica which was investigated by means of XRF. Fabricating the glass samples were performed by using melting-glass method. Silica powder was mixed with various ratio of SiO2:Na2CO3:PbO:Al2O3. Subsequently, a mixture of various Al2O3 doped lead silicate glasses were melted at 970°C and directy continued by annealed at 300°C. The samples were investigated by XRD, FTIR, SEM-EDX and measuring dielectric constant was done using dc-capacitance meter with various light intensities. The investigation result of XRD patterns showed that the crystal structures of the samples are amorphous state. The introduction of Al2O3 does not alter the crystal structure, but significantly change the structure of the functional glass bonding PbO-SiO2 which was shown by the FTIR spectra. It was noted that some new peak peaks were exist in the doped samples. Measuring result of dielectricity shows that the dielectric constant of glass increases with the addition of Al2O3. Increasing the light intensity gives rise to increase their dielectric constant in general. A detail observation of the dielectric seen that there are discontinuous step-like of dielectric. Most likely a specific quantization mechanism occurs when glass exposed under light.

  2. Photo-acoustic spectroscopy and quantum efficiency of Yb3+ doped alumino silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution, we analyze the effect of several preparation methods of Yb3+ doped alumino silicate glasses on their quantum efficiency by using photo-acoustic measurements in comparison to standard measurement methods including the determination via the fluorescence lifetime and an integrating sphere setup. The preparation methods focused on decreasing the OH concentration by means of fluorine-substitution and/or applying dry melting atmospheres, which led to an increase in the measured fluorescence lifetime. However, it was found that the influence of these methods on radiative properties such as the measured fluorescence lifetime alone does not per se give exact information about the actual quantum efficiency of the sample. The determination of the quantum efficiency by means of fluorescence lifetime shows inaccuracies when refractive index changing elements such as fluorine are incorporated into the glass. Since fluorine not only eliminates OH from the glass but also increases the “intrinsic” radiative fluorescence lifetime, which is needed to calculate the quantum efficiency, it is difficult to separate lifetime quenching from purely radiative effects. The approach used in this contribution offers a possibility to disentangle radiative from non-radiative properties which is not possible by using fluorescence lifetime measurements alone and allows an accurate determination of the quantum efficiency of a given sample. The comparative determination by an integrating sphere setup leads to the well-known problem of reabsorption which embodies itself in the measurement of too low quantum efficiencies, especially for samples with small quantum efficiencies

  3. Time-resolved luminescence studies of Eu3+ in soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda-lime glasses doped with Eu3+ were synthesized using a variety of compositions, namely changing the fraction of CaO or Eu2O3. Those glasses were characterized with several techniques, including ellipsometry, UV–vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy and time-resolved luminescence. The compositions' effects on optical properties such as refraction indexes, Eu3+ oscillator strengths and luminescence lifetimes were accessed from the analysis of the experimental results. Judd–Ofelt theory was used to analyze all these aspects, which allow the detection of a mismatch of optical properties from absorption and emission spectroscopy. This mismatch was confirmed from the time-resolved data, showing the existence of two different spectroscopic Eu3+ species. From those results it is concluded that there is evidence for lanthanide aggregation, giving rise to self-quenching effects that may be described through resonance energy transfer mechanisms. The difference between luminescence lifetimes for isolated and aggregated Eu(III) is interpreted as due to different interactions with oxygen in the matrix, namely degree of covalency of the Eu–O bond and point group symmetry of the lanthanide. -- Highlights: • Time resolved luminescence studies of Eu(III) in soda-lime silicate glass show the existence of two different species. • Mismatch of Judd–Ofelt parameters are obtained from absorption and emission spectroscopy. • Eu(III) has less clustering tendency when Eu2O3 concentration decreases and when CaO concentration increases

  4. Low energy and low dose electron irradiation of potassium-lime-silicate glass investigated by XPS. I. Surface composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gedeon, O.; Zemek, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 320, - (2003), s. 177-186. ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/99/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy * potassium-lime-silicate glass * electron-solid interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.563, year: 2003

  5. The dissolution rate of silicate glasses and minerals: an alternative model based on several activated complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the mineral reactions in natural water-rock systems progress at conditions close to the chemical equilibrium. The kinetics of these reactions, in particular the dissolution rate of the primary minerals, is a major constrain for the numerical modelling of diagenetic and hydrothermal processes. In the case of silicates, recent experimental studies have pointed out the necessity to better understand the elementary reactions which control the dissolution process. This article presents several models that have been proposed to account for the observed dissolution rate/chemical affinity relationships. The case of glasses (R7T7), feldspars and clays, in water, in near neutral pH aqueous solutions and in acid/basic media, are reviewed. (A.C.)

  6. The research of properties of Eu3+-doped cadmium aluminium silicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue-e.; Hou, Lan-tian; Song, Zhao-yuan

    2008-11-01

    We have prepared (40SiO2-14Al2O3-(40-x) CdO-2Li2O-2K2O-2Na2O -x Eu2O3) cadmium aluminium silicate glasses doped with europium by high temperature solid-state reaction method. The absorption spectra, excitation spectra, emission spectra are obtained. With the increase of Eu2O3, the absorption peaks are founded increasing to the best doped concentration and then reducing, which is nonlinear relationship. The charge-transfer band is moved to 320 nm due to the addition of Cd2+. We can see that the ratio of peak in 591 nm and 615 nm is 0.6-0.75 in general, and is unrelated to doped concentration. By changing concentration of Eu3+.We can adjust and mix different intensity of light according to the demand.

  7. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  8. Investigation of emulsified, acid and acid-alkali catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres for bone regeneration and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Guohou [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 China (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 China (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 China (China); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 China (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 China (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 China (China); Dong, Hua [National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 China (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 China (China); School of Biological Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Fang, Liming; Mao, Cong; Li, Yuli; Li, Zhengmao; Hu, Qing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 China (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 China (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 China (China)

    2013-10-15

    Acid-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-A) and acid-alkali co-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-B) were successfully synthesized via combination of sol-gel and water-in-oil (W/O) micro-emulsion methods. The structural, morphological and textural properties of mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs) were characterized by various techniques. Results show that both MBGMs-A and MBGMs-B exhibit regularly spherical shape but with different internal porous structures, i.e., a dense microstructure for MBGMs-A and internally porous structure for MBGMs-B. {sup 29}Si NMR data reveal that MGBMs have low polymerization degree of silica network. The in vitro bioactivity tests indicate that the apatite formation rate of MBGMs-B was faster than that of MBGMs-A after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Furthermore, the two kinds of MBGMs have similar storage capacity of alendronate (AL), and the release behaviors of AL could be controlled due to their unique porous structure. In conclusion, the microspheres are shown to be promising candidates as bone-related drug carriers and filling materials of composite scaffold for bone repair. - Graphical abstract: The morphologies and microstructures of acid-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-A) and acid-alkali co-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-B) were observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. MBGMs-A exhibits a dense structure and a porous can be observed in MBGMs-B. The microspheres have a quick inducing-apatite formation ability and show a sustained release of alendronate (AL). Highlights: • A rapid method was reported to prepare mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres. • The addition of ammonia significantly shortens the preparation time. • Acid and acid-alkali co-catalyzed microspheres were studied for the first time. • The materials exhibited excellent in vitro bioactivity and

  9. Investigation of emulsified, acid and acid-alkali catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres for bone regeneration and drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-A) and acid-alkali co-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-B) were successfully synthesized via combination of sol-gel and water-in-oil (W/O) micro-emulsion methods. The structural, morphological and textural properties of mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs) were characterized by various techniques. Results show that both MBGMs-A and MBGMs-B exhibit regularly spherical shape but with different internal porous structures, i.e., a dense microstructure for MBGMs-A and internally porous structure for MBGMs-B. 29Si NMR data reveal that MGBMs have low polymerization degree of silica network. The in vitro bioactivity tests indicate that the apatite formation rate of MBGMs-B was faster than that of MBGMs-A after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Furthermore, the two kinds of MBGMs have similar storage capacity of alendronate (AL), and the release behaviors of AL could be controlled due to their unique porous structure. In conclusion, the microspheres are shown to be promising candidates as bone-related drug carriers and filling materials of composite scaffold for bone repair. - Graphical abstract: The morphologies and microstructures of acid-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-A) and acid-alkali co-catalyzed mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres (MBGMs-B) were observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. MBGMs-A exhibits a dense structure and a porous can be observed in MBGMs-B. The microspheres have a quick inducing-apatite formation ability and show a sustained release of alendronate (AL). Highlights: • A rapid method was reported to prepare mesoporous bioactive glass microspheres. • The addition of ammonia significantly shortens the preparation time. • Acid and acid-alkali co-catalyzed microspheres were studied for the first time. • The materials exhibited excellent in vitro bioactivity and drug

  10. Field-assisted reaction at metal-molten silicate glass interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the previous paper, the electrochemical phenomena of Ni and Mo in a molten silicate glass of the composition 16 Na2O · 12 CaO · 72 SiO2 in wt% were investigated. In this paper, W, Cr, Fe, SUS 304 and Inconel 600 were chosen as the objects to be measured. Anodic dissolution, passivation and cathodic deposition for these metals were investigated by linear potential sweep voltammetry at various potential sweep rates (5 ∼ 0.05 V/sec) with platinum reference and auxiliary electrodes in Ar gas atmosphere or in air. Moreover, the metal-glass interface after polarization was analysed by EPMA. On cathodic potential sweep of every metal investigated here, silicate anions were easily reduced to silicon element and a kind of silicide layer covered the electrode surface. Since the silicide has high electrical resistance, its formation made the measurement of voltammogram difficult at slower sweep rates. The anodic voltammogram of W at 3 V/sec showed a large current peak around 1.7 V(relative to Pt reference). The peak potential shifted to more cathodic direction with decreasing sweep rate. The current peak was attributed to the formation of a passive layer on the W electrode. The occurrence of tungsten oxide layer with 30 μm thick on the W electrode was confirmed by EPMA. The oxide layer seemed to be made up by WO3. The broad current peak was observed on anodic voltammogram of Cr due to the formation of chromium oxide Cr2O3. There was no peak on the anodic current-potential curve for the Fe electrode and Fe dissolved rapidly and easily. Both SUS 304 and Inconel 600 were subject to passivation by oxide film formation of Cr2O3 and NiO on anodic polarization. (author)

  11. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  12. Multi-channel transition emissions of Sm3+ in lithium yttrium aluminum silicate glasses and derived opalescent glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Multi-channel transitions of Sm3+ in aluminosilicate glasses are investigated. • Judd–Ofelt parameters are derived to be 4.12 × 10−20, 4.26 × 10−20 and 2.11 × 10−20 cm2. • Cross-section profiles σem for visible and NIR emissions are calculated by FL formula. • 44.9% internal quantum efficiency and 11.58% external quantum yield are exposed. • Orientational crystallization was observed after the heat-treatment testing. -- Abstract: Sm3+-doped lithium–yttrium–aluminum-silicate (LYAS) glasses have been fabricated and effective visible and near-infrared (NIR) emissions are exhibited. The predicated spontaneous emission probabilities (Arad) are derived to be 29.1, 149.2, 150.1 and 39.0 s−1 for conventional visible emissions assigned to 4G5/2 → 6HJ (J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2) transitions, and Arad are obtained to be 24.8, 4.6 and 2.7 s−1 for the optical transitions 4G5/2 → 6FJ (J = 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2) corresponding to the NIR emissions, respectively. The maximum stimulated emission cross-sections (σem) are obtained to be 7.45 × 10−22 and 0.48 × 10−22 cm2 for visible (4G5/2 → 6H9/2) and NIR (4G5/2 → 6F9/2) emissions, respectively. Internal quantum efficiency for the 4G5/2 level and external quantum yield for visible emissions of Sm3+ are determined to be 44.9% and 11.58%, respectively. High temperature heat treatment testing was carried out on the LYAS glasses and orientational crystallization was observed. Visible transition emissions of Sm3+ with obvious Stark splitting indicate Sm3+ ions have been introduced into the YAG micro-crystal formed in the glass ceramics. Investigations on multi-channel radiative transition emissions of Sm3+ in LYAS glasses provide a new clue to develop tunable lasers, compact light sources and optoelectronic devices

  13. Effect of ZnO on the Physical Properties and Optical Band Gap of Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Sabri Mohd Ghazali; Mohd Hafiz Mohd Zaid; Azmi Zakaria; Sidek Hj. Abdul Aziz; Khamirul Amin Matori

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reports on the physical properties and optical band gap of five samples of soda lime silicate (SLS) glass combined with zinc oxide (ZnO) that were prepared by a melting and quenching process. To understand the role of ZnO in this glass structure, the density, molar volume and optical band gaps were investigated. The density and absorption spectra in the Ultra-Violet-Visible (UV-Visible) region were recorded at room temperature. The results show that the densities of the glass ...

  14. Formation of silver colloids on ion exchanged soda lime silicate glasses by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ionizing radiation (gamma rays, X-rays and electrons) on soda lime silicate glasses, in which part of the Na+ was substituted by Ag+ by means of an ionic exchange process, was studied. The techniques of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to follow the formation of silver colloids by irradiation. Also the thermoluminescence (TL) of the samples was measured and three peaks between room temperature and 450 C were observed. The TEM and TSDC results agree that, as expected, ionizing radiation promotes the formation of silver colloids on the ion exchanged surface of soda lime glasses. Soft X-rays are much more efficient in the process than gamma rays and electrons. The correlation with thermoluminescence glow curves indicates that the intensity of a TL peak at 230 C can provide a rapid means of evaluating the presence of silver colloids. TL sensitivities, measured as area under the glow curve per unit mass and unit dose, are very similar for ion exchanged and not exchanged samples submitted to X-ray irradiation, although the peak temperatures differ in about 40 C in the two cases. For both electron and gamma irradiated samples, the TL sensitivity drops about an order of magnitude when compared to the X-ray irradiated ones. (orig.)

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ALKALI RESISTANT GLASS FIBER FOR CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT AND CHEMICAL DURABILITY COMPARISON WITH SrO-Mn2O3-Fe2O3-MgO-ZrO2-SiO2 (SMFMZS SYSTEM GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göktuğ GÜNKAYA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the relevant literature, the utilization of different kind of glass fibers in concrete introduces positive effect on the mechanical behavior, especially toughness. There are many glassfibers available to reinforce concretes. Glass fiber composition is so important because it may change the properties such as strength, elastic modulus and alkali resistance. Its most important property to be used in concrete is the alkali resistance. Some glasses of SrO–MgO–ZrO2–SiO2 (SMZS quaternary system, such as 26SrO, 20MgO, 14ZrO2, 40SiO2 (Zrn glass, have been found to be highly alkali resistant thanks to their high ZrO2 and MgO contents. Previous researches on these glasses with MnO and/or Fe2O3 partially replacing SrO have been made with the aim of improving the chemical resistance and decreasing the production cost.The main target of the present study, first of all, was to characterize commercially available alkali resistant glass fiber for concrete reinforcement and then to compare its alkali durability with those of the SrO-Mn2O3-Fe2O3-MgO-ZrO2-SiO2 (SMFMZS system glasses. For such purposes, XRF, Tg-DTA, alkali resistance tests and SEM analysis conducted with EDX were employed. According tothe alkali endurance test results it was revealed that some of the SMFMZS system glass powders are 10 times resistant to alkali environments than the commercial glass fibers used in this study.Therefore, they can be considered as alternative filling materials on the evolution of chemically resistant concrete structures.

  16. Effect of Li2O content on physical and structural properties of vanadyl doped alkali zinc borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Li2O content in vanadyl doped 20ZnO+xLi2O+(30-x)Na2O+50B2O3 (5≤x≥25) glasses has been studied with respect to their physical and structural properties. The absence of sharp peaks in XRD spectra of these glass samples confirms the amorphous nature. The physical parameters like density, refractive index, ionic concentration and electronic polarizability vary non-linearly with x mol% depending on the diffusivities of alkali ions. EPR and optical absorption spectra reveal that the resonance signals are characteristics of VO2+ ions in tetragonally compressed octahedral site. Spin-Hamiltonian, crystal field, tetragonal field and bonding parameters are found to be in good agreement with the other reported glass systems. The tetragonal distortion (gperpendicular-g||) and Dt reveals that their values vary non-linearly with Li2O content and reaches a minimum at x=10 mol%. An anomaly of character has been observed in all the properties of vanadyl doped glass systems, which gives a clear indication of mixed alkali effect.

  17. Effect of Li 2O content on physical and structural properties of vanadyl doped alkali zinc borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra Rao, T.; Rama Krishna, Ch.; Udayachandran Thampy, U. S.; Venkata Reddy, Ch.; Reddy, Y. P.; Sambasiva Rao, P.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of Li 2O content in vanadyl doped 20ZnO+ xLi 2O+(30- x)Na 2O+50B 2O 3 (5≤ x≥25) glasses has been studied with respect to their physical and structural properties. The absence of sharp peaks in XRD spectra of these glass samples confirms the amorphous nature. The physical parameters like density, refractive index, ionic concentration and electronic polarizability vary non-linearly with x mol% depending on the diffusivities of alkali ions. EPR and optical absorption spectra reveal that the resonance signals are characteristics of VO 2+ ions in tetragonally compressed octahedral site. Spin-Hamiltonian, crystal field, tetragonal field and bonding parameters are found to be in good agreement with the other reported glass systems. The tetragonal distortion ( g⊥- g∥) and Dt reveals that their values vary non-linearly with Li 2O content and reaches a minimum at x=10 mol%. An anomaly of character has been observed in all the properties of vanadyl doped glass systems, which gives a clear indication of mixed alkali effect.

  18. Strengthening mechanisms and fracture surface characteristics of silicate glass matrix composites with inclusion of alumina particles of different particle sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Minghui, E-mail: mhchen@imr.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Strengthening mechanisms of silicate glass by the inclusion of alumina particles of different volume fractions and different particle sizes are reported. The formulas of three responsible strengthening mechanisms, based on inclusion/crack interactions and interfacial elemental diffusion, were deduced; these include crack deflection, crack bridging and interdiffusion. The strength of the glass/alumina composites increased with inclusion fraction, but followed strengthening mechanisms that varied with alumina particle size. Crack deflection and bridging mechanisms dominated in strengthening for the glass/alumina (at mean particle size of 6 μm) composites while interdiffusion mechanism played a major role in the glass/alumina (at mean particle size of 1 μm) composites. The theoretical deduction of strengthening mechanisms depending on the particle size of alumina inclusions was demonstrated by the experimental strength data and fracture surface characteristics of the glass/alumina composites.

  19. Strengthening mechanisms and fracture surface characteristics of silicate glass matrix composites with inclusion of alumina particles of different particle sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strengthening mechanisms of silicate glass by the inclusion of alumina particles of different volume fractions and different particle sizes are reported. The formulas of three responsible strengthening mechanisms, based on inclusion/crack interactions and interfacial elemental diffusion, were deduced; these include crack deflection, crack bridging and interdiffusion. The strength of the glass/alumina composites increased with inclusion fraction, but followed strengthening mechanisms that varied with alumina particle size. Crack deflection and bridging mechanisms dominated in strengthening for the glass/alumina (at mean particle size of 6 μm) composites while interdiffusion mechanism played a major role in the glass/alumina (at mean particle size of 1 μm) composites. The theoretical deduction of strengthening mechanisms depending on the particle size of alumina inclusions was demonstrated by the experimental strength data and fracture surface characteristics of the glass/alumina composites

  20. Characterization of Cr3+ doped mixed alkali ions effect in zinc borate glasses - Physical and spectroscopic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama Sundari, G.; Pushpa Manjari, V.; Raghavendra Rao, T.; Satish, D. V.; Rama Krishna, Ch.; Venkata Reddy, Ch.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2014-06-01

    The physical and structural properties of Cr3+ doped 19.9 ZnO + xLi2O + (30 - x) Na2O + 50B2O3 (5 ⩽ x ⩽ 25) (ZLNB) glasses have been studied. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the amorphous nature of the glass samples. The physical parameters of all the glasses were also evaluated with respect to the composition. They exhibit the non-linearity providing the evidence for mixed alkali ions effect. The infrared spectra of the glasses in the range 400-4000 cm-1 showed the presence of BO3 and BO4 local structures in all the glass systems. No boroxol ring formation was observed in the structure of these glasses. Optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance studies were carried out at room temperature. From the optical absorption data various optical parameters such as optical band gap, Urbach energy were evaluated. Crystal field and Racah parameters are evaluated from optical absorption spectra. The EPR spectra of Cr3+ doped ZLNB glasses exhibited resonance signals at g = 4.066 and g = 1.9779 characteristic of Cr3+ ions. The evaluated bonding parameters suggest the covalent nature.

  1. Computational modelling of large deformations in layered-silicate/PET nanocomposites near the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figiel, Łukasz; Dunne, Fionn P. E.; Buckley, C. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Layered-silicate nanoparticles offer a cost-effective reinforcement for thermoplastics. Computational modelling has been employed to study large deformations in layered-silicate/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites near the glass transition, as would be experienced during industrial forming processes such as thermoforming or injection stretch blow moulding. Non-linear numerical modelling was applied, to predict the macroscopic large deformation behaviour, with morphology evolution and deformation occurring at the microscopic level, using the representative volume element (RVE) approach. A physically based elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model, describing the behaviour of the PET matrix within the RVE, was numerically implemented into a finite element solver (ABAQUS) using an UMAT subroutine. The implementation was designed to be robust, for accommodating large rotations and stretches of the matrix local to, and between, the nanoparticles. The nanocomposite morphology was reconstructed at the RVE level using a Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that placed straight, high-aspect ratio particles according to the specified orientation and volume fraction, with the assumption of periodicity. Computational experiments using this methodology enabled prediction of the strain-stiffening behaviour of the nanocomposite, observed experimentally, as functions of strain, strain rate, temperature and particle volume fraction. These results revealed the probable origins of the enhanced strain stiffening observed: (a) evolution of the morphology (through particle re-orientation) and (b) early onset of stress-induced pre-crystallization (and hence lock-up of viscous flow), triggered by the presence of particles. The computational model enabled prediction of the effects of process parameters (strain rate, temperature) on evolution of the morphology, and hence on the end-use properties.

  2. Equation of state of refractory silicate glasses and melts by high-pressure x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesher, C. E.; Gaudio, S.; Wang, Y.; Nishiyama, N.; Rivers, M.; Tangeman, J.

    2005-12-01

    The new high-pressure x-ray tomographic microscope on 13-BM-D at GSECARS-APS/ANL is being used to determine the equation of state of glasses and melts. We demonstrate that the volume of compressed silicate glass microspheres can be measured accurately to constrain the bulk modulus and its pressure derivative up to ~6 GPa. The pressure generation system consists of two opposing Drickamer anvils compressed within an x-ray-transparent Al containment ring supported by thrust bearings and driven by a 250-ton hydraulic press. This configuration permits the pressure cell to rotate under load, while collecting 360 x-ray radiographs through 180 degrees of rotation. Individual x-ray radiographs are recorded by a CCD camera after conversion to visible light by a YAG scintillator and combined to render the volume using a back-projection algorithm and standard flat/dark field corrections with minimal filtering, following by image processing. Results are reported for two magnesium silicate glasses (33 mol % and 38 mol % SiO2) synthesized by levitation-laser heating. Vitreous forsterite (33 mol % SiO2) compressed to 4.8 GPa shows a 5% reduction in volume, while 38 mol % SiO2 glass compressed to 6.4 GPa shows an 8.7% decrease in volume - corresponding to bulk moduli of 75 and 55 GPa, respectively, for K' of 4. The differences in the compressibility of these magnesium silicate glasses are consistent with the structural differences inferred from neutron and x-ray diffraction studies. Efforts to develop a heating circuit will soon allow the recovery of thermal expansivity, central to efforts to derive a P-V-T equation of state for silicate liquids relevant to the Earth's deep interior.

  3. Silicate glasses doped with Ag+ ions: The comparisSilicate glasses doped with Ag+ ions: The comparison between the ion-exchange and ion implantationon between the ion-exchange and ion implantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.; Kormunda, M.; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Pešička, J.; Špirková, J.

    Praha, 2010. s. 139-139. ISBN 978-80-904678-0-4. [SSC-Conference on Solid State Chemistry. 11.09.2010-15.09.2010, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0125; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Silicate glasses * Silver * Ion exchange * Ion implantation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  4. Chemical durability of alkali-borosilicate glasses studied by analytical SEM, IBA, isotopic-tracing and SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple and complex alkali-borosilicate glasses were submitted to aqueous corrosion at room temperature, 60 and 90 deg. C in solutions with pH ranging between 0 and 12. Analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques, isotopic tracing and secondary ion mass-depth profiling (SIMS) have been used to investigate the variations of the surface composition of glass. In acidic medium, the glass surface is generally covered by a thick hydrated silica layer, mobile elements like Li, Na and B and transition elements (Fe, Zr, Mo, etc.) are strongly depleted. Near pH 7, relative enrichments of aluminium, iron and rare earths are shown together with strong Li, Na and B depletions. In basic medium, the glass surface exhibits relative enrichments of the major part of transition metals (from Cr to U) whereas mobile elements seem to be kept close to their nominal concentration level at the glass surface and Si is severely impoverished. Hydrogen incorporated at the glass surface after leaching is much more immobile in neutral and basic media than in acid medium

  5. Electron and x-ray photon radiation effects on surfaces of lead silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation effects on insulators have been extensively studied in terms of radiation induced damage. However, little work has concentrated on in situ surface modification during irradiation and the evolution of surface relaxation after the termination of irradiation. In this work, 1.3 keV electrons and 1.2536 keV Mg Kα X-ray photons were applied to investigate radiation effects on surface structural changes during irradiation and relaxation. The microstructure and composition of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ in an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Similar surface radiation effects were observed using both types of radiation which included permanent metallic lead separation from the glass network resulting from Pb-O bond breaking, bimodal distribution of the O 1s XPS signal due to bridging and non-bridging oxygens, gradual increase of total lead and silicon concentrations and gradual decrease of oxygen concentration during relaxation. Different radiation effects for electron beam and X-ray photons were also observed. For photon irradiation, silicon and lead continuously accumulated while the oxygen on the surface continuously decreased during irradiation and relaxation. In the case of electron irradiation, both silicon and lead were depleted from the surface during irradiation and accumulated during relaxation. Opposite concentration changes were observed for oxygen; it increased during irradiation and decreased during relaxation. The experimental results are discussed in terms of charge effects, secondary electron yield, field-enhanced diffusion, non-bridging oxygens and nucleation of metallic lead

  6. Volumetric properties of magnesium silicate glasses and supercooled liquid at high pressure by X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesher, Charles E.; Wang, Yanbin; Gaudio, Sarah; Clark, Alisha; Nishiyama, Nori; Rivers, Mark

    2009-05-01

    The volumetric properties of silicate glasses and supercooled liquid are examined at high pressures and temperatures using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and absorption. The high pressure X-ray microtomography (HPXMT) system at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (GeoSoilEnvironCARS 13-BM-D beamline) consists of two opposing anvils compressed within an X-ray-transparent containment ring supported by thrust bearings and loaded using a 250-ton hydraulic press. This system permits the pressure cell to rotate under the load, while collecting radiographs through at least 180° of rotation. The 13-BM-D beamline permits convenient switching between monochromatic radiation required for radiography and polychromatic radiation for pressure determination by energy dispersive diffraction. We report initial results on several refractory magnesium silicate glasses synthesized by levitation laser heating. Volume changes during room temperature compression of Mg-silicate glasses with 33 mol% and 38 mol% SiO 2 up to 11.5 GPa give an isothermal bulk moduli of 93-100 GPa for a K' of 1. These values are consistent with ultrasonic measurements of more silica-rich glasses. The volumetric properties of amorphous MgSiO 3 at 2 GPa were examined during annealing up to 1000 °C. We consider the consequences of heating through the glass transition and the implications for thermal expansivity of supercooled liquids at high pressure. Our results illustrate the capabilities of HPXMT for studies of refractory glasses and liquids at high pressure and offer strategies for future studies of liquid densities within the melting interval for magmas in planet interiors.

  7. Study of fluorine in silicate glass with 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, T. M.; Douglass, D. C.; Csencsits, R.; Walker, K. L.

    1986-07-01

    We report an application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to the study of fluorine-doped silicate glass prepared by the modified chemical vapor deposition process, prior to drawing the rod into fibers. The silica contains 1.03-wt. % fluorine, as determined by the calibrated intensity of the 19F NMR spectrum. The isotropic chemical shift of the 19F spectrum shows that fluorine bonds only to silicon; there is no evidence of oxyfluorides. Analysis of the distribution of nuclear dipolar couplings between fluorine nuclei reveals that the relative populations of silicon monofluoride sites [Si(O-)3F] and species having near-neighbor fluorines, such as silicon difluoride sites [Si(O-)2F2], are nearly statistically random. That is, to a good approximation, the fluorine substitutes randomly into the oxygen sites of the silica network. There is no evidence of local clusters of fluorine sites, silicon trifluoride sites [Si(O-)F3], or silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4).

  8. Electrical Enhancement of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Transistors Using Fluorinated Silicate Glass Passivation Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Wen; Deng, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jiun-Jia; Wang, Tong-Yi; Lei, Tan-Fu

    2008-02-01

    Polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (poly-Si TFTs) with a fluorinated silicate glass (FSG) passivation layer are proposed and demonstrated in this study. Experimental results reveal that the electrical characteristics can be improved by the incorporation of appropriate amounts of fluorine in the poly-Si film. The poly-Si TFTs with a FSG passivation layer show a high on-current, a low off-state gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) current, a high field-effect mobility, and a suppressed kink effect, compared with the poly-Si TFTs with an undoped SiO2 passivation layer. The presence of incorporated fluorine atoms from the FSG passivation layer in the poly-Si channel film can passivate the trap states at the grain boundaries. Furthermore, the incorporation of fluorine atoms can form stronger Si-F bonds near the source and drain sides to enhance the immunity against hot-carrier stress. In addition, the proposed poly-Si TFTs are easy to fabricate, have a low production cost, and are realized using a process compatible with modern TFT manufacturing technology.

  9. Gamma irradiated soda lime silicate glasses of different origin: Isothermal light emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isothermal light emission, at temperatures from 30 to 70 deg. C, from gamma irradiated (9 kGy with 60Co source, at room temperature) soda lime silicate glasses, with different amounts of K, Na and/or Ca in the matrix is presented. This emission was not expected in view of the thermoluminescent (TL) peak temperatures, commensurate with low probability of emission at temperatures too much below the peak maxima. It was noticed that single or multi-exponential decay functions can be fitted to experimental data for all the samples. The time constants of luminescence decay obtained range from minutes to several hours, depending on sample composition and temperature. For each sample and temperature, there is a tendency of enlargement of the half life of the light emission for longer heating duration. As the TL mechanism of this material is not yet fully understood, the analysis included, correlated with already known results of other techniques, gives a contribution to its comprehension

  10. Effect of ZnO on the Physical Properties and Optical Band Gap of Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sabri Mohd Ghazali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reports on the physical properties and optical band gap of five samples of soda lime silicate (SLS glass combined with zinc oxide (ZnO that were prepared by a melting and quenching process. To understand the role of ZnO in this glass structure, the density, molar volume and optical band gaps were investigated. The density and absorption spectra in the Ultra-Violet-Visible (UV-Visible region were recorded at room temperature. The results show that the densities of the glass samples increased as the ZnO weight percentage increased. The molar volume of the glasses shows the same trend as the density: the molar volume increased as the ZnO content increased. The optical band gaps were calculated from the absorption edge, and it was found that the optical band gap decreased from 3.20 to 2.32 eV as the ZnO concentration increased.

  11. The photosensitive effect of Ce on the precipitation of Ag nanoparticles induced by femtosecond laser in silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the photosensitive effect of cerium oxide on the precipitation of Ag nanoparticles after femtosecond laser irradiating into silicate glass and successive annealing. Spectroscopy analysis and diffraction efficiency measurements show that the introduction of cerium oxide may increase the concentration of Ag atoms in the femtosecond laser-irradiated regions resulting from the photoreduction reaction Ce3+ + Ag+ → Ce4+ + Ag0 via multiphoton excitation. These results promote the aggregation of Ag nanoparticles during the annealing process. It is also found that different concentrations of cerium oxide may influence the Ag nanoparticle precipitation in the corresponding glass. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  12. Investigation of UV-photon induced hydrophilicity of titanium ion-implanted soda-lime silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UV-induced wetting effect on titanium oxide surface is well-known; however, the UV-induced hydrophilicity of titanium implanted soda-lime silicate glass has not been investigated. Hence the contact angle of water droplet under the indoor fluorescent lights on titanium-ion implanted soda-lime silicate glasses was investigated. The silicate glasses were implanted by MEVVA ion implanter by 40 keV titanium ions with a fluence of 1015 ions cm-2. The contact angle, the chemical bonding environment, and surface morphologies were examined. Results show the formation of TiO2, the increase of surface roughness, and the reduction of the contact angle after the ion implantation. Further enhancement of hydrophilicity after the 254 nm pre-UV irradiation for 1 h on the implanted sample surface was observed. The enhancement of the wetting effect after ion implantation could be attributed to rougher TiO2 content surface. However, according to the mechanisms of UV photo-induced hydrophilicity on TiO2 proposed previously, the enhancement of hydrophilicity of titanium implanted surface with and without 254 nm pre-photon radiation can be attributed to not only the reduction of hydrocarbon on surface during the UV radiation but also to the oxygen vacancies produced by 254 nm UV photon irradiation.

  13. Dissolution mechanism of soda-lime silicate glass and of PNL 76-68 in the presence of dissolved Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching studies were performed on powdered PNL 76-68 glass in de-ionized water in the presence of Mg solute. The results showed that the presence of Mg in the leachant greatly reduced the rate of glass dissolution. The equation Q = ktα was used to express the experimental data. In the absence of Mg, α was about 1, i.e., the amount of glass dissolved was linear with time. In the presence of Mg, α was close to 0.5, i.e. the extracted amount was proportional to the square root of time. Therefore, the reduction of the dissolution rate of PNL 76-68 glass in the presence of Mg solute could be explained as a result of a change in the glass dissolution mechanism. Comparative leaching studies on bulk soda-lime silicate glass in a sodium borate buffered system (pH 8.1) showed the same results. The presence of Mg in the leachant reduced the rate of glass dissolution. In the absence of Mg, α was about 1, while in the presence of Mg, α was 0.5. This change in α was not caused by changes in pH, and it represents a real change in the glass dissolution mechanism

  14. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  15. A new approach for understanding ion transport in glasses; example of complex alkali diborate glasses containing lead, bismuth and tellurium oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V C Veeranna Gowda; C Narayana Reddy; K J Rao

    2013-02-01

    Mechanism of ion transport in glasses continues to be incompletely understood. Several of the theoretical models in vogue fail to rationalize conductivity behaviour when d.c. and a.c. measurements are considered together. While they seem to involve the presence of at least two components in d.c. activation energy, experiments fail to reveal that feature. Further, only minor importance is given to the influence of structure of the glass on the ionic conductivity behaviour. In this paper, we have examined several general aspects of ion transport taking the example of ionically conducting glasses in pseudo binary, Na2B4O7.(1−) M$_{a}$O$_{b}$ (with = 0.25–0.79 and M$_{a}$O$_{b}$ = PbO, TeO2 and Bi2O3) system of glasses which have also been recently characterized. Ion transport in them has been studied in detail. We have proposed that non-bridging oxygen (NBO) participation is crucial to the understanding of the observed conductivity behaviour. NBO–BO switching is projected as the first important step in ion transport and alkali ion jump is a subsequent event with a characteristically lower barrier which is, therefore, not observed in any study. All important observations in d.c. and a.c. transport in glasses are found consistent with this model.

  16. Effect of Er2O3 dopant on electrical and optical properties of potassium sodium niobate silicate glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The KNN–SiO2 doped Er2O3 glass-ceramics was prepared by incorporation method. • High dielectric constant (458.41 at 100 kHz) and low loss (0.0005) could be obtained. • TEM and SEM confirmed the existence of KNN crystals embedded in glass matrix. • The Er2O3 dopant causes insignificant effect on modifying Eg value. - Abstract: In this study, transparent glass-ceramics from potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-silicate glass system doped with erbium oxide (Er2O3) were successfully prepared by incorporation method. KNN was added in glass batches as heterogeneous nucleating agent. The KNN powder was mixed with SiO2 and Er2O3 dopant with KNN and Er2O3 content varied between 70–80 and 0.5–1.0 mol%, respectively. Each batch was subsequently melted at 1300 °C for 15 min in a platinum crucible using an electric furnace. The quenched glasses were then subjected to heat treatment at various temperatures for 4 h. XRD results showed that the prepared glass ceramics contained crystals of KNN solid solution. In contrary, dielectric constant (ϵr) and dielectric loss (tan δ) were found to increase with increasing heat treatment temperature. Additionally, optical properties such as absorbance and energy band gap have been investigated

  17. Effect of γ-irradiation on the electrical conductivity of some soda lime silicate glass containing blast furnace slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electric field strength on conduction in soda lime silicate glass doped with blast furnace slag with different concentration was studied and the value of jump distance was calculated. The structure and the mixed anion effect in the conductivity have been examined by measuring the electrical conductivity of glass samples at temperature ranging between 20 and 250 deg. C. The results showed that the electrical conductivity of the examined glasses are divided into three ranges depending on the temperature range. The first is from room temperature to about 49.5 deg. C, the second is at a temperature range of 60.3-104 deg. C where the glass shows a decrease in its conductivity with the increase in temperature. This was followed by another increase in the electrical conductivity with the increase in temperature. The results also showed that the glass becomes more insulating as the slag content increased. The effect of irradiation was also studied by exposing glass samples to two different irradiation doses. It can be noticed that irradiation causes an increase in the electrical conductivity, especially at high temperature. The results were discussed and correlated according to the molecular structure of the prepared glass

  18. Irradiations effects on the structure of boro-silicated glasses: long term behaviour of nuclear waste glassy matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the long term behaviour of R7T7-type nuclear waste glasses and more particularly of non-active boro-silicated glasses made up of 3 or 5 oxides. Radioactivity of active glasses is simulated by multi energies ions implantations which reproduce the same defects. The damages due to the alpha particles are simulated by helium ions implantations and those corresponding to the recoil nucleus are obtained with gold ions ones. Minor actinides, stemming from the used fuel, is simulated by trivalent rare-earths (Eu3+ and Nd3+). In a first part, we have shown by macroscopic experiments (Vickers hardness - swelling) and optical spectroscopies (Raman - ATR-IR) that the structure of the glassy matrices is modified under implantations until a dose of 2,3.1013 at.cm-2, which corresponds to a R7T7 storage time estimated at 300 years. Beyond this dose, no additional modifications have been observed. The second part concerns the local environment of the rare-earth ions in glasses. Two different environments were found and identified as follows: one is a silicate rich one and the other is attributed to a borate rich one. (author)

  19. Molecular dynamics study of the influence of mobile cations on the reconstruction of an irradiated silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ballistic collisions in a simplified nuclear glass was investigated by molecular dynamics. Systematic results were obtained in the 0-16 keV energy range. Following a damage peak, reconstruction of the glass structure was observed in terms of the overall degree of polymerization. The reconstruction was facilitated by the presence of mobile cations. The dynamics of restoration of the SiO4 tetrahedrons during displacement cascades and during the formation of a structure from a random configuration can be fitted to curves corresponding to the same analytic formula. This similarity allowed us to examine the influence of mobile cations (alkalis or alkaline earths) on the formation of SiO4 entities in smaller systems formed from random configurations. The formation rate of SiO4 tetrahedrons accelerates with the Na2O or CaO percentage to reach a maximum rate above about 10 mol% Na2O or CaO. This threshold corresponds to the disappearance in the glass structure of zones comprising a central bridging oxygen surrounded by two first-neighbor bridging oxygen rings. No mixed alkali effect was observed in systems containing both Na and Cs because the formation of SiO4 does not require long-range diffusion of mobile cations

  20. Thermal diffusion in glass melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish thermal diffusion also with heavy ions in glasses, temperatures above Tg of the glasses are necessary to reach acceptable experimental times. Disturbances by convection currents can be avoided either by an experiment under weightless conditions or by suitable experimental setup. The second way was chosen here by heating a disk-like sample of glass from above and cooling it from below. Until now from the literature there is known the enrichment of potassium in Na-K-silicate glasses at the cold end and that the light alkali ions Li+, Na+ and K+ in binary silicate glasses travel to the hot end (heats of transport of 3-10 kJ/mole). Here mixed alkali glasses containing among other things also Rb+ and Cs+ were used as model glasses. The resulting concentration profiles were measured with EDAX, microprobe as well as at some radioactive marked samples by autoradiography. These instationary profiles were computed theoretically starting out from different possible temperature profiles. With linear temperature profiles there was the best accordance with the measured ones. The heavier ion always moved to the cold end. This was also found in glasses containing two alkali metals with different concentration ratios. The differences of the heat of transport lie between 2 and 14 kJ/mole. Disturbances by convection could not be found. Thermal diffusion should not be a factor in the final storage of radioactive fission products in glass blocks, due to the long time for reaching the steady state. (orig.)

  1. Observation of Supercontinuum Generation and Darkening Effect in Bro-Silicate Glass under 800 nm Femtosecond Irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahpour, D.; Jamshidi-Ghaleh, K.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we report the experimental observations of supercontinuum generation and darkening effect in bro-silicate glasses under 200 femtosecond pulses at wavelength of 800 nm. The spectrum of supercontinuum emission from the sample is recorded in the UV wavelength range. The length of filamentation or white light and darkening are investigated at different incident laser pulse energies. The begging position of the generated white light and darkening moves inside glass bulk with decreasing of incident pulse energy. The pulse energy threshold for supercontinuum generation and the laser-induced darkening in this material has been measured. By controlling of the laser-induced darkening in borosilicate glasses prepares a promising technique for designing optical devices.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses. Progress report, June 1, 1996--May 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

    1998-06-01

    This DOE-funded project (DE-FG03-ER13445, 6/1/96-5/31/99) emphasizes study of the behavior of volatiles in magmatic systems. The project is explicitly focused on the combined application of IR spectroscopy, experimental petrology, and stable isotope geochemistry to understanding the behavior and properties of the volatile components dissolved in silicate melts and glasses, although in recent years, our emphasis has broadened to include non-volatile aspects of stable isotope geochemistry. Results obtained during the current grant and previous grant periods confirm that when applied to study of well-chosen synthetic and natural systems, the combination of these approaches and techniques can yield insights of general petrological and volcanological value and of practical value to DOE. In particular, the results of our DOE-funded work has led to a deeper understanding of the physical chemistry of silicate melts as well as specific constraints on the thermal and chemical evolution of high-level magmatic systems of the sort being evaluated as potential geothermal and magmathermal energy sources. Moreover, our work has also contributed to understanding the behavior of H-, C-, and O-bearing species in amorphous and crystalline silicates, including the kinetics of their interactions; we believe these results will contribute to efforts to use silicates in the development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

  3. Glass as a waste form for the immobilization of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several alternatives for disposal of surplus plutonium are being considered. One method is incorporating Pu into glass and in this paper we discuss the development and corrosion behavior of an alkali-tin-silicate glass and update results in testing Pu doped Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference glasses. The alkali-tin-silicate glass was engineered to accommodate a high Pu loading and to be durable under conditions likely to accelerate glass reaction. The glass dissolves about 7 wt% Pu together with the neutron absorber Gd, and under test conditions expected to accelerate the glass reaction with water, is resistant to corrosion. The Pu and the Gd are released from the glass at nearly the same rate in static corrosion tests in water, and are not segregated into surface alteration phases when the glass is reacted in water vapor. Similar results for the behavior of Pu and Gd are found for the DWPF reference glasses, although the long-term rate of reaction for the reference glasses is more rapid than for the alkali-tin-silicate glass

  4. UV-curable silicate phosphor planar films printed on glass substrate for white light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jin Woo; Kim, Jun Sik; Kwon, Oh Hyeon; Lee, Tae Hyeon; Cho, Yong Soo

    2015-08-15

    We suggest a simple way of forming a nonconventional remote phosphor layer for white light-emitting diodes. A printing technology using a paste consisting of yellow (Ba,Sr,Ca)(2)SiO(4):Eu(2+) silicate phosphor and ultraviolet (UV)-curable polymer is applied to form solid planar films on a common soda lime silicate glass substrate through UV radiation. Relative content of the phosphor was adjusted for the best dispersion of the phosphor particles in the polymer matrix with better emission and luminescence performance. As a result, the 70 wt. % phosphor-embedded film has a luminous efficacy of ∼70.1  lm/W at 200 mA. PMID:26274644

  5. Spectroscopic studying of silicate glasses subjected to photon and ion fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary exposure of glass to UV-and γ-radiation activates the ion synthesis of glass within glass as it causes the increase of number of broken bonds in glass structural net through stimulation of the processes of chemical interaction of the implants with their neighbors. (authors)

  6. Generation of alkali-free and high-proton concentration layer in a soda lime glass using non-contact corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation mechanisms of alkali-free and high-proton concentration surfaces were investigated for a soda lime glass using a corona discharge treatment under an atmospheric pressure. Protons produced by high DC voltage around an anode needle electrode were incorporated into a sodium ion site in the anode side glass. The sodium ion was swept away to the cathode side as a charge carrier. Then it was discharged. The precipitated sodium was transformed to a Na2CO3 powder when the surface contacted with air. The sodium ion in the glass surface layer of the anode side was replaced completely by protons. The concentration of OH groups in the layer was balanced with the amount of excluded sodium ions. The substitution reaction of sodium ions with protons tends to be saturated according to a square root function of time. The alkali depletion layer formation rate was affected by the large difference in mobility between sodium ions and protons in the glass

  7. Investigation on Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped silicate glass for ~2 µm fiber lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xueqiang; Huang, Feifei; Cheng, Jimeng; Fan, Xiaokang; Gao, Song [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, Junjie [College of Materials Science and Technology, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-06-15

    A stable Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped lead silicate glass is developed. Luminescent properties are recorded under pumping with 808 and 1550 nm lasers. Energy-transfer mechanism and efficiency are analyzed. Energy-transfer efficiency from Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} to Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7} reaches 93.8% at 3 mol% Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} doping concentration. Strong luminescence is detected when pumped at 1550 nm because of efficient energy transfer from Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} to Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7}. Peak gain coefficient at 2056 nm is detected as 1.62 cm{sup −1}. The excellent luminescent property and high stability indicate that Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped lead silicate glass can be applied in 2 µm fiber lasers. - Highlights: • Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped silicate glasses with high stability are prepared. • Strong luminescence is detected under pump of 1550 nm lasers owing to efficient energy transfer from Er{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+}. • Transfer efficiency is calculated to be 93.8% when Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} doping concentration is up to 3 mol%. • Gain coefficient peaks at 2056 nm to be 1.62 cm{sup −1}.

  8. The studies of nanoparticles formed in silicate glasses doped by cerium and titanium oxides by means of small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure aspect of Ti-Ce-O nanoparticles, which is forming in silicate glasses doped by TiO2 and CeO2 oxides have been studied by means of a small angle neutron scattering. It was found, the complex oxide nanoparticles forms in these glasses in sizes range 30-38 nm and its average sizes depends on initial oxides concentration ratio. The correlation between nanoparticles structure features and silica glasses optical properties are discussed.

  9. Large-mode-area single-mode-output Neodymium-doped silicate glass all-solid photonic crystal fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Wentao Li; Danping Chen; Zhou Qinling; Lili Hu

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a 45 μm core diameter Neodymium-doped all-solid silicate glass photonic crystal fiber laser with a single mode laser output. The structure parameters and modes information of the fiber are both demonstrated by theoretical calculations using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and experimental measurements. Maximum 0.8 W output power limited by launched pump power has been generated in 1064 nm with laser beam quality factor M2 1.18.

  10. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  11. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted β-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of β/γ radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  12. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted {beta}-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of {beta}/{gamma} radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  13. ∼2 μm fluorescence radiative dynamics and energy transfer between Er3+ and Tm3+ ions in silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A Er3+/Tm3+ co-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability (kgl = 0.402 for STE glass) is prepared. • Efficient ∼2 μm emission is observed under 808 nm and 980 nm laser excitation. • The glass structure and spectroscopic properties are confirmed by optical absorption, IR transmission, Raman and fluorescence studies. • The content of OH groups deceases efficiently after fluorine ions are introduced. • The energy transfer coefficient from Er3+ to Tm3+ in STFE glass is 13.39 × 10−40 cm6/s. - Abstract: A Er3+/Tm3+ co-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability is prepared by melt-quenching method. An efficient emission of ∼2 μm is observed under different selective laser excitations. The optical absorption and transmission spectra, Raman spectra, and emission spectra are tested to characterize ∼2 μm emission properties of Er3+/Tm3+ co-doped silicate glasses and a reasonable energy transfer mechanism of ∼2 μm emission between Er3+ and Tm3+ ions is proposed. Based on the optical absorption spectra, the Judd–Ofelt parameters and radiative properties were calculated. Intense ∼2 μm emission is obtained from Er3+/Tm3+ co-doped silicate glasses due to the efficient energy transfer from Er3+ to Tm3+ ions. The energy transfer coefficient from Er3+ to Tm3+ ions can reach as high as 13.39 × 10−40 cm6/s. In addition, the population of the OH groups is decreased and the ∼2 μm emission is effectively enhanced with fluoride introduction. The emission property, together with good thermal property, indicates that Er3+/Tm3+ co-doped silicate glass is a potential kind of laser glass for efficient ∼2 μm laser

  14. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17 C, with R2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided

  15. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegel, Alex

    2007-02-01

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

  16. Study of bi-alkali photocathode growth on glass by X-ray techniques for fast timing response photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Junqi; Demarteau, Marcel; Wagner, Robert; Ruiz-Oses, Miguel; Liang, Xue; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Attenkofer, Klaus; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Wong, Jared; Padmore, Howard; Woll, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Bi-alkali antimonide photocathode is an essential component in fast timing response photomultipliers. Real-time in-situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and post-growth x-ray reflectivity measurement were performed to study the photocathode deposition process on glass substrate. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction patterns show the formation of Sb crystalline, dissolution of crystalline phase Sb by the application of K vapor and reformation of refined crystal textures. XRR result exhibits that the film thickness increases ~ 4.5 times after K diffusion and almost have no change after Cs diffusion. Further investigation is expected to understand the photocathode growth process and provide guidelines for photocathode development.

  17. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwöbel, André; Precht, Ruben; Motzko, Markus; Carrillo Solano, Mercedes A.; Calvet, Wolfram; Hausbrand, René; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode-electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses.

  18. CRYSTALLIZATION AND THERMAL EXPANSION CHARACTERISTICS OF In2O3-CONTAINING LITHIUM IRON SILICATE-DIOPSIDE GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    *S. M. Salman; S.N. Salama

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization characteristics of glasses based on lithium iron silicate (LiFeSi2O6)-diopside (CaMgSi2O6) composition with addition of Al2O3 at the expense of Fe2O3 were described. The effect of LiInSi2O6/CaMgSi2O6 replacements was also investigated. The thermal treatment, the crystal phases, and the micro-structural properties of (LiFeSi2O6–CaMgSi2O6) glasses, replacing partial Fe2O3 with Al2O3 and partial CaMgSi2O6 with LiInSi2O6, have been studied by a differential thermal analysis, a...

  19. Effects of doping CeO2/TiO2 on structure and properties of silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Doping CeO2 results in depolymerization and narrowed Qn distribution. • Co-doping CeO2 and TiO2 favors enhanced network and broader Qn distribution. • Cerium acts as modifier and titanium as intermediate in glass network structure. • Adding CeO2/TiO2 results in decreased optical band gap. • Doping-induced structural modifications affect mechanical properties. - Abstract: In order to elucidate the effects of doping CeO2/TiO2 on the structure and physical properties of silicate glass, glasses with composition 72SiO2–3Al2O3–10Na2O–10K2O–5CaO doped with varied ratios of CeO2/TiO2 were synthesized by melt-quenching method and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared and Raman spectrometry, UV–Visible spectrophotometry and micro-indentations. X-ray diffraction conforms the amorphous state of doped glasses. The spectroscopic analysis reveals that doping CeO2 alone results in depolymerization of glass network and narrowed distribution of Qn (Si–O tetrahedral with n bridging oxygen atoms), while doping TiO2 singly or combined with CeO2 favors the enhanced polymerization of network and regains a broader Qn distribution relative to doping CeO2 alone. It is proposed that doped cerium and titanium in glass exists in multivalent state and the former in presence of trivalent state preferentially acts as modifier inducing network depolymerization, whilst the latter in form of tetrahedral tends to interconnect network units as intermediate. Doped cerium in trivalent state contributes mainly to the red-shift of absorption edge while titanium suppresses such change of absorption band. Either adding cerium alone or co-doping with titanium will result in decreased optical band gap due to the structural modifications. The relatively loosened structure due to depolymerization induced by cerium is responsible for the decline in hardness and E-modulus but rising in fracture toughness, whereas network compactness by virtue of interconnectivity of

  20. Effects of doping CeO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} on structure and properties of silicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenlin, E-mail: wzl@cqut.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composites Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composites Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Doping CeO{sub 2} results in depolymerization and narrowed Q{sup n} distribution. • Co-doping CeO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} favors enhanced network and broader Q{sup n} distribution. • Cerium acts as modifier and titanium as intermediate in glass network structure. • Adding CeO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} results in decreased optical band gap. • Doping-induced structural modifications affect mechanical properties. - Abstract: In order to elucidate the effects of doping CeO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} on the structure and physical properties of silicate glass, glasses with composition 72SiO{sub 2}–3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10Na{sub 2}O–10K{sub 2}O–5CaO doped with varied ratios of CeO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} were synthesized by melt-quenching method and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared and Raman spectrometry, UV–Visible spectrophotometry and micro-indentations. X-ray diffraction conforms the amorphous state of doped glasses. The spectroscopic analysis reveals that doping CeO{sub 2} alone results in depolymerization of glass network and narrowed distribution of Q{sup n} (Si–O tetrahedral with n bridging oxygen atoms), while doping TiO{sub 2} singly or combined with CeO{sub 2} favors the enhanced polymerization of network and regains a broader Q{sup n} distribution relative to doping CeO{sub 2} alone. It is proposed that doped cerium and titanium in glass exists in multivalent state and the former in presence of trivalent state preferentially acts as modifier inducing network depolymerization, whilst the latter in form of tetrahedral tends to interconnect network units as intermediate. Doped cerium in trivalent state contributes mainly to the red-shift of absorption edge while titanium suppresses such change of absorption band. Either adding cerium alone or co-doping with titanium will result in decreased optical band gap due to the structural modifications. The relatively loosened structure due to depolymerization induced by cerium is responsible for

  1. Observation of a stuffed unmodified network in beryllium silicate glasses with multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of BeO-SiO2 glasses with up to 20 mol % BeO has been studied with 9Be and 29Si NMR spectroscopic techniques. The NMR results are consistent with a glass structure consisting of nanoclusters of corner-shared BeO4 tetrahedra that occupy the interstices of an unmodified and highly strained corner-shared SiO4 network. The complete absence of nonbridging oxygens in these glasses contradicts the conventional wisdom of oxide glass structures based on the modified random-network-type models. This structure type may have important implications in understanding and designing glasses with unusual properties

  2. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Ae [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Abo-Mosallam, Hany A. [Glass Research Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Young [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyu-Ri [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae-Won [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae-Hyoung, E-mail: haelee@dku.edu [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-CaO-ZnO-MgO{sub (1-X)}-SrO{sub X}-CaF{sub 2} (X = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X = 0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X = 0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues. - Highlights: • We developed multicomponent glass compositions for a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement (GIC). • The effects of MgO replacement with SrO in the glasses on the mechanical properties and cell proliferation were evaluated. • Substitution of MgO with SrO at low levels led to improvement of mechanical properties and cell viability of the cements. • Microstructural degradations in the cement matrix of the GICs with strontium at high levels were observed after aging.

  3. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO2-P2O5-CaO-ZnO-MgO(1-X)-SrOX-CaF2 (X = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X = 0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X = 0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues. - Highlights: • We developed multicomponent glass compositions for a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement (GIC). • The effects of MgO replacement with SrO in the glasses on the mechanical properties and cell proliferation were evaluated. • Substitution of MgO with SrO at low levels led to improvement of mechanical properties and cell viability of the cements. • Microstructural degradations in the cement matrix of the GICs with strontium at high levels were observed after aging

  4. Effect of cerium oxide addition on electrical and physical properties of alkali borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of electrical conductivity, density and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Na2O:K2O:B2O3:SiO2:BaO glass samples with addition of cerium oxide has been carried out. It has been observed that the addition of cerium oxide affects the electrical conductivity, density and CTE. The results have been explained on the basis of the variation in number of bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) present in the glass. In general, the glass with more NBOs has a weak network which exhibits higher electrical conductivity. The weakening of the network has been supported by the observed decrease in density and increase in CTE for the glasses.

  5. Nucleation and Crystallization as Induced by Bending Stress in Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol W.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    Glass Fibers of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and Li2O.1.6SiO2 (LS1.6) compositions were heated near, but below, the glass transition temperature for different times while subjected to a constant bending stress of about 1.2 GPa. The nucleation density and the crystallization tendency estimated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) of a glass sample in the vicinity of the maximum of the bending stress increased relative to that of stress-free glass fibers. LS2 glass fibers were found more resistant to nucleation and crystallization than the Ls1.6 glass fibers. These results are discussed in regards to shear thinning effects on glass stability.

  6. Alkali-Phosphate Glasses Containing WO3 and Nb2O5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New phosphate glasses in the quaternary system (50-x A2O-x WO3-10 Nb2O5-40 P2O5, with x = 0; 30 and A = Li or Na were prepared by the melt quenching method. The effect on the crystallization behaviour of the glass due to the introduction of WO3 into the glass composition and, consequently, the diminishing of the molar amount of the alkaline oxide and the decreasing of the molar ratio between network modifiers and network formers (M/F was studied. The prepared glasses were heat-treated in air, at 550°C, 600°C, and 650°C for 4 hours. The structure, of the obtained samples, was studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, and Raman spectroscopy and the morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that the replacement of Li2O or Na2O by WO3 reduces the number of the crystallised phases. In the lithium-niobiophosphate glasses, the presence of WO3 promotes the formation of NbOPO4 instead of the LiNbO3 phase and reduces the formation of ortho- and pyro-phosphate phases. The thermal treatments affect the arrangements of the network structure of the AW40-glasses.

  7. Effect of composition of titanium silicate glasses containing simulated Cs-loaded HLW on the leaching behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The titanium silicate glasses containing simulated Cs-loaded HLW were prepared. MCC-1 method was used to test the chemical durability of the glasses. The simulated solid samples were immersed for 7 days in deionized water at 90 degree C. The ratio of the surface area of sample to the volume of deionized water is 10 m-1. The leachate was analyzed with ICP-AES and AAS. The results show that the leachate is mainly composed of Na+ and Si4+. The amount of ZrO2 in the glass is a major factor affecting the leaching processes. When the glass contains about 1.5%-4.5% ZrO2, the concentration of Na+ and Si4+ in the leachate is greatly decreased. The amount of TiO2 and SiO2 also affect the concentration of Na+ and Si4+ in the leachate, the suitable ratio of TiO2/SiO2 in the system is about 0.40

  8. Thermally activated conversion of a silicate gel to an oxyfluoride glass ceramic: Optical study using Eu3+ probe ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol–gel route using metal alkoxides precursor and trifluoroacetic acid as in situ fluorination reagent has been used to prepare Eu3+-doped silicate xerogel, followed by thermal annealing to obtain oxyfluoride glass ceramic containing Eu3+-doped BaF2 nanocrystals. We have used Eu3+ as probe ion and we analyzed its characteristic features (photoluminescence, optical absorption and magnetic circular dichroism) to get information about the local environment around the ion during thermally activated evolution of the sol to xerogel and then glass ceramic. As the drying and annealing proceeds silica network is formed accompanied by precipitation of the nanofluoride crystalline phase; Eu3+ coordination changes gradually from a random and assymetric CF3COO- one (in the sol) to a symmetric one (in the BaF2 nanocrystals) given by the fluorine ions. Glass ceramization is based on a homogenous crystallization mechanism with BaF2 nucleation centres resulted from thermal decomposition of Ba-trifluoacetate at around 300 °C followed by subsequent growth into BaF2 nanocrystals above 600 °C; Eu3+-ions are incorporated during the nanocrystals growth. -- Highlights: • Glass ceramization is the result of a homogenous crystallization with BaF2 nucleation centres. • Eu3+-ions are incorporated during nanocrystals growth, above 600 °C. • Eu3+-ions are embedded dominantly in the BaF2 nanocrystals in high symmetry sites

  9. Crystallization and physical properties of alkali phosphomolybdate glasses containing niobium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M.A.; Graca, M.P.F. [Physics Department (I3N), Aveiro University, Campus Universitario de Santiago, Aveiro (Portugal); Bih, L.; Bih, H. [Equipe Sciences de Materiaux, FST-Errachidia (Morocco)

    2011-11-15

    Glasses with transition metal ions have interest because of their potential use in electrochemical, electronic and electro-optical devices. Molybdenum oxide is not a glass-forming, but it is able to enter the glass structure in the form of MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral or MoO{sub 6} octahedral with some glass-forming, like P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The binary MoO{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glasses were stable over a wide range of compositions. The ternary glass P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-MoO{sub 3}-Li{sub 2}O presents high potentiality as fast ion-conductors. Ferroelectric crystalline particles (LiNbO{sub 3}) can be obtained by heat-treatments of the glass P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Li{sub 2}O-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The heat-treatment does not promote glass-ceramics with a single crystalline phase. The quaternary system P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-MoO{sub 3}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-X{sub 2}O, (X=Li, Na), prepared by melt quenching, allowed the control of the crystalline phases obtained by heat-treatments. In this work, the transparent as-prepared glasses were heat-treated at 550 C and 650 C for 4 hours. The structure of the samples was analyzed by differential thermal analyses (DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The change of the MoO{sub 3}/P{sub 2}O{sub 5} ratio is the main chemical parameter that governs the nucleation and growth of different crystallites. The decrease of this ratio induces the formation of non-linear optical NbOPO{sub 4} crystallites in the glass. The increase of the ratio leads to the formation of other phases, such as LiPO{sub 3} (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Evolution of mechanical properties of silicate glasses: Impact of the chemical composition and effects of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines: (1) how the chemical composition changes the hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior in model pristine and (2) how external irradiation impact these properties. It is to be incorporated in the context of the storage of nuclear waste in borosilicate glass matrix, the structural integrity of which should be assessed. Eight simplified borosilicate glasses made of 3 oxides with modulated proportions (SiO2-B2O3-Na2O (SBN) have been selected and their hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior have been characterized prior and after irradiation. The comparative study of the non-irradiated SBN glasses provides the role played by the chemical composition. The sodium content is found to be the key parameter: As it increases, the glass plasticity increases, leading to changes in the mechanical response to strain. Hardness (Hv) and toughness (Kc) decrease since the flow under indenter increases. The analysis of the stress corrosion behavior evidences a clear shift of the SCC curves linked also to the glass plasticity. Four of the 8 simplified SBN glass systems highlight the influence of electron, light and heavy ions irradiations on the mechanical properties. Once again, the sodium content is a key parameter. It is found to inhibit the glass modification: Glasses with high sodium content are more stable. Ions irradiations highlight the predominant role of nuclear interaction in changing the glass properties. Finally, electronic interaction induced by helium and electron irradiation does not lead to the same structural/mechanical glasses variations. (author)

  11. Microstructural studies on some silicate and phosphate based glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments have made it possible to make a new class of ceramic materials called glass-ceramics with tailored expansion coefficients and improved thermo-mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. Since these are formed by controlled crystallization in which crystallites are embedded in the glassy matrix, it is possible to make nano glass-ceramics having pronounced effect of particle size on various properties such as transparency, bioactivity, etc. In this talk, some of the recent results on micro-structural properties of a few glass-ceramic-to-metal sealants and bio-glass-ceramics are discussed

  12. Dependence of Hardness of Silicate Glasses on Composition and Thermal History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The prediction of hardness is possible for crystalline materials, but so far not possible for glasses. In this work, several important factors that should be used for predicting the hardness of glasses are discussed. To do so, we have studied the influences of thermal history and chemical...

  13. Solid-state autocatalysis and oscillatory reactions in silicate glass systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canning, John; Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Kristensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of autocatalysis and oscillatory behaviour in the solid-state where no decomposition process is involved. Our material system is solid-state silica glass impregnated with hydrogen. It is at the heart of photosensitivity in glass-based optical waveguides and devices...

  14. Solid-state autocatalysis and oscillatory reactions in silicate glass systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canning, John; Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Kristensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of autocatalysis and oscillatory behaviour in the solid-state where no decomposition process is involved. Our material system is solid-state silica glass impregnated with hydrogen. It is at the heart of photosensitivity in glass-based optical waveguides and devic...

  15. Effect of natural and synthetic iron corrosion products on silicate glass alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, Philippe; Gin, Stéphane; Neff, Delphine; Gentaz, Lucile; Rebiscoul, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Glass long term alteration in the context of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) storage is influenced by near-field materials and environmental context. As previous studies have shown, the extent of glass alteration is strongly related to the presence of iron in the system, mainly provided by the steel overpack around surrounding the HLW glass package. A key to understanding what will happen to the glass-borne elements in the geological disposal lies in the relationship between the iron-bearing phases and the glass alteration products formed. In this study, we focus on the influence of the formation conditions (synthetized or in-situ) and the age of different iron corrosion products on SON68 glass alteration. Corrosion products obtained from archaeological iron artifacts are considered here to be true analogues of the corrosion products in a waste disposal system due to the similarities in formation conditions and physical properties. These representative corrosion products (RCP) are used in the experiment along with synthetized iron anoxic corrosion products and pristine metallic iron. The model-cracks of SON68 glass were altered in cell reactors, with one of the different iron-sources inserted in the crack each time. The study was successful in reproducing most of the processes observed in the long term archaeological system. Between the different systems, alteration variations were noted both in nature and intensity, confirming the influence of the iron-source on glass alteration. Results seem to point to a lesser effect of long term iron corrosion products (RCP) on the glass alteration than that of the more recent products (SCP), both in terms of general glass alteration and of iron transport.

  16. Micro-Brillouin spectroscopy mapping of the residual density field induced by Vickers indentation in a soda-lime silicate glass

    OpenAIRE

    H. Tran; Clément, S.; Vialla, R.; Vandembroucq, D.; Rufflé, B.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution Brillouin scattering is used to achieve 3-dimensional maps of the longitudinal acoustic mode frequency shift in soda-lime silicate glasses subject to Vickers indentations. Assuming that residual stress-induced effects are simply proportional to density changes, residual densification fields are obtained. The density gradient is nearly isotropic, confirming earlier optical observations made on a similar glass. The results show that Brillouin micro-spectroscopy opens the way to ...

  17. 阳离子对硅酸盐玻璃激光拉曼光谱影响的研究%Influence of Cations on the Laser Raman Spectra of Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊义; 赵虹霞; 干福熹

    2012-01-01

    Na2O(K2O)-CaO(MgO)-SiO2, Na2O(K2O)-A12O3-SiO2, Na2O(K2O)-B2Q3-SiOz, Na2O(K2O)-PbO-SiO2 and PbO-BaO-SiO2 glass systems were investigated using laser Raman spectroscopic technique. The modification of short-range structure of glass caused by network modifier cations will influence Raman signature. Alkali and alkali-earth ions can weaken the bridging oxygen bond, thus lower the frequency of Si-Ob-Si anti-symmetric stretching vibration. When coordinated by oxygen ions, B3+ can form [BO4] tetrahedron and enter the silicon-oxygen network, but this effect had little impact on the frequency of Raman peaks located in the high-frequency region. Al3+ can also be coordinated by oxygen ions to form [A1O4 ] tetrahedron. [ AlO4 ] will increase the disorder degree of network while entering network. Ba2+ can increase the density of electron cloud along the Si-Onb bond when it bonds with non-bridging oxygen, which will lead to a higher peak intensity of O-Si-O stretching vibration. The Raman peaks of alkli- and alkali-earth silicate glasses are mainly distributed in the region of 400~1 200 cm-1, while in the spectrum of Na2O(K2O)-PbO-SiO2 glass system a 131 cm-1 peak existed. The authors assigned it to the Pb-O symmetric stretching vibration. Some of the samples were produced in the laboratory according to the average compositions of ancient glasses, so this research is very significant to discriminating ancient silicate glasses of different systems by Laser Raman spectroscopic technique.%运用拉曼光谱技术研究了Na2O (K2O) CaO( MgO)-SiO2,Na2O (K2O)- Al2-O3-SiO2,Na2O(K2O)-B2O3-SiO2,Na2O(K2O)-PbO-SiO2和PbO-BaO-SiO2五个系统的玻璃.结果表明,阳离子对玻璃近程结构的改造会引起拉曼特征的变化.部分样品是根据古玻璃平均成分在实验室烧制的,这项研究对于运用激光拉曼光谱区分不同系统的古代硅酸盐玻璃有重要意义.

  18. Preparation and Properties of Alkali Activated Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effective activation and utilization of metakaolin as an alkali activated geopolymer precursor and its use in concrete surface protection is of great interest. In this paper, the formula of alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers was studied using an orthogonal experimental design. It was found that the optimal geopolymer was prepared with metakaolin, sodium hydroxide, sodium silicate and water, with the molar ratio of SiO2:Al2O3:Na2O:NaOH:H2O being 3.4:1.1:0.5:1.0:11.8. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR were adopted to investigate the influence of curing conditions on the mechanical properties and microstructures of the geopolymers. The best curing condition was 60 °C for 168 h, and this alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymer showed the highest compression strength at 52.26 MPa. In addition, hollow micro-sphere glass beads were mixed with metakaolin particles to improve the thermal insulation properties of the alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymer. These results suggest that a suitable volume ratio of metakaolin to hollow micro-sphere glass beads in alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers was 6:1, which achieved a thermal conductivity of 0.37 W/mK and compressive strength of 50 MPa. By adjusting to a milder curing condition, as-prepared alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers could find widespread applications in concrete thermal protection.

  19. Inorganic glasses and glass-ceramics studied by isothermal mechanical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes isothermal mechanical spectroscopy measurements carried out in silicate glasses and LAS (Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2)-type glass-ceramics. Single alkali silicate glass Na2O.3SiO2 exhibits two relaxation peaks. The first one located at a low temperature is generally assigned to the stress-induced diffusion of alkali ions. The second relaxation peak is attributed to the 'non-bridging oxygen'. Mixed alkali silicate glasses (1 - x)Na2O.xLi2O.3SiO2 with x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 exhibit the mixed alkali peak. And also the 'non-bridging oxygen' peak. Two LAS-type glass-ceramics having the same chemical composition but different microstructures: 'β-quartz' and 'β-spodumene' type, respectively, and their parent glass have been studied. For the glass which does not contain 'non-bridging oxygen', a single mechanical relaxation peak linked with the stress-induced movement of lithium ions is observed. On the contrary, two peaks occur in the 'β-quartz' and 'β-spodumene' glass-ceramics. The 'low-temperature' peak (∼340 K for 1 Hz) is linked with ion mobility in the respective main crystalline phase. The origin of the 'high-temperature' peak is totally different for the two glass-ceramics; in the 'β-quartz' glass-ceramic, it is due to Mg2+ and Zn2+ ion relaxation in the crystalline phase, whereas in the 'β-spodumene' glass-ceramic, it is linked with a complex entity within the residual vitreous phase

  20. Mixed alkali effect in Li2O-Na2O-B2O3 glasses containing Fe2O3-An EPR and optical absorption study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the interesting results on mixed alkali effect (MAE) in xLi2O-(30-x)Na2O-69.5B2O3 (5 ≤ x ≤ 28) glasses containing Fe2O3 studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption techniques. The EPR spectra in these glasses exhibit three resonance signals at g = 7.60, 4.20 and 2.02. The resonance signal at g = 7.60 has been attributed to Fe3+ ions in axial symmetry sites whereas the resonance signal at g = 4.20 is due to isolated Fe3+ ions in rhombic symmetry site. The resonance signal at g = 2.02 is due to Fe3+ ions coupled by exchange interaction. It is interesting to observe that the number of spins participating in resonance (N) and its paramagnetic susceptibility (χ) exhibits the mixed alkali effect with composition. The present study also gives an indication that the size of alkali ions we choose in mixed alkali glasses is also an important contributing factor in showing the mixed alkali effect. It is observed that the variation of N with temperature obeys Boltzmann law. A linear relationship is observed between 1/χ and T in accordance with Curie-Weiss law. The paramagnetic Curie temperature (θ p) is negative for the investigated sample, which suggests that the iron ions are antiferromagnetically coupled by negative super exchange interactions at very low temperatures. The optical absorption spectra exhibit only one weak band corresponding to the transition 6A1g(S) →4A1g(G); 4Eg(G) at 446 nm which is a characteristic of Fe3+ ions in octahedral symmetry

  1. Thermal decomposition of fission product nitrates and their reaction with glass batch additives Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal decomposition of fission product nitrates constituting a 'Purex' waste and their reaction with silica, alumina and aluminosilicate (Al2O3.2SiO2) have been studied. Oxides of nitrogen may be released from fission product nitrates in the temperature range (150 - 850degC) either due to their thermal decomposition or due to the reaction of alkali nitrates with silica or alumina of the glass batch additives. Fission product nitrates, CaNO3 and RbNO3 excepting, react very slowly with silica, the principal glass forming additive for a silicate glass, at temperatures of 1000degC. Complete reaction of Gr.II-Gr.IV metal nitrates with silica may be achieved at temperatures of 1400degC which is too high for a fission product immobilisation process. The alkali nitrates react very rapidly with boric oxide, silica, alumina and metakaolin (Al2O3.2SiO2) at subsolidus temperatures forming the alkali metaborate, alkali disilicate, alkali monoaluminate and alkali alumino disilicate respectively. A phenomenological description of the heating-up processes for fission product nitrate with silicate glass batch additives has been included. It has been very strongly recommended, that, if a silicate matrix is selected for incorporation of fission products, the glass melting should be carried out until a homogeneous or nearly homogeneous product is obtained and should not be stopped at a stage where a sintered or semivitreous mass is the resultant product. (author)

  2. Grafting Silane onto Silicate Glass Surface Treated by DBD in Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric barrier discharge plasma in air was used to modify glass surface to induce the graft of silane onto the treated surface to increase the possibility of biomolecule immobilization. The plasma treated glass had been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS) and surface water contact angle measurement. The validity of grafting silane onto glass surface was approved by the analysis of water contact angle measurement, SEM and XPS. The grafted silane content was measured by visible absorption spectroscopy using acid Orange-7. It is shown that the grafting density of silane for glass samples increases significantly after plasma treatment.

  3. Analysis of H2O in silicate glass using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) micro-FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Pitcher, Bradley W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a calibration for attenuated total reflectance (ATR) micro-FTIR for analysis of H2O in hydrous glass. A Ge ATR accessory was used to measure evanescent wave absorption by H2O within hydrous rhyolite and other standards. Absorbance at 3450 cm−1 (representing total H2O or H2Ot) and 1630 cm−1 (molecular H2O or H2Om) showed high correlation with measured H2O in the glasses as determined by transmission FTIR spectroscopy and manometry. For rhyolite, wt%H2O=245(±9)×A3450-0.22(±0.03) and wt%H2Om=235(±11)×A1630-0.20(±0.03) where A3450 and A1630 represent the ATR absorption at the relevant infrared wavelengths. The calibration permits determination of volatiles in singly polished glass samples with spot size down to ~5 μm (for H2O-rich samples) and detection limits of ~0.1 wt% H2O. Basaltic, basaltic andesite and dacitic glasses of known H2O concentrations fall along a density-adjusted calibration, indicating that ATR is relatively insensitive to glass composition, at least for calc-alkaline glasses. The following equation allows quantification of H2O in silicate glasses that range in composition from basalt to rhyolite: wt%H2O=(ω×A3450/ρ)+b where ω = 550 ± 21, b = −0.19 ± 0.03, ρ = density, in g/cm3, and A3450 is the ATR absorbance at 3450 cm−1. The ATR micro-FTIR technique is less sensitive than transmission FTIR, but requires only a singly polished sample for quantitative results, thus minimizing time for sample preparation. Compared with specular reflectance, it is more sensitive and better suited for imaging of H2O variations in heterogeneous samples such as melt inclusions. One drawback is that the technique can damage fragile samples and we therefore recommend mounting of unknowns in epoxy prior to polishing. Our calibration should hold for any Ge ATR crystals with the same incident angle (31°). Use of a different crystal type or geometry would require measurement of several H2O-bearing standards to provide a crystal

  4. High-efficiency ytterbium-free erbium-doped all-glass double cladding silicate glass fiber for resonantly-pumped fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zexuan; Geng, Jihong; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shibin

    2014-02-01

    A highly efficient ytterbium-free erbium-doped silicate glass fiber has been developed for high-power fiber laser applications at an eye-safe wavelength near 1.55 μm. Our preliminary experiments show that high laser efficiency can be obtained from a relatively short length of the gain fiber when resonantly pumped at 1535 nm in both core- and cladding-pumping configurations. With a core-pumping configuration as high as 75%, optical-to-optical efficiency and 4 W output power were obtained at 1560 nm from a 1 m long gain fiber. When using a cladding-pumping configuration, approximately 13 W output power with 67.7% slope efficiency was demonstrated from a piece of 2 m long fiber. The lengths of silicate-based gain fiber are much shorter than their silica-based counterparts used in other experiments, which is significantly important for high-power narrow-band and/or pulsed laser applications. PMID:24514181

  5. Nanocrystal formation using laser irradiation on Nd3+ doped barium titanium silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We compare two methods to produce glass–ceramic, furnace and laser irradiation. ► We study the spectroscopic properties of the glass ceramic created by both methods. ► A spectral mapping shows the area converted from glass to glass–ceramic by the laser. ► XRD, electronic microscopy and AFM confirm the spectral mapping conclusions. -- Abstract: Two different thermal treatments were used to create nanocrystals from a precursor glass. The glass whose composition is Ba2TiSi2O8 and doped with 3% of Nd3+ was prepared using the melt quenching method. A conventional thermal treatment in an electrical furnace was used to obtain transparent glass ceramic samples, which contain Fresnoite nanocrystals with an average size of 35 nm. Moreover, these nanocrystals were obtained in a localized area of the precursor glass by irradiating with a continuous Ar+ laser. Evidence of the changes induced by laser irradiation was confirmed by optical spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy

  6. Borosilicate glass alteration driven by magnesium carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We studied borosilicate glass/hydromagnesite interaction. ► Magnesium silicate precipitation increases glass alteration. ► Geochemical modeling allows to quantify the alteration mechanisms involved. - Abstract: The alteration of simplified synthetic glass, representative of the French reference nuclear glass R7T7, in presence of hydromagnesite has been experimentally investigated and modeled. Magnesium in solution is known to potentially enhance glass alteration; nuclear glass clayed host rocks contain magnesium and can dissolve to maintain the concentration of magnesium in solution. For modeling purposes, it was suitable to study a simple system. Hydromagnesite was therefore chosen as a simple model mineral in order to check the influence of an Mg-rich mineral on glass alteration. Since the models use thermodynamic and kinetic parameters measured in pure water and pH-buffered solutions, changing the solution composition or adding minerals is a key step towards the validation of the modeling assumptions before using the model for predictive purposes. Experiments revealed that glass alteration is enhanced in presence of hydromagnesite. Modeling was performed using the GRAAL model implemented within the CHESS/HYTEC reactive transport code. Modeling proved useful both for explaining the mechanisms involved and quantifying the impact on glass alteration: Mg coming from hydromagnesite dissolution reacts with Si provided by the glass in order to form magnesium silicates. This reaction decreases the pH down to neutral conditions where magnesium silicates are more soluble than at the natural alkali pH imposed by glass or hydromagnesite dissolution. The driving force of the magnesium silicate precipitation is eventually the interdiffusion of alkali within the altered amorphous glass layer as this mechanism consumes protons. The model’s ability to describe the concentrations of elements in solution and formed solids whatever the glass

  7. The Durability and Performance of Short Fibers for a Newly Developed Alkali-Activated Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Funke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the development of a fiber-reinforced alkali-activated binder (FRAAB with an emphasis on the performance and the durability of the fibers in the alkaline alkali-activated binder (AAB-matrix. For the development of the matrix, the reactive components granulated slag and coal fly ash were used, which were alkali-activated with a mixture of sodium hydroxide (2–10 mol/L and an aqueous sodium silicate solution (SiO2/Na2O molar ratio: 2.1 at ambient temperature. For the reinforcement of the matrix integral fibers of alkali-resistant glass (AR-glass, E-glass, basalt, and carbon with a fiber volume content of 0.5% were used. By the integration of these short fibers, the three-point bending tensile strength of the AAB increased strikingly from 4.6 MPa (no fibers up to 5.7 MPa (carbon after one day. As a result of the investigations of the alkali resistance, the AR-glass and the carbon fibers showed the highest durability of all fibers in the FRAAB-matrix. In contrast to that, the weight loss of E-glass and basalt fibers was significant under the alkaline condition. According to these results, only the AR-glass and the carbon fibers reveal sufficient durability in the alkaline AAB-matrix.

  8. Kinetics and mechanisms of the conversion of silicate (45S5), borate, and borosilicate glasses to hydroxyapatite in dilute phosphate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenhai; Day, Delbert E; Kittiratanapiboon, Kanisa; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2006-07-01

    Bioactive glasses with controllable conversion rates to hydroxyapatite (HA) may provide a novel class of scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering. The objective of the present work was to comprehensively characterize the conversion of a silicate bioactive glass (45S5), a borate glass, and two intermediate borosilicate glass compositions to HA in a dilute phosphate solution at 37 degrees Celsius. The borate glass and the borosilicate glasses were derived from the 45S5 glass by fully or partially replacing the SiO(2) with B(2)O(3). Higher B(2)O(3) content produced a more rapid conversion of the glass to HA and a lower pH value of the phosphate solution. Whereas the borate glass was fully converted to HA in less than 4 days, the silicate (45S5) and borosilicate compositions were only partially converted even after 70 days, and contained residual SiO(2) in a Na-depleted core. The concentration of Na(+) in the phosphate solution increased with reaction time whereas the PO(4) (3-) concentration decreased, both reaching final limiting values at a rate that increased with the B(2)O(3) content of the glass. However, the Ca(2+) concentration in the solution remained low, below the detection limit of atomic absorption, throughout the reaction. Immersion of the glasses in a mixed solution of K(2)HPO(4) and K(2)CO(3) produced a carbonate-substituted HA but the presence of the K(2)CO(3) had little effect on the kinetics of conversion to HA. The kinetics and mechanisms of the conversion process of the four glasses to HA are compared and used to develop a model for the process. PMID:16770542

  9. Effects of Aqueous Solutions on the Slow Crack Growth of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow crack growth (SCG) parameters of soda-lime-silicate were measured in distilled and saltwater of various concentrations in order to determine if the presence of salt and the contaminate formation of a weak sodium film affects stress corrosion susceptibility. Past research indicates that solvents affect the rate of crack growth; however, the effects of salt have not been studied. The results indicate a small but statistically significant effect on the SCG parameters A and n at high concentrations; however, for typical engineering purposes, the effect can be ignored.

  10. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwöbel, André, E-mail: aschwoebel@surface.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Materials Science Department, Surface Science Division, Jovanka-Bontschits-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Precht, Ruben; Motzko, Markus; Carrillo Solano, Mercedes A. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Materials Science Department, Surface Science Division, Jovanka-Bontschits-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Calvet, Wolfram [Helmholzzentrum Berlin GmbH, Solar Energy Research, Heterogeneous Materials Systems, Albert Einstein Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hausbrand, René; Jaegermann, Wolfram [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Materials Science Department, Surface Science Division, Jovanka-Bontschits-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • In situ photoemission of LiPON solid Li-ion electrolyte. • We find that the valence band is similar to the known phosphates. • We find evidence for a resonance at the O1s edge shown by a Fano profile. • We find that the top of the valence band is due to N2p states. - Abstract: Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode–electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses.

  11. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In situ photoemission of LiPON solid Li-ion electrolyte. • We find that the valence band is similar to the known phosphates. • We find evidence for a resonance at the O1s edge shown by a Fano profile. • We find that the top of the valence band is due to N2p states. - Abstract: Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode–electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses

  12. Medium-range order in alkali metaphosphate glasses and melts investigated by reverse Monte Carlo simulations and diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reverse Monte Carlo simulations have been performed on the alkali metaphosphate glasses Na0.5Li0.5PO3 and LiPO3 concerning structural experimental data obtained by neutron and x-ray diffraction at 300 K for both systems and versus temperature up to the melting point for the mixed composition. It appears that the contrast effect due to the negative scattering length of Li is not the only reason for the difference in the intensity of the prepeak observed in both systems. The main structural difference lies in the intermediate-range order, while the short-range order is quite similar in both systems. Moreover, it is shown that the intensity increase of the prepeak in the Na0.5Li0.5PO3 structure factor is due to the partial structure factors of the PO4 tetrahedron, sustaining the hypothesis of an ordering between several PO4 tetrahedra and voids with temperature

  13. Mineralogy of silicate inclusions of the Colomera IIE iron and crystallization of Cr-diopside and alkali feldspar from a partial melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Hsu, Weibiao; Huss, Gary R.

    2003-06-01

    We studied the mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and compositions of 48 interior silicate inclusions and a large K-rich surface inclusion from the Colomera IIE iron meteorite. Common minerals in the interior silicate inclusions are Cr diopside and Na plagioclase (albite). They are often enclosed by or coexist with albitic glasses with excess silica and minor Fe-Mg components. This mineral assemblage is similar to the "andesitic" material found in the Caddo County IAB iron meteorite for which a partial melt origin has been proposed. The fairly uniform compositions of Cr diopside (Ca 44Mg 46Fe 10) and Na plagioclase (Or 2.5Ab 90.0An 7.5 to Or 3.5Ab 96.1An 0.4) in Colomera interior inclusions and the angular boundaries between minerals and metal suggest that diopside and plagioclase partially crystallized under near-equilibrium conditions from a common melt before emplacement into molten metal. The melt-crystal assemblage has been called "crystal mush." The bulk compositions of the individual composite inclusions form an array between the most diopside-rich inclusion and plagioclase. This is consistent only with a simple mechanical mixing relationship, not a magmatic evolution series. We propose a model in which partly molten metal and crystal mush were mixed together by impact on the IIE parent body. Other models involving impact melting of the chondritic source material followed by growth of diopside and plagioclase do not easily explain near equilibrium growth of diopside and Na plagioclase, followed by rapid cooling. In the K-rich surface inclusion, K feldspar, orthopyroxene, and olivine were found together with diopside for the first time. K feldspar (sanidine, Or 92.7Ab 7.2An 0.1 to Or 87.3Ab 11.0An 1.7) occurs in an irregular veinlike region in contact with large orthopyroxene crystals of nearly uniform composition (Ca 1.3Mg 80.5Fe 17.8 to Ca 3.1Mg 78.1Fe 18.9) and intruding into a relict olivine with deformed-oval shape. Silica and subrounded Cr diopside are

  14. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na2O/Li2O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn0.60Ni0.20Mg0.20)(Cr1.37Fe0.63)O4. The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q3 species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na2O/Li2O base glass up to 28 days, due to a combination of the enhanced network polymerisation and the

  15. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua, E-mail: nzhangh@aliyun.com [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275-93, 102413 Beijing (China); Corkhill, Claire L.; Heath, Paul G.; Hand, Russell J.; Stennett, Martin C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn{sub 0.60}Ni{sub 0.20}Mg{sub 0.20})(Cr{sub 1.37}Fe{sub 0.63})O{sub 4}. The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q{sup 3} species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O base glass up to 28 days, due to

  16. Utilization of Mineral Wools as Alkali-Activated Material Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Yliniemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral wools are the most common insulation materials in buildings worldwide. However, mineral wool waste is often considered unrecyclable because of its fibrous nature and low density. In this paper, rock wool (RW and glass wool (GW were studied as alkali-activated material precursors without any additional co-binders. Both mineral wools were pulverized by a vibratory disc mill in order to remove the fibrous nature of the material. The pulverized mineral wools were then alkali-activated with a sodium aluminate solution. Compressive strengths of up to 30.0 MPa and 48.7 MPa were measured for RW and GW, respectively, with high flexural strengths measured for both (20.1 MPa for RW and 13.2 MPa for GW. The resulting alkali-activated matrix was a composite-type in which partly-dissolved fibers were dispersed. In addition to the amorphous material, sodium aluminate silicate hydroxide hydrate and magnesium aluminum hydroxide carbonate phases were identified in the alkali-activated RW samples. The only crystalline phase in the GW samples was sodium aluminum silicate. The results of this study show that mineral wool is a very promising raw material for alkali activation.

  17. Structural Role of Alkali Cations in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses as Examined Using Oxygen-17 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukenaga, Sohei; Kanehashi, Koji; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noritaka; Nakashima, Kunihiko

    2016-08-01

    The structural roles of alkali and calcium cations are important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of aluminosilicate melts and glasses. Recently, oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (17O NMR) studies of calcium-sodium aluminosilicate glasses showed that these structural roles are not randomly given, but rather each cation has its own preferential role. However, the relationship between cation type and role preference in calcium aluminosilicate glass is not completely understood. In the present study, the structural roles of lithium, sodium, and potassium cations in selected calcium aluminosilicate glasses are investigated using 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Data from these experiments clearly show that potassium cations have a notably stronger tendency to act as charge compensators within the network structure, compared to sodium and lithium cations. The result of 17O NMR experiment also showed that sodium and lithium cations in part act as network modifier alongside with calcium cations.

  18. Structural Role of Alkali Cations in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses as Examined Using Oxygen-17 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukenaga, Sohei; Kanehashi, Koji; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noritaka; Nakashima, Kunihiko

    2016-05-01

    The structural roles of alkali and calcium cations are important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of aluminosilicate melts and glasses. Recently, oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (17O NMR) studies of calcium-sodium aluminosilicate glasses showed that these structural roles are not randomly given, but rather each cation has its own preferential role. However, the relationship between cation type and role preference in calcium aluminosilicate glass is not completely understood. In the present study, the structural roles of lithium, sodium, and potassium cations in selected calcium aluminosilicate glasses are investigated using 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Data from these experiments clearly show that potassium cations have a notably stronger tendency to act as charge compensators within the network structure, compared to sodium and lithium cations. The result of 17O NMR experiment also showed that sodium and lithium cations in part act as network modifier alongside with calcium cations.

  19. Visible light activated catalytic effect of iron containing soda-lime silicate glass characterized by 57Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relationship between local structure and visible light activated catalytic effect of iron containing soda lime silicate glass with the composition of 15Na2O·15CaO·xFe2O3·(70-x)SiO2, x = 5-50 mass %, abbreviated as NCFSx was investigated by means of 57Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). Moessbauer spectra of NCFSx glass with 'x' being equal to or larger than 30 after isothermal annealing at 1,000 deg C for 100 min consisted of a paramagnetic doublet and a magnetic sextet. The former had isomer shift (δ) of 0.24 mm s-1 and quadrupole splitting (Δ) of 0.99 mm s-1 due to distorted FeIIIO4 tetrahedra, and the latter had δ of 0.36 mm s-1 and internal magnetic field (Hint) of 51.8 T due to hematite (α-Fe2O3). The absorption area (A) of α-Fe2O3 varied from 47.2 to 75.9, 93.1, 64.8 and 47.9 % with 'x' from 30 to 35, 40, 45 and 50, indicating that the amount of precipitated α-Fe2O3 varied with the Fe2O3 content of NCFSx glass. The precipitation of α-Fe2O3 was also confirmed by XRD study of annealed NCFS glass with 'x' larger than 30. A relaxed sexted with δ, Hint and Γ of 0.34 mm s-1 and 37.9 T and 1.32 mm s-1 was observed from the Moessbauer spectra of annealed NCFSx glass with 'x' of 45 and 50, implying that the precipitation of non-stoichiometric iron hydroxide oxide with the composition of Fe1.833(OH)0.5O2.5 having the similar structure of α-Fe2O3 and α-FeOOH. A remarkable decrease in the concentration of methylene blue (MB) from 10 to 0.0 μmol L-1 with the first-order rate constant (k) of 2.87 × 10-2 h-1 was observed for 10-day leaching test using annealed NCFS50 glass under visible light irradiation. ESI-MS study indicated that existence of fragments with m/z value of 129, 117 and 207 etc. originating from MB having m/z of 284. This result evidently showed that the MB concentration

  20. Spectral properties of erbium-doped heavy metal oxyfluoride silicate glasses for broadband amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐时清; 杨中民; 戴世勋; 杨建虎; 戴能利; 林傲翔; 胡丽丽; 姜中宏

    2003-01-01

    Erbium-doped glasses showing a wide 1.55?m emission band are reported ina novel heavy metal oxyfluoride glass system SiO2-PbO-PbF2 and their optical properties such as emission spectra,fluorescence lifetime and the refractive index have been investigated.The broad and flat 4I13/2 →4I15/2 emission of Er3+ ions around 1.55μm can be used as host materials for potential optical amplifiers in wavelength-division-multiplexing network system.We find that with increasing PbF2 content in the glass composition,the fluorescence full width at half maximum and fluorescence lifetime of the 4I13/2 level of Er3+ increase,while refractive index and density decrease.

  1. Surface signatures of bioactivity: MD simulations of 45S and 65S silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilocca, Antonio; Cormack, Alastair N

    2010-01-01

    The surface of a bioactive (45S) and a bioinactive (65S) glass composition has been modeled using shell-model classical molecular dynamics simulations. Direct comparison of the two structures allowed us to identify the potential role of specific surface features in the processes leading to integration of a bioglass implant with the host tissues, focusing in particular on the initial dissolution of the glass network. The simulations highlight the critical role of network fragmentation and sodium enrichment of the surface in determining the rapid hydrolysis and release of silica fragments in solution, characteristic of highly bioactive compositions. On the other hand, no correlation has been found between the surface density of small (two- and three-membered) rings and bioactivity, thus suggesting that additional factors need to be taken into account to fully understand the role of these sites in the mechanism leading to calcium phosphate deposition on the glass surface. PMID:19725567

  2. Role of elastic deformation in determining the mixed alkaline earth effect of hardness in silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Potuzak, M.;

    2015-01-01

    show that the mixed alkaline earth effect manifests itself as deviations from linearity in shear modulus, Poisson’s ratio, glass transition temperature, liquid fragility index, hardness, volume of densification, and volume of plastic flow. We find no correlation between the elastic part of the......Glasses deform permanently as a result of indentation and the total resistance to deformation consists of three individual resistances, i.e., those to elastic deformation, densification, and plastic flow. The link between Vickers hardness and the resistances to densification and plastic flow has...... been investigated previously, but the link between the resistance to elastic deformation and hardness has not yet been studied. In this work, we investigate the link between elastic deformation during indentation and Vickers hardness in a series of mixed magnesium-barium boroaluminosilicate glasses. We...

  3. Effect of Ti(+4) on in vitro bioactivity and antibacterial activity of silicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Hussain, Tousif; Bashir, Farooq; Ikhram, Hafeez

    2016-12-01

    A novel glass-ceramic series in (48-x) SiO2-36 CaO-4 P2O5-12 Na2O-xTiO2 (where x=0, 3.5, 7, 10.5 and 14mol %) system was synthesized by crystallization of glass powders, obtained by melt quenching technique. The differential scanning calorimetric analysis (DSC) was used to study the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the as prepared glasses. The crystallization behaviour of glasses was analyzed under non-isothermal conditions, and qualitative phase analysis of glass-ceramics was made by X-ray diffraction. The in vitro bioactivity of synthesized glass-ceramics was studied in stimulated body fluid at 37°C under static condition for 24days. The formation of hydroxyl-carbonated apatite layer; evident of bioactivity of the material, was elucidated by XRD, FTIR, AAS, SEM and EDX analysis. The result showed that partial substitution of TiO2 with SiO2 negatively influenced bioactivity; it decreased with increase in concentration of TiO2. As Ti(+4) having stronger field strength as compared to Si(+4) so its replacement became the cause for reduction in degradation that in turn improved the chemical stability. The compressive strength was also enhanced with progress addition of TiO2 in the system. The antibacterial properties were examined against Staphylococcus Epidermidis. Strong antibacterial efficacy was observed with the addition of TiO2 in the system. PMID:27612803

  4. Effect of halides addition on the ligand field of chromium in alkali borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, M.A., E-mail: moukhtar_hassan@yahoo.com

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •The 10 KM–64.7 B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–25 Na{sub 2}O–0.3 Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (M = Cl, Br and I) glassy system was prepared by a quenching method. •Optical basicity, ligand field theory optical band gap energy, refractive index, ESR and IR were studied. •The electronegativity plays an important role in deforming the crystal field around the transition metal ions. •The crystal-field sites of KCl or KBr sample are very strong compared to the very weak one in the KI sample. -- Abstract: Borate oxide glass system of composition 10 KM–64.7 B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–25 Na{sub 2}O–0.3 Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (M = Cl, Br and I) was prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the investigated glasses was checked by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The optical basicity of the system has been calculated, and was found to increase by going from KCl to KBr and to KI. Optical absorption spectra were recorded in the UV–visible range. Through a careful analysis of the data, the ligand field parameters (crystal field strength Dq, Racah parameters B and nephelauxetic functions h) and the optical parameters (optical band gap, Urbach tail band width, and refractive index) have been estimated. The obtained results reveal a strong correlation between that ligand field parameters and the type of halogen atom; the crystal-field strength of KCl or KBr samples are very pronounced but it is rather weak in the KI sample. Electron spin resonance (ESR) has been used to probe the valency of the Chromium ions. The resulting ESR parameters revealed that chromium ions are predominantly in the trivalent state with traces of hexavalent state. Using Infrared spectroscopy (IR) information on the boron structural units has been obtained. The N{sub 4} ratio increases by replacing the KCl by KBr or KI, and it was found that the tetrahedral coordination of Cr{sup +} ions becomes preferential in the host glasses with increasing the optical basicity.

  5. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution; Structure et reactivite aqueuse des verres silicates apport de la resonance magnetique nucleaire haute-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeli, F

    2000-10-25

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 17}O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the {sup 17}O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  6. Preliminary study of window silicate glass powder for EPR dosimetry with 10-MeV electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Window silicate glass powder has been evaluated as a possible high dose dosimeter using EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) technique. In this work window glass powder with maximum dimension of 700 μm was irradiated with 10 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 580 Gy to 46.52 kGy. The EPR response of the irradiated samples showed a linear behavior to applied doses up to 8 kGy. The EPR spectra of NBOHC (Non-Bonding Oxygen Hole Center) was found at g1 = 2.0092 ± 0.0001 and g2 = 2.0042 ± 0.0001. The line widths of all spectra were found to be the same. Finally, the thermal fading of EPR intensity was studied for 70 days and showed a sharp decline on the first day. This fading continued up to almost 15 days and then the slope of the decay-curve tended to gradual changes up to 50 days. Afterwards, it presented a fairly constant value with time and a predictable stability was achieved.

  7. A dynamic fatigue study of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses using small scale indentation flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic fatigue characteristics of two glasses, soda-lime silicate and borosilicate, in water have been studied using a controlled indentation flaw technique. It is argued that the indentation approach offers several advantages over more conventional fatigue testing procedures: (i) the reproducibility of data is relatively high, eliminating statistics as a basis of analysis: (ii) the flaw ultimately responsible for failure is well defined and may be conveniently characterised before and after (and during, if necessary) the strength test; (iii) via adjustment of the indentation load, the size of the flaw can be suitably predetermined. Particular attention is devoted to the third point because of the facility it provides for systematic investigation of the range of flaw sizes over which macroscopic crack behaviour remains applicable. The first part of the paper summarises the essential fracture mechanics theory of the extension of an indentation flaw to failure. In the next part of the paper the results of dynamic fatigue tests on glass rods in distilled water are described. Data are obtained for Vickers indentation loads in the range 0.05 to 100 N, corresponding to contact dimensions of 2 to 100 μm. Finally, the implications of the results in relation to the response of 'natural' flaws are discussed. (author)

  8. Effect of additive ions on the optical density and stability of the color centers induced by X-ray irradiation in soda-lime silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To apply radiation-induced coloration of glasses as a reversible glass-coloring technique, we studied the influence of various additive ions incorporated into a soda-lime silicate glass on the optical density and stability of the color induced by X-ray irradiation. Absorption spectra before and after irradiation are discussed in the comparison with those of the undoped soda-lime silicate glass. Additive ions were incorporated as metal oxides, namely TiO2, V2O5, Fe2O3, ZnO, Ga2O3, GeO2, ZrO2, Nb2O3, MoO3, Ag2O, In2O3, SnO, SnO2, CeO2, Eu2O3, Ta2O5, WO3 and Bi2O3. Among them, TiO2, GeO2, Nb2O3, MoO3, Ag2O, In2O3, Eu2O3, Ta2O5, WO3 and Bi2O3 have a large effect on optical density. The optical densities in the visible region for glasses doped with these oxides were much stronger than for undoped soda-lime silicate glass. On the other hand, incorporation of Fe2O3, SnO and CeO2 reduced the optical density. Over longer periods the coloration of the undoped glass was one of the most stable while those of the Fe2O3, SnO and CeO2-doped glasses soon faded.

  9. Self-diffusion of oxygen in soda-lime silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-diffusion coefficients of oxygen in 16Na2O x 12CaO x 72SiO2 glass were measured in the temperature range from 500 to 1,4700C by means of an isotope exchange technique employing 18O as the tracer. The results in the temperature range over 8000C were represented by D = 4.5 x 10-2 exp(-38.6 x 103/RT). This activation energy for diffusion was in good agreement with that for viscous flow of the glass. The relationship between the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient and the viscosity was satisfactorily described by Eyring's equation rather than the Stokes-Einstein relation. The measured oxygen self-diffusion coefficients also showed agreements with the diffusion coefficients calculated from an interdiffusion kinetics and from the dissolution rate of a quartz glass in the glass melt, which indicated that these processes were governed by the diffusion of oxygen ions. The steep temperature dependence of the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient which was determined in the transition range was explained to be due to an excess structural activation energy required for migration of oxygen ions. (orig.)

  10. Luminescence of radiation-oxidized iron in silicate and quartz glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence of glasses in IR spectrum region after the radiation action is revealed. The correlation between luminescence intensities and EPR signals of Fe3+ ions is observed. During the Fe2+ ionization its octahedral environment does not change. The Fe2+ ion, being formed in this case, is the source of additional bands of radiation and excitation

  11. Synthesis and structural studies of multi-component strontium zinc silicate glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass having composition 40SrO−10ZnO−40SiO2−2B2O3−2Al2O3−2TiO2−2Cr2O3−2Y2O3, (mol %) was prepared by melt-quench technique and converted into glass-ceramics by subjecting it to varying heat treatments. Thermal properties were measured by thermo-mechanical analyzer and differential thermal analyzer. The XRD revealed that initially Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase at lower temperature and later SrSiO3/Sr3Si3O9 phase crystallized. The structural elucidation by Raman spectroscopy shows the presence of mainly Q1 structural units along with Q2 and Q0 units in the base glass. Raman spectra revealed that during crystallization initially crystalline phase having Q1 structural units (corresponding to Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase) are formed and later crystalline phase having Q2 structural units with 3 member ring type structure crystallizes. Thus, Raman spectroscopy and XRD together confirm that in early stage of crystallization, Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase and later Sr3Si3O9 phase formed in the glass-ceramics.

  12. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses

  13. Study of corrosion of sodium-zirconium-silicate glass in sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate solutions at 90-150 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examined are the time- and temperature dependencies of glass corrosion (glass composition: 20.48% mole Na2Ox6.65% molexZrO2x72.87% mole SiO2) in aqueous solutions of sodium hydrate and sodium carbonate with concentrations of 2g-equiv/l at 90-150 deg C. The measurements are made by two methods: estimation of glass weight losses in the course of corrosion; and estimation of the amounts of SiO2 and ZrO2 that had passed from the glass surface to the solution. Glass dissolution in NaOH was found to occur non-uniformly. Increased alkali-stability was caused not only by low ZrO2 solubility, but also by formation on the glass surface of a hydrolysis film, chiefly composed of zirconium hydroxide. A leached layer containing a considerable amount of zirconium dioxide in hydrolyzed state was noted to form on the glass surface when the glass interacted with the sodium carbonate solution. The presence of this layer made the glass increasingly resistant to sodium carbonate and had a positive effect on the kinetic characteristics of the corrosion process

  14. Methodology of leach testing of boro-silicate glasses in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching rate is the principal parameter to be taken into account in the optimization of the conditioning glasses. It is also important for the analysis of the possible release rate of radioactive elements. In this context leaching tests must provide an answer to the release rate of radioactive nuclides under three different conditions: radioactive leaks in cooling pools (when asked by the management scheme) during engineering storage; release of radioactive elements when, due to a possible (even if highly improbable) accident, a large amount of water leaches the glass up to its complete dissolution; long term degradation of the conditioning barrier in the repository. To find a single test which complies to these different requirements does not seem probable. The task is aggravated by the complexity of the leaching mechanism

  15. On the Paramagnetic Impurity Concentration of Silicate Glasses from Low-Temperature Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Jug, Giancarlo

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of paramagnetic trace impurities in glasses can be determined via precise SQUID measurements of the sample's magnetization in a magnetic field. However, the existence of quasi-ordered structural inhomogeneities in the disordered solid causes correlated tunneling currents that can contribute to the magnetization, surprisingly, also at the higher temperatures. We show that taking into account such tunneling systems gives rise to a good agreement between the concentrations extracted from SQUID magnetization and those extracted from low-temperature heat capacity measurements. Without suitable inclusion of such magnetization contribution from the tunneling currents, we find that the concentration of paramagnetic impurities gets considerably over-estimated. This analysis represents a further positive test for the structural inhomogeneity theory of the magnetic effects in the cold glasses.

  16. Generation of alkali-free and high-proton concentration layer in a soda lime glass using non-contact corona discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Nishii, Junji [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan); Funatsu, Shiro [Production Technology Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1-1 Suehiro-cyo, Tsurumiku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio [Research Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1150 Hazawa-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8755 (Japan); Harada, Kenji [Department of Computer Science, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

    2013-08-14

    Formation mechanisms of alkali-free and high-proton concentration surfaces were investigated for a soda lime glass using a corona discharge treatment under an atmospheric pressure. Protons produced by high DC voltage around an anode needle electrode were incorporated into a sodium ion site in the anode side glass. The sodium ion was swept away to the cathode side as a charge carrier. Then it was discharged. The precipitated sodium was transformed to a Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} powder when the surface contacted with air. The sodium ion in the glass surface layer of the anode side was replaced completely by protons. The concentration of OH groups in the layer was balanced with the amount of excluded sodium ions. The substitution reaction of sodium ions with protons tends to be saturated according to a square root function of time. The alkali depletion layer formation rate was affected by the large difference in mobility between sodium ions and protons in the glass.

  17. Photocatalytic effect and Mössbauer study of iron titanium silicate glass prepared by sol-gel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Kubuki, Shiro; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Sinkó, Katalin; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2015-06-01

    A relationship between the photocatalytic effect and the local structure of 50Fe2O3ṡ (50- x)SiO2ṡ xTiO2 glass abbreviated as 50FS xTi prepared by sol-gel method was investigated by 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy (FeMS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-VIS). Mössbauer spectra of 50FS xTi glass before annealing showed a doublet with the isomer shift ( δ) and quadrupole splitting (Δ) of 0.41±0.01 mm s-1 and 0.75±0.02 mm s-1, indicating that Fe3+ formed FeO6 octahedra ( O h). A comparable δ of 0.36±0.02 mm s-1 and the larger Δ of 0.92±0.02 mm s-1 values were confirmed for 50FS xTi after annealed at 400 ∘ C for 3 h. These results indicates that the coordination number of iron polyhedra decreases from 6 to 4 due to annealing. UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectra of 50FS10Ti yielded two optical band gap energies ( E g's) of 2.05 eV and 3.55 eV. This result implied that 50FS10Ti has two optical band gaps in the visible area and UV area. A bleaching test performed by 10 mL of MB aqueous solution and 40 mg of powder 50FS10Ti glass sample showed that MB absorbance decreased from 3.16 to 0.43 after UV-visible light irradiation for 2 h with the first order rate constant ( k) of . These results prove that titanium containing iron silicate glass with the composition of 50Fe2O3ṡ40SiO2ṡ10TiO2 has the UV and visible light responsive photocatalytic effect.

  18. Pressure-induced coordination change of Ti in silicate glass: a XANES study

    OpenAIRE

    Paris, Eleonora; Dingwell, Donald B.; Seifert, Friedrich; Mottana, Annibale; Romano, Claudia

    1994-01-01

    The effect of pressure on titanium coordination in glasses, with composition K2TiSi4O11, quenched isobarically from liquids equilibrated at high pressure (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 kbar respectively) and T=1600° C has been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XANES spectra collected at the Ti K-edge clearly show a variation with pressure that is related to changes in the geometrical environment around the Ti atoms. By comparison with spectra of standard materials, the XANES sp...

  19. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in silicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Yu. V.; Rempel, A. A.; Meyer, M.; Pipich, V.; Gerth, S.; Magerl, A.

    2016-08-01

    Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering on Cd and S doped glass annealed at 600 °C shows after the first 12 h nucleation and growth of spherical CdS nanoparticles with a radius of up to 34±4 Å. After the nucleation is completed after 24 h, further growth in this amorphous environment is governed by oriented particle attachment mechanism as found for a liquid medium. Towards 48 h the particle shape has changed into spheroidal with short and long axis of 40±2 Å and 120±2 Å, respectively.

  20. Ultrafast dynamics of copper nanoparticles embedded in soda-lime silicate glass fabricated by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper nanoparticles embedded in soda-lime glass were fabricated by ion exchange followed by thermal treatment in hydrogen. The ultrafast dynamics of the embedded Cu nanoparticles formed under different fabrication conditions were investigated by applying femtosecond pump-probe technique. Non-Fermi electrons were suggested to be dominant in the transient behavior of the nanocomposites far from surface plasmon resonance of Cu. The long ion-exchange processing time was found to benefit and improve the ultrafast response of the fabricated nanocomposites.

  1. Moessbauer analysis of crystallization processes in iron-soda-lime-silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to observe the crystallization process in glasses with composition denoted by [0.50SiO2, 0.45Na2O, 0.05CaO]100-x(Fe2O3)x with x equal to 4, 10 and 16 mol%. It is shown that Moessbauer spectroscopy is a very suitable technique for detecting and checking the very early stages of crystallite formation in amorphous materials. The crystallization process was observed and qualitatively analysed by means of classical volume nucleation theory

  2. Time-resolved luminescence studies of Eu3+ in soda-lime silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruivo, Andreia; Muralha, Vânia S. F.; Águas, Hugo; de Matos, António Pires; Laia, César A. T.

    2014-02-01

    Soda-lime glasses doped with Eu3+ were synthesized using a variety of compositions, namely changing the fraction of CaO or Eu2O3. Those glasses were characterized with several techniques, including ellipsometry, UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy, steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy and time-resolved luminescence. The compositions' effects on optical properties such as refraction indexes, Eu3+ oscillator strengths and luminescence lifetimes were accessed from the analysis of the experimental results. Judd-Ofelt theory was used to analyze all these aspects, which allow the detection of a mismatch of optical properties from absorption and emission spectroscopy. This mismatch was confirmed from the time-resolved data, showing the existence of two different spectroscopic Eu3+ species. From those results it is concluded that there is evidence for lanthanide aggregation, giving rise to self-quenching effects that may be described through resonance energy transfer mechanisms. The difference between luminescence lifetimes for isolated and aggregated Eu(III) is interpreted as due to different interactions with oxygen in the matrix, namely degree of covalency of the Eu-O bond and point group symmetry of the lanthanide.

  3. Enamel and Dentin Surface Finishing Influence on the Roughness and Microshear Bond Strength of a Lithium Silicate Glass-Ceramic for Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Bravo, Ruth Peggy; Pavelski, Thiago Vinícius; Garcia, Paula Pontes; Gisele Maria CORRER; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Adilson Yoshio FURUSE

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the influence of cavity surface finishing with diamond burs of different grit mounted on high-speed turbine and ultrasound on the roughness and microshear bond strength (MBS) of a lithium silicate glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Methods. Enamel and dentin specimens were divided into seven groups, according to the type of surface finishing: 1200-grit sandpaper (control), two different brands of medium-grit and fine-grit diamond burs in a high-speed turbine;...

  4. Passivating boron silicate glasses for co-diffused high-efficiency n-type silicon solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Josh, E-mail: josh.engelhardt@uni-konstanz.de; Frey, Alexander; Gloger, Sebastian; Hahn, Giso; Terheiden, Barbara [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    Doping layers commonly have but one function: supplying the dopants to form a doped region within a substrate. This work presents B doping layers/stacks, which at the same time supply dopant atoms, passivate the B-doped crystalline Si surface sufficiently well (j{sub 0E} < 50 fA/cm{sup 2}), and show optical properties suitable for anti-reflective coating. Furthermore, these boron silicate glasses can act as a barrier against parasitic P in-diffusion during a co-diffusion step. The boron emitters diffused from the inductively coupled plasma plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited B containing SiO{sub x} layers are investigated and optimized concerning passivation quality and contact properties for high-efficiency n-type solar Si cell designs. It is shown that even 10 nm thin SiO{sub x}:B films already allow for suitable emitter sheet resistance for screen-printed contacts. Furthermore, SiO{sub x}:B layers presented here allow for iV{sub OC} values of 675 mV and contact resistivity of 1 mΩcm{sup 2} for commercial Ag instead of Ag/Al pastes on the diffused boron emitter passivated with the SiO{sub x}:B layer supporting the contact formation. All of these properties can be achieved within one single B doping layer/stack.

  5. Passivating boron silicate glasses for co-diffused high-efficiency n-type silicon solar cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doping layers commonly have but one function: supplying the dopants to form a doped region within a substrate. This work presents B doping layers/stacks, which at the same time supply dopant atoms, passivate the B-doped crystalline Si surface sufficiently well (j0E < 50 fA/cm2), and show optical properties suitable for anti-reflective coating. Furthermore, these boron silicate glasses can act as a barrier against parasitic P in-diffusion during a co-diffusion step. The boron emitters diffused from the inductively coupled plasma plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited B containing SiOx layers are investigated and optimized concerning passivation quality and contact properties for high-efficiency n-type solar Si cell designs. It is shown that even 10 nm thin SiOx:B films already allow for suitable emitter sheet resistance for screen-printed contacts. Furthermore, SiOx:B layers presented here allow for iVOC values of 675 mV and contact resistivity of 1 mΩcm2 for commercial Ag instead of Ag/Al pastes on the diffused boron emitter passivated with the SiOx:B layer supporting the contact formation. All of these properties can be achieved within one single B doping layer/stack

  6. Phospho-silicate glass gated 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor devices: Phosphorus concentration dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, C.; Ahyi, A. C.; Xu, C.; Morisette, D.; Feldman, L. C.; Dhar, S.

    2016-04-01

    The correlation between phosphorus concentration in phospho-silicate glass (PSG) gate dielectrics and electrical properties of 4H-SiC MOS devices has been investigated. Varying P uptake in PSG is achieved by changing the POCl3 post-oxidation annealing temperature. The density of interface traps (Dit) at the PSG/4H-SiC interface decreases as the amount of interfacial P increases. Most significantly, the MOSFET channel mobility does not correlate with Dit for all samples, which is highly unusual for SiC MOSFETs. Further analysis reveals two types of field-effect mobility (μfe) behavior, depending on the annealing temperature. Annealing at 1000 °C improves the channel mobility most effectively, with a peak value ˜105 cm2 V-1 s-1, and results in a surface phonon scattering limited mobility at high oxide field. On the other hand, PSG annealed at other temperatures results in a surface roughness scattering limited mobility at similar field.

  7. Formation of Na1+xV3O8 Nanoribbon Thin Film from V2O5 Xerogel on Sodium Silicate Glass Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yi; XU Jin-jie; LI Jun; YANG Wen-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Na1+xV3O8 nanoribbon thin film was successfully fabricated by annealing the V2O5 xerogel film on sodium silicate glass substrate at 450 ℃. It has been identified that the amount of sodium ions diffused into the V2O5 xerogel film increases with the high temperature of annealing treatment. The sodium glass substrate serves as a limited sodium source to induce the transformation from V2O5 to Na1+xV3O8.

  8. Effect of gamma rays absorbed doses and heat treatment on the optical absorption spectra of silver ion-exchanged silicate glass

    OpenAIRE

    Farah, Khaled; Hosni, Faouzi; Mejri, Arbi; Boizot, Bruno; Hafedh, Ben; Hamzaoui, Ahmed Hichem

    2014-01-01

    International audience Samples of a commercial silicate glass have been subjected to ion exchange at 320 °C in a molten mixture of AgNO 3 and NaNO 3 with molar ratio of 1:99 and 5:95 for 60 min. The ion exchange process was followed by gamma irradiation in the dose range of 1–250 kGy and heating at the temperature of 550 °C for different time periods ranging from 10 to 582 min. The spectral absorption in UV–Vis range of the Ag–Na ion exchanged glass was measured and used to determine the s...

  9. Investigation of the electrical conductivity of γ-irradiated sodium silicate glasses containing multivalence Cu ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation deals with a study of the γ-radiation effects on the d.c. electrical resistivity (rho) of SiO2-Na2O-CaO glasses containing Cu0, Cu+, Cu2+ and mixture of Cu+ and Cu2+ ions over the temperature (T) range from 300 to 6300K. The applicability of the polaron hopping conduction mechanism has been established from the reciprocal temperature dependence of 1n rho/T for the samples under investigation. The electrical resistivity is found to decrease by increasing the TM valancy which enhances the hoping process. The post-irradiation effect due to ionizing gamma-radiation is investigated within the frame work of the electron (and hole) trapping theory, and an average value of 0.45 is obtained for the parameter Δ, characterizing traps with an exponentially decreasing numbers below the conduction band. (author)

  10. The behavior of Er3+ dopants during crystallization in oxyfluoride silicate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the changes of local environment of Er3+ during heat treatment process have been studied in 50SiO2-45PbF2-5PbO system. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), absorption spectra, fluorescence decay curves and luminescence spectra. The experimental results indicate that PbF2 crystals were precipitated in the precursor sample. However, a significant fraction of Er3+ remains in the glassy phase. With increasing heat treatment time, the Er3+ in the glass matrix may enter into fluoride nanocrystals gradually. When the heat treatment time reached 15 min, most of the Er3+ ions were incorporated into the fluoride nanocrystals. Based on the experimental analysis, we considered that Er3+ not only act as nucleating agents for the precipitation of crystalline fluoride phase during nucleation process but also enter into nanocrystals during crystals growth process.

  11. Actinides in silicate glasses and melts and on mineral surfaces: information on local co-ordination environments from XAFS spectroscopy and bond valence theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of actinides on the environment is mitigated by their interaction with particle surfaces and by incorporation into suitable waste forms. In both cases, a fundamental knowledge of the local co-ordination environment of actinide ions is essential for understanding their stability in various near-surface environments under a range of conditions. When actinide ions are sorbed on mineral surfaces, the extent to which the ions are immobilised depends on the type of surface complex or solid precipitate that forms. When incorporated into a glass or crystalline waste form, the stability of the actinide will depend in part on its redox state and local co-ordination environment. In both cases, XAFS spectroscopy can provide unique information on the number and types of first and, in certain cases, more distant neighbours, and their geometric arrangement (including inter-atomic distances and a measure of their disorder). When this structural information from XAFS spectroscopy is combined with Pauling bond valence theory and modem bond valences corrected for bond length variations, it is also possible to develop plausible models for their medium-range co-ordination environments (out to ≅ 4 Angstrom radial distance around the actinide) for both sorbed actinide ions and those present in a silicate glass or melt. We discuss results from several XAFS studies of the naturally occurring actinides uranium and thorium in sorption samples, silicate glasses and silicate melts at high temperature. (authors)

  12. The behavior of Er{sup 3+} dopants during crystallization in oxyfluoride silicate glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Lejing [Institute of Modern Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology of Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Ren Guozhong, E-mail: rgz76@sohu.co [Institute of Modern Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology of Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Chen Minpeng; Liu Yang [Institute of Modern Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology of Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China)

    2009-11-03

    In this paper, the changes of local environment of Er{sup 3+} during heat treatment process have been studied in 50SiO{sub 2}-45PbF{sub 2}-5PbO system. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), absorption spectra, fluorescence decay curves and luminescence spectra. The experimental results indicate that PbF{sub 2} crystals were precipitated in the precursor sample. However, a significant fraction of Er{sup 3+} remains in the glassy phase. With increasing heat treatment time, the Er{sup 3+} in the glass matrix may enter into fluoride nanocrystals gradually. When the heat treatment time reached 15 min, most of the Er{sup 3+} ions were incorporated into the fluoride nanocrystals. Based on the experimental analysis, we considered that Er{sup 3+} not only act as nucleating agents for the precipitation of crystalline fluoride phase during nucleation process but also enter into nanocrystals during crystals growth process.

  13. A study on microstructure and luminescent properties of oxyfluoride silicate glass-ceramics with (Ho3+,Yb3+):NaYF4 crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Oxyfluoride glass-ceramic with NaYF4 nanocrystals content the Ho3+ and Yb3+ ions. → Up-converted green emission in glass-ceramics was observed. → Up-converted red emission occurs in glass samples. → Appropriate up-conversion mechanism is proposed. - Abstract: Glass-ceramics containing NaYF4 nanocrystals were prepared by heat-treatment from oxyfluoride silicate-based glass doped with Ho3+ and Yb3+ ions. The formation of crystalline fluoride phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Absorption and emission spectra revealed that a fraction of Ho3+ and Yb3+ ions is incorporated into the NaYF4 ordered lattice influencing spectroscopic features of glass-ceramics in comparison with those of precursor glass. Green up-conversion emission (545 nm) originating in the 5S2 level in glass-ceramics and up-converted red emission (650 nm) originating in the 5F5 level in as-melted glass were observed under optical pumping into Yb3+ absorption band and analyzed. Although both emissions in both materials are achieved by two-photon excitations, the relation between green and red emission intensity in glass-ceramics and glass implies that processes relevant to up-conversion phenomena are different. Based on a careful analysis of relaxation dynamics of Ho3+ and Yb3+ excited states, the mechanisms involved in conversion of the infrared radiation into the visible emission in these materials are proposed and discussed.

  14. A study on microstructure and luminescent properties of oxyfluoride silicate glass-ceramics with (Ho{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}):NaYF{sub 4} crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominiak-Dzik, G., E-mail: G.Dominiak-Dzik@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland); Lisiecki, R.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Krajczyk, L. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Oxyfluoride glass-ceramic with NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals content the Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions. > Up-converted green emission in glass-ceramics was observed. > Up-converted red emission occurs in glass samples. > Appropriate up-conversion mechanism is proposed. - Abstract: Glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals were prepared by heat-treatment from oxyfluoride silicate-based glass doped with Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions. The formation of crystalline fluoride phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Absorption and emission spectra revealed that a fraction of Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions is incorporated into the NaYF{sub 4} ordered lattice influencing spectroscopic features of glass-ceramics in comparison with those of precursor glass. Green up-conversion emission (545 nm) originating in the {sup 5}S{sub 2} level in glass-ceramics and up-converted red emission (650 nm) originating in the {sup 5}F{sub 5} level in as-melted glass were observed under optical pumping into Yb{sup 3+} absorption band and analyzed. Although both emissions in both materials are achieved by two-photon excitations, the relation between green and red emission intensity in glass-ceramics and glass implies that processes relevant to up-conversion phenomena are different. Based on a careful analysis of relaxation dynamics of Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} excited states, the mechanisms involved in conversion of the infrared radiation into the visible emission in these materials are proposed and discussed.

  15. Experimental study on preparation of sodium silicate by purification of gangue and alkali melting activation%煤矸石除杂及碱融活化制取硅酸钠的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔德顺; 吴红

    2013-01-01

    研究利用煤矸石中的硅元素制取硅酸钠,先将煤矸石粉在750℃下煅烧2h,除去有机质并破坏了煤矸石中的高岭石等矿物的晶型结构,再将煅烧过的煤矸石粉在95℃、液固比(mL/g)为8:1、质量分数为40%的硫酸中酸浸5h,煤矸石煅烧粉中的铁和铝等金属杂质离子的总去除率为86.93%;还研究了碱融活化条件对硅元素溶出率的影响,获得了适宜的碱融活化条件:m(酸浸粉):m(碳酸钠)=1:1.5、碱融温度为800 ℃、碱融时间为2h.在此条件下,硅元素溶出率大于75%,最终获得了硅酸钠溶液.%In order to utilize silicon in the coal gangue to prepare sodium silicate,the gangue powder was calcined at 750 ℃for 2 h firstly,then the organic matters were removed and the crystal structures of the minerals,such as kaolin in the gangue were destroyed.The calcined gangue powder was leached in sulfuric acid with mass fraction of 40% and liquid to solid ratio of 8:l at 95 ℃ for 5 h.The total removal ratio of impurity metal ions,such as iron and aluminum was 86.93%;the influences of the alkali melting activation conditions on the dissolution ratios of silicon element were investigated,then the suitable activation conditions were obtained:the mass ratio of acid leaching powder to sodium carbonate was 1:1.5,the alkali melting temperature was 800 ℃,and the alkali melting time was 2 h.Under these conditions silicon element dissolution ratio was more than 75% and the sodium silicate solution was obtained finally.

  16. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. I. Preparation and in vitro degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Fu, Hailuo; Liu, Xin

    2010-10-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of dry human trabecular bone but with three different compositions were evaluated for potential applications in bone repair. The preparation of the scaffolds and the effect of the glass composition on the degradation and conversion of the scaffolds to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) are reported here (Part I). The in vitro response of osteogenic cells to the scaffolds and the in vivo evaluation of the scaffolds in a rat subcutaneous implantation model are described in Part II. Scaffolds (porosity = 78-82%; pore size = 100-500 microm) were prepared using a polymer foam replication technique. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. The conversion rate of the scaffolds to HA in the SBF increased markedly with the B2O3 content of the glass. Concurrently, the pH of the SBF also increased with the B2O3 content of the scaffolds. The compressive strengths of the as-prepared scaffolds (5-11 MPa) were in the upper range of values reported for trabecular bone, but they decreased markedly with immersion time in the SBF and with increasing B2O3 content of the glass. The results show that scaffolds with a wide range of bioactivity and degradation rate can be achieved by replacing varying amounts of SiO(2) in silicate bioactive glass with B2O3. PMID:20544804

  17. Better Alternative to "Astronomical Silicate": Laboratory-Based Optical Functions of Chondritic/Solar Abundance Glass With Application to HD161796

    CERN Document Server

    Speck, A K; Hofmeister, A M

    2015-01-01

    "Astronomical" or "circumstellar" silicate optical functions (real and imaginary indices of refraction n and k have been previously derived from compositionally and structurally disparate samples; past values were compiled from different sources in the literature, and are essentially kluges of observational, laboratory, and extrapolated or interpolated values. These synthetic optical functions were created because astronomers lack the quantitative data on amorphous silicates at all wavelengths needed for radiative transfer modeling. This paper provides optical functions that (1) are created with a consistent methodology, (2) use the same sample across all wavelengths, and (3) minimize interpolation and extrapolation wherever possible. We present electronic data tables of optical functions derived from mid-ultraviolet to far-infrared laboratory transmission spectra for two materials: iron-free glass with chondritic/solar atmospheric abundances, and metallic iron. We compare these optical functions to other pop...

  18. Mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated fly ash geopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komljenovic, M., E-mail: miroslav.komljenovic@imsi.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, Material Science, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Bascarevic, Z., E-mail: zvezdana@cms.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, Material Science, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Bradic, V., E-mail: violeta.bradic@cms.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, Material Science, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates the properties of geopolymer obtained by alkali-activation of fly ash (FA), i.e. the influence of characteristics of the representative group of FA (class F) from Serbia, as well as that of the nature and concentration of various activators on mechanical and microstructural properties of geopolymers. Aqueous solutions of Ca(OH){sub 2}, NaOH, NaOH + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, KOH and sodium silicate (water glass) of various concentrations were used as alkali activators. It was established that the nature and concentration of the activator was the most dominant parameter in the alkali-activation process. In respect of physical characteristics of FA, the key parameter was fineness. The geopolymer based on FA with the highest content of fine particles (<43 {mu}m), showed the highest compressive strength in all cases. Regardless of FA characteristics, nature and concentration of the activator, the alkali-activation products were mainly amorphous. The formation of crystalline phases (zeolites) occurred in some cases, depending on the reaction conditions. The highest compressive strength was obtained using sodium silicate. Together with the increase of sodium silicate SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O mass ratio, the atomic Si/Al ratio in the reaction products was also increased. Under the experimental conditions of this investigation, high strength was directly related to the high Si/Al ratio.

  19. An integrated experimental-modeling approach to study the acid leaching behavior of lead from sub-micrometer lead silicate glass particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Generation of particles by laser ablation of lead silicate glass. • Collection of particles on filters and continuous acid leaching and ICP-MS monitoring. • Fitting of the lead leaching profile to a mathematical intraparticle diffusion model. • Extraction of individual leaching profiles for selected mono-dispersed size fractions. • Leaching kinetics is based on ion-exchange and correlated with particle size. -- Abstract: This work focuses on the development of a procedure to study the mechanism of leaching of lead from sub-micrometer lead glass particles using 0.3 mol l−1 HNO3 as a leachant. Glass particles with an effective size distribution range from 0.05 to 1.4 μm were generated by laser ablation (213 nm Nd:YAG laser) and collected on an inline 0.2 μm syringe filter. Subsequently, the glass particles on the filter were subjected to online leaching and continuous monitoring of lead (Pb-208) in the leachate by quadrupole ICP-MS. The lead leaching profile, aided by the particle size distribution information from cascade impaction, was numerically fitted to a mathematical model based on the glass intraparticle diffusion, liquid film distribution and thermodynamic glass-leachant distribution equilibrium. The findings of the modeling show that the rate-limiting step of leaching is the migration of lead from the core to the surface of the glass particle by an ion-exchange mechanism, governed by the apparent intraparticle lead diffusivity in glass which was calculated to be 3.1 × 10−18 m2 s−1. Lead leaching is illustrated in the form of graphs and animations of intraparticle lead release (in time and intraparticle position) from particles with sizes of 0.1 and 0.3 μm

  20. Structure of glasses containing transition-metal ions. Progress report, January 1, 1982-October 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of host glasses include the completion of an interpretation of the Raman spectra of soda-gallia-silica glasses and some new work on zinc-containing glasses. The question of the structural environment of transition metal ions in silicate glasses and whether these ions should be regarded as occupying sites (a crystal-like model) or whether they form complexes (a solution-like model) continues to occupy our attention. A study of cobalt in alkali silicate glasses was completed and work is underway on chromium in borate glasses. The investigation of diffusion processes and the hydration of glass surfaces by sputter-induced-photon spectrometry (SIPS) was completed and the final portions are reported

  1. Influence of ZnO/MgO substitution on sintering, crystallisation, and bio-activity of alkali-free glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study reports on the influence of partial replacement of MgO by ZnO on the structure, crystallisation behaviour and bioactivity of alkali-free bioactive glass-ceramics (GCs). A series of glass compositions (mol%): 36.07 CaO–(19.24 − x) MgO–x ZnO–5.61 P2O5–38.49 SiO2–0.59 CaF2 (x = 2–10) have been synthesised by melt–quench technique. The structural changes were investigated by solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. The sintering and crystallisation behaviours of glass powders were studied by hot-stage microscopy and differential thermal analysis, respectively. All the glass compositions exhibited good densification ability resulting in well sintered and mechanically strong GCs. The crystallisation and mechanical behaviour were studied under non-isothermal heating conditions at 850 °C for 1 h. Diopside was the primary crystalline phase in all the GCs followed by fluorapatite and rankinite as secondary phases. Another phase named petedunnite was identified in GCs with ZnO content > 4 mol. The proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) on GCs was revealed to be Zn-dose dependent with the highest performance being observed for 4 mol% ZnO. - Highlights: • The addition of zinc to glasses decreased Tg and promoted crystallisation. • Zinc enhanced the sintering ability and increased mechanical strength by 36%. • The apatite formation ability decreased with increasing Zn contents. • Zinc stimulated mesenchymal stem cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner

  2. Influence of ZnO/MgO substitution on sintering, crystallisation, and bio-activity of alkali-free glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Saurabh [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Goel, Ashutosh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8065 (United States); Correia, Ana Filipa [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pascual, Maria J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (CSIC), Kelsen 5, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Hae-Won [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN) & College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science & BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330714 (Korea, Republic of); Ferreira, José M.F., E-mail: jmf@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-08-01

    The present study reports on the influence of partial replacement of MgO by ZnO on the structure, crystallisation behaviour and bioactivity of alkali-free bioactive glass-ceramics (GCs). A series of glass compositions (mol%): 36.07 CaO–(19.24 − x) MgO–x ZnO–5.61 P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–38.49 SiO{sub 2}–0.59 CaF{sub 2} (x = 2–10) have been synthesised by melt–quench technique. The structural changes were investigated by solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. The sintering and crystallisation behaviours of glass powders were studied by hot-stage microscopy and differential thermal analysis, respectively. All the glass compositions exhibited good densification ability resulting in well sintered and mechanically strong GCs. The crystallisation and mechanical behaviour were studied under non-isothermal heating conditions at 850 °C for 1 h. Diopside was the primary crystalline phase in all the GCs followed by fluorapatite and rankinite as secondary phases. Another phase named petedunnite was identified in GCs with ZnO content > 4 mol. The proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) on GCs was revealed to be Zn-dose dependent with the highest performance being observed for 4 mol% ZnO. - Highlights: • The addition of zinc to glasses decreased T{sub g} and promoted crystallisation. • Zinc enhanced the sintering ability and increased mechanical strength by 36%. • The apatite formation ability decreased with increasing Zn contents. • Zinc stimulated mesenchymal stem cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner.

  3. The influence of different parameters on the hydration process of binders based on alkali activated slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DARKO KRIZAN

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of certain types of activators (water glass Na2O·nSiO2 and sodium-metasilicate Na2SiO3·5H2O on the hydration process of alkali activated slag was investigated in this study. The influence of activator concentration, specific surface area of the slag and the modulus n of the water glass (mass ratio between SiO2 and Na2O on the kinetics of the hydration process i.e., the change of compressive strength were also investigated. Poorly crystallized low base calcium silicate hydrate C–S–H (I is the main hydration product of alkali activated slag regardless of the activator used. This is the reason for the rapid increase in the strength of alkali activated slag and also of the very high strength values. The strength growth rate and strength values were significantly higher when sodium–metasilicate was used as the activator than when water glass was used. The specific surface area of the slag and the activator concentration are parameters which have a closely connected influence on strength and their action is cumulative. The modulus n of water glass does not have an explicit influence on the strength of alkali activated slag.

  4. Development of multi-gap resistive plate chambers with low-resistive silicate glass electrodes for operation at high particle fluxes and large transported charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using electrodes made of semi-conductive glass is an innovative way of improving the rate capability of resistive plate chambers. To address this issue, we developed 6- and 10-gap counters with low-resistive silicate glass electrodes (bulk resistivity ∼1010 Ω cm) suited for time-of-flight (TOF) applications at high rates and high transported charges. Measurements were performed at GSI-Darmstadt under uniform an irradiation by secondary particles stemming from proton reactions at 2.5 GeV/A. For the 10-gap MRPC, time resolutions below 90 ps and efficiencies larger than 90% were obtained at counting rates up to 25 kHz/cm2. When the particle flux increases every 5 kHz/cm2, the efficiency decreases by 1% and the time resolution deteriorates by 4 ps. A tolerable decrease of the material conductivity was also observed for a total transported charge of 1 C/cm2.

  5. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material and radioopaque posterior glass ionomer restorative cement in primary and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Guptha Raju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restoration of carious primary molars is still a major concern while treating the young children that too in deep carious lesion which extends below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ where pulp protection and achieving adequate marginal seal are very important to prevent secondary caries. The needs were met with the development of new materials. One such of new bioactive material is tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine, recommended for restoring deep lesions. Aim: To evaluate and compare shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine and glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP in primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surface of crowns were ground flat. PVC molds were stabilized over flat dentin surface and filled with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP according to group ascertained. Shear bond strength was evaluated using universal testing machine (INSTRON. Standardized Class II cavities were prepared on both primary and permanent teeth, and then restored with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP according to group ascertained, over which composite resin material was restored using an open sandwich technique. Microleakage was assessed using dye penetration. Microleakage was examined using a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed that glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP exhibited better shear bond strength than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine. Mean microleakage score for glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP in permanent teeth was 1.52 and for primary teeth was 1.56. The mean microleakage for tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine in permanent teeth was 0.76 and for primary teeth was 0.60. Glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP exhibited more microleakage than tricalcium silicate-based restorative

  6. Effect of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant on electrical and optical properties of potassium sodium niobate silicate glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsiri, Ploypailin [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sirisoonthorn, Somnuk [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Pengpat, Kamonpan, E-mail: kamonpan.p@cmu.ac.th [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The KNN–SiO{sub 2} doped Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass-ceramics was prepared by incorporation method. • High dielectric constant (458.41 at 100 kHz) and low loss (0.0005) could be obtained. • TEM and SEM confirmed the existence of KNN crystals embedded in glass matrix. • The Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant causes insignificant effect on modifying E{sub g} value. - Abstract: In this study, transparent glass-ceramics from potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-silicate glass system doped with erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were successfully prepared by incorporation method. KNN was added in glass batches as heterogeneous nucleating agent. The KNN powder was mixed with SiO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant with KNN and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} content varied between 70–80 and 0.5–1.0 mol%, respectively. Each batch was subsequently melted at 1300 °C for 15 min in a platinum crucible using an electric furnace. The quenched glasses were then subjected to heat treatment at various temperatures for 4 h. XRD results showed that the prepared glass ceramics contained crystals of KNN solid solution. In contrary, dielectric constant (ϵ{sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan δ) were found to increase with increasing heat treatment temperature. Additionally, optical properties such as absorbance and energy band gap have been investigated.

  7. Mixed alkali effect in borate glasses - electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption studies in Cu sup 2 sup + doped xNa sub 2 O- (30 - x)K sub 2 O- 70B sub 2 O sub 3 glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Chakradhar, R P S; Rao, J L; Ramakrishna, J

    2003-01-01

    The mixed alkali borate glasses xNa sub 2 O-(30 - x)K sub 2 O-70B sub 2 O sub 3 (5 sup sup 2 B sub 2 sub g) and a weak band on the higher energy side at 22 115 cm sup - sup 1 corresponding to the transition ( sup 2 B sub 1 sub g -> sup 2 E sub g). With x > 5, the higher energy band disappears and the lower energy band shifts slightly to the lower energy side. By correlating the EPR and optical absorption data, the molecular orbital coefficients alpha sup 2 and beta sub 1 sup 2 are evaluated for the different glasses investigated. The values indicate that the in-plane sigma bonding is moderately covalent while the in-plane pi bonding is significantly ionic in nature; these exhibit a minimum with x = 15, showing the MAE. The theoretical values of optical basicity of the glasses have also been evaluated. From optical absorption edges, the optical bandgap energies have been calculated and are found to lie in the range 3.00-3.40 eV. The physical properties of the glasses studied have also been evaluated with respe...

  8. Fixation by ion exchange of toxic materials in a glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for disposing of toxic materials such as radioactive waste comprises reacting a porous silicate glass or silica gel, having interconnected pores and alkali metal cations. Group 1b metal cations and/or ammonium cation bonded to silicon through divalent oxygen linkages on the internal surfaces of said pores, with a toxic material containing toxic cations as well as non-cationic portions. The toxic cations are capable of displacing the alkali metal cations, Group 1b metal cations and/or ammonium cations to provide a distribution of internal silicon-bonded toxic cation oxide groups within the pores of the glass or silica gel. (author)

  9. Studies on γ-ray induced structural changes in Nd3+ doped lead alumino silicate glasses by means of thermoluminescence for dosimetric applications in high dose ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: TL glow curves of PbO–SiO2:Nd3+ glasses mixed with different concentrations of Al2O3 exposed to γ-rays of dose 5.0 kGy. - Highlights: • TL studies of Nd3+ ions doped lead alumino silicate glasses were carried out. • Highest TL output was observed in the glasses mixed with 10 mol% of Al2O3. • Different mechanisms responsible for TL emission were discussed. • Near linearity of the dose response was observed in the dose range of 1.0–3.0 kGy. • These glasses may be useful as dosimeters in processing perishable food commodities. - Abstract: Thermoluminescence (TL) studies on PbO–Al2O3–SiO2:Nd3+ glasses mixed with varying concentrations of Al2O3 exposed to γ-rays of dose in the range 0–5.0 kGy were carried out. The TL emission exhibited a dosimetric peak at about 185 °C. The TL output under the glow peak increased with increasing Al2O3 and also with the γ-ray dose. The mechanisms responsible for TL emission and enhancement of TL output with increase in the concentration of Al2O3 were quantitatively discussed in terms of induced structural defects in the vicinity of Nd3+ ions due to interaction of γ-rays with the glass network in the scenario of varying concentration of Al2O3. The dose response of these glass samples exhibited linear behavior in the medium dose range viz., 1.0–3.0 kGy. Finally, it is concluded that the glass containing the highest concentration of Al2O3 exhibits high TL output and such glasses are useful for dosimetry in the range 1.0–3.0 kGy and hence these glasses may be useful for dosimetry in such high range of doses required for commercial radiation processing of perishable food commodities to extend their shelf-lives

  10. Properties and Structure of RO-R2O-Na2O-Al2O3-P2O5 Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties and structural features of RO-R2O-Na 2O-Al2O3-P2O5 (R= Mg, Ca, Ba and RO= Li) glasses in the system have been investigated. The properties of those glasses seem to depend on the field strength of the alkali or alkali-earth ions in glasses as in silicate glasses. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy indicates that the glass network is dominated by bridging P-tetrahedral present in glasses with O/P ≅ 3.0. The variation in physical properties of the glasses seem to be closely related to the variation in structure of the glasses and could be explained by simple mechanism such as field strength and differences in mass

  11. Density and compressibility of the molten lunar picritic glasses: Implications for the roles of Ti and Fe in the structures of silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; Agee, Carl B.; McCubbin, Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    The density and compressibility of four synthetic molten lunar picritic glasses was investigated from 0 to 10 GPa and 1748 to 2473 K. The picritic glasses were collected from the lunar surface during the Apollo missions, and they are hypothesized to have rapidly quenched as glass beads during pyroclastic fire fountain eruptions. The specific melt compositions investigated in the present study are the Apollo 15 green glass Type C (A15C, TiO2 = 0.26 wt%), the Apollo 14 yellow glass (A14Y, TiO2 = 4.58 wt%), the Apollo 17 orange glass 74220-type (A17O TiO2 = 9.12 wt%), and the Apollo 14 black glass (A14B, TiO2 = 16.40 wt%). These glasses are reported to represent primary unfractionated melts, making them a prime candidate for experimental studies into lunar basalt density and compressibility during partial melting of the lunar mantle. Sink-float experiments were conducted on the synthetic molten lunar glass compositions using a piston-cylinder apparatus (P style multi-anvil device (P > 2.5 GPa) in order to bracket the density of the melts. New sink-float data are reported for A15C, A14Y, and A17O, which are combined with previously published density and compressibility data on A15C, A17O, and A14B. Although the Ti-rich liquids are highly compressible at lower pressures, they become nearly incompressible at much higher pressures when compared to the molten low-Ti glasses. Consequently, the melts with the most TiO2 (A14B) are the least dense at higher pressures, a reversal of what is seen at lower pressures. This change in density and compressibility is attributed to changes in coordination of Ti and Fe in the silicate melt structure. As Ti4+ abundances in the silicate melt increase, predominantly [IV]Ti4+ and [IV]Fe2+ change to [VI]Ti4+ and [VI]Fe2+ in the melt structure. All of the data from the present study were used to calculate a Birch-Murnaghan equation-of-state (BM-EOS) for each melt composition. The BM-EOS model for each composition was then combined with

  12. The development of a potassium-sulfide glass fiber cell and studies on impurities in alkali metal-sulfur cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, F. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Potassium sulfur rechargeable cells, having as the electrolyte the thin walls of hollow glass fibers made from permeable glass, were developed. The cells had short lives, probably due to the construction materials and impurities in the potassium. The effect of the impurities in the analogous NA-S system was studied. Calcium, potassium, and NaOH/oxide impurities caused increased resistance or corrosion of the glass fibers. For long lived cell operation, the Na must contain less than 1 ppm Ca and less than a few ppm of hydroxide/oxide. Up to 150 ppm K can be tolerated. After purification of the Na anolyte, cell lifetimes in excess of 1000 deep charge-discharge cycles or over 8 months on continuous cycling at 10-30 percent depth of discharge were obtained.

  13. Leaching experiment of alkali-activated cementitious materials solidified forms of radioactive incineration ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to solidify safely radioactive incineration ash, the alkali-activated cementitious materials were prepared with slag, fly ash, cement and zeolite, with water glass or sodium silicate (sulfate) as the activator. The recommended formulation of solidification matrix is 65% (mass fraction, the same below) slag, 10% fly ash, 20% zeolite, 2% cement, 3% Ca (OH)2. Adding quantity of water glass is 5%, when addition of 30% radioactive incineration ash, with 0.34-0.35 of the ratio of water and ash, the mechanical property of solidification forms performs well. The leaching rate of U for the cement wastes forms is 6.0 x 10-6 cm/d in 35 d, and the long time leaching rate is very low. The results of diffusion coefficient of U in the solidification forms indicate that retention capability about U of alkali-activated cementitious materials si good. The leaching mechanisms of solidification forms are discussed. (authors)

  14. Effect of gamma rays absorbed doses and heat treatment on the optical absorption spectra of silver ion-exchanged silicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, Khaled, E-mail: kafarah@gmail.com [Unité de recherche: Maîtrise et développement des techniques nucléaires à caractère pacifique, Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucléaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); ISTLS, University of Sousse (Tunisia); Hosni, Faouzi [Unité de recherche: Maîtrise et développement des techniques nucléaires à caractère pacifique, Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucléaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Academie Militaire de Fondouk Jedid, 8012 Nabeul (Tunisia); Mejri, Arbi [Unité de recherche: Maîtrise et développement des techniques nucléaires à caractère pacifique, Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucléaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Boizot, Bruno [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Hamzaoui, Ahmed Hichem [Centre National de Recherche en Sciences des Matériaux, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Ben Ouada, Hafedh [Laboratoire des Interfaces et Matériaux Avancés, Faculté des Sciences, University of Monastir, Avenue de l’environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2014-03-15

    Samples of a commercial silicate glass have been subjected to ion exchange at 320 °C in a molten mixture of AgNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3} with molar ratio of 1:99 and 5:95 for 60 min. The ion exchange process was followed by gamma irradiation in the dose range of 1–250 kGy and heating at the temperature of 550 °C for different time periods ranging from 10 to 582 min. The spectral absorption in UV–Vis range of the Ag–Na ion exchanged glass was measured and used to determine the states of silver prevailing in the glass during the ion exchange, the gamma irradiation and the heat treatment. The gamma irradiation induced holes and electrons in the glass structure leading to the creation of a brown colour, and silver ions trapped electrons to form silver atoms. We observed the first stage of aggregation after irradiation, as well as after heating. The silver atoms diffused and then aggregated to form nanoclusters after heating at 550 °C. A characteristic band at about 430 nm was induced. The surface Plasmon absorption of silver nanoclusters in the glass indicated that the nanoclusters radius grew between 0.9 and 1.43 nm with increasing of annealing time from 10 to 242 min and then saturated. We also found that the size of aggregates depends on the value of gamma radiation absorbed dose. Contrary to what was expected, we found that 20 kGy is the optimal absorbed dose corresponding to the larger size of the aggregates which decreases for absorbed doses above 20 kGy.

  15. Effect of gamma rays absorbed doses and heat treatment on the optical absorption spectra of silver ion-exchanged silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of a commercial silicate glass have been subjected to ion exchange at 320 °C in a molten mixture of AgNO3 and NaNO3 with molar ratio of 1:99 and 5:95 for 60 min. The ion exchange process was followed by gamma irradiation in the dose range of 1–250 kGy and heating at the temperature of 550 °C for different time periods ranging from 10 to 582 min. The spectral absorption in UV–Vis range of the Ag–Na ion exchanged glass was measured and used to determine the states of silver prevailing in the glass during the ion exchange, the gamma irradiation and the heat treatment. The gamma irradiation induced holes and electrons in the glass structure leading to the creation of a brown colour, and silver ions trapped electrons to form silver atoms. We observed the first stage of aggregation after irradiation, as well as after heating. The silver atoms diffused and then aggregated to form nanoclusters after heating at 550 °C. A characteristic band at about 430 nm was induced. The surface Plasmon absorption of silver nanoclusters in the glass indicated that the nanoclusters radius grew between 0.9 and 1.43 nm with increasing of annealing time from 10 to 242 min and then saturated. We also found that the size of aggregates depends on the value of gamma radiation absorbed dose. Contrary to what was expected, we found that 20 kGy is the optimal absorbed dose corresponding to the larger size of the aggregates which decreases for absorbed doses above 20 kGy

  16. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  17. High content silicate porous glasses used for radioactive wastes storage: preparation and characterization of the spinodal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase separation behavior via spinodal decomposition of two sodium borosilicate glasses has been studied having the following compositions in weight %: Glass A: 8% Na2 O - 32% B2O3 - 60% Si O2 Glass 8% B: Na2 O -27% B2 O3 - 65% Si O2. The growth of the mean size r of the minor phase microstructure has been determined as a function of both the time length (0-100 hours) and the heat treatment by analyzing temperature 580, 6000 C of the glass sample images obtained with a Scanning Electron Microscope. The results are in good agreement with the theory of Lifshitz-Slyozov which predict a growth of the minor phase microstructure via a diffusion controlled process through the insoluble phase such that r-bar = Ao t e - ΔE/R T. The activation energy ΔE and the pre-exponential factor Ao of the diffusion process were found ΔE = 58,8 kCal/mol; Ao = 8,42 x 1021 Angstrom3/h for the glass A and ΔE = 92,6 kCal/mol; Ao = 4,84 x 1029 Angstrom3/h for the glass B. The distribution curves of the microstructure size allowed to suggest for the glasses under study the most adequate heat treatments to absorbs after the leaching of the soluble phase. (author)

  18. Comparative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and micro pressure chemical vapor deposition of phosphorus silicate glass layers after rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the bonding state of Phosphorus Silicate Glass (PSG) layers obtained by two different technological approaches, i.e. in two types of reactors: Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and Micro Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPCVD) are investigated employing XPS and AES. The PSG layers are deposited at 3800C and 4200C in corresponding reactors. XPS and AES analyses show that Si2p peak recorded from PECVD layers are not as expected at their position characteristics of silicon dioxide but instead they are at the characteristic of elemental silicon. Plasma enhancement during deposition leads to less oxidized and more inhomogeneous layer. After rapid thermal annealing the Si2p peak is situated at position characteristic of silicon dioxide. (authors)

  19. Extraction of Soluble Sodium Silicate using Corn Cob Ash as a Silica Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Ajayi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of soluble sodium silicate was carried out in this study using corn cob ash as silica source and alkali as soda source. Initially, received corn cob was burnt in open air to obtain the corn cob ash. The obtained corn cob ash was then placed inside refractory crucible and further heating was carried out inside muffle furnace at the temperature of 6000C for 5hrs. The thermally treated corn cob ash was mixed with 3M conc. NAOH and boiled with a constant stirring in a heating glass vessel placed inside a thermostatic water bath at 800C for 4hrs and 900C for 3hrs respectively. Various analyses such as PH value, specific gravity, electrical conductivity, viscosity were conducted on the produced sodium silicate and the results were compared with the reference sodium silicate sample.

  20. A structural investigation of the alkali metal site distribution within bioactive glass using neutron diffraction and multinuclear solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard A; Twyman, Helen L; Rees, Gregory J; Smith, Jodie M; Barney, Emma R; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Newport, Robert J

    2012-09-21

    The atomic-scale structure of Bioglass and the effect of substituting lithium for sodium within these glasses have been investigated using neutron diffraction and solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Applying an effective isomorphic substitution difference function to the neutron diffraction data has enabled the Na-O and Li-O nearest-neighbour correlations to be isolated from the overlapping Ca-O, O-(P)-O and O-(Si)-O correlations. These results reveal that Na and Li behave in a similar manner within the glassy matrix and do not disrupt the short range order of the network former. Residual differences are attributed solely to the variation in ionic radius between the two species. Successful simplification of the 2 bioactive glasses, and an analogous splitting of the Li-O correlations. The observed correlations are attributed to the metal ions bonded either to bridging or to non-bridging oxygen atoms. (23)Na triple quantum MAS (3QMAS) NMR data corroborates the split Na-O correlations. The structural sites present will be intimately related to the release properties of the glass system in physiological fluids such as plasma and saliva, and hence to the bioactivity of the material. Detailed structural knowledge is therefore a prerequisite for optimizing material design. PMID:22868255

  1. Formation and bleaching of induced colour centres in gamma-irradiated vanadium-containing alkali-borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of radiation-induced defects and defect generation process in glasses of the base composition B2O3 and R2O + 0.5 g V2O5, where R is Li2O, Na2O or K2O were studied. The glasses were exposed to successive irradiation doses up to 17 kGy and their optical absorption spectra were measured in the range 200-1100 nm. Three factors were investigated: the role of V2O5, the effect of chemical composition, irradiation doses and the decay of colour centres by heat treatment at 200oC. The optical spectra have been shown to reveal the presence of V3+, V4+ and V5+ ions altogether in varying proportions. The response of the glass to irradiation is related to the competition between formation and annihilation of induced defects and hence the observed characteristic colour centres. The rate of thermal bleaching at interval times was discussed. (author)

  2. The structure of alteration layers on cast glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alteration layers developed on SRL-165 simulated waste glasses in dilute sodium silicate/bicarbonate leaching solutions have been examined by Secondary Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) using fine-scale, multiple-element depth profiling. Selected samples were examined with an imaging detector system, which demonstrated the horizontal homogeneity of the layer development at all depths within the layer. After 1 day of reaction at 90 degrees C the reaction layer shows depletion of glass elements to a depth of 0.2 μm. The surface of the layer in contact with the solution shows enrichment of Si, Al, and alkali elements even at this short reaction time, suggesting the early stages of development of secondary aluminosilicate phases. With increased reaction time, the layer thickens to about 1.3 μm at 91 days, while the evidence for aluminosilicate development at the surface of the layer becomes more prominent. Penetration of hydrogen into the ''unreacted'' glass proceeds to a depth of about 0.5 μm deeper than the alkali depletion zone. This suggests the mechanism of initial reaction of the glass is by attack of the silicate structure by molecular water or hydroxide ion rather than by alkali-hydrogen ion exchange. The simple structure of the layers developed in the silicate solution is in contrast to the complexity of layer structure found when glasses are reacted in deionized water. Since the conditions for geologic disposal will be closer to those used in the silicate leaching experiments, these results hold promise for the ability to model the system to predict long-term performance after disposal in a repository

  3. Glass substrates crosslinked with tetracycline-imprinted polymeric silicate and CdTe quantum dots as fluorescent sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Mu-Rong; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chen, Jian-Lian

    2016-06-21

    A fluorescence-based sensor that combines the merits of quantum dots (QDs) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was first fabricated on a glass substrate via a sol-gel route. Some of the key performance factors, including silane selection, substrate etching, the reaction times of glass silanization and sol-gel polymerization, and the times and methods used for template stripping and loading, were discussed and determined. After fabricating the sensor on either a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) or a 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPS) modified glass substrate, APS showed a much better performance than MPS as both the capping reagent of QDs and the functional monomer of tetracycline-templated MIPs. The APS-QDs on APS-modified glass had a higher imprinted factor (IF = 5.6), a lower LOD (2.1 μM, 3σ), and a more stable signal (2.8%, n = 10 at 70 μM) than those on the MPS-modified glass (IF = 5.2, LOD = 6.5 μM, stability = 6.2%). Furthermore, the recoveries of tetracycline (70 μM) from BSA (133 μg/mL) and FBS (0.66 ppt) by the APS-modified glass were 98% (RSD = 3.5%, n = 5) and 97% (RSD = 5.7%), respectively. For the MPS-modified glass, recoveries of 95% (RSD = 7.2%) and 89% (RSD = 8.7%) were observed at 67 μg/mL of BSA and 0.33 ppt of FBS, respectively. PMID:27188318

  4. A structural investigation of the alkali metal site distribution within bioactive glass using neutron diffraction and multinuclear solid state NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, R A; Twyman, H.L.; Rees, G.J.; Smith, J M; Barney, E. R.; Smith, M E; Hanna, J. V.; Newport, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The atomic-scale structure of Bioglass and the effect of substituting lithium for sodium within these glasses have been investigated using neutron diffraction and solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Applying an effective isomorphic substitution difference function to the neutron diffraction data has enabled the Na-O and Li-O nearest-neighbour correlations to be isolated from the overlapping Ca-O, O-(P)-O and O-(Si)-O correlations. These results reveal that Na and Li behave in a simila...

  5. Study the effect of alkali/alkaline earth addition on the environment of borochromate glasses by means of spectroscopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The xSrO–(30 − x)Li2O–65.5B2O3–0.5Cr2O3 (x = 0,5,10,15 and 20 mol%) glassy system was prepared by a quenching method. • XRD patterns reveal the amorphous nature of the present glass matrix. • Spectroscopy analysis shows an increase in Cr3+ concentration which acts as modifiers. • UV-optical measurements show a decrement of optical band gap energy and an increment of refractive index. • The electronegativity plays an important role in deforming the crystal field around the transition metal ions. -- Abstract: Glassy samples of composition xSrO–(30 − x)Li2O–65.5B2O3–0.5Cr2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mol%) were fabricated by using the melt quenching technique method. The investigated glass samples have been examined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. FT-IR spectroscopy, density, optical absorption in UV–VIS range and the calculated optical basicity and EPR spectra were recorded. The obtained results of the XRD spectra of all the samples confirmed the amorphous nature of the prepared glasses. The spectrum of FT-IR reveals that, the BO4 units decrease with increasing SrO content and the non bridging oxygen’s increase. The obtained density and the molar volume exhibit linear increase with increasing SrO content. Optical measurements show a decrement of optical band gap energy and steepness parameter as well as an increment of the Urbach energy and refractive index. The ligand field parameters calculation shows that, the values of the crystal field strength and the degree of covalency between ions increase as well as the interelectronic d–d repulsion Racah parameters decrease. The increase of the (Dq/B) ratio with increasing SrO content which reaches to 2.58 for x = 20 mol%, suggesting that strong crystal field strength. An increase of the electronegativity by replacing Li2O by SrO, causes a decrease of the glass matrix basicity. The obtained EPR parameters indicate that the increasing of Cr3+ signal intensity and

  6. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian

    also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models are......The composition of glass can be varied continuously within their glass-forming regions. This compositional flexibility makes it possible to tailor the properties of a glass for a variety of specific uses. In the industry such tailoring is done on a trial-and-error basis with only the intuition of a...... proposed based on topological selection rules and experimentally verified. The relation between structure and properties is evaluated using topological constraint theory, which in its essence is a theory that quantifies the two intuitions of the glass scientist. The end result is a quantitative model...

  7. Intrinsic single- and multiple-pulse laser-induced damage in silicate glasses in the femtosecond-to-nanosecond region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the threshold power density of the intrinsic laser-induced damage in borosilicate glass at ∼1 μm wavelength does not depend on pulse duration from 2x10-13 to 3x10-8 s and has the same value for both single- and multiple-pulse exposure of the sample. This indicates that the mechanism of the intrinsic damage in glasses involves a collective response of a certain volume in the dielectric as a whole, such as 'dielectric-metal' phase transition, rather than a process of individual generation and accumulation of electrons, such as multiphoton, tunneling, or avalanche. Also, we demonstrate that under femtosecond exposure the threshold of the plasma formation in transparent glasses is considerably higher than the threshold of the residual change of medium parameters

  8. Determination of lead, uranium, thorium, and thallium in silicate glass standard materials by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, I.L.; Garner, E.L.; Gramlich, J.W.; Moore, L.J.; Murphy, T.J.; Machlan, L.A.; Shields, W.R.; Tatsumoto, M.; Knight, R.J.

    1973-01-01

    A set of four standard glasses has been prepared which have been doped with 61 different elements at the 500-, 50-, 1-, and 0.02-ppm level. The concentrations of lead, uranium, thorium, and thallium have been determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry at a number of points in each of the glasses. The results obtained from independent determinations in two laboratories demonstrate the homogeneity of the samples and that precision of the order of 0.5% (95% L.E.) may be obtained by the method even at the 20-ppb level for these elements. The chemical and mass spectrometric procedures necessary are presented.

  9. Process for draining a charge of boron silicate glass melt from a ceramic glass melting furnace with heated floor drain, and device for carrying out the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drain below the drain stones consists of a piece of pipe made of Inconel 600 or 690. By inductive heating in the melting phase of the glass stopper stopping drainage and subsequent resistance heating, one can control the quantity drained off. (HP)

  10. Nickel-assisted growth and selective doping of spinel-like gallium oxide nanocrystals in germano-silicate glasses for infrared broadband light emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The target of taking advantage of the near-infrared light-emission properties of nickel ions in crystals for the design of novel broadband optical amplifiers requires the identification of suitable nanostructured glasses able to embed Ni-doped nanocrystals and to preserve the workability of a glass. Here we show that Ni doping of Li2O–Na2O–Ga2O3–GeO2–SiO2 glass (with composition 7.5:2.5:20:35:35 and melting temperature 1480 °C, sensibly lower than in Ge-free silicates) enables the selective embedding of nickel ions in thermally grown nanocrystals of spinel-like gallium oxide. The analysis of transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction data as a function of Ni-content (from 0.01 to 1 mol%) indicates that Ni ions promote the nanophase crystallization without affecting nanoparticle size (∼6 nm) and concentration (∼4 × 1018 cm−3). Importantly, as shown by optical absorption spectra, all nickel ions enter into the nanophase, with a number of ions per nanocrystal that depends on the nanocrystal concentration and ranges from 1 to 102. Photoluminescence data indicate that fast non-radiative decay processes become relevant only at mean ion–ion distances shorter than 1.4 nm, which enables the incorporation of a few Ni ions per nanoparticle without too large a worsening of the light-emission efficiency. Indeed, at 0.1 mol% nickel, the room temperature quantum yield is 9%, with an effective bandwidth of 320 nm.

  11. Visible and near infrared up-conversion luminescence in Yb{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+} co-doped yttria-alumino-silicate glass based optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, Arindam [Fiber Optics and Photonics Division, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India); Chandra Paul, Mukul, E-mail: mcpal1266@gmail.com [Fiber Optics and Photonics Division, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India); Wadi Harun, Sulaiman [Depertment of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kumar Bhadra, Shyamal, E-mail: skbhadra@cgcri.res.in [Fiber Optics and Photonics Division, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India); Bysakh, Sandip [Electron Microscopy Section, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India); Das, Shyamal; Pal, Mrinmay [Fiber Optics and Photonics Division, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India)

    2013-11-15

    We report blue light up-conversion (UC) emission in Yb–Tm co-doped nano-phase separated yttria-alumino-silicate (YAS) glass based D-shaped with low-index cladding optical fibers. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} creates an environment of nano structured YAS glass phases with Yb and Tm rich zone into the core glass which confirmed from TEM analyses. This kind of glass host assists in distributing of Yb and Tm rich zone uniformly throughout the core region. Yb and Tm doped regions exist mainly into nano YAS phases, defined as RE rich nano YAS-RE phases. All samples exhibit UC luminescence peaks at 483 nm, 650 nm and 817 nm for Tm{sup 3+} and 1044 nm for Yb{sup 3+} under excitation by 975 nm laser light. In such type of nano-engineered glass–ceramic based host, almost all the Yb ions transferred its energy to the nearer Tm ions. In particular 483 nm emission is attributed to {sup 1}G{sub 4}→{sup 3}H{sub 6} transition through a three step resonance energy transfer (ET) from excited Yb{sup 3+}. The highest emission intensity is obtained with a concentration of 0.5 wt% Tm{sup 3+} and 2.0 wt% Yb{sup 3+}. The ET between Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} is increased with increase of Yb{sup 3+} concentration with respect to Tm{sup 3+}. The experimental fluorescence life-times of Tm{sup 3+} upconversion emission at visible wavelengths into such kind of fiber is reported under 975 nm pump excitation. The present study is important for development of an efficient tunable 483 nm fluorescence light source. -- Highlights: • We report nano-phase separated YAS glass host based Yb–Tm co-doped optical fibers. • Almost all the Yb transferred its energy to the neighboring Tm ions. • We report strong UC luminescence peaks at 483 nm and 817 nm wavelengths. • We report third ET coefficient as 1.6723 Hz for such kind of Yb–Tm codoped fiber. • We report suitable fiber as an efficient tunable 483 nm fluorescence light source.

  12. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    OpenAIRE

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Robert J. Flatt; D'Espinose De Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measuremen...

  13. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan CANTEK?N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB composites, silorane-based (SB composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Material and Methods: Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results: The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2 than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7 (p<0.001, the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6 and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6 showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively. Conclusions: The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  14. Comparative investigation on the effect of alkaline earth oxides on the intensity of absorption bands due to Cu2+, Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions in ternary silicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S P Singh; Aman; Anal Tarafder

    2004-06-01

    Absorption characteristics of Cu2+, Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions in ternary silicate (20Na2O.10RO.70SiO2, where R=Ca, Sr, Ba) glasses were investigated. The intensities of absorption bands due to Cu2+ ion was found to increase with increasing ionic radii of the alkaline earth ions whereas it was found to decrease in case of Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions with increasing ionic radii of the alkaline earth ions. The results were discussed in the light of relation between linear extinction coefficients of these ions and coulombic force of alkaline earth ions. The change in intensities of Cu2+, Mn3+ and Cr3+ ion is attributed due to change in silicate glass compositions.

  15. Chemistry of glass corrosion in high saline brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion data obtained in laboratory tests can be used for the performance assessment of nuclear waste glasses in a repository if the data are quantitatively described in the frame of a geochemical model. Experimental data were obtained for conventional pH values corrected for liquid junction, amorphous silica solubility and glass corrosion in concentrated salt brines. The data were interpreted with a geochemical model. The brine chemistry was described with the Pitzer formalism using a data base which allows calculation of brine compositions in equilibrium with salt minerals at temperatures up to 200C. In MgCl2 dominated brines Mg silicates form and due to the consumption of Mg the pH decreases with proceeding reaction. A constant pH (about 4) and composition of alteration products is achieved, when the alkali release from the glass balances the Mg consumption. The low pH results in high release of rare earth elements REE (rare earth elements) and U from the glass. In the NaCl dominated brine MgCl2 becomes exhausted by Mg silicate formation. As long as there is still Mg left in solution the pH decreases. After exhaustion of Mg the pH rises with the alkali release from the glass and analcime is formed

  16. Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G; Palmer, Donald A; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Beard, James S

    2014-03-18

    In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

  17. Structure and rheological properties in alkali aluminosilicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviors. In this mind, it is very important to understand which parameters influence these properties. Up to now, we know for example that viscosity of silicate melts is dependent of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts like haplogranitic rhyolitic alkali magmas. We will first present our viscosity measurements and some modelisation concepts based on the Adam and Gibbs theory. From configurational entropy theory we obtain some macroscopic information's that we can link to the structure of glasses and melts. In this mind, we have investigated them with Raman and NMR spectroscopies. These spectroscopies provide information on speciation and polymerization of glasses and melts. We will present and discuss structural and rheological variations as a function of temperature and chemical change.

  18. Cd1−xMnxTe ultrasmall quantum dots growth in a silicate glass matrix by the fusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we synthesized Cd1−xMnxTe ultrasmall quantum dots (USQDs) in SiO2-Na2CO3-Al2O3-B2O3 glass system using the fusion method. Growth of these Cd1−xMnxTe USQDs was confirmed by optical absorption, atomic force microscopy (AFM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The blueshift of absorption transition with increasing manganese concentration gives evidence of incorporation of manganese ions (Mn2+) in CdTe USQDs. AFM, TEM, and MFM confirmed, respectively, the formation of high quality Cd1−xMnxTe USQDs with uniformly distributed size and magnetic phases. Furthermore, EPR spectra showed six lines associated to the S = 5/2 spin half-filled d-state, characteristic of Mn2+, and confirmed that Mn2+ are located in the sites core and surface of the CdTe USQD. Therefore, synthesis of high quality Cd1−xMnxTe USQDs may allow the control of optical and magnetic properties.

  19. Cd1-xMnxTe ultrasmall quantum dots growth in a silicate glass matrix by the fusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; de Lima Fernandes, Guilherme; Baffa, Oswaldo; Gómez, Jorge Antônio; Almeida Silva, Anielle Christine

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we synthesized Cd1-xMnxTe ultrasmall quantum dots (USQDs) in SiO2-Na2CO3-Al2O3-B2O3 glass system using the fusion method. Growth of these Cd1-xMnxTe USQDs was confirmed by optical absorption, atomic force microscopy (AFM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The blueshift of absorption transition with increasing manganese concentration gives evidence of incorporation of manganese ions (Mn2+) in CdTe USQDs. AFM, TEM, and MFM confirmed, respectively, the formation of high quality Cd1-xMnxTe USQDs with uniformly distributed size and magnetic phases. Furthermore, EPR spectra showed six lines associated to the S = 5/2 spin half-filled d-state, characteristic of Mn2+, and confirmed that Mn2+ are located in the sites core and surface of the CdTe USQD. Therefore, synthesis of high quality Cd1-xMnxTe USQDs may allow the control of optical and magnetic properties.

  20. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  1. Annual progress report to Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratories on prediction of phase separation of simulated nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research is to predict the immiscibility boundaries of multi-component borosilicate glasses, on which many nuclear waste glass compositions are based. The method used is similar to the prediction method of immiscibility boundaries of multi-component silicate glass systems successfully made earlier and is based upon the superposition of immiscibility boundaries of simple systems using an appropriate parameter. This method is possible because many immiscibility boundaries have similar shapes and can be scaled by a parameter. In the alkali and alkaline earth binary silicate systems, for example, the critical temperature and compositions were scaled using the Debye-Hueckel theory. In the present study on borosilicate systems, first, immiscibility boundaries of various binary alkali and alkaline borate glass systems (e.g. BaO-B2O3) were examined and their critical temperatures were evaluated in terms of Debye-Hueckel theory. The mixing effects of two alkali and alkaline-earth borate systems on the critical temperature were also explored. Next immiscibility boundaries of ternary borosilicate glasses (e.g. Na2O-SiO2-B2O3, K2O-SiO2-B2O3, Rb2O-SiO2-B2O3, and Cs2O-SiO2-B2O3) were examined. Their mixing effects are currently under investigation

  2. Effect of an electric field and heat treatment on formation of radiation color centers in quartz glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electrothermal treatment (ETT) on the formation of color centers in KI and KS-4V open-quotes dryclose quotes quartz glasses under γ- and UV laser radiation was investigated. It was shown that the ETT procedure causes redistribution of precursors of most of the radiation color center (RCC) investigated inside the sample. The dominant process that determines the change in the composition of RCC precursors in the part of the sample near the anode is substitution of alkali metal atoms by hydrogen atoms in alkali silicate complexes. The effect of ETT on formation of RCC (670 nm) in open-quotes dryclose quotes glasses suggests the alkali nature of the precursors of these RCC

  3. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt; Etude cinetique des reactions d'oxydoreduction dans les silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, V

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  4. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  5. Concrete alkali-silica reaction and nuclear radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deterioration of concrete by alkali-silica reaction of aggregates (ASR) and the effect of nuclear radiations on the ASR have been reviewed based on our studies on the mechanism of ASR and the effect of nuclear radiations on the resistivity of minerals to alkaline solution. It has been found that the ASR is initiated by the attack of alkaline solution in concrete to silicious aggregates to convert them into hydrated alkali silicate. The consumption of alkali hydroxide by the aggregates induces the dissolution of Ca2+ ions into the solution. The alkali silicate surrounding the aggregates then reacts with Ca2+ ions to convert to insoluble tight and rigid reaction rims. The reaction rim allows the penetration of alkaline solution but prevents the leakage of viscous alkali silicate, so that alkali silicate generated afterward is accumulated in the aggregate to give an expansive pressure enough for cracking the aggregate and the surrounding concrete. The effect of nuclear radiation on the reactivity of quartz and plagioclase, a part of major minerals composing volcanic rocks as popular aggregates, to alkaline solution has been examined for clarifying whether nuclear radiations accelerates the ASR. It has been found that the irradiation of these minerals converts them into alkali-reactive amorphous ones. The radiation dose for plagioclase is as low as 108 Gy, which suggests that the ASR of concrete surrounding nuclear reactors is possible to be accelerated by nuclear radiation. (author)

  6. Preliminary estudies on the use of sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) in the manufacture of alkali activated binders

    OpenAIRE

    Castaldelli, V.N.; Mitsuuchi Tashima, Mauro; Melges, J.L.; Monzó Balbuena, José Mª; AKASAKI, JORGE LUIS; Borrachero Rosado, María Victoria; Soriano Martinez, Lourdes; Paya Bernabeu, Jorge Juan

    2014-01-01

    Alkali activated binders require the addition of a mineral-rich amorphous silica and alumina. This paper proposes the use of a mineral residue from the burning of sugar cane bagasse. The alkali activated mixtures were prepared containing binary mixtures of sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) and other mineral admixtures: fly ash (FA) or blast furnace slag (BFS). As alkaline activators, mixtures of alkali (Na+ or K+) hydroxide and alkali (Na+ or K+) silicate were used. Alkali-activated pastes and mo...

  7. Ion-Exchange Processes and Mechanisms in Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of alkalis from glass is widely recognized as an important mechanism in the initial stages of glass-water interactions. Pioneering experimental studies [1-3] nearly thirty-five years ago established that alkali (designated as M+) are lost to solution more rapidly than network-forming cations. The overall chemical reaction describing the process can be written as: (triplebond)Si-O-M + H+ → (triplebond)Si-OH + M+ (1) or (triplebond)Si-O-M + H3O+ → (triplebond)Si-OH + M+ + H2O. (2) Doremus and coworkers [4-7] fashioned a quantitative model where M+ ions in the glass are exchanged for counter-diffusing H3O+ or H+. Subsequent investigations [8], which have relied heavily on reaction layer analysis, recognized the role of H2O molecules in the alkali-exchange process, without minimizing the importance of charged hydrogen species. Beginning in the 1980s, however, interest in M+-H+ exchange reactions in silicate glasses diminished considerably because important experimental observations showed that network hydrolysis and dissolution rates were principally controlled by the chemical potential difference between the glass and solution (chemical affinity) [9]. For nuclear waste glasses, formation of alteration products or secondary phases that remove important elements from solution, particularly Si, was found to have very large impacts on glass dissolution rates [10,11]. Consequently, recent work on glass/water interactions has focused on understanding this process and incorporating it into models [12]. The ion-exchange process has been largely ignored because it has been thought to be a short duration, secondary or tertiary process that had little or no bearing on long-term corrosion or radionuclide release rates from glasses [13]. The only significant effect identified in the literature that is attributed to alkali ion exchange is an increase in solution pH in static laboratory tests conducted at high surface area-to-volume ratios [14,15]. Renewed interest in

  8. Study of influence of P.sub.2./sub.O.sub.5./sub. content in the starting batch on thermal properties of alkali rare earth phosphate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemenová, Petra; Nitsch, Karel; Král, Robert

    Lublin: Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Press, 2015 - (Rzączyńska, Z.; Pacewska, B.; Łyszczek, R.). s. 138-139 ISBN 978-83-7784-684-1. [CCTA12 Conference on calorimetry and thermal analysis /12./. Joint Czech-Hungarian-Polish-Slovakian thermoanalytical conference /5./. 06.09.2015-10.09.2015, Zakopane] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : phosphate glass * erbium doping * thermal analyses * temperature of glass transition * crystallization * glass composition Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  9. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of water content of the magma ocean would have water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was likely very significant in the evolution of the lunar mantle. Conclusions: Lunar granites

  10. SODIUM ENVIRONMENTS IN GLASS

    OpenAIRE

    Greaves, G.

    1981-01-01

    Sodium environments have been measured directly in several oxide glasses using EXAFS at the sodium K edge. The existence of local structure around sodium in glass contradicts the conventional Zachariasen model. Analysis of the EXAFS indicates there are significant differences relating to the glass modifier : glass former chemistry - the details of which demonstrate similarities with crystalline silicates and borates.

  11. Studies on γ-ray induced structural changes in Nd{sup 3+} doped lead alumino silicate glasses by means of thermoluminescence for dosimetric applications in high dose ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundara Rao, M. [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, Guntur, A.P. (India); Gandhi, Y. [Department of Physics, Kakani Venkata Ratnam College, Nandigama 521 185, A.P. (India); Sanyal, Bhaskar [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bhargavi, K. [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, Guntur, A.P. (India); Piasecki, M. [Institute of Physics, J. Dlugosz University, Ul. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-201 Czestochowa (Poland); Veeraiah, N., E-mail: nvr8@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, Guntur, A.P. (India)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: TL glow curves of PbO–SiO{sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} glasses mixed with different concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposed to γ-rays of dose 5.0 kGy. - Highlights: • TL studies of Nd{sup 3+} ions doped lead alumino silicate glasses were carried out. • Highest TL output was observed in the glasses mixed with 10 mol% of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Different mechanisms responsible for TL emission were discussed. • Near linearity of the dose response was observed in the dose range of 1.0–3.0 kGy. • These glasses may be useful as dosimeters in processing perishable food commodities. - Abstract: Thermoluminescence (TL) studies on PbO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} glasses mixed with varying concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposed to γ-rays of dose in the range 0–5.0 kGy were carried out. The TL emission exhibited a dosimetric peak at about 185 °C. The TL output under the glow peak increased with increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and also with the γ-ray dose. The mechanisms responsible for TL emission and enhancement of TL output with increase in the concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were quantitatively discussed in terms of induced structural defects in the vicinity of Nd{sup 3+} ions due to interaction of γ-rays with the glass network in the scenario of varying concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The dose response of these glass samples exhibited linear behavior in the medium dose range viz., 1.0–3.0 kGy. Finally, it is concluded that the glass containing the highest concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits high TL output and such glasses are useful for dosimetry in the range 1.0–3.0 kGy and hence these glasses may be useful for dosimetry in such high range of doses required for commercial radiation processing of perishable food commodities to extend their shelf-lives.

  12. High effective silica fume alkali activator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vladimír Živica

    2004-04-01

    Growing demands on the engineering properties of cement based materials and the urgency to decrease unsuitable ecologic impact of Portland cement manufacturing represent significant motivation for the development of new cement corresponding to these aspects. One category represents prospective alkali activated cements. A significant factor influencing their properties is alkali activator used. In this paper we present a new high effective alkali activator prepared from silica fume and its effectiveness. According to the results obtained this activator seems to be more effective than currently used activators like natrium hydroxide, natrium carbonate, and water glass.

  13. Surface stress relaxation of oxide glasses: The effects on mechanical strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezzi, Peter Joseph

    A new glass strengthening mechanism based upon surface compressive stress formation by surface stress relaxation of glasses that were held under a tensile stress, at a temperature lower than the glass transition temperature, in low water vapor pressure, has been demonstrated. Although glass fibers are traditionally known to become mechanically weaker when heat-treated at a temperature lower than the glass transition temperature in the presence of water vapor, the strength was found to become greater than the as-received fiber strength when fibers were subjected to a sub-critical tensile stress during heat-treatment. The observed strengthening was attributed to surface compressive residual stress formation through surface stress relaxation during the sub-critical tensile stress application in the atmosphere containing water vapor. Surface stress relaxation of the same glass fibers was shown to take place under conditions identical to those experienced by the strengthened mechanical test specimens by observing permanent bending of the fiber. Furthermore, the magnitude and presence of the residual stresses formed during bending or tensile heat-treatments were confirmed by FTIR, fiber etching, and fiber slicing methods. The method can in principle be used to strengthen any oxide glass and is not subjected to the constraints of traditional strengthening methods such as a minimum thickness for tempering, or a glass containing alkali ions for ion-exchange. Thus far, the method has been successful in strengthening silica glass, E-glass, and soda-lime silicate glass by approximately 20-30%.

  14. Y2O3掺杂对硅酸盐玻璃结构及其熔体黏度的影响%Effect of Y2O3 Dopant on Structure and Viscosity of Silicate Glass and Melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王觅堂; 程金树; 李梅; 何峰

    2013-01-01

    Silicate glasses and melts, soda lime silicate glass frits with various contents of Y2O3 were prepared via melting-quenching in water The effect of Y2O3 on the structure and viscosity was investigated. The samples were characterized by Raman spectrometer and viscometer, respectively. The melting temperature was obtained based on the Arrhenius equation. Some expressions for the glass structure (i.e., fraction of non-bridging oxygen, average number of non-bridging oxygen per tetrahedron, average number of oxygen pre tetrahedron and average number of bridging comers per tetrahedron) were proposed. The results show that Y2O3 doped into soda lime silicate glass can change the [SiO4] tetrahedron structural unit, and the average number of non-bridging oxygen per tetrahedron and the average number of oxygen pre tetrahedron both increase and the average number of bridging corners per tetrahedron decreases with increasing the content of Y2O3. In addition, the incorporation of Y2O3 also decreases the viscosity and melting temperature of soda lime silicate glass.%为了探索稀土氧化物Y2O3掺杂对硅酸盐玻璃结构及其高温熔体黏度的影响,用熔融-水淬法制得了掺杂不同含量Y2O3的Na2O-CaO-SiO2系玻璃料,采用激光共聚焦Raman光谱仪和高温旋转黏度计分别对玻璃料进行了Raman光谱和黏度的测试,根据Arrhenius方程推算了玻璃的熔制温度,同时给出了计算玻璃结构中每个四面体中的氧数、非桥氧数、平均桥数及非桥氧比例的公式.结果表明:Y2O3的掺杂使得Na2O-CaO-SiO2系玻璃中,具有不同非桥氧的结构单元之间发生了一定转化.随着Y2O3掺杂量的增加,玻璃中每个四面体中的氧数和非桥氧数都逐渐增大,玻璃中每个四面体中的连接数降低.此外Y2O3的掺杂降低了Na2O-CaO-SiO2系玻璃的高温黏度与熔制温度,且与玻璃结构的变化规律相一致.

  15. Why neutron guides may end up breaking down? Some results on the macroscopic behaviour of alkali-borosilicate glass support plates under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report on a first part of a study on the mechanisms leading to brittle fracture in neutron guides made of glass as structural element. Such devices are widely used to deliver thermal and cold neutron beams to experimental lines in most large neutron research facilities. We present results on macroscopic properties of samples of guide glass substrates which are subjected to neutron irradiation at relatively large fluences. The results show a striking dependence of some of the macroscopic properties such as density, shape or surface curvature upon the specific chemical composition of a given glass. The relevance of the present findings for the installation of either replacement guides at the existing facilities or for the deployment of instruments for ongoing projects such as the European Spallation Source is briefly discussed

  16. Why neutron guides may end up breaking down? Some results on the macroscopic behaviour of alkali-borosilicate glass support plates under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffy, R.; Kreuz, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beaucour, J., E-mail: beaucour@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Köster, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, E-20886 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we report on a first part of a study on the mechanisms leading to brittle fracture in neutron guides made of glass as structural element. Such devices are widely used to deliver thermal and cold neutron beams to experimental lines in most large neutron research facilities. We present results on macroscopic properties of samples of guide glass substrates which are subjected to neutron irradiation at relatively large fluences. The results show a striking dependence of some of the macroscopic properties such as density, shape or surface curvature upon the specific chemical composition of a given glass. The relevance of the present findings for the installation of either replacement guides at the existing facilities or for the deployment of instruments for ongoing projects such as the European Spallation Source is briefly discussed.

  17. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  18. Debris of potassium–magnesium silicate glass generated by femtosecond laser-induced ablation in air: An analysis by near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, micro Raman and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redeposited material (debris) resulting from ablation of a potassium–magnesium silicate glass upon scanning femtosecond laser pulse irradiation (130 fs, 800 nm) in air environment is investigated by means of three complementary surface analytical methods. Changes in the electronic band structure of the glass constituent Magnesium (Mg) were identified by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy (XANES) using synchrotron radiation. An up-shift of ≈0.8 eV of a specific Magnesium K-edge absorption peak in the spectrum of the redeposited material along with a significant change in its leading edge position was detected. In contrast, the surface left after laser ablation exhibits a downshift of the peak position by ≈0.9 eV. Both observations may be related to a change of the Mg coordinative state of the laser modified/redeposited glass material. The presence of carbon in the debris is revealed by micro Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). These observations are attributed to structural changes and chemical reactions taking place during the ablation process.

  19. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miae; Heo, Jong

    2015-12-01

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca2Nd8-xCex(SiO4)6O2] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca-silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca-silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10-6 g m-2 for Ce ion and 2.19·10-6 g m-2 for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing.

  20. Influence of SiO2 on conduction and relaxation mechanism of Li+ ions in binary network former lead silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion conducting glasses having composition 30Li2O·(70−x)PbO·xSiO2 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The compositional variations in density, molar volume and glass transition temperature confirm the dual role of PbO acting as a network modifying oxide as well as a network forming oxide. Conduction and relaxation mechanisms in these glasses were studied using impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 7 MHz and in a temperature range below glass transition temperature. The ac and dc conductivities, activation energy of the dc conductivity and relaxation frequency were extracted from the impedance spectra. Similar values of activation energy for dc conduction and for conductivity relaxation time indicate that the ions have to overcome the same energy barrier while conducting and relaxing. The increase in dc conductivity for silica rich compositions is attributed to the presence of mixed former effect in the studied glasses. The study of conductivity spectra reveals a transition from non-random to random hopping motion of lithium ions on successive replacement of PbO by SiO2 in glass matrix. The conduction and relaxation mechanism in the studied glasses are well explained with the concept of mismatch and relaxation (CMR) model

  1. Present and future of glass-ionomers and calcium-silicate cements as bioactive materials in dentistry: Biophotonics-based interfacial analyses in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Timothy F; Atmeh, Amre R.; Sajini, Shara; Cook, Richard J.; Festy, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Objective Since their introduction, calcium silicate cements have primarily found use as endodontic sealers, due to long setting times. While similar in chemistry, recent variations such as constituent proportions, purities and manufacturing processes mandate a critical understanding of service behavior differences of the new coronal restorative material variants. Of particular relevance to minimally invasive philosophies is the potential for ion supply, from initial hydration to mature set i...

  2. Mixed mobile ion effect in fluorozincate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mixed mobile ion effect has been investigated for the first time in zinc fluoride glasses where in addition to alkali cations fluorine anions also participate in the diffusion process, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses. The minimum in the conductivity, conductivity relaxation frequency, crossover frequency and decoupling index indicates the existence of the mixed mobile ion effect in these fluoride glasses. It has been observed that the non-exponential parameter and the frequency exponent are independent of temperature. It has been established that alkali ions and fluorine anions exhibit lower dimensionality of the conduction pathways in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses than that in the single alkali lithium based zinc fluoride glasses while they are migrating. From the scaling of the conductivity spectra, it has been established that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses is independent of temperature and composition

  3. The red-shift of ultraviolet spectra and the relation to optical basicity of Ce-doped alkali rare-earth phosphate glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, G.; Baccaro, S.; Nikl, Martin; Cecilia, A.; Du, Y. Y.; Mihóková, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 7 (2004), s. 1378-1380. ISSN 0002-7820 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 621 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : scintillation glass * Ce 3+ * luminescence * absorption Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.710, year: 2004

  4. Spent FCC catalyst for preparing alkali-activated binders: an opportunity for a high-degree valorization

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuuchi Tashima, Mauro; Soriano Martinez, Lourdes; AKASAKI, JORGE LUIS; V.N.Castaldelli; Monzó Balbuena, José Mª; Paya Bernabeu, Jorge Juan; Borrachero Rosado, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Spent FCC catalyst is a waste from the petrochemical industry which has excellent pozzolanic properties, containing more than 90% silica and alumina. Its similarity to metakaolin creates interesting prospects for its use in the production of alkali-activated binders. In this study, the alkali activation of this residue, spent FCC catalyst, through mixtures with alkali hydroxide and silicate solutions (both sodium and potassium) has been carried out. The alkali cation had an important role in ...

  5. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  6. Origin of hydrous alkali feldspar-silica intergrowth in spherulites from intra-plate A2-type rhyolites at the Jabal Shama, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surour, Adel A.; El-Nisr, Said A.; Bakhsh, Rami A.

    2016-03-01

    Miocene rhyolites (19.2 ± 0.9 Ma) at the Jabal Shama in western Saudi Arabia represent an example of rift-related silicic volcanism that took place during the formation of the Red Sea. They mostly consist of tuffaceous varieties with distinct flow banding, and pea-sized spherulites, obsidian and perlitized rhyolite tuffs. Although they have the geochemical signature of A2-type rhyolites, these silicic rocks are not typically alkaline but alkali-calcic to calc-alkaline. They developed in a within-plate regime and possibly derived from a recycled mafic subducted slab in depleted sub-continental mantle beneath the western Arabian plate. The Jabal Shama rhyolites are younger in age than their Miocene counterparts in Yemen and Ethiopia. The Jabal Shama spherulites consist of hydrous alkali feldspar-silica radial intergrowths with an occasional brown glass nucleus. Carbonate- and glass-free spherulites give up to 4.45 wt% L.O.I. The hydrous nature of these silicates and the absence of magnetite in the spherulites is a strong indication of oxidizing conditions. The spherulites contain hydrous feldspars with up to ∼6 wt% H2O, and they develop by diffusion and devitrification of glass in the rhyolite tuff at ∼800 °C. Owing to higher undercooling due to supersaturation, the radial hydrous phases within spherulites might grow faster and led to coagulation. The polygonal contacts between spherulites and the ∼120° dihedral angle suggest solid-state modification and recrystallization as the process of devitrification proceeds as low as ∼300 °C. The sum of FeO + MgO is positively correlated with total alkalies along with magnetite oxidation in the matrix to Fe-oxyhydroxides, and to the incorporation of OH- into silicates within the spehrulites themselves. Structural H2O in glass of the Jabal Shama perlite (obsidian) is considerable (∼9-12 wt%) with 3.72-5.6 wt% L.O.I. of the whole-rock. The presence of deleterious silica impurities would lower the ore grade due to

  7. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  8. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  9. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  10. The effects of silicic acid, aluminate ion activity and hydrosilicate gel development on the dissolution rate of a simulated British Magnox waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution rate of a simulated Magnox waste glass has been investigated in single-pass flow-through experiments designed to investigate the role of Al and Si in the dissolution process. The results indicate that both Al and Si species suppress the rate of dissolution. These effects may be modeled using a combined Al/Si affinity term in a conventional glass dissolution rate law. Aluminium species may also play an inhibitory role when present at relatively high solution activities. In Si-rich alkaline media, the concentration of aluminium is controlled to very low levels by the development of secondary aluminosilicate phases. Removal of Al by secondary phase precipitation results in dissolved Al activities below that required to reach saturation with respect to the glass

  11. Where's the glass? Biomarkers, molecular clocks, and microRNAs suggest a 200-Myr missing Precambrian fossil record of siliceous sponge spicules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, E. A.; Robinson, J.; Pisani, D.; Peterson, K.

    2010-12-01

    The earliest evidence for animal life comes from the fossil record of 24-isopropylcholestane, a sterane found in Cryogenian deposits, and whose precursors are found in modern demosponges, but not choanoflagellates, calcareans, hexactinellids, or eumetazoans. However, many modern demosponges are also characterized by the presence of siliceous spicules, and there are no convincing demosponge spicules in strata older than the Cambrian. This temporal disparity highlights a problem with our understanding of the Precambrian fossil record - either these supposed demosponge-specific biomarkers were derived from the sterols of some other organism and are simply retained in modern demosponges, or spicules do not primitively characterize crown-group demosponges. Resolving this issue requires resolving the phylogenetic placement of another group of sponges, the hexactinellids, which not only make a spicule thought to be homologous to the spicules of demosponges, but also make their first appearance near the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary. Using two independent analytical approaches and data sets - traditional molecular phylogenetic analyses and the presence or absence of specific microRNA genes - we show that demosponges are monophyletic, and that hexactinellids are their sister group (together forming the Silicea). Thus, spicules must have evolved before the last common ancestor of all living siliceans, suggesting the presence of a significant gap in the silicean spicule fossil record. Molecular divergence estimates date the origin of this last common ancestor well within the Cryogenian, consistent with the biomarker record, and strongly suggests that siliceous spicules were present during the Precambrian but were not preserved.

  12. Silicate-salt(sulfate) liquid immiscibility: a study of melt inclusions in minerals of the Mushugai-Khuduk carbonatite-bearing complex ( southern Mongolia )%硅酸盐-盐(硫酸盐)流体不混溶:蒙古南部Mushugai-Khuduk含火成碳酸岩杂岩体矿物中的熔体包裹体研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irina A.Andreeva; Vyacheslav I.Kovalenko; Vladimir B.Naumov

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline and melt inclusions were studied in garnet, diopside, potassium feldspar, and sphene from the garnet syenite porphyry of the carbonatite-bearing complex Mushugai-Khuduk, southern Mongolia. Phlogopite, clinopyroxene, albite, potassium feldspar, sphene, wollastonite, magnetite, Ca and Sr sulfates, fluorite, and apatite were identified among the crystalline inclusions.The melt inclusions were homogenized at 1010 ~ 1080℃ and analyzed on an electron microprobe. Silicate, salt, and combined silicatesalt melt inclusions were found. Silicate melts show considerable variations in SiO2 concentration (56 to 66wt% ), high Na2O + K2O(up to 17wt% ), and elevated Zr, F, and Cl contents. In terms of bulk rock chemistry, the silicate melts are alkali syenites. During thermometric experiments, salt melt inclusions quenched into homogeneous glasses of predominantly sulfate compositions containing no more than 1.3wt% SiO2. These melts are enriched in alkalis, Ba, Sr, P, F, and Cl. The investigation of the silicate and salt melt inclusions in minerals of the garnet syenite porphyries indicate that these rocks were formed under influence of the processes of crystallization differentiation and magma separation into immiscible silicate and salt (sulfate)liquids.

  13. Oxygen isotope and petrological study of silicate inclusions in IIE iron meteorites and their relationship with H chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Kathryn H.; Greenwood, Richard C.; Scott, Edward R. D.; Franchi, Ian A.; Anand, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    suggest that the IIE meteorites formed on an internally heated H/HH chondrite-like body that experienced the initial stages of differentiation in response to radiogenic heating. However, prior to full differentiation the IIE parent body experienced a major hit-and-run style collision that resulted in silicate-metal mixing. The initial stages of this event involved a phase of rapid cooling that prevented unmixing of metal and silicates. Reassembly of the IIE parent body produced a large regolith blanket that facilitated subsequent slow cooling. The IIE parent body has probably experienced numerous subsequent less catastrophic collisions. The development of alkali glass textures in some differentiated inclusions is probably the result of one of these later events.

  14. Effect of copper-doped silicate 13-93 bioactive glass scaffolds on the response of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and on bone regeneration and angiogenesis in rat calvarial defects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yinan; Xiao, Wei; Bal, B Sonny; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2016-10-01

    The release of inorganic ions from biomaterials could provide an alternative approach to the use of growth factors for improving tissue healing. In the present study, the release of copper (Cu) ions from bioactive silicate (13-93) glass scaffolds on the response of cells in vitro and on bone regeneration and angiogenesis in vivo was studied. Scaffolds doped with varying concentrations of Cu (0-2.0wt.% CuO) were created with a grid-like microstructure by robotic deposition. When immersed in simulated body fluid in vitro, the Cu-doped scaffolds released Cu ions into the medium in a dose-dependent manner and converted partially to hydroxyapatite. The proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on the scaffolds were not affected by 0.4 and 0.8wt.% CuO in the glass but they were significantly reduced by 2.0wt.% CuO. The percent new bone that infiltrated the scaffolds implanted for 6weeks in rat calvarial defects (46±8%) was not significantly affected by 0.4 or 0.8wt.% CuO in the glass whereas it was significantly inhibited (0.8±0.7%) in the scaffolds doped with 2.0wt.% CuO. The area of new blood vessels in the fibrous tissue that infiltrated the scaffolds increased with CuO content of the glass and was significantly higher for the scaffolds doped with 2.0wt.% CuO. Loading the scaffolds with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (1μg/defect) significantly enhanced bone infiltration and reduced fibrous tissue in the scaffolds. These results showed that doping the 13-93 glass scaffolds with up to 0.8wt.% CuO did not affect their biocompatibility whereas 2.0wt.% CuO was toxic to cells and detrimental to bone regeneration. PMID:27287141

  15. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  16. Study of the effect of Ca/Mg alkali-oxides ratio on the structure of a glass-ceramic based on an aluminosilicated glass containing 2wt.% of zirconolite crystalline phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souag R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New nuclear glass-ceramics are extensively studied for the radioactive waste confinement, due to the double confinement conferred by the glass-ceramics. In this study, a glass-ceramic constituted by an aluminosilicate glass in the system: SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgOZrO2-TiO2, containing 2wt.% of Ca0.83Ce0.17ZrTi1.66Al0.34O7 zirconolite, has been synthesized by the discontinuous method. Cerium, an actinide surrogate is introduced both in the glass and ceramic phases. The synthesis is performed by a double melting at 1350°C, followed by a nucleation at 564°C, during 2 h, and a crystal growth at 1010°C during 3 h. Then effect of Ca/Mg ratio on the distribution of the crystalline network in the material was studied for Ca / Mg ratios ranging from 0.4 to 5.5. For the whole of the materials, Archimedes density is about 2.80 g/cm3. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis shows that the increase of Ca/Mg ratio leads to the increase of aluminosilicated crystalline phases with high Ca contents; the materials molar volumes remaining constant. The zirconolite phase is not affected by these additive aluminosilicated phases. The scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis confirmed these results; and shows the uniformity of distribution of the ceramics in the bulk of the materials.

  17. DFT modeling of 45S5 and 77S soda-lime phospho-silicate glass surfaces: clues on different bioactivity mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, Enrico; Pedone, Alfonso; Ugliengo, Piero; Corno, Marta

    2013-05-14

    The reactivity of bioglasses, which is related to the dissolution of cations and orthosilicate groups in the physiological fluid, strongly depends on the key structural features present at the glass surfaces. On the basis of the composition and the synthetic routes employed to make the glass, surfaces with very different characteristics and thus presenting different mechanisms of dissolution can be observed. In this paper, the surface structures of two very different bioglass compositions, namely 45S5 (46.1 SiO2, 24.4 Na2O, 26.9 CaO, and 2.6 P2O5 mol %) and 77S (80.0 SiO2, 16.0 CaO, and 4.0 P2O5 mol %), have been investigated by means of periodic DFT calculations based on a PBE functional and localized Gaussian basis set as encoded in the CRYSTAL code. Our calculations show that the two glass surfaces differ by the relative amount of key structural sites such as NBOs, exposed ions, orthosilicate units, and small rings. We have demonstrated how the number of these sites affects the surface stability and reactivity (bioactivity). PMID:23594027

  18. Fixation by ION exchange of toxic materials in a glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to the immobilization of toxic, e.g., radioactive, materials in a silicate glass or silica gel matrix for extremely long periods of time. Toxic materials, such as radioactive wastes containing radioactive cations, which may be in the form of liquids, or solids dissolved or dispersed in liquids or gases, are incorporated into a glass or silica gel matrix, having alkali metal, Group Ib metal and/or ammonium cations bonded to silicon atoms of said glass or silica gel through divalent oxygen linkages, by a process which involves the ion exchange of said toxic or radioactive cations with said alkali metal, Group Ib metal and/or ammonium cations to bind said toxic or radioactive cations to silicon atoms of said glass or silica gel through said silicon-bonded divalent oxygen linkages. Thereafter, the resulting glass or silica gel now characterized by toxic or radioactive cations bonded to silicon atoms through divalent oxygen linkages can be stored, or packaged in suitable containers, or disposed of as by burial, and/or sintered to collapse the pores thereof

  19. Carbonatite-silicate immiscible melt inclusion in lamprophyre from Kutch, western India: Implication for plume-lithosphere interaction and initiation of Deccan Trap magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Arijit; Paul, Dalim Kumar; Sen, Gautam; Biswas, Sanjib Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Kutch province of western India has undergone repeated rifting and marine transgression events from late Triassic to the late Cretaceous. Magmatic rocks occur in profusion in Kutch Basin. The southern part is characterized by occurrences of thick flows of tholeiitic basalt of Deccan Trap affinity, central part of Kutch Basin has numerous volcanic plugs of alkali basalt which is also considered as member of Deccan Trap, contain thin, discoidal mantle xenoliths of spinel lherzolite and wehrlite composition. Northern Kutch is dominated by suite of alkaline magmatic rocks similar to magmatic rocks of continental rift zone. The alkaline suite contains alkali pyroxenite, theralite, teschenite, basanite, nepheline syenite and kaersutite bearing lamprophyre (Ray et al., 2006, Das et al., 2007, Paul et al., 2008). The newly discovered east-west trending lamprophyre dyke swarm of northern Kutch (Pachham Island) is camptonite in composition and contains kaersutite phenocrysts in large proportion. These kaersutite phencrysts contain immscible melt/glass phases as melt inclusions. The lamprophyre yields an age of ca. 67 Ma.by Ar-Ar method (Sen et al., 2014 in press) synchronous with alkali basalt of central Kutch. The melt inclusions are fundamentally of two types - calciocarbonatite and alkaline silicate melts. We found sphene within carbonatitic melt and the rare mineral rhonite in silicate melt. Petrographic evidence indicates that carbonatite melt always occurs within alkali silicate melt as immiscible fraction. These carbonatite melts are extremely rich in CaCO3 (upto 95%) which contradicts the experimental results of carbonate melt composition (upto 80% CaCO3) in silicate-carbonate immiscible melt pair by Lee and Wyllie. The abundance of wehrlite xenoliths over lherzolite in alkali basalt, petrographic evidence of orthopyroxene to clinopyroxene transformation in wehrlite xenoliths, occurrence of calcite vein in mantle xenoliths indicate carbonatite metasomatism of spinel

  20. Microstructure and Engineering Properties of Alkali Activated Fly Ash -as an environment friendly alternative to Portland cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Alkali activated fly ash (AAFA), also named “geopolymer”, has emerged as a novel engineering material in the construction industry. This material is normally formed by the reaction between fly ash and aqueous hydroxide or alkali silicate solution. With proper mix design, AAFA can present comparable

  1. Dielectric properties of plasma sprayed silicates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Neufuss, Karel; Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel

    -, č. 31 (2005), s. 315-321. ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Optical microscopy * electric al properties * silicates * insulators * plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2005

  2. Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te ultrasmall quantum dots growth in a silicate glass matrix by the fusion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Lima Fernandes, Guilherme de; Almeida Silva, Anielle Christine [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38408-100 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo; Gómez, Jorge Antônio [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-29

    In this study, we synthesized Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te ultrasmall quantum dots (USQDs) in SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass system using the fusion method. Growth of these Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te USQDs was confirmed by optical absorption, atomic force microscopy (AFM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The blueshift of absorption transition with increasing manganese concentration gives evidence of incorporation of manganese ions (Mn{sup 2+}) in CdTe USQDs. AFM, TEM, and MFM confirmed, respectively, the formation of high quality Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te USQDs with uniformly distributed size and magnetic phases. Furthermore, EPR spectra showed six lines associated to the S = 5/2 spin half-filled d-state, characteristic of Mn{sup 2+}, and confirmed that Mn{sup 2+} are located in the sites core and surface of the CdTe USQD. Therefore, synthesis of high quality Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te USQDs may allow the control of optical and magnetic properties.

  3. Rapid quantitative determination of major and trace elements in silicate rocks and soils employing fused glass discs using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, A. Keshav; Khanna, Tarun C.; Mohan, K. Rama

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a calibration procedure and provides the data achieved for accuracy, precision, reproducibility and the detection limits for major (Si, Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ti, P) and trace (Ba, Cr, Cu, Hf, La, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Ta, Th, U, Y, Zn, Zr) elements in the routine analysis of geological and environmental samples. Forty-two rock and soil reference materials were used to calibrate and evaluate the analytical method using a sequential wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Samples were prepared as fused glass discs and analysis performed with a total measuring time of thirty-one minutes. Another set of twelve independent reference materials were analyzed for the evaluation of accuracy. The detection limits and accuracy obtained for the trace elements (1-2 mg/kg) are adequate both for geochemical exploration and environmental studies. The fitness for purpose of the results was also evaluated by the quality criteria test proposed by the International Global Geochemical Mapping Program (IGCP) from which it can be deduced that the method is adequate considering geochemical mapping application and accuracy obtained is within the expected interval of certified values in most cases.

  4. Utilization of Mineral Wools as Alkali-Activated Material Precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Juho Yliniemi; Paivo Kinnunen; Pasi Karinkanta; Mirja Illikainen

    2016-01-01

    Mineral wools are the most common insulation materials in buildings worldwide. However, mineral wool waste is often considered unrecyclable because of its fibrous nature and low density. In this paper, rock wool (RW) and glass wool (GW) were studied as alkali-activated material precursors without any additional co-binders. Both mineral wools were pulverized by a vibratory disc mill in order to remove the fibrous nature of the material. The pulverized mineral wools were then alkali-activated w...

  5. Cementitious binders from activated stainless steel refining slag and the effect of alkali solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Muhammad; Cizer, Özlem; Pontikes, Yiannis; Snellings, Ruben; Vandewalle, Lucie; Blanpain, Bart; Van Balen, Koen

    2015-04-01

    With an aim of producing high value cementitious binder, stainless steel refining slag containing a high amount of CaO in γ-dicalcium silicate form was activated with NaOH and Na-silicate as well as KOH and K-silicate solutions, followed by steam curing at 80 °C. Higher levels of alkali-silicate in the activating solution resulted in higher cumulative heat suggesting accelerated reaction kinetics. With respect to compressive strength, higher levels of alkali silicate resulted in higher strength and the mortars with Na activator were found to have higher early strength than the ones with K activator. The long term strength was found to be similar, regardless of the alkali metal. Thermogravimetric, QXRD and FTIR analyses showed an increase in the amount of reaction products (C-S-H type) over time, further confirming the reactivity of the crystalline slag. Batch leaching results showed lower leaching of heavy metals and metalloids with K activator compared to the Na activator. These results demonstrate that the alkali type and the ratio of hydroxide to silicates have a significant impact on the hydration and mechanical strength development of the stainless steel slag. The above findings can aid in the recycling and valorization of these type of slags which otherwise end up landfilled. PMID:25577317

  6. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Magee Jr.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionization of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  7. Irradiations effects on the structure of boro-silicated glasses: long term behaviour of nuclear waste glassy matrices; Effets d'irradiations sur la structure de verres borosilicates - comportement a long terme des matrices vitreuses de stockage des dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfils, J. de

    2007-09-15

    This work deals with the long term behaviour of R7T7-type nuclear waste glasses and more particularly of non-active boro-silicated glasses made up of 3 or 5 oxides. Radioactivity of active glasses is simulated by multi energies ions implantations which reproduce the same defects. The damages due to the alpha particles are simulated by helium ions implantations and those corresponding to the recoil nucleus are obtained with gold ions ones. Minor actinides, stemming from the used fuel, is simulated by trivalent rare-earths (Eu{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}). In a first part, we have shown by macroscopic experiments (Vickers hardness - swelling) and optical spectroscopies (Raman - ATR-IR) that the structure of the glassy matrices is modified under implantations until a dose of 2,3.10{sup 13} at.cm{sup -2}, which corresponds to a R7T7 storage time estimated at 300 years. Beyond this dose, no additional modifications have been observed. The second part concerns the local environment of the rare-earth ions in glasses. Two different environments were found and identified as follows: one is a silicate rich one and the other is attributed to a borate rich one. (author)

  8. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author)

  9. The effect of melt composition on the partitioning of oxidized sulfur between silicate melts and magmatic volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajacz, Zoltán

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were conducted at 500 MPa and 1240 °C in a piston cylinder apparatus to assess the effect of melt composition on the melt/volatile partition coefficient of sulfur (DSmelt/volatile) , which was used as a measure of the silicate melt's capacity to dissolve oxidized sulfur species. Iron-free, three- and four-component silicate melts were equilibrated with H2O-S fluids with sulfur concentrations ⩽2 mol% at an oxygen fugacity imposed by the Re-ReO2 buffer (1.4 log units above the Ni-NiO buffer). At these conditions, SO2 (S4+) is predicted to be the dominant sulfur species in the volatile phase and sulfate (S6+) is the dominant sulfur species in the silicate melt. The values of DSmelt /volatile were calculated by mass balance. The results show that DSmelt /volatile values increase exponentially with decreasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure. For example, in calcium-aluminosilicate melts, DSmelt /volatile changes from 0.005 to 0.3 as the degree of melt polymerization changes from the equivalent of a rhyolite to the equivalent of a basalt. At a constant degree of melt polymerization, DSmelt /volatile in equilibrium with sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) melts is more than an order of magnitude higher than in equilibrium with calcium-aluminosilicate (CAS) melts, and more than two orders of magnitude higher than in equilibrium with magnesium-aluminosilicate (MAS) melts. The value of DSmelt /volatile changes from 0.014 in MAS glasses to 3.4 in NAS glasses for the most depolymerized compositions in each series. Potassium has a similar effect on sulfate dissolution to that of Na. The variation of DSmelt /volatile in equilibrium with various calcium-sodium aluminosilicate (CNAS), magnesium-sodium aluminosilicate (MNAS) and magnesium-potassium aluminosilicate (MKAS) melts indicates that alkalis are only available for sulfate complexation when they are present in excess compared to the required amount to charge balance for the Si4+ to Al3

  10. Composition dependence of spontaneous crystallization of phosphosilicate glass melts during cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Zhu, C.F.; Zhang, Y.F.; Xiao, Z.H.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    crystallization degree. It is found that adding NaF into the studied compositions slightly decreases melt fragility and improves both the glass-forming ability and melt workability. This effect is associated with the unique structural role of NaF compared to the other modifier oxides. It is also found that the......Crystallization behavior of alumino-phospho-silicate melts during cooling is studied by means of the differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry and viscometry. The results show a pronounced impact of alkaline earth oxide, alkali oxide and fluoride on the crystal type and...... onset viscosity of crystallization can be used as a parameter for describing both glass-forming ability and melt workability....

  11. Fixation by ion exchange of toxic materials in a glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is reported for reacting a porous silicate or borosilicate glass or silica gel with alkali metal cations, Group lb cations and/or ammonium cations bonded to the silicon through divalent oxygen linkages on the internal surfaces of the pores. Ion exchange of the cations with toxic or radioactive cations was possible resulting in a distribution of internal silicon-bonded toxic cation oxide groups within the pores of the glass or silica gel. The ion exchange reaction may be done successfully with acidic, neutral or alkaline pH solutions. The aim of the immobilization is for permanent storage of hazardous materials such as Hg2+, Hg+, Cd2+, Tl+, Pb2+ and radioactive cations

  12. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  13. In situ alkali-silica reaction observed by x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.J.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    In concrete, alkali metal ions and hydroxyl ions contributed by the cement and reactive silicates present in aggregate can participate in a destructive alkali-silica reaction (ASR). This reaction of the alkalis with the silicates produces a gel that tends to imbibe water found in the concrete pores, leading to swelling of the gel and eventual cracking of the affected concrete member. Over 104 cases of alkali-aggregate reaction in dams and spillways have been reported around the world. At present, no method exists to arrest the expansive chemical reaction which generates significant distress in the affected structures. Most existing techniques available for the examination of concrete microstructure, including ASR products, demand that samples be dried and exposed to high pressure during the observation period. These sample preparation requirements present a major disadvantage for the study of alkali-silica reaction. Given the nature of the reaction and the affect of water on its products, it is likely that the removal of water will affect the morphology, creating artifacts in the sample. The purpose of this research is to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction, including each of the specific reactions identified previously, in situ without introducing sample artifacts. For observation of unconditioned samples, x-ray microscopy offers an opportunity for such an examination of the alkali-silica reaction. Currently, this investigation is focusing on the effect of calcium ions on the alkali-silica reaction.

  14. Phase separation in an ionomer glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Tian, K.V.; Dobó-Nagy, C.;

    2015-01-01

    The G338 ionomer glass is a fluoro-alumino-silicate system, which is used as the powder component of glass ionomer cements (GICs) in dental applications. However, despite progress in understanding the nature of this glass, chemical identity of its separated amorphous phases has not yet been...... behavior of GICs, and hence improving performances of GICs by optimizing the glass production conditions....

  15. Alkali metal ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  16. Reaction sintered glass: a durable matrix for spinel-forming nuclear waste compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass formation by reaction sintering under isostatic pressure is an innovative process to vitrify refractory-rich high-level radioactive waste. We used a typical defense waste composition, containing spinel-forming components such as ∼4 wt% of Cr2O3, ∼23 wt% Al2O3, ∼13 wt% Fe2O3, and ∼9 wt% UO2, with CeO2 simulating UO2. Reaction sintered silicate glasses with waste loading up to 45 wt% were prepared within three hours, by hot pressing at 800 deg. C. The glass former was amorphous silica. Simulated waste was added as calcined oxides. The reaction sintered glass samples were characterized using scanning and analytical electron microscopy. The results show that extensive reaction sintering took place and a continuous glass phase formed. Waste components such as Na2O, CaO, MnO2, and Fe2O3, dissolved completely in the continuous glass phase. Cr2O3, Al2O3, and CeO2 were only partially dissolved due to incomplete dissolution (Al2O3) or super-saturation and reprecipitation (Cr2O3 and CeO2). The precipitation mechanism is related to a time dependent alkali content in the developing glass phase. Short-term corrosion tests in water showed that the glasses are chemically more durable than melted nuclear waste glasses. Based on hydration energies calculations, the long-term chemical durability of our reaction sintered glasses is expected to be comparable to that of rhyolitic and tektite glasses

  17. NMR investigation of cation distribution in HLW wasteform glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic-angle-spinning NMR has been used to establish the structural roles of various cations added to the borosilicate glass which is used for the vitrification of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). Representative surrogate oxides with nominal valencies of +1, +2 and +3 have been studied which span the range of oxides from modifier to intermediate and conditional glass former. NMR has been carried out on those nuclei which are accessible and the species observed have been correlated with the physical and chemical behaviour. The controlling factor is the manner in which the alkali cations partition between the various network groups, changing the distribution of silicon Qn species and the boron N4 ratio. Identifiable super-structural units are also present in these glasses. The aqueous corrosion rate increases with Q3 content, as does the weight loss due to evaporation from the melt. The activation energy for DC conduction scales with N4. Values of N4 obtained for these glasses deviate significantly from those predicted by the currently accepted model (Dell and Bray) and are strongly affected by the modifier or intermediate nature of the surrogate oxide and also by its effect on the distribution of non bridging oxygens between the silicate and borate polyhedra. (authors)

  18. Investigation on lithium migration for treating alkali-silica reaction affected concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Silva De Souza, L.M.; Polder, R.B.; Copuroglu,O.

    2014-01-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the major deterioration mechanisms that affect numerous concrete structures worldwide. During the reaction, hydroxyl and alkali (sodium and potassium ) ions react with certain siliceous compounds in the aggregate, forming a hygroscopic gel. The gel absorbs water from the cement paste and swells, possibly leading to deleterious expansion and cracking of the structure. Once ASR is detected in existing structures, there are no treatments to stop it and prol...

  19. Mechanical effects of alkali silica reaction in concrete studied by SEM-image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Haha, Mohsen

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of alkali-silica and alkali-silicate reactions causes damage in concrete. Even though the reaction has been known for some time, the progress of reaction in affected structures is difficult to predict. This research programme aims to study the relationship between the progress of the reaction and the mechanical properties of the concrete in order to support better prognosis of the effect of ASR on affected structure. The basic principal of the research programme is to character...

  20. Mechanical effects of alkali silica reaction in concrete studied by SEM-image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Haha, Mohsen; Scrivener, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of alkali-silica and alkali-silicate reactions causes damage in concrete. Even though the reaction has been known for some time, the progress of reaction in affected structures is difficult to predict. This research programme aims to study the relationship between the progress of the reaction and the mechanical properties of the concrete in order to support better prognosis of the effect of ASR on affected structure. The basic principal of the research programme is to character...

  1. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  2. Photoactive transparent nano-crystalline glass-ceramic for remazole red dye degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation and characterization of novel transparent nanocrystalline glass-ceramic. ► Precipitation of photoactive phases by using controlled heat-treatment. ► Conservation of transparency along with photoactivity. ► Using the prepared nanocrystalline glass-ceramic in water purification. -- Abstract: Transparent glass ceramic material was prepared from alkali-borosilicate glass containing titania by proper heat treatment scheme. The prepared samples were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV–visible spectroscopy. The applied heat treatment program allowed the crystallization of nano-crystalline anatase, rutile, barium titanate, titanium borate and silicate phases while maintaining the transparency. The precipitated nano-crystalline anatase and rutile phases were responsible for the observed high photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples. Samples of 24.29 and 32.39 TiO2 wt% showed better efficiency for the decolorization of remazole red dye compared with commercial-TiO2 used in preparation of glass-ceramic. The reuse of prepared glass-ceramic photocatalyst with nearly same efficiency for different times was also proved.

  3. High alkali-resistant basalt fiber for reinforcing concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Doping of basalt fiber with ZrSiO4 increased its alkali resistance. • Alkali treatment results in formation of protective surface layer on fibers. • Morphology and chemical composition of surface layer were investigated. • Mechanical properties of fibers were analyzed by a Weibull distribution. • Zirconia doped basalt fibers demonstrate high performance in concrete. - Abstract: Basalt glasses and fibers with zirconia content in the range from 0 to 7 wt% were obtained using ZrSiO4 as a zirconium source. Weight loss and tensile strength loss of fibers after refluxing in alkali solution were determined. Basalt fiber with 5.7 wt% ZrO2 had the best alkali resistance properties. Alkali treatment results in formation of protective surface layer on fibers. Morphology and chemical composition of surface layer were investigated. It was shown that alkali resistance of zirconia doped basalt fibers is caused by insoluble compounds of Zr4+, Fe3+ and Mg2+ in corrosion layer. Mechanical properties of initial and leached fibers were evaluated by a Weibull distribution. The properties of basalt fibers with ZrSiO4 were compared with AR-glass fibers. The performance of concrete with obtained fibers was investigated

  4. Alkali activated fly ash binders. A comparative study between sodium and potassium activators

    OpenAIRE

    Criado, M.; Palomo, A.; Fernández-Jiménez, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows the effect of the nature of some alkaline activators in the microstructural development of thermal-alkali activated f/y ash systems. The alkaline compounds employed in this investigation were: NaOH, KOH, Na2C03, K2C03, sodium silicate and potassium silicate. Results confirm that the main reaction product of the activation process (throughout the studied systems) is the amorphous alkaline aluminosilicate gel with a three-dimensional structure already observed in earlier resea...

  5. Development of borosilicate glass compositions for the immobilisation of the UK's separated plutonium stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK inventory of separated civil plutonium is expected to exceed 100 tonnes by 2010. Whilst the majority of this could be used in the manufacture of MOx (Mixed Oxide) fuel in future power generation scenarios, options for the disposal of surplus plutonium are currently being investigated by Nexia Solutions Ltd on behalf of the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). One of the options being considered is immobilisation in a durable glass matrix followed by long term storage and subsequent final repository disposal. A preliminary experimental survey assessed a selection of potential glass systems on the basis of Pu-surrogate (cerium) loading, durability, and ease of processing. Following this, a number of borosilicate compositions have been taken forward into a more detailed investigation in order to fully qualify their potential for Pu-immobilisation. The selected compositions are lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS), alkali tin silicate (ATS) and high-lanthanide alkali borosilicate (modified-MW). For this second series of experiments, hafnium was selected as the Pu surrogate, and a study of the potential waste loading as a function of temperature for the three selected compositions is described in this paper. Furthermore, several variations of the LaBS composition were fabricated in order to investigate the effect of total lanthanide content on melting temperature. The benchmark of 10 wt% HfO2 incorporation is achievable for all three glasses with temperatures of 1200, 1300 and 1400 deg. C required for ATS, modified-MW and LaBS respectively. (authors)

  6. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460–490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches. (paper)

  7. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komljenovic, Miroslav M., E-mail: miroslav.komljenovic@imsi.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Bascarevic, Zvezdana, E-mail: zvezdana@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Marjanovic, Natasa, E-mail: natasa@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Nikolic, Violeta, E-mail: violeta@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of decalcification on properties of alkali-activated slag were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decalcification was performed by concentrated NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution (accelerated test). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decalcification led to strength decrease and noticeable structural changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkali-activated slag showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification. - Abstract: This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si {approx}0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification.

  8. The Durability and Performance of Short Fibers for a Newly Developed Alkali-Activated Binder

    OpenAIRE

    Henrik Funke; Sandra Gelbrich; Lothar Kroll

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development of a fiber-reinforced alkali-activated binder (FRAAB) with an emphasis on the performance and the durability of the fibers in the alkaline alkali-activated binder (AAB)-matrix. For the development of the matrix, the reactive components granulated slag and coal fly ash were used, which were alkali-activated with a mixture of sodium hydroxide (2–10 mol/L) and an aqueous sodium silicate solution (SiO2/Na2O molar ratio: 2.1) at ambient temperature. For the reinf...

  9. Effect of ZnO and CaO on Alkali Borosilicate Glass Waste-form Immobilizing Simulated Mixed HLW%ZnO 和 CaO对模拟高放废液硅酸盐玻璃固化体性能的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; N.C.Hyatt; J.R.Stevens; R.Hand

    2015-01-01

    针对有些高放废液含有较多Fe、Cr、Ni过渡金属元素,在玻璃固化工艺过程中易于形成晶体,导致熔融玻璃体的黏度增加、化学稳定性变差以及工艺过程中易出现出料口堵塞等问题,研究了废物包容量为15%和20%、添加ZnO (5.6%)和CaO (1.75%)的配方对形成的4种玻璃固化体的物理性能(密度、硬度、断裂韧性)、化学性能(产品一致性测试和蒸汽腐蚀测试)和结构(X射线衍射析晶分析、拉曼光谱分析)的影响。研究分析显示,提高废物包容量至20%以及添加ZnO和CaO均可促进硼硅酸盐玻璃固化体网络结构的稳定性和化学稳定性,并增强玻璃体的密度,提高硬度;但玻璃固化体的高温黏度升高,断裂韧性下降。%Since the transit metals ,such as Fe ,Cr and Ni ,contained in some kinds of mixed HLW ,can likely to form crystal ,increase the melt viscosity ,destroy the chemi‐cal durability and block the discharge port .T he results obtained from investigating four glass waste‐forms ,including the alkali borosilicate glass matrix and alkali borosilicate glass matrix doped with 5.6% ZnO and 1.75% CaO in base matrixes ,immobilizing the simulated mixed HLW with 15% and 20% waste loadings aiming to determinate the effect of ZnO on the alkali borosilicate glass chemical durability with waste loading increasing ,were presented in this paper .Glass samples were characterized with XRD and Raman spectroscopy .The chemical durability was investigated using the standard protocols PCT and VHT .The XRD analysis results show that spinel crystal appears and grows in glass samples at the waste loading in 20% without ZnO addition and waste loading in 15% and 20% added ZnO .T he Raman spectroscopy analysis results indicate that ZnO and CaO can enhance the glass network connective ,and the chemical durability test results display that the addition of ZnO and CaO can improve the short term

  10. Structural and crystallisation study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass designed for nuclear waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to the study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass, which molar composition is 61,81 SiO2 - 3,05 Al2O3 - 8,94 B2O3 - 14,41 Na2O - 6,33 CaO - 1,90 ZrO2 - 3,56 Nd2O3, and envisaged for the immobilization of nuclear wastes originating from the reprocessing of high discharge burn up spent fuel. From a structural viewpoint, we investigated the role of the modifier cations on the arrangement of the glass network through different modifications of the glass composition: variation of the Na/Ca ratio and modification of the nature of the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The NMR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were useful to determine the distribution of modifier cations among the glass network and also to cast light on the competition phenomena occurring between alkali and alkaline earth cations for charge compensation of [AlO4]- and [BO4]- species. The neodymium local environment could be probed by optical absorption and EXAFS spectroscopies which enabled to better understand the insertion mode of Nd3+ ions among the silicate domains of the glass network. Concerning the crystallization behavior we were interested in how the glass composition may influence the crystallization processes and especially the formation of the apatite phase of composition Ca2Nd8(SiO4)6O2. In particular, this work underlined the important role of both alkaline earth and rare earth cations on the crystallization of the apatite phase. (author)

  11. Nouvelle approche pour le suivi de la réactivité de phases SiO2 soumises à la Réaction Alcali Silice (RAS New approach for monitoring the reactivity of SiO2 phases subject to Alkali Silica Reaction (SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harfouche M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nous avons suivi- au moyen de la microscopie électronique à balayage environnementale (MEBE la diffraction X et la spectroscopie d’absorption des rayons X sous rayonnement synchrotron (XANES- la réactivité de certaines phases SiO2 lors du processus de la Réaction Alcali Silice (RAS. Cette réactivité est étroitement liée à la structure locale autour des atomes de silicium ainsi qu’à la présence d’impuretés comme le fer. Dans le cas du silex brut, la raie blanche du seuil K du fer ressemble davantage à celle de Fe3O4 ce qui permet de déduire la présence d’un mélange de Fe2+/Fe3+ dans le silex de départ. Après réaction, l’allure du spectre d’absorption des rayons X au seuil K du fer du silex est conservée avec un léger déplacement de la raie blanche vers les hautes énergies. Cette augmentation montre une prédominance de la valence Fe3+ au détriment de la valence Fe2+. Les résultats montrent que le fer participe à la stabilisation de la structure des phases formées. Cette étude peut être étendue à d’autres éléments traces présents dans la structure du silex de départ. In this study the reactivity of some SiO2 phases under Alkali Silica Reaction (RAS process is followed, using the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy X-ray synchrotron radiation (XANES. This reactivity is closely related to the local structure around the silicon atoms and the presence of impurities such as iron. In the case of flint raw skate white iron K line is more like that of Fe3O4 which allows to deduce the presence of a mixture of Fe2+ / Fe3+ in the flint to start. After reaction, the shape of the spectrum of X-ray absorption K edge of iron in the flint is retained with a slight displacement of the white stripe to high energies. This increase shows a predominance of the valence Fe3+ at the expense of Fe2+ valence. The results show that iron is involved in stabilizing the

  12. Alkalis and Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, John E; Tan, Jin Lin; Ming, Justin Choong Tzen; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to provide an overview of the chemical interactions occurring in the skin of our patients on contact with alkaline agents. Strongly basic alkali is highly aggressive and will readily hydrolyze (or cleave) key biological molecules such as lipids and proteins. This phenomenon is known as saponification in the case of lipids and liquefactive denaturation for peptides and proteins. A short section on current first-aid concepts is included. A better understanding of the basic science behind alkali burns will make us better teachers and provide an insight into the urgency needed in treating these common and dangerous chemical injuries. PMID:26182072

  13. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  14. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  15. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  16. Analysis of early medieval glass beads – Glass in the transition period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th–10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE–PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  17. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, Ziga, E-mail: ziga.smit@ijs.si [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Knific, Timotej [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jezersek, David [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Istenic, Janka [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  18. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  19. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  20. Alkali-ions diffusion, mullite formation, and crystals dissolution during sintering of porcelain bodies: Microstructural approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonelli, C.; Kamseu, E.; Boccaccini, Dino; Sglavo, V.M.; Pellacani, G.C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of alkali-silicate glassy matrix as replacement for feldspar in soft and hard porcelain compositions was studied. SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to evidence phase evolution. For each composition, the influence of soaking time was evaluated. The difference in chemical comp...